WorldWideScience

Sample records for predicted thermal superluminescence

  1. Ghost Spectroscopy with Classical Thermal Light Emitted by a Superluminescent Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janassek, Patrick; Blumenstein, Sébastien; Elsäßer, Wolfgang

    2018-02-01

    We propose and realize the first classical ghost-imaging (GI) experiment in the frequency or wavelength domain, thus performing ghost spectroscopy using thermal light exhibiting photon bunching. The required wavelength correlations are provided by light emitted by spectrally broadband near-infrared amplified spontaneous emission of a semiconductor-based superluminescent diode. They are characterized by wavelength-resolved intensity cross-correlation measurements utilizing two-photon-absorption interferometry. Finally, a real-world spectroscopic application of this ghost spectroscopy with a classical light scheme is demonstrated in which an absorption band of trichloromethane (chloroform) at 1214 nm is reconstructed with a spectral resolution of 10 nm as a proof-of-principle experiment. This ghost-spectroscopy work fills the gap of a hitherto missing analogy between the spatial and the spectral domain in classical GI modalities, with the expectation of contributing towards a broader dissemination of correlated photon ghost modalities, hence paving the way towards more applications which exploit the favorable advantages.

  2. Characteristics of chirped quantum dot superluminescent diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, H.C.; Park, H.L. [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); You, Y.C. [Department of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 440-746 (Korea); Han, I.K. [Nano Device Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea); Kim, J.S. [Department of Image System Science and Engineering, Pukyong National University, Pusan Department of Image System Science and Engineering, Pukyong National University, Pusan 608-739 (Korea)

    2009-04-15

    We compared the superluminescent diodes (SLDs) of two types in order to see the effect of embedding another quantum dots (QDs) layer. The insertion of another QDs layer showed a new possibility for a wider spectrum. In addition, through comparing two kinds of SLD structures, the peak positions of the ground state and excited state were observed to be affected differently by band-filling, thermal effect, and the overlap of tails of excited state (ES) gain, according to the wafer structure, and the effect of the cap layer is superior to the carrier non-uniformity. We also revealed the temperature sensitivity of carriers in QDs through measuring characteristic temperature. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Orthogonal linear polarization tunable-beat ring laser with a superluminescent diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Y.; Yoshino, T. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376 (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    An orthogonal linear polarization operated ring laser with a superluminescent diode has been demonstrated to generate a tunable optical beat signal. The ring cavity contains a superluminescent diode as the optical gain medium, Faraday rotators, and a variable phase retarder (Babinet-Soleil compensator). By controlling the retarder, we changed the beat frequency in the range from a few tens of megahertz to 100 MHz. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  4. Emission characteristics of laser and superluminescent diodes with a gradient-index waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazarov, A.E.; Garmash, I.A.; Goldobin, I.S.; Eliukhin, V.A.; Pak, G.T.

    1987-05-01

    A study is made of the emission characteristics of laser and superluminescent diodes with gradient-index waveguides based on Al(x)Ga(1-x)As solid solutions, operating in the CW mode at room temperature. The coupling coefficients for a single-mode fiber are 25 and 18 percent for laser and superluminescent diodes, respectively, when an interface device consisting of three microlenses is used. 6 references.

  5. Wavelength characteristics of chirped quantum dot superluminescent diodes for broad spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hyung-Chul; Park, Hong-Lee [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); You, Young-Chae [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Il-Ki [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    A chirped InAs quantum dot superluminescent diode both with and without a In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As cap layer was fabricated for a broad-band spectrum. This study shows that the cap layer reduces strain and operates as a carrier capturer and that carriers excited by lattice heating also affect the radiative recombination in the quantum dots (QDs) as well as the cap layer through the characteristic temperature (T{sub 0}). In addition, by surveying peaks of each QD layers, the characteristics of carriers in QDs, such as band-filling effect and the thermal effect, were analyzed, in QDs, and a more effective method for creating a wider spectrum is proposed.

  6. Short-wavelength InAlGaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot superluminescent diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, De-Chun; An, Qi; Jin, Peng; Li, Xin-Kun; Wei, Heng; Wu, Ju; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of J-shaped bent-waveguide superluminescent diodes utilizing an InAlGaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot active region. The emission spectrum of the device is centred at 884 nm with a full width at half maximum of 37 nm and an output power of 18 mW. By incorporating an Al composition into the quantum dot active region, short-wavelength superluminescent diode devices can be obtained. An intersection was found for the light power-injection current curves measured from the straight-waveguide facet and the bent-waveguide facet, respectively. The result is attributed to the conjunct effects of the gain and the additional loss of the bent waveguide. A numerical simulation is performed to verify the qualitative explanation. It is shown that bent waveguide loss is an important factor that affects the output power of J-shaped superluminescent diode devices.

  7. Nitride superluminescent diodes with broadened emission spectrum fabricated using laterally patterned substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafar, A; Stanczyk, S; Sarzynski, M; Grzanka, S; Goss, J; Targowski, G; Nowakowska-Siwinska, A; Suski, T; Perlin, P

    2016-05-02

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN superluminescent diodes with broadened emission spectra fabricated on surface-shaped bulk GaN (0001) substrates. The patterning changes the local vicinal angle linearly along the device waveguide, which results in an indium incorporation profile in InGaN quantum wells. The structure was investigated by microphotoluminescence mapping, showing a shift of central emission wavelength from 413 nm to 430 nm. Spectral full width at half maximum of processed superluminescent diodes is equal to 6.1 nm, while the reference chips show 3.4 nm. This approach may open the path for using nitride devices in applications requiring broad emission spectrum and high beam quality, such as optical coherence tomography.

  8. Nearest-IR superluminescent diodes with a 100-nm spectral width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Il' chenko, S N; Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Yakubovich, S D

    2012-11-30

    This paper presents an experimental study of quantum well superluminescent diodes with an extremely thin (InGa)As active layer. Under cw injection, the output power of such diodes is several milliwatts, with a centre wavelength of 830 nm and emission bandwidth of about 100 nm. (letters)

  9. Wide emission spectrum from superluminescent diodes with chirped quantum dot multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, L.H.; Rossetti, M.; Fiore, A.; Occhi, L.; Velez, C.

    2005-01-01

    A superluminescent diode (SLED) using chirped multiple InAs quantum dot (QD) layers as the active region is demonstrated. The fabricated QD SLEDs exhibit a large spectral width up to 121 nm, covering the range 1165-1286 nm.

  10. High-power quantum-dot superluminescent diodes with p-doped active region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossetti, M.; Li, L.; Fiore, A.; Occhi, L.; Velez, C.; Mikhrin, S.; Kovsh, A.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of p-doping in the active region of quantum-dot superluminescent diodes. Modal gain measurements and light output-current characteristics prove that p-doping is beneficial for achieving higher gain, higher output power, and better temperature stability

  11. Observations of acoustic-wave-induced superluminescence in an argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramyan, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that in an argon discharge plasma it is possible to obtain overpopulation of certain electronic levels of atomic argon under the influence of acoustic waves. When the specified threshold is exceeded, then a superluminescence (in the form of light flashes) from the overpopulated electronic levels of atomic argon is observed

  12. Visible laser and superluminescent diode based free space and underwater communications

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-30

    We report on our recent progress in high-modulation-efficiency, InGaN-based integrated waveguide modulator-laser diodes (IWM-LDs), high-speed violet and blue emitting superluminescent diodes (SLDs), InGaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), and their applications for gigahertz laser based free-space and underwater wireless optical communications.

  13. Visible laser and superluminescent diode based free space and underwater communications

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    We report on our recent progress in high-modulation-efficiency, InGaN-based integrated waveguide modulator-laser diodes (IWM-LDs), high-speed violet and blue emitting superluminescent diodes (SLDs), InGaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), and their applications for gigahertz laser based free-space and underwater wireless optical communications.

  14. A novel theoretical model for broadband blue InGaN/GaN superluminescent light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moslehi Milani, N. [Photonics-Electronics Group, Aras International Campus, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51666-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohadesi, V. [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51665-163 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asgari, A., E-mail: asgari@tabrizu.ac.ir [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51665-163 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-02-07

    A broadband superluminescent light emitting diode with In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) active region is investigated. The investigation is based on a theoretical model which includes the calculation of electronic states of the structure, rate equations, and the spectral radiation power. Two rate equations corresponding to MQW active region and separate confinement heterostructures layer are solved self-consistently with no-k selection wavelength dependent gain and quasi-Fermi level functions. Our results show that the superluminescence started in a current of ∼120 mA (∼7.5 kA/Cm{sup 2}) at 300 K. The range of peak emission wavelengths for different currents is 423–426 nm and the emission bandwidth is ∼5 nm in the superluminescence regime. A maximum light output power of 7.59 mW is obtained at 600 mA and the peak modal gain as a function of current indicates logarithmic behavior. Also, the comparison of our calculated results with published experimental data is shown to be in good agreement.

  15. Study on superluminescent diodes using InGaAs-InAs chirped quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Il Ki; Heo, Du Chang; Song, Jin Dong; Lee, Jung Il [Korea Institute Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joo In [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-11-15

    We have fabricated superluminescent diodes (SLD) by using InGaAs-InAs chirped quantum dots (QD). The spectral bandwidth of the SLD was measured to be 170 nm. These results explain the possibility of QD-based SLD exceeding the performance of multi-quantum well-based ones.

  16. High tunability and superluminescence in InAs mid-infrared light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherstnev, V.V.; Krier, A.; Hill, G.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the observation of super luminescence and high spectral current tunability (181 nm) of InAs light emitting diodes operating at 3.0 μm. The source is based on an optical whispering gallery mode which is generated near the edges of the mesa and which is responsible for the superluminescence. (author)

  17. InGaAs Quantum Well Grown on High-Index Surfaces for Superluminescent Diode Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The morphological and optical properties of In0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs quantum wells grown on various substrates are investigated for possible application to superluminescent diodes. The In0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs quantum wells are grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (100, (210, (311, and (731 substrates. A broad photoluminescence emission peak (~950 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM of 48 nm is obtained from the sample grown on (210 substrate at room temperature, which is over four times wider than the quantum well simultaneously grown on (100 substrate. On the other hand, a very narrow photoluminescence spectrum is observed from the sample grown on (311 with FWHM = 7.8 nm. The results presented in this article demonstrate the potential of high-index GaAs substrates for superluminescent diode applications.

  18. Improved emission spectrum from quantum dot superluminescent light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.H.; Rossetti, M.; Fiore, A. [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Electronics, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Occhi, L.; Velez, C. [EXALOS AG, Technoparkstrasse 1, 8005 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2006-12-15

    The size dispersion of InAs quantum dots (QD) was optimized to broaden the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. A broad PL spectral width up to 96 nm is achieved from a single QD layer with InAs thickness smaller than 2.4 monolayers at a growth temperature of 510 C. QD Superluminescent light emitting diodes with an ultrawide (115 nm), smooth output spectrum are obtained by incorporating this QD layer into chirped stacked structures. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Flat-topped emission centred at 1 250 nm from quantum dot superluminescent diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Hogg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a method for tailoring a broadband and flat-topped emission spectrum in quantum dot superluminescent diodes based upon modification of the dots-in-compositionally-modulated-well (DCMWELL technique. We demonstrate flat-topped emission with 95 nm full width at half maximum (FWHM, centred at 1 250 nm, and with output power in excess of 8 mW.

  20. Superluminescence from an optically pumped molecular tunneling junction by injection of plasmon induced hot electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Braun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Here, we demonstrate a bias-driven superluminescent point light-source based on an optically pumped molecular junction (gold substrate/self-assembled molecular monolayer/gold tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, operating at ambient conditions and providing almost three orders of magnitude higher electron-to-photon conversion efficiency than electroluminescence induced by inelastic tunneling without optical pumping. A positive, steadily increasing bias voltage induces a step-like rise of the Stokes shifted optical signal emitted from the junction. This emission is strongly attenuated by reversing the applied bias voltage. At high bias voltage, the emission intensity depends non-linearly on the optical pump power. The enhanced emission can be modelled by rate equations taking into account hole injection from the tip (anode into the highest occupied orbital of the closest substrate-bound molecule (lower level and radiative recombination with an electron from above the Fermi level (upper level, hence feeding photons back by stimulated emission resonant with the gap mode. The system reflects many essential features of a superluminescent light emitting diode.

  1. Unselective regrowth buried heterostructure long-wavelength superluminescent diode realized with MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Ying [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)]. E-mail: yingding@red.semi.ac.cn; Zhou Fan [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen Weixi [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang Wei [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2007-01-15

    A novel unselective regrowth buried heterostructure (BH) long-wavelength superluminescent diode (SLD), which has a grade-strained bulk InGaAs active region, was developed by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The 3 dB emission spectrum bandwidth of the SLD is about 65 nm with the range from 1596 to 1661 nm at 90 mA and from 1585 to 1650 nm at 150 mA.An output power of 3.5 mW is obtained at 200 mA injection current under CW operation at room temperature.

  2. Single-transverse-mode near-IR superluminescent diodes with cw output power up to 100 mW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, E V; Il' chenko, S N; Kostin, Yu O [Superlum Diodes Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-29

    A series of light-emitting modules based on single-mode quantum-well superluminescent diodes with centre emission wavelengths of about 790, 840, 960 and 1060 nm and a cw output power up to 100 mW in free space is developed. A sufficiently long service life of these devices is demonstrated. (lasers)

  3. Single-transverse-mode near-IR superluminescent diodes with cw output power up to 100 mW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, E V; Il'chenko, S N; Kostin, Yu O; Yakubovich, S D

    2014-01-01

    A series of light-emitting modules based on single-mode quantum-well superluminescent diodes with centre emission wavelengths of about 790, 840, 960 and 1060 nm and a cw output power up to 100 mW in free space is developed. A sufficiently long service life of these devices is demonstrated. (lasers)

  4. Quantum dot superluminescent light emitting diodes: Ideal blackbody radiators?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazek, Martin; Elsaesser, Wolfgang [Institute of Applied Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology (Germany); Hopkinson, Mark [Dept. E and E.E, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Krakowski, Michel [Alcatel Thales, III-V Lab. (France)

    2008-07-01

    Quantum dot (QD) superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLEDs) provide large optical bandwidths at desired wavelengths and are therefore promising devices for incoherent light application. The intensity noise behavior of QD SLEDs is of fundamental physical interest as it provides insight into the photon emission process. We performed high precision intensity noise measurements over several decades of optical output power. For low driving currents spontaneous emission leads to Shot Noise. For high currents we find excess noise behavior with Amplified Spontaneous Emission acting as the dominant source of noise. The QD SLEDs' noise can be described as blackbody radiation noise with a limited number of optical modes. It is therefore possible to identify the SLEDs' relevant intensity noise parameters.

  5. High performance superluminescent diode with InAs quantum-dashes and chirped AlGaInAs barriers active region

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa; Majid, Mohammed Abdul; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2013-01-01

    The demonstration of high power, ultra-low ripple superluminescent diode using multiple quantum-dash-in-a-well layers with variable barrier thickness is reported. The device exhibits >20 mW power, < 0.3dB ripple, and > 80 nm 3dB bandwidth at ~1.55 μm.

  6. INFLUENCE OF THE ORTHOGONALLY POLARIZED BACK REFLECTIONS ON THE POWER AND RADIATION SPECTRUM OF SUPERLUMINESCENT DIODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Mukhtubayev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the back reflections influence on the spectrum for optical radiation source of superluminescent diode type and have provided optimal operating conditions of the radiation source. The feature of the research method is the usage of a fiber polarization controller and an optical mirror coated on the end of an optical fiber. The studies were conducted with two sources of optical radiation: ThorLabs superluminescent diode series S5FC1005SXL and LED module ELED-1550-1-E-9-SM1-FA-CW. It was revealed that at the value of back reflections equal to -13 dB relative to the output power source, a negative impact on power and spectral characteristics of the source with an optical power of 2.3 µW is beginning to appear. It was also confirmed that at the increase of the radiation power by increasing the source pumping current, back reflection influence is exhibiting at a lower level of back reflections. The results obtained need to be considered when designing fiber optic sensors in order to eliminate the effect of back reflections on the sources of optical radiation having been studied in this paper.

  7. Superluminescence of cadmium sulfide crystals under pulse X-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovskaya, N.G.; Tarasov, M.D.; Balakin, V.A.; Varava, V.P.; Lobov, S.I.; Surskij, O.K.; Tsukerman, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Studies were made to elucidate luminescence properties of CdS crystal radiated by short pulses of braking x-ray radiation. Such a radiation causes the appearance of superluminescence. The radiation was carried out at 295 and 170 K, the radiation dose being changed from 3600 to 1600 r/pulse. At the temperature of 295 K light luminescence was registered at the wave length of 528 nm and half-width of 15 nm. While the temperature lowers, the radiation shifts to the range of shorter wave lengths, and a decrease of the spectrum half-width is observed. With the increase of radiation dose the decrease of radiation spectrum half-width is observed. Approximate calculations show that to achieve the spectrum narrowing to 1 nm at room temperature it is necessary to increase radiation dose per pulse 5-6 times

  8. Broadband superluminescent diodes and semiconductor optical amplifiers for the spectral range 750 - 800 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'chenko, S N; Kostin, Yu O; Kukushkin, I A; Ladugin, M A; Lapin, P I; Lobintsov, A A; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Yakubovich, S D

    2011-01-01

    We have studied superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) based on an (Al x Ga 1-x )As/GaAs single quantum well structure with an Al content x ∼ 0.1 in a 10-nm-thick active layer. Depending on the length of the active channel, the single-mode fibre coupled cw output power of the SLDs is 1 to 30 mW at a spectral width of about 50 nm. The width of the optical gain band in the active channel exceeds 40 nm. Preliminary operating life tests have demonstrated that the devices are sufficiently reliable. (lasers)

  9. High-speed 405-nm superluminescent diode (SLD) with 807-MHz modulation bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2016-08-25

    III-nitride LEDs are fundamental components for visible-light communication (VLC). However, the modulation bandwidth is inherently limited by the relatively long carrier lifetime. In this letter, we present the 405 nm emitting superluminescent diode (SLD) with tilted facet design on semipolar GaN substrate, showing a broad emission of ∼9 nm at 20 mW optical power. Owing to the fast recombination (τ<0.35 ns) through the amplified spontaneous emission, the SLD exhibits a significantly large 3-dB bandwidth of 807 MHz. A data rate of 1.3 Gbps with a bit-error rate of 2.9 × 10 was obtained using on-off keying modulation scheme, suggesting the SLD being a high-speed transmitter for VLC applications.

  10. High-speed 405-nm superluminescent diode (SLD) with 807-MHz modulation bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao; Lee, Changmin; Ng, Tien Khee; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-Desouki, Munir M.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-01-01

    III-nitride LEDs are fundamental components for visible-light communication (VLC). However, the modulation bandwidth is inherently limited by the relatively long carrier lifetime. In this letter, we present the 405 nm emitting superluminescent diode (SLD) with tilted facet design on semipolar GaN substrate, showing a broad emission of ∼9 nm at 20 mW optical power. Owing to the fast recombination (τ<0.35 ns) through the amplified spontaneous emission, the SLD exhibits a significantly large 3-dB bandwidth of 807 MHz. A data rate of 1.3 Gbps with a bit-error rate of 2.9 × 10 was obtained using on-off keying modulation scheme, suggesting the SLD being a high-speed transmitter for VLC applications.

  11. Non-Fourier based thermal-mechanical tissue damage prediction for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2017-01-02

    Prediction of tissue damage under thermal loads plays important role for thermal ablation planning. A new methodology is presented in this paper by combing non-Fourier bio-heat transfer, constitutive elastic mechanics as well as non-rigid motion of dynamics to predict and analyze thermal distribution, thermal-induced mechanical deformation and thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues under thermal loads. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed methodology based on the non-Fourier bio-heat transfer can account for the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and predict tissue thermal damage more accurately than classical Fourier bio-heat transfer based model.

  12. First demonstration of InGaP/InAlGaP based 608nm orange laser and 583nm yellow superluminescent diode

    KAUST Repository

    Majid, Mohammed Abdul

    2015-11-12

    We report on the first demonstration of InGaP/InAlGaP based orange semiconductor laser (OSL) and yellow superluminescent diode (YSLD) emitting at a wavelength of 608nm and 583nm respectively. The total output power of YSLD is ∼4.5mW which is the highest ever reported power on this material system at room-temperature.

  13. Characterization and modeling of broad spectrum InAs-GaAs quantum-dot superluminescent diodes emitting at 1.2-1.3 μm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossetti, M.; Li, L.; Markus, A.; Fiore, A.; Occhi, L.; Velez, C.; Mikhrin, S.; Krestnikov, I.; Kovsh, A.

    2007-01-01

    High-power broadband superluminescent diodes (SLDs) emitting in the 1.2-1.3-?m region are demonstrated using InAs-GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The highest output powers of ?30-50 mW are achieved using 18 QD layers with p-doped GaAs spacers. At these high powers the device operates in a regime of broad

  14. GaN-based superluminescent diodes with long lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglia, A.; Rossetti, M.; Matuschek, N.; Rezzonico, R.; Duelk, M.; Vélez, C.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the reliability of GaN-based super-luminescent light emitting diodes (SLEDs) emitting at a wavelength of 405 nm. We show that the Mg doping level in the p-type layers has an impact on both the device electro-optical characteristics and their reliability. Optimized doping levels allow decreasing the operating voltage on single-mode devices from more than 6 V to less than 5 V for an injection current of 100 mA. Furthermore, maximum output powers as high as 350 mW (for an injection current of 500 mA) have been achieved in continuous-wave operation (CW) at room temperature. Modules with standard and optimized p-type layers were finally tested in terms of lifetime, at a constant output power of 10 mW, in CW operation and at a case temperature of 25 °C. The modules with non-optimized p-type doping showed a fast and remarkable increase in the drive current during the first hundreds of hours together with an increase of the device series resistance. No degradation of the electrical characteristics was observed over 2000 h on devices with optimized p-type layers. The estimated lifetime for those devices was longer than 5000 h.

  15. Ultrafast self-modulation of the optical absorption spectrum under conditions of both the ultrashort optical pumping and superluminescence in GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageeva, N. N.; Bronevoi, I. L.; Krivonosov, A. N.; Stegantsov, S. V.

    2006-01-01

    Self-modulation of the optical absorption spectrum is observed during the picosecond photogeneration of charge carriers and intense superluminescence in GaAs. As the picosecond delay τ of the probing pulse with respect to the pump pulse is varied in the region of τ < 0, the local points of the absorption intensification (juts) shift along the spectrum (the modulation resembles a running wave). As the value of τ is varied in the vicinity of τ = 0, the juts in the spectrum arise and disappear at approximately fixed photon energies (the modulation resembles a standing wave). At certain photon energies, the dependence of the rate of variation in the absorption coefficient dα/dτ on τ is found to be modulated by pulsations, similarly to the previously observed modulation of the picosecond stimulated emission from GaAs. Presumably, the spectrum self-modulation represents (and, thus, reveals) the modulation of the electron distribution in the conduction band. This modulation is caused by the fact that the evolution of the electron-population depletion at the bottom of the conduction band during superluminescence reflects (due to the electron-phonon interaction) on the population of the upper energy levels in the band

  16. Review of prediction for thermal contact resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical prediction research on thermal contact resistance is reviewed in this paper. In general, modeling or simulating the thermal contact resistance involves several aspects, including the descriptions of surface topography, the analysis of micro mechanical deformation, and the thermal models. Some key problems are proposed for accurately predicting the thermal resistance of two solid contact surfaces. We provide a perspective on further promising research, which would be beneficial to understanding mechanisms and engineering applications of the thermal contact resistance in heat transport phenomena.

  17. Thermal sensation prediction by soft computing methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jović, Srđan; Arsić, Nebojša; Vilimonović, Jovana; Petković, Dalibor

    2016-12-01

    Thermal comfort in open urban areas is very factor based on environmental point of view. Therefore it is need to fulfill demands for suitable thermal comfort during urban planning and design. Thermal comfort can be modeled based on climatic parameters and other factors. The factors are variables and they are changed throughout the year and days. Therefore there is need to establish an algorithm for thermal comfort prediction according to the input variables. The prediction results could be used for planning of time of usage of urban areas. Since it is very nonlinear task, in this investigation was applied soft computing methodology in order to predict the thermal comfort. The main goal was to apply extreme leaning machine (ELM) for forecasting of physiological equivalent temperature (PET) values. Temperature, pressure, wind speed and irradiance were used as inputs. The prediction results are compared with some benchmark models. Based on the results ELM can be used effectively in forecasting of PET. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a Thermal Equilibrium Prediction Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aviles-Ramos, Cuauhtemoc

    2002-01-01

    A thermal equilibrium prediction algorithm is developed and tested using a heat conduction model and data sets from calorimetric measurements. The physical model used in this study is the exact solution of a system of two partial differential equations that govern the heat conduction in the calorimeter. A multi-parameter estimation technique is developed and implemented to estimate the effective volumetric heat generation and thermal diffusivity in the calorimeter measurement chamber, and the effective thermal diffusivity of the heat flux sensor. These effective properties and the exact solution are used to predict the heat flux sensor voltage readings at thermal equilibrium. Thermal equilibrium predictions are carried out considering only 20% of the total measurement time required for thermal equilibrium. A comparison of the predicted and experimental thermal equilibrium voltages shows that the average percentage error from 330 data sets is only 0.1%. The data sets used in this study come from calorimeters of different sizes that use different kinds of heat flux sensors. Furthermore, different nuclear material matrices were assayed in the process of generating these data sets. This study shows that the integration of this algorithm into the calorimeter data acquisition software will result in an 80% reduction of measurement time. This reduction results in a significant cutback in operational costs for the calorimetric assay of nuclear materials. (authors)

  19. Superluminescent light emitting diodes on naturally survived InGaN/GaN lateral nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, D.; Sankaranarayanan, S.; Khachariya, D.; Nadar, M. B.; Ganguly, S.; Saha, D., E-mail: dipankarsaha@iitb.ac.in [Applied Quantum Mechanics Laboratory, Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-07-18

    We demonstrate a method for nanowire formation by natural selection during wet anisotropic chemical etching in boiling phosphoric acid. Nanowires of sub-10 nm lateral dimensions and lengths of 700 nm or more are naturally formed during the wet etching due to the convergence of the nearby crystallographic hexagonal etch pits. These nanowires are site controlled when formed in augmentation with dry etching. Temperature and power dependent photoluminescence characterizations confirm excitonic transitions up to room temperature. The exciton confinement is enhanced by using two-dimensional confinement whereby enforcing greater overlap of the electron-hole wave-functions. The surviving nanowires have less defects and a small temperature variation of the output electroluminescent light. We have observed superluminescent behaviour of the light emitting diodes formed on these nanowires. There is no observable efficiency roll off for current densities up to 400 A/cm{sup 2}.

  20. Broadband superluminescent diodes with bell-shaped spectra emitting in the range from 800 to 900 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, E V; Il' ichenko, S N; Kostin, Yu O; Lapin, P I [Superlum Diodes Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation); Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, A A [Open Joint-Stock Company ' M.F. Stel' makh Polyus Research and Development Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31

    Quantum-well superluminescent diodes (SLD) with extremely thin active (AlGa)As and (InGa)As layers and centre wavelengths about 810, 840, 860 and 880 nm are experimentally studied. Their emission spectrum possesses the shape close to Gaussian, its FWHM being 30 – 60 nm depending on the length of the active channel and the level of pumping. Under cw injection, the output power of light-emitting modules based on such SLDs can amount to 1.0 – 25 mW at the output of a single-mode fibre. It is demonstrated that the operation lifetime of these devices exceeds 30000 hours. Based on the light-emitting modules the prototypes of combined BroadLighter series light sources are implemented having a bell-shaped spectrum with the width up to 100 nm. (optical radiation sources)

  1. Equivalence of displacement radiation damage in superluminescent diodes induced by protons and heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Chaoming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lan, Mujie; Xiao, Liyi [Center of Micro-electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Jianchun; Ding, Dongfa [Beijing Aerospace Times Optical-electronic Technology Co.Ltd, Beijing 100854 (China); Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-07-11

    The degradation of optical power for superluminescent diodes is in situ measured under exposures of protons with various energies (170 keV, 3 MeV and 5 MeV), and 25 MeV carbon ions for several irradiation fluences. Experimental results show that the optical power of the SLDs decreases with increasing fluence. The protons with lower energies cause more degradation in the optical power of SLDs than those with higher energies at a given fluence. Compared to the proton irradiation with various energies, the 25 MeV carbon ions induce more severe degradation to the optical power. To characterize the radiation damage of the SLDs, the displacement doses as a function of chip depth in the SLDs are calculated by SRIM code for the protons and carbon ions. Based on the irradiation testing and calculation results, an approach is given to normalize the equivalence of displacement damage induced by various charged particles in SLDs.

  2. High-Power and High-Efficiency 1.3- µm Superluminescent Diode With Flat-Top and Ultrawide Emission Bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa; Alhashim, Hala H.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a flat-top and ultrawide emission bandwidth of 125 nm from InGaAsP/InP multiple quantum-well (MQW) superluminescent diode with antireflection coated and tilted ridge-waveguide device configuration. A total output power in excess of 70 mW with an average power spectral density of 0.56 mW/nm and spectral ripple ≤ 1.2 ± 0.5 dB is measured from the device. Wall-plug efficiency and output power as high as 14% and 80 mW, respectively, is demonstrated from this batch of devices. We attribute the broad emission to the inherent inhomogeneity of the electron-heavy-hole (e-hh) and electron-light-hole (e-lh) recombination of the ground state and the first excited state of the MQWs and their simultaneous emission.

  3. High-Power and High-Efficiency 1.3- µm Superluminescent Diode With Flat-Top and Ultrawide Emission Bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2015-02-01

    We report on a flat-top and ultrawide emission bandwidth of 125 nm from InGaAsP/InP multiple quantum-well (MQW) superluminescent diode with antireflection coated and tilted ridge-waveguide device configuration. A total output power in excess of 70 mW with an average power spectral density of 0.56 mW/nm and spectral ripple ≤ 1.2 ± 0.5 dB is measured from the device. Wall-plug efficiency and output power as high as 14% and 80 mW, respectively, is demonstrated from this batch of devices. We attribute the broad emission to the inherent inhomogeneity of the electron-heavy-hole (e-hh) and electron-light-hole (e-lh) recombination of the ground state and the first excited state of the MQWs and their simultaneous emission.

  4. Simultaneous quantum dash-well emission in a chirped dash-in-well superluminescent diode with spectral bandwidth >700 nm

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2013-10-01

    We report on the quantitative evidence of simultaneous amplified spontaneous emission from the AlGaInAs/InAs/ InP-based quantum-well (Qwell) and quantum-dashes (Qdash) in a multistack dash-in-an-asymmetric-well superluminescent diode heterostructure. As a result, an emission bandwidth (full width at half-maximum) of 700 nm is achieved, covering entire O-E-S-C-L-U communication bands, and a maximum continuous wave output power of 1.3 mW, from this device structure. This demonstration paves a way to bridge entire telecommunication bands through proper optimization of device gain region, bringing significant advances and impact to a variety of cross-disciplinary field applications. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  5. Simultaneous quantum dash-well emission in a chirped dash-in-well superluminescent diode with spectral bandwidth >700 nm

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa; Cha, Dong Kyu; Majid, Mohammed Abdul; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the quantitative evidence of simultaneous amplified spontaneous emission from the AlGaInAs/InAs/ InP-based quantum-well (Qwell) and quantum-dashes (Qdash) in a multistack dash-in-an-asymmetric-well superluminescent diode heterostructure. As a result, an emission bandwidth (full width at half-maximum) of 700 nm is achieved, covering entire O-E-S-C-L-U communication bands, and a maximum continuous wave output power of 1.3 mW, from this device structure. This demonstration paves a way to bridge entire telecommunication bands through proper optimization of device gain region, bringing significant advances and impact to a variety of cross-disciplinary field applications. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  6. Influence of thermal buoyancy on vertical tube bundle thermal density head predictions under transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.C.; Kasza, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic behavior of an LMFBR system under various types of plant transients is usually studied using one-dimensional (1-D) flow and energy transport models of the system components. Many of the transient events involve the change from a high to a low flow with an accompanying change in temperature of the fluid passing through the components which can be conductive to significant thermal bouyancy forces. Thermal bouyancy can exert its influence on system dynamic energy transport predictions through alterations of flow and thermal distributions which in turn can influence decay heat removal, system-response time constants, heat transport between primary and secondary systems, and thermal energy rejection at the reactor heat sink, i.e., the steam generator. In this paper the results from a comparison of a 1-D model prediction and experimental data for vertical tube bundle overall thermal density head and outlet temperature under transient conditions causing varying degrees of thermal bouyancy are presented. These comparisons are being used to generate insight into how, when, and to what degree thermal buoyancy can cause departures from 1-D model predictions

  7. Gain optimization method of a DQW superluminescent diode with broad multi-state emission

    KAUST Repository

    Dimas, Clara E.

    2010-01-01

    Optimizing gain through systematic methods of varying current injection schemes analytically is significant to maximize experimentally device yield and evaluation. Various techniques are used to calculate the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) gain for light emitting devices consisting of single-section and multiple-sections of even length. Recently double quantum well (DQW) superluminescent diodes (SLD) have shown a broad multi-state emission due to mutlielectrodes of non-equal lengths and at high non-equal current densities. In this study, we adopt an improved method utilizing an ASE intensity ratio to calibrate a gain curve based on the sum of the measured ASE spectra to efficiently estimate the gain. Although the laser gain for GaAs/AlGaAs material is well studied, the ASE gain of SLD devices has not been systematically studied particular to further explain the multiple-state emission observed in fabricated devices. In addition a unique gain estimate was achieved where the excited state gain clamps prior to the ground state due to approaching saturation levels. In our results, high current densities in long sectioned active regions achieved sufficient un-truncated gain that show evidence of excited state emission has been observed.

  8. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and prediction of effective thermal conductivity of porous consolidated igneous rocks at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb; Ali, Zulqurnain; Gurmani, Samia Faiz; Maqsood, Asghari

    2006-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and heat capacity per unit volume of porous consolidated igneous rocks have been measured, simultaneously by Gustafsson's probe at room temperature and normal pressure using air as saturant. Data are presented for eleven samples of dunite, ranging in porosity from 0.130 to 0.665% by volume, taken from Chillas near Gilgit, Pakistan. The porosity and density parameters have been measured using American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards at ambient conditions. The mineral composition of samples has been analysed from their thin sections (petrography). An empirical model to predict the thermal conductivity of porous consolidated igneous rocks is also proposed. The thermal conductivities are predicted by some of the existing models along with the proposed one. It is observed that the values of effective thermal conductivity predicted by the proposed model are in agreement with the experimental thermal conductivity data within 6%

  9. Power Admission Control with Predictive Thermal Management in Smart Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Jianguo; Costanzo, Giuseppe Tommaso; Zhu, Guchuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a control scheme for thermal management in smart buildings based on predictive power admission control. This approach combines model predictive control with budget-schedulability analysis in order to reduce peak power consumption as well as ensure thermal comfort. First...

  10. The equivalent thermal conductivity of lattice core sandwich structure: A predictive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiangmeng; Wei, Kai; He, Rujie; Pei, Yongmao; Fang, Daining

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A predictive model of the equivalent thermal conductivity was established. • Both the heat conduction and radiation were considered. • The predictive results were in good agreement with experiment and FEM. • Some methods for improving the thermal protection performance were proposed. - Abstract: The equivalent thermal conductivity of lattice core sandwich structure was predicted using a novel model. The predictive results were in good agreement with experimental and Finite Element Method results. The thermal conductivity of the lattice core sandwich structure was attributed to both core conduction and radiation. The core conduction caused thermal conductivity only relied on the relative density of the structure. And the radiation caused thermal conductivity increased linearly with the thickness of the core. It was found that the equivalent thermal conductivity of the lattice core sandwich structure showed a highly dependent relationship on temperature. At low temperatures, the structure exhibited a nearly thermal insulated behavior. With the temperature increasing, the thermal conductivity of the structure increased owing to radiation. Therefore, some attempts, such as reducing the emissivity of the core or designing multilayered structure, are believe to be of benefit for improving the thermal protection performance of the structure at high temperatures.

  11. On-Line, Self-Learning, Predictive Tool for Determining Payload Thermal Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Chian-Li; Tilwick, Leon

    2000-01-01

    This paper will present the results of a joint ManTech / Goddard R&D effort, currently under way, to develop and test a computer based, on-line, predictive simulation model for use by facility operators to predict the thermal response of a payload during thermal vacuum testing. Thermal response was identified as an area that could benefit from the algorithms developed by Dr. Jeri for complex computer simulations. Most thermal vacuum test setups are unique since no two payloads have the same thermal properties. This requires that the operators depend on their past experiences to conduct the test which requires time for them to learn how the payload responds while at the same time limiting any risk of exceeding hot or cold temperature limits. The predictive tool being developed is intended to be used with the new Thermal Vacuum Data System (TVDS) developed at Goddard for the Thermal Vacuum Test Operations group. This model can learn the thermal response of the payload by reading a few data points from the TVDS, accepting the payload's current temperature as the initial condition for prediction. The model can then be used as a predictive tool to estimate the future payload temperatures according to a predetermined shroud temperature profile. If the error of prediction is too big, the model can be asked to re-learn the new situation on-line in real-time and give a new prediction. Based on some preliminary tests, we feel this predictive model can forecast the payload temperature of the entire test cycle within 5 degrees Celsius after it has learned 3 times during the beginning of the test. The tool will allow the operator to play "what-if' experiments to decide what is his best shroud temperature set-point control strategy. This tool will save money by minimizing guess work and optimizing transitions as well as making the testing process safer and easier to conduct.

  12. Computational Efficient Upscaling Methodology for Predicting Thermal Conductivity of Nuclear Waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated different upscaling methods to predict thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form, a heterogeneous material system. The efficiency and accuracy of these methods were compared. Thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form is an important property specific to scientific researchers, in waste form Integrated performance and safety code (IPSC). The effective thermal conductivity obtained from microstructure information and local thermal conductivity of different components is critical in predicting the life and performance of waste form during storage. How the heat generated during storage is directly related to thermal conductivity, which in turn determining the mechanical deformation behavior, corrosion resistance and aging performance. Several methods, including the Taylor model, Sachs model, self-consistent model, and statistical upscaling models were developed and implemented. Due to the absence of experimental data, prediction results from finite element method (FEM) were used as reference to determine the accuracy of different upscaling models. Micrographs from different loading of nuclear waste were used in the prediction of thermal conductivity. Prediction results demonstrated that in term of efficiency, boundary models (Taylor and Sachs model) are better than self consistent model, statistical upscaling method and FEM. Balancing the computation resource and accuracy, statistical upscaling is a computational efficient method in predicting effective thermal conductivity for nuclear waste form.

  13. Thermal Model Predictions of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Fabanich, William Anthony; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents recent thermal model results of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). The three-dimensional (3D) ASRG thermal power model was built using the Thermal Desktop(trademark) thermal analyzer. The model was correlated with ASRG engineering unit test data and ASRG flight unit predictions from Lockheed Martin's (LM's) I-deas(trademark) TMG thermal model. The auxiliary cooling system (ACS) of the ASRG is also included in the ASRG thermal model. The ACS is designed to remove waste heat from the ASRG so that it can be used to heat spacecraft components. The performance of the ACS is reported under nominal conditions and during a Venus flyby scenario. The results for the nominal case are validated with data from Lockheed Martin. Transient thermal analysis results of ASRG for a Venus flyby with a representative trajectory are also presented. In addition, model results of an ASRG mounted on a Cassini-like spacecraft with a sunshade are presented to show a way to mitigate the high temperatures of a Venus flyby. It was predicted that the sunshade can lower the temperature of the ASRG alternator by 20 C for the representative Venus flyby trajectory. The 3D model also was modified to predict generator performance after a single Advanced Stirling Convertor failure. The geometry of the Microtherm HT insulation block on the outboard side was modified to match deformation and shrinkage observed during testing of a prototypic ASRG test fixture by LM. Test conditions and test data were used to correlate the model by adjusting the thermal conductivity of the deformed insulation to match the post-heat-dump steady state temperatures. Results for these conditions showed that the performance of the still-functioning inboard ACS was unaffected.

  14. 2.5-Gb/s hybridly-integrated tunable external cavity laser using a superluminescent diode and a polymer Bragg reflector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ki-Hong; Oh, Su Hwan; Kim, Ki Soo; Kwon, O-Kyun; Oh, Dae Kon; Noh, Young-Ouk; Lee, Hyung-Jong

    2010-03-15

    We presented a hybridly-integrated tunable external cavity laser with 0.8 nm mode spacing 16 channels operating in the direct modulation of 2.5-Gbps for a low-cost source of a WDM-PON system. The tunable laser was fabricated by using a superluminescent diode (SLD) and a polymer Bragg reflector. The maximum output power and the power slope efficiency of the tunable laser were 10.3 mW and 0.132 mW/mA, respectively, at the SLD current of 100 mA and the temperature of 25 degrees C. The directly-modulated tunable laser successfully provided 2.5-Gbps transmissions through 20-km standard single mode fiber. The power penalty of the tunable laser was less than 0.8 dB for 16 channels after a 20-km transmission. The power penalty variation was less than 1.4 dB during the blue-shifted wavelength tuning.

  15. Prediction and control of the coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegeldorf, S.; Kleiser, K.; Hilsdorf, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    Prediction and control of the coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete. In this report various procedures for the prediction of the coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete are summarized. The values predicted with these procedures are compared to experimental data. In the experimental investigation the coefficient of thermal expansion of various types of aggregates and types of concrete both in a dry and a moist state in the temperature range RT/180 0 C have been measured. The most significant result obtained is that for equal volume fractions the thermal properties of coarse aggregates have a more pronounced effect upon thermal expansion of concrete than those of fine aggregates. In the analysis an attempt has been made to estimate the thermal expansion of concrete from the properties of the concrete components by means of a finite element procedure. On the basis of the experimental data and of the analysis of internal temperature stresses in the concrete a simple relationship for the determination of the coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete has been deduced. In this relationship different thermal properties of coarse and fine aggregates may be taken into account. Compared to other methods this relationship yields, both for dry and for moist concrete, values which are in good agreement with the experimental data. (orig.) [de

  16. Prediction of Thermal Environment in a Large Space Using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jung Yoon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the thermal environment of large space buildings such as stadiums can vary depending on the location of the stands, it is important to divide them into different zones and evaluate their thermal environment separately. The thermal environment can be evaluated using physical values measured with the sensors, but the occupant density of the stadium stands is high, which limits the locations available to install the sensors. As a method to resolve the limitations of installing the sensors, we propose a method to predict the thermal environment of each zone in a large space. We set six key thermal factors affecting the thermal environment in a large space to be predicted factors (indoor air temperature, mean radiant temperature, and clothing and the fixed factors (air velocity, metabolic rate, and relative humidity. Using artificial neural network (ANN models and the outdoor air temperature and the surface temperature of the interior walls around the stands as input data, we developed a method to predict the three thermal factors. Learning and verification datasets were established using STAR CCM+ (2016.10, Siemens PLM software, Plano, TX, USA. An analysis of each model’s prediction results showed that the prediction accuracy increased with the number of learning data points. The thermal environment evaluation process developed in this study can be used to control heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC facilities in each zone in a large space building with sufficient learning by ANN models at the building testing or the evaluation stage.

  17. Quantum chemical aided prediction of the thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures of ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, Maaike C.; Buijs, Wim; Peters, Cor J.; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The long-term thermal stability of ionic liquids is of utmost importance for their industrial application. Although the thermal decomposition temperatures of various ionic liquids have been measured previously, experimental data on the thermal decomposition mechanisms and kinetics are scarce. It is desirable to develop quantitative chemical tools that can predict thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures (kinetics) of ionic liquids. In this work ab initio quantum chemical calculations (DFT-B3LYP) have been used to predict thermal decomposition mechanisms, temperatures and the activation energies of the thermal breakdown reactions. These quantum chemical calculations proved to be an excellent method to predict the thermal stability of various ionic liquids

  18. CFD-FEM coupling for accurate prediction of thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannink, M.H.C.; Kuczaj, A.K.; Blom, F.J.; Church, J.M.; Komen, E.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal fatigue is a safety related issue in primary pipework systems of nuclear power plants. Life extension of current reactors and the design of a next generation of new reactors lead to growing importance of research in this direction. The thermal fatigue degradation mechanism is induced by temperature fluctuations in a fluid, which arise from mixing of hot and cold flows. Accompanied physical phenomena include thermal stratification, thermal striping, and turbulence [1]. Current plant instrumentation systems allow monitoring of possible causes as stratification and temperature gradients at fatigue susceptible locations [1]. However, high-cycle temperature fluctuations associated with turbulent mixing cannot be adequately detected by common thermocouple instrumentations. For a proper evaluation of thermal fatigue, therefore, numerical simulations are necessary that couple instantaneous fluid and solid interactions. In this work, a strategy for the numerical prediction of thermal fatigue is presented. The approach couples Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and the Finite Element Method (FEM). For the development of the computational approach, a classical test case for the investigation of thermal fatigue problems is studied, i.e. mixing in a T-junction. Due to turbulent mixing of hot and cold fluids in two perpendicularly connected pipes, temperature fluctuations arise in the mixing zone downstream in the flow. Subsequently, these temperature fluctuations are also induced in the pipes. The stresses that arise due to the fluctuations may eventually lead to thermal fatigue. In the first step of the applied procedure, the temperature fluctuations in both fluid and structure are calculated using the CFD method. Subsequently, the temperature fluctuations in the structure are imposed as thermal loads in a FEM model of the pipes. A mechanical analysis is then performed to determine the thermal stresses, which are used to predict the fatigue lifetime of the structure

  19. Prediction of thermal conductivity of sedimentary rocks from well logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Förster, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The calculation of heat-flow density in boreholes requires reliable values for the change of temperature and rock thermal conductivity with depth. As rock samples for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity (TC) are usually rare geophysical well logs are used alternatively to determine TC...... parameters (i.e. thermal conductivity, density, hydrogen index, sonic interval transit time, gamma-ray response, photoelectric factor) of artificial mineral assemblages consisting 15 rock-forming minerals that are used in different combinations to typify sedimentary rocks. The predictive capacity of the new...... equations is evaluated on subsurface data from four boreholes drilled into the Mesozoic sequence of the North German Basin, including more than 1700 laboratory-measured thermal-conductivity values. Results are compared with those from other approaches published in the past. The new approach predicts TC...

  20. 1550 nm superluminescent diode and anti-Stokes effect CCD camera based optical coherence tomography for full-field optical metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kredzinski, Lukasz; Connelly, Michael J.

    2011-06-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a promising non-invasive imaging technology capable of carrying out 3D high-resolution cross-sectional images of the internal microstructure of examined material. However, almost all of these systems are expensive, requiring the use of complex optical setups, expensive light sources and complicated scanning of the sample under test. In addition most of these systems have not taken advantage of the competitively priced optical components available at wavelength within the main optical communications band located in the 1550 nm region. A comparatively simple and inexpensive full-field OCT system (FF-OCT), based on a superluminescent diode (SLD) light source and anti-stokes imaging device was constructed, to perform 3D cross-sectional imaging. This kind of inexpensive setup with moderate resolution could be easily applicable in low-level biomedical and industrial diagnostics. This paper involves calibration of the system and determines its suitability for imaging structures of biological tissues such as teeth, which has low absorption at 1550 nm.

  1. Method for Predicting Thermal Buckling in Rails

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    A method is proposed herein for predicting the onset of thermal buckling in rails in such a way as to provide a means of avoiding this type of potentially devastating failure. The method consists of the development of a thermomechanical model of rail...

  2. [Evaluation of thermal comfort in a student population: predictive value of an integrated index (Fanger's predicted mean value].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catenacci, G; Terzi, R; Marcaletti, G; Tringali, S

    1989-01-01

    Practical applications and predictive values of a thermal comfort index (Fanger's PRV) were verified on a sample school population (1236 subjects) by studying the relationships between thermal sensations (subjective analysis), determined by means of an individual questionnaire, and the values of thermal comfort index (objective analysis) obtained by calculating the PMV index individually in the subjects under study. In homogeneous conditions of metabolic expenditure rate and thermal impedence from clothing, significant differences were found between the two kinds of analyses. At 22 degrees C mean radiant and operative temperature, the PMV values averaged 0 and the percentage of subjects who experienced thermal comfort did not exceed 60%. The high level of subjects who were dissatisfied with their environmental thermal conditions confirms the doubts regarding the use of the PMV index as a predictive indicator of thermal comfort, especially considering that the negative answers were not homogeneous nor attributable to the small thermal fluctuations (less than 0.5 degree C) measured in the classrooms.

  3. Well-log based prediction of thermal conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Förster, Andrea

    Rock thermal conductivity (TC) is paramount for the determination of heat flow and the calculation of temperature profiles. Due to the scarcity of drill cores compared to the availability of petrophysical well logs, methods are desired to indirectly predict TC in sedimentary basins. Most...

  4. High-brightness semipolar (2021¯) blue InGaN/GaN superluminescent diodes for droop-free solid-state lighting and visible-light communications

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2016-05-25

    A high-brightness, droop-free, and speckle-free InGaN/GaN quantum well blue superluminescent diode (SLD) was demonstrated on a semipolar (2021) GaN substrate. The 447-nm emitting SLD has a broad spectral linewidth of 6.3 nm at an optical power of 123 mW. A peak optical power of 256 mW was achieved at 700 mA CW injection current. By combining YAG:Ce phosphor, SLD-generated white light shows a color-rendering index (CRI) of 68.9 and a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4340 K. The measured frequency response of the SLD revealed a -3 dB bandwidth of 560 MHz, thus demonstrating the feasibility of the device for both solid-state lighting (SSL) and visible-light communication (VLC) applications. © 2016 Optical Society of America.

  5. High-brightness semipolar (2021¯) blue InGaN/GaN superluminescent diodes for droop-free solid-state lighting and visible-light communications

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee; Leonard, John T.; Pourhashemi, Arash; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-desouki, Munir M.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-01-01

    A high-brightness, droop-free, and speckle-free InGaN/GaN quantum well blue superluminescent diode (SLD) was demonstrated on a semipolar (2021) GaN substrate. The 447-nm emitting SLD has a broad spectral linewidth of 6.3 nm at an optical power of 123 mW. A peak optical power of 256 mW was achieved at 700 mA CW injection current. By combining YAG:Ce phosphor, SLD-generated white light shows a color-rendering index (CRI) of 68.9 and a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4340 K. The measured frequency response of the SLD revealed a -3 dB bandwidth of 560 MHz, thus demonstrating the feasibility of the device for both solid-state lighting (SSL) and visible-light communication (VLC) applications. © 2016 Optical Society of America.

  6. Research and development studies for predicting the thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, D.; Garnier, J.; Fissolo, A.; Lejeail, Y.; Stephan, J.M.; Moinereau, D.; Masson, J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents some studies in development or realized in the EDF and CEA laboratories, concerning the thermal fatigue damage in nuclear reactor components. The first part presents the basic principles and the methods of lifetime prediction. The second part gives some examples on sodium loop, water loop, welded junctions resistance to thermal fatigue and tests on fatigue specimen. (A.L.B.)

  7. Performance reliability prediction for thermal aging based on kalman filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Shuhong; Wen Zhenhua; Xue Fei; Zhao Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    The performance reliability of the nuclear power plant main pipeline that failed due to thermal aging was studied by the performance degradation theory. Firstly, through the data obtained from the accelerated thermal aging experiments, the degradation process of the impact strength and fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steel material of the main pipeline was analyzed. The time-varying performance degradation model based on the state space method was built, and the performance trends were predicted by using Kalman filtering. Then, the multi-parameter and real-time performance reliability prediction model for the main pipeline thermal aging was developed by considering the correlation between the impact properties and fracture toughness, and by using the stochastic process theory. Thus, the thermal aging performance reliability and reliability life of the main pipeline with multi-parameter were obtained, which provides the scientific basis for the optimization management of the aging maintenance decision making for nuclear power plant main pipelines. (authors)

  8. Predicting lattice thermal conductivity with help from ab initio methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, David

    2015-03-01

    The lattice thermal conductivity is a fundamental transport parameter that determines the utility a material for specific thermal management applications. Materials with low thermal conductivity find applicability in thermoelectric cooling and energy harvesting. High thermal conductivity materials are urgently needed to help address the ever-growing heat dissipation problem in microelectronic devices. Predictive computational approaches can provide critical guidance in the search and development of new materials for such applications. Ab initio methods for calculating lattice thermal conductivity have demonstrated predictive capability, but while they are becoming increasingly efficient, they are still computationally expensive particularly for complex crystals with large unit cells . In this talk, I will review our work on first principles phonon transport for which the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity is limited only by phonon-phonon scattering arising from anharmonicity. I will examine use of the phase space for anharmonic phonon scattering and the Grüneisen parameters as measures of the thermal conductivities for a range of materials and compare these to the widely used guidelines stemming from the theory of Liebfried and Schölmann. This research was supported primarily by the NSF under Grant CBET-1402949, and by the S3TEC, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US DOE, office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award No. DE-SC0001299.

  9. Thermal comfort in residential buildings - Failure to predict by Standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, R. [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Rabin Building, Technion City, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Paciuk, M. [National Building Research Institute, Technion - IIT, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2009-05-15

    A field study, conducted in 189 dwellings in winter and 205 dwellings in summer, included measurement of hygro-thermal conditions and documentation of occupant responses and behavior patterns. Both samples included both passive and actively space-conditioned dwellings. Predicted mean votes (PMV) computed using Fanger's model yielded significantly lower-than-reported thermal sensation (TS) values, especially for the winter heated and summer air-conditioned groups. The basic model assumption of a proportional relationship between thermal response and thermal load proved to be inadequate, with actual thermal comfort achieved at substantially lower loads than predicted. Survey results also refuted the model's second assumption that symmetrical responses in the negative and positive directions of the scale represent similar comfort levels. Results showed that the model's curve of predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD) substantially overestimated the actual percentage of dissatisfied within the partial group of respondents who voted TS > 0 in winter as well as within the partial group of respondents who voted TS < 0 in summer. Analyses of sensitivity to possible survey-related inaccuracy factors (metabolic rate, clothing thermal resistance) did not explain the systematic discrepancies. These discrepancies highlight the role of contextual variables (local climate, expectations, available control) in thermal adaptation in actual settings. Collected data was analyzed statistically to establish baseline data for local standardized thermal and energy calculations. A 90% satisfaction criterion yielded 19.5 C and 26 C as limit values for passive winter and summer design conditions, respectively, while during active conditioning periods, set-point temperatures of 21.5 C and 23 C should be assumed for winter and summer, respectively. (author)

  10. High-Performance 1.55-µm Superluminescent Diode Based on Broad Gain InAs/InGaAlAs/InP Quantum Dash Active Region

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2014-08-01

    We report on the high-performance characteristics from superluminescent diodes (SLDs) based on four-stack InAs/InGaAlAs chirped-barrier thickness quantum dash (Qdash) in a well structure. The active region exhibits a measured broad gain spectrum of 140 nm, with a peak modal gain of ~41 cm-1. The noncoated two-section gainabsorber broad-area and ridge-waveguide device configuration exhibits an output power of > 20 mW and > 12 mW, respectively. The corresponding -3-dB bandwidths span ~82 nm and ~72 nm, with a small spectral ripple of <; 0.2 dB, related largely to the contribution from dispersive height dash ensembles of the highly inhomogeneous active region. These C-L communication band devices will find applications in various cross-disciplinary fields of optical metrology, optical coherent tomography, etc.

  11. Prediction of the Thermal Conductivity of Refrigerants by Computational Methods and Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Forouzan; Ghaderi, Amir H; Ghaderi, Noushin; Najafi, Bijan

    2017-01-01

    Background: The thermal conductivity of fluids can be calculated by several computational methods. However, these methods are reliable only at the confined levels of density, and there is no specific computational method for calculating thermal conductivity in the wide ranges of density. Methods: In this paper, two methods, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) approach and a computational method established upon the Rainwater-Friend theory, were used to predict the value of thermal conductivity in all ranges of density. The thermal conductivity of six refrigerants, R12, R14, R32, R115, R143, and R152 was predicted by these methods and the effectiveness of models was specified and compared. Results: The results show that the computational method is a usable method for predicting thermal conductivity at low levels of density. However, the efficiency of this model is considerably reduced in the mid-range of density. It means that this model cannot be used at density levels which are higher than 6. On the other hand, the ANN approach is a reliable method for thermal conductivity prediction in all ranges of density. The best accuracy of ANN is achieved when the number of units is increased in the hidden layer. Conclusion: The results of the computational method indicate that the regular dependence between thermal conductivity and density at higher densities is eliminated. It can develop a nonlinear problem. Therefore, analytical approaches are not able to predict thermal conductivity in wide ranges of density. Instead, a nonlinear approach such as, ANN is a valuable method for this purpose.

  12. Prediction of thermal fatigue life of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, N.; Kamigaito, O.

    1979-01-01

    On the assumption that the thermal fatigue life of ceramics is determined mainly by the duration over which a crack reaches a small critical length, a prediction of the life was made by application of fracture mechanics to ceramics based on subcritical crack growth. Approximated formulae were derived. Experimental examination showed that the formulae proved to be valid for glass, sintered mullite under moderate shock severity, and zirconia. Data given by other authors also prove their validity. The deviation of the life from the formulae for sintered mullite under a thermal shock of extremely low severty, suggests that a certain mechanism, for example strengthening, is needed to understand the life of the sintered mullite. (author)

  13. Lifetime prediction of structures submitted to thermal fatigue loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiable, S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to predict the lifetime of structures submitted to thermal fatigue loadings. This work lies within the studies undertaken by the CEA on the thermal fatigue problems from the french reactor of Civaux. In particular we study the SPLASH test: a specimen is heated continuously and cyclically cooled down by a water spray. This loading generates important temperature gradients in space and time and leads to the initiation and the propagation of a crack network. We propose a new thermo-mechanical model to simulate the SPLASH experiment and we propose a new fatigue criterion to predict the lifetime of the SPLASH specimen. We propose and compare several numerical models with various complexity to estimate the mechanical response of the SPLASH specimen. The practical implications of this work are the reevaluation of the hypothesis used in the French code RCC, which are used to simulate thermal shock and to interpret the results in terms of fatigue. This work leads to new perspectives on the mechanical interpretation of the fatigue criterion. (author)

  14. Reliability residual-life prediction method for thermal aging based on performance degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Shuhong; Xue Fei; Yu Weiwei; Ti Wenxin; Liu Xiaotian

    2013-01-01

    The paper makes the study of the nuclear power plant main pipeline. The residual-life of the main pipeline that failed due to thermal aging has been studied by the use of performance degradation theory and Bayesian updating methods. Firstly, the thermal aging impact property degradation process of the main pipeline austenitic stainless steel has been analyzed by the accelerated thermal aging test data. Then, the thermal aging residual-life prediction model based on the impact property degradation data is built by Bayesian updating methods. Finally, these models are applied in practical situations. It is shown that the proposed methods are feasible and the prediction accuracy meets the needs of the project. Also, it provides a foundation for the scientific management of aging management of the main pipeline. (authors)

  15. Analytical prediction of thermal performance of hypervapotron and its application to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.; Falter, H.

    1992-09-01

    A hypervapotron (HV) is a water cooled device made of high thermal conductivity material such as copper. A surface heat flux of up to 30 MW/m 2 has been achieved in copper hypervapotrans cooled by water at a velocity of 10 m/s and at a pressure of six bar. Hypervapotrons have been used in the past as beam dumps at the Joint European Torus (JET). It is planned to use them for diverter cooling during Mark II upgrade of the JET. Although a large amount of experimental data has been collected on these devices, an analytical performance prediction has not been done before due to the complexity of the heat transfer mechanisms. A method to analytically predict the thermal performance of the hypervapotron is described. The method uses a combination of a number of thermal hydraulic correlations and a finite element analysis. The analytical prediction shows an excellent agreement with experimental results over a wide range of velocities, pressures, subcooling, and geometries. The method was used to predict the performance of hypervapotron made of beryllium. Merits for the use of hypervapotrons for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) are discussed

  16. Occupant feedback based model predictive control for thermal comfort and energy optimization: A chamber experimental evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiao; Wang, Qian; Srebric, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This study evaluates an occupant-feedback driven Model Predictive Controller (MPC). • The MPC adjusts indoor temperature based on a dynamic thermal sensation (DTS) model. • A chamber model for predicting chamber air temperature is developed and validated. • Experiments show that MPC using DTS performs better than using Predicted Mean Vote. - Abstract: In current centralized building climate control, occupants do not have much opportunity to intervene the automated control system. This study explores the benefit of using thermal comfort feedback from occupants in the model predictive control (MPC) design based on a novel dynamic thermal sensation (DTS) model. This DTS model based MPC was evaluated in chamber experiments. A hierarchical structure for thermal control was adopted in the chamber experiments. At the high level, an MPC controller calculates the optimal supply air temperature of the chamber heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system, using the feedback of occupants’ votes on thermal sensation. At the low level, the actual supply air temperature is controlled by the chiller/heater using a PI control to achieve the optimal set point. This DTS-based MPC was also compared to an MPC designed based on the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) model for thermal sensation. The experiment results demonstrated that the DTS-based MPC using occupant feedback allows significant energy saving while maintaining occupant thermal comfort compared to the PMV-based MPC.

  17. Development of Building Thermal Load and Discomfort Degree Hour Prediction Models Using Data Mining Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaolin Lin

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal load and indoor comfort level are two important building performance indicators, rapid predictions of which can help significantly reduce the computation time during design optimization. In this paper, a three-step approach is used to develop and evaluate prediction models. Firstly, the Latin Hypercube Sampling Method (LHSM is used to generate a representative 19-dimensional design database and DesignBuilder is then used to obtain the thermal load and discomfort degree hours through simulation. Secondly, samples from the database are used to develop and validate seven prediction models, using data mining approaches including multilinear regression (MLR, chi-square automatic interaction detector (CHAID, exhaustive CHAID (ECHAID, back-propagation neural network (BPNN, radial basis function network (RBFN, classification and regression trees (CART, and support vector machines (SVM. It is found that the MLR and BPNN models outperform the others in the prediction of thermal load with average absolute error of less than 1.19%, and the BPNN model is the best at predicting discomfort degree hour with 0.62% average absolute error. Finally, two hybrid models—MLR (MLR + BPNN and MLR-BPNN—are developed. The MLR-BPNN models are found to be the best prediction models, with average absolute error of 0.82% in thermal load and 0.59% in discomfort degree hour.

  18. Robust multi-model predictive control of multi-zone thermal plate system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poom Jatunitanon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A modern controller was designed by using the mathematical model of a multi–zone thermal plate system. An important requirement for this type of controller is that it must be able to keep the temperature set-point of each thermal zone. The mathematical model used in the design was determined through a system identification process. The results showed that when the operating condition is changed, the performance of the controller may be reduced as a result of the system parameter uncertainties. This paper proposes a weighting technique of combining the robust model predictive controller for each operating condition into a single robust multi-model predictive control. Simulation and experimental results showed that the proposed method performed better than the conventional multi-model predictive control in rise time of transient response, when used in a system designed to work over a wide range of operating conditions.

  19. Thermal fluctuation within nests and predicted sex ratio of Morelet's Crocodile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo-Galván, Armando H; López-Luna, Marco A; Cupul-Magaña, Fabio G

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the interplay between thermal variations and sex ratio in reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination is the first step for developing long-term conservation strategies. In case of crocodilians, the information is fragmentary and insufficient for establishing a general framework to consider how thermal fluctuation influence sex determination under natural conditions. The main goal of this study was to analyze thermal variation in nests of Crocodylus moreletii and to discuss the potential implications for predicting offspring sex ratio. The study was carried out at the Centro de Estudios Tecnológicos del Mar N° 2 and at the Sistemas Productivos Cocodrilo, Campeche, Mexico. Data was collected in the nesting season of Morelet's Crocodiles during three consecutive seasons (2007-2009). Thermal fluctuations for multiple areas of the nest chamber were registered by data loggers. We calculate the constant temperature equivalent based on thermal profiles among nests to assess whether there are differences between the nest temperature and its equivalent to constant temperature. We observed that mean nest temperature was only different among nests, while daily thermal fluctuations vary depending on the depth position within the nest chamber, years and nests. The constant temperature equivalent was different among and within nests, but not among survey years. We observed differences between constant temperature equivalent and mean nest temperature both at the top and in the middle of the nest cavities, but were not significantly different at the bottom of nest cavities. Our results enable examine and discuss the relevance of daily thermal fluctuations to predict sex ratio of the Morelet's Crocodile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting Formation Damage in Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems Utilizing a Coupled Hydraulic-Thermal-Chemical Reservoir Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel; Regenspurg, Simona; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido; Kranz, Stefan; Saadat, Ali

    2014-05-01

    In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, large amounts of energy can be stored by injecting hot water into deep or intermediate aquifers. In a seasonal production-injection cycle, water is circulated through a system comprising the porous aquifer, a production well, a heat exchanger and an injection well. This process involves large temperature and pressure differences, which shift chemical equilibria and introduce or amplify mechanical processes. Rock-fluid interaction such as dissolution and precipitation or migration and deposition of fine particles will affect the hydraulic properties of the porous medium and may lead to irreversible formation damage. In consequence, these processes determine the long-term performance of the ATES system and need to be predicted to ensure the reliability of the system. However, high temperature and pressure gradients and dynamic feedback cycles pose challenges on predicting the influence of the relevant processes. Within this study, a reservoir model comprising a coupled hydraulic-thermal-chemical simulation was developed based on an ATES demonstration project located in the city of Berlin, Germany. The structural model was created with Petrel, based on data available from seismic cross-sections and wellbores. The reservoir simulation was realized by combining the capabilities of multiple simulation tools. For the reactive transport model, COMSOL Multiphysics (hydraulic-thermal) and PHREEQC (chemical) were combined using the novel interface COMSOL_PHREEQC, developed by Wissmeier & Barry (2011). It provides a MATLAB-based coupling interface between both programs. Compared to using COMSOL's built-in reactive transport simulator, PHREEQC additionally calculates adsorption and reaction kinetics and allows the selection of different activity coefficient models in the database. The presented simulation tool will be able to predict the most important aspects of hydraulic, thermal and chemical transport processes relevant to

  1. Thermal preference predicts animal personality in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Marco; Rey, Sonia; Silva, Tome; Featherstone, Zoe; Crumlish, Margaret; MacKenzie, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Environmental temperature gradients provide habitat structure in which fish orientate and individual thermal choice may reflect an essential integrated response to the environment. The use of subtle thermal gradients likely impacts upon specific physiological and behavioural processes reflected as a suite of traits described by animal personality. In this study, we examine the relationship between thermal choice, animal personality and the impact of infection upon this interaction. We predicted that thermal choice in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus reflects distinct personality traits and that under a challenge individuals exhibit differential thermal distribution. Nile tilapia were screened following two different protocols: 1) a suite of individual behavioural tests to screen for personality and 2) thermal choice in a custom-built tank with a thermal gradient (TCH tank) ranging from 21 to 33 °C. A first set of fish were screened for behaviour and then thermal preference, and a second set were tested in the opposite fashion: thermal then behaviour. The final thermal distribution of the fish after 48 h was assessed reflecting final thermal preferendum. Additionally, fish were then challenged using a bacterial Streptococcus iniae model infection to assess the behavioural fever response of proactive and reactive fish. Results showed that individuals with preference for higher temperatures were also classified as proactive with behavioural tests and reactive contemporaries chose significantly lower water temperatures. All groups exhibited behavioural fever recovering personality-specific thermal preferences after 5 days. Our results show that thermal preference can be used as a proxy to assess personality traits in Nile tilapia and it is a central factor to understand the adaptive meaning of animal personality within a population. Importantly, response to infection by expressing behavioural fever overrides personality-related thermal choice. © 2016 The Authors

  2. A theoretical adaptive model of thermal comfort - Adaptive Predicted Mean Vote (aPMV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Runming [School of Construction Management and Engineering, The University of Reading (United Kingdom); Faculty of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University (China); Li, Baizhan [Key Laboratory of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region' s Eco-Environment (Ministry of Education), Chongqing University (China); Faculty of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University (China); Liu, Jing [School of Construction Management and Engineering, The University of Reading (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents in detail a theoretical adaptive model of thermal comfort based on the ''Black Box'' theory, taking into account factors such as culture, climate, social, psychological and behavioural adaptations, which have an impact on the senses used to detect thermal comfort. The model is called the Adaptive Predicted Mean Vote (aPMV) model. The aPMV model explains, by applying the cybernetics concept, the phenomena that the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) is greater than the Actual Mean Vote (AMV) in free-running buildings, which has been revealed by many researchers in field studies. An Adaptive coefficient ({lambda}) representing the adaptive factors that affect the sense of thermal comfort has been proposed. The empirical coefficients in warm and cool conditions for the Chongqing area in China have been derived by applying the least square method to the monitored onsite environmental data and the thermal comfort survey results. (author)

  3. Predicted thermal and stress environments in the vicinity of repository openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, S.J.; Hardy, M.P.; Lin, M.

    1991-01-01

    An understanding of the thermal and stress environment in the vicinity of repository openings is important for preclosure performance considerations and worker health and safety considerations for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This paper presents the results of two and three dimensional numerical analyses which have determined the thermal and stress environments for typical repository openings. In general, it is predicted that openings close to heat sources attain high temperatures and experience a significant stress increase. Openings away from heat sources experience more uniform temperature changes and experience a stress change which results in part from a far-field thermal loading

  4. Experiment and Artificial Neural Network Prediction of Thermal Conductivity and Viscosity for Alumina-Water Nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ningbo; Li, Zhiming

    2017-05-19

    To effectively predict the thermal conductivity and viscosity of alumina (Al₂O₃)-water nanofluids, an artificial neural network (ANN) approach was investigated in the present study. Firstly, using a two-step method, four Al₂O₃-water nanofluids were prepared respectively by dispersing different volume fractions (1.31%, 2.72%, 4.25%, and 5.92%) of nanoparticles with the average diameter of 30 nm. On this basis, the thermal conductivity and viscosity of the above nanofluids were analyzed experimentally under various temperatures ranging from 296 to 313 K. Then a radial basis function (RBF) neural network was constructed to predict the thermal conductivity and viscosity of Al₂O₃-water nanofluids as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction and temperature. The experimental results showed that both nanoparticle volume fraction and temperature could enhance the thermal conductivity of Al₂O₃-water nanofluids. However, the viscosity only depended strongly on Al₂O₃ nanoparticle volume fraction and was increased slightly by changing temperature. In addition, the comparative analysis revealed that the RBF neural network had an excellent ability to predict the thermal conductivity and viscosity of Al₂O₃-water nanofluids with the mean absolute percent errors of 0.5177% and 0.5618%, respectively. This demonstrated that the ANN provided an effective way to predict the thermophysical properties of nanofluids with limited experimental data.

  5. Physical and JIT Model Based Hybrid Modeling Approach for Building Thermal Load Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Yutaka; Murai, Masahiko; Murayama, Dai; Motoyama, Ichiro

    Energy conservation in building fields is one of the key issues in environmental point of view as well as that of industrial, transportation and residential fields. The half of the total energy consumption in a building is occupied by HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning) systems. In order to realize energy conservation of HVAC system, a thermal load prediction model for building is required. This paper propose a hybrid modeling approach with physical and Just-in-Time (JIT) model for building thermal load prediction. The proposed method has features and benefits such as, (1) it is applicable to the case in which past operation data for load prediction model learning is poor, (2) it has a self checking function, which always supervises if the data driven load prediction and the physical based one are consistent or not, so it can find if something is wrong in load prediction procedure, (3) it has ability to adjust load prediction in real-time against sudden change of model parameters and environmental conditions. The proposed method is evaluated with real operation data of an existing building, and the improvement of load prediction performance is illustrated.

  6. Derivation of governing equation for predicting thermal conductivity of composites with spherical inclusions and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-Kon; Kim, Jin-Gon

    2011-01-01

    A governing differential equation for predicting the effective thermal conductivity of composites with spherical inclusions is shown to be simply derived by using the result of the generalized self-consistent model. By applying the equation to composites including spherical inclusions such as graded spherical inclusions, microballoons, mutiply-coated spheres, and spherical inclusions with an interphase, their effective thermal conductivities are easily predicted. The results are compared with those in the literatures to be consistent. It can be stated from the investigations that the effective thermal conductivity of composites with spherical inclusions can be estimated as long as their conductivities are expressed as a function of their radius. -- Highlights: → We derive equation for predicting the effective thermal conductivity of composites. → The equation is derived using the results of the generalized self-consistent model. → The inclusions are graded sphere, microballoons, and mutiply-coated spheres.

  7. An experimental correlation approach for predicting thermal conductivity of water-EG based nanofluids of zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Nadooshan, Afshin

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the effects of temperature (20 °Cthermal conductivity of zinc oxide/ethylene glycol-water nanofluid have been presented. Nanofluid samples were prepared by a two-step method and thermal conductivity measurements were performed by a KD2 pro instrument. Results showed that the thermal conductivity increases uniformly with increasing solid volume fraction and temperature. The results also revealed that the thermal conductivity of nanofluids significantly increases with increasing solid volume fraction at higher temperatures. Moreover, it can be seen that for more concentrated samples, the effect of temperature was more tangible. Experimental thermal conductivity enhancement of the nanofluid in comparison with the Maxwell model indicated that Maxwell model was unable to predict the thermal conductivity of the present nanofluid. Therefore, a new correlation was presented for predicting the thermal conductivity of ZnO/EG-water nanofluid.

  8. Revisiting concepts of thermal physiology: Predicting responses of mammals to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Duncan; Snelling, Edward P; Hetem, Robyn S; Maloney, Shane K; Strauss, Willem Maartin; Fuller, Andrea

    2018-02-26

    The accuracy of predictive models (also known as mechanistic or causal models) of animal responses to climate change depends on properly incorporating the principles of heat transfer and thermoregulation into those models. Regrettably, proper incorporation of these principles is not always evident. We have revisited the relevant principles of thermal physiology and analysed how they have been applied in predictive models of large mammals, which are particularly vulnerable, to climate change. We considered dry heat exchange, evaporative heat transfer, the thermoneutral zone and homeothermy, and we examined the roles of size and shape in the thermal physiology of large mammals. We report on the following misconceptions in influential predictive models: underestimation of the role of radiant heat transfer, misassignment of the role and misunderstanding of the sustainability of evaporative cooling, misinterpretation of the thermoneutral zone as a zone of thermal tolerance or as a zone of sustainable energetics, confusion of upper critical temperature and critical thermal maximum, overestimation of the metabolic energy cost of evaporative cooling, failure to appreciate that the current advantages of size and shape will become disadvantageous as climate change advances, misassumptions about skin temperature and, lastly, misconceptions about the relationship between body core temperature and its variability with body mass in large mammals. Not all misconceptions invalidate the models, but we believe that preventing inappropriate assumptions from propagating will improve model accuracy, especially as models progress beyond their current typically static format to include genetic and epigenetic adaptation that can result in phenotypic plasticity. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2018 British Ecological Society.

  9. Comparative analysis of modified PMV models and SET models to predict human thermal sensation in naturally ventilated buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Jie; Wang, Yi; Wargocki, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a comparative analysis was performed on the human thermal sensation estimated by modified predicted mean vote (PMV) models and modified standard effective temperature (SET) models in naturally ventilated buildings; the data were collected in field study. These prediction models were....../s, the expectancy factors for the extended PMV model and the extended SET model were from 0.770 to 0.974 and from 1.330 to 1.363, and the adaptive coefficients for the adaptive PMV model and the adaptive SET model were from 0.029 to 0.167 and from-0.213 to-0.195. In addition, the difference in thermal sensation...... between the measured and predicted values using the modified PMV models exceeded 25%, while the difference between the measured thermal sensation and the predicted thermal sensation using modified SET models was approximately less than 25%. It is concluded that the modified SET models can predict human...

  10. Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

    2005-09-30

    Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very

  11. Prediction of reduced thermal conductivity in nano-engineered rough semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Pierre N; Aksamija, Zlatan; Ravaioli, Umberto [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beckman Institute for Advanced Technology and Science, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Pop, Eric, E-mail: pmartin7@illinois.ed, E-mail: epop@illinois.ed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beckman Institute for Advanced Technology and Science, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Micro- and Nano-Technology Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    We explore phonon decay processes necessary to the design of efficient rough semiconductor nanowire (NW) thermoelectric devices. A novel approach to surface roughness-limited thermal conductivity of Si, Ge, and GaAs NW with diameter D < 500 nm is presented. In particular, a frequency-dependent phonon scattering rate is computed from perturbation theory and related to a description of the surface through the root-mean-square roughness height {Delta} and autocovariance length L. Using a full phonon dispersion relation, the thermal conductivity varies quadratically with diameter and roughness as (D/{Delta}){sup 2}. Computed results are in agreement with experimental data, and predict remarkably low thermal conductivity below 1 W/m/K in rough-etched 56 nm Ge and GaAs NW at room temperature.

  12. S – C – L triple wavelength superluminescent source based on an ultra-wideband SOA and FBGs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, H; Zulkifli, M Z; Hassan, N A; Muhammad, F D; Harun, S W [Photonics Research Center (Department of Physics), University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2013-10-31

    We propose and demonstrate a wide-band semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) based triple-wavelength superluminescent source with the output in the S-, C- and L-band regions. The proposed systems uses an ultra-wideband SOA with an amplification range from 1440 to 1620 nm as the linear gain medium. Three fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) with centre wavelengths of 1500, 1540 and 1580 nm are used to generate the lasing wavelengths in the S-, Cand L-bands respectively, while a variable optical attenuator is used to finely balance the optical powers of the lasing wavelengths. The ultra-wideband SOA generates an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectrum with a peak power of -33 dBm at the highest SOA drive current, and also demonstrates a down-shift in the centre wavelength of the generated spectrum due to the spatial distribution of the carrier densities. The S-band wavelength is the dominant wavelength at high drive currents, with an output power of -6 dBm as compared to the C- and L-bands, which only have powers of -11 and -10 dBm, respectively. All wavelengths have a high average signal-to-noise ratio more than 60 dB at the highest drive current of 390 mA, and the system also shows a high degree of stability, with power fluctuations of less than 3 dB within 70 min. The proposed system can find many applications where a wide-band and stable laser source is crucial, such as in communications and sensing. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  13. S – C – L triple wavelength superluminescent source based on an ultra-wideband SOA and FBGs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, H; Zulkifli, M Z; Hassan, N A; Muhammad, F D; Harun, S W

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a wide-band semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) based triple-wavelength superluminescent source with the output in the S-, C- and L-band regions. The proposed systems uses an ultra-wideband SOA with an amplification range from 1440 to 1620 nm as the linear gain medium. Three fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) with centre wavelengths of 1500, 1540 and 1580 nm are used to generate the lasing wavelengths in the S-, Cand L-bands respectively, while a variable optical attenuator is used to finely balance the optical powers of the lasing wavelengths. The ultra-wideband SOA generates an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectrum with a peak power of -33 dBm at the highest SOA drive current, and also demonstrates a down-shift in the centre wavelength of the generated spectrum due to the spatial distribution of the carrier densities. The S-band wavelength is the dominant wavelength at high drive currents, with an output power of -6 dBm as compared to the C- and L-bands, which only have powers of -11 and -10 dBm, respectively. All wavelengths have a high average signal-to-noise ratio more than 60 dB at the highest drive current of 390 mA, and the system also shows a high degree of stability, with power fluctuations of less than 3 dB within 70 min. The proposed system can find many applications where a wide-band and stable laser source is crucial, such as in communications and sensing. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  14. Field studies of submerged-diffuser thermal plumes with comparisons to predictive model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigo, A.A.; Paddock, R.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal plumes from submerged discharges of cooling water from two power plants on Lake Michigan were studied. The system for the acquisition of water temperatures and ambient conditions permitted the three-dimensional structure of the plumes to be determined. The Zion Nuclear Power Station has two submerged discharge structures separated by only 94 m. Under conditions of flow from both structures, interaction between the two plumes resulted in larger thermal fields than would be predicted by the superposition of single non-interacting plumes. Maximum temperatures in the near-field region of the plume compared favorably with mathematical model predictions. A comparison of physical-model predictions for the plume at the D. C. Cook Nuclear Plant with prototype measurements indicated good agreement in the near-field region, but differences in the far-field occurred as similitude was not preserved there

  15. Prediction of effective thermal conductivity of porous consolidated media as a function of temperature: a test example of limestones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb; Khan, Liaqat Ali; Maqsood, Asghari

    2007-01-01

    The thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and heat capacity per unit volume of sedimentary rocks (limestones) taken from Nammal Gorge sections, Western Salt Range, Pakistan, have been measured simultaneously using the transient plane source technique. The temperature dependence of thermal transport properties was studied in the temperature range 293 to 443 K. Different relations for the estimation of thermal conductivity are applied. A proposal for the prediction of thermal conductivity as a function of temperature is also given. It is observed that the values of effective thermal conductivity predicted by the proposed model are in agreement with the experimental thermal conductivity data within 8%. Furthermore, the errors in experimental calculations of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and volumetric heat capacity are around 5%, 7% and 10%, respectively

  16. Cellular and Porous Materials Thermal Properties Simulation and Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas; de Lemos, Marcelo J S

    2008-01-01

    Providing the reader with a solid understanding of the fundamentals as well as an awareness of recent advances in properties and applications of cellular and porous materials, this handbook and ready reference covers all important analytical and numerical methods for characterizing and predicting thermal properties. In so doing it directly addresses the special characteristics of foam-like and hole-riddled materials, combining theoretical and experimental aspects for characterization purposes.

  17. Combinatory Models for Predicting the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frozen and Unfrozen Food Materials

    OpenAIRE

    K. S. Reddy; P Karthikeyan

    2010-01-01

    A model to predict the effective thermal conductivity of heterogeneous materials is proposed based on unit cell approach. The model is combined with four fundamental effective thermal conductivity models (Parallel, Series, Maxwell-Eucken-I, and Maxwell-Eucken-II) to evolve a unifying equation for the estimation of effective thermal conductivity of porous and nonporous food materials. The effect of volume fraction (ν) on the structure composition factor (ψ) of the food materials is studied. Th...

  18. Thermal conductivity predictions of herringbone graphite nanofibers using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, Masoud H; Wemhoff, Aaron P

    2013-02-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are used to investigate the thermal conductivity of herringbone graphite nanofibers (GNFs) at room temperature by breaking down the axial and transverse conductivity values into intralayer and interlayer components. The optimized Tersoff potential is used to account for intralayer carbon-carbon interactions while the Lennard-Jones potential is used to model the interlayer carbon-carbon interactions. The intralayer thermal conductivity of the graphene layers near room temperature is calculated for different crease angles and number of layers using NEMD with a constant applied heat flux. The edge effect on a layer's thermal conductivity is investigated by computing the thermal conductivity values in both zigzag and armchair directions of the heat flow. The interlayer thermal conductivity is also predicted by imposing hot and cold Nosé-Hoover thermostats on two layers. The limiting case of a 90° crease angle is used to compare the results with those of single-layer graphene and few-layer graphene. The axial and transverse thermal conductivities are then calculated using standard trigonometric conversions of the calculated intralayer and interlayer thermal conductivities, along with calculations of few-layer graphene without a crease. The results show a large influence of the crease angle on the intralayer thermal conductivity, and the saturation of thermal conductivity occurs when number of layers is more than three. The axial thermal conductivity, transverse thermal conductivity in the crease direction, and transverse thermal conductivity normal to the crease for the case of a five-layer herringbone GNF with a 45° crease angle are calculated to be 27 W∕m K, 263 W∕m K, and 1500 W∕m K, respectively, where the axial thermal conductivity is in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  19. A prediction method of temperature distribution and thermal stress for the throttle turbine rotor and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a prediction method of the temperature distribution for the thermal stress for the throttle-regulated steam turbine rotor is proposed. The rotor thermal stress curve can be calculated according to the preset power requirement, the operation mode and the predicted critical parameters. The results of the 660 MW throttle turbine rotor show that the operators are able to predict the operation results and to adjust the operation parameters in advance with the help of the inertial element method. Meanwhile, it can also raise the operation level, thus providing the technical guarantee for the thermal stress optimization control and the safety of the steam turbine rotor under the variable load operation.

  20. Fatigue life prediction of Ni-base thermal solar receiver tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartrott, Philipp von; Schlesinger, Michael [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik (IWM), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Uhlig, Ralf; Jedamski, Jens [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Solar receivers for tower type Solar Thermal Power Plants are subjected to complex thermo-mechanical loads including fast and severe thermo-mechanical cycles. The material temperatures can reach more than 800 C and fall to room temperature very quickly. In order to predict the fatigue life of a receiver design, receiver tubes made of Alloy 625 with a wall thickness of 0.5 mm were tested in isothermal and thermo-cyclic experiments. The number of cycles to failure was in the range of 100 to 100,000. A thermo-mechanical fatigue life prediction model was set up. The model is based on the cyclic deformation of the material and the damage caused by the growth of fatigue micro cracks. The model reasonably predicts the experimental results. (orig.)

  1. Improving rational thermal comfort prediction by using subpopulation characteristics: A case study at Hermitage Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Rick; Schellen, Lisje; Schellen, Henk; Kingma, Boris

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to improve the prediction accuracy of the rational standard thermal comfort model, known as the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) model, by (1) calibrating one of its input variables "metabolic rate," and (2) extending it by explicitly incorporating the variable running mean outdoor temperature (RMOT) that relates to adaptive thermal comfort. The analysis was performed with survey data ( n = 1121) and climate measurements of the indoor and outdoor environment from a one year-long case study undertaken at Hermitage Amsterdam museum in the Netherlands. The PMVs were calculated for 35 survey days using (1) an a priori assumed metabolic rate, (2) a calibrated metabolic rate found by fitting the PMVs to the thermal sensation votes (TSVs) of each respondent using an optimization routine, and (3) extending the PMV model by including the RMOT. The results show that the calibrated metabolic rate is estimated to be 1.5 Met for this case study that was predominantly visited by elderly females. However, significant differences in metabolic rates have been revealed between adults and elderly showing the importance of differentiating between subpopulations. Hence, the standard tabular values, which only differentiate between various activities, may be oversimplified for many cases. Moreover, extending the PMV model with the RMOT substantially improves the thermal sensation prediction, but thermal sensation toward extreme cool and warm sensations remains partly underestimated.

  2. Model Predictive Control of Hybrid Thermal Energy Systems in Transport Refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafiei, Seyed Ehsan; Alleyne, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    A predictive control scheme is designed to control a transport refrigeration system, such as a delivery truck, that includes a vapor compression cycle configured in parallel with a thermal energy storage (TES) unit. A novel approach to TES utilization is introduced and is based on the current...

  3. Thermal property prediction and measurement of organic phase change materials in the liquid phase near the melting point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, William E.; Warzoha, Ronald; Weigand, Rebecca; Fleischer, Amy S.; Wemhoff, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Liquid-phase thermal properties for five phase change materials were estimated. • Various liquid phase and phase transition thermal properties were measured. • The thermal diffusivity was found using a best path to prediction approach. • The thermal diffusivity predictive method shows 15% agreement for organic PCMs. - Abstract: Organic phase change materials (PCMs) are a popular choice for many thermal energy storage applications including solar energy, building envelope thermal barriers, and passive cooling of portable electronics. Since the extent of phase change during a heating or cooling process is dependent upon rapid thermal penetration into the PCM, accurate knowledge of the thermal diffusivity of the PCM in both solid and liquid phases is crucial. This study addresses the existing gaps in information for liquid-phase PCM properties by examining an approach that determines the best path to prediction (BPP) for the thermal diffusivity of both alkanes and unsaturated acids. Knowledge of the BPP will enable researchers to explore the influence of PCM molecular structure on bulk thermophysical properties, thereby allowing the fabrication of optimized PCMs. The BPP method determines which of the tens of thousands of combinations of 22 different available theoretical techniques provides best agreement with thermal diffusivity values based on reported or measured density, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity for each of five PCMs (heneicosane, tricosane, tetracosane, oleic acid, and linoleic acid) in the liquid phase near the melting point. Separate BPPs were calibrated for alkanes based on heneicosane and tetracosane, and for the unsaturated acids. The alkane and unsaturated acid BPPs were then tested on a variety of similar materials, showing agreement with reported/measured thermal diffusivity within ∼15% for all materials. The alkane BPP was then applied to find that increasing the length of alkane chains decreases the PCM thermal

  4. Thermal conductivity of silicic tuffs: predictive formalism and comparison with preliminary experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappin, A. R.

    1980-07-01

    Performance of both near- and far-field thermomechanical calculations to assess the feasibility of waste disposal in silicic tuffs requires a formalism for predicting thermal conductivity of a broad range of tuffs. This report summarizes the available thermal conductivity data for silicate phases that occur in tuffs and describes several grain-density and conductivity trends which may be expected to result from post-emplacement alteration. A bounding curve is drawn that predicts the minimum theoretical matrix (zero-porosity) conductivity for most tuffs as a function of grain density. Comparison of experimental results with this curve shows that experimental conductivities are consistently lower at any given grain density. Use of the lowered bounding curve and an effective gas conductivity of 0.12 W/m 0 C allows conservative prediction of conductivity for a broad range of tuff types. For the samples measured here, use of the predictive curve allows estimation of conductivity to within 15% or better, with one exception. Application and possible improvement of the formalism are also discussed

  5. Thermal Storage Power Balancing with Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvgaard, Rasmus; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The method described in this paper balances power production and consumption with a large number of thermal loads. Linear controllers are used for the loads to track a temperature set point, while Model Predictive Control (MPC) and model estimation of the load behavior are used for coordination....... The total power consumption of all loads is controlled indirectly through a real-time price. The MPC incorporates forecasts of the power production and disturbances that influence the loads, e.g. time-varying weather forecasts, in order to react ahead of time. A simulation scenario demonstrates...

  6. Prediction of Geomechanical Properties from Thermal Conductivity of Low-Permeable Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhonin, Evgeny; Popov, Evgeny; Popov, Yury; Spasennykh, Mikhail; Ovcharenko, Yury; Zhukov, Vladislav; Martemyanov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    A key to assessing a sedimentary basin's hydrocarbon prospect is correct reconstruction of thermal and structural evolution. It is impossible without adequate theory and reliable input data including among other factors thermal and geomechanical rock properties. Both these factors are also important in geothermal reservoirs evaluation and carbon sequestration problem. Geomechanical parameters are usually estimated from sonic logging and rare laboratory measurements, but sometimes it is not possible technically (low quality of the acoustic signal, inappropriate borehole and mud conditions, low core quality). No wonder that there are attempts to correlate the thermal and geomechanical properties of rock, but no one before did it with large amount of high quality thermal conductivity data. Coupling results of sonic logging and non-destructive non-contact thermal core logging opens wide perspectives for studying a relationship between the thermal and geomechanical properties. More than 150 m of full size cores have been measured at core storage with optical scanning technique. Along with results of sonic logging performed with Sonic Scanner in different wells drilled in low permeable formations in West Siberia (Russia) it provided us with unique data set. It was established a strong correlation between components of thermal conductivity (measured perpendicular and parallel to bedding) and compressional and shear acoustic velocities in Bazhen formation. As a result, prediction of geomechanical properties via thermal conductivity data becomes possible, corresponding results was demonstrated. The work was supported by the Russian Ministry of Education and Science, project No. RFMEFI58114X0008.

  7. Performance assessment of turbulence models for the prediction of moderator thermal flow inside CANDU calandria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gong Hee; Bang, Young Seok; Woo, Sweng Woong

    2012-01-01

    The moderator thermal flow in the CANDU calandria is generally complex and highly turbulent because of the interaction of the buoyancy force with the inlet jet inertia. In this study, the prediction performance of turbulence models for the accurate analysis of the moderator thermal flow are assessed by comparing the results calculated with various types of turbulence models in the commercial flow solver FLUENT with experimental data for the test vessel at Sheridan Park Engineering Laboratory (SPEL). Through this comparative study of turbulence models, it is concluded that turbulence models that include the source term to consider the effects of buoyancy on the turbulent flow should be used for the reliable prediction of the moderator thermal flow inside the CANDU calandria

  8. Research and development studies for predicting the thermal fatigue; Etudes de R and D pour la prediction de la fatigue thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, D.; Garnier, J.; Fissolo, A.; Lejeail, Y. [CEA, 75 - Paris (France); Stephan, J.M.; Moinereau, D.; Masson, J. [Electricite de France, Les Renardieres, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents some studies in development or realized in the EDF and CEA laboratories, concerning the thermal fatigue damage in nuclear reactor components. The first part presents the basic principles and the methods of lifetime prediction. The second part gives some examples on sodium loop, water loop, welded junctions resistance to thermal fatigue and tests on fatigue specimen. (A.L.B.)

  9. Predicting thermal reference conditions for USA streams and rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ryan A.; Hawkins, Charles P.; Carlisle, Daren M.

    2013-01-01

    Temperature is a primary driver of the structure and function of stream ecosystems. However, the lack of stream temperature (ST) data for the vast majority of streams and rivers severely compromises our ability to describe patterns of thermal variation among streams, test hypotheses regarding the effects of temperature on macroecological patterns, and assess the effects of altered STs on ecological resources. Our goal was to develop empirical models that could: 1) quantify the effects of stream and watershed alteration (SWA) on STs, and 2) accurately and precisely predict natural (i.e., reference condition) STs in conterminous USA streams and rivers. We modeled 3 ecologically important elements of the thermal regime: mean summer, mean winter, and mean annual ST. To build reference-condition models (RCMs), we used daily mean ST data obtained from several thousand US Geological Survey temperature sites distributed across the conterminous USA and iteratively modeled ST with Random Forests to identify sites in reference condition. We first created a set of dirty models (DMs) that related STs to both natural factors (e.g., climate, watershed area, topography) and measures of SWA, i.e., reservoirs, urbanization, and agriculture. The 3 models performed well (r2 = 0.84–0.94, residual mean square error [RMSE] = 1.2–2.0°C). For each DM, we used partial dependence plots to identify SWA thresholds below which response in ST was minimal. We then used data from only the sites with upstream SWA below these thresholds to build RCMs with only natural factors as predictors (r2 = 0.87–0.95, RMSE = 1.1–1.9°C). Use of only reference-quality sites caused RCMs to suffer modest loss of predictor space and spatial coverage, but this loss was associated with parts of ST response curves that were flat and, therefore, not responsive to further variation in predictor space. We then compared predictions made with the RCMs to predictions made with the DMs with SWA set to 0. For most

  10. Prediction of Thermal Properties of Sweet Sorghum Bagasse as a Function of Moisture Content Using Artificial Neural Networks and Regression Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosukonda Ramana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks (ANN and traditional regression models were developed for prediction of thermal properties of sweet sorghum bagasse as a function of moisture content and room temperature. Predictions were made for three thermal properties: 1 thermal conductivity, 2 volumetric specific heat, and 3 thermal diffusivity. Each thermal property had five levels of moisture content (8.52%, 12.93%, 18.94%, 24.63%, and 28.62%, w. b. and room temperature as inputs. Data were sub-partitioned for training, testing, and validation of models. Backpropagation (BP and Kalman Filter (KF learning algorithms were employed to develop nonparametric models between input and output data sets. Statistical indices including correlation coefficient (R between actual and predicted outputs were produced for selecting the suitable models. Prediction plots for thermal properties indicated that the ANN models had better accuracy from unseen patterns as compared to regression models. In general, ANN models were able to strongly generalize and interpolate unseen patterns within the domain of training.

  11. Thermal conductivity prediction of nanoscale phononic crystal slabs using a hybrid lattice dynamics-continuum mechanics technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles M. Reinke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has demonstrated that nanostructuring of a semiconductor material to form a phononic crystal (PnC can significantly reduce its thermal conductivity. In this paper, we present a classical method that combines atomic-level information with the application of Bloch theory at the continuum level for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of finite-thickness PnCs with unit cells sized in the micron scale. Lattice dynamics calculations are done at the bulk material level, and the plane-wave expansion method is implemented at the macrosale PnC unit cell level. The combination of the lattice dynamics-based and continuum mechanics-based dispersion information is then used in the Callaway-Holland model to calculate the thermal transport properties of the PnC. We demonstrate that this hybrid approach provides both accurate and efficient predictions of the thermal conductivity.

  12. Prediction of thermal-Hydraulic phenomena in the LBLOCA experiment L2-3 using RELAP5/MOD2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Young Seok; Chung, Bub Dong; Kim, Hho Jung

    1991-01-01

    The LOFT LOCE L2-3 was simulated using the RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04 code to assess its capability in predicting the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in LBLOCA of a PWR. The reactor vessel was simulated with two core channels and split downcomer modeling for a base case calculation using the frozen code. The result of the base calculation showed that the code predicted the hydraulic behavior, and the blowdown thermal response at high power region of the core reasonably and that the code had deficiencies in the critical flow model during subcooled-two-phase transition period, in the CHF correlation at high mass flux and in the blowdown rewet criteria. An overprediction of coolant inventory due to the deficiencies yielded the poor prediction of reflood thermal response. Improvement of the code, RELAP5/MOD2 Cycle 36.04, based on the sensitivity study increased the accuracy of the prediction of the rewet phenomena. (Author)

  13. Comparison of measured and predicted thermal mixing tests using improved finite difference technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Y.A.; Rice, J.G.; Kim, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    The numerical diffusion introduced by the use of upwind formulations in the finite difference solution of the flow and energy equations for thermal mixing problems (cold water injection after small break LOCA in a PWR) was examined. The relative importance of numerical diffusion in the flow equations, compared to its effect on the energy equation was demonstrated. The flow field equations were solved using both first order accurate upwind, and second order accurate differencing schemes. The energy equation was treated using the conventional upwind and a mass weighted skew upwind scheme. Results presented for a simple test case showed that, for thermal mixing problems, the numerical diffusion was most significant in the energy equation. The numerical diffusion effect in the flow field equations was much less significant. A comparison of predictions using the skew upwind and the conventional upwind with experimental data from a two dimensional thermal mixing text are presented. The use of the skew upwind scheme showed a significant improvement in the accuracy of the steady state predicted temperatures. (orig./HP)

  14. Predicting thermally stressful events in rivers with a strategy to evaluate management alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, K.O.; Cole, J.C.; Schmid, M.

    2016-01-01

    Water temperature is an important factor in river ecology. Numerous models have been developed to predict river temperature. However, many were not designed to predict thermally stressful periods. Because such events are rare, traditionally applied analyses are inappropriate. Here, we developed two logistic regression models to predict thermally stressful events in the Delaware River at the US Geological Survey gage near Lordville, New York. One model predicted the probability of an event >20.0 °C, and a second predicted an event >22.2 °C. Both models were strong (independent test data sensitivity 0.94 and 1.00, specificity 0.96 and 0.96) predicting 63 of 67 events in the >20.0 °C model and all 15 events in the >22.2 °C model. Both showed negative relationships with released volume from the upstream Cannonsville Reservoir and positive relationships with difference between air temperature and previous day's water temperature at Lordville. We further predicted how increasing release volumes from Cannonsville Reservoir affected the probabilities of correctly predicted events. For the >20.0 °C model, an increase of 0.5 to a proportionally adjusted release (that accounts for other sources) resulted in 35.9% of events in the training data falling below cutoffs; increasing this adjustment by 1.0 resulted in 81.7% falling below cutoffs. For the >22.2 °C these adjustments resulted in 71.1% and 100.0% of events falling below cutoffs. Results from these analyses can help managers make informed decisions on alternative release scenarios.

  15. Hybrid model predictive control of a residential HVAC system with on-site thermal energy generation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorentini, Massimo; Wall, Josh; Ma, Zhenjun; Braslavsky, Julio H.; Cooper, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A comprehensive approach to managing thermal energy in residential buildings. • Solar-assisted HVAC system with on-site energy generation and storage. • Mixed logic-dynamical building model identified using experimental data. • Design and implementation of a logic-dynamical model predictive control strategy. • MPC applied to the Net-Zero Energy house winner of the Solar Decathlon China 2013. - Abstract: This paper describes the development, implementation and experimental investigation of a Hybrid Model Predictive Control (HMPC) strategy to control solar-assisted heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems with on-site thermal energy generation and storage. A comprehensive approach to the thermal energy management of a residential building is presented to optimise the scheduling of the available thermal energy resources to meet a comfort objective. The system has a hybrid nature with both continuous variables and discrete, logic-driven operating modes. The proposed control strategy is organized in two hierarchical levels. At the high-level, an HMPC controller with a 24-h prediction horizon and a 1-h control step is used to select the operating mode of the HVAC system. At the low-level, each operating mode is optimised using a 1-h rolling prediction horizon with a 5-min control step. The proposed control strategy has been practically implemented on the Building Management and Control System (BMCS) of a Net Zero-Energy Solar Decathlon house. This house features a sophisticated HVAC system comprising of an air-based photovoltaic thermal (PVT) collector and a phase change material (PCM) thermal storage integrated with the air-handling unit (AHU) of a ducted reverse-cycle heat pump system. The simulation and experimental results demonstrated the high performance achievable using an HMPC approach to optimising complex multimode HVAC systems in residential buildings, illustrating efficient selection of the appropriate operating modes

  16. Thermal conductivity prediction of closed-cell aluminum alloy considering micropore effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghui Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Large quantities of micro-scale pores are observed in the matrix of closed-cell aluminum alloy by scanning electron microscope, which indicates the dual-scale pore characteristics. Corresponding to this kind of special structural morphology, a new kind of dual-scale method is proposed to estimate its effective thermal conductivity. Comparing with the experimental results, the article puts forward the view that the prediction accuracy can be improved by the dual-scale method greatly. Different empirical formulas are also investigated in detail. It provides a new method for thermal properties estimation and makes preparation for more suitable empirical formula for closed-cell aluminum alloy.

  17. Daily Thermal Predictions of the AGR-1 Experiment with Gas Gaps Varying with Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Hawkes; James Sterbentz; John Maki; Binh Pham

    2012-06-01

    A new daily as-run thermal analysis was performed at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) test experiment number one at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This thermal analysis incorporates gas gaps changing with time during the irradiation experiment. The purpose of this analysis was to calculate the daily average temperatures of each compact to compare with experimental results. Post irradiation examination (PIE) measurements of the graphite holder and fuel compacts showed the gas gaps varying from the beginning of life. The control temperature gas gap and the fuel compact – graphite holder gas gaps were linearly changed from the original fabrication dimensions, to the end of irradiation measurements. A steady-state thermal analysis was performed for each daily calculation. These new thermal predictions more closely match the experimental data taken during the experiment than previous analyses. Results are presented comparing normalized compact average temperatures to normalized log(R/B) Kr-85m. The R/B term is the measured release rate divided by the predicted birth rate for the isotope Kr-85m. Correlations between these two normalized values are presented.

  18. Predicting Top-of-Atmosphere Thermal Radiance Using MERRA-2 Atmospheric Data with Deep Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Kleynhans

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Image data from space-borne thermal infrared (IR sensors are used for a variety of applications, however they are often limited by their temporal resolution (i.e., repeat coverage. To potentially increase the temporal availability of thermal image data, a study was performed to determine the extent to which thermal image data can be simulated from available atmospheric and surface data. The work conducted here explored the use of Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2 developed by The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA to predict top-of-atmosphere (TOA thermal IR radiance globally at time scales finer than available satellite data. For this case study, TOA radiance data was derived for band 31 (10.97 μ m of the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS sensor. Two approaches have been followed, namely an atmospheric radiative transfer forward modeling approach and a supervised learning approach. The first approach uses forward modeling to predict TOA radiance from the available surface and atmospheric data. The second approach applied four different supervised learning algorithms to the atmospheric data. The algorithms included a linear least squares regression model, a non-linear support vector regression (SVR model, a multi-layer perceptron (MLP, and a convolutional neural network (CNN. This research found that the multi-layer perceptron model produced the lowest overall error rates with an root mean square error (RMSE of 1.36 W/m 2 ·sr· μ m when compared to actual Terra/MODIS band 31 image data. These studies found that for radiances above 6 W/m 2 ·sr· μ m, the forward modeling approach could predict TOA radiance to within 12 percent, and the best supervised learning approach can predict TOA to within 11 percent.

  19. A prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids considering agglomeration and the radial distribution function of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z. M.; Wang, B.

    2018-06-01

    Conventional heat transfer fluids usually have low thermal conductivity, limiting their efficiency in many applications. Many experiments have shown that adding nanosize solid particles to conventional fluids can greatly enhance their thermal conductivity. To explain this anomalous phenomenon, many theoretical investigations have been conducted in recent years. Some of this research has indicated that the particle agglomeration effect that commonly occurs in nanofluids should play an important role in such enhancement of the thermal conductivity, while some have shown that the enhancement of the effective thermal conductivity might be accounted for by the structure of nanofluids, which can be described using the radial distribution function of particles. However, theoretical predictions from these studies are not in very good agreement with experimental results. This paper proposes a prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids, considering both the agglomeration effect and the radial distribution function of nanoparticles. The resulting theoretical predictions for several sets of nanofluids are highly consistent with experimental data.

  20. Predictive control of thermal state of blast furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbasova, T. A.; Filimonova, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    The work describes the structure of the model for predictive control of the thermal state of a blast furnace. The proposed model contains the following input parameters: coke rate; theoretical combustion temperature, comprising: natural gas consumption, blasting temperature, humidity, oxygen, blast furnace cooling water; blast furnace gas utilization rate. The output parameter is the cast iron temperature. The results for determining the cast iron temperature were obtained following the identification using the Hammerstein-Wiener model. The result of solving the cast iron temperature stabilization problem was provided for the calculated values of process parameters of the target area of the respective blast furnace operation mode.

  1. Lifetime prediction of structures submitted to thermal fatigue loadings; Prediction de duree de vie de structures sous chargement de fatigue thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiable, S

    2006-01-15

    The aim of this work is to predict the lifetime of structures submitted to thermal fatigue loadings. This work lies within the studies undertaken by the CEA on the thermal fatigue problems from the french reactor of Civaux. In particular we study the SPLASH test: a specimen is heated continuously and cyclically cooled down by a water spray. This loading generates important temperature gradients in space and time and leads to the initiation and the propagation of a crack network. We propose a new thermo-mechanical model to simulate the SPLASH experiment and we propose a new fatigue criterion to predict the lifetime of the SPLASH specimen. We propose and compare several numerical models with various complexity to estimate the mechanical response of the SPLASH specimen. The practical implications of this work are the reevaluation of the hypothesis used in the French code RCC, which are used to simulate thermal shock and to interpret the results in terms of fatigue. This work leads to new perspectives on the mechanical interpretation of the fatigue criterion. (author)

  2. Thermal time constant: optimising the skin temperature predictive modelling in lower limb prostheses using Gaussian processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Neha; Glesk, Ivan; Buis, Arjan

    2016-06-01

    Elevated skin temperature at the body/device interface of lower-limb prostheses is one of the major factors that affect tissue health. The heat dissipation in prosthetic sockets is greatly influenced by the thermal conductive properties of the hard socket and liner material employed. However, monitoring of the interface temperature at skin level in lower-limb prosthesis is notoriously complicated. This is due to the flexible nature of the interface liners used which requires consistent positioning of sensors during donning and doffing. Predicting the residual limb temperature by monitoring the temperature between socket and liner rather than skin and liner could be an important step in alleviating complaints on increased temperature and perspiration in prosthetic sockets. To predict the residual limb temperature, a machine learning algorithm - Gaussian processes is employed, which utilizes the thermal time constant values of commonly used socket and liner materials. This Letter highlights the relevance of thermal time constant of prosthetic materials in Gaussian processes technique which would be useful in addressing the challenge of non-invasively monitoring the residual limb skin temperature. With the introduction of thermal time constant, the model can be optimised and generalised for a given prosthetic setup, thereby making the predictions more reliable.

  3. High-accuracy CFD prediction methods for fluid and structure temperature fluctuations at T-junction for thermal fatigue evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Shaoxiang, E-mail: qian.shaoxiang@jgc.com [EN Technology Center, Process Technology Division, JGC Corporation, 2-3-1 Minato Mirai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama 220-6001 (Japan); Kanamaru, Shinichiro [EN Technology Center, Process Technology Division, JGC Corporation, 2-3-1 Minato Mirai, Nishi-ku, Yokohama 220-6001 (Japan); Kasahara, Naoto [Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Numerical methods for accurate prediction of thermal loading were proposed. • Predicted fluid temperature fluctuation (FTF) intensity is close to the experiment. • Predicted structure temperature fluctuation (STF) range is close to the experiment. • Predicted peak frequencies of FTF and STF also agree well with the experiment. • CFD results show the proposed numerical methods are of sufficiently high accuracy. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuations generated by the mixing of hot and cold fluids at a T-junction, which is widely used in nuclear power and process plants, can cause thermal fatigue failure. The conventional methods for evaluating thermal fatigue tend to provide insufficient accuracy, because they were developed based on limited experimental data and a simplified one-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). CFD/FEA coupling analysis is expected as a useful tool for the more accurate evaluation of thermal fatigue. The present paper aims to verify the accuracy of proposed numerical methods of simulating fluid and structure temperature fluctuations at a T-junction for thermal fatigue evaluation. The dynamic Smagorinsky model (DSM) is used for large eddy simulation (LES) sub-grid scale (SGS) turbulence model, and a hybrid scheme (HS) is adopted for the calculation of convective terms in the governing equations. Also, heat transfer between fluid and structure is calculated directly through thermal conduction by creating a mesh with near wall resolution (NWR) by allocating grid points within the thermal boundary sub-layer. The simulation results show that the distribution of fluid temperature fluctuation intensity and the range of structure temperature fluctuation are remarkably close to the experimental results. Moreover, the peak frequencies of power spectrum density (PSD) of both fluid and structure temperature fluctuations also agree well with the experimental results. Therefore, the numerical methods used in the present paper are

  4. Stage I surface crack formation in thermal fatigue: A predictive multi-scale approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterstock, S.; Robertson, C.; Sauzay, M.; Aubin, V.; Degallaix, S.

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale numerical model is developed, predicting the formation of stage I cracks, in thermal fatigue loading conditions. The proposed approach comprises 2 distinct calculation steps. Firstly, the number of cycles to micro-crack initiation is determined, in individual grains. The adopted initiation model depends on local stress-strain conditions, relative to sub-grain plasticity, grain orientation and grain deformation incompatibilities. Secondly, 2-4 grains long surface cracks (stage I) is predicted, by accounting for micro-crack coalescence, in 3 dimensions. The method described in this paper is applied to a 500 grains aggregate, loaded in representative thermal fatigue conditions. Preliminary results provide quantitative insight regarding position, density, spacing and orientations of stage I surface cracks and subsequent formation of crack networks. The proposed method is fully deterministic, provided all grain crystallographic orientations and micro-crack linking thresholds are specified. (authors)

  5. Predictive values of thermal and electrical dental pulp tests: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Chávez, Carlos E; Patiño-Marín, Nuria; Loyola-Rodríguez, Juan P; Zavala-Alonso, Norma V; Martínez-Castañón, Gabriel A; Medina-Solís, Carlo E

    2013-08-01

    For a diagnostic test to be useful, it is necessary to determine the probability that the test will provide the correct diagnosis. Therefore, it is necessary to calculate the predictive value of diagnostics. The aim of the present study was to identify the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, accuracy, and reproducibility of thermal and electrical tests of pulp sensitivity. The thermal tests studied were the 1, 1, 1, 2-tetrafluoroethane (cold) and hot gutta-percha (hot) tests. For the electrical test, the Analytic Technology Pulp Tester (Analytic Technology, Redmond, WA) was used. A total of 110 teeth were tested: 60 teeth with vital pulp and 50 teeth with necrotic pulps (disease prevalence of 45%). The ideal standard was established by direct pulp inspection. The sensitivities of the diagnostic tests were 0.88 for the cold test, 0.86 for the heat test, and 0.76 for the electrical test, and the specificity was 1.0 for all 3 tests. The negative predictive value was 0.90 for the cold test, 0.89 for the heat test, and 0.83 for the electrical test, and the positive predictive value was 1.0 for all 3 tests. The highest accuracy (0.94) and reproducibility (0.88) were observed for the cold test. The cold test was the most accurate method for diagnostic testing. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting germination in semi-arid wildland seedbeds II. Field validation of wet thermal-time models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer K. Rawlins; Bruce A. Roundy; Dennis Eggett; Nathan. Cline

    2011-01-01

    Accurate prediction of germination for species used for semi-arid land revegetation would support selection of plant materials for specific climatic conditions and sites. Wet thermal-time models predict germination time by summing progress toward germination subpopulation percentages as a function of temperature across intermittent wet periods or within singular wet...

  7. Thermal stress prediction in mirror and multilayer coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xianchao; Zhang, Lin; Morawe, Christian; Sanchez Del Rio, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Multilayer optics for X-rays typically consist of hundreds of periods of two types of alternating sub-layers which are coated on a silicon substrate. The thickness of the coating is well below 1 µm (tens or hundreds of nanometers). The high aspect ratio (∼10(7)) between the size of the optics and the thickness of the multilayer can lead to a huge number of elements (∼10(16)) for the numerical simulation (by finite-element analysis using ANSYS code). In this work, the finite-element model for thermal-structural analysis of multilayer optics has been implemented using the ANSYS layer-functioned elements. The number of meshed elements is considerably reduced and the number of sub-layers feasible for the present computers is increased significantly. Based on this technique, single-layer coated mirrors and multilayer monochromators cooled by water or liquid nitrogen are studied with typical parameters of heat-load, cooling and geometry. The effects of cooling-down of the optics and heating of the X-ray beam are described. It is shown that the influences from the coating on temperature and deformation are negligible. However, large stresses are induced in the layers due to the different thermal expansion coefficients between the layer and the substrate materials, which is the critical issue for the survival of the optics. This is particularly true for the liquid-nitrogen cooling condition. The material properties of thin multilayer films are applied in the simulation to predict the layer thermal stresses with more precision.

  8. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  9. Theoretical prediction of thermal conductivity for thermal protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, F.; Corasaniti, S.; Worek, W.M.; Minkowycz, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is aimed to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity of an ablative composite material in the state of virgin material and in three paths of degradation. The composite material is undergoing ablation with formation of void pores or char and void pores. The one dimensional effective thermal conductivity is evaluated theoretically by the solution of heat conduction under two assumptions, i.e. parallel isotherms and parallel heat fluxes. The paper presents the theoretical model applied to an elementary cubic cell of the composite material which is made of two crossed fibres and a matrix. A numerical simulation is carried out to compare the numerical results with the theoretical ones for different values of the filler volume fraction. - Highlights: ► Theoretical models of the thermal conductivity of an ablative composite. ► Composite material is made of two crossed fibres and a matrix. ► Three mechanisms of degradation are investigated. ► One dimensional thermal conductivity is evaluated by the heat conduction equation. ► Numerical simulations to be compared with the theoretical models.

  10. Prediction of thermal coagulation from the instantaneous strain distribution induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Takagi, Ryo; Tomiyasu, Kentaro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2017-07-01

    The targeting of the ultrasound beam and the prediction of thermal lesion formation in advance are the requirements for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment with safety and reproducibility. To visualize the HIFU focal zone, we utilized an acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging-based method. After inducing displacements inside tissues with pulsed HIFU called the push pulse exposure, the distribution of axial displacements started expanding and moving. To acquire RF data immediately after and during the HIFU push pulse exposure to improve prediction accuracy, we attempted methods using extrapolation estimation and applying HIFU noise elimination. The distributions going back in the time domain from the end of push pulse exposure are in good agreement with tissue coagulation at the center. The results suggest that the proposed focal zone visualization employing pulsed HIFU entailing the high-speed ARFI imaging method is useful for the prediction of thermal coagulation in advance.

  11. Life prediction methodology for thermal-mechanical fatigue and elevated temperature creep design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annigeri, Ravindra

    Nickel-based superalloys are used for hot section components of gas turbine engines. Life prediction techniques are necessary to assess service damage in superalloy components resulting from thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) and elevated temperature creep. A new TMF life model based on continuum damage mechanics has been developed and applied to IN 738 LC substrate material with and without coating. The model also characterizes TMF failure in bulk NiCoCrAlY overlay and NiAl aluminide coatings. The inputs to the TMF life model are mechanical strain range, hold time, peak cycle temperatures and maximum stress measured from the stabilized or mid-life hysteresis loops. A viscoplastic model is used to predict the stress-strain hysteresis loops. A flow rule used in the viscoplastic model characterizes the inelastic strain rate as a function of the applied stress and a set of three internal stress variables known as back stress, drag stress and limit stress. Test results show that the viscoplastic model can reasonably predict time-dependent stress-strain response of the coated material and stress relaxation during hold times. In addition to the TMF life prediction methodology, a model has been developed to characterize the uniaxial and multiaxial creep behavior. An effective stress defined as the applied stress minus the back stress is used to characterize the creep recovery and primary creep behavior. The back stress has terms representing strain hardening, dynamic recovery and thermal recovery. Whenever the back stress is greater than the applied stress, the model predicts a negative creep rate observed during multiple stress and multiple temperature cyclic tests. The model also predicted the rupture time and the remaining life that are important for life assessment. The model has been applied to IN 738 LC, Mar-M247, bulk NiCoCrAlY overlay coating and 316 austenitic stainless steel. The proposed model predicts creep response with a reasonable accuracy for wide range of

  12. Experiment and prediction on thermal conductivity of Al2O3/ZnO ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Experiment and prediction on thermal conductivity of Al2O3/ZnO nano thin film interface structure. PING YANG*, LIQIANG ZHANG, HAIYING YANG†, DONGJING LIU and XIALONG LI. Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing and Reliability for MEMS/NEMS/OEDS,. School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, ...

  13. Thermal-Induced Errors Prediction and Compensation for a Coordinate Boring Machine Based on Time Series Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the CNC machine tools precision, a thermal error modeling for the motorized spindle was proposed based on time series analysis, considering the length of cutting tools and thermal declined angles, and the real-time error compensation was implemented. A five-point method was applied to measure radial thermal declinations and axial expansion of the spindle with eddy current sensors, solving the problem that the three-point measurement cannot obtain the radial thermal angle errors. Then the stationarity of the thermal error sequences was determined by the Augmented Dickey-Fuller Test Algorithm, and the autocorrelation/partial autocorrelation function was applied to identify the model pattern. By combining both Yule-Walker equations and information criteria, the order and parameters of the models were solved effectively, which improved the prediction accuracy and generalization ability. The results indicated that the prediction accuracy of the time series model could reach up to 90%. In addition, the axial maximum error decreased from 39.6 μm to 7 μm after error compensation, and the machining accuracy was improved by 89.7%. Moreover, the X/Y-direction accuracy can reach up to 77.4% and 86%, respectively, which demonstrated that the proposed methods of measurement, modeling, and compensation were effective.

  14. Combinatory Models for Predicting the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frozen and Unfrozen Food Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Reddy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A model to predict the effective thermal conductivity of heterogeneous materials is proposed based on unit cell approach. The model is combined with four fundamental effective thermal conductivity models (Parallel, Series, Maxwell-Eucken-I, and Maxwell-Eucken-II to evolve a unifying equation for the estimation of effective thermal conductivity of porous and nonporous food materials. The effect of volume fraction (ν on the structure composition factor (ψ of the food materials is studied. The models are compared with the experimental data of various foods at the initial freezing temperature. The effective thermal conductivity estimated by the Maxwell-Eucken-I + Present model shows good agreement with the experimental data with a minimum average deviation of ±8.66% and maximum deviation of ±42.76% of Series + Present Model. The combined models have advantages over other empirical and semiempirical models.

  15. Robust design and thermal fatigue life prediction of anisotropic conductive film flip chip package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Hyun Wook

    2004-01-01

    The use of flip-chip technology has many advantages over other approaches for high-density electronic packaging. ACF(Anisotropic Conductive Film) is one of the major flip-chip technologies, which has short chip-to-chip interconnection length, high productivity, and miniaturization of package. In this study, thermal fatigue life of ACF bonding flip-chip package has been predicted. Elastic and thermal properties of ACF were measured by using DMA and TMA. Temperature dependent nonlinear bi-thermal analysis was conducted and the result was compared with Moire interferometer experiment. Calculated displacement field was well matched with experimental result. Thermal fatigue analysis was also conducted. The maximum shear strain occurs at the outmost located bump. Shear stress-strain curve was obtained to calculate fatigue life. Fatigue model for electronic adhesives was used to predict thermal fatigue life of ACF bonding flip-chip packaging. DOE (Design Of Experiment) technique was used to find important design factors. The results show that PCB CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) and elastic modulus of ACF material are important material parameters. And as important design parameters, chip width, bump pitch and bump width were chose. 2 nd DOE was conducted to obtain RSM equation for the choose 3 design parameter. The coefficient of determination (R 2 ) for the calculated RSM equation is 0.99934. Optimum design is conducted using the RSM equation. MMFD (Modified Method for Feasible Direction) algorithm is used to optimum design. The optimum value for chip width, bump pitch and bump width were 7.87mm, 430μm, and 78μm, respectively. Approximately, 1400 cycles have been expected under optimum conditions. Reliability analysis was conducted to find out guideline for control range of design parameter. Sigma value was calculated with changing standard deviation of design variable. To acquire 6 sigma level thermal fatigue reliability, the Std. Deviation of design parameter

  16. Characterization of dispersed and aggregated Al2O3 morphologies for predicting nanofluid thermal conductivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xuemei; Johnson, Drew W.

    2013-01-01

    Nanofluids are reported to have enhanced thermal conductivities resulting from nanoparticle aggregation. The goal of this study was to explore through experimental measurements, dispersed and aggregated morphology effects on enhanced thermal conductivities for Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles with a primary size of 54.2 ± 2.0 nm. Aggregation effects were investigated by measuring thermal conductivity of different particle morphologies that occurred under different aggregation conditions. Fractal dimensions and aspect ratios were used to quantify the aggregation morphologies. Fractal dimensions were measured using static light scattering and imaging techniques. Aspect ratios were measured using dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Results showed that the enhancements in thermal conductivity can be predicted with effective medium theory when aspect ratio was considered.

  17. Measurement and prediction of indoor air quality using a breathing thermal manikin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikov, A; Kaczmarczyk, J

    2007-02-01

    The analyses performed in this paper reveal that a breathing thermal manikin with realistic simulation of respiration including breathing cycle, pulmonary ventilation rate, frequency and breathing mode, gas concentration, humidity and temperature of exhaled air and human body shape and surface temperature is sensitive enough to perform reliable measurement of characteristics of air as inhaled by occupants. The temperature, humidity, and pollution concentration in the inhaled air can be measured accurately with a thermal manikin without breathing simulation if they are measured at the upper lip at a distance of measured inhaled air parameters. Proper simulation of breathing, especially of exhalation, is needed for studying the transport of exhaled air between occupants. A method for predicting air acceptability based on inhaled air parameters and known exposure-response relationships established in experiments with human subjects is suggested. Recommendations for optimal simulation of human breathing by means of a breathing thermal manikin when studying pollution concentration, temperature and humidity of the inhaled air as well as the transport of exhaled air (which may carry infectious agents) between occupants are outlined. In order to compare results obtained with breathing thermal manikins, their nose and mouth geometry should be standardized.

  18. Optimal day-ahead wind-thermal unit commitment considering statistical and predicted features of wind speeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yanan; Dong, Jizhe; Ding, Lijuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A day–ahead wind–thermal unit commitment model is presented. • Wind speed transfer matrix is formed to depict the sequential wind features. • Spinning reserve setting considering wind power accuracy and variation is proposed. • Verified study is performed to check the correctness of the program. - Abstract: The increasing penetration of intermittent wind power affects the secure operation of power systems and leads to a requirement of robust and economic generation scheduling. This paper presents an optimal day–ahead wind–thermal generation scheduling method that considers the statistical and predicted features of wind speeds. In this method, the statistical analysis of historical wind data, which represents the local wind regime, is first implemented. Then, according to the statistical results and the predicted wind power, the spinning reserve requirements for the scheduling period are calculated. Based on the calculated spinning reserve requirements, the wind–thermal generation scheduling is finally conducted. To validate the program, a verified study is performed on a test system. Then, numerical studies to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method are conducted.

  19. Simulating Physiological Response with a Passive Sensor Manikin and an Adaptive Thermal Manikin to Predict Thermal Sensation and Comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugh, John P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chaney, Larry [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hepokoski, Mark [ThermoAnalytics Inc.; Curran, Allen [ThermoAnalytics Inc.; Burke, Richard [Measurement Technology NW; Maranville, Clay [Ford Motor Company

    2015-04-14

    Reliable assessment of occupant thermal comfort can be difficult to obtain within automotive environments, especially under transient and asymmetric heating and cooling scenarios. Evaluation of HVAC system performance in terms of comfort commonly requires human subject testing, which may involve multiple repetitions, as well as multiple test subjects. Instrumentation (typically comprised of an array of temperature sensors) is usually only sparsely applied across the human body, significantly reducing the spatial resolution of available test data. Further, since comfort is highly subjective in nature, a single test protocol can yield a wide variation in results which can only be overcome by increasing the number of test replications and subjects. In light of these difficulties, various types of manikins are finding use in automotive testing scenarios. These manikins can act as human surrogates from which local skin and core temperatures can be obtained, which are necessary for accurately predicting local and whole body thermal sensation and comfort using a physiology-based comfort model (e.g., the Berkeley Comfort Model). This paper evaluates two different types of manikins, i) an adaptive sweating thermal manikin, which is coupled with a human thermoregulation model, running in real-time, to obtain realistic skin temperatures; and, ii) a passive sensor manikin, which is used to measure boundary conditions as they would act on a human, from which skin and core temperatures can be predicted using a thermophysiological model. The simulated physiological responses and comfort obtained from both of these manikin-model coupling schemes are compared to those of a human subject within a vehicle cabin compartment transient heat-up scenario.

  20. Effects of heat transfer coefficient treatments on thermal shock fracture prediction for LWR fuel claddings in water quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youho; Lee, Jeong Ik; Cheon, Hee

    2015-01-01

    Accurate modeling of thermal shock induced stresses has become ever most important to emerging accident-tolerant ceramic cladding concepts, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and SiC coated zircaloy. Since fractures of ceramic (entirely ceramic or coated) occur by excessive tensile stresses with linear elasticity, modeling transient stress distribution in the material provides a direct indication of the structural integrity. Indeed, even for the current zircaloy cladding material, the oxide layer formed on the surface - where cracks starts to develop upon water quenching - essentially behaves as a brittle ceramic. Hence, enhanced understanding of thermal shock fracture of a brittle material would fundamentally contribute to safety of nuclear reactors for both the current fuel design and that of the coming future. Understanding thermal shock fracture of a brittle material requires heat transfer rate between the solid and the fluid for transient temperature fields of the solid, and structural response of the solid under the obtained transient temperature fields. In water quenching, a solid experiences dynamic time-varying heat transfer rates with phase changes of the fluid over a short quenching period. Yet, such a dynamic change of heat transfer rates during the water quenching transience has been overlooked in assessments of mechanisms, predictability, and uncertainties for thermal shock fracture. Rather, a time-constant heat transfer coefficient, named 'effective heat transfer coefficient' has become a conventional input to thermal shock fracture analysis. No single constant heat transfer could suffice to depict the actual stress evolution subject to dynamic heat transfer coefficient changes with fluid phase changes. Use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient will remarkably increase predictability of thermal shock fracture of brittle materials and complete the picture of stress evolution in the quenched solid. The presented result

  1. Thermal niche predicts tolerance to habitat conversion in tropical amphibians and reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frishkoff, Luke O; Hadly, Elizabeth A; Daily, Gretchen C

    2015-11-01

    Habitat conversion is a major driver of the biodiversity crisis, yet why some species undergo local extinction while others thrive under novel conditions remains unclear. We suggest that focusing on species' niches, rather than traits, may provide the predictive power needed to forecast biodiversity change. We first examine two Neotropical frog congeners with drastically different affinities to deforestation and document how thermal niche explains deforestation tolerance. The more deforestation-tolerant species is associated with warmer macroclimates across Costa Rica, and warmer microclimates within landscapes. Further, in laboratory experiments, the more deforestation-tolerant species has critical thermal limits, and a jumping performance optimum, shifted ~2 °C warmer than those of the more forest-affiliated species, corresponding to the ~3 °C difference in daytime maximum temperature that these species experience between habitats. Crucially, neither species strictly specializes on either habitat - instead habitat use is governed by regional environmental temperature. Both species track temperature along an elevational gradient, and shift their habitat use from cooler forest at lower elevations to warmer deforested pastures upslope. To generalize these conclusions, we expand our analysis to the entire mid-elevational herpetological community of southern Costa Rica. We assess the climatological affinities of 33 amphibian and reptile species, showing that across both taxonomic classes, thermal niche predicts presence in deforested habitat as well as or better than many commonly used traits. These data suggest that warm-adapted species carry a significant survival advantage amidst the synergistic impacts of land-use conversion and climate change. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. PREDICTING THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF ROOFING SYSTEMS IN SURABAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MINTOROGO Danny Santoso

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional roofing systems in the developing country likes Indonesia are still be dominated by the 30o, 45o, and more pitched angle roofs; the roofing cover materials are widely used to traditional clay roof tiles, then modern concrete roof tiles, and ceramic roof tiles. In the 90’s decay, shop houses are prosperous built with flat concrete roofs dominant. Green roofs and roof ponds are almost rarely built to meet the sustainable environmental issues. Some tested various roof systems in Surabaya were carried out to observe the roof thermal performances. Mathematical equation model from three references are also performed in order to compare with the real project tested. Calculated with equation (Kabre et al., the 30o pitched concrete-roof-tile, 30o clay-roof-tile, 45o pitched concrete-roof-tile are the worst thermal heat flux coming to room respectively. In contrast, the bare soil concrete roof and roof pond system are the least heat flux streamed onto room. Based on predicted calculation without insulation and cross-ventilation attic space, the roof pond and bare soil concrete roof (greenery roof are the appropriate roof systems for the Surabaya’s climate; meanwhile the most un-recommended roof is pitched 30o or 45o angle with concrete-roof tiles roofing systems.

  3. Prediction of thermal conductivity of rock through physico-mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, T.N. [Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 400 076 (India); Sinha, S.; Singh, V.K. [Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India)

    2007-01-15

    The transfer of energy between two adjacent parts of rock mainly depends on its thermal conductivity. Present study supports the use of artificial neural network (ANN) and adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) in the study of thermal conductivity along with other intrinsic properties of rock due to its increasing importance in many areas of rock engineering, agronomy and geo environmental engineering field. In recent years, considerable effort has been made to develop techniques to determine these properties. Comparative analysis is made to analyze the capabilities among six different models of ANN and ANFIS. ANN models are based on feedforward backpropagation network with training functions resilient backpropagation (RP), one step secant (OSS) and Powell-Beale restarts (CGB) and radial basis with training functions generalized regression neural network (GRNN) and more efficient design radial basis network (NEWRB). A data set of 136 has been used for training different models and 15 were used for testing purposes. A statistical analysis is made to show the consistency among them. ANFIS is proved to be the best among all the networks tried in this case with average absolute percentage error of 0.03% and regression coefficient of 1, whereas best performance shown by the FFBP (RP) with average absolute error of 2.26%. Thermal conductivity is predicted using P-wave velocity, porosity, bulk density, uniaxial compressive strength of rock as input parameters. (author)

  4. Thermal specialization across large geographical scales predicts the resilience of mangrove crab populations to global warming

    KAUST Repository

    Fusi, Marco; Giomi, Folco; Babbini, Simone; Daffonchio, Daniele; Mcquaid, Christopher D.; Porri, Francesca; Cannicci, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The broad prediction that ectotherms will be more vulnerable to climate change in the tropics than in temperate regions includes assumptions about centre/edge population effects that can only be tested by within-species comparisons across wide latitudinal gradients. Here, we investigated the thermal vulnerability of two mangrove crab species, comparing populations at the centre (Kenya) and edge (South Africa) of their distributions. At the same time, we investigated the role of respiratory mode (water- versus air-breathing) in determining the thermal tolerance in amphibious organisms. To do this, we compared the vulnerability to acute temperature fluctuations of two sympatric species with two different lifestyle adaptations: the free living Perisesarma guttatum and the burrowing Uca urvillei, both pivotal to the ecosystem functioning of mangroves. The results revealed the air-breathing U. urvillei to be a thermal generalist with much higher thermal tolerances than P. guttatum. Importantly, however, we found that, while U. urvillei showed little difference between edge and centre populations, P. guttatum showed adaptation to local conditions. Equatorial populations had elevated tolerances to acute heat stress and mechanisms of partial thermoregulation, which make them less vulnerable to global warming than temperate conspecifics. The results reveal both the importance of respiratory mode to thermal tolerance and the unexpected potential for low latitude populations/species to endure a warming climate. The results also contribute to a conceptual model on the latitudinal thermal tolerance of these key species. This highlights the need for an integrated population-level approach to predict the consequences of climate change. © 2014 The Authors.

  5. Thermal specialization across large geographical scales predicts the resilience of mangrove crab populations to global warming

    KAUST Repository

    Fusi, Marco

    2014-11-18

    The broad prediction that ectotherms will be more vulnerable to climate change in the tropics than in temperate regions includes assumptions about centre/edge population effects that can only be tested by within-species comparisons across wide latitudinal gradients. Here, we investigated the thermal vulnerability of two mangrove crab species, comparing populations at the centre (Kenya) and edge (South Africa) of their distributions. At the same time, we investigated the role of respiratory mode (water- versus air-breathing) in determining the thermal tolerance in amphibious organisms. To do this, we compared the vulnerability to acute temperature fluctuations of two sympatric species with two different lifestyle adaptations: the free living Perisesarma guttatum and the burrowing Uca urvillei, both pivotal to the ecosystem functioning of mangroves. The results revealed the air-breathing U. urvillei to be a thermal generalist with much higher thermal tolerances than P. guttatum. Importantly, however, we found that, while U. urvillei showed little difference between edge and centre populations, P. guttatum showed adaptation to local conditions. Equatorial populations had elevated tolerances to acute heat stress and mechanisms of partial thermoregulation, which make them less vulnerable to global warming than temperate conspecifics. The results reveal both the importance of respiratory mode to thermal tolerance and the unexpected potential for low latitude populations/species to endure a warming climate. The results also contribute to a conceptual model on the latitudinal thermal tolerance of these key species. This highlights the need for an integrated population-level approach to predict the consequences of climate change. © 2014 The Authors.

  6. Predictive uncertainty reduction in coupled neutron-kinetics/thermal hydraulics modeling of the BWR-TT2 benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, Aurelian F., E-mail: aurelian.badea@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Vincenz-Prießnitz-Str. 3, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cacuci, Dan G. [Center for Nuclear Science and Energy/Dept. of ME, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark. • Substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted transient power. • 6660 uncertain model parameters were calibrated. - Abstract: By applying a comprehensive predictive modeling methodology, this work demonstrates a substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted total transient power in the BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark while calibrating the numerical simulation of this benchmark, comprising 6090 macroscopic cross sections, and 570 thermal-hydraulics parameters involved in modeling the phase-slip correlation, transient outlet pressure, and total mass flow. The BWR-TT2 benchmark is based on an experiment that was carried out in 1977 in the NPP Peach Bottom 2, involving the closure of the turbine stop valve which caused a pressure wave that propagated with attenuation into the reactor core. The condensation of the steam in the reactor core caused by the pressure increase led to a positive reactivity insertion. The subsequent rise of power was limited by the feedback and the insertion of the control rods. The BWR-TT2 benchmark was modeled with the three-dimensional reactor physics code system DYN3D, by coupling neutron kinetics with two-phase thermal-hydraulics. All 6660 DYN3D model parameters were calibrated by applying a predictive modeling methodology that combines experimental and computational information to produce optimally predicted best-estimate results with reduced predicted uncertainties. Simultaneously, the predictive modeling methodology yields optimally predicted values for the BWR total transient power while reducing significantly the accompanying predicted standard deviations.

  7. Predictive uncertainty reduction in coupled neutron-kinetics/thermal hydraulics modeling of the BWR-TT2 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badea, Aurelian F.; Cacuci, Dan G.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark. • Substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted transient power. • 6660 uncertain model parameters were calibrated. - Abstract: By applying a comprehensive predictive modeling methodology, this work demonstrates a substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted total transient power in the BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark while calibrating the numerical simulation of this benchmark, comprising 6090 macroscopic cross sections, and 570 thermal-hydraulics parameters involved in modeling the phase-slip correlation, transient outlet pressure, and total mass flow. The BWR-TT2 benchmark is based on an experiment that was carried out in 1977 in the NPP Peach Bottom 2, involving the closure of the turbine stop valve which caused a pressure wave that propagated with attenuation into the reactor core. The condensation of the steam in the reactor core caused by the pressure increase led to a positive reactivity insertion. The subsequent rise of power was limited by the feedback and the insertion of the control rods. The BWR-TT2 benchmark was modeled with the three-dimensional reactor physics code system DYN3D, by coupling neutron kinetics with two-phase thermal-hydraulics. All 6660 DYN3D model parameters were calibrated by applying a predictive modeling methodology that combines experimental and computational information to produce optimally predicted best-estimate results with reduced predicted uncertainties. Simultaneously, the predictive modeling methodology yields optimally predicted values for the BWR total transient power while reducing significantly the accompanying predicted standard deviations.

  8. Effects of heat transfer coefficient treatments on thermal shock fracture prediction for LWR fuel claddings in water quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho; Lee, Jeong Ik; Cheon, Hee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Accurate modeling of thermal shock induced stresses has become ever most important to emerging accident-tolerant ceramic cladding concepts, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and SiC coated zircaloy. Since fractures of ceramic (entirely ceramic or coated) occur by excessive tensile stresses with linear elasticity, modeling transient stress distribution in the material provides a direct indication of the structural integrity. Indeed, even for the current zircaloy cladding material, the oxide layer formed on the surface - where cracks starts to develop upon water quenching - essentially behaves as a brittle ceramic. Hence, enhanced understanding of thermal shock fracture of a brittle material would fundamentally contribute to safety of nuclear reactors for both the current fuel design and that of the coming future. Understanding thermal shock fracture of a brittle material requires heat transfer rate between the solid and the fluid for transient temperature fields of the solid, and structural response of the solid under the obtained transient temperature fields. In water quenching, a solid experiences dynamic time-varying heat transfer rates with phase changes of the fluid over a short quenching period. Yet, such a dynamic change of heat transfer rates during the water quenching transience has been overlooked in assessments of mechanisms, predictability, and uncertainties for thermal shock fracture. Rather, a time-constant heat transfer coefficient, named 'effective heat transfer coefficient' has become a conventional input to thermal shock fracture analysis. No single constant heat transfer could suffice to depict the actual stress evolution subject to dynamic heat transfer coefficient changes with fluid phase changes. Use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient will remarkably increase predictability of thermal shock fracture of brittle materials and complete the picture of stress evolution in the quenched solid. The presented result

  9. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  10. Effective high-order solver with thermally perfect gas model for hypersonic heating prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Zhenhua; Yan, Chao; Yu, Jian; Qu, Feng; Ma, Libin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Design proper numerical flux for thermally perfect gas. • Line-implicit LUSGS enhances efficiency without extra memory consumption. • Develop unified framework for both second-order MUSCL and fifth-order WENO. • The designed gas model can be applied to much wider temperature range. - Abstract: Effective high-order solver based on the model of thermally perfect gas has been developed for hypersonic heat transfer computation. The technique of polynomial curve fit coupling to thermodynamics equation is suggested to establish the current model and particular attention has been paid to the design of proper numerical flux for thermally perfect gas. We present procedures that unify five-order WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) scheme in the existing second-order finite volume framework and a line-implicit method that improves the computational efficiency without increasing memory consumption. A variety of hypersonic viscous flows are performed to examine the capability of the resulted high order thermally perfect gas solver. Numerical results demonstrate its superior performance compared to low-order calorically perfect gas method and indicate its potential application to hypersonic heating predictions for real-life problem.

  11. Development of Reliability Based Life Prediction Methods for Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashwin

    2001-01-01

    Literature survey related to the EBC/TBC (environmental barrier coating/thermal barrier coating) fife models, failure mechanisms in EBC/TBC and the initial work plan for the proposed EBC/TBC life prediction methods development was developed as well as the finite element model for the thermal/stress analysis of the GRC-developed EBC system was prepared. Technical report for these activities is given in the subsequent sections.

  12. A predictive model for smart control of a domestic heat pump and thermal storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Richard Pieter; Gebhardt, I.; de Wit, J.B.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a predictive model of a thermal storage which is charged by a heat pump and used for domestic hot water supply. The model is used for smart grid control purposes and requires measurement signals of flow and temperature at the inlet and outlet of

  13. Thermal and Alignment Analysis of the Instrument-Level ATLAS Thermal Vacuum Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Heather

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the thermal analysis and test design performed in preparation for the ATLAS thermal vacuum test. NASA's Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) will be flown as the sole instrument aboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2). It will be used to take measurements of topography and ice thickness for Arctic and Antarctic regions, providing crucial data used to predict future changes in worldwide sea levels. Due to the precise measurements ATLAS is taking, the laser altimeter has very tight pointing requirements. Therefore, the instrument is very sensitive to temperature-induced thermal distortions. For this reason, it is necessary to perform a Structural, Thermal, Optical Performance (STOP) analysis not only for flight, but also to ensure performance requirements can be operationally met during instrument-level thermal vacuum testing. This paper describes the thermal model created for the chamber setup, which was used to generate inputs for the environmental STOP analysis. This paper also presents the results of the STOP analysis, which indicate that the test predictions adequately replicate the thermal distortions predicted for flight. This is a new application of an existing process, as STOP analyses are generally performed to predict flight behavior only. Another novel aspect of this test is that it presents the opportunity to verify pointing results of a STOP model, which is not generally done. It is possible in this case, however, because the actual pointing will be measured using flight hardware during thermal vacuum testing and can be compared to STOP predictions.

  14. Prediction of air temperature for thermal comfort of people using sleeping bags: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianhua

    2008-11-01

    Six models for determining air temperatures for thermal comfort of people using sleeping bags were reviewed. These models were based on distinctive metabolic rates and mean skin temperatures. All model predictions of air temperatures are low when the insulation values of the sleeping bag are high. Nevertheless, prediction variations are greatest for the sleeping bags with high insulation values, and there is a high risk of hypothermia if an inappropriate sleeping bag is chosen for the intended conditions of use. There is, therefore, a pressing need to validate the models by wear trial and determine which one best reflects ordinary consumer needs.

  15. Development of a hot water tank simulation program with improved prediction of thermal stratification in the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon; Yue, Hongqiang

    2015-01-01

    A simulation program SpiralSol was developed in previous investigations to calculate thermal performance of a solar domestic hot water (SDHW) system with a hot water tank with a built-in heat exchanger spiral [1]. The simulation program is improved in the paper in term of prediction of thermal...... stratification in the tank. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the hot water tank during cooling caused by standby heat loss are investigated by validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. Detailed CFD investigations are carried out to determine the influence of thickness and material...... property of the tank wall on thermal stratification in the tank. It is elucidated how thermal stratification in the tank is influenced by the natural convection and how the heat loss from the tank sides will be distributed at different levels of the tank at different thermal conditions. The existing...

  16. A predictive model for the chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon in a cold wall, rapid thermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toprac, A.J.; Trachtenberg, I.; Edgar, T.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon from thermally activated silane in a cold wall, single-wafer rapid thermal system was studied by experimentation at a variety of low pressure conditions, including very high temperatures. The effect of diluent gas on polysilicon deposition rates was examined using hydrogen, helium, and krypton. A mass-transfer model for the chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon in a cold wall, rapid thermal system was developed. This model was used to produce an empirical rate expression for silicon deposition from silane by regressing kinetic parameters to fit experimental data. The resulting model provided accurate predictions over widely varying conditions in the experimental data.

  17. Prediction of Equilibrium States of Kinematic and Thermal Fields in Homogeneous Turbulence Submitted To the Rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chebbi, Besma; Bouzaiane, Mounir; Lili, Taieb

    2009-01-01

    In this work, effects of rotation on the evolution of kinematic and thermal fields in homogeneous sheared turbulence are investigated using second order closure modeling. The Launder-Reece-Ro di models, the Speziale-Sarkar-Gatski model and the Shih-Lumley models are retained for pressure-strain correlation and pressure-temperature correlation. Whereas classic models are retained for time evolution equations of kinematic and thermal dissipation rates. The fourth order Runge-Kutta method is used to resolve three non linear differential systems obtained after modeling. The numerical integration is carried out separately for several values of the dimensionless rotation number R equal to 0, 0.25 and 0.5. The obtained results are compared to the recent results of Direct Numerical Simulations of G.Brethouwer. The results have confirmed the asymptotic equilibrium behaviors of kinematic and thermal dimensionless parameters. Furthermore they have shown that rotation affects not only kinematic field but also thermal field. The coupling between the Speziale-Sarkar-Gatski model and the Launder-Reece-Rodi model is of a big contribution on the prediction of kinematic and thermal fields

  18. Transitioning from interpretive to predictive in thermal hydraulic codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousseau, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    The current thermal hydraulic codes in use in the US, RELAP and TRAC, where originally written in the mid to late 1970's. At that time computers were slow, expensive, and had small memories. Because of these constraints, sacrifices had to be made, both in physics and numerical methods, which resulted in limitations on the accuracy of the solutions. Significant changes have occurred that induce very different requirements for the thermal hydraulic codes to be used for the future GEN-IV nuclear reactors. First, computers speed and memory grow at an exponential rate while the costs hold constant or decrease. Second, passive safety systems in modern designs stretch the length of relevant transients to many days. Finally, costs of experiments have grown very rapidly. Because of these new constraints, modern thermal hydraulic codes will be relied on for a significantly larger portion of bringing a nuclear reactor on line. Simulation codes will have to define in which part of state space experiments will be run. They will then have to be able to extend the small number of experiments to cover the large state space in which the reactors will operate. This data extrapolation mode will be referred to as 'predictive'. One of the keys to analyzing the accuracy of a simulation is to consider the entire domain being simulated. For example, in a reactor design where the containment is coupled to the reactor cooling system through radiative heat transfer, the accuracy of a transient includes the containment, the radiation heat transfer, the fluid flow in the cooling system, the thermal conduction in the solid, and the neutron transport in the reactor. All of this physics is coupled together in one nonlinear system through material properties, cross sections, heat transfer coefficients, and other mechanisms that exchange mass, momentum, and energy. Traditionally, these different physical domains, (containment, cooling system, nuclear fuel, etc.) have been solved in different

  19. Human Thermal Model Evaluation Using the JSC Human Thermal Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Makinen, Janice; Cognata, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Human thermal modeling has considerable long term utility to human space flight. Such models provide a tool to predict crew survivability in support of vehicle design and to evaluate crew response in untested space environments. It is to the benefit of any such model not only to collect relevant experimental data to correlate it against, but also to maintain an experimental standard or benchmark for future development in a readily and rapidly searchable and software accessible format. The Human thermal database project is intended to do just so; to collect relevant data from literature and experimentation and to store the data in a database structure for immediate and future use as a benchmark to judge human thermal models against, in identifying model strengths and weakness, to support model development and improve correlation, and to statistically quantify a model s predictive quality. The human thermal database developed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is intended to evaluate a set of widely used human thermal models. This set includes the Wissler human thermal model, a model that has been widely used to predict the human thermoregulatory response to a variety of cold and hot environments. These models are statistically compared to the current database, which contains experiments of human subjects primarily in air from a literature survey ranging between 1953 and 2004 and from a suited experiment recently performed by the authors, for a quantitative study of relative strength and predictive quality of the models.

  20. Negative thermal expansion in TiF{sub 3} from the first-principles prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Yuan, Peng-Fei; Wang, Fei; Sun, Qiang; Liang, Er-Jun [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Center for Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Jia, Yu, E-mail: jiayu@zzu.edu.cn [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Center for Clean Energy and Quantum Structures, and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Guo, Zheng-Xiao, E-mail: z.x.guo@ucl.ac.uk [Deparment of Chemistry, University College London, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Rhombohedral TiF{sub 3} as a new NTE material is predicted from first-principles calculation. • The NTE mechanism is proposed based on the analysis of vibrational properties. • The rotation coupling of TiF{sub 6} octahedra at low frequencies is most responsible for NTE. - Abstract: In negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials, rhombohedral TiF{sub 3} as a new member is predicted from first-principles calculation. The NTE behavior of rhombohedral TiF{sub 3} occurs at low temperatures. In our work, the NTE mechanism is elaborated in accordance with vibrational modes. It is confirmed that the rigid unit mode (RUM) of internal TiF{sub 6} octahedra in low-frequency optical range is most responsible for the NTE properties.

  1. The impact of thermal wave characteristics on thermal dose distribution during thermal therapy: A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, T.-C.; Kou, H.-S.; Liauh, C.-T.; Lin, W.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the propagation speed of a thermal wave in terms of the thermal relaxation time on the temperature/thermal dose distributions in living tissue during thermal therapies. The temperature field in tissue was solved by the finite difference method, and the thermal dose was calculated from the formulation proposed by Sapareto and Dewey [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 10, 787-800 (1984)]. Under the same total deposited energy, for a rapid heating process the time lagging behavior of the peak temperature became pronounced and the level of the peak temperature was decreased with increasing the thermal relaxation time. When the heating duration was longer than the thermal relaxation time of tissues, there was no significant difference between the thermal dose distributions with/without considering the effect of the thermal relaxation time. In other words, when the heating duration is comparable to or shorter than the thermal relaxation time of tissue, the results of the wave bioheat transfer equation (WBHTE) are fully different from that of the Pennes' bioheat transfer equation (PBHTE). Besides, for a rapid heating process the dimension of thermal lesion was still significantly affected by perfusion, because this is what is predicted by the WBHTE but not by the PBHTE, i.e., the wave feature of the temperature field cannot fully be predicted by the PBHTE

  2. Evaluating local and overall thermal comfort in buildings using thermal manikins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, E.

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation methods of human thermal comfort that are based on whole-body heat balance with its surroundings may not be adequate for evaluations in non-uniform thermal conditions. Under these conditions, the human body's segments may experience a wide range of room physical parameters and the evaluation of the local (segmental) thermal comfort becomes necessary. In this work, subjective measurements of skin temperature were carried out to investigate the human body's local responses due to a step change in the room temperature; and the variability in the body's local temperatures under different indoor conditions and exposures as well as the physiological steady state local temperatures. Then, a multi-segmental model of human thermoregulation was developed based on these findings to predict the local skin temperatures of individuals' body segments with a good accuracy. The model predictability of skin temperature was verified for steady state and dynamic conditions using measured data at uniform neutral, cold and warm as well as different asymmetric thermal conditions. The model showed very good predictability with average absolute deviation ranged from 0.3-0.8 K. The model was then implemented onto the control system of the thermal manikin 'THERMINATOR' to adjust the segmental skin temperature set-points based on the indoor conditions. This new control for the manikin was experimentally validated for the prediction of local and overall thermal comfort using the equivalent temperature measure. THERMINATOR with the new control mode was then employed in the evaluation of localized floor-heating system variants towards maximum energy efficiency. This aimed at illustrating a design strategy using the thermal manikin to find the optimum geometry and surface area of a floor-heater for a single seated person. Furthermore, a psychological comfort model that is based on local skin temperature was adapted for the use with the model of human

  3. The response of human thermal sensation and its prediction to temperature step-change (cool-neutral-cool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuyuan Du

    Full Text Available This paper reports on studies of the effect of temperature step-change (between a cool and a neutral environment on human thermal sensation and skin temperature. Experiments with three temperature conditions were carried out in a climate chamber during the period in winter. Twelve subjects participated in the experiments simulating moving inside and outside of rooms or cabins with air conditioning. Skin temperatures and thermal sensation were recorded. Results showed overshoot and asymmetry of TSV due to the step-change. Skin temperature changed immediately when subjects entered a new environment. When moving into a neutral environment from cool, dynamic thermal sensation was in the thermal comfort zone and overshoot was not obvious. Air-conditioning in a transitional area should be considered to limit temperature difference to not more than 5°C to decrease the unacceptability of temperature step-change. The linear relationship between thermal sensation and skin temperature or gradient of skin temperature does not apply in a step-change environment. There is a significant linear correlation between TSV and Qloss in the transient environment. Heat loss from the human skin surface can be used to predict dynamic thermal sensation instead of the heat transfer of the whole human body.

  4. The Response of Human Thermal Sensation and Its Prediction to Temperature Step-Change (Cool-Neutral-Cool)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiuyuan; Li, Baizhan; Liu, Hong; Yang, Dong; Yu, Wei; Liao, Jianke; Huang, Zhichao; Xia, Kechao

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on studies of the effect of temperature step-change (between a cool and a neutral environment) on human thermal sensation and skin temperature. Experiments with three temperature conditions were carried out in a climate chamber during the period in winter. Twelve subjects participated in the experiments simulating moving inside and outside of rooms or cabins with air conditioning. Skin temperatures and thermal sensation were recorded. Results showed overshoot and asymmetry of TSV due to the step-change. Skin temperature changed immediately when subjects entered a new environment. When moving into a neutral environment from cool, dynamic thermal sensation was in the thermal comfort zone and overshoot was not obvious. Air-conditioning in a transitional area should be considered to limit temperature difference to not more than 5°C to decrease the unacceptability of temperature step-change. The linear relationship between thermal sensation and skin temperature or gradient of skin temperature does not apply in a step-change environment. There is a significant linear correlation between TSV and Qloss in the transient environment. Heat loss from the human skin surface can be used to predict dynamic thermal sensation instead of the heat transfer of the whole human body. PMID:25136808

  5. Predicting variation in subject thermal response during transcranial magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery: Comparison in seventeen subject datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, Urvi, E-mail: urvi.vyas@gmail.com; Ghanouni, Pejman; Halpern, Casey H.; Pauly, Kim Butts [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Elias, Jeff [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: In transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (tcMRgFUS) treatments, the acoustic and spatial heterogeneity of the skull cause reflection, absorption, and scattering of the acoustic beams. These effects depend on skull-specific parameters and can lead to patient-specific thermal responses to the same transducer power. In this work, the authors develop a simulation tool to help predict these different experimental responses using 3D heterogeneous tissue models based on the subject CT images. The authors then validate and compare the predicted skull efficiencies to an experimental metric based on the subject thermal responses during tcMRgFUS treatments in a dataset of seventeen human subjects. Methods: Seventeen human head CT scans were used to create tissue acoustic models, simulating the effects of reflection, absorption, and scattering of the acoustic beam as it propagates through a heterogeneous skull. The hybrid angular spectrum technique was used to model the acoustic beam propagation of the InSightec ExAblate 4000 head transducer for each subject, yielding maps of the specific absorption rate (SAR). The simulation assumed the transducer was geometrically focused to the thalamus of each subject, and the focal SAR at the target was used as a measure of the simulated skull efficiency. Experimental skull efficiency for each subject was calculated using the thermal temperature maps from the tcMRgFUS treatments. Axial temperature images (with no artifacts) were reconstructed with a single baseline, corrected using a referenceless algorithm. The experimental skull efficiency was calculated by dividing the reconstructed temperature rise 8.8 s after sonication by the applied acoustic power. Results: The simulated skull efficiency using individual-specific heterogeneous models predicts well (R{sup 2} = 0.84) the experimental energy efficiency. Conclusions: This paper presents a simulation model to predict the variation in thermal responses

  6. A predictive thermal dynamic model for parameter generation in the laser assisted direct write process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Shuo; Fearon, Eamonn; Wellburn, Dan; Sato, Taku; Edwardson, Stuart; Dearden, G; Watkins, K G

    2011-01-01

    The laser assisted direct write (LADW) method can be used to generate electrical circuitry on a substrate by depositing metallic ink and curing the ink thermally by a laser. Laser curing has emerged over recent years as a novel yet efficient alternative to oven curing. This method can be used in situ, over complicated 3D contours of large parts (e.g. aircraft wings) and selectively cure over heat sensitive substrates, with little or no thermal damage. In previous studies, empirical methods have been used to generate processing windows for this technique, relating to the several interdependent processing parameters on which the curing quality and efficiency strongly depend. Incorrect parameters can result in a track that is cured in some areas and uncured in others, or in damaged substrates. This paper addresses the strong need for a quantitative model which can systematically output the processing conditions for a given combination of ink, substrate and laser source; transforming the LADW technique from a purely empirical approach, to a simple, repeatable, mathematically sound, efficient and predictable process. The method comprises a novel and generic finite element model (FEM) that for the first time predicts the evolution of the thermal profile of the ink track during laser curing and thus generates a parametric map which indicates the most suitable combination of parameters for process optimization. Experimental data are compared with simulation results to verify the accuracy of the model.

  7. Integrating metabolic performance, thermal tolerance, and plasticity enables for more accurate predictions on species vulnerability to acute and chronic effects of global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magozzi, Sarah; Calosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Predicting species vulnerability to global warming requires a comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of sublethal and lethal thermal tolerances. To date, however, most studies investigating species physiological responses to increasing temperature have focused on the underlying physiological traits of either acute or chronic tolerance in isolation. Here we propose an integrative, synthetic approach including the investigation of multiple physiological traits (metabolic performance and thermal tolerance), and their plasticity, to provide more accurate and balanced predictions on species and assemblage vulnerability to both acute and chronic effects of global warming. We applied this approach to more accurately elucidate relative species vulnerability to warming within an assemblage of six caridean prawns occurring in the same geographic, hence macroclimatic, region, but living in different thermal habitats. Prawns were exposed to four incubation temperatures (10, 15, 20 and 25 °C) for 7 days, their metabolic rates and upper thermal limits were measured, and plasticity was calculated according to the concept of Reaction Norms, as well as Q10 for metabolism. Compared to species occupying narrower/more stable thermal niches, species inhabiting broader/more variable thermal environments (including the invasive Palaemon macrodactylus) are likely to be less vulnerable to extreme acute thermal events as a result of their higher upper thermal limits. Nevertheless, they may be at greater risk from chronic exposure to warming due to the greater metabolic costs they incur. Indeed, a trade-off between acute and chronic tolerance was apparent in the assemblage investigated. However, the invasive species P. macrodactylus represents an exception to this pattern, showing elevated thermal limits and plasticity of these limits, as well as a high metabolic control. In general, integrating multiple proxies for species physiological acute and chronic responses to increasing

  8. Life Prediction Issues in Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Brewer, David N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2001-01-01

    Issues and design requirements for the environmental barrier coating (EBC)/thermal barrier coating (TBC) life that are general and those specific to the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) development program have been described. The current state and trend of the research, methods in vogue related to the failure analysis, and long-term behavior and life prediction of EBCITBC systems are reported. Also, the perceived failure mechanisms, variables, and related uncertainties governing the EBCITBC system life are summarized. A combined heat transfer and structural analysis approach based on the oxidation kinetics using the Arrhenius theory is proposed to develop a life prediction model for the EBC/TBC systems. Stochastic process-based reliability approach that includes the physical variables such as gas pressure, temperature, velocity, moisture content, crack density, oxygen content, etc., is suggested. Benefits of the reliability-based approach are also discussed in the report.

  9. A Probabilistic Approach to Predict Thermal Fatigue Life for Ball Grid Array Solder Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Helin; Wang, Kuisheng

    2011-11-01

    Numerous studies of the reliability of solder joints have been performed. Most life prediction models are limited to a deterministic approach. However, manufacturing induces uncertainty in the geometry parameters of solder joints, and the environmental temperature varies widely due to end-user diversity, creating uncertainties in the reliability of solder joints. In this study, a methodology for accounting for variation in the lifetime prediction for lead-free solder joints of ball grid array packages (PBGA) is demonstrated. The key aspects of the solder joint parameters and the cyclic temperature range related to reliability are involved. Probabilistic solutions of the inelastic strain range and thermal fatigue life based on the Engelmaier model are developed to determine the probability of solder joint failure. The results indicate that the standard deviation increases significantly when more random variations are involved. Using the probabilistic method, the influence of each variable on the thermal fatigue life is quantified. This information can be used to optimize product design and process validation acceptance criteria. The probabilistic approach creates the opportunity to identify the root causes of failed samples from product fatigue tests and field returns. The method can be applied to better understand how variation affects parameters of interest in an electronic package design with area array interconnections.

  10. Damage assessment of low-cycle fatigue by crack growth prediction. Fatigue life under cyclic thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The number of cycles to failure of specimens in fatigue tests can be estimated by predicting crack growth. Under a cyclic thermal stress caused by fluctuation of fluid temperature, due to the stress gradient in the thickness direction, the estimated fatigue life differs from that estimated for mechanical fatigue tests. In this paper, the influence of crack growth under cyclic thermal loading on the fatigue life was investigated. First, the thermal stress was derived by superposing analytical solutions, and then, the stress intensity factor was obtained by the weight function method. It was shown that the thermal stress depended not on the rate of the fluid temperature change but on the rise time, and the magnitude of the stress was increased as the rise time was decreased. The stress intensity factor under the cyclic thermal stress was smaller than that under the uniform stress distribution. The change in the stress intensity factor with the crack depth was almost the same regardless of the rise time. The estimated fatigue life under the cyclic thermal loading could be 1.6 times longer than that under the uniform stress distribution. The critical size for the fatigue life determination was assumed to be 3 mm for fatigue test specimens of 10 mm diameter. By evaluating the critical size by structural integrity analyses, the fatigue life was increased and the effect of the critical size on the fatigue life was more pronounced for the cyclic thermal stress. (author)

  11. Prediction of thermal behaviors of an air-cooled lithium-ion battery system for hybrid electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong Seok; Kang, Dal Mo

    2014-12-01

    Thermal management has been one of the major issues in developing a lithium-ion (Li-ion) hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) battery system since the Li-ion battery is vulnerable to excessive heat load under abnormal or severe operational conditions. In this work, in order to design a suitable thermal management system, a simple modeling methodology describing thermal behavior of an air-cooled Li-ion battery system was proposed from vehicle components designer's point of view. A proposed mathematical model was constructed based on the battery's electrical and mechanical properties. Also, validation test results for the Li-ion battery system were presented. A pulse current duty and an adjusted US06 current cycle for a two-mode HEV system were used to validate the accuracy of the model prediction. Results showed that the present model can give good estimations for simulating convective heat transfer cooling during battery operation. The developed thermal model is useful in structuring the flow system and determining the appropriate cooling capacity for a specified design prerequisite of the battery system.

  12. Thermal deformation prediction in reticles for extreme ultraviolet lithography based on a measurement-dependent low-order model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikcora, C.; Weiland, S.; Coene, W.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography, imaging errors due to thermal deformation of reticles are becoming progressively intolerable as the source power increases. Despite this trend, such errors can be mitigated by adjusting the wafer and reticle stages based on a set of predicted deformation-induced

  13. A prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of mono-sized pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • One new method to couple the contact area with bed strain is developed. • The constant coefficient to correlate the effect of gas flow is determined. • This model is valid for various cases, and its advantages are showed obviously. - Abstract: A model is presented here to predict the effective thermal conductivity of porous medium packed with mono-sized spherical pebbles, and it is valid when pebbles’ size is far less than the characteristic length of porous medium just like the fusion pebble beds. In this model, the influences of parameters such as properties of pebble and gas materials, bed porosity, pebble size, gas flow, contact area, thermal radiation, contact resistance, etc. are all taken into account, and one method to couple the contact areas with bed strains is also developed and implemented preliminarily. Compared with available theoretical models, CFD numerical simulations and experimental data, this model is verified to be successful to forecast the bed effective thermal conductivity in various cases and its advantages are also showed obviously. Especially, the convection in pebble beds is focused on and a constant coefficient C to correlate the effect of gas flow is determined for the fully developed region of beds by numerical simulation, which is close to some experimental data.

  14. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Loke Ming; Toh, Tai Chong; Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change.

  15. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera–Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change. PMID:27438593

  16. [Evolution of methodical approaches to solve problem of evaluating and predicting the thermal status of cosmonauts in the real flight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznets, E I; Bobrov, A F; Bekreneva, L N; Mikhailova, L I; Utekhin, B A; Pruzhinina, T I; Iakovleva, E V; Chadov, V I

    1996-01-01

    The problem of evaluating and predicting the thermal status of a cosmonaut in the long-term space mission is a pressing one and remains to be solved. The previous studies indicated that the best plan to be followed is to evaluate the thermal status of a cosmonaut during his egress into outer space with the use of the procedure of parotid thermometry of the mean body temperature.

  17. Thermal Vacuum Test Correlation of a Zero Propellant Load Case Thermal Capacitance Propellant Gauging Analytical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckim, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and correlation of a thermal model that forms the foundation of a thermal capacitance spacecraft propellant load estimator. Specific details of creating the thermal model for the diaphragm propellant tank used on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft using ANSYS and the correlation process implemented are presented. The thermal model was correlated to within plus or minus 3 degrees Celsius of the thermal vacuum test data, and was determined sufficient to make future propellant predictions on MMS. The model was also found to be relatively sensitive to uncertainties in applied heat flux and mass knowledge of the tank. More work is needed to improve temperature predictions in the upper hemisphere of the propellant tank where predictions were found to be 2 to 2.5 C lower than the test data. A road map for applying the model to predict propellant loads on the actual MMS spacecraft toward its end of life in 2017-2018 is also presented.

  18. Predicting thermal distortion of synchrotron radiation mirrors with finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiGennaro, R.; Edwards, W.R.; Hoyer, E.

    1985-10-01

    High power and high power densities due to absorbed radiation are significant design considerations which can limit performance of mirrors receiving highly collimated synchrotron radiation from insertion devices and bending magnet sources. Although the grazing incidence angles needed for x-ray optics spread the thermal load, localized, non-uniform heating can cause distortions which exceed allowable surface figure errors and limit focusing resolution. This paper discusses the suitability of numerical approximations using finite element methods for heat transfer, deformation, and stress analysis of optical elements. The primary analysis objectives are (1) to estimate optical surface figure under maximum heat loads, (2) to correctly predict thermal stresses in order to select suitable materials and mechanical design configurations, and (3) to minimize fabrication costs by specifying appropriate tolerances for surface figure. Important factors which determine accuracy of results include finite element model mesh refinement, accuracy of boundary condition modeling, and reliability of material property data. Some methods to verify accuracy are suggested. Design analysis for an x-ray mirror is presented. Some specific configurations for internal water-cooling are evaluated in order to determine design sensitivity with respect to structural geometry, material properties, fabrication tolerances, absorbed heat magnitude and distribution, and heat transfer approximations. Estimated accuracy of these results is discussed

  19. Damage assessment of low-cycle fatigue by crack growth prediction. Fatigue life under cyclic thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The number of cycles to failure of specimens in fatigue tests can be estimated by predicting crack growth. Under a cyclic thermal stress caused by fluctuation of fluid temperature, due to the stress gradient in the thickness direction, the estimated fatigue life differs from that estimated for mechanical fatigue tests. In this paper, the influence of crack growth under cyclic thermal loading on the fatigue life was investigated. First, the thermal stress was derived by superposing analytical solutions, and then, the stress intensity factor was obtained by the weight function method. It was shown that the thermal stress depended not on the rate of the fluid temperature change but on the rise time, and the magnitude of the stress was increased as the rise time was decreased. The stress intensity factor under the cyclic thermal stress was smaller than that under the uniform stress distribution. The change in the stress intensity factor with the crack depth did not depend on the heat transfer coefficient and only slightly depended on the rise time. The estimated fatigue life under the cyclic thermal loading could be 1.6 times longer than that under the uniform stress distribution. The critical size for the fatigue life determination was assumed to be 3 mm for fatigue test specimens of 10 mm diameter. By evaluating the critical size by structural integrity analyses, the fatigue life was increased and the effect of the critical size on the fatigue life was more pronounced for the cyclic thermal stress. (author)

  20. GAPCON-THERMAL-2: a computer program for calculating the thermal behavior of an oxide fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, C.E.; Hann, C.R.; Lanning, D.D.; Panisko, F.E.; Parchen, L.J.

    1975-11-01

    A description is presented of the computer code GAPCON THERMAL-2, a light water reactor (LWR) fuel thermal performance prediction code. GAPCON-THERMAL-2, is intended to be used as a calculational tool for reactor fuel steady-state thermal performance and to provide input for accident analyses. Some models used in the code provide best estimate as well as conservative predictions. Each of the individual models in the code is based on the best available data

  1. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2014-11-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, the organic carbon concentration is measured using thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) from quartz fiber filters. Here, methods are presented whereby Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters are used to accurately predict TOR OC. Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filters. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites sampled during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to artifact-corrected TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date which leads to precise and accurate OC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, all μg m-3 values based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by OC mass and by OM / OC which reflects the organic composition of the particulate matter and is obtained from organic functional group composition; this division also leads to precise and accurate OC predictions. Low OC concentrations have higher bias and normalized error due to TOR analytical errors and artifact correction errors, not due to the range of OC mass of the samples in the calibration set. However, samples with low OC mass can be used to predict samples with high OC mass indicating that the

  2. Nanoscale thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  3. The Adaptive Thermal Comfort model may not always predict thermal effects on performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyon, David Peter; Wargocki, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years," by R.J. de Dear and colleagues.......A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years," by R.J. de Dear and colleagues....

  4. Use of the Long Duration Exposure Facility's thermal measurement system for the verification of thermal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, William M.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) postflight thermal model predicted temperatures were matched to flight temperature data recorded by the Thermal Measurement System (THERM), LDEF experiment P0003. Flight temperatures, recorded at intervals of approximately 112 minutes for the first 390 days of LDEF's 2105 day mission were compared with predictions using the thermal mathematical model (TMM). This model was unverified prior to flight. The postflight analysis has reduced the thermal model uncertainty at the temperature sensor locations from +/- 40 F to +/- 18 F. The improved temperature predictions will be used by the LDEF's principal investigators to calculate improved flight temperatures experienced by 57 experiments located on 86 trays of the facility.

  5. Post-test comparison of thermal-hydrologic measurements and numerical predictions for the in situ single heater test, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, S.; Francis, N.D.; Sobolik, S.R.; Finley, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    The Single Heater Test (SHT) is a sixteen-month-long heating and cooling experiment begun in August, 1996, located underground within the unsaturated zone near the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. During the 9 month heating phase of the test, roughly 15 m 3 of rock were raised to temperatures exceeding 100 C. In this paper, temperatures measured in sealed boreholes surrounding the heater are compared to temperatures predicted by 3D thermal-hydrologic calculations performed with a finite difference code. Three separate model runs using different values of bulk rock permeability (4 microdarcy to 5.2 darcy) yielded significantly different predicted temperatures and temperature distributions. All the models differ from the data, suggesting that to accurately model the thermal-hydrologic behavior of the SHT, the Equivalent Continuum Model (ECM), the conceptual basis for dealing with the fractured porous medium in the numerical predictions, should be discarded in favor of more sophisticated approaches

  6. Thermal mixing characteritics during a postulated PTS event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jae Won; Bang, Young Seok; Seul, Kwang Won; Kim, Hho Jung

    1998-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the characteristics of thermal fluid mixing during a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) under two-phase flow condition using RELAP5 code. The RELAP5 code has been widely used in estimating global system thermal-hydraulic behaviors. However, the RELAP5 is not fully verified for the prediction of thermal mixing phenomena due to its limitation to the multi-dimensional behavior. Therefore, supplementary analysis is required, which can address the performance and limitation of the current RELAP5 code in predicting the thermal mixing. Another objective of this study is to compare the applicable empirical correlation (Theofanous') and the calculation of simple mixing code (REMIX) with one predicted by RELAP5. By those comparisons the capability on PTS thermal mixing of the current RELAP5 can be evaluated. In this study, thermal mixing behavior is analyzed for the task of the international comparative assessment study on PTS (PTS-ICAS) which was proposed by OECD-NEA. Through some preliminary calculations using RELAP5, the boundary conditions relevant to the problem constraints are appropriately specified with some artificial assumptions. As a calculation results, system pressure, downcomer water level, wall heat transfer coefficient, etc., are predicted as suitable for given problem constraints. From the predicted thermal hydraulic behavior, it is shown that the thermal stratification begins to start around 200 seconds after high pressure safety injection. At 400 seconds, the maximum difference in azimuthal temperature distribution at the downcomer due to thermal mixing is predicted about 150 K. Based on the comparison of the current RELAP5 prediction with the Theofanous' correlation and the REMIX calculation, it is found that thermal stratification characteristics predicted by RELAP5 is agreed in qualitative manner to the empirical correlation

  7. A Robust Model Predictive Control for efficient thermal management of internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzonia, Francesco; Castiglione, Teresa; Bova, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A Robust Model Predictive Control for ICE thermal management was developed. • The proposed control is effective in decreasing the warm-up time. • The control system reduces coolant flow rate under fully warmed conditions. • The control strategy operates the cooling system around onset of nucleate boiling. • Little on-line computational effort is required. - Abstract: Optimal thermal management of modern internal combustion engines (ICE) is one of the key factors for reducing fuel consumption and CO_2 emissions. These are measured by using standardized driving cycles, like the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), during which the engine does not reach thermal steady state; engine efficiency and emissions are therefore penalized. Several techniques for improving ICE thermal efficiency were proposed, which range from the use of empirical look-up tables to pulsed pump operation. A systematic approach to the problem is however still missing and this paper aims to bridge this gap. The paper proposes a Robust Model Predictive Control of the coolant flow rate, which makes use of a zero-dimensional model of the cooling system of an ICE. The control methodology incorporates explicitly the model uncertainties and achieves the synthesis of a state-feedback control law that minimizes the “worst case” objective function while taking into account the system constraints, as proposed by Kothare et al. (1996). The proposed control strategy is to adjust the coolant flow rate by means of an electric pump, in order to bring the cooling system to operate around the onset of nucleate boiling: across it during warm-up and above it (nucleate or saturated boiling) under fully warmed conditions. The computationally heavy optimization is carried out off-line, while during the operation of the engine the control parameters are simply picked-up on-line from look-up tables. Owing to the little computational effort required, the resulting control strategy is suitable for

  8. The thermal niche of Neotropical nectar-feeding bats: Its evolution and application to predict responses to global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-García, Stephanie; Guevara, Lázaro; Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquín; Lindig-Cisneros, Roberto; Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Vega, Ernesto; Schondube, Jorge E

    2017-09-01

    The thermal niche of a species is one of the main determinants of its ecology and biogeography. In this study, we determined the thermal niche of 23 species of Neotropical nectar-feeding bats of the subfamily Glossophaginae (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae). We calculated their thermal niches using temperature data obtained from collection records, by generating a distribution curve of the maximum and minimum temperatures per locality, and using the inflection points of the temperature distributions to estimate the species optimal (STZ) and suboptimal (SRZ) zones of the thermal niche. Additionally, by mapping the values of the STZ and SRZ on a phylogeny of the group, we generated a hypothesis of the evolution of the thermal niches of this clade of nectar-feeding bats. Finally, we used the characteristics of their thermal niches to predict the responses of these organisms to climate change. We found a large variation in the width and limits of the thermal niches of nectar-feeding bats. Additionally, while the upper limits of the thermal niches varied little among species, their lower limits differ wildly. The ancestral reconstruction of the thermal niche indicated that this group of Neotropical bats evolved under cooler temperatures. The two clades inside the Glossophaginae differ in the evolution of their thermal niches, with most members of the clade Choeronycterines evolving "colder" thermal niches, while the majority of the species in the clade Glossophagines evolving "warmer" thermal niches. By comparing thermal niches with climate change models, we found that all species could be affected by an increase of 1°C in temperature at the end of this century. This suggests that even nocturnal species could suffer important physiological costs from global warming. Our study highlights the value of scientific collections to obtain ecologically significant physiological data for a large number of species.

  9. Thermal Vacuum Test Correlation of A Zero Propellant Load Case Thermal Capacitance Propellant Gauging Analytics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and test data validation of the thermal model that is the foundation of a thermal capacitance spacecraft propellant load estimator. Specific details of creating the thermal model for the diaphragm propellant tank used on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft using ANSYS and the correlation process implemented to validate the model are presented. The thermal model was correlated to within plus or minus 3 degrees Centigrade of the thermal vacuum test data, and was found to be relatively insensitive to uncertainties in applied heat flux and mass knowledge of the tank. More work is needed, however, to refine the thermal model to further improve temperature predictions in the upper hemisphere of the propellant tank. Temperatures predictions in this portion were found to be 2-2.5 degrees Centigrade lower than the test data. A road map to apply the model to predict propellant loads on the actual MMS spacecraft toward its end of life in 2017-2018 is also presented.

  10. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loke Ming Chou

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached. The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change.

  11. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-10-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive and nondestructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FT-IR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed: one developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a uniform distribution of Low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the Low EC calibration to Low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produce predictions for Low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), no bias (0.00 μg m-3, a

  12. GAPCON-THERMAL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, C.L.; Lanning, D.D.; Panisko, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    The fuel performance code GAPCON-THERMAL-3 has been expanded to include recent transient material deformation constitutive relations and the FLECHT heat transfer correlation. The modifications make it possible to compute the thermal and mechanical response of nuclear fuel to postulated Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA). The numerical formulation has the capability of predicting both steady state and transient behavior of a fuel rod using a single analytical procedure. GAPCON-THERMAL-3 (G-T-3) uses a specialized finite element procedure for mechanics predictions and the method of weighted residuals and finite difference techniques to compute temperature and thermal behavior. Fuel behavior, gas release models, gas conductance models, and stored energy calculations are applicable to both steady state and transient conditions. The code has been used to perform scoping analysis for in-reactor LOCA simulation testing. (orig.)

  13. Prediction and design of efficient exciplex emitters for high-efficiency, thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Ke; Chen, Zhan; Zheng, Cai-Jun; Liu, Chuan-Lin; Lee, Chun-Sing; Li, Fan; Ou, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Hong

    2015-04-08

    High-efficiency, thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes based on exciplex emitters are demonstrated. The best device, based on a TAPC:DPTPCz emitter, shows a high external quantum efficiency of 15.4%. Strategies for predicting and designing efficient exciplex emitters are also provided. This approach allow prediction and design of efficient exciplex emitters for achieving high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes, for future use in displays and lighting applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A simple model for the prediction of thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Jae Sik

    2013-01-01

    A modified version of the Mayadas-Shatzkes (MS) model is proposed for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of both amorphous and crystalline of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 (GST) phase-change materials at room temperature. The structural parameters of the original MS model are extended to describe the additional disorder scattering effects caused by the ternary components of the GST. The effect of disorder due to the alloy composition on the grain boundary scattering can be interpreted with the aid of thermal models. It is also found that for all phases of GST, the contribution of disorder scattering to the thermal resistance is nearly uniform. This is consistent with the fact that the GST phase changes without any destruction of the structural basis such as the building blocks.

  15. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: extending the predictions to different years and different sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggente, Matteo; Dillner, Ann M.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) are major components of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), which has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality, climate change, and reduced visibility. Typically OC and EC concentrations are measured using thermal-optical methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) from samples collected on quartz filters. In this work, we estimate TOR OC and EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE Teflon) filters using partial least square regression (PLSR) calibrated to TOR OC and EC measurements for a wide range of samples. The proposed method can be integrated with analysis of routinely collected PTFE filter samples that, in addition to OC and EC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the functional group composition of the organic aerosol. We have used the FT-IR absorbance spectra and TOR OC and EC concentrations collected in the Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network (USA). We used 526 samples collected in 2011 at seven sites to calibrate the models, and more than 2000 samples collected in 2013 at 17 sites to test the models. Samples from six sites are present both in the calibration and test sets. The calibrations produce accurate predictions both for samples collected at the same six sites present in the calibration set (R2 = 0.97 and R2 = 0.95 for OC and EC respectively), and for samples from 9 of the 11 sites not included in the calibration set (R2 = 0.96 and R2 = 0.91 for OC and EC respectively). Samples collected at the other two sites require a different calibration model to achieve accurate predictions. We also propose a method to anticipate the prediction error; we calculate the squared Mahalanobis distance in the feature space (scores determined by PLSR) between new spectra and spectra in the calibration set. The squared Mahalanobis distance provides a crude method for assessing the

  16. Optically Transparent Thermally Insulating Silica Aerogels for Solar Thermal Insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, A Alperen; Kim, Hannah; Nagarajan, Naveen; Lopez, Mateusz; Kantharaj, Rajath; Alsaati, Albraa; Marconnet, Amy; Lenert, Andrej; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2018-04-18

    Rooftop solar thermal collectors have the potential to meet residential heating demands if deployed efficiently at low solar irradiance (i.e., 1 sun). The efficiency of solar thermal collectors depends on their ability to absorb incoming solar energy and minimize thermal losses. Most techniques utilize a vacuum gap between the solar absorber and the surroundings to eliminate conduction and convection losses, in combination with surface coatings to minimize reradiation losses. Here, we present an alternative approach that operates at atmospheric pressure with simple, black, absorbing surfaces. Silica based aerogels coated on black surfaces have the potential to act as simple and inexpensive solar thermal collectors because of their high transmission to solar radiation and low transmission to thermal radiation. To demonstrate their heat-trapping properties, we fabricated tetramethyl orthosilicate-based silica aerogels. A hydrophilic aerogel with a thickness of 1 cm exhibited a solar-averaged transmission of 76% and thermally averaged transmission of ≈1% (at 100 °C). To minimize unwanted solar absorption by O-H groups, we functionalized the aerogel to be hydrophobic, resulting in a solar-averaged transmission of 88%. To provide a deeper understanding of the link between aerogel properties and overall efficiency, we developed a coupled radiative-conductive heat transfer model and used it to predict solar thermal performance. Instantaneous solar thermal efficiencies approaching 55% at 1 sun and 80 °C were predicted. This study sheds light on the applicability of silica aerogels on black coatings for solar thermal collectors and offers design priorities for next-generation solar thermal aerogels.

  17. Prediction of thermal hydraulic parameters in the loss of coolant accident by using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaziri, N.; Erfani, A.; Monsefi, M.; Hajabri, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a reactor accident like loss of coolant accident , one or more signals may not be monitored by control panel for some reasons such as interruptions and so on. Therefore a fast alternative method could guarantee the safe and reliable exploration of nuclear power planets. In this study, we used artificial neural network with Elman recurrent structure to predict six thermal hydraulic signals in a loss of coolant accident after upper plenum break. In the prediction procedure, a few previous samples are fed to the artificial neural network and the output value or next time step is estimated by the network output. The Elman recurrent network is trained with the data obtained from the benchmark simulation of loss of coolant accident in VVER. The results reveal that the predicted values follow the real trends well and artificial neural network can be used as a fast alternative prediction tool in loss of coolant accident

  18. A Lumped Thermal Model Including Thermal Coupling and Thermal Boundary Conditions for High Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2018-01-01

    Detailed thermal dynamics of high power IGBT modules are important information for the reliability analysis and thermal design of power electronic systems. However, the existing thermal models have their limits to correctly predict these complicated thermal behavior in the IGBTs: The typically used...... thermal model based on one-dimensional RC lumps have limits to provide temperature distributions inside the device, moreover some variable factors in the real-field applications like the cooling and heating conditions of the converter cannot be adapted. On the other hand, the more advanced three......-dimensional thermal models based on Finite Element Method (FEM) need massive computations, which make the long-term thermal dynamics difficult to calculate. In this paper, a new lumped three-dimensional thermal model is proposed, which can be easily characterized from FEM simulations and can acquire the critical...

  19. Thermal and hydrologic responses to climate change predict marked alterations in boreal stream invertebrate assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, Kaisa-Riikka; Mykrä, Heikki; Marttila, Hannu; Sarremejane, Romain; Veijalainen, Noora; Sippel, Kalle; Muotka, Timo; Hawkins, Charles P

    2018-06-01

    Air temperature at the northernmost latitudes is predicted to increase steeply and precipitation to become more variable by the end of the 21st century, resulting in altered thermal and hydrological regimes. We applied five climate scenarios to predict the future (2070-2100) benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages at 239 near-pristine sites across Finland (ca. 1200 km latitudinal span). We used a multitaxon distribution model with air temperature and modeled daily flow as predictors. As expected, projected air temperature increased the most in northernmost Finland. Predicted taxonomic richness also increased the most in northern Finland, congruent with the predicted northwards shift of many species' distributions. Compositional changes were predicted to be high even without changes in richness, suggesting that species replacement may be the main mechanism causing climate-induced changes in macroinvertebrate assemblages. Northern streams were predicted to lose much of the seasonality of their flow regimes, causing potentially marked changes in stream benthic assemblages. Sites with the highest loss of seasonality were predicted to support future assemblages that deviate most in compositional similarity from the present-day assemblages. Macroinvertebrate assemblages were also predicted to change more in headwaters than in larger streams, as headwaters were particularly sensitive to changes in flow patterns. Our results emphasize the importance of focusing protection and mitigation on headwater streams with high-flow seasonality because of their vulnerability to climate change. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Development of irradiated UO2 thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Bang Je-Geon; Kim Dae Ho; Jung Youn Ho

    2001-01-01

    Thermal conductivity model of the irradiated UO 2 pellet was developed, based upon the thermal diffusivity data of the irradiated UO 2 pellet measured during thermal cycling. The model predicts the thermal conductivity by multiplying such separate correction factors as solid fission products, gaseous fission products, radiation damage and porosity. The developed model was validated by comparison with the variation of the measured thermal diffusivity data during thermal cycling and prediction of other UO 2 thermal conductivity models. Since the developed model considers the effect of gaseous fission products as a separate factor, it can predict variation of thermal conductivity in the rim region of high burnup UO 2 pellet where the fission gases in the matrix are precipitated into bubbles, indicating that decrease of thermal conductivity by bubble precipitation in rim region would be significantly compensated by the enhancing effect of fission gas depletion in the UO 2 matrix. (author)

  1. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also

  2. A correlation linking the predicted mean vote and the mean thermal vote based on an investigation on the human thermal comfort in short-haul domestic flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaconia, Carlo; Orioli, Aldo; Di Gangi, Alessandra

    2015-05-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on the human thermal comfort inside the cabin of some Airbus A319 aircrafts during 14 short-haul domestic flights, linking various Italian cities, are presented and used to define a correlation among the predicted mean vote (PMV), a procedure which is commonly used to assess the thermal comfort in inhabited environments, and the equivalent temperature and mean thermal vote (MTV), which are the parameters suggested by the European Standard EN ISO 14505-2 for the evaluation of the thermal environment in vehicles. The measurements of the radiant temperature, air temperature and relative humidity during flights were performed. The air temperature varied between 22.2 °C and 26.0 °C; the relative humidity ranged from 8.7% to 59.2%. The calculated values of the PMV varied from -0.16 to 0.90 and were confirmed by the answers of the passengers. The equivalent temperature was evaluated using the equations of Fanger or on the basis of the values of the skin temperature measured on some volunteers. The correlation linking the thermal sensation scales and zones used by the PMV and the MTV resulted quite accurate because the minimum value of the absolute difference between such environmental indexes equalled 0.0073 and the maximum difference did not exceed the value of 0.0589. Even though the equivalent temperature and the MTV were specifically proposed to evaluate the thermal sensation in vehicles, their use may be effectively extended to the assessment of the thermal comfort in airplanes or other occupied places. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Mathematical modeling of a new satellite thermal architecture system connecting the east and west radiator panels and flight performance prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Alejandro; Mishkinis, Donatas; Kaya, Tarik

    2014-01-01

    An entirely novel satellite thermal architecture, connecting the east and west radiators of a geostationary telecommunications satellite via loop heat pipes (LHPs), is proposed. The LHP operating temperature is regulated by using pressure regulating valves (PRVs). A transient numerical model is developed to simulate the thermal dynamic behavior of the proposed system. The details of the proposed architecture and mathematical model are presented. The model is used to analyze a set of critical design cases to identify potential failure modes prior to the qualification and in-orbit tests. The mathematical model results for critical cases are presented and discussed. The model results demonstrated the robustness and versatility of the proposed architecture under the predicted worst-case conditions. - Highlights: •We developed a mathematical model of a novel satellite thermal architecture. •We provided the dimensioning cases to design the thermal architecture. •We provided the failure mode cases to verify the thermal architecture. •We provided the results of the corresponding dimensioning and failure cases

  4. Thermal Management and Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Aqib

    2016-01-01

    During my internship in the Thermal Design Branch (ES3), I contributed to two main projects: i) novel passive thermal management system for future human exploration, ii) AVCOAT undercut thermal analysis. i) As NASA prepares to further expand human and robotic presence in space, it is well known that spacecraft architectures will be challenged with unprecedented thermal environments. Future exploration activities will have the need of thermal management systems that can provide higher reliability, mass and power reduction and increased performance. In an effort to start addressing the current technical gaps the NASA Johnson Space Center Passive Thermal Discipline has engaged in technology development activities. One of these activities was done through an in-house Passive Thermal Management System (PTMS) design for a lunar lander. The proposed PTMS, functional in both microgravity and gravity environments, consists of three main components: a heat spreader, a novel hybrid wick Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP), and a radiator. The aim of this PTMS is to keep electronics on a vehicle within their temperature limits (0 and 50 C for the current design) during all mission phases including multiple lunar day/night cycles. The VCHP was tested to verify its thermal performance. I created a thermal math model using Thermal Desktop (TD) and analyzed it to predict the PTMS performance. After testing, the test data provided a means to correlate the thermal math model. This correlation took into account conduction and convection heat transfer, representing the actual benchtop test. Since this PTMS is proposed for space missions, a vacuum test will be taking place to provide confidence that the system is functional in space environments. Therefore, the model was modified to include a vacuum chamber with a liquid nitrogen shroud while taking into account conduction and radiation heat transfer. Infrared Lamps were modelled and introduced into the model to simulate the sun

  5. An Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System for Sea Level Prediction Considering Tide-Generating Forces and Oceanic Thermal Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ching Lin Hsien-Kuo Chang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system for predicting sea level considering tide-generating forces and oceanic thermal expansion assuming a model of sea level dependence on sea surface temperature. The proposed model named TGFT-FN (Tide-Generating Forces considering sea surface Temperature and Fuzzy Neuro-network system is applied to predict tides at five tide gauge sites located in Taiwan and has the root mean square of error of about 7.3 - 15.0 cm. The capability of TGFT-FN model is superior in sea level prediction than the previous TGF-NN model developed by Chang and Lin (2006 that considers the tide-generating forces only. The TGFT-FN model is employed to train and predict the sea level of Hua-Lien station, and is also appropriate for the same prediction at the tide gauge sites next to Hua-Lien station.

  6. Predicting micro thermal habitat of lizards in a dynamic thermal environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fei, T.; Skidmore, A.K.; Venus, V.; Wang, T.; Toxopeus, A.G.; Bian, B.M.; Liu, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding behavioural thermoregulation and its consequences is a central topic in ecology. In this study, a spatial explicit model was developed to simulate the movement and thermal habitat use of lizards in a controlled environment. The model incorporates a lizard's transient body temperatures

  7. Study on thermal wave based on the thermal mass theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The conservation equations for heat conduction are established based on the concept of thermal mass.We obtain a general heat conduction law which takes into account the spatial and temporal inertia of thermal mass.The general law introduces a damped thermal wave equation.It reduces to the well-known CV model when the spatial inertia of heat flux and temperature and the temporal inertia of temperature are neglected,which indicates that the CV model only considers the temporal inertia of heat flux.Numerical simulations on the propagation and superposition of thermal waves show that for small thermal perturbation the CV model agrees with the thermal wave equation based on the thermal mass theory.For larger thermal perturbation,however,the physically impossible phenomenon pre-dicted by CV model,i.e.the negative temperature induced by the thermal wave superposition,is eliminated by the general heat conduction law,which demonstrates that the present heat conduction law based on the thermal mass theory is more reasonable.

  8. Study on thermal wave based on the thermal mass theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU RuiFeng; CAO BingYang

    2009-01-01

    The conservation equations for heat conduction are established based on the concept of thermal mass. We obtain a general heat conduction law which takes into account the spatial and temporal inertia of thermal mass. The general law introduces a damped thermal wave equation. It reduces to the well-known CV model when the spatial inertia of heat flux and temperature and the temporal inertia of temperature are neglected, which indicates that the CV model only considers the temporal inertia of heat flux. Numerical simulations on the propagation and superposition of thermal waves show that for small thermal perturbation the CV model agrees with the thermal wave equation based on the thermal mass theory. For larger thermal perturbation, however, the physically impossible phenomenon pre-dicted by CV model, i.e. the negative temperature induced by the thermal wave superposition, is eliminated by the general heat conduction law, which demonstrates that the present heat conduction law based on the thermal mass theory is more reasonable.

  9. Equivalent lifetime prediction of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber for thermal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. Y.; Jang, H. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, B. H. [Dongguk Universty, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C. [Chungbuk University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Thermal degradation of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber(NBR), which is used for O-ring material as elastomeric sealed diaphragm valve in the nuclear power plants, is examined. The thermal degradation is accelerated at 130 .deg. C by arrhenius exploit method using the activation energy calculated by thermogravimetric analysis. The weight loss temperature and glass transition temperature are verified for thermally aged NBR. The relationship between dynamic mechanical properties and elongation at break are also investigated. The threshold valued of thermally aged NBR is a ten year in the change of elongation at break.

  10. Equivalent lifetime prediction of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber for thermal aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. Y.; Jang, H. K.; Ryu, B. H.; Lee, C.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal degradation of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber(NBR), which is used for O-ring material as elastomeric sealed diaphragm valve in the nuclear power plants, is examined. The thermal degradation is accelerated at 130 .deg. C by arrhenius exploit method using the activation energy calculated by thermogravimetric analysis. The weight loss temperature and glass transition temperature are verified for thermally aged NBR. The relationship between dynamic mechanical properties and elongation at break are also investigated. The threshold valued of thermally aged NBR is a ten year in the change of elongation at break

  11. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-06-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure tested and developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed, one which is developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a~uniform distribution of low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the low EC calibration to low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produces predictions for low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), no

  12. Random laser illumination: an ideal source for biomedical polarization imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Mariana T.; Lotay, Amrit S.; Kenny, Fiona M.; Girkin, John M.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging applications increasingly require light sources with high spectral density (power over spectral bandwidth. This has led in many cases to the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers and superluminescent diodes. Although lasers and superluminescent diodes appear to be ideal light sources due to their narrow bandwidth and power, however, in the case of full-field imaging, their spatial coherence leads to coherent artefacts, such as speckle, that corrupt the image. LEDs, in contrast, have lower spatial coherence and thus seem the natural choice, but they have low spectral density. Random Lasers are an unconventional type of laser that can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence with high spectral density. These characteristics makes them potential sources for biological imaging applications where specific absorption and reflection are the characteristics required for state of the art imaging. In this work, a Random Laser (RL) is used to demonstrate speckle-free full-field imaging for polarization-dependent imaging in an epi-illumination configuration. We compare LED and RL illumination analysing the resulting images demonstrating that the RL illumination produces an imaging system with higher performance (image quality and spectral density) than that provided by LEDs.

  13. Thermal Stress Limit Rafting Migration of Seahorses: Prediction Based on Physiological and Behavioral Responses to Thermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, G.; Li, C.; Lin, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Marine fish species escape from harmful environment by migration. Seahorses, with upright posture and low mobility, could migrate from unfavorable environment by rafting with their prehensile tail. The present study was designed to examine the tolerance of lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus to thermal stress and evaluate the effects of temperature on seahorse migration. The results figured that seahorses' tolerance to thermal stress was time dependent. Acute thermal stress (30°C) increased breathing rate and HSP genes expression significantly, but didn't affect seahorse feeding behavior. Chronic thermal treatment lead to persistent high expression of HSP genes, higher breathing rate, and decreasing feeding, and final higher mortality, suggesting that seahorse cannot adapt to thermal stress by acclimation. No significant negative effects were found in seahorse reproduction in response to chronic thermal stress. Given that seahorses make much slower migration by rafting on sea surface compared to other fishes, we suggest that thermal stress might limit seahorse migration range. and the influence might be magnified by global warming in future.

  14. Thermal Phase Variations of WASP-12b: Defying Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Machalek, Pavel; Croll, Bryce; Shekhtman, Louis M.; Burrows, Adam; Deming, Drake; Greene, Tom; Hora, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    We report Warm Spitzer full-orbit phase observations of WASP-12b at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers. This extremely inflated hot Jupiter is thought to be overflowing its Roche lobe, undergoing mass loss and accretion onto its host star, and has been claimed to have a C/O ratio in excess of unity. We are able to measure the transit depths, eclipse depths, thermal and ellipsoidal phase variations at both wavelengths. The large-amplitude phase variations, combined with the planet's previously measured dayside spectral energy distribution, are indicative of non-zero Bond albedo and very poor day-night heat redistribution. The transit depths in the mid-infrared-(R(sub p)/R(sub *))(sup 2) = 0.0123(3) and 0.0111(3) at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers, respectively-indicate that the atmospheric opacity is greater at 3.6 than at 4.5 micrometers, in disagreement with model predictions, irrespective of C/O ratio. The secondary eclipse depths are consistent with previous studies: F(sub day)/F(sub *) = 0.0038(4) and 0.0039(3) at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers, respectively. We do not detect ellipsoidal variations at 3.6 micrometers, but our parameter uncertainties-estimated via prayer-bead Monte Carlo-keep this non-detection consistent with model predictions. At 4.5 micrometers, on the other hand, we detect ellipsoidal variations that are much stronger than predicted. If interpreted as a geometric effect due to the planet's elongated shape, these variations imply a 3:2 ratio for the planet's longest:shortest axes and a relatively bright day-night terminator. If we instead presume that the 4.5 micrometer ellipsoidal variations are due to uncorrected systematic noise and we fix the amplitude of the variations to zero, the best-fit 4.5 micrometer transit depth becomes commensurate with the 3.6 micrometer depth, within the uncertainties. The relative transit depths are then consistent with a solar composition and short scale height at the terminator. Assuming zero ellipsoidal variations also yields a much

  15. THERMAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF WASP-12b: DEFYING PREDICTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Shekhtman, Louis M.; Machalek, Pavel; Croll, Bryce; Burrows, Adam; Deming, Drake; Greene, Tom; Hora, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    We report Warm Spitzer full-orbit phase observations of WASP-12b at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. This extremely inflated hot Jupiter is thought to be overflowing its Roche lobe, undergoing mass loss and accretion onto its host star, and has been claimed to have a C/O ratio in excess of unity. We are able to measure the transit depths, eclipse depths, thermal and ellipsoidal phase variations at both wavelengths. The large-amplitude phase variations, combined with the planet's previously measured dayside spectral energy distribution, are indicative of non-zero Bond albedo and very poor day-night heat redistribution. The transit depths in the mid-infrared—(R p /R * ) 2 = 0.0123(3) and 0.0111(3) at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, respectively—indicate that the atmospheric opacity is greater at 3.6 than at 4.5 μm, in disagreement with model predictions, irrespective of C/O ratio. The secondary eclipse depths are consistent with previous studies: F day /F * = 0.0038(4) and 0.0039(3) at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, respectively. We do not detect ellipsoidal variations at 3.6 μm, but our parameter uncertainties—estimated via prayer-bead Monte Carlo—keep this non-detection consistent with model predictions. At 4.5 μm, on the other hand, we detect ellipsoidal variations that are much stronger than predicted. If interpreted as a geometric effect due to the planet's elongated shape, these variations imply a 3:2 ratio for the planet's longest:shortest axes and a relatively bright day-night terminator. If we instead presume that the 4.5 μm ellipsoidal variations are due to uncorrected systematic noise and we fix the amplitude of the variations to zero, the best-fit 4.5 μm transit depth becomes commensurate with the 3.6 μm depth, within the uncertainties. The relative transit depths are then consistent with a solar composition and short scale height at the terminator. Assuming zero ellipsoidal variations also yields a much deeper 4.5 μm eclipse depth, consistent with a solar composition and modest

  16. Separation and prediction of irrecoverable strain components of concrete during the first thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Strains of three AGR type concretes were measured during the first heat cycle and their relative thermal stability determined. It was possible to isolate for the first time the shrinkage and creep components for the period during heating-up. Predictions of the residual strains for the loaded specimens can be made by simple superposition of creep and shrinkage components up to a certain critical temperature, which for basalt concrete is about 500 deg. C and limestone concrete is about 200-300 deg. C. Above the critical temperature, it is necessary to add a 'cracking component'. (author)

  17. Towards the prediction of thermal fatigue cracks networks development; Vers la prediction de l'apparition de reseau de fissures en fatigue thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterstock, St. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of the influence of the surface and the structure of materials used in the cooling system of reactor, Depres studied in 2004 at the CEA, the evolution of the microstructure inside the surface grains under a thermal fatigue loading, from dynamic of dislocations calculation. In this context the aim of this study is to bring experimental elements of validation of the numerical results obtained by Depres and to verify if these elements allow the prediction of cracks networks apparition. (A.L.B.)

  18. Uncertainties in modeling and scaling in the prediction of fuel stored energy and thermal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.

    1987-01-01

    The steady-state temperature distribution and the stored energy in nuclear fuel elements are computed by analytical methods and used to rank, in the order of importance, the effects on stored energy from statistical uncertainties in modeling parameters, in boundary and in operating conditions. An integral technique is used to calculate the transient fuel temperature and to estimate the uncertainties in predicting the fuel thermal response and the peak clad temperature during a large-break loss of coolant accident. The uncertainty analysis presented here is an important part of evaluating the applicability, the uncertainties and the scaling capabilities of computer codes for nuclear reactor safety analyses. The methods employed in this analysis merit general attention because of their simplicity. It is shown that the blowdown peak is dominated by fuel stored energy alone or, equivalently, by linear heating rate. Gap conductance, peaking factors and fuel thermal conductivity are the three most important fuel modeling parameters affecting peak clad temperature uncertainty. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Polarization modeling and predictions for DKIST part 3: focal ratio and thermal dependencies of spectral polarization fringes and optic retardance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, David M.; Sueoka, Stacey R.

    2018-01-01

    Data products from high spectral resolution astronomical polarimeters are often limited by fringes. Fringes can skew derived magnetic field properties from spectropolarimetric data. Fringe removal algorithms can also corrupt the data if the fringes and object signals are too similar. For some narrow-band imaging polarimeters, fringes change the calibration retarder properties and dominate the calibration errors. Systems-level engineering tools for polarimetric instrumentation require accurate predictions of fringe amplitudes, periods for transmission, diattenuation, and retardance. The relevant instabilities caused by environmental, thermal, and optical properties can be modeled and mitigation tools developed. We create spectral polarization fringe amplitude and temporal instability predictions by applying the Berreman calculus and simple interferometric calculations to optics in beams of varying F/ number. We then apply the formalism to superachromatic six-crystal retarders in converging beams under beam thermal loading in outdoor environmental conditions for two of the world's largest observatories: the 10-m Keck telescope and the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST). DKIST will produce a 300-W optical beam, which has imposed stringent requirements on the large diameter six-crystal retarders, dichroic beamsplitters, and internal optics. DKIST retarders are used in a converging beam with F/ ratios between 8 and 62. The fringe spectral periods, amplitudes, and thermal models of retarder behavior assisted DKIST optical designs and calibration plans with future application to many astronomical spectropolarimeters. The Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph with polarimetry instrument at Keck also uses six-crystal retarders in a converging F / 13 beam in a Cassegrain focus exposed to summit environmental conditions providing observational verification of our predictions.

  20. Evaluation of properties and thermal stress field for thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王良; 齐红宇; 杨晓光; 李旭

    2008-01-01

    In order to get thermal stress field of the hot section with thermal barrier coating (TBCs), the thermal conductivity and elastic modulus of top-coat are the physical key properties. The porosity of top-coat was tested and evaluated under different high temperatures. The relationship between the microstructure (porosity of top-coat) and properties of TBCs were analyzed to predict the thermal properties of ceramic top-coat, such as thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The temperature and stress field of the vane with TBCs were simulated using two sets of thermal conductivity data and elastic modulus, which are from literatures and this work, respectively. The results show that the temperature and stress distributions change with thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The differences of maximum temperatures and stress are 6.5% and 8.0%, respectively.

  1. Evolution of the Thermal Conductivity of Sintered Silver Joints with their Porosity Predicted by the Finite Element Analysis of Real 3D Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signor, L.; Kumar, P.; Tressou, B.; Nadot-Martin, C.; Miranda-Ordonez, José; Carr, J.; Joulain, K.; Milhet, X.

    2018-07-01

    Silver paste sintering is a very promising technology for chip bonding in future power electronics modules owing to its high melting temperature and the good electrical and thermal properties among other classic solder alloys. However, in its sintered form, these joints contain nanometric/submicrometric pores that affect their thermal performance. The present study gives insight into the relationship between the material thermal conductivity and the real three-dimensional porous structure using finite element modelling. It is shown that over a certain pore fraction threshold (˜ 13%), the pore morphology has a non-negligible influence on the thermal conductivity. Results are also compared to predictions obtained by analytical models available in the literature.

  2. Thermal Analysis of the Fastrac Chamber/Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Darrell

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the thermal analysis techniques used to predict temperatures in the film-cooled ablative rocket nozzle used on the Fastrac 60K rocket engine. A model was developed that predicts char and pyrolysis depths, liner thermal gradients, and temperatures of the bondline between the overwrap and liner. Correlation of the model was accomplished by thermal analog tests performed at Southern Research, and specially instrumented hot fire tests at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Infrared thermography was instrumental in defining nozzle hot wall surface temperatures. In-depth and outboard thermocouple data was used to correlate the kinetic decomposition routine used to predict char and pyrolysis depths. These depths were anchored with measured char and pyrolysis depths from cross-sectioned hot-fire nozzles. For the X-34 flight analysis, the model includes the ablative Thermal Protection System (TPS) material that protects the overwrap from the recirculating plume. Results from model correlation, hot-fire testing, and flight predictions will be discussed.

  3. Thermal comfort assessment in civil aircraft cabins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Liping

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft passengers are more and demanding in terms of thermal comfort. But it is not yet easy for aircraft crew to control the environment control system (ECS that satisfies the thermal comfort for most passengers due to a number of causes. This paper adopts a corrected predicted mean vote (PMV model and an adaptive model to assess the thermal comfort conditions for 31 investigated flights and draws the conclusion that there does exist an uncomfortable thermal phenomenon in civil aircraft cabins, especially in some short-haul continental flights. It is necessary to develop an easy way to predict the thermal sensation of passengers and to direct the crew to control ECS. Due to the assessment consistency of the corrected PMV model and the adaptive model, the adaptive model of thermal neutrality temperature can be used as a method to predict the cabin optimal operative temperature. Because only the mean outdoor effective temperature ET∗ of a departure city is an input variable for the adaptive model, this method can be easily understood and implemented by the crew and can satisfy 80–90% of the thermal acceptability levels of passengers.

  4. THERMAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF WASP-12b: DEFYING PREDICTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Shekhtman, Louis M. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Dr, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Machalek, Pavel [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Ave., Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Croll, Bryce [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 George St., Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 05844 (United States); Deming, Drake [Planetary Systems Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Greene, Tom [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Hora, Joseph L., E-mail: n-cowan@northwestern.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We report Warm Spitzer full-orbit phase observations of WASP-12b at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. This extremely inflated hot Jupiter is thought to be overflowing its Roche lobe, undergoing mass loss and accretion onto its host star, and has been claimed to have a C/O ratio in excess of unity. We are able to measure the transit depths, eclipse depths, thermal and ellipsoidal phase variations at both wavelengths. The large-amplitude phase variations, combined with the planet's previously measured dayside spectral energy distribution, are indicative of non-zero Bond albedo and very poor day-night heat redistribution. The transit depths in the mid-infrared-(R{sub p} /R{sub *}){sup 2} = 0.0123(3) and 0.0111(3) at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, respectively-indicate that the atmospheric opacity is greater at 3.6 than at 4.5 {mu}m, in disagreement with model predictions, irrespective of C/O ratio. The secondary eclipse depths are consistent with previous studies: F{sub day}/F{sub *} = 0.0038(4) and 0.0039(3) at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, respectively. We do not detect ellipsoidal variations at 3.6 {mu}m, but our parameter uncertainties-estimated via prayer-bead Monte Carlo-keep this non-detection consistent with model predictions. At 4.5 {mu}m, on the other hand, we detect ellipsoidal variations that are much stronger than predicted. If interpreted as a geometric effect due to the planet's elongated shape, these variations imply a 3:2 ratio for the planet's longest:shortest axes and a relatively bright day-night terminator. If we instead presume that the 4.5 {mu}m ellipsoidal variations are due to uncorrected systematic noise and we fix the amplitude of the variations to zero, the best-fit 4.5 {mu}m transit depth becomes commensurate with the 3.6 {mu}m depth, within the uncertainties. The relative transit depths are then consistent with a solar composition and short scale height at the terminator. Assuming zero ellipsoidal variations also yields a much deeper 4.5 {mu}m eclipse depth

  5. Fiber/matrix interfacial thermal conductance effect on the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    SiC/SiC composites used in fusion reactor applications are subjected to high heat fluxes and require knowledge and tailoring of their in-service thermal conductivity. Accurately predicting the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites as a function of temperature will guide the design of these materials for their intended use, which will eventually include the effects of 14-MeV neutron irradiations. This paper applies an Eshelby–Mori–Tanaka approach (EMTA) to compute the thermal conductivity of unirradiated SiC/SiC composites. The homogenization procedure includes three steps. In the first step EMTA computes the homogenized thermal conductivity of the unidirectional (UD) SiC fiber embraced by its coating layer. The second step computes the thermal conductivity of the UD composite formed by the equivalent SiC fibers embedded in a SiC matrix, and finally the thermal conductivity of the as-formed SiC/SiC composite is obtained by averaging the solution for the UD composite over all possible fiber orientations using the second-order fiber orientation tensor. The EMTA predictions for the transverse thermal conductivity of several types of SiC/SiC composites with different fiber types and interfaces are compared to the predicted and experimental results by Youngblood et al. [J. Nucl. Mater. 307–311 (2002) 1120–1125, Fusion Sci. Technol. 45 (2004) 583–591, Compos. Sci. Technol. 62 (2002) 1127–1139.

  6. Cognitive Appraisals Affect Both Embodiment of Thermal Sensation and Its Mapping to Thermal Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Trevor P; Roesch, Etienne B; Clements-Croome, Derek

    2016-01-01

    The physical environment leads to a thermal sensation that is perceived and appraised by occupants. The present study focuses on the relationship between sensation and evaluation. We asked 166 people to recall a thermal event from their recent past. They were then asked how they evaluated this experience in terms of 10 different emotions (frustrated, resigned, dislike, indifferent, angry, anxious, liking, joyful, regretful, proud). We tested whether four psychological factors (appraisal dimensions) could be used to predict the ensuing emotions, as well as comfort, acceptability, and sensation. The four dimensions were: the Conduciveness of the event, who/what caused the event (Causality), who had control (Agency), and whether the event was expected (Expectations). These dimensions, except for Expectations, were good predictors of the reported emotions. Expectations, however, predicted the reported thermal sensation, its acceptability, and ensuing comfort. The more expected an event was, the more uncomfortable a person felt, and the less likely they reported a neutral thermal sensation. Together, these results support an embodied view of how subjective appraisals affect thermal experience. Overall, we show that appraisal dimensions mediate occupants' evaluation of their thermal sensation, which suggests an additional method for understanding psychological adaption.

  7. Geographic analysis of thermal equilibria: A bioenergetic model for predicting thermal response of aquatic insect communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, B.W.; Newbold, J.D.; Vannote, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    The thermal regime immediately downstream from bottom release reservoirs is often characterized by reduced diel and seasonal (winter warm/summer cool) conditions. These unusual thermal patterns have often been implicated as a primary factor underlying observed downstream changes in the species composition of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities. The potential mechanisms for selective elimination of benthic species by unusual thermal regimes has been reviewed. Although the effects of temperature on the rate and magnitude of larval growth and development has been included in the list of potential mechanisms, only recently have field studies below dams focused on this interrelationship. This study investigates the overall community structure as well as the seasonal pattern of larval growth and development for several univoltine species of insects in the Delaware River below or near the hypolimnetic discharge of the Cannonsville and Pepeacton dams. These dams, which are located on the West and East branches of the Delaware River, respectively, produce a thermal gradient extending about 70 km downstream

  8. Experimental Preparation and Numerical Simulation of High Thermal Conductive Cu/CNTs Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhsan Ali Samer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid growth of high performance electronics devices accompanied by overheating problem, heat dissipater nanocomposites material having ultra-high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion was proposed. In this work, a nanocomposite material made of copper (Cu reinforced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs up to 10 vol. % was prepared and their thermal behaviour was measured experimentally and evaluated using numerical simulation. In order to numerically predict the thermal behaviour of Cu/CNTs composites, three different prediction methods were performed. The results showed that rules of mixture method records the highest thermal conductivity for all predicted composites. In contrast, the prediction model which takes into account the influence of the interface thermal resistance between CNTs and copper particles, has shown the lowest thermal conductivity which considered as the closest results to the experimental measurement. The experimentally measured thermal conductivities showed remarkable increase after adding 5 vol.% CNTs and higher than the thermal conductivities predicted via Nan models, indicating that the improved fabrication technique of powder injection molding that has been used to produced Cu/CNTs nanocomposites has overcome the challenges assumed in the mathematical models.

  9. Prediction of thermal and mechanical stress-strain responses of TMC's subjected to complex TMF histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mirdamadi, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and analytical evaluation of cross-plied laminates of Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn (Ti-15-3) matrix reinforced with continuous silicon-carbide fibers (SCS-6) subjected to a complex TMF loading profile. Thermomechanical fatigue test techniques were developed to conduct a simulation of a generic hypersonic flight profile. A micromechanical analysis was used. The analysis predicts the stress-strain response of the laminate and of the constituents in each ply during thermal and mechanical cycling by using only constituent properties as input. The fiber was modeled as elastic with transverse orthotropic and temperature-dependent properties. The matrix was modeled using a thermoviscoplastic constitutive relation. The fiber transverse modulus was reduced in the analysis to simulate the fiber-matrix interface failures. Excellent correlation was found between measured and predicted laminate stress-strain response due to generic hypersonic flight profile when fiber debonding was modeled.

  10. Thermal-hydraulic unreliability of passive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.; Saltos, N.T.

    1995-01-01

    Advanced light water reactor designs like AP600 and the simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) use passive safety systems for accident prevention and mitigation. Because these systems rely on natural forces for their operation, their unavailability due to hardware failures and human error is significantly smaller than that of active systems. However, the coolant flows predicted to be delivered by these systems can be subject to significant uncertainties, which in turn can lead to a significant uncertainty in the predicted thermal-hydraulic performance of the plant under accident conditions. Because of these uncertainties, there is a probability that an accident sequence for which a best estimate thermal-hydraulic analysis predicts no core damage (success sequence) may actually lead to core damage. For brevity, this probability will be called thermal-hydraulic unreliability. The assessment of this unreliability for all the success sequences requires very expensive computations. Moreover, the computational cost increases drastically as the required thermal-hydraulic reliability increases. The required computational effort can be greatly reduced if a bounding approach can be used that either eliminates the need to compute thermal-hydraulic unreliabilities, or it leads to the analysis of a few bounding sequences for which the required thermal-hydraulic reliability is relatively small. The objective of this paper is to present such an approach and determine the order of magnitude of the thermal-hydraulic unreliabilities that may have to be computed

  11. Thermal Analysis of the MC-1 Chamber/Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Darrell W.; Phelps, Lisa H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the thermal analysis techniques used to predict temperatures in the film-cooled ablative rocket nozzle used on the MC-1 60K rocket engine. A model was developed that predicts char and pyrolysis depths, liner thermal gradients, and temperatures of the bondline between the overwrap and liner. Correlation of the model was accomplished by thermal analog tests performed at Southern Research, and specially instrumented hot fire tests at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Infrared thermography was instrumental in defining nozzle hot wall surface temperatures. In-depth and outboard thermocouple data was used to correlate the kinetic decomposition routine used to predict char and pyrolysis depths. These depths were anchored with measured char and pyrolysis depths from cross-sectioned hot-fire nozzles. For the X-34 flight analysis, the model includes the ablative Thermal Protection System (TPS) material that protects the overwrap from the recirculating plume. Results from model correlation, hot-fire testing, and flight predictions will be discussed.

  12. Mars Science Laboratory Rover System Thermal Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Keith S.; Kempenaar, Joshua E.; Liu, Yuanming; Bhandari, Pradeep; Dudik, Brenda A.

    2012-01-01

    On November 26, 2011, NASA launched a large (900 kg) rover as part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission to Mars. The MSL rover is scheduled to land on Mars on August 5, 2012. Prior to launch, the Rover was successfully operated in simulated mission extreme environments during a 16-day long Rover System Thermal Test (STT). This paper describes the MSL Rover STT, test planning, test execution, test results, thermal model correlation and flight predictions. The rover was tested in the JPL 25-Foot Diameter Space Simulator Facility at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Rover operated in simulated Cruise (vacuum) and Mars Surface environments (8 Torr nitrogen gas) with mission extreme hot and cold boundary conditions. A Xenon lamp solar simulator was used to impose simulated solar loads on the rover during a bounding hot case and during a simulated Mars diurnal test case. All thermal hardware was exercised and performed nominally. The Rover Heat Rejection System, a liquid-phase fluid loop used to transport heat in and out of the electronics boxes inside the rover chassis, performed better than predicted. Steady state and transient data were collected to allow correlation of analytical thermal models. These thermal models were subsequently used to predict rover thermal performance for the MSL Gale Crater landing site. Models predict that critical hardware temperatures will be maintained within allowable flight limits over the entire 669 Sol surface mission.

  13. Thermal Characterization and Lifetime Prediction of LED Boards for SSL Lamp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Formanek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a detailed 3-D thermo-mechanical modelling of two LED board technologies to compare their performance. LED board are considered to be used in high power 800 lumen retrofit SSL (Solid State Lighting lamp. Thermal, mechanical and life time properties are evaluated by numerical modelling. Experimental results measured on fabricated LED board samples are compared to calculated data. Main role of LED board in SSL lamp is to transport heat from LED die to a heat sink and keep the thermal stresses in all layers as low as possible. The work focuses on improving of new LED board thermal management. Moreover, reliability and lifetime of LED board has been inspected by numerical calculation and validated by experiment. Thermally induced stress has been studied for wide temperature range that can affect the LED boards (-40 to +125°C. Numerical modelling of thermal performance, thermal stress distribution and lifetime has been carried out with ANSYS structural analysis where temperature dependent stress-strain material properties have been taken into account. The objective of this study is to improve not only the thermal performance of new LED board, but also identification of potential problems from mechanical fatigue point of view. Accelerated lifetime testing (e.g., mechanical is carried out in order to study the failure behaviour of current and newly developed LED board.

  14. Assessment of thermal-hydraulic aging characteristics of Wolsong-1 and aging predictions to ensure optimized future operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, H.; Hartmann, W.J.; Seo, H.B.

    2005-01-01

    'Full text:' All industrial plants undergo changes with time and nuclear plants are no exception. Wolsong-1 started its' commercial operation in 1983. Through more than 20 years of operation the plant has experienced aging behavior in many aspects. Specifically, aging of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS), can affect fuel cooling characteristics. This reduces the margin to Onset of Intermittent Dryout (OID) of the CANDU fuel, a criterion used to conservatively prevent the possibility of fuel failure under nominal and accident scenarios. The power level associated with OID defines the Critical Channel Powers (CCP). In order to mitigate margin degradation Wolsong-1 had cleaned the primary side of all steam generators in March of 2003, reducing reactor inlet header temperature. However, even with this action, degradation of margin is continuing. To track and assess the current conditions of the primary heat transport system components, data showing aging effects are acquired and steady-state thermal-hydraulic models are developed. The resulting analysis allows for optimum safe and economic reactor operation. The following issues are explored specifically with respect to Wolsong-1 nuclear reactor operation. 1. Pressure tube creep measurement, prediction, and model development Radiation induced, increasing pressure tube diameters, specifically pressure tube diametral creep, cause more and more coolant to bypass the sub-channels of the fuel bundles, reducing margin to CCP. For Wolsong-1, pressure tubes were inspected in 1990, 1992, 1994, 2001 and 2004. Measurement in the nineties was done with the 'CIGAR' system and in the 21st century with the 'AFCIS' system. For each year's inspection, more than 12 channels are measured and some channels have been inspected in several years. The diameters of specific channels, repeatedly measured in more than three different years, allow an accurate diametral creep prediction. The initial manufacturing diameter and the aged, measured

  15. Stability of thermal HFB and dissipative thermal RPA

    CERN Document Server

    Tanabe, K

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that, as for a Nilsson + pairing model, the extended stability condition of the thermal Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (THFB) solution coincides with the one of the thermal RPA (TRPA) solution unless the pairing constant G is too large. As possible extensions of the TRPA equation in alternative ways describing thermal fluctuation effect, the extended TRPA (ETRPA) and the dissipative TRPA (DTRPA) are discussed. Furthermore, the general microscopic framework of the TRPA predicts the saturation and decrease of giant resonance width in high temperature limit, i.e. the fragmentation width GAMMA sub f propor to(kT) sup ( sup - sup 3 sup ( sup 2 sup ) sup ) and the spreading width GAMMA suparrow down propor to(kT) sup ( sup - sup 1 sup ( sup 2 sup ) sup ).

  16. Predicting the effects of magnesium oxide nanoparticles and temperature on the thermal conductivity of water using artificial neural network and experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrand, Masoud; Hemmat Esfe, Mohammad; Abedini, Ehsan; Teimouri, Hamid

    2017-03-01

    The current paper first presents an empirical correlation based on experimental results for estimating thermal conductivity enhancement of MgO-water nanofluid using curve fitting method. Then, artificial neural networks (ANNs) with various numbers of neurons have been assessed by considering temperature and MgO volume fraction as the inputs variables and thermal conductivity enhancement as the output variable to select the most appropriate and optimized network. Results indicated that the network with 7 neurons had minimum error. Eventually, the output of artificial neural network was compared with the results of the proposed empirical correlation and those of the experiments. Comparisons revealed that ANN modeling was more accurate than curve-fitting method in the predicting the thermal conductivity enhancement of the nanofluid.

  17. Estimating envelope thermal characteristics from single point in time thermal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatshati, Salahaldin Faraj

    Energy efficiency programs implemented nationally in the U.S. by utilities have rendered savings which have cost on average 0.03/kWh. This cost is still well below generation costs. However, as the lowest cost energy efficiency measures are adopted, this the cost effectiveness of further investment declines. Thus there is a need to more effectively find the most opportunities for savings regionally and nationally, so that the greatest cost effectiveness in implementing energy efficiency can be achieved. Integral to this process. are at scale energy audits. However, on-site building energy audits process are expensive, in the range of US1.29/m2-$5.37/m2 and there are an insufficient number of professionals to perform the audits. Energy audits that can be conducted at-scale and at low cost are needed. Research is presented that addresses at community-wide scales characterization of building envelope thermal characteristics via drive-by and fly-over GPS linked thermal imaging. A central question drives this research: Can single point-in-time thermal images be used to infer U-values and thermal capacitances of walls and roofs? Previous efforts to use thermal images to estimate U-values have been limited to rare steady exterior weather conditions. The approaches posed here are based upon the development two models first is a dynamic model of a building envelope component with unknown U-value and thermal capacitance. The weather conditions prior to the thermal image are used as inputs to the model. The model is solved to determine the exterior surface temperature, ultimately predicted the temperature at the thermal measurement time. The model U-value and thermal capacitance are tuned in order to force the error between the predicted surface temperature and the measured surface temperature from thermal imaging to be near zero. This model is developed simply to show that such a model cannot be relied upon to accurately estimate the U-value. The second is a data

  18. Prediction of temperature and HAZ in thermal-based processes with Gaussian heat source by a hybrid GA-ANN model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazli Shahri, Hamid Reza; Mahdavinejad, Ramezanali

    2018-02-01

    Thermal-based processes with Gaussian heat source often produce excessive temperature which can impose thermally-affected layers in specimens. Therefore, the temperature distribution and Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of materials are two critical factors which are influenced by different process parameters. Measurement of the HAZ thickness and temperature distribution within the processes are not only difficult but also expensive. This research aims at finding a valuable knowledge on these factors by prediction of the process through a novel combinatory model. In this study, an integrated Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and genetic algorithm (GA) was used to predict the HAZ and temperature distribution of the specimens. To end this, a series of full factorial design of experiments were conducted by applying a Gaussian heat flux on Ti-6Al-4 V at first, then the temperature of the specimen was measured by Infrared thermography. The HAZ width of each sample was investigated through measuring the microhardness. Secondly, the experimental data was used to create a GA-ANN model. The efficiency of GA in design and optimization of the architecture of ANN was investigated. The GA was used to determine the optimal number of neurons in hidden layer, learning rate and momentum coefficient of both output and hidden layers of ANN. Finally, the reliability of models was assessed according to the experimental results and statistical indicators. The results demonstrated that the combinatory model predicted the HAZ and temperature more effective than a trial-and-error ANN model.

  19. Thermal sensation models: a systematic comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelblen, B; Psikuta, A; Bogdan, A; Annaheim, S; Rossi, R M

    2017-05-01

    Thermal sensation models, capable of predicting human's perception of thermal surroundings, are commonly used to assess given indoor conditions. These models differ in many aspects, such as the number and type of input conditions, the range of conditions in which the models can be applied, and the complexity of equations. Moreover, the models are associated with various thermal sensation scales. In this study, a systematic comparison of seven existing thermal sensation models has been performed with regard to exposures including various air temperatures, clothing thermal insulation, and metabolic rate values after a careful investigation of the models' range of applicability. Thermo-physiological data needed as input for some of the models were obtained from a mathematical model for human physiological responses. The comparison showed differences between models' predictions for the analyzed conditions, mostly higher than typical intersubject differences in votes. Therefore, it can be concluded that the choice of model strongly influences the assessment of indoor spaces. The issue of comparing different thermal sensation scales has also been discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. ATLAST ULE mirror segment performance analytical predictions based on thermally induced distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhower, Michael J.; Cohen, Lester M.; Feinberg, Lee D.; Matthews, Gary W.; Nissen, Joel A.; Park, Sang C.; Peabody, Hume L.

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for a 9.2 m aperture space-borne observatory operating across the UV/Optical/NIR spectra. The primary mirror for ATLAST is a segmented architecture with pico-meter class wavefront stability. Due to its extraordinarily low coefficient of thermal expansion, a leading candidate for the primary mirror substrate is Corning's ULE® titania-silicate glass. The ATLAST ULE® mirror substrates will be maintained at `room temperature' during on orbit flight operations minimizing the need for compensation of mirror deformation between the manufacturing temperature and the operational temperatures. This approach requires active thermal management to maintain operational temperature while on orbit. Furthermore, the active thermal control must be sufficiently stable to prevent time-varying thermally induced distortions in the mirror substrates. This paper describes a conceptual thermal management system for the ATLAST 9.2 m segmented mirror architecture that maintains the wavefront stability to less than 10 pico-meters/10 minutes RMS. Thermal and finite element models, analytical techniques, accuracies involved in solving the mirror figure errors, and early findings from the thermal and thermal-distortion analyses are presented.

  1. Nitrogen oxides emissions from thermal power plants in china: current status and future predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hezhong; Liu, Kaiyun; Hao, Jiming; Wang, Yan; Gao, Jiajia; Qiu, Peipei; Zhu, Chuanyong

    2013-10-01

    Increasing emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) over the Chinese mainland have been of great concern due to their adverse impacts on regional air quality and public health. To explore and obtain the temporal and spatial characteristics of NOx emissions from thermal power plants in China, a unit-based method is developed. The method assesses NOx emissions based on detailed information on unit capacity, boiler and burner patterns, feed fuel types, emission control technologies, and geographical locations. The national total NOx emissions in 2010 are estimated at 7801.6 kt, of which 5495.8 kt is released from coal-fired power plant units of considerable size between 300 and 1000 MW. The top provincial emitter is Shandong where plants are densely concentrated. The average NOx-intensity is estimated at 2.28 g/kWh, markedly higher than that of developed countries, mainly owing to the inadequate application of high-efficiency denitrification devices such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Future NOx emissions are predicted by applying scenario analysis, indicating that a reduction of about 40% by the year 2020 can be achieved compared with emissions in 2010. These results suggest that NOx emissions from Chinese thermal power plants could be substantially mitigated within 10 years if reasonable control measures were implemented effectively.

  2. Bayesian networks modeling for thermal error of numerical control machine tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-hua YAO; Jian-zhong FU; Zi-chen CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between the heat source location,its intensity,thermal expansion coefficient,the machine system configuration and the running environment creates complex thermal behavior of a machine tool,and also makes thermal error prediction difficult.To address this issue,a novel prediction method for machine tool thermal error based on Bayesian networks (BNs) was presented.The method described causal relationships of factors inducing thermal deformation by graph theory and estimated the thermal error by Bayesian statistical techniques.Due to the effective combination of domain knowledge and sampled data,the BN method could adapt to the change of running state of machine,and obtain satisfactory prediction accuracy.Ex-periments on spindle thermal deformation were conducted to evaluate the modeling performance.Experimental results indicate that the BN method performs far better than the least squares(LS)analysis in terms of modeling estimation accuracy.

  3. Multiscale thermal transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2004-02-01

    A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

  4. Evaluation of use of MPAD trajectory tape and number of orbit points for orbiter mission thermal predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The application of using the mission planning and analysis division (MPAD) common format trajectory data tape to predict temperatures for preflight and post flight mission analysis is presented and evaluated. All of the analyses utilized the latest Space Transportation System 1 flight (STS-1) MPAD trajectory tape, and the simplified '136 note' midsection/payload bay thermal math model. For the first 6.7 hours of the STS-1 flight profile, transient temperatures are presented for selected nodal locations with the current standard method, and the trajectory tape method. Whether the differences are considered significant or not depends upon the view point. Other transient temperature predictions are also presented. These results were obtained to investigate an initial concern that perhaps the predicted temperature differences between the two methods would not only be caused by the inaccuracies of the current method's assumed nominal attitude profile but also be affected by a lack of a sufficient number of orbit points in the current method. Comparison between 6, 12, and 24 orbit point parameters showed a surprising insensitivity to the number of orbit points.

  5. Coupling of the Models of Human Physiology and Thermal Comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, J.; Jicha, M.

    2013-04-01

    A coupled model of human physiology and thermal comfort was developed in Dymola/Modelica. A coupling combines a modified Tanabe model of human physiology and thermal comfort model developed by Zhang. The Coupled model allows predicting the thermal sensation and comfort of both local and overall from local boundary conditions representing ambient and personal factors. The aim of this study was to compare prediction of the Coupled model with the Fiala model prediction and experimental data. Validation data were taken from the literature, mainly from the validation manual of software Theseus-FE [1]. In the paper validation of the model for very light physical activities (1 met) indoor environment with temperatures from 12 °C up to 48 °C is presented. The Coupled model predicts mean skin temperature for cold, neutral and warm environment well. However prediction of core temperature in cold environment is inaccurate and very affected by ambient temperature. Evaluation of thermal comfort in warm environment is supplemented by skin wettedness prediction. The Coupled model is designed for non-uniform and transient environmental conditions; it is also suitable simulation of thermal comfort in vehicles cabins. The usage of the model is limited for very light physical activities up to 1.2 met only.

  6. Coupling of the Models of Human Physiology and Thermal Comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A coupled model of human physiology and thermal comfort was developed in Dymola/Modelica. A coupling combines a modified Tanabe model of human physiology and thermal comfort model developed by Zhang. The Coupled model allows predicting the thermal sensation and comfort of both local and overall from local boundary conditions representing ambient and personal factors. The aim of this study was to compare prediction of the Coupled model with the Fiala model prediction and experimental data. Validation data were taken from the literature, mainly from the validation manual of software Theseus–FE [1]. In the paper validation of the model for very light physical activities (1 met indoor environment with temperatures from 12 °C up to 48 °C is presented. The Coupled model predicts mean skin temperature for cold, neutral and warm environment well. However prediction of core temperature in cold environment is inaccurate and very affected by ambient temperature. Evaluation of thermal comfort in warm environment is supplemented by skin wettedness prediction. The Coupled model is designed for non-uniform and transient environmental conditions; it is also suitable simulation of thermal comfort in vehicles cabins. The usage of the model is limited for very light physical activities up to 1.2 met only.

  7. Existence of negative differential thermal conductance in one-dimensional diffusive thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiuning; Chen, Yong P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that in a finite one-dimensional (1D) system with diffusive thermal transport described by the Fourier's law, negative differential thermal conductance (NDTC) cannot occur when the temperature at one end is fixed and there are no abrupt junctions. We demonstrate that NDTC in this case requires the presence of junction(s) with temperature-dependent thermal contact resistance (TCR). We derive a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of NDTC in terms of the properties of the TCR for systems with a single junction. We show that under certain circumstances we even could have infinite (negative or positive) differential thermal conductance in the presence of the TCR. Our predictions provide theoretical basis for constructing NDTC-based devices, such as thermal amplifiers, oscillators, and logic devices.

  8. Computational micromagnetics: prediction of time dependent and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrefl, T.; Scholz, W.; Suess, Dieter; Fidler, J.

    2001-01-01

    Finite element modeling treats magnetization processes on a length scale of several nanometers and thus gives a quantitative correlation between the microstructure and the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials. This work presents a novel finite element/boundary element micro-magnetics solver that combines a wavelet-based matrix compression technique for magnetostatic field calculations with a BDF/GMRES method for the time integration of the Gilbert equation of motion. The simulations show that metastable energy minima and nonuniform magnetic states within the grains are important factors in the reversal dynamics at finite temperature. The numerical solution of the Gilbert equation shows how reversed domains nucleate and expand. The switching time of submicron magnetic elements depends on the shape of the elements. Elements with slanted ends decrease the overall reversal time, as a transverse demagnetizing field suppresses oscillations of the magnetization. Thermal activated processes can be included adding a random thermal field to the effective magnetic field. Thermally assisted reversal was studied for CoCrPtTa thin-film media

  9. Electrical and thermal modeling of railguns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical and thermal modeling of railguns at Los Alamos has been done for two purposes: (1) to obtain detailed information about the behavior of specific railgun components such as the rails, and (2) to predict overall performance of railgun tests. Detailed electrical and thermal modeling has concentrated on calculations of the inductance and surface current distribution of long parallel conductors in the high-frequency limit and on calculations of current and thermal diffusion in rails. Inductance calculations for various rail cross sections and for magnetic flux compression generators (MFCG) have been done. Inductance and current distribution results were compared with experimental measurements. Twodimensional calculations of current and thermal diffusion in rail cross sections have been done; predictions of rail heating and melting as a function of rail size and total current have been made. An overall performance model of a railgun and power supply has been developed and used to design tests at Los Alamos. The lumped-parameter circuit model uses results from the detailed inductance and current diffusion calculations along with other circuit component models to predict rail current and projectile acceleration, velocity, and position as a function of time

  10. Factors Affecting the Thickness of Thermal Aureoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Annen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Intrusions of magma induce thermal aureoles in the country rock. Analytical solutions predict that the thickness of an aureole is proportional to the thickness of the intrusion. However, in the field, thermal aureoles are often significantly thinner or wider than predicted by simple thermal models. Numerical models show that thermal aureoles are wider if the heat transfer in the magma is faster than in the country rock due to contrasts in thermal diffusivities or the effect of magma convection. Large thermal aureoles can also be caused by repeated injection close to the contact. Aureoles are thin when heat transfer in the country rock is faster than heat transfer within the magma or in case of incrementally, slowly emplaced magma. Absorption of latent heat due to metamorphic reactions or water volatilization also affects thermal aureoles but to a lesser extent. The way these parameters affect the thickness of a thermal aureole depends on the isotherm under consideration, hence on which metamorphic phase is used to draw the limit of the aureole. Thermal aureoles provide insight on the dynamics of intrusions emplacement. Although available examples are limited, asymmetric aureoles point to magma emplacement by over-accretion for mafic cases and by under-accretion for felsic cases, consistent with geochronological data.

  11. Thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal expansion of fuel pellet is an important property which limits the lifetime of the fuels in reactors, because it affects both the pellet and cladding mechanical interaction and the gap conductivity. By fitting a number of available measured data, recommended equations have been presented and successfully used to estimate thermal expansion coefficient of the nuclear fuel pellet. However, due to large scatter of the measured data, non-consensus data have been omitted in formulating the equations. Also, the equation is strongly governed by the lack of appropriate experimental data. For those reasons, it is important to develop theoretical methodologies to better describe thermal expansion behaviour of nuclear fuel. In particular, first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations have been certainly contributed to predict reliable thermal expansion without fitting the measured data. Furthermore, the two theoretical techniques have improved on understanding the change of fuel dimension by describing the atomic-scale processes associated with lattice expansion in the fuels. (author)

  12. Development of Mitsubishi high thermal performance grid 1 - CFD applicability for thermal hydraulic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, K.; Hoshi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Mitsubishi applied the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation method for designing of the new lower pressure loss and higher DNB performance grid spacer. Reduction of pressure loss of the grid has been estimated by CFD. Also, CFD has been developed as a design tool to predict the coolant mixing ability of vane structures, that is to compare the relative peak spot temperatures around fuel rods at the same heat flux condition. These evaluations have been reflected to the new grid spacer design. The prototype grid was manufactured and some flow tests were performed to examine the thermal hydraulic performance, which were predicted by CFD. The experimental data of pressure loss was in good agreement with CFD prediction. The CFD prediction of flow behaviors at downstream of the mixing vanes was verified by detail cross-flow measurements at rod gaps by the rod LDV system. It is concluded that the applicability of the CFD evaluation method for the thermal hydraulic design of the grid is confirmed. (authors)

  13. Improving thermal model prediction through statistical analysis of irradiation and post-irradiation data from AGR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Binh T.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Einerson, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the High Temperature Reactors (HTR) R and D program, a series of irradiation tests, designated as Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR), have been defined to support development and qualification of fuel design, fabrication process, and fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The AGR tests employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule and instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in graphite blocks enabling temperature control. While not possible to obtain by direct measurements in the tests, crucial fuel conditions (e.g., temperature, neutron fast fluence, and burnup) are calculated using core physics and thermal modeling codes. This paper is focused on AGR test fuel temperature predicted by the ABAQUS code's finite element-based thermal models. The work follows up on a previous study, in which several statistical analysis methods were adapted, implemented in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS), and applied for qualification of AGR-1 thermocouple data. Abnormal trends in measured data revealed by the statistical analysis are traced to either measuring instrument deterioration or physical mechanisms in capsules that may have shifted the system thermal response. The main thrust of this work is to exploit the variety of data obtained in irradiation and post-irradiation examination (PIE) for assessment of modeling assumptions. As an example, the uneven reduction of the control gas gap in Capsule 5 found in the capsule metrology measurements in PIE helps identify mechanisms other than TC drift causing the decrease in TC readings. This suggests a more physics-based modification of the thermal model that leads to a better fit with experimental data, thus reducing model uncertainty and increasing confidence in the calculated fuel temperatures of the AGR-1 test

  14. Improving thermal model prediction through statistical analysis of irradiation and post-irradiation data from AGR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Binh T., E-mail: Binh.Pham@inl.gov [Human Factor, Controls and Statistics Department, Nuclear Science and Technology, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Hawkes, Grant L. [Thermal Science and Safety Analysis Department, Nuclear Science and Technology, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Einerson, Jeffrey J. [Human Factor, Controls and Statistics Department, Nuclear Science and Technology, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    As part of the High Temperature Reactors (HTR) R and D program, a series of irradiation tests, designated as Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR), have been defined to support development and qualification of fuel design, fabrication process, and fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The AGR tests employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule and instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in graphite blocks enabling temperature control. While not possible to obtain by direct measurements in the tests, crucial fuel conditions (e.g., temperature, neutron fast fluence, and burnup) are calculated using core physics and thermal modeling codes. This paper is focused on AGR test fuel temperature predicted by the ABAQUS code's finite element-based thermal models. The work follows up on a previous study, in which several statistical analysis methods were adapted, implemented in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS), and applied for qualification of AGR-1 thermocouple data. Abnormal trends in measured data revealed by the statistical analysis are traced to either measuring instrument deterioration or physical mechanisms in capsules that may have shifted the system thermal response. The main thrust of this work is to exploit the variety of data obtained in irradiation and post-irradiation examination (PIE) for assessment of modeling assumptions. As an example, the uneven reduction of the control gas gap in Capsule 5 found in the capsule metrology measurements in PIE helps identify mechanisms other than TC drift causing the decrease in TC readings. This suggests a more physics-based modification of the thermal model that leads to a better fit with experimental data, thus reducing model uncertainty and increasing confidence in the calculated fuel temperatures of the AGR-1 test.

  15. A study on the abundance of quartz in thermal coals of India and its relation to abrasion index: Development of predictive model for abrasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandopadhyay, A.K. [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research Digwadih Campus, P.O.-FRI, Dhanbad-828108, Jharkhand (India)

    2010-10-01

    The quartz content of each of the 61 thermal coals used in power stations in India has been determined using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy. It has been observed that quartz is abundant in the thermal coals and its proportion varies from 5 to 20% by wt. The abrasion index (AI), a measure of abrasion caused by coals, has been determined for each coal according to the procedure laid down in Indian Standard IS: 9949-1986. The data generated on abrasion together with ash and quartz percentages of the coals studied have been subjected to regression and correlation analysis. Positive correlations have been found between AI and quartz content and between AI and ash yield, but the correlation between AI and ash (A) and quartz (Q) percentages has been observed to be the most significant (R{sup 2} = 0.86). The linear regression model AI = 1.00A + 1.35Q thus developed has the ability to predict AI of the thermal coals within {+-} 10 mg/kg at 95.5% confidence level. Results of application of the model to predicting abrasion of a limited number of foreign coals with different origins have been found to be encouraging. Integration of other variables like the size and the shape of the abrading particles along with other physical properties of coal, like the bulk density and the grindability, with the model, in addition to the variables already considered, has been suggested for improved prediction. (author)

  16. Thermal stress management of a solid oxide fuel cell using neural network predictive control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajimolana, S.A.; Tonekabonimoghadam, S.M.; Hussain, M.A.; Chakrabarti, M.H.; Jayakumar, N.S.; Hashim, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In SOFC (solid oxide fuel cell) systems operating at high temperatures, temperature fluctuation induces a thermal stress in the electrodes and electrolyte ceramics; therefore, the cell temperature distribution is recommended to be kept as constant as possible. In the present work, a mathematical model based on first principles is presented to avert such temperature fluctuations. The fuel cell running on ammonia is divided into five subsystems and factors such as mass/energy/momentum transfer, diffusion through porous media, electrochemical reactions, and polarization losses inside the subsystems are presented. Dynamic cell-tube temperature responses of the cell to step changes in conditions of the feed streams is investigated. The results of simulation indicate that the transient response of the SOFC is mainly influenced by the temperature dynamics. It is also shown that the inlet stream temperatures are associated with the highest long term start-up time (467 s) among other parameters in terms of step changes. In contrast the step change in fuel velocity has the lowest influence on the start-up time (about 190 s from initial steady state to the new steady state) among other parameters. A NNPC (neural network predictive controller) is then implemented for thermal stress management by controlling the cell tube temperature to avoid performance degradation by manipulating the temperature of the inlet air stream. The regulatory performance of the NNPC is compared with a PI (proportional–integral) controller. The performance of the control system confirms that NNPC is a non-linear-model-based strategy which can assure less oscillating control responses with shorter settling times in comparison to the PI controller. - Highlights: • Effect of the operating parameters on the fuel cell temperature is analysed. • A neural network predictive controller (NNPC) is implemented. • The performance of NNPC is compared with the PI controller. • A detailed model is used for

  17. Pressurized Thermal Shock, Pts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, C.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurized Thermal Shock (Pts) refers to a condition that challenges the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel. The root cause of this problem is the radiation embrittlement of the reactor vessel. This embrittlement leads to an increase in the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RTNDT). RTNDT can increase to the point where the reactor vessel material can loose fracture toughness during overcooling events. The analysis of the risk of having a Pts for a specific plant is a multi-disciplinary problem involving probabilistic risk analysis (PRA), thermal-hydraulic analysis, and ultimately a structural and fracture analysis of the vessel wall. The PRA effort involves the postulation of overcooling events and ultimately leads to an integrated risk analysis. The thermal-hydraulic effort involves the difficult task of predicting the system behavior during a postulated overcooling scenario with a special emphasis on predicting the thermal and mechanic loadings on the reactor pressure vessel wall. The structural and fracture analysis of the reactor vessel wall relies on the thermal-hydraulic conditions as boundary conditions. The US experience has indicated that medium and large diameter primary system breaks dominate the risk of Pts along with scenarios that involve a stuck open valve (and associated system cooldown) that recloses resulting in system re-pressurization while the vessel wall is cool.

  18. Thermal Expansion Anomaly Regulated by Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zi-Kui; Wang, Yi; Shang, Shunli

    2014-11-01

    Thermal expansion, defined as the temperature dependence of volume under constant pressure, is a common phenomenon in nature and originates from anharmonic lattice dynamics. However, it has been poorly understood how thermal expansion can show anomalies such as colossal positive, zero, or negative thermal expansion (CPTE, ZTE, or NTE), especially in quantitative terms. Here we show that changes in configurational entropy due to metastable micro(scopic)states can lead to quantitative prediction of these anomalies. We integrate the Maxwell relation, statistic mechanics, and first-principles calculations to demonstrate that when the entropy is increased by pressure, NTE occurs such as in Invar alloy (Fe3Pt, for example), silicon, ice, and water, and when the entropy is decreased dramatically by pressure, CPTE is expected such as in anti-Invar cerium, ice and water. Our findings provide a theoretic framework to understand and predict a broad range of anomalies in nature in addition to thermal expansion, which may include gigantic electrocaloric and electromechanical responses, anomalously reduced thermal conductivity, and spin distributions.

  19. Solar Probe Plus MAG Sensor Thermal Design for Low Heater Power and Extreme Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The heater power available for the Solar Probe Plus FIELDS MAG sensor is less than half of the heritage value for other missions. Nominally the MAG sensors are in the spacecraft's umbra. In the worst hot case, approximately 200 spacecraft communication downlinks, up to 10 hours each, are required at 0.7 AU. These downlinks require the spacecraft to slew 45 deg. about the Y-axis, exposing the MAG sensors and boom to sunlight. This paper presents the thermal design to meet the MAG sensor thermal requirements in the extreme thermal environment and with low heater power. A thermal balance test on the MAG sensor engineering model has verified the thermal design and correlated the thermal model for flight temperature predictions.

  20. On the unification of thermal perception and adaptive actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haldi, Frederic; Robinson, Darren [Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory (LESO-PB), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    Occupants exercise adaptive actions in response to discomforting environmental stimuli in an attempt to restore their comfort. These responses to adaptive actions are either ignored (conventional PMV models) or handled in an aggregated way (adaptive thermal comfort models). Furthermore the availability of adaptive actions and their effectiveness tends to be particular to a given building and climatic context. A good model should predict the probability with which available adaptive actions will be exercised and the feedback to occupants' perceived comfort from these specific actions. In this paper we introduce a new modelling framework which does just that. Informed by results from detailed monitoring campaigns we first present a model to predict the probability distribution of thermal sensation in non air-conditioned buildings and a new method for deducing comfort zones in such buildings. We then introduce a methodology for combining recent advances in the prediction of occupants' adaptive actions with the comfort feedback from these actions. We demonstrate how thermal sensation probability distribution may be deduced accounting for exercised adaptive actions and develop a comprehensive model for predicting comfort temperature which explicitly accounts for probable adaptive actions and their thermal feedback. We go on to describe how this modelling framework, which may be readily applied for thermal comfort prediction in specific building and climatic contexts, significantly deepens our understanding of adaptive thermal comfort mechanisms. Finally, we also describe ways of handling individuals' diversity within this new framework as well as how it may be applied to evaluate visual and olfactory comfort. (author)

  1. Three-dimensional transport coefficient model and prediction-correction numerical method for thermal margin analysis of PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.

    1981-01-01

    Combustion Engineering Inc. designs its modern PWR reactor cores using open-core thermal-hydraulic methods where the mass, momentum and energy equations are solved in three dimensions (one axial and two lateral directions). The resultant fluid properties are used to compute the minimum Departure from Nuclear Boiling Ratio (DNBR) which ultimately sets the power capability of the core. The on-line digital monitoring and protection systems require a small fast-running algorithm of the design code. This paper presents two techniques used in the development of the on-line DNB algorithm. First, a three-dimensional transport coefficient model is introduced to radially group the flow subchannel into channels for the thermal-hydraulic fluid properties calculation. Conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for this channels are derived using transport coefficients to modify the calculation of the radial transport of enthalpy and momentum. Second, a simplified, non-iterative numerical method, called the prediction-correction method, is applied together with the transport coefficient model to reduce the computer execution time in the determination of fluid properties. Comparison of the algorithm and the design thermal-hydraulic code shows agreement to within 0.65% equivalent power at a 95/95 confidence/probability level for all normal operating conditions of the PWR core. This algorithm accuracy is achieved with 1/800th of the computer processing time of its parent design code. (orig.)

  2. Thermal conductivity model for nanofiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinpeng; Huang, Congliang; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Yang, Ronggui

    2018-02-01

    Understanding thermal transport in nanofiber networks is essential for their applications in thermal management, which are used extensively as mechanically sturdy thermal insulation or high thermal conductivity materials. In this study, using the statistical theory and Fourier's law of heat conduction while accounting for both the inter-fiber contact thermal resistance and the intrinsic thermal resistance of nanofibers, an analytical model is developed to predict the thermal conductivity of nanofiber networks as a function of their geometric and thermal properties. A scaling relation between the thermal conductivity and the geometric properties including volume fraction and nanofiber length of the network is revealed. This model agrees well with both numerical simulations and experimental measurements found in the literature. This model may prove useful in analyzing the experimental results and designing nanofiber networks for both high and low thermal conductivity applications.

  3. Thermal conductivity model for nanofiber networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xinpeng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Huang, Congliang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; School of Electrical and Power Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, China; Liu, Qingkun [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Smalyukh, Ivan I. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Yang, Ronggui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Buildings and Thermal Systems Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA

    2018-02-28

    Understanding thermal transport in nanofiber networks is essential for their applications in thermal management, which are used extensively as mechanically sturdy thermal insulation or high thermal conductivity materials. In this study, using the statistical theory and Fourier's law of heat conduction while accounting for both the inter-fiber contact thermal resistance and the intrinsic thermal resistance of nanofibers, an analytical model is developed to predict the thermal conductivity of nanofiber networks as a function of their geometric and thermal properties. A scaling relation between the thermal conductivity and the geometric properties including volume fraction and nanofiber length of the network is revealed. This model agrees well with both numerical simulations and experimental measurements found in the literature. This model may prove useful in analyzing the experimental results and designing nanofiber networks for both high and low thermal conductivity applications.

  4. House thermal model parameter estimation method for Model Predictive Control applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Richard Pieter; de Wit, J.B.; Fink, J.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    In this paper we investigate thermal network models with different model orders applied to various Dutch low-energy house types with high and low interior thermal mass and containing floor heating. Parameter estimations are performed by using data from TRNSYS simulations. The paper discusses results

  5. Predicting fundamental and realized distributions based on thermal niche: A case study of a freshwater turtle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João Fabrício Mota; Coelho, Marco Túlio Pacheco; Ribeiro, Bruno R.

    2018-04-01

    Species distribution models (SDM) have been broadly used in ecology to address theoretical and practical problems. Currently, there are two main approaches to generate SDMs: (i) correlative, which is based on species occurrences and environmental predictor layers and (ii) process-based models, which are constructed based on species' functional traits and physiological tolerances. The distributions estimated by each approach are based on different components of species niche. Predictions of correlative models approach species realized niches, while predictions of process-based are more akin to species fundamental niche. Here, we integrated the predictions of fundamental and realized distributions of the freshwater turtle Trachemys dorbigni. Fundamental distribution was estimated using data of T. dorbigni's egg incubation temperature, and realized distribution was estimated using species occurrence records. Both types of distributions were estimated using the same regression approaches (logistic regression and support vector machines), both considering macroclimatic and microclimatic temperatures. The realized distribution of T. dorbigni was generally nested in its fundamental distribution reinforcing theoretical assumptions that the species' realized niche is a subset of its fundamental niche. Both modelling algorithms produced similar results but microtemperature generated better results than macrotemperature for the incubation model. Finally, our results reinforce the conclusion that species realized distributions are constrained by other factors other than just thermal tolerances.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Metallic Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hin, Celine

    2018-03-10

    This project has developed a modeling and simulation approaches to predict the thermal conductivity of metallic fuels and their alloys. We focus on two methods. The first method has been developed by the team at the University of Wisconsin Madison. They developed a practical and general modeling approach for thermal conductivity of metals and metal alloys that integrates ab-initio and semi-empirical physics-based models to maximize the strengths of both techniques. The second method has been developed by the team at Virginia Tech. This approach consists of a determining the thermal conductivity using only ab-initio methods without any fitting parameters. Both methods were complementary. The models incorporated both phonon and electron contributions. Good agreement with experimental data over a wide temperature range were found. The models also provided insight into the different physical factors that govern the thermal conductivity under different temperatures. The models were general enough to incorporate more complex effects like additional alloying species, defects, transmutation products and noble gas bubbles to predict the behavior of complex metallic alloys like U-alloy fuel systems under burnup. 3 Introduction Thermal conductivity is an important thermal physical property affecting the performance and efficiency of metallic fuels [1]. Some experimental measurement of thermal conductivity and its correlation with composition and temperature from empirical fitting are available for U, Zr and their alloys with Pu and other minor actinides. However, as reviewed in by Kim, Cho and Sohn [2], due to the difficulty in doing experiments on actinide materials, thermal conductivities of metallic fuels have only been measured at limited alloy compositions and temperatures, some of them even being negative and unphysical. Furthermore, the correlations developed so far are empirical in nature and may not be accurate when used for prediction at conditions far from those

  7. Thermal infrared anomalies of several strong earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Congxin; Zhang, Yuansheng; Guo, Xiao; Hui, Shaoxing; Qin, Manzhong; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of "time-frequency relative power spectrum." (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting.

  8. Method of estimating thermal power distribution of core of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately and rapidly predict the thermal power of the core of a BWR they reactor at load follow-up operating time. Method: A parameter value corrected from a correction coefficient deciding unit and a xenon density distribution value predicted and calculated from a xenon density distributor are inputted to a thermal power distribution predicting devise, the status amount such as coolant flow rate or the like predetermined at this and next high power operating times is substituted for physical model to predict and calculate the thermal power distribution. The status amount of a nuclear reactor at the time of operating in previous high power corresponding to the next high power operation to be predicted is read from the status amount of the reactor stored in time series manner is a reactor core status memory, and the physical model used in the prediction and calculation of the thermal power distribution at the time of next high power operation is corrected. (Sikiya, K.)

  9. Optimization and Prediction of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Graphene/LLDPE Nanocomposites by Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Noorunnisa Khanam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this work is to develop the knowledge of prediction of the physical and chemical properties of processed linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE/graphene nanoplatelets composites. Composites made from LLDPE reinforced with 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 wt% grade C graphene nanoplatelets (C-GNP were processed in a twin screw extruder with three different screw speeds and feeder speeds (50, 100, and 150 rpm. These applied conditions are used to optimize the following properties: thermal conductivity, crystallization temperature, degradation temperature, and tensile strength while prediction of these properties was done through artificial neural network (ANN. The three first properties increased with increase in both screw speed and C-GNP content. The tensile strength reached a maximum value at 4 wt% C-GNP and a speed of 150 rpm as this represented the optimum condition for the stress transfer through the amorphous chains of the matrix to the C-GNP. ANN can be confidently used as a tool to predict the above material properties before investing in development programs and actual manufacturing, thus significantly saving money, time, and effort.

  10. Forty years of Fanger's model of thermal comfort: comfort for all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, J

    2008-06-01

    The predicted mean vote (PMV) model of thermal comfort, created by Fanger in the late 1960s, is used worldwide to assess thermal comfort. Fanger based his model on college-aged students for use in invariant environmental conditions in air-conditioned buildings in moderate thermal climate zones. Environmental engineering practice calls for a predictive method that is applicable to all types of people in any kind of building in every climate zone. In this publication, existing support and criticism, as well as modifications to the PMV model are discussed in light of the requirements by environmental engineering practice in the 21st century in order to move from a predicted mean vote to comfort for all. Improved prediction of thermal comfort can be achieved through improving the validity of the PMV model, better specification of the model's input parameters, and accounting for outdoor thermal conditions and special groups. The application range of the PMV model can be enlarged, for instance, by using the model to assess the effects of the thermal environment on productivity and behavior, and interactions with other indoor environmental parameters, and the use of information and communication technologies. Even with such modifications to thermal comfort evaluation, thermal comfort for all can only be achieved when occupants have effective control over their own thermal environment. The paper treats the assessment of thermal comfort using the PMV model of Fanger, and deals with the strengths and limitations of this model. Readers are made familiar to some opportunities for use in the 21st-century information society.

  11. Analysis of Thermal Comfort in an Intelligent Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Grzegorz; Telejko, Marek; Orman, Łukasz J.

    2017-06-01

    Analysis of thermal comfort in the ENERGIS Building, an intelligent building in the campus of the Kielce University of Technology, Poland is the focus of this paper. For this purpose, air temperature, air relative humidity, air flow rate and carbon dioxide concentration were measured and the mean radiant temperature was determined. Thermal sensations of the students occupying the rooms of the building were evaluated with the use of a questionnaire. The students used a seven-point scale of thermal comfort. The microclimate measurement results were used to determine the Predicted Mean Vote and the Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied indices.

  12. Optical polymers for laser medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanova, Nina G.; Kasarova, Stefka N.; Nikolov, Ivan D.

    2016-01-01

    In medicine, optical polymers are used not only in ophthalmology but in many laser surgical, diagnostic and therapeutic systems. The application in lens design is determined by their refractive and dispersive properties in the considered spectral region. We have used different measuring techniques to obtain precise refractometric data in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Dispersive, thermal and other important optical characteristics of polymers have been studied. Design of a plastic achromatic objective, used in a surgical stereo-microscope at 1064 nm laser wavelength, is accomplished. Geometrical and wavefront aberrations are calculated. Another example of application of polymers is the designed all-mirror apochromatic micro-lens, intended for superluminescent diode fiber coupling in medical systems.

  13. Simplified Building Thermal Model Used for Optimal Control of Radiant Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MPC has the ability to optimize the system operation parameters for energy conservation. Recently, it has been used in HVAC systems for saving energy, but there are very few applications in radiant cooling systems. To implement MPC in buildings with radiant terminals, the predictions of cooling load and thermal environment are indispensable. In this paper, a simplified thermal model is proposed for predicting cooling load and thermal environment in buildings with radiant floor. In this thermal model, the black-box model is introduced to derive the incident solar radiation, while the genetic algorithm is utilized to identify the parameters of the thermal model. In order to further validate this simplified thermal model, simulated results from TRNSYS are compared with those from this model and the deviation is evaluated based on coefficient of variation of root mean square (CV. The results show that the simplified model can predict the operative temperature with a CV lower than 1% and predict cooling loads with a CV lower than 10%. For the purpose of supervisory control in HVAC systems, this simplified RC thermal model has an acceptable accuracy and can be used for further MPC in buildings with radiation terminals.

  14. Predicting the Air Quality, Thermal Comfort and Draught Risk for a Virtual Classroom with Desk-Type Personalized Ventilation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eusébio Z. E. Conceição

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the prediction of indoor air quality (IAQ, thermal comfort (TC and draught risk (DR for a virtual classroom with desk-type personalized ventilation system (PVS. This numerical study considers a coupling of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD, human thermal comfort (HTC and building thermal behavior (BTB numerical models. The following indexes are used: the predicted percentage of dissatisfied people (PPD index is used for the evaluation of the TC level; the carbon dioxide (CO2 concentration in the breathing zone is used for the calculation of IAQ; and the DR level around the occupants is used for the evaluation of the discomfort due to draught. The air distribution index (ADI, based in the TC level, the IAQ level, the effectiveness for heat removal and the effectiveness for contaminant removal, is used for evaluating the performance of the personalized air distribution system. The numerical simulation is made for a virtual classroom with six desks. Each desk is equipped with one PVS with two air terminal devices located overhead and two air terminal devices located below the desktop. In one numerical simulation six occupants are used, while in another simulation twelve occupants are considered. For each numerical simulation an air supply temperature of 20 °C and 24 °C is applied. The results obtained show that the ADI value is higher for twelve persons than for six persons in the classroom and it is higher for an inlet air temperature of 20 °C than for an inlet air temperature of 24 °C. In future works, more combinations of upper and lower air terminal devices located around the body area and more combinations of occupants located in the desks will be analyzed.

  15. Thermal behavior in the transition region between nucleate and film boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adiutori, E.F.

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of post Critical Heat Flux (CHF) behavior is complicated by the highly nonlinear thermal behavior of boiling interfaces--ie by the nonlinear nature of the boiling curve. Nonlinearity in the boiling curve can and does cause thermal instability, resulting in temperature discontinuities. Thus the prediction of post CHF behavior requires the analysis of thermal stability. This in turn requires an accurate description of thermal behavior in transition boiling. This paper determines thermal behavior in transition boiling by analysis of literature data. It also describes design features which improve post CHF performance and are reported in the literature

  16. A statistical approach for predicting thermal diffusivity profiles in fusion plasmas as a transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    A statistical approach is proposed to predict thermal diffusivity profiles as a transport “model” in fusion plasmas. It can provide regression expressions for the ion and electron heat diffusivities (χ i and χ e ), separately, to construct their radial profiles. An approach that this letter is proposing outstrips the conventional scaling laws for the global confinement time (τ E ) since it also deals with profiles (temperature, density, heating depositions etc.). This approach has become possible with the analysis database accumulated by the extensive application of the integrated transport analysis suite to experiment data. In this letter, TASK3D-a analysis database for high-ion-temperature (high-T i ) plasmas in the LHD (Large Helical Device) is used as an example to describe an approach. (author)

  17. Nanoscale hotspots due to nonequilibrium thermal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Sanjiv; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental and modeling efforts have been directed towards the issue of temperature localization and hotspot formation in the vicinity of nanoscale heat generating devices. The nonequilibrium transport conditions which develop around these nanoscale devices results in elevated temperatures near the heat source which can not be predicted by continuum diffusion theory. Efforts to determine the severity of this temperature localization phenomena in silicon devices near and above room temperature are of technological importance to the development of microelectronics and other nanotechnologies. In this work, we have developed a new modeling tool in order to explore the magnitude of the additional thermal resistance which forms around nanoscale hotspots from temperatures of 100-1000K. The models are based on a two fluid approximation in which thermal energy is transferred between ''stationary'' optical phonons and fast propagating acoustic phonon modes. The results of the model have shown excellent agreement with experimental results of localized hotspots in silicon at lower temperatures. The model predicts that the effect of added thermal resistance due to the nonequilibrium phonon distribution is greatest at lower temperatures, but is maintained out to temperatures of 1000K. The resistance predicted by the numerical code can be easily integrated with continuum models in order to predict the temperature distribution around nanoscale heat sources with improved accuracy. Additional research efforts also focused on the measurements of the thermal resistance of silicon thin films at higher temperatures, with a focus on polycrystalline silicon. This work was intended to provide much needed experimental data on the thermal transport properties for micro and nanoscale devices built with this material. Initial experiments have shown that the exposure of polycrystalline silicon to high temperatures may induce recrystallization and radically increase the thermal

  18. Multi-Node Thermal System Model for Lithium-Ion Battery Packs: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Ying; Smith, Kandler; Wood, Eric; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2015-09-14

    Temperature is one of the main factors that controls the degradation in lithium ion batteries. Accurate knowledge and control of cell temperatures in a pack helps the battery management system (BMS) to maximize cell utilization and ensure pack safety and service life. In a pack with arrays of cells, a cells temperature is not only affected by its own thermal characteristics but also by its neighbors, the cooling system and pack configuration, which increase the noise level and the complexity of cell temperatures prediction. This work proposes to model lithium ion packs thermal behavior using a multi-node thermal network model, which predicts the cell temperatures by zones. The model was parametrized and validated using commercial lithium-ion battery packs. neighbors, the cooling system and pack configuration, which increase the noise level and the complexity of cell temperatures prediction. This work proposes to model lithium ion packs thermal behavior using a multi-node thermal network model, which predicts the cell temperatures by zones. The model was parametrized and validated using commercial lithium-ion battery packs.

  19. Thermal and physical properties of bakery products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, O D; Marcotte, M; Sablani, S S; Castaigne, F

    2001-07-01

    This article reviews the measurement techniques, prediction models, and data on thermo-physical properties of bakery products: specific heat, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and density. Over the last decade, investigation has focused more on thermo-physical properties of nonbread bakery products. Both commonly used and new measurement techniques for thermo-physical properties reported in the publication are presented with directions for their proper use. Data and prediction models are tabulated for the range of moisture content and temperature of the bakery products.

  20. Thermal Perception in the Mediterranean Area: Comparing the Mediterranean Outdoor Comfort Index (MOCI to Other Outdoor Thermal Comfort Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacopo Golasi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor thermal comfort is an essential factor of people’s everyday life and deeply affects the habitability of outdoor spaces. However the indices used for its evaluation were usually developed for indoor environments assuming still air conditions and absence of solar radiation and were only later adapted to outdoor spaces. For this reason, in a previous study the Mediterranean Outdoor Comfort Index (MOCI was developed, which is an empirical index able to estimate the thermal perception of people living in the Mediterranean area. In this study it was compared numerically (by using the data obtained through a field survey with other selected thermal indices. This comparison, performed in terms of Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient, association Gamma, percentage of correct predictions and cross-tabulation analysis, led to identify the MOCI as the most suitable index to examine outdoor thermal comfort in the interested area. As a matter of fact it showed a total percentage of correct predictions of 35.5%. Good performances were reported even in thermophysiological indices as the Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET and Predicted Mean Vote (PMV. Moreover it was revealed that adaptation and acclimatization phenomena tend to have a certain influence as well.

  1. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-03-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ˜ 1 nm , the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal

  2. Thermal comfort: research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, Joost; Mazej, Mitja; Hensen, Jan L M

    2010-01-01

    Thermal comfort--the state of mind, which expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment--is an important aspect of the building design process as modern man spends most of the day indoors. This paper reviews the developments in indoor thermal comfort research and practice since the second half of the 1990s, and groups these developments around two main themes; (i) thermal comfort models and standards, and (ii) advances in computerization. Within the first theme, the PMV-model (Predicted Mean Vote), created by Fanger in the late 1960s is discussed in the light of the emergence of models of adaptive thermal comfort. The adaptive models are based on adaptive opportunities of occupants and are related to options of personal control of the indoor climate and psychology and performance. Both models have been considered in the latest round of thermal comfort standard revisions. The second theme focuses on the ever increasing role played by computerization in thermal comfort research and practice, including sophisticated multi-segmental modeling and building performance simulation, transient thermal conditions and interactions, thermal manikins.

  3. Development of a thermal control algorithm using artificial neural network models for improved thermal comfort and energy efficiency in accommodation buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jin Woo; Jung, Sung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An ANN model for predicting optimal start moment of the cooling system was developed. • An ANN model for predicting the amount of cooling energy consumption was developed. • An optimal control algorithm was developed employing two ANN models. • The algorithm showed the advanced thermal comfort and energy efficiency. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to develop a control algorithm to demonstrate the improved thermal comfort and building energy efficiency of accommodation buildings in the cooling season. For this, two artificial neural network (ANN)-based predictive and adaptive models were developed and employed in the algorithm. One model predicted the cooling energy consumption during the unoccupied period for different setback temperatures and the other predicted the time required for restoring current indoor temperature to the normal set-point temperature. Using numerical simulation methods, the prediction accuracy of the two ANN models and the performance of the algorithm were tested. Through the test result analysis, the two ANN models showed their prediction accuracy with an acceptable error rate when applied in the control algorithm. In addition, the two ANN models based algorithm can be used to provide a more comfortable and energy efficient indoor thermal environment than the two conventional control methods, which respectively employed a fixed set-point temperature for the entire day and a setback temperature during the unoccupied period. Therefore, the operating range was 23–26 °C during the occupied period and 25–28 °C during the unoccupied period. Based on the analysis, it can be concluded that the optimal algorithm with two predictive and adaptive ANN models can be used to design a more comfortable and energy efficient indoor thermal environment for accommodation buildings in a comprehensive manner.

  4. Thermal comfort assessment in civil aircraft cabins

    OpenAIRE

    Pang Liping; Qin Yue; Liu Dong; Liu Meng

    2014-01-01

    Aircraft passengers are more and demanding in terms of thermal comfort. But it is not yet easy for aircraft crew to control the environment control system (ECS) that satisfies the thermal comfort for most passengers due to a number of causes. This paper adopts a corrected predicted mean vote (PMV) model and an adaptive model to assess the thermal comfort conditions for 31 investigated flights and draws the conclusion that there does exist an uncomfortable thermal phenomenon in civil aircraft ...

  5. A decision-tree-based model for evaluating the thermal comfort of horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula de Assis Maia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is of great importance in preserving body temperature homeostasis during thermal stress conditions. Although the thermal comfort of horses has been widely studied, there is no report of its relationship with surface temperature (T S. This study aimed to assess the potential of data mining techniques as a tool to associate surface temperature with thermal comfort of horses. T S was obtained using infrared thermography image processing. Physiological and environmental variables were used to define the predicted class, which classified thermal comfort as "comfort" and "discomfort". The variables of armpit, croup, breast and groin T S of horses and the predicted classes were then subjected to a machine learning process. All variables in the dataset were considered relevant for the classification problem and the decision-tree model yielded an accuracy rate of 74 %. The feature selection methods used to reduce computational cost and simplify predictive learning decreased model accuracy to 70 %; however, the model became simpler with easily interpretable rules. For both these selection methods and for the classification using all attributes, armpit and breast T S had a higher power rating for predicting thermal comfort. Data mining techniques show promise in the discovery of new variables associated with the thermal comfort of horses.

  6. Impact on DNB predictions of mixing models implemented into the three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic code Thyc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banner, D.

    1993-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to point out how departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) predictions can be improved by the THYC software. The EPRI/Columbia University E161 data base has been used for this study. In a first step, three thermal-hydraulic mixing models have been implemented into the code in order to obtain more accurate calculations of local void fractions at the DNB location. The three investigated models (A, B and C) are presented by growing complexity. Model A assumes a constant turbulent viscosity throughout the flow. In model B, a k-L turbulence transport equation has been implemented to model generation and decay of turbulence in the DNB test section. Model C is obtained by representing oriented transverse flows due to mixing vanes in addition to the k-L equation. A parametric study carried out with the three mixing models exhibits the most significant parameters. The occurrence of departure from nucleate boiling is then predicted by using a DNB correlation. Similar results are obtained as long as the DNB correlation is kept unchanged. In a second step, an attempt to substitute correlations by another statistical approach (pseudo-cubic thin-plate type Spline method) has been done. It is then shown that standard deviations of P/M (predicted to measured) ratios can be greatly improved by advanced statistics. (author). 7 figs., 2 tabs., 9 refs

  7. Adaptive thermal modeling of Li-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rad, M.S.; Danilov, D.L.; Baghalha, M.; Kazemeini, M.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2013-01-01

    An accurate thermal model to predict the heat generation in rechargeable batteries is an essential tool for advanced thermal management in high power applications, such as electric vehicles. For such applications, the battery materials’ details and cell design are normally not provided. In this work

  8. On the thermal analysis of a plate-fin heat sink considering the thermal-entry length effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassiouny, Ramadan; Maher, Hisham; Hegazy, Adel A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dissipated convective heat strongly depends on convection coefficient. Two correlations were developed for so and validated. • A clear error in air temperature distribution along the heat sink was seen if coefficient were not properly selected. • The error decreases when thermal-entry length effect is considered, as for thermal flow through short conduits as Pr <1. - Abstract: Cooling electric and electronic components is very imperative to keep these components functioning properly. The heat sink is a device used to dissipate generated heat and accordingly cool these components. Airflow through heat sinks experiences velocity and thermal boundary layer variation that significantly affects the heat transfer process and heat sink performance as a result. The present study aims at developing an analytical model that compares the effect of adopting fully-developed or thermally-developing flow on convective heat transfer coefficient and accordingly longitudinal predicted air temperature distribution. Experiments on plate-fin heat sinks were carried out to validate the developed model. The results quantitatively showed a noticeable overprediction in the air temperature distribution when the heat transfer coefficient was estimated based on a fully-developed assumption. On the other hand, a close agreement between predicted and measured values was noticed when the thermal-entry length effect was considered.

  9. Buffer thermal energy storage for an air Brayton solar engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    The application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine was studied. To demonstrate the effect of buffer thermal energy storage on engine operation, a computer program was written which models the recuperator, receiver, and thermal storage device as finite-element thermal masses. Actual operating or predicted performance data are used for all components, including the rotating equipment. Based on insolation input and a specified control scheme, the program predicts the Brayton engine operation, including flows, temperatures, and pressures for the various components, along with the engine output power. An economic parametric study indicates that the economic viability of buffer thermal energy storage is largely a function of the achievable engine life.

  10. Evaluation of Defects of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Thermal Shock Test Using Eddy Current Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Tae Hoon; Cho, Youn Ho; Lee, Joon Hyun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jeong Seok; Lee, Koo Hyun [KIMM, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Periodical thermal shock can introduce defects in thermal barrier coating made by layers of CoNiCrAlY bond coating(BC) and ZrO{sub 2}-8wt%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic top coating(TC) on Inconel-738 substrate using plasma spraying. Thermal shock test is performed by severe condition that is to heat until 1000 .deg. C and cool until 20 .deg. C. As the number of cycle is increased, the fatigue by thermal shock is also increased. After test, the micro-structures and mechanical characteristics of thermal barrier coating were investigated by SEM, XRD. The TGO layer of is Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed between BC and TC by periodical thermal shock test, and its change in thickness is inspected by eddy current test(ECT). By ECT test, it is shown that TGO and micro-crack can be detected and it is possible to predict the life of thermal barrier coating

  11. Increasing of prediction reliability of calcium carbonate scale formation in heat exchanger of secondary coolant circuits of thermal and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tret'yakov, O.V.; Kritskij, V.G.; Styazhkin, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium carbonate scale formation in the secondary circuit heat exchanger of thermal and nuclear power plants is investigated. A model of calcium-carbonate scale formation providing quite reliable prediction of process running and the possibility of its control affecting the parameters of hydrochemical regime (HCR) is developed. The results can be used when designing the automatic-control system of HCR

  12. Thermal Plasma decomposition of fluoriated greenhouse gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Seok; Watanabe, Takayuki [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Park, Dong Wha [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Fluorinated compounds mainly used in the semiconductor industry are potent greenhouse gases. Recently, thermal plasma gas scrubbers have been gradually replacing conventional burn-wet type gas scrubbers which are based on the combustion of fossil fuels because high conversion efficiency and control of byproduct generation are achievable in chemically reactive high temperature thermal plasma. Chemical equilibrium composition at high temperature and numerical analysis on a complex thermal flow in the thermal plasma decomposition system are used to predict the process of thermal decomposition of fluorinated gas. In order to increase economic feasibility of the thermal plasma decomposition process, increase of thermal efficiency of the plasma torch and enhancement of gas mixing between the thermal plasma jet and waste gas are discussed. In addition, noble thermal plasma systems to be applied in the thermal plasma gas treatment are introduced in the present paper.

  13. Thermal and hydraulic analyses of the System 81 cold traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.

    1977-06-15

    Thermal and hydraulic analyses of the System 81 Type I and II cold traps were completed except for thermal transients analysis. Results are evaluated, discussed, and reported. Analytical models were developed to determine the physical dimensions of the cold traps and to predict the performance. The FFTF cold trap crystallizer performances were simulated using the thermal model. This simulation shows that the analytical model developed predicts reasonably conservative temperatures. Pressure drop and sodium residence time calculations indicate that the present design will meet the requirements specified in the E-Specification. Steady state temperature data for the critical regions were generated to assess the magnitude of the thermal stress.

  14. The Neural-fuzzy Thermal Error Compensation Controller on CNC Machining Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Pai-Chung; Chen, Shen-Len

    The geometric errors and structural thermal deformation are factors that influence the machining accuracy of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machining center. Therefore, researchers pay attention to thermal error compensation technologies on CNC machine tools. Some real-time error compensation techniques have been successfully demonstrated in both laboratories and industrial sites. The compensation results still need to be enhanced. In this research, the neural-fuzzy theory has been conducted to derive a thermal prediction model. An IC-type thermometer has been used to detect the heat sources temperature variation. The thermal drifts are online measured by a touch-triggered probe with a standard bar. A thermal prediction model is then derived by neural-fuzzy theory based on the temperature variation and the thermal drifts. A Graphic User Interface (GUI) system is also built to conduct the user friendly operation interface with Insprise C++ Builder. The experimental results show that the thermal prediction model developed by neural-fuzzy theory methodology can improve machining accuracy from 80µm to 3µm. Comparison with the multi-variable linear regression analysis the compensation accuracy is increased from ±10µm to ±3µm.

  15. Design and development of a linear thermal actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, G.; Osborne, D.

    1985-01-01

    The design and development of a linear thermal actuator (LTA) for space applications is described. The actuator is driven by thermal energy and utilizes the property of thermal expansion to do work. Equations to predict performance are developed and used to optimize the design of the development model LTA. Design details and test results are presented and discussed.

  16. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids

  17. Thermal regime of the lithosphere and prediction of seismic hazard in the Caspian region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, L.E.; Solodilov, L.N.; Kondorskaya, N.V.; Gasanov, A.G; Panahi, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text : Prediction of seicmicity is one of elements of ecology hazard warning. In this collective research, it is elaborated in three directions : quantitative estimate of regional faults by level of seismic activity; ascertainment of space position of earthquake risk zones, determination of high seismic potential sites for the period of the next 3-5 years. During elaboration of prediction, it takes into account that peculiar feature all over the is determined by relationship of about 90 percent of earthquake hypocenters and released energy of seismic waves with elactic-brittle ayer of the lithosphere. Concetration of earthquakes epicenters is established predominantly in zones of complex structure of elastic-brittle layer where gradient of it thickness is 20-30 km. Directions of hypocenters migration in the plastic-viscous layer reveal a space position of seismic dangerous zones. All this provides a necessity for generalization of data on location of earthquakes epicenters; determination of their magnitudes, space position of regional faults and heat flow with calculation of thermal regime being made for clarification of the lithosphere and elastic-brittle thickness variations separately. General analysis includes a calculation of released seismic wave energy and determination of peculiar features of its distribution in the entire region and also studies of hypocenters migration in the plastic-viscous layer of the litosphere in time.

  18. Efficient thermal error prediction in a machine tool using finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian, Naeem S; Fletcher, Simon; Longstaff, Andrew P; Myers, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Thermally induced errors have a major significance on the positional accuracy of a machine tool. Heat generated during the machining process produces thermal gradients that flow through the machine structure causing linear and nonlinear thermal expansions and distortions of associated complex discrete structures, producing deformations that adversely affect structural stability. The heat passes through structural linkages and mechanical joints where interfacial parameters such as the roughness and form of the contacting surfaces affect the thermal resistance and thus the heat transfer coefficients. This paper presents a novel offline technique using finite element analysis (FEA) to simulate the effects of the major internal heat sources such as bearings, motors and belt drives of a small vertical milling machine (VMC) and the effects of ambient temperature pockets that build up during the machine operation. Simplified models of the machine have been created offline using FEA software and evaluated experimental results applied for offline thermal behaviour simulation of the full machine structure. The FEA simulated results are in close agreement with the experimental results ranging from 65% to 90% for a variety of testing regimes and revealed a maximum error range of 70 µm reduced to less than 10 µm

  19. Numerical methods for the prediction of thermal fatigue due to turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannink, M.H.C.; Blom, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Thermal fatigue due to turbulent mixing is caused by moving temperature spots on the pipe wall. → Passing temperature spots cause temperature fluctuations of sinusoidal nature. → Input parameters for a sinusoidal model can be obtained by linking it with a coupled CFD-FEM model. → Overconservatism of the sinusoidal method can be reduced, having more knowledge on thermal loads. - Abstract: Turbulent mixing of hot and cold flows is one of the possible causes of thermal fatigue in piping systems. Especially in primary pipework of nuclear power plants this is an important, safety related issue. Since the frequencies of the involved temperature fluctuations are generally too high to be detected well by common plant instrumentation, accurate numerical simulations are indispensable for a proper fatigue assessment. In this paper, a link is made between two such numerical methods: a coupled CFD-FEM model and a sinusoidal model. By linking these methods, more insight is obtained in the physical phenomenon causing thermal fatigue due to turbulent mixing. Furthermore, useful knowledge is acquired on the determination of thermal loading parameters, essential for reducing overconservatism, as currently present in simplified fatigue assessment methods.

  20. Three-dimensional thermal finite element modeling of lithium-ion battery in thermal abuse application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guifang; Long, Bo; Cheng, Bo; Zhou, Shiqiong; Xu, Peng; Cao, Binggang

    In order to better understand the thermal abuse behavior of high capacities and large power lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicle application, a three-dimensional thermal model has been developed for analyzing the temperature distribution under abuse conditions. The model takes into account the effects of heat generation, internal conduction and convection, and external heat dissipation to predict the temperature distribution in a battery. Three-dimensional model also considers the geometrical features to simulate oven test, which are significant in larger cells for electric vehicle application. The model predictions are compared to oven test results for VLP 50/62/100S-Fe (3.2 V/55 Ah) LiFePO 4/graphite cells and shown to be in great agreement.

  1. Strongly anisotropic in-plane thermal transport in single-layer black phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankit; McGaughey, Alan J H

    2015-02-17

    Using first principles calculations, we predict the thermal conductivity of the two-dimensional materials black phosphorene and blue phosphorene. Black phosphorene has an unprecedented thermal conductivity anisotropy ratio of three, with predicted values of 110 W/m-K and 36 W/m-K along its armchair and zigzag directions at a temperature of 300 K. For blue phosphorene, which is isotropic with a zigzag structure, the predicted value is 78 W/m-K. The two allotropes show strikingly different thermal conductivity accumulation, with phonons of mean free paths between 10 nm and 1 μm dominating in black phosphorene, while a much narrower band of mean free paths (50-200 nm) dominate in blue phosphorene. Black phosphorene shows intriguing potential for strain-tuning of its thermal conductivity tensor.

  2. Thermal Model Predictions of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Fabanich, William Anthony; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes the capabilities of three-dimensional thermal power model of advanced stirling radioisotope generator (ASRG). The performance of the ASRG is presented for different scenario, such as Venus flyby with or without the auxiliary cooling system.

  3. Nonlinear thermal reduced model for Microwave Circuit Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Christophe; Sommet, Raphael; Quéré, Raymond; Dueme, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    With the constant increase of transistor power density, electro thermal modeling is becoming a necessity for accurate prediction of device electrical performances. For this reason, this paper deals with a methodology to obtain a precise nonlinear thermal model based on Model Order Reduction of a three dimensional thermal Finite Element (FE) description. This reduced thermal model is based on the Ritz vector approach which ensure the steady state solution in every case. An equi...

  4. Predicting the performance of amorphous and crystalline silicon based photovoltaic solar thermal collectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daghigh, Ronak; Ibrahim, Adnan; Jin, Goh Li; Ruslan, Mohd Hafidz; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman

    2011-01-01

    BIPVT is an application where solar PV/T modules are integrated into the building structure. System design parameters such as thermal conductivity and fin efficiency, type of cells, type of coolant and operating conditions are factors which influence the performance of BIPVT. Attempts have been made to improve the efficiency of building-integrated photovoltaic thermal (BIPVT). A new design concept of water-based PVT collector for building-integrated applications has been designed and evaluated. The results of simulation study of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV/T and crystalline silicon (c-Si) module types are based on the metrological condition of Malaysia for a typical day in March. At a flow rate of 0.02 kg/s, solar radiation level between 700 and 900 W/m 2 and ambient temperature between 22 and 32 o C, the electrical, thermal and combined photovoltaic thermal efficiencies for the PV/T (a-Si) were 4.9%, 72% and 77%, respectively. Moreover, the electrical, thermal and combined photovoltaic thermal efficiencies of the PV/T (c-Si) were 11.6%, 51% and 63%.

  5. Thermal aging of some decommissioned reactor components and methodology for life prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.

    1989-03-01

    Since a realistic aging of cast stainless steel components for end-of-life or life-extension conditions cannot be produced, it is customary to simulate the thermal aging embrittlement by accelerated aging at ∼400 degree C. In this investigation, field components obtained from decommissioned reactors have been examined after service up to 22 yr to provide a benchmark of the laboratory simulation. The primary and secondary aging processes were found to be identical to those of the laboratory-aged specimens, and the kinetic characteristics were also similar. The extent of the aging embrittlement processes and other key factors that are known to influence the embrittlement kinetics have been compared for the decommissioned reactor components and materials aged under accelerated conditions. On the basis of the study, a mechanistic understanding of the causes of the complex behavior in kinetics and activation energy of aging (i.e., the temperature dependence of aging embrittlement between the accelerated and reactor-operating conditions) is presented. A mechanistic correlation developed thereon is compared with a number of available empirical correlations to provide an insight for development of a better methodology of life prediction of the reactor components. 18 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Shuttle TPS thermal performance and analysis methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, W. E.; Mcbride, D. U.; Armour, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal performance of the thermal protection system was approximately as predicted. The only extensive anomalies were filler bar scorching and over-predictions in the high Delta p gap heating regions of the orbiter. A technique to predict filler bar scorching has been developed that can aid in defining a solution. Improvement in high Delta p gap heating methodology is still under study. Minor anomalies were also examined for improvements in modeling techniques and prediction capabilities. These include improved definition of low Delta p gap heating, an analytical model for inner mode line convection heat transfer, better modeling of structure, and inclusion of sneak heating. The limited number of problems related to penetration items that presented themselves during orbital flight tests were resolved expeditiously, and designs were changed and proved successful within the time frame of that program.

  7. Foundation heat transfer analysis for buildings with thermal piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almanza Huerta, Luis Enrique; Krarti, Moncef

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A numerical transient thermal model for thermo-active foundations is developed. • Thermal interactions between thermal piles and building foundations are evaluated. • A simplified analysis method of thermal interactions between thermal piles and building foundations is developed. - Abstract: Thermal piles or thermo-active foundations utilize heat exchangers embedded within foundation footings to heat and/or cool buildings. In this paper, the impact of thermal piles on building foundation heat transfer is investigated. In particular, a simplified analysis method is developed to estimate the annual ground-coupled foundation heat transfer when buildings are equipped with thermal piles. First, a numerical analysis of the thermal performance of thermo-active building foundations is developed and used to assess the interactions between thermal piles and slab-on-grade building foundations. The impact of various design parameters and operating conditions is evaluated including foundation pile depth, building slab width, foundation insulation configuration, and soil thermal properties. Based on the results of a series of parametric analyses, a simplified analysis method is presented to assess the impact of the thermal piles on the annual heat fluxes toward or from the building foundations. A comparative evaluation of the predictions of the simplified analysis method and those obtained from the detailed numerical analysis indicated good agreement with prediction accuracy lower than 5%. Moreover, it is found that thermal piles can affect annual building foundation heat loss/gain by up to 30% depending on foundation size and insulation level

  8. Electro-thermal Modeling for Junction Temperature Cycling-Based Lifetime Prediction of a Press-Pack IGBT 3L-NPC-VSC Applied to Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senturk, Osman Selcuk; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Teodorescu, Remus

    2011-01-01

    Reliability is a critical criterion for multi-MW wind turbines, which are being employed with increasing numbers in wind power plants, since they operate under harsh conditions and have high maintenance cost due to their remote locations. In this study, the wind turbine grid-side converter...... reliability is investigated regarding IGBT lifetime based on junction temperature cycling for the grid-side press-pack IGBT 3L-NPC-VSC, which is a state-of-the art high reliability solution. In order to acquire IGBT junction temperatures for given wind power profiles and to use them in IGBT lifetime...... prediction, the converter electro-thermal model including electrical, power loss, and dynamical thermal models is developed with the main focus on the thermal modeling regarding converter topology, switch technology, and physical structure. Moreover, these models are simplified for their practical...

  9. Hybrid photovoltaic–thermal solar collectors dynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amrizal, N.; Chemisana, D.; Rosell, J.I.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A hybrid photovoltaic/thermal dynamic model is presented. ► The model, once calibrated, can predict the power output for any set of climate data. ► The physical electrical model includes explicitly thermal and irradiance dependences. ► The results agree with those obtained through steady-state characterization. ► The model approaches the junction cell temperature through the system energy balance. -- Abstract: A hybrid photovoltaic/thermal transient model has been developed and validated experimentally. The methodology extends the quasi-dynamic thermal model stated in the EN 12975 in order to involve the electrical performance and consider the dynamic behavior minimizing constraints when characterizing the collector. A backward moving average filtering procedure has been applied to improve the model response for variable working conditions. Concerning the electrical part, the model includes the thermal and radiation dependences in its variables. The results revealed that the characteristic parameters included in the model agree reasonably well with the experimental values obtained from the standard steady-state and IV characteristic curve measurements. After a calibration process, the model is a suitable tool to predict the thermal and electrical performance of a hybrid solar collector, for a specific weather data set.

  10. Thermal conductivity model for nanoporous thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Congliang; Zhao, Xinpeng; Regner, Keith; Yang, Ronggui

    2018-03-01

    Nanoporous thin films have attracted great interest because of their extremely low thermal conductivity and potential applications in thin thermal insulators and thermoelectrics. Although there are some numerical and experimental studies about the thermal conductivity of nanoporous thin films, a simplified model is still needed to provide a straightforward prediction. In this paper, by including the phonon scattering lifetimes due to film thickness boundary scattering, nanopore scattering and the frequency-dependent intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering, a fitting-parameter-free model based on the kinetic theory of phonon transport is developed to predict both the in-plane and the cross-plane thermal conductivities of nanoporous thin films. With input parameters such as the lattice constants, thermal conductivity, and the group velocity of acoustic phonons of bulk silicon, our model shows a good agreement with available experimental and numerical results of nanoporous silicon thin films. It illustrates that the size effect of film thickness boundary scattering not only depends on the film thickness but also on the size of nanopores, and a larger nanopore leads to a stronger size effect of the film thickness. Our model also reveals that there are different optimal structures for getting the lowest in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities.

  11. Thermal model of attic systems with radiant barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, K.E.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a project to model the thermal performance of radiant barriers. The objective of this phase of the project was to develop a refined model for the thermal performance of residential house attics, with and without radiant barriers, and to verify the model by comparing its predictions against selected existing experimental thermal performance data. Models for the thermal performance of attics with and without radiant barriers have been developed and implemented on an IBM PC/AT computer. The validity of the models has been tested by comparing their predictions with ceiling heat fluxes measured in a number of laboratory and field experiments on attics with and without radiant barriers. Cumulative heat flows predicted by the models were usually within about 5 to 10 percent of measured values. In future phases of the project, the models for attic/radiant barrier performance will be coupled with a whole-house model and further comparisons with experimental data will be made. Following this, the models will be utilized to provide an initial assessment of the energy savings potential of radiant barriers in various configurations and under various climatic conditions. 38 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

  12. Analysis of Heat Transfer in Power Split Device for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Using Thermal Network Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixin Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a rational prediction of temperature field on the differential hybrid system (DHS based on the thermal network method (TNM. The whole thermal network model is built by considering both the contact thermal resistance between gasket and planet gear and the temperature effect on the physical property parameters of lubricant. The contact thermal resistance is obtained by using the concept of contact branch thermal resistance and G-W elastic model. By building an elaborate thermal network model and computing models for power losses and thermal resistances between components, the whole temperature field of DHS under typical operating condition is predicted. Results show that thermal network method can be effectively used to predict the temperature distribution and the rule of temperature variation, the surface roughness significantly affects contact thermal conduction, and the decrease in the thermal resistance of the natural convection between air and DHS housing can effectively improve the thermal environment of DHS.

  13. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  14. Thermal niche for in situ seed germination by Mediterranean mountain streams: model prediction and validation for Rhamnus persicifolia seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porceddu, Marco; Mattana, Efisio; Pritchard, Hugh W.; Bacchetta, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Mediterranean mountain species face exacting ecological conditions of rainy, cold winters and arid, hot summers, which affect seed germination phenology. In this study, a soil heat sum model was used to predict field emergence of Rhamnus persicifolia, an endemic tree species living at the edge of mountain streams of central eastern Sardinia. Methods Seeds were incubated in the light at a range of temperatures (10–25 and 25/10 °C) after different periods (up to 3 months) of cold stratification at 5 °C. Base temperatures (Tb), and thermal times for 50 % germination (θ50) were calculated. Seeds were also buried in the soil in two natural populations (Rio Correboi and Rio Olai), both underneath and outside the tree canopy, and exhumed at regular intervals. Soil temperatures were recorded using data loggers and soil heat sum (°Cd) was calculated on the basis of the estimated Tb and soil temperatures. Key Results Cold stratification released physiological dormancy (PD), increasing final germination and widening the range of germination temperatures, indicative of a Type 2 non-deep PD. Tb was reduced from 10·5 °C for non-stratified seeds to 2·7 °C for seeds cold stratified for 3 months. The best thermal time model was obtained by fitting probit germination against log °Cd. θ50 was 2·6 log °Cd for untreated seeds and 2·17–2·19 log °Cd for stratified seeds. When θ50 values were integrated with soil heat sum estimates, field emergence was predicted from March to April and confirmed through field observations. Conclusions Tb and θ50 values facilitated model development of the thermal niche for in situ germination of R. persicifolia. These experimental approaches may be applied to model the natural regeneration patterns of other species growing on Mediterranean mountain waterways and of physiologically dormant species, with overwintering cold stratification requirement and spring germination. PMID:24201139

  15. Physiological responses to short-term thermal stress in mayfly (Neocloeon triangulifer) larvae in relation to upper thermal limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Sun; Chou, Hsuan; Funk, David H; Jackson, John K; Sweeney, Bernard W; Buchwalter, David B

    2017-07-15

    Understanding species' thermal limits and their physiological determinants is critical in light of climate change and other human activities that warm freshwater ecosystems. Here, we ask whether oxygen limitation determines the chronic upper thermal limits in larvae of the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer , an emerging model for ecological and physiological studies. Our experiments are based on a robust understanding of the upper acute (∼40°C) and chronic thermal limits of this species (>28°C, ≤30°C) derived from full life cycle rearing experiments across temperatures. We tested two related predictions derived from the hypothesis that oxygen limitation sets the chronic upper thermal limits: (1) aerobic scope declines in mayfly larvae as they approach and exceed temperatures that are chronically lethal to larvae; and (2) genes indicative of hypoxia challenge are also responsive in larvae exposed to ecologically relevant thermal limits. Neither prediction held true. We estimated aerobic scope by subtracting measurements of standard oxygen consumption rates from measurements of maximum oxygen consumption rates, the latter of which was obtained by treating with the metabolic uncoupling agent carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy) pheylhydrazone (FCCP). Aerobic scope was similar in larvae held below and above chronic thermal limits. Genes indicative of oxygen limitation (LDH, EGL-9) were only upregulated under hypoxia or during exposure to temperatures beyond the chronic (and more ecologically relevant) thermal limits of this species (LDH). Our results suggest that the chronic thermal limits of this species are likely not driven by oxygen limitation, but rather are determined by other factors, e.g. bioenergetics costs. We caution against the use of short-term thermal ramping approaches to estimate critical thermal limits (CT max ) in aquatic insects because those temperatures are typically higher than those that occur in nature. © 2017. Published by The Company of

  16. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS)-Based Models for Predicting the Weld Bead Width and Depth of Penetration from the Infrared Thermal Image of the Weld Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subashini, L.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Type 316 LN stainless steel is the major structural material used in the construction of nuclear reactors. Activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding has been developed to increase the depth of penetration because the depth of penetration achievable in single-pass TIG welding is limited. Real-time monitoring and control of weld processes is gaining importance because of the requirement of remoter welding process technologies. Hence, it is essential to develop computational methodologies based on an adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) or artificial neural network (ANN) for predicting and controlling the depth of penetration and weld bead width during A-TIG welding of type 316 LN stainless steel. In the current work, A-TIG welding experiments have been carried out on 6-mm-thick plates of 316 LN stainless steel by varying the welding current. During welding, infrared (IR) thermal images of the weld pool have been acquired in real time, and the features have been extracted from the IR thermal images of the weld pool. The welding current values, along with the extracted features such as length, width of the hot spot, thermal area determined from the Gaussian fit, and thermal bead width computed from the first derivative curve were used as inputs, whereas the measured depth of penetration and weld bead width were used as output of the respective models. Accurate ANFIS models have been developed for predicting the depth of penetration and the weld bead width during TIG welding of 6-mm-thick 316 LN stainless steel plates. A good correlation between the measured and predicted values of weld bead width and depth of penetration were observed in the developed models. The performance of the ANFIS models are compared with that of the ANN models.

  17. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-01-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ∼1 nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and

  18. Thermal rectification based on phonon hydrodynamics and thermomass theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal diode is the fundamental device for phononics. There are various mechanisms for thermal rectification, e.g. different temperature dependent thermal conductivity of two ends, asymmetric interfacial resistance, and nonlocal behavior of phonon transport in asymmetric structures. The phonon hydrodynamics and thermomass theory treat the heat conduction in a fluidic viewpoint. The phonon gas flowing through the media is characterized by the balance equation of momentum, like the Navier-Stokes equation for fluid mechanics. Generalized heat conduction law thereby contains the spatial acceleration (convection term and the viscous (Laplacian term. The viscous term predicts the size dependent thermal conductivity. Rectification appears due to the MFP supersession of phonons. The convection term also predicts rectification because of the inertia effect, like a gas passing through a nozzle or diffuser.

  19. Correlation of physical properties of ceramic materials with resistance to fracture by thermal shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidman, W G; Bobrowsky, A R

    1949-01-01

    An analysis is made to determine which properties of materials affect their resistance to fracture by thermal stresses.From this analysis, a parameter is evaluated that is correlated with the resistance of ceramic materials to fracture by thermal shock as experimentally determined. This parameter may be used to predict qualitatively the resistance of a material to fracture by thermal shock. Resistance to fracture by thermal shock is shown to be dependent upon the following material properties: thermal conductivity, tensile strength, thermal expansion, and ductility modulus. For qualitative prediction of resistance of materials to fracture by thermal shock, the parameter may be expressed as the product of thermal conductivity and tensile strength divided by the product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and ductility modulus of the specimen.

  20. Numerical study on lithium titanate battery thermal response under adiabatic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Qiujuan; Wang, Qingsong; Zhao, Xuejuan; Sun, Jinhua; Lin, Zijing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The thermal behavior of lithium titanate battery during cycling was investigated. • The temperature rate in charging was less than that of discharging in the cycling. • The temperature difference was less than 0.02 °C at 0.5 C in adiabatic condition. • The temperature distribution and thermal runaway of the battery were predicted. - Abstract: To analyze the thermal behavior of 945 mA h lithium titanate battery during charging and discharging processes, the experimental and numerical studies are performed in this work. The cathode and anode of the 945 mA h lithium titanate soft package battery are the lithium nickel–cobalt–manganese-oxide and lithium titanate, respectively. In the experiment, an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter combined with battery cycler is employed to investigate the electrochemical–thermal behavior during charge–discharge cycling under the adiabatic condition. In numerical simulation, one electrochemical-thermal model is adopted to predict the thermal response and validated with the experimental results. From both experimental and simulated results, the profile of potential and current, the heat generation, the temperature, the temperature changing rate and the temperature distribution in the cell are obtained and thermal runaway is predicted. The analysis of the electrochemical and thermal behavior is beneficial for the commercial application of lithium titanate battery in the fields of electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles

  1. Thermal Analysis of Filler Reinforced Polymeric Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadge, Mahesh Devidas

    Improving heat dissipating property of composite materials is becoming increasingly important in domains ranging from the automotive industry, electronic devices to aeronautical industry. Effective heat dissipation is required especially in aircraft and racing tires to guarantee high performance and good service life [1]. The present study is focused on improving the thermal conductivity of Emulsion-styrene butadiene rubber (ESBR) which is a cheap alternative to other rubber composites. The disadvantages of ESBR are low thermal conductivity and high heat generation. Adding fillers with high thermal conductivity to ESBR is proposed as a technique for improving the thermal conductivity of ESBR. The purpose of the research is to predict the thermal conductivity of ESBR when filled with fillers of much higher thermal conductivity and also to find out to what extent the filler properties affect the heat transfer capabilities of the composite matrix. The influence of different filler shapes i.e. spherical, cylindrical and platelets on the overall thermal capability of composite matrix is studied, the finite element modelings are conducted using Abaqus. Three-dimensional and two-dimensional models are created in Abaqus to simulate the microstructure of the composite matrix filled with fillers. Results indicate that the overall thermal conductivity increases with increasing filler loading i.e. for a filler volume fraction of 0.27, the conductivity increased by around 50%. Filler shapes, orientation angle, and aspect ratio of the fillers significantly influences the thermal conductivity. Conductivity increases with increasing aspect ratio (length/diameter) of the cylindrical fillers since longer conductive chains are able to form at the same volume percentage as compared to spherical fillers. The composite matrix reaches maximum thermal conductivity when the cylindrical fillers are oriented in the direction of heat flow. The heat conductivity predicted by FEM for ESBR is

  2. Thermal performance measurements on ATLAS-SCT KB forward modules

    CERN Document Server

    Donegà, M; D'Onofrio, M; Ferrère, D; Hirt, C; Ikegami, Y; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Lindsay, S; Mangin-Brinet, M; Niinikoski, T O; Pernegger, H; Perrin, E; Taylor, G; Terada, S; Unno, Y; Wallny, R; Weber, M

    2003-01-01

    The thermal design of the KB module is presented. A Finite Elements Analysis (FEA) has been used to finalize the module design. The thermal performance of an outer irradiated KB module has been measured at different cooling conditions. The thermal runaway of the module has been measured. The FEA model has been compared with the measurements and has been used to predict the thermal performance in a realistic SCT scenario.

  3. Thermal carrying capacity for a thermally-sensitive species at the warmest edge of its range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ayllón

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic environmental change is causing unprecedented rates of population extirpation and altering the setting of range limits for many species. Significant population declines may occur however before any reduction in range is observed. Determining and modelling the factors driving population size and trends is consequently critical to predict trajectories of change and future extinction risk. We tracked during 12 years 51 populations of a cold-water fish species (brown trout Salmo trutta living along a temperature gradient at the warmest thermal edge of its range. We developed a carrying capacity model in which maximum population size is limited by physical habitat conditions and regulated through territoriality. We first tested whether population numbers were driven by carrying capacity dynamics and then targeted on establishing (1 the temperature thresholds beyond which population numbers switch from being physical habitat- to temperature-limited; and (2 the rate at which carrying capacity declines with temperature within limiting thermal ranges. Carrying capacity along with emergent density-dependent responses explained up to 76% of spatio-temporal density variability of juveniles and adults but only 50% of young-of-the-year's. By contrast, young-of-the-year trout were highly sensitive to thermal conditions, their performance declining with temperature at a higher rate than older life stages, and disruptions being triggered at lower temperature thresholds. Results suggest that limiting temperature effects were progressively stronger with increasing anthropogenic disturbance. There was however a critical threshold, matching the incipient thermal limit for survival, beyond which realized density was always below potential numbers irrespective of disturbance intensity. We additionally found a lower threshold, matching the thermal limit for feeding, beyond which even unaltered populations declined. We predict that most of our study

  4. Modeling of thermal conductivity of nanofluids by modifying Maxwell’s equation using cell model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Siddharth; Chauhan, K. Prashanth; Kanagaraj, S.

    2011-01-01

    Nanofluid is an innovative heat transfer fluid with superior potential for enhancing the heat transfer performance of conventional fluids. Though many attempts have been made to investigate the abnormal high thermal conductivity of nanofluids, the existing models cannot precisely predict the same. An attempt has been made to develop a model for predicting the thermal conductivity of different types of nanofluids. The model presented here is derived based on the fact that thermal conductivity of nanofluids depends on thermal conductivity of particle and fluid as well as micro-convective heat transfer due to Brownian motion of nanoparticles. Novelty of the article lies in giving a unique equation which predicts thermal conductivity of nanofluids for different concentrations and particle sizes which also correctly predicts the trends observed in experimental data over a wide range of particle sizes, temperatures, and particle concentrations.

  5. Thermal mixing in T-junction piping system concerned with high-cycle thermal fatigue in structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Monji, Hideaki

    2008-01-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), a numerical simulation code 'MUGTHES' has been developed to investigate thermal striping phenomena caused by turbulence mixing of fluids in different temperature and to provide transient data for an evaluation method of high-cycle thermal fatigue. MUGTHES adopts Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach to predict unsteady phenomena in thermal mixing and employs boundary fitted coordinate system to be applied to complex geometry in a power reactor. Numerical simulation of thermal striping phenomena in a T-junction piping system (T-pipe) is conducted. Boundary condition for the simulation is chosen from an existing water experiment in JAEA, named as WATLON experiment. In the numerical simulation, standard Smagorinsky model is employed as eddy viscosity model with the model coefficient of 0.14 (=Cs). Numerical results of MUGTHES are verified by the comparisons with experimental results of velocity and temperature. Through the numerical simulation in the T-pipe, applicability of MUGTHES to the thermal striping phenomena is confirmed and the characteristic large-scale eddy structure which dominates thermal mixing and may cause high-cycle thermal fatigue is revealed. (author)

  6. Thermal properties of cesium molybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kousaku; Takano, Masahide; Sato, Seichi; Ohashi, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    Cesium is one of the most important fission products to aid in the understanding and prediction of the behavior of oxide nuclear fuels because of its high mobility, chemical reactivity, and large yield. In postirradiation examinations of the Phoenix reactor fuel pins, the accumulation of cesium and molybdenum between the fuel pellet and cladding was observed, though the chemical form was not determined. In the thermodynamic analyses of chemical states of fission products, Cs 2 MoO 4 was often predicted to exist as a stable compound in oxide fuels. The Cs 2 MoO 4 compound is thermodynamically stable under the conditions of light water reactors, fast breeder reactors, and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. In the Cs-Mo-O system several phases have been found, and the structural and thermodynamic properties were studied. At room temperature, Cs 2 MoO 4 has an orthorhombic structure and a phase transition occurs at 841 K to a hexagonal structure. Both structures are expected to exist in the fuel, depending on the fuel temperature. However, no data has been available on the thermal properties of CS 2 MoO 4 . In the current work, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of Cs 2 MoO 4 were determined, which are the basic data needed to understand and predict the fuel/clad mechanical interaction and fuel temperature

  7. Thermal Properties Measurement Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, Jon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Braase, Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hurley, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gofryk, Krzysztof [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fielding, Randy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knight, Collin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Meyer, Mitch [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Thermal Properties Measurement Report summarizes the research, development, installation, and initial use of significant experimental thermal property characterization capabilities at the INL in FY 2015. These new capabilities were used to characterize a U3Si2 (candidate Accident Tolerant) fuel sample fabricated at the INL. The ability to perform measurements at various length scales is important and provides additional data that is not currently in the literature. However, the real value of the data will be in accomplishing a phenomenological understanding of the thermal conductivity in fuels and the ties to predictive modeling. Thus, the MARMOT advanced modeling and simulation capability was utilized to illustrate how the microstructural data can be modeled and compared with bulk characterization data. A scientific method was established for thermal property measurement capability on irradiated nuclear fuel samples, which will be installed in the Irradiated Material Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  8. Mapping Thermal Habitat of Ectotherms Based on Behavioral Thermoregulation in a Controlled Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, T.; Skidmore, A.; Liu, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Thermal environment is especially important to ectotherm because a lot of physiological functions rely on the body temperature such as thermoregulation. The so-called behavioural thermoregulation function made use of the heterogeneity of the thermal properties within an individual's habitat to sustain the animal's physiological processes. This function links the spatial utilization and distribution of individual ectotherm with the thermal properties of habitat (thermal habitat). In this study we modelled the relationship between the two by a spatial explicit model that simulates the movements of a lizard in a controlled environment. The model incorporates a lizard's transient body temperatures with a cellular automaton algorithm as a way to link the physiology knowledge of the animal with the spatial utilization of its microhabitat. On a larger spatial scale, 'thermal roughness' of the habitat was defined and used to predict the habitat occupancy of the target species. The results showed the habitat occupancy can be modelled by the cellular automaton based algorithm at a smaller scale, and can be modelled by the thermal roughness index at a larger scale.

  9. Thermal Conductivity of EB-PVD Thermal Barrier Coatings Evaluated by a Steady-State Laser Heat Flux Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Nagaraj, Ben A.; Bruce, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) Zr02-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined by a steady-state heat flux laser technique. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of the EB-PVD ceramic coatings were also obtained in real time, at high temperatures, under the laser high heat flux, long term test conditions. The thermal conductivity increase due to micro-pore sintering and the decrease due to coating micro-delaminations in the EB-PVD coatings were evaluated for grooved and non-grooved EB-PVD coating systems under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions. The coating failure modes under the high heat flux test conditions were also investigated. The test technique provides a viable means for obtaining coating thermal conductivity data for use in design, development, and life prediction for engine applications.

  10. Study on thermal conductive BN/novolac resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shasha; Qi, Shuhua; Liu, Nailiang; Cao, Peng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Boron nitride (BN) particles were used to modify novolac resin. → BN particles were pretreated by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. → The thermal conductivity trend of composite almost agrees with the predicted data from the Maxwell-Eucken model. → At BN concentration of 80 wt.%, thermal conductivity value of composite is 4.5 times that of pure novolac resin. → Combined use of the larger and smaller particles with a mass ratio of 1:2 provides the composites with the maximum thermal conductivity among the testing systems. → The composite thermal property also increases with an increase in the BN concentration. - Abstract: In this study, γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane-treated boron nitride (BN) particles were used to modify novolac resin. The effect of varying the BN concentration, particle size, and hybrid BN fillers with the binary particle size distribution on the thermal conductivity of the composites was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed homogeneously dispersed treated BN particles in the matrix. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity increased as the BN concentration was increased. This behavior was also observed when the filler size was increased. Experimentally obtained thermal conductivity values agree with the predicted data from the Maxwell-Eucken model well at less than 70 wt.% BN loading. A larger particle size BN-filled novolac resin exhibits a higher thermal conductivity than a smaller particle size BN-filled one. The combined use of 0.5 and 15 μm particles with a mass ratio of 2:1 achieved the maximum thermal conductivity among the testing systems. The thermal resistance properties of the composites were also studied.

  11. Prediction of soot and thermal radiation in a model gas turbine combustor burning kerosene fuel spray at different swirl levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Prakash; Patra, Jitendra; Datta, Amitava; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya

    2016-05-01

    Combustion of kerosene fuel spray has been numerically simulated in a laboratory scale combustor geometry to predict soot and the effects of thermal radiation at different swirl levels of primary air flow. The two-phase motion in the combustor is simulated using an Eulerian-Lagragian formulation considering the stochastic separated flow model. The Favre-averaged governing equations are solved for the gas phase with the turbulent quantities simulated by realisable k-ɛ model. The injection of the fuel is considered through a pressure swirl atomiser and the combustion is simulated by a laminar flamelet model with detailed kinetics of kerosene combustion. Soot formation in the flame is predicted using an empirical model with the model parameters adjusted for kerosene fuel. Contributions of gas phase and soot towards thermal radiation have been considered to predict the incident heat flux on the combustor wall and fuel injector. Swirl in the primary flow significantly influences the flow and flame structures in the combustor. The stronger recirculation at high swirl draws more air into the flame region, reduces the flame length and peak flame temperature and also brings the soot laden zone closer to the inlet plane. As a result, the radiative heat flux on the peripheral wall decreases at high swirl and also shifts closer to the inlet plane. However, increased swirl increases the combustor wall temperature due to radial spreading of the flame. The high incident radiative heat flux and the high surface temperature make the fuel injector a critical item in the combustor. The injector peak temperature increases with the increase in swirl flow mainly because the flame is located closer to the inlet plane. On the other hand, a more uniform temperature distribution in the exhaust gas can be attained at the combustor exit at high swirl condition.

  12. A Theoretical Study on Quantitative Prediction and Evaluation of Thermal Residual Stresses in Metal Matrix Composite (Case 1 : Two-Dimensional In-Plane Fiber Distribution)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Son, Bong Jin

    1997-01-01

    Although discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composite(MMC) is one of the most promising materials for applications of aerospace, automotive industries, the thermal residual stresses developed in the MMC due to the mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion between the matrix and the fiber under a temperature change has been pointed out as one of the serious problem in practical applications. There are very limited nondestructive techniques to measure the residual stress of composite materials. However, many difficulties have been reported in their applications. Therefore it is important to establish analytical model to evaluate the thermal residual stress of MMC for practical engineering application. In this study, an elastic model is developed to predict the average thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber of a misoriented short fiber composite. The thermal residual stresses are induced by the mismatch in the coefficient of the thermal expansion of the matrix and fiber when the composite is subjected to a uniform temperature change. The model considers two-dimensional in-plane fiber misorientation. The analytical formulation of the model is based on Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and is unique in that it is able to account for interactions among fibers. This model is more general than past models to investigate the effect of parameters which might influence thermal residual stress in composites. The present model is to investigate the effects of fiber volume fraction, distribution type, distribution cut-off angle, and aspect ratio on thermal residual stress for in-plane fiber misorientation. Fiber volume fraction, aspect ratio, and distribution cut-off angle are shown to have more significant effects on the magnitude of the thermal residual stresses than fiber distribution type for in-plane misorientation

  13. The relationship between bioclimatic thermal stress and subjective thermal sensation in pedestrian spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlmutter, David; Jiao, Dixin; Garb, Yaakov

    2014-12-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort has important implications for urban planning and energy consumption in the built environment. To better understand the relation of subjective thermal experience to bioclimatic thermal stress in such contexts, this study compares micrometeorological and perceptual data from urban spaces in the hot-arid Negev region of Israel. Pedestrians reported on their thermal sensation in these spaces, whereas radiation and convection-related data were used to compute the Index of Thermal Stress (ITS) and physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). The former is a straightforward characterization of energy exchanges between the human body and its surroundings, without any conversion to an "equivalent temperature." Although the relation of ITS to subjective thermal sensation has been analyzed in the past under controlled indoor conditions, this paper offers the first analysis of this relation in an outdoor setting. ITS alone can account for nearly 60 % of the variance in pedestrians' thermal sensation under outdoor conditions, somewhat more than PET. A series of regressions with individual contextual variables and ITS identified those factors which accounted for additional variance in thermal sensation, whereas multivariate analyses indicated the considerable predictive power ( R-square = 0.74) of models including multiple contextual variables in addition to ITS. Our findings indicate that pedestrians experiencing variable outdoor conditions have a greater tolerance for incremental changes in thermal stress than has been shown previously under controlled indoor conditions, with a tapering of responses at high values of ITS. However, the thresholds of ITS corresponding to thermal "neutrality" and thermal "acceptability" are quite consistent regardless of context.

  14. Thermal-Acoustic Fatigue of a Multilayer Thermal Protection System in Combined Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure integrity of thermal protection system (TPS structure for hypersonic vehicles exposed to severe operating environments, a study is undertaken to investigate the response and thermal-acoustic fatigue damage of a representative multilayer TPS structure under combined thermal and acoustic loads. An unsteady-state flight of a hypersonic vehicle is composed of a series of steady-state snapshots, and for each snapshot an acoustic load is imposed to a static steady-state TPS structure. A multistep thermal-acoustic fatigue damage intensity analysis procedure is given and consists of a heat transfer analysis, a nonlinear thermoelastic analysis, and a random response analysis under a combined loading environment and the fatigue damage intensity has been evaluated with two fatigue analysis techniques. The effects of thermally induced deterministic stress and nondeterministic dynamic stress due to the acoustic loading have been considered in the damage intensity estimation with a maximum stress fatigue model. The results show that the given thermal-acoustic fatigue intensity estimation procedure is a viable approach for life prediction of TPS structures under a typical mission cycle with combined loadings characterized by largely different time-scales. A discussion of the effects of the thermal load, the acoustic load, and fatigue analysis methodology on the fatigue damage intensity has been provided.

  15. Frequency-domain thermal modelling of power semiconductor devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede; Andresen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    to correctly predict the device temperatures, especially when considering the thermal grease and heat sink attached to the power semiconductor devices. In this paper, the frequency-domain approach is applied to the modelling of thermal dynamics for power devices. The limits of the existing RC lump...

  16. Thermal sensation and thermophysiological responses with metabolic step-changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goto, Tomonobu; Toftum, Jørn; deDear, Richard

    2006-01-01

    at sedentary activity. In a second experimental series, subjects alternated between rest and exercise as well as between exercise at different intensities at two temperature levels. Measurements comprised skin and oesophageal temperatures, heart rate and subjective responses. Thermal sensation started to rise....... The sensitivity of thermal sensation to changes in core temperature was higher for activity down-steps than for up-steps. A model was proposed that estimates transient thermal sensation after metabolic step-changes. Based on predictions by the model, weighting factors were suggested to estimate a representative...... average metabolic rate with varying activity levels, e.g. for the prediction of thermal sensation by steady-state comfort models. The activity during the most recent 5 min should be weighted 65%, during the prior 10-5 min 25% and during the prior 20-10 min 10%....

  17. Thermal Cycling Life Prediction of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu Solder Joint Using Type-I Censored Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Mi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Because solder joint interconnections are the weaknesses of microelectronic packaging, their reliability has great influence on the reliability of the entire packaging structure. Based on an accelerated life test the reliability assessment and life prediction of lead-free solder joints using Weibull distribution are investigated. The type-I interval censored lifetime data were collected from a thermal cycling test, which was implemented on microelectronic packaging with lead-free ball grid array (BGA and fine-pitch ball grid array (FBGA interconnection structures. The number of cycles to failure of lead-free solder joints is predicted by using a modified Engelmaier fatigue life model and a type-I censored data processing method. Then, the Pan model is employed to calculate the acceleration factor of this test. A comparison of life predictions between the proposed method and the ones calculated directly by Matlab and Minitab is conducted to demonstrate the practicability and effectiveness of the proposed method. At last, failure analysis and microstructure evolution of lead-free solders are carried out to provide useful guidance for the regular maintenance, replacement of substructure, and subsequent processing of electronic products.

  18. Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage for Seasonal Thermal Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostampour, Vahab; Bloemendal, Martin; Keviczky, Tamas

    2017-04-01

    Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) systems allow storing large quantities of thermal energy in subsurface aquifers enabling significant energy savings and greenhouse gas reductions. This is achieved by injection and extraction of water into and from saturated underground aquifers, simultaneously. An ATES system consists of two wells and operates in a seasonal mode. One well is used for the storage of cold water, the other one for the storage of heat. In warm seasons, cold water is extracted from the cold well to provide cooling to a building. The temperature of the extracted cold water increases as it passes through the building climate control systems and then gets simultaneously, injected back into the warm well. This procedure is reversed during cold seasons where the flow direction is reversed such that the warmer water is extracted from the warm well to provide heating to a building. From the perspective of building climate comfort systems, an ATES system is considered as a seasonal storage system that can be a heat source or sink, or as a storage for thermal energy. This leads to an interesting and challenging optimal control problem of the building climate comfort system that can be used to develop a seasonal-based energy management strategy. In [1] we develop a control-oriented model to predict thermal energy balance in a building climate control system integrated with ATES. Such a model however cannot cope with off-nominal but realistic situations such as when the wells are completely depleted, or the start-up phase of newly installed wells, etc., leading to direct usage of aquifer ambient temperature. Building upon our previous work in [1], we here extend the mathematical model for ATES system to handle the above mentioned more realistic situations. Using our improved models, one can more precisely predict system behavior and apply optimal control strategies to manage the building climate comfort along with energy savings and greenhouse gas reductions

  19. A thermal spike analysis of low energy ion activated surface processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, G.M.; Haeri, A.; Sprague, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports a thermal spike analysis utilized to predict the time evolution of energy propagation through a solid resulting from energetic particle impact. An analytical solution was developed that can predict the number of surface excitations such as desorption, diffusion or chemical reaction activated by an energetic particle. The analytical solution is limited to substrates at zero Kelvin and to materials with constant thermal diffusivities. These limitations were removed by developing a computer numerical integration of the propagation of the thermal spike through the solid and the subsequent activation of surface processes

  20. Laser-induced thermal damage of skin. Final report, September 1976--April 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takata, A.N.; Zaneveld, L.; Richter, W.

    1977-12-01

    A computerized model was developed for predicting thermal damage of skin by laser exposures. Thermal, optical, and physiological data are presented for the model. Model predictions of extent of irreversible damage were compared with histologic determinations of the extent of damage produced in pig skin by carbon dioxide and ruby lasers. (Author)

  1. Use of artificial neuronal networks for prediction of the control parameters in the process of anaerobic digestion with thermal pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Asis, Rita; Méndez-Contreras, Juan M; Juárez-Martínez, Ulises; Alvarado-Lassman, Alejandro; Villanueva-Vásquez, Daniel; Aguilar-Lasserre, Alberto A

    2018-04-19

    This article focuses on the analysis of the behavior patterns of the variables involved in the anaerobic digestion process. The objective is to predict the impact factor and the behavior pattern of the variables, i.e., temperature, pH, volatile solids (VS), total solids, volumetric load, and hydraulic residence time, considering that these are the control variables for the conservation of the different groups of anaerobic microorganisms. To conduct the research, samples of physicochemical sludge were taken from a water treatment plant in a poultry processing factory, and, then, the substrate was characterized, and a thermal pretreatment was used to accelerate the hydrolysis process. The anaerobic digestion process was analyzed in order to obtain experimental data of the control variables and observe their impact on the production of biogas. The results showed that the thermal pre-hydrolysis applied at 90°C for 90 min accelerated the hydrolysis phase, allowing a significant 52% increase in the volume of methane produced. An artificial neural network was developed, and it was trained with the database obtained by monitoring the anaerobic digestion process. The results obtained from the artificial neural network showed that there is an adjustment between the real values and the prediction of validation based on 60 samples with a 96.4% coefficient of determination, and it was observed that the variables with the major impact on the process were the loading rate and VS, with impact factors of 36% and 23%, respectively.

  2. The influence of local effects on thermal sensation under non-uniform environmental conditions — Gender differences in thermophysiology, thermal comfort and productivity during convective and radiant cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellen, L.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; de Wit, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    , thermal comfort and productivity in response to thermal non-uniform environmental conditions. Twenty healthy subjects (10 males and 10 females, age 20–29years) were exposed to two different experimental conditions: a convective cooling situation (CC) and a radiant cooling situation (RC). During...... the experiments physiological responses, thermal comfort and productivity were measured. The results show that under both experimental conditions the actual mean thermal sensation votes significantly differ from the PMV-index; the subjects are feeling colder than predicted. Furthermore, the females are more...... of the occupants. Non-uniform thermal conditions, which may occur due to application of high temperature cooling systems, can be responsible for discomfort. Contradictions in literature exist regarding the validity of the often used predicted mean vote (PMV) index for both genders, and the index is not intended...

  3. Thermal Analysis of Ball screw Systems by Explicit Finite Difference Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Bog Ki [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chun Hong; Chung, Sung Chong [KIMM, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Friction generated from balls and grooves incurs temperature rise in the ball screw system. Thermal deformation due to the heat degrades positioning accuracy of the feed drive system. To compensate for the thermal error, accurate prediction of the temperature distribution is required first. In this paper, to predict the temperature distribution according to the rotational speed, solid and hollow cylinders are applied for analysis of the ball screw shaft and nut, respectively. Boundary conditions such as the convective heat transfer coefficient, friction torque, and thermal contact conductance (TCC) between balls and grooves are formulated according to operating and fabrication conditions of the ball screw. Explicit FDM (finite difference method) is studied for development of a temperature prediction simulator. Its effectiveness is verified through numerical analysis.

  4. Evaluation of thermal shock resistance of cordierite honeycombs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A comparative study on thermal shock resistance (TSR) of extruded cordierite honeycombs is presented. TSR is an important property that predicts the life of these products in thermal environments used for automobile pollution control as catalytic converter or as diesel particulate filter. TSR was experimentally studied by ...

  5. Investigation of Thermal Performance for Atria: a Method Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosavi Leila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of low energy design in large buildings has encouraged researchers to implement different methods for predicting a building’s thermal performance. Atria, as energy efficient features, have been implemented to improve the indoor thermal environment in large modern buildings. Though widely implemented, the thorough study of atrium performance is restricted due to its large size, complex thermodynamic behavior and the inaccuracies and limitations of available prediction tools. This study reviews the most common research tools implemented in previous researches on atria thermal performance, to explore the advantages and limitation of different methods for future studies. The methods reviewed are analytical, experimental, computer modelling and a combination of any or all of these methods. The findings showed that CFD (computational fluid dynamic models are the most popular tools of recent due to their higher accuracy, capabilities and user-friendly modification. Although the experimental methods were reliable for predicting atria thermal and ventilation performance, they have mostly been used to provide data for validation of CFD models. Furthermore, coupling CFD with other experimental models could increase the reliability and accuracy of the models and provide a more comprehensive analysis.

  6. Examination of thermal comfort in a hospital using PMV-PPD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourshaghaghy, A; Omidvari, M

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the performance of air conditioning system and the level of thermal comfort are determined in a state hospital located in Kermanshah city in the west of Iran in winter and summer using the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) model which has been presented by ISO-7730 (2005). The Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) and the Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied (PPD) indices were computed using the data acquired from the experimental measurements performed in the building. The results showed that the values of PMV in some parts of the building, both for men and women, are not within the standard acceptable range defined by ISO. It was found that the most thermal problems in winter occur in morning work shift, and the worst thermal conditions in summer occur in noon work shift. The t-test results revealed that there is no noticeable difference between the thermal conditions of some rooms and those of the surroundings. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermalized axion inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio, E-mail: rferreira@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: notari@ub.edu [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton φ to gauge fields of the form φ F F-tilde / f , as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= φ-dot /(2 fH ), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H , due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξ∼>2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξ∼>3.4; however, observations require ξ∼>6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of T {sub eq} ≅ ξ H / g-bar where g-bar is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if φ is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H /(2 T ), if tensors do not thermalize.

  8. Thermalized axion inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton phi to gauge fields of the form phi F tilde F/f, as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= dot phi/(2fH), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H, due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξgtrsim2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξgtrsim3.4 however, observations require ξgtrsim6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of Teq simeq ξ H/bar g where bar g is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if phi is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H/(2T), if tensors do not thermalize.

  9. Thermal comfort assessment in a Dutch hospital setting – model applicability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottenheijm, E.M.M.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Kort, H.S.M.; Trip, A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Limited information is available on thermal comfort performance of the indoor environment in health care facilities both for staff and patients. Thermal comfort models such as Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) and Adaptive Thermal Comfort (ATC), have not been applied extensively for this setting. In

  10. Impacts of transient heat transfer modeling on prediction of advanced cladding fracture during LWR LBLOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho, E-mail: euo@kaist.ac.kr; Lee, Jeong Ik, E-mail: jeongiklee@kaist.ac.kr; NO, Hee Cheon, E-mail: hcno@kaist.ac.kr

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Use of constant heat transfer coefficient for fracture analysis is not sound. • On-time heat transfer coefficient should be used for thermal fracture prediction. • ∼90% of the actual fracture stresses were predicted with the on-time transient h. • Thermal-hydraulic codes can be used to better predict brittle cladding fracture. • Effects of surface oxides on thermal shock fracture should be accounted by h. - Abstract: This study presents the importance of coherency in modeling thermal-hydraulics and mechanical behavior of a solid for an advanced prediction of cladding thermal shock fracture. In water quenching, a solid experiences dynamic heat transfer rate evolutions with phase changes of the fluid over a short quenching period. Yet, such a dynamic change of heat transfer rates has been overlooked in the analysis of thermal shock fracture. In this study, we are presenting quantitative evidence against the prevailing use of a constant heat transfer coefficient for thermal shock fracture analysis in water. We conclude that no single constant heat transfer could suffice to depict the actual stress evolution subject to dynamic fluid phase changes. Use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient will remarkably increase predictability of thermal shock fracture of brittle materials. The presented results show a remarkable stress prediction improvement up to 80–90% of the actual stress with the use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient. For thermal shock fracture analysis of brittle fuel cladding such as oxidized zirconium-based alloy or silicon carbide during LWR reflood, transient subchannel heat transfer coefficients obtained from a thermal-hydraulics code should be used as input for stress analysis. Such efforts will lead to a fundamental improvement in thermal shock fracture predictability over the current experimental empiricism for cladding fracture analysis during reflood.

  11. Prediction of future subsurface temperatures in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Kim, S. K.; Jeong, J.; SHIN, E.

    2017-12-01

    The importance of climate change has been increasingly recognized because it has had the huge amount of impact on social, economic, and environmental aspect. For the reason, paleoclimate change has been studied intensively using different geological tools including borehole temperatures and future surface air temperatures (SATs) have been predicted for the local areas and the globe. Future subsurface temperatures can have also enormous impact on various areas and be predicted by an analytical method or a numerical simulation using measured and predicted SATs, and thermal diffusivity data of rocks. SATs have been measured at 73 meteorological observatories since 1907 in Korea and predicted at same locations up to the year of 2100. Measured SATs at the Seoul meteorological observatory increased by about 3.0 K from the year of 1907 to the present. Predicted SATs have 4 different scenarios depending on mainly CO2 concentration and national action plan on climate change in the future. The hottest scenario shows that SATs in Korea will increase by about 5.0 K from the present to the year of 2100. In addition, thermal diffusivity values have been measured on 2,903 rock samples collected from entire Korea. Data pretreatment based on autocorrelation analysis was conducted to control high frequency noise in thermal diffusivity data. Finally, future subsurface temperatures in Korea were predicted up to the year of 2100 by a FEM simulation code (COMSOL Multiphysics) using measured and predicted SATs, and thermal diffusivity data in Korea. At Seoul, the results of predictions show that subsurface temperatures will increase by about 5.4 K, 3.0 K, 1.5 K, and 0.2 K from the present to 2050 and then by about 7.9 K, 4.8 K, 2.5 K, and 0.5 K to 2100 at the depths of 10 m, 50 m, 100 m, and 200 m, respectively. We are now proceeding numerical simulations for subsurface temperature predictions for 73 locations in Korea.

  12. Lifetime prediction of LED lighting systems considering thermal coupling between LED sources and drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfarog, Azzarn Orner; Qu, Xiaohui; Wang, Huai

    2017-01-01

    and accelerate the failure. In this paper, a new thermal model concerning the thermal coupling is proposed with Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation for parameter acquirement. The proposed model has a better estimation of the thermal stresses of key components in the LED lamps and therefore an improved...... separately, and then the thermal design is also optimized independently. In practice, the LED source and driver are usually compacted in a single fixture. The heat dissipated from LED source and driver will be coupled together and affect the heat transfer performance, which may degrade the whole system...

  13. Thermal non-equilibrium in porous medium adjacent to vertical plate: ANN approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, N. J. Salman; Ahamed, K. S. Nazim; Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Athani, Abdulgaphur

    2018-05-01

    Thermal non-equilibrium in porous medium is a condition that refers to temperature discrepancy in solid matrix and fluid of porous medium. This type of flow is complex flow requiring complex set of partial differential equations that govern the flow behavior. The current work is undertaken to predict the thermal non-equilibrium behavior of porous medium adjacent to vertical plate using artificial neural network. A set of neurons in 3 layers are trained to predict the heat transfer characteristics. It is found that the thermal non-equilibrium heat transfer behavior in terms of Nusselt number of fluid as well as solid phase can be predicted accurately by using well-trained neural network.

  14. Thermal sensitivity of cold climate lizards and the importance of distributional ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, Marcelo F; Moreno Azócar, Débora L; Schulte, James A; Abdala, Cristian S; Cruz, Félix B

    2015-08-01

    One of the fundamental goals in macroecology is to understand the relationship among species' geographic ranges, ecophysiology, and climate; however, the mechanisms underlying the distributional geographic patterns observed remain unknown for most organisms. In the case of ectotherms this is particularly important because the knowledge of these interactions may provide a robust framework for predicting the potential consequences of climate change in these organisms. Here we studied the relationship of thermal sensitivity and thermal tolerance in Patagonian lizards and their geographic ranges, proposing that species with wider distributions have broader plasticity and thermal tolerance. We predicted that lizard thermal physiology is related to the thermal characteristics of the environment. We also explored the presence of trade-offs of some thermal traits and evaluated the potential effects of a predicted scenario of climate change for these species. We examined sixteen species of Liolaemini lizards from Patagonia representing species with different geographic range sizes. We obtained thermal tolerance data and performance curves for each species in laboratory trials. We found evidence supporting the idea that higher physiological plasticity allows species to achieve broader distribution ranges compared to species with restricted distributions. We also found a trade-off between broad levels of plasticity and higher optimum temperatures of performance. Finally, results from contrasting performance curves against the highest environmental temperatures that lizards may face in a future scenario (year 2080) suggest that the activity of species occurring at high latitudes may be unaffected by predicted climatic changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Forty years of Fanger's model of thermal comfort: Comfort for all?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, van J.

    2008-01-01

    The predicted mean vote (PMV) model of thermal comfort, created by Fanger in the late 1960s, is used worldwide to assess thermal comfort. Fanger based his model on college-aged students for use in invariant environmental conditions in air-conditioned buildings in moderate thermal climate zones.

  16. Dynamic thermal characteristics of heat pipe via segmented thermal resistance model for electric vehicle battery cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feifei; Lan, Fengchong; Chen, Jiqing

    2016-07-01

    Heat pipe cooling for battery thermal management systems (BTMSs) in electric vehicles (EVs) is growing due to its advantages of high cooling efficiency, compact structure and flexible geometry. Considering the transient conduction, phase change and uncertain thermal conditions in a heat pipe, it is challenging to obtain the dynamic thermal characteristics accurately in such complex heat and mass transfer process. In this paper, a ;segmented; thermal resistance model of a heat pipe is proposed based on thermal circuit method. The equivalent conductivities of different segments, viz. the evaporator and condenser of pipe, are used to determine their own thermal parameters and conditions integrated into the thermal model of battery for a complete three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The proposed ;segmented; model shows more precise than the ;non-segmented; model by the comparison of simulated and experimental temperature distribution and variation of an ultra-thin micro heat pipe (UMHP) battery pack, and has less calculation error to obtain dynamic thermal behavior for exact thermal design, management and control of heat pipe BTMSs. Using the ;segmented; model, the cooling effect of the UMHP pack with different natural/forced convection and arrangements is predicted, and the results correspond well to the tests.

  17. Impact of isotopic disorders on thermal transport properties of nanotubes and nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Tao [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Kang, Wei [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Jianxiang, E-mail: jxwang@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-01-21

    We present a one-dimensional lattice model to describe thermal transport in isotopically doped nanotubes and nanowires. The thermal conductivities thus predicted, as a function of isotopic concentration, agree well with recent experiments and other simulations. Our results display that for any given concentration of isotopic atoms in a lattice without sharp atomic interfaces, the maximum thermal conductivity is attained when isotopic atoms are placed regularly with an equal space, whereas the minimum is achieved when they are randomly inserted with a uniform distribution. Non-uniformity of disorder can further tune the thermal conductivity between the two values. Moreover, the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the nanoscale feature size becomes weak at low temperature when disorder exists. In addition, when self-consistent thermal reservoirs are included to describe diffusive nanomaterials, the thermal conductivities predicted by our model are in line with the results of macroscopic theories with an interfacial effect. Our results suggest that the disorder provides an additional freedom to tune the thermal properties of nanomaterials in many technological applications including nanoelectronics, solid-state lighting, energy conservation, and conversion.

  18. Impact of isotopic disorders on thermal transport properties of nanotubes and nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tao; Kang, Wei; Wang, Jianxiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a one-dimensional lattice model to describe thermal transport in isotopically doped nanotubes and nanowires. The thermal conductivities thus predicted, as a function of isotopic concentration, agree well with recent experiments and other simulations. Our results display that for any given concentration of isotopic atoms in a lattice without sharp atomic interfaces, the maximum thermal conductivity is attained when isotopic atoms are placed regularly with an equal space, whereas the minimum is achieved when they are randomly inserted with a uniform distribution. Non-uniformity of disorder can further tune the thermal conductivity between the two values. Moreover, the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the nanoscale feature size becomes weak at low temperature when disorder exists. In addition, when self-consistent thermal reservoirs are included to describe diffusive nanomaterials, the thermal conductivities predicted by our model are in line with the results of macroscopic theories with an interfacial effect. Our results suggest that the disorder provides an additional freedom to tune the thermal properties of nanomaterials in many technological applications including nanoelectronics, solid-state lighting, energy conservation, and conversion

  19. Thermal-hydrological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buscheck, T., LLNL

    1998-04-29

    This chapter describes the physical processes and natural and engineered system conditions that affect thermal-hydrological (T-H) behavior in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain and how these effects are represented in mathematical and numerical models that are used to predict T-H conditions in the near field, altered zone, and engineered barrier system (EBS), and on waste package (WP) surfaces.

  20. Thermal/structural analysis of radiators for heavy-duty trucks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Shaolin; Cheng, Changrui; Li Xianchang; Michaelides, Efstathios E.

    2010-01-01

    A thermal/structural coupling approach is applied to analyze thermal performance and predict the thermal stress of a radiator for heavy-duty transportation cooling systems. Bench test and field test data show that non-uniform temperature gradient and dynamic pressure loads may induce large thermal stress on the radiator. A finite element analysis (FEA) tool is used to predict the strains and displacement of radiator based on the solid wall temperature, wall-based fluid film heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop. These are obtained from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. A 3D simulation of turbulent flow and coupled heat transfer between the working fluids poses a major difficulty because the range of length scales involved in heavy-duty radiators varies from few millimeters of the fin pitch and/or tube cross-section to several meters for the overall size of the radiator. It is very computational expensive, if not impossible, to directly simulate the turbulent heat transfer between fins and the thermal boundary layer in each tube. In order to overcome the computational difficulties, a dual porous zone (DPZ) method is applied, in which fins in the air side and turbulators in the water side are treated as porous region. The parameters involved in the DPZ method are tuned based on experimental data in prior. A distinguished advantage of the porous medium method is its effectiveness of modeling wide-range characteristic scale problems. A parametric study of the impact of flow rate on the heat transfer coefficient is presented. The FEA results predict the maximum value of stress/strain and target locations for possible structural failure and the results obtained are consistent with experimental observations. The results demonstrate that the coupling thermal/structural analysis is a powerful tool applied to heavy-duty cooling product design to improve the radiator thermal performance, durability and reliability under rigid working environment.

  1. Analysis of dual-phase-lag thermal behaviour in layered films with temperature-dependent interface thermal resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K-C

    2005-01-01

    This work analyses theoretically the dual-phase-lag thermal behaviour in two-layered thin films with an interface thermal resistance, which is predicted by the radiation boundary condition model. The effect of the interface thermal resistance on the transmission-reflection phenomenon, induced by a pulsed volumetric source adjacent to the exterior surface of one layer, is investigated. Due to the difference between the two layers in the relaxation times, τ q and τ T , and the nonlinearity of the interfacial boundary condition, complexity is introduced and some mathematical difficulties are involved in solving the present problem. A hybrid application of the Laplace transform method and a control-volume formulation are used along with the linearization technique. The results show that the effect of the thermophysical properties on the behaviour of the energy passing across the interface gradually reduces with increasing interface thermal resistance. The lagging thermal behaviour depends on the magnitude of τ T and τ q more than on the ratio of τ T /τ q

  2. Prediction of cleavage crack propagation and arrest in a nuclear pressure vessel steel (16MND5) under thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-01

    the critical stress was developed. The results of this analytical model is in good agreement with the empirical criterion identified. In order to test the validity of the identified criterion, the prediction of the crack propagation and arrest by the criterion was first performed for isothermal tests. It was performed both on CT25 specimens (crack was solicited in mode I) and on ring specimens in mixed mode loading which were carried out at three different temperatures. The numerical results of prediction were in good agreement with experiments. They showed the validity of the criterion for experiments under isothermal loading for two different specimen geometries. In order to test the validity of criterion for the situation of thermal shock, experiments were carried out on ring specimens. At first, one ring specimen was cooled down to -150 C, and then hot water (∼90 C) was injected through the inner side of the ring specimen. At the same time of thermal shock, this specimen was submitted to a mechanical compressive loading (-750 kN). The prediction of crack propagation and arrest by the criterion for this situation was calculated in both 2D and 3D. The predicted results were in good agreement with experiments for both crack speed and crack length. This confirmed that the criterion is relevant to predict the crack propagation and arrest for thermal shock. In parallel, some experiments were performed on extended CT25 specimens (same height but double the width of the CT25 specimen). The crack path on this kind of specimen was curved. A statistical effect by a random selection in the propagation direction was introduced to take into account the instability during the crack propagation. The numerical results correctly reproduce the curvature and the dispersion of the crack paths. (author) [fr

  3. CFD modeling of thermal mixing in a T-junction geometry using LES model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayhan, Hueseyin, E-mail: huseyinayhan@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Beytepe, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Soekmen, Cemal Niyazi, E-mail: cemalniyazi.sokmen@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Beytepe, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFD simulations of temperature and velocity fluctuations for thermal mixing cases in T-junction are performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that the frequency range of 2-5 Hz contains most of the energy; therefore, may cause thermal fatigue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study shows that RANS based calculations fail to predict a realistic mixing between the fluids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LES model can predict instantaneous turbulence behavior. - Abstract: Turbulent mixing of fluids at different temperatures can lead to temperature fluctuations at the pipe material. These fluctuations, or thermal striping, inducing cyclical thermal stresses and resulting thermal fatigue, may cause unexpected failure of pipe material. Therefore, an accurate characterization of temperature fluctuations is important in order to estimate the lifetime of pipe material. Thermal fatigue of the coolant circuits of nuclear power plants is one of the major issues in nuclear safety. To investigate thermal fatigue damage, the OECD/NEA has recently organized a blind benchmark study including some of results of present work for prediction of temperature and velocity fluctuations performing a thermal mixing experiment in a T-junction. This paper aims to estimate the frequency of velocity and temperature fluctuations in the mixing region using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models were used to simulate turbulence. CFD results were compared with the available experimental results. Predicted LES results, even in coarse mesh, were found to be in well-agreement with the experimental results in terms of amplitude and frequency of temperature and velocity fluctuations. Analysis of the temperature fluctuations and the power spectrum densities (PSD) at the locations having the strongest temperature fluctuations in the tee junction shows that the frequency range of 2-5 Hz

  4. A comparative study on three types of solar utilization technologies for buildings: Photovoltaic, solar thermal and hybrid photovoltaic/thermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huide, Fu; Xuxin, Zhao; Lei, Ma; Tao, Zhang; Qixing, Wu; Hongyuan, Sun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Models of Solar thermal, Photovoltaic and Photovoltaic/thermal systems are developed. • Experiments are performed to validate the simulation results. • Annual performances of the three solar systems used in china are predicted. • Energy comparison between the three solar systems is analyzed. - Abstract: Buildings need energy including heat and electricity, and both of them can be provided by the solar systems. Solar thermal and photovoltaic systems absorb the solar energy and can supply the heat and electricity for buildings, respectively. However, for the urban residential buildings, the limited available area makes installation of the solar thermal collectors and photovoltaic modules together impossible. A hybrid photovoltaic/thermal system can simultaneously generate heat and electricity, which is deemed to be quite suitable for the urban residential buildings application. And yet, for a rural house of China, the available area for installation of the solar collectors is large but daily domestic hot water demand of a rural family is generally not exceeded 300 L. If only the hybrid photovoltaic/thermal collectors are installed on the whole available area, this will lead to an overproduction of the thermal energy, especially in summer. Moreover, buildings requiring for the heat and electricity are different in different regions and different seasons. In this paper, simulation models of the solar thermal, photovoltaic and hybrid photovoltaic/thermal systems are presented, and experiments are also performed to validate the simulation results. Using the validated models, performances of the three solar systems for residential applications were predicted. And energy comparison between the three solar systems used in Hongkong, Lhasa, Shanghai and Beijing of China, respectively, were also studied. Results show that, for the urban residential building with limited available installation space, a hybrid photovoltaic/thermal system may have the

  5. Investigation of coolant thermal mixing within 28-element CANDU fuel bundles using the ASSERT-PV thermal hydraulics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightston, M.F.; Rock, R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the thermal mixing of single-phase coolant in 28-element CANDU fuel bundles under steady-state conditions. The study, which is based on simulations performed using the ASSERT-PV thermal hydraulic code, consists of two main parts. In the first part the various physical mechanisms that contribute to coolant mixing are identified and their impact is isolated via ASSERT-PV simulations. The second part is concerned with development of a preliminary model suitable for use in the fuel and fuel channel code FACTAR to predict the thermal mixing that occurs between flow annuli. (author)

  6. Micro-Scale Avionics Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    Trends in the thermal management of avionics and commercial ground-based microelectronics are converging, and facing the same dilemma: a shortfall in technology to meet near-term maximum junction temperature and package power projections. Micro-scale devices hold the key to significant advances in thermal management, particularly micro-refrigerators/coolers that can drive cooling temperatures below ambient. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) Stirling cooler is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this challenge with predicted efficiencies that are an order of magnitude better than current and future thermoelectric coolers.

  7. Thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors from a kinetic-collective model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tomas, C; Cantarero, A; Lopeandia, A F; Alvarez, F X

    2014-09-08

    The thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors (silicon, germanium, diamond and grey tin) with several isotopic compositions has been calculated from a kinetic-collective model. From this approach, significantly different to Callaway-like models in its physical interpretation, the thermal conductivity expression accounts for a transition from a kinetic (individual phonon transport) to a collective (hydrodynamic phonon transport) behaviour of the phonon field. Within the model, we confirm the theoretical proportionality between the phonon-phonon relaxation times of the group-IV semiconductors. This proportionality depends on some materials properties and it allows us to predict the thermal conductivity of the whole group of materials without the need to fit each material individually. The predictions on thermal conductivities are in good agreement with experimental data over a wide temperature range.

  8. Thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors from a kinetic-collective model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tomas, C.; Cantarero, A.; Lopeandia, A. F.; Alvarez, F. X.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors (silicon, germanium, diamond and grey tin) with several isotopic compositions has been calculated from a kinetic-collective model. From this approach, significantly different to Callaway-like models in its physical interpretation, the thermal conductivity expression accounts for a transition from a kinetic (individual phonon transport) to a collective (hydrodynamic phonon transport) behaviour of the phonon field. Within the model, we confirm the theoretical proportionality between the phonon–phonon relaxation times of the group-IV semiconductors. This proportionality depends on some materials properties and it allows us to predict the thermal conductivity of the whole group of materials without the need to fit each material individually. The predictions on thermal conductivities are in good agreement with experimental data over a wide temperature range. PMID:25197256

  9. Acoustic and Thermal Vibrational Behavior of Rare Earth Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senin, H. B.; Kancono, W.; Sidek, H. A. A.

    2007-01-01

    The ultrasonic wave velocity and the thermal expansion of the rare earth glasses have been measured as functions of temperature and pressure to test predictions of the soft potential model for the acoustic and thermal properties. The longitudinal ultrasonic wave velocities increase under pressure. The hydrostatic pressure derivative of the bulk modulus is positive: these glasses show a normal elastic response as compressed. However, the pressure derivative of the shear modulus is negative and small, indicating weak softening of shear modes under pressure. The results found are used to determine the Gruneisen parameters. This is to obtain the acoustic mode contribution to thermal expansion. After subtraction of the relaxation and anharmonic contributions, the temperature dependence of the shear wave ultrasound velocity follows a linear law as predicted by the Soft Potential Model

  10. Predicting thermal history a-priori for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia of internal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Purbarun; Sirisha Maganti, Lakshmi

    2017-08-01

    This article proposes a simplistic and realistic method where a direct analytical expression can be derived for the temperature field within a tumour during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. The approximated analytical expression for thermal history within the tumour is derived based on the lumped capacitance approach and considers all therapy protocols and parameters. The present method is simplistic and provides an easy framework for estimating hyperthermia protocol parameters promptly. The model has been validated with respect to several experimental reports on animal models such as mice/rabbit/hamster and human clinical trials. It has been observed that the model is able to accurately estimate the thermal history within the carcinoma during the hyperthermia therapy. The present approach may find implications in a-priori estimation of the thermal history in internal tumours for optimizing magnetic hyperthermia treatment protocols with respect to the ablation time, tumour size, magnetic drug concentration, field strength, field frequency, nanoparticle material and size, tumour location, and so on.

  11. A minimal model of the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability: its genesis and predictability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou, Hsien-Wang [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Palisades, NY (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Through a box model of the subpolar North Atlantic, we examine the genesis and predictability of the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability (AMV), posited as a linear perturbation sustained by the stochastic atmosphere. Postulating a density-dependent thermohaline circulation (THC), the latter would strongly differentiate the thermal and saline damping, and facilitate a negative feedback between the two fields. This negative feedback preferentially suppresses the low-frequency thermal variance to render a broad multidecadal peak bounded by the thermal and saline damping time. We offer this ''differential variance suppression'' as an alternative paradigm of the AMV in place of the ''damped oscillation'' - the latter generally not allowed by the deterministic dynamics and in any event bears no relation to the thermal peak. With the validated dynamics, we then assess the AMV predictability based on the relative entropy - a difference of the forecast and climatological probability distributions, which decays through both error growth and dynamical damping. Since the stochastic forcing is mainly in the surface heat flux, the thermal noise grows rapidly and together with its climatological variance limited by the THC-aided thermal damping, they strongly curtail the thermal predictability. The latter may be prolonged if the initial thermal and saline anomalies are of the same sign, but even rare events of less than 1% chance of occurrence yield a predictable time that is well short of a decade; we contend therefore that the AMV is in effect unpredictable. (orig.)

  12. Investigation and Modelling of Thermal Conditions in Low Flow SDHW Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Louise Jivan

    1999-01-01

    and compared with the CFD-predicted flow structures in the mantle. The results showed that the mantle flow was highly dominated by buoyancy and the CFD-models were able to model this flow. With a steel mantle tank, different dynamic thermal experiments were carried out in a heat storage test facility....... This simulation program predicts the yearly thermal performance of low flow SDHW systems based on mantle tanks. MANTLSIM was verified and afterwards used as a tool for parameter analysis. This analysis showed that MANTLSIM predicted expected tendencies. Only for the mantle gap variations, results in poor...

  13. Physiological and pathological effects of thermal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hymes, I.

    1983-09-15

    This report deals with man's response to abnormally high levels of thermal radiation. The early sections deal with the properties and biological roles of the skin in some detail as a basis for the definitions and descriptions of pathological damage. The estimation of hazard ranges in thermal radiation exposures requires a moderately accurate knowledge of the intensity and duration of the emitted flux. The (BLEVE) Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapor Explosion fireball conveniently meets this requirement as well as having the capability to inflict severe burn injuries over considerable distances. Liquid Petroleum Gas fireballs have been used as the source term for the thermal radiation calculations which predict threshold lethality and various categories of burn injury. Inevitably there are areas of uncertainty in such calculations, some contributory factors being atmospheric conditions, fuel container rupture pattern, type of clothing worn etc. The sensitivity of the predicted hazard ranges to these influential parameters is exemplified in several of the graphs presented. The susceptibility of everyday clothing to ignite or melt in thermal fluxes greater than about 70 kW/m/sup 2/ is shown to be a matter of some gravity since burning clothing can thwart escape and inflict serious, if not fatal, burns quite apart from injuries directly received from the incident radiation. The various means by which incident heat fluxes can be reduced or their effects mitigated are reviewed. Two major BLEVE case histories are discussed in some detail and the circumstances compared with those predicted by the theoretical calculations. 38 refs., 36 figs.

  14. Modeling of cross-plane interface thermal conductance between graphene nano-ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, Vikas; Lee, Jonghoon; Farmer, Barry L; Voevodin, Andrey A; Roy, Ajit K

    2014-01-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics for thermal energy transfer, we investigate the interfacial thermal conductance between non-covalently interacting graphene nano-ribbons (GNRs) of varying lengths and widths in a cross-contact (x-shaped) geometry. Our results show that the out-of-plane conductance between GNRs can vary significantly (up to a factor of 4) depending upon their geometric parameters. We observe that when plotted against aspect ratio, the predicted interface thermal conductance values fit excellently on a single master-plot with a logarithmic scaling, suggesting the importance of GNR aspect ratio towards thermal conductance. We propose a model based on incorporating different thermal conductance characteristics of edge and inner interacting regions which predicts the observed logarithmic dependence on aspect ratio. We also study the effect of graphene edge roughness, temperature, and strain on out-of-plane thermal conductance and discuss the observed results based on local vibrational characteristics of atoms within interacting region, number of interacting phonons, and the degree to which they interact across the interaction zone. (paper)

  15. Thermal-spectrum recriticality energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.

    1993-12-01

    Large computer codes have been created in the past to predict the energy release in hypothetical core disruptive accidents (CDA), postulated to occur in liquid metal reactors (LMR). These codes, such as SIMMER, are highly specific to LMR designs. More recent attention has focused on thermal-spectrum criticality accidents, such as for fuel storage basins and waste tanks containing fissile material. This paper resents results from recent one-dimensional kinetics simulations, performed for a recriticality accident in a thermal spectrum. Reactivity insertion rates generally are smaller than in LMR CDAs, and the energetics generally are more benign. Parametric variation of input was performed, including reactivity insertion and initial temperature

  16. Thermal recovery gaining importance, says expert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-12-21

    In a forecast presented to the Calgary section CIM- AIME at a recent monthly technical meeting, J.V. Howard, Core Labs. Inc., predicted that within the next 2 to 5 yr, California oil production will come from thermal recovery schemes to the extent of 200,000 bpd. One American major oil company is planning a fire flood in a heavy oil reservoir at 12,000 ft depth, where primary recovery is estimated as only 3% of original oil in place. It is estimated that the minimum oil saturation feasible for thermal recovery is 950 bbl per acre-ft. The larger number of variables that will determine the success or failure of thermal recovery makes it essential to have thorough and complete studies of all the thermal processes before one is selected for a given set of reservoir and economic conditions. The number of thermal recovery projects will increase rapidly and the success of any project will depend upon the proper application of experience and technology in thermal recovery.

  17. Thermal stress analysis of a planar SOFC stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Kuang; Chen, Tsung-Ting; Chyou, Yau-Pin; Chiang, Lieh-Kwang

    The aim of this study is, by using finite element analysis (FEA), to characterize the thermal stress distribution in a planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack during various stages. The temperature profiles generated by an integrated thermo-electrochemical model were applied to calculate the thermal stress distributions in a multiple-cell SOFC stack by using a three-dimensional (3D) FEA model. The constructed 3D FEA model consists of the complete components used in a practical SOFC stack, including positive electrode-electrolyte-negative electrode (PEN) assembly, interconnect, nickel mesh, and gas-tight glass-ceramic seals. Incorporation of the glass-ceramic sealant, which was never considered in previous studies, into the 3D FEA model would produce more realistic results in thermal stress analysis and enhance the reliability of predicting potential failure locations in an SOFC stack. The effects of stack support condition, viscous behavior of the glass-ceramic sealant, temperature gradient, and thermal expansion mismatch between components were characterized. Modeling results indicated that a change in the support condition at the bottom frame of the SOFC stack would not cause significant changes in thermal stress distribution. Thermal stress distribution did not differ significantly in each unit cell of the multiple-cell stack due to a comparable in-plane temperature profile. By considering the viscous characteristics of the glass-ceramic sealant at temperatures above the glass-transition temperature, relaxation of thermal stresses in the PEN was predicted. The thermal expansion behavior of the metallic interconnect/frame had a greater influence on the thermal stress distribution in the PEN than did that of the glass-ceramic sealant due to the domination of interconnect/frame in the volume of a planar SOFC assembly.

  18. Evaluation of environmental impact predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, P.A.; Adams, S.M.; Kumar, K.D.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis and evaluation of the ecological monitoring program at the Surry Nuclear Power Plant showed that predictions of potential environmental impact made in the Final Environmental Statement (FES), which were based on generally accepted ecological principles, were not completely substantiated by environmental monitoring data. The Surry Nuclear Power Plant (Units 1 and 2) was chosen for study because of the facility's relatively continuous operating history and the availability of environmental data adequate for analysis. Preoperational and operational fish monitoring data were used to assess the validity of the FES prediction that fish would congregate in the thermal plume during winter months and would avoid the plume during summer months. Analysis of monitoring data showed that fish catch per unit effort (CPE) was generally high in the thermal plume during winter months; however, the highest fish catches occurred in the plume during the summer. Possible explanations for differences between the FES prediction and results observed in analysis of monitoring data are discussed, and general recommendations are outlined for improving impact assessment predictions

  19. Four-phonon scattering significantly reduces intrinsic thermal conductivity of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tianli; Lindsay, Lucas; Ruan, Xiulin

    2017-10-01

    For decades, the three-phonon scattering process has been considered to govern thermal transport in solids, while the role of higher-order four-phonon scattering has been persistently unclear and so ignored. However, recent quantitative calculations of three-phonon scattering have often shown a significant overestimation of thermal conductivity as compared to experimental values. In this Rapid Communication we show that four-phonon scattering is generally important in solids and can remedy such discrepancies. For silicon and diamond, the predicted thermal conductivity is reduced by 30% at 1000 K after including four-phonon scattering, bringing predictions in excellent agreement with measurements. For the projected ultrahigh-thermal conductivity material, zinc-blende BAs, a competitor of diamond as a heat sink material, four-phonon scattering is found to be strikingly strong as three-phonon processes have an extremely limited phase space for scattering. The four-phonon scattering reduces the predicted thermal conductivity from 2200 to 1400 W/m K at room temperature. The reduction at 1000 K is 60%. We also find that optical phonon scattering rates are largely affected, being important in applications such as phonon bottlenecks in equilibrating electronic excitations. Recognizing that four-phonon scattering is expensive to calculate, in the end we provide some guidelines on how to quickly assess the significance of four-phonon scattering, based on energy surface anharmonicity and the scattering phase space. Our work clears the decades-long fundamental question of the significance of higher-order scattering, and points out ways to improve thermoelectrics, thermal barrier coatings, nuclear materials, and radiative heat transfer.

  20. Numerical Investigation of the Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakak Khadem, Masoud

    The thermal conductivity of graphite nano-fibers (GNFs) with different styles is predicted computationally. GNFs are formed as basal planes of graphene stacked based on the catalytic configuration. The large GNF thermal conductivity relative to a base phase change material (PCM) may lead to improved PCM performance when embedded with GNFs. Three different types of GNFs are modeled: platelet, ribbon, and herringbone. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used in this study as a means to predict the thermal conductivity tensor based on atomic behavior. The in-house MD code, Molecular Dynamics in Arbitrary Geometries (MDAG), was updated with the features required to create the predictions. To model both interlayer van-der Waals and intralayer covalent bonding of carbon atoms in GNFs, a combination of the optimized Tersoff potential function for atoms within the layers and a pairwise Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function to model the interactions between the layers was used. Tests of energy conservation in the NVE ensemble have been performed to validate the employed potential model. Nose-Hoover, Andersen, and Berendsen thermostats were also incorporated into MDAG to enable MD simulations in NVT ensembles, where the volume, number of atoms, and temperature of the system are conserved. Equilibrium MD with Green-Kubo (GK) relations was then employed to extract the thermal conductivity tensor for symmetric GNFs (platelet and ribbon). The thermal conductivity of solid argon at different temperatures was calculated and compared to other studies to validate the GK implementation. Different heat current formulations, as a result of using the three-body Tersoff potential, were considered and the discrepancy in the calculated thermal conductivity values of graphene using each formula was resolved by employing a novel comparative technique that identifies the most accurate formulation. The effect of stacking configuration on the thermal conductivity of platelet and ribbon GNFs

  1. Bulk temperature measurement in thermally striped pipe flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemure, N.; Olvera, J.R.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1995-12-01

    The hot leg flows in some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designs have a temperature distribution across the pipe cross-section. This condition is often referred to as a thermally striped flow. Here, the bulk temperature measurement of pipe flows with thermal striping is explored. An experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the external surface of the pipe to estimate the bulk temperature of the flow. Simple mixing models are used to characterize the development of the temperature profile in the flow. Simple averaging techniques and Backward Propagating Neural Net are used to predict bulk temperature from the external temperature measurements. Accurate bulk temperatures can be predicted. However, some temperature distributions in the flow effectively mask the bulk temperature from the wall and cause significant error in the bulk temperature predicted using this technique

  2. Thermal Fluctuations in Smooth Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation of mesoscopic thermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos; Yang, Jun

    2013-11-01

    The SDPD-DV is implemented in our work for arbitrary 3D wall bounded geometries. The particle position and momentum equations are integrated with a velocity-Verlet algorithm and the entropy equation is integrated with a Runge-Kutta algorithm. Simulations of nitrogen gas are performed to evaluate the effects of timestep and particle scale on temperature, self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity. The hydrodynamic fluctuations in temperature, density, pressure and velocity from the SDPD-DV simulations are evaluated and compared with theoretical predictions. Steady planar thermal Couette flows are simulated and compared with analytical solutions. Simulations cover the hydrodynamic and mesocopic regime and show thermal fluctuations and their dependence on particle size.

  3. Empirical model to estimate the thermal conductivity of granite with various water contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Win Jin; Kwon, Sang Ki; Lee, Jae Owan

    2010-01-01

    To obtain the input data for the design and long-term performance assessment of a high-level waste repository, the thermal conductivities of several granite rocks which were taken from the rock cores from the declined borehole were measured. The thermal conductivities of granite were measured under the different conditions of water content to investigate the effects of the water content on the thermal conductivity. A simple empirical correlation was proposed to predict the thermal conductivity of granite as a function of effective porosity and water content which can be measured with relative ease while neglecting the possible effects of mineralogy, structure and anisotropy. The correlation could predict the thermal conductivity of granite with the effective porosity below 2.7% from the KURT site with an estimated error below 10%.

  4. Thermal expansion of quaternary nitride coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnádi, Ferenc; Wang, Fei; Odén, Magnus; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2018-04-01

    The thermal expansion coefficient of technologically relevant multicomponent cubic nitride alloys are predicted using the Debye model with ab initio elastic constants calculated at 0 K and an isotropic approximation for the Grüneisen parameter. Our method is benchmarked against measured thermal expansion of TiN and Ti(1-x)Al x N as well as against results of molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the thermal expansion coefficients of Ti(1-x-y)X y Al x N (X  =  Zr, Hf, Nb, V, Ta) solid solutions monotonously increase with the amount of alloying element X at all temperatures except for Zr and Hf, for which they instead decrease for y≳ 0.5 .

  5. Predictive FEM simulation of thermal shock damage in the refractory lining of steelmaking installations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhof, F.; Brekelmans, W.A.M.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal shock damage in the refractory lining of steelmaking installations is modelled using an experimentally validated constitutive damage framework which is coupled incrementally with a thermo-elastic FE package. Both non-local elasticity-based damage induced by temperature gradients and thermal

  6. Nuclear grade cable thermal life model by time temperature superposition algorithm based on Matlab GUI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yanyun; Gu Shenjie; Lou Tianyang

    2014-01-01

    Background: As nuclear grade cable must endure harsh environment within design life, it is critical to predict cable thermal life accurately owing to thermal aging, which is one of dominant factors of aging mechanism. Purpose: Using time temperature superposition (TTS) method, the aim is to construct nuclear grade cable thermal life model, predict cable residual life and develop life model interactive interface under Matlab GUI. Methods: According to TTS, nuclear grade cable thermal life model can be constructed by shifting data groups at various temperatures to preset reference temperature with translation factor which is determined by non linear programming optimization. Interactive interface of cable thermal life model developed under Matlab GUI consists of superposition mode and standard mode which include features such as optimization of translation factor, calculation of activation energy, construction of thermal aging curve and analysis of aging mechanism., Results: With calculation result comparison between superposition and standard method, the result with TTS has better accuracy than that with standard method. Furthermore, confidence level of nuclear grade cable thermal life with TTS is higher than that with standard method. Conclusion: The results show that TTS methodology is applicable to thermal life prediction of nuclear grade cable. Interactive Interface under Matlab GUI achieves anticipated functionalities. (authors)

  7. First-principles prediction of phononic thermal conductivity of silicene: A comparison with graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Xiaokun; Yang, Ronggui

    2015-01-01

    There has been great interest in two-dimensional materials, beyond graphene, for both fundamental sciences and technological applications. Silicene, a silicon counterpart of graphene, has been shown to possess some better electronic properties than graphene. However, its thermal transport properties have not been fully studied. In this paper, we apply the first-principles-based phonon Boltzmann transport equation to investigate the thermal conductivity of silicene as well as the phonon scattering mechanisms. Although both graphene and silicene are two-dimensional crystals with similar crystal structure, we find that phonon transport in silicene is quite different from that in graphene. The thermal conductivity of silicene shows a logarithmic increase with respect to the sample size due to the small scattering rates of acoustic in-plane phonon modes, while that of graphene is finite. Detailed analysis of phonon scattering channels shows that the linear dispersion of the acoustic out-of-plane (ZA) phonon modes, which is induced by the buckled structure, makes the long-wavelength longitudinal acoustic phonon modes in silicene not as efficiently scattered as that in graphene. Compared with graphene, where most of the heat is carried by the acoustic out-of-plane (ZA) phonon modes, the ZA phonon modes in silicene only have ∼10% contribution to the total thermal conductivity, which can also be attributed to the buckled structure. This systematic comparison of phonon transport and thermal conductivity of silicene and graphene using the first-principle-based calculations shed some light on other two-dimensional materials, such as two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

  8. Thermal conductivity analysis of SiC ceramics and fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyeon-Geun; Kim, Daejong; Lee, Seung Jae; Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity of SiC ceramics and FCM pellets was measured and discussed. • Thermal conductivity of FCM pellets was analyzed by the Maxwell-Eucken equation. • Effective thermal conductivity of TRISO particles applied in this study was assumed. - Abstract: The thermal conductivity of SiC ceramics and FCM fuel composites, consisting of a SiC matrix and TRISO coated particles, was measured and analyzed. SiC ceramics and FCM pellets were fabricated by hot press sintering with Al_2O_3 and Y_2O_3 sintering additives. Several factors that influence thermal conductivity, specifically the content of sintering additives for SiC ceramics and the volume fraction of TRISO particles and the matrix thermal conductivity of FCM pellets, were investigated. The thermal conductivity values of samples were analyzed on the basis of their microstructure and the arrangement of TRISO particles. The thermal conductivity of the FCM pellets was compared to that predicted by the Maxwell-Eucken equation and the thermal conductivity of TRISO coated particles was calculated. The thermal conductivity of FCM pellets in various sintering conditions was in close agreement to that predicted by the Maxwell-Eucken equation with the fitted thermal conductivity value of TRISO particles.

  9. Evaluation and verification of thermal stratification models for was

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    prediction of the condition of thermal stratification in WSPs under different hydraulic conditions and ... off coefficient. The models are verified with data collected from the full scale waste .... comparing two mathematical models based ..... 2 Comparison of measured and predicted effluent coliform bacteria (N) againsty depth.

  10. Thermal and mechanical stability of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks polymorphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Bouëssel du Bourg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies on the experimental feasibility of hypothetical Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs have focused so far on relative energy of various polymorphs by energy minimization at the quantum chemical level. We present here a systematic study of stability of 18 ZIFs as a function of temperature and pressure by molecular dynamics simulations. This approach allows us to better understand the limited stability of some experimental structures upon solvent or guest removal. We also find that many of the hypothetical ZIFs proposed in the literature are not stable at room temperature. Mechanical and thermal stability criteria thus need to be considered for the prediction of new MOF structures. Finally, we predict a variety of thermal expansion behavior for ZIFs as a function of framework topology, with some materials showing large negative volume thermal expansion.

  11. The integrity of cracked structures under thermal loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townley, C.H.A.

    1976-01-01

    Previous work by Dowling and Townley on the load-carrying capacity of a cracked structure is extended so that quantitative predictions can be made about failure under thermal loading. Residual stresses can be dealt with in the same way as thermal stresses. It is shown that the tolerance of the structure to thermal stress can be quantified in terms of a parameter which defines the state of the structure. This state parameter can be deduced from the calculated performance of the structure when subjected to an external load. (author)

  12. Enthalpy estimation for thermal comfort and energy saving in air conditioning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, C.-M.; Jong, T.-L.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal comfort control of a room must consider not only the thermal comfort level but also energy saving. This paper proposes an enthalpy estimation that is conducive for thermal comfort control and energy saving. The least enthalpy estimator (LEE) combines the concept of human thermal comfort with the theory of enthalpy to predict the load for a suitable setting pair in order to maintain more precisely the thermal comfort level and save energy in the air conditioning system

  13. Geometric model for softwood transverse thermal conductivity. Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-mei Gu; Audrey Zink-Sharp

    2005-01-01

    Thermal conductivity is a very important parameter in determining heat transfer rate and is required for developing of drying models and in industrial operations such as adhesive cure rate. Geometric models for predicting softwood thermal conductivity in the radial and tangential directions were generated in this study based on obervation and measurements of wood...

  14. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  15. Investigation of thermal fatigue behavior of thermal barrier coating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Dongming; Miller, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation, and of coating failure under thermal loads that simulate those in diesel engines are investigated. Surface cracks initiate early and grow continuously under thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) stresses. It is found that, in the absence of interfacial oxidation, the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures. Significant LCF and HCF interactions have been observed in the thermal fatigue tests. The fatigue crack growth rate in the ceramic coating strongly depends on the characteristic HCF cycle number, N* HCF which is defined as the number of HCF cycles per LCF cycle. The crack growth rate is increased from 0.36 μm/LCF cycle for a pure LCF test to 2.8 μm/LCF cycle for a combined LCF and HCF test at N* HCF about 20 000. A surface wedging model has been proposed to account for the HCF crack growth in the coating systems. This mechanism predicts that the HCF damage effect increases with heat flux and thus with increasing surface temperature swing, thermal expansion coefficient and elastic modulus of the ceramic coating, as well as with the HCF interacting depth. Good correlation has been found between the analysis and experimental evidence. (orig.)

  16. Coupled electrochemical thermal modelling of a novel Li-ion battery pack thermal management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Suman; Hariharan, Krishnan S.; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Song, Taewon; Sohn, Dong Kee; Yeo, Taejung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three-dimensional electrochemical thermal model of Li-ion battery pack using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). • Novel pack design for compact liquid cooling based thermal management system. • Simple temperature estimation algorithm for the cells in the pack using the results from the model. • Sensitivity of the thermal performance to contact resistance has been investigated. - Abstract: Thermal management system is of critical importance for a Li-ion battery pack, as high performance and long battery pack life can be simultaneously achieved when operated within a narrow range of temperature around the room temperature. An efficient thermal management system is required to keep the battery temperature in this range, despite widely varying operating conditions. A novel liquid coolant based thermal management system, for 18,650 battery pack has been introduced herein. This system is designed to be compact and economical without compromising safety. A coupled three-dimensional (3D) electrochemical thermal model is constructed for the proposed Li-ion battery pack. The model is used to evaluate the effects of different operating conditions like coolant flow-rate and discharge current on the pack temperature. Contact resistance is found to have the strongest impact on the thermal performance of the pack. From the numerical solution, a simple and novel temperature correlation of predicting the temperatures of all the individual cells given the temperature measurement of one cell is devised and validated with experimental results. Such coefficients have great potential of reducing the sensor requirement and complexity in a large Li-ion battery pack, typical of an electric vehicle.

  17. Estimating top-of-atmosphere thermal infrared radiance using MERRA-2 atmospheric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleynhans, Tania; Montanaro, Matthew; Gerace, Aaron; Kanan, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    Thermal infrared satellite images have been widely used in environmental studies. However, satellites have limited temporal resolution, e.g., 16 day Landsat or 1 to 2 day Terra MODIS. This paper investigates the use of the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) reanalysis data product, produced by NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) to predict global topof-atmosphere (TOA) thermal infrared radiance. The high temporal resolution of the MERRA-2 data product presents opportunities for novel research and applications. Various methods were applied to estimate TOA radiance from MERRA-2 variables namely (1) a parameterized physics based method, (2) Linear regression models and (3) non-linear Support Vector Regression. Model prediction accuracy was evaluated using temporally and spatially coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) thermal infrared data as reference data. This research found that Support Vector Regression with a radial basis function kernel produced the lowest error rates. Sources of errors are discussed and defined. Further research is currently being conducted to train deep learning models to predict TOA thermal radiance

  18. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of spent fuel storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer code, which is designed to predict flow and temperature distributions in spent nuclear fuel storage and transportation systems. The decay heat generated by spent fuel in a dry storage cask is removed through a combination of conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. One major advantage of COBRA-SFS is that fluid recirculation within the cask is computed directly by solving the mass and momentum conservation equations. In addition, thermal radiation heat transfer is modeled using detailed radiation exchange factors based on quarter-rod segments. The equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation for incompressible flows are presented, and the semi-implicit solution method is described. COBRA-SFS predictions are compared to temperature data from a spent fuel storage cask test and the effect of different fill media on the cladding temperature distribution is discussed. The effect of spent fuel consolidation on cask thermal performance is also investigated. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Thermal conductivity measurements in unsaturated hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Cha, Jong-Ho; Rosenbaum, Eilis J.; Zhang, Wu; Seol, Yongkoo

    2015-08-01

    Current database on the thermal properties of hydrate-bearing sediments remains limited and has not been able to capture their consequential changes during gas production where vigorous phase changes occur in this unsaturated system. This study uses the transient plane source (TPS) technique to measure the thermal conductivity of methane hydrate-bearing sediments with various hydrate/water/gas saturations. We propose a simplified method to obtain thermal properties from single-sided TPS signatures. Results reveal that both volume fraction and distribution of the pore constituents govern the thermal conductivity of unsaturated specimens. Thermal conductivity hysteresis is observed due to water redistribution and fabric change caused by hydrate formation and dissociation. Measured thermal conductivity increases evidently when hydrate saturation Sh > 30-40%, shifting upward from the geometric mean model prediction to a Pythagorean mixing model. These observations envisage a significant drop in sediment thermal conductivity when residual hydrate/water saturation falls below ~40%, hindering further gas production.

  20. Phonon thermal conductivity of scandium nitride for thermoelectrics from first-principles calculations and thin-film growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerdsongpanya, Sit; Hellman, Olle; Sun, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of lattice thermal conductivity of materials under realistic conditions is vitally important since many modern technologies require either high or low thermal conductivity. Here, we propose a theoretical model for determining lattice thermal conductivity, which takes into account......-domain thermoreflectance. Our experimental results show a trend of reduction in lattice thermal conductivity with decreasing domain size predicted by the theoretical model. These results suggest a possibility to control thermal conductivity by microstructural tailoring and provide a predictive tool for the effect...... of the microstructure on the lattice thermal conductivity of materials based on ab initio calculations....

  1. Calculation of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity of sedimentary rocks using petrophysical well logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels; Förster, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    properties (density, sonic interval transit time, hydrogen index, volume fraction of shale and photoelectric absorption index) using multivariate statistics. The application of these relations allows computing continuous borehole profiles for each rock thermal property. The uncertainties in the prediction...

  2. Pressure supression pool thermal mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    A model is developed and verified to describe the thermal mixing that occurs in the pressure suppression pool (PSP) of a commercial BWR. The model is designed specifically for a Mark-I containment and is intended for use in severe accident sequence analyses. The model developed in this work produces space and time dependent temperature results throughout the PSP and is useful for evaluating the bulk PSP thermal mixing, the condensation effectiveness of the PSP, and the long-term containment integrity. The model is designed to accommodate single or multiple discharging T-quenchers, a PSP circumferential circulation induced by the residual heat removal system discharge, and the thermal stratification of the pool that occurs immediately after the relief valves close. The PSP thermal mixing is verified by comparing the model-predicted temperatures to experimental temperatures that were measured in an operating BWR suppression pool. The model is then used to investigate several PSP thermal mixing problems that include the time to saturate at full relief valve flow, the temperature response to a typical stuck open relief valve scenario, and the effect of operator rotation of the relief valve discharge point

  3. Pressure suppression pool thermal mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    A model is developed and verified to describe the thermal mixing that occurs in the pressure suppression pool (PSP) of a commercial BWR. The model is designed specifically for a Mark-I containment and is intended for use in severe accident sequence analyses. The model produces space and time dependent temperature results throughout the PSP and is useful for evaluating the bulk PSP thermal mixing, the condensation effectiveness of the PSP, and the long-term containment integrity. The model is designed to accommodate single or multiple discharging T-quenchers, a PSP circumferential circulation induced by the residual heat removal system discharge, and the thermal stratification of the pool that occurs immediately after the relief valves close. The PSP thermal mixing model is verified by comparing the model predicted temperatures to experimental temperatures that were measured in an operating BWR suppression pool. The model is then used to investigate several PSP thermal mixing problems that include the time to saturate at full relief valve flow, the temperature response to a typical stuck open relief valve scenario, and the effect of operator rotation of the relief valve discharge point

  4. Novel Thermal Analysis Model of the Foot-Shoe Sole Interface during Gait Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Shimazaki

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Excessive heat at the foot-shoe sole interface negatively affects a human’s thermal comfort. An understanding of the thermal behavior at this interface is important for alleviating this discomfort. During gait motion, a human’s body weight cyclically compresses a shoe sole (commonly constructed of viscoelastic materials, generating heat during loading. To evaluate the thermal effects of this internal heat generation on foot comfort, we developed and empirically validated a thermal analysis model during gait motion. A simple, one-dimensional prediction model for heat conduction with heat generation during compressive loading was used. Heat generation was estimated as a function of the shoe sole’s material properties (e.g., elastic modulus and various gait parameters. When compared with experimental results, the proposed model proved effective in predicting thermal behavior at the foot-shoe sole interface under various conditions and shows potential for improving a human’s thermal comfort during gait motion through informed footwear design.

  5. Thermal hydraulic evaluation of advanced wire-wrapped assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic analyses presented in this report are based on application of the subchannel concept in association with the use of bulk parameters for coolant velocity and coolant temperature within a subchannel. The interactions between subchannels are due to turbulent interchange, pressure-induced diversion crossflow, directed sweeping crossflow induced by the helical wire wrap, and transverse thermal conduction. The FULMIX-II computer program was successfully developed to perform the steady-state temperature predictions for LMFBR fuel assemblies with the reference straight-start design and the advanced wire-wrap designs. Predicted steady-state temperature profiles are presented for a typical CRBRP 217-rod wire-wrapped assembly with the selected wire-wrap designs

  6. Modeling directional thermal radiance from a forest canopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, M.J.; Balick, L.K.; Smith, J.A.; Hutchison, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technology have increased interest in utilizing the thermal-infared region to gain additional information about surface features such as vegetation canopies. Studies have shown that sensor view angle, canopy structure, and percentage of canopy coverage can affect the response of a thermal sensor. These studies have been primarily of agricultural regions and there have been relatively few examples describing the thermal characteristics of forested regions. This paper describes an extension of an existing thermal vegetation canopy radiance model which has been modified to partially account for the geometrically rough structure of a forest canopy. Fourier series expansion of a canopy height profile is used to calculate improved view factors which partially account for the directional variations in canopy thermal radiance transfers. The original and updated radiance model predictions are compared with experimental data obtained over a deciduous (oak-hickory) forest site. The experimental observations are also used to document azimuthal and nadir directional radiance variations. Maximum angular variations in measured canopy temperatures were 4–6°C (azimuth) and 2.5°C (nadir). Maximum angular variations in simulated temperatures using the modified rough surface model was 4°C. The rough surface model appeared to be sensitive to large gaps in the canopy height profile, which influenced the resultant predicted temperature. (author)

  7. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power required, the ...

  8. Ablative thermal protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, J.; Fisher, R.; Wojciechowski, C.; Dean, W.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures used to establish the TPS (thermal protection system) design of the SRB (solid rocket booster) element of the Space Shuttle vehicle are discussed. A final evaluation of the adequacy of this design will be made from data obtained from the first five Shuttle flights. Temperature sensors installed at selected locations on the SRB structure covered by the TPS give information as a function of time throughout the flight. Anomalies are to be investigated and computer design thermal models adjusted if required. In addition, the actual TPS ablator material loss is to be measured after each flight and compared with analytically determined losses. The analytical methods of predicting ablator performance are surveyed. 5 references

  9. Report on Understanding and Predicting Effects of Thermal Aging on Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Grade 91 Steel for Structural Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Weiying [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This report provides an update on understanding and predicting the effects of long-term thermal aging on microstructure and tensile properties of G91 to corroborate the ASME Code rules in strength reduction due to elevated temperature service. The research is to support the design and long-term operation of G91 structural components in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). The report is a Level 2 deliverable in FY17 (M2AT-17AN1602017), under the Work Package AT-17AN160201, “SFR Materials Testing” performed by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies Program.

  10. DNS, LES and RANS of turbulent heat transfer in boundary layer with suddenly changing wall thermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Hirofumi; Yamada, Shohei; Tanaka, Masahiro; Houra, Tomoya; Nagano, Yasutaka

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the turbulent boundary layer with heat transfer by DNS. • Turbulent boundary layers with suddenly changing wall thermal conditions are observed. • The detailed turbulent statistics and structures in turbulent thermal boundary layer are discussed. • Turbulence models in LES and RANS are evaluated using DNS results. • LES and RANS are almost in good agreement with DNS results. -- Abstract: The objectives of this study are to investigate a thermal field in a turbulent boundary layer with suddenly changing wall thermal conditions by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS), and to evaluate predictions of a turbulence model in such a thermal field, in which DNS of spatially developing boundary layers with heat transfer can be conducted using the generation of turbulent inflow data as a method. In this study, two types of wall thermal condition are investigated using DNS and predicted by large eddy simulation (LES) and Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equation simulation (RANS). In the first case, the velocity boundary layer only develops in the entrance of simulation, and the flat plate is heated from the halfway point, i.e., the adiabatic wall condition is adopted in the entrance, and the entrance region of thermal field in turbulence is simulated. Then, the thermal boundary layer develops along a constant temperature wall followed by adiabatic wall. In the second case, velocity and thermal boundary layers simultaneously develop, and the wall thermal condition is changed from a constant temperature to an adiabatic wall in the downstream region. DNS results clearly show the statistics and structure of turbulent heat transfer in a constant temperature wall followed by an adiabatic wall. In the first case, the entrance region of thermal field in turbulence can be also observed. Thus, both the development and the entrance regions in thermal fields can be explored, and the effects upstream of the thermal field on the adiabatic region are

  11. Determination of the core temperature of a Li-ion cell during thermal runaway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhizi, M.; Ahmed, M. B.; Jain, A.

    2017-12-01

    Safety and performance of Li-ion cells is severely affected by thermal runaway where exothermic processes within the cell cause uncontrolled temperature rise, eventually leading to catastrophic failure. Most past experimental papers on thermal runaway only report surface temperature measurement, while the core temperature of the cell remains largely unknown. This paper presents an experimentally validated method based on thermal conduction analysis to determine the core temperature of a Li-ion cell during thermal runaway using surface temperature and chemical kinetics data. Experiments conducted on a thermal test cell show that core temperature computed using this method is in good agreement with independent thermocouple-based measurements in a wide range of experimental conditions. The validated method is used to predict core temperature as a function of time for several previously reported thermal runaway tests. In each case, the predicted peak core temperature is found to be several hundreds of degrees Celsius higher than the measured surface temperature. This shows that surface temperature alone is not sufficient for thermally characterizing the cell during thermal runaway. Besides providing key insights into the fundamental nature of thermal runaway, the ability to determine the core temperature shown here may lead to practical tools for characterizing and mitigating thermal runaway.

  12. Prediction of heat-illness symptoms with the prediction of human vascular response in hot environment under resting condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Yogender; Karan, Bhuwan Mohan; Das, Barsa Nand; Sinha, Rakesh Kumar

    2008-04-01

    The thermoregulatory control of human skin blood flow is vital to maintain the body heat storage during challenges of thermal homeostasis under heat stress. Whenever thermal homeostasis disturbed, the heat load exceeds heat dissipation capacity, which alters the cutaneous vascular responses along with other body physiological variables. Whole body skin blood flow has been calculated from the forearm blood flow. Present model has been designed using electronics circuit simulator (Multisim 8.0, National Instruments, USA), is to execute a series of predictive equations for early prediction of physiological parameters of young nude subjects during resting condition at various level of dry heat stress under almost still air to avoid causalities associated with hot environmental. The users can execute the model by changing the environmental temperature in degrees C and exposure time in minutes. The model would be able to predict and detect the changes in human vascular responses along with other physiological parameters and from this predicted values heat related-illness symptoms can be inferred.

  13. Comments on the effect of liquid layering on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroodchi, Elham; Evans, Thomas Michael; Moghtaderi, Behdad

    2009-01-01

    This article provides critical examinations of two mathematical models that have been developed in recent years to describe the impact of nano-layering on the enhancement of the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Discrepancy between the two models is found to be an artefact of an incorrect derivation used in one of the models. With correct formulation, both models predict effective thermal conductivity enhancements that are not significantly greater than those predicted by classical Maxwell theory. This study indicates that nano-layering by itself is unable to account for the effective thermal conductivity enhancements observed in nanofluids.

  14. Thermal modelling of Li-ion polymer battery for electric vehicle drive cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Salvio; Chung, Yongmann M.

    2012-09-01

    Time-dependent, thermal behaviour of a lithium-ion (Li-ion) polymer cell has been modelled for electric vehicle (EV) drive cycles with a view to developing an effective battery thermal management system. The fully coupled, three-dimensional transient electro-thermal model has been implemented based on a finite volume method. To support the numerical study, a high energy density Li-ion polymer pouch cell was tested in a climatic chamber for electric load cycles consisting of various charge and discharge rates, and a good agreement was found between the model predictions and the experimental data. The cell-level thermal behaviour under stressful conditions such as high power draw and high ambient temperature was predicted with the model. A significant temperature increase was observed in the stressful condition, corresponding to a repeated acceleration and deceleration, indicating that an effective battery thermal management system would be required to maintain the optimal cell performance and also to achieve a full battery lifesapn.

  15. Numerical model for predicting thermodynamic cycle and thermal efficiency of a beta-type Stirling engine with rhombic-drive mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chin-Hsiang; Yu, Ying-Ju [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, Ta-Shieh Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-15

    This study is aimed at development of a numerical model for a beta-type Stirling engine with rhombic-drive mechanism. By taking into account the non-isothermal effects, the effectiveness of the regenerative channel, and the thermal resistance of the heating head, the energy equations for the control volumes in the expansion chamber, the compression chamber, and the regenerative channel can be derived and solved. Meanwhile, a fully developed flow velocity profile in the regenerative channel, in terms of the reciprocating velocity of the displacer and the instantaneous pressure difference between the expansion and the compression chambers, is derived for calculation of the mass flow rate through the regenerative channel. In this manner, the internal irreversibility caused by pressure difference in the two chambers and the viscous shear effects due to the motion of the reciprocating displacer on the fluid flow in the regenerative channel gap are included. Periodic variation of pressures, volumes, temperatures, masses, and heat transfers in the expansion and the compression chambers are predicted. A parametric study of the dependence of the power output and thermal efficiency on the geometrical and physical parameters, involving regenerative gap, distance between two gears, offset distance from the crank to the center of gear, and the heat source temperature, has been performed. (author)

  16. Development of a finite element based thermal cracking performance prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Low-temperature cracking of hot-mix asphalt (HMA) pavements continues to be a leading cause of : premature pavement deterioration in regions of cold climate and/or where significant thermal cycling : occurs. Recent advances in fracture testing and mo...

  17. Thermal ripples in model molybdenum disulfide monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remsing, Richard C.; Klein, Michael L. [Institute for Computational Molecular Science, Center for the Computational, Design of Functional Layered Materials, and Department of Chemistry, Temple University, 1925 N. 12th St., 19122, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Waghmare, Umesh V. [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, 560 064, Jakkur, Bangalore (India)

    2017-01-15

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) monolayers have the potential to revolutionize nanotechnology. To reach this potential, it will be necessary to understand the behavior of this two-dimensional (2D) material on large length scales and under thermal conditions. Herein, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the nature of the rippling induced by thermal fluctuations in monolayers of the 2H and 1T phases of MoS{sub 2}. The 1T phase is found to be more rigid than the 2H phase. Both monolayer phases are predicted to follow long wavelength scaling behavior typical of systems with anharmonic coupling between vibrational modes as predicted by classic theories of membrane-like systems. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Fast and Accurate Prediction of Stratified Steel Temperature During Holding Period of Ladle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deodhar, Anirudh; Singh, Umesh; Shukla, Rishabh; Gautham, B. P.; Singh, Amarendra K.

    2017-04-01

    Thermal stratification of liquid steel in a ladle during the holding period and the teeming operation has a direct bearing on the superheat available at the caster and hence on the caster set points such as casting speed and cooling rates. The changes in the caster set points are typically carried out based on temperature measurements at the end of tundish outlet. Thermal prediction models provide advance knowledge of the influence of process and design parameters on the steel temperature at various stages. Therefore, they can be used in making accurate decisions about the caster set points in real time. However, this requires both fast and accurate thermal prediction models. In this work, we develop a surrogate model for the prediction of thermal stratification using data extracted from a set of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, pre-determined using design of experiments technique. Regression method is used for training the predictor. The model predicts the stratified temperature profile instantaneously, for a given set of process parameters such as initial steel temperature, refractory heat content, slag thickness, and holding time. More than 96 pct of the predicted values are within an error range of ±5 K (±5 °C), when compared against corresponding CFD results. Considering its accuracy and computational efficiency, the model can be extended for thermal control of casting operations. This work also sets a benchmark for developing similar thermal models for downstream processes such as tundish and caster.

  19. Anisotropic thermal expansion in flexible materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romao, Carl P.

    2017-10-01

    A definition of the Grüneisen parameters for anisotropic materials is derived based on the response of phonon frequencies to uniaxial stress perturbations. This Grüneisen model relates the thermal expansion in a given direction (αi i) to one element of the elastic compliance tensor, which corresponds to the Young's modulus in that direction (Yi i). The model is tested through ab initio prediction of thermal expansion in zinc, graphite, and calcite using density functional perturbation theory, indicating that it could lead to increased accuracy for structurally complex systems. The direct dependence of αi i on Yi i suggests that materials which are flexible along their principal axes but rigid in other directions will generally display both positive and negative thermal expansion.

  20. Temperature dependency of the thermal conductivity of porous heat storage media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemariam, Henok; Wuttke, Frank

    2018-04-01

    Analyzing the variation of thermal conductivity with temperature is vital in the design and assessment of the efficiency of sensible heat storage systems. In this study, the temperature variation of the thermal conductivity of a commercial cement-based porous heat storage material named - Füllbinder L is analyzed in saturated condition in the temperature range between 20 to 70°C (water based storage) with a steady state thermal conductivity and diffusivity meter. A considerable decrease in the thermal conductivity of the saturated sensible heat storage material upon increase in temperature is obtained, resulting in a significant loss of system efficiency and slower loading/un-loading rates, which when unaccounted for can lead to the under-designing of such systems. Furthermore, a new empirical prediction model for the estimation of thermal conductivity of cement-based porous sensible heat storage materials and naturally occurring crystalline rock formations as a function of temperature is proposed. The results of the model prediction are compared with the experimental results with satisfactory results.

  1. Effect of stacking sequence and surface treatment on the thermal conductivity of multilayered hybrid nano-composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, G. C.; Pappa, E. J.; Portan, D. V.; Kotrotsos, A.; Kollia, E.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of both the stacking sequence and surface treatment on the thermal conductivity of multilayered hybrid nano-composites. Four types of multilayered hybrid nanocomposites were manufactured and tested: Nitinol- CNTs (carbon nanotubes)- Acrylic resin; Nitinol- Acrylic resin- CNTs; Surface treated Nitinol- CNTs- Acrylic resin and Surface treated Nitinol- Acrylic resin- CNTs. Surface treatment of Nitinol plies was realized by means of the electrochemical anodization. Surface topography of the anodized nitinol sheets was investigated through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). It was found that the overall thermal response of the manufactured multilayered nano-composites was greatly influenced by both the anodization and the stacking sequence. A theoretical model for the prediction of the overall thermal conductivity has been developed considering the nature of the different layers, their stacking sequence as well as the interfacial thermal resistance. Thermal conductivity and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements were conducted, to verify the predicted by the model overall thermal conductivities. In all cases, a good agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental results was found.

  2. Improving the temperature predictions of subsurface thermal models by using high-quality input data. Part 1: Uncertainty analysis of the thermal-conductivity parameterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The subsurface temperature field and the geothermal conditions in sedimentary basins are frequently examined by using numerical thermal models. For those models, detailed knowledge of rock thermal properties are paramount for a reliable parameterization of layer properties and boundary conditions...

  3. Evaluation of the of thermal shock resistance of a castable containing andalusite aggregates by thermal shock cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.C.R.; Santos, E.M.B.; Ribeiro, S.; Rodrigues, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal shock resistance of refractory materials is one of the most important characteristics that determine their performance in many applications, since abrupt and drastic differences in temperature can damage them. Resistance to thermal shock damage can be evaluated based on thermal cycles, i.e., successive heating and cooling cycles followed by an analysis of the drop in Young's modulus occurring in each cycle. The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance to thermal shock damage in a commercial refractory concrete with andalusite aggregate. Concrete samples that were sintered at 1000 deg C and 1450 deg C for 5 hours to predict and were subjected to 30 thermal shock cycles, soaking in the furnace for 20 minutes at a temperature of 1000 deg C, and subsequent cooling in circulating water at 25 deg C. The results showed a decrease in Young's modulus and rupture around 72% for samples sintered at 1000 ° C, and 82% in sintered at 1450 ° C. The refractory sintered at 1450 deg C would show lower thermal shock resistance than the refractory sintered at 1000 deg C. (author)

  4. Some aspects of thermal fatigue in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, A.F.; Crespi, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the analysis of failures in a moderator circuit branch piping of the ATUCHA-I pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), made of austenitic steel to DIN 1.4550 specification (similar to AISI 347). These failures are considered to result from a thermal fatigue processes induced by fluctuations in a zone where stratified temperature layers occurred -the fluctuations being associated with variations in the heavy water flow. The first section evaluates the possibility of cracking due to thermal fatigue phenomena and concludes that under service conditions a crack may be initiated and growth through 7 mm of the wall thickness of the pipe. Laboratory thermal fatigue tests that simulated the thermomechanical conditions for such a component, showed that the number of cycles required to initiate a thermal fatigue crack in a notched modified standard fatigue specimen was about 10 3 . This value may be used to give a conservative prediction of the number of thermal cycles for crack initiation in actual station piping, including those who suffered a cold plug condition which is produced in some emergency shut-down and valve testing situations. It was also demonstrated that beyond a crack depth of 7 mm stress corrosion cracking has the main process in further crack propagation. The relevance of this prediction has been confirmed by microfractographic observations, since the brittle nature of the fracture surfaces under service conditions appears very different from the transgranular ductile striations found in both thermal and mechanical fatigue test specimens as a result of environmental effects. (Author)

  5. Analytical and subjective interpretation of thermal comfort in hospitals: A case study in two sterilization services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalhais, Carlos; Santos, Joana; Vieira da Silva, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Hospital facilities are normally very complex, which combined with patient requirements promote conditions for potential development of uncomfortable working conditions. Thermal discomfort is one such example. This study aimed to determine levels of thermal comfort, sensations, and preferences, from a field investigation conducted in two sterilization services (SS) of two hospitals from Porto and Aveiro, Portugal. The analytical determination and interpretation of thermal comfort was based upon assumptions of ISO 7726:1998 and ISO 7730:2005. The predicted mean vote (PMV) and predicted percentage of dissatisfaction (PPD) indices were obtained by measurement and estimation of environmental and personal variables, respectively, and calculated according to ISO 7730 equations. The subjective variables were obtained from thermal sensation (subjective PMV) and affective assessment (subjective PPD), reported by a questionnaire based upon ISO 10551:1995. Both approaches confirmed thermal discomfort in both SS (codified as SS1 and SS2). For all areas, PMV and PPD exceeded in all periods of the day the recommended range of -0.5 to +0.5 and thermal discomfort. There were no significant differences between PMV and thermal sensations, as well as between PPD and affective assessment. The PMV/PPD model was found suitable to predict thermal sensations of occupants in hospital SS located in areas with a mild climate in Portugal.

  6. Electrochemical-thermal modeling and microscale phase change for passive internal thermal management of lithium ion batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Thomas F. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Bandhauer, Todd (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Garimella, Srinivas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2012-01-01

    A fully coupled electrochemical and thermal model for lithium-ion batteries is developed to investigate the impact of different thermal management strategies on battery performance. In contrast to previous modeling efforts focused either exclusively on particle electrochemistry on the one hand or overall vehicle simulations on the other, the present work predicts local electrochemical reaction rates using temperature-dependent data on commercially available batteries designed for high rates (C/LiFePO{sub 4}) in a computationally efficient manner. Simulation results show that conventional external cooling systems for these batteries, which have a low composite thermal conductivity ({approx}1 W/m-K), cause either large temperature rises or internal temperature gradients. Thus, a novel, passive internal cooling system that uses heat removal through liquid-vapor phase change is developed. Although there have been prior investigations of phase change at the microscales, fluid flow at the conditions expected here is not well understood. A first-principles based cooling system performance model is developed and validated experimentally, and is integrated into the coupled electrochemical-thermal model for assessment of performance improvement relative to conventional thermal management strategies. The proposed cooling system passively removes heat almost isothermally with negligible thermal resistances between the heat source and cooling fluid. Thus, the minimization of peak temperatures and gradients within batteries allow increased power and energy densities unencumbered by thermal limitations.

  7. Thermal Analysis of the Receiver of a Standalone Pilot Solar Dish–Stirling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Gholamalizadeh

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in solar thermal systems have aroused considerable interest in several countries with high solar potential. One of the most promising solar driven technologies is the solar thermal dish-Stirling system. One of the main issues of the solar dish–Stirling system is thermal losses from its components. The majority of the thermal losses of the system occur through its receiver before the thermal energy is converted to electrical energy by the Stirling engine. The goal of this investigation is to analyze the thermal performance of the receiver of a standalone pilot solar dish–Stirling system installed in Kerman City, Iran, to be used in remote off-grid areas of the Kerman Province. An analytical model was developed to predict the input energy, thermal losses, and thermal efficiency of the receiver. The receiver thermal model was first validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements for the EuroDish project. Then, the incident flux intensity intercepted by the receiver aperture, the thermal losses through the receiver (including conduction, convection, and radiation losses, and the power output during daytime hours (average day of each month for a year were predicted. The results showed that the conduction loss was small, while the convection and radiation losses played major roles in the total thermal losses through the receiver. The convection loss is dominant during the early morning and later evening hours, while radiation loss reaches its highest value near midday. Finally, the thermal efficiency of the receiver and the power output for each working hour throughout the year were calculated. The maximum performance of the system occurred at midday in the middle of July, with a predicted power output of 850 W, and a receiver efficiency of about 60%. At this time, a conduction loss of about 266 W, a convection loss of 284 W, and a radiation loss of about 2000 W were estimated.

  8. Simulation of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Barton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [K. R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou, and C. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 14, 103102 (2007PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.2779281; J. Zhou, K. R. Samokhvalova, and C. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 15, 023102 (2008PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.2837891]. In particular, results are obtained for adiabatic thermal beams that do not rotate in the Larmor frame. For such beams, the theoretical predictions of the rms beam envelope, the conservations of the rms thermal emittances, the adiabatic equation of state, and the Debye length are verified in the simulations. Furthermore, the adiabatic thermal beam is found be stable in the parameter regime where the simulations are performed.

  9. Progress in Characterizing Thermal Degradation of Ethylene-Propylene Rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huang, Qian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Childers, Matthew I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Correa, Miguel [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shin, Yongsoon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zwoster, Andy [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-26

    Ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) is one of the two most common nuclear cable insulation materials. A large fraction of EPR-insulated cables in use in the nuclear industry were manufactured by The Okonite Company. Okoguard® is the name of the medium voltage thermoset EPR manufactured by The Okonite Company. Okoguard® has been produced with silane-treated clay filler and the characteristic pink color since the 1970’s. EPR is complex material that undergoes simultaneous reactions during thermal aging including oxidative and thermal cleavage and oxidative and thermal crosslinking. This reaction complexity makes precise EPR service life prediction from accelerated aging using approaches designed for single discreet reactions such as the Arrhenius approach problematic. Performance data and activation energies for EPR aged at conditions closer to service conditions will improve EPR lifetime prediction. In this report pink Okoguard® EPR insulation material has been thermally aged at elevated temperatures. A variety of characterization techniques have been employed to track material changes with aging. It was noted that EPR aged significant departure in aging behavior seemed to occur at accelerated aging temperatures between 140°C and 150°C at around 20 days of exposure. This may be due to alternative degradation mechanisms being accessed at this higher temperature and reinforces the need to perform accelerated aging for Okoguard® EPR service life prediction at temperatures below 150°C.

  10. Study of thermal-hydraulic characteristics in an LMFBR intermediate plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uotani, M.; Naohara, N.; Kinoshita, I.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental studies using water and liquid metal were conducted in order to investigate the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of an LMFBR intermediate plenum. The present study is an attempt to evaluate the effect of natural convection on the temperature field and to validate the prediction method of temperature profile in a thermally stratified cavity. The experimental results indicated that the effect of the natural convection on flow velocity and heat transfer in the cavity is reduced with increasing the modified stratification parameter. The calculation by FEM code and a simple 1-D model are effective to predict the temperature profile in the cavity

  11. Adaptive thermal modeling of Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadman Rad, M.; Danilov, D.L.; Baghalha, M.; Kazemeini, M.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple, accurate and adaptive thermal model is proposed for Li-ion batteries. • Equilibrium voltages, overpotentials and entropy changes are quantified from experimental results. • Entropy changes are highly dependent on the battery State-of-Charge. • Good agreement between simulated and measured heat development is obtained under all conditions. • Radiation contributes to about 50% of heat dissipation at elevated temperatures. -- Abstract: An accurate thermal model to predict the heat generation in rechargeable batteries is an essential tool for advanced thermal management in high power applications, such as electric vehicles. For such applications, the battery materials’ details and cell design are normally not provided. In this work a simple, though accurate, thermal model for batteries has been developed, considering the temperature- and current-dependent overpotential heat generation and State-of-Charge dependent entropy contributions. High power rechargeable Li-ion (7.5 Ah) batteries have been experimentally investigated and the results are used for model verification. It is shown that the State-of-Charge dependent entropy is a significant heat source and is therefore essential to correctly predict the thermal behavior of Li-ion batteries under a wide variety of operating conditions. An adaptive model is introduced to obtain these entropy values. A temperature-dependent equation for heat transfer to the environment is also taken into account. Good agreement between the simulations and measurements is obtained in all cases. The parameters for both the heat generation and heat transfer processes can be applied to the thermal design of advanced battery packs. The proposed methodology is generic and independent on the cell chemistry and battery design. The parameters for the adaptive model can be determined by performing simple cell potential/current and temperature measurements for a limited number of charge/discharge cycles

  12. Hydrodynamic and thermal modelling of gas-particle flow in fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelkawi, O.S; Abdalla, A.M.; Atwan, E.F; Abdelmonem, S.A.; Elshazly, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study a mathematical model has been developed to simulate two dimensional fluidized bed with uniform fluidization. The model consists of two sub models for hydrodynamic and thermal behavior of fluidized bed on which a FORTRAN program entitled (NEWFLUIDIZED) is devolved. The program is used to predict the volume fraction of gas and particle phases, the velocity of the two phases, the gas pressure and the temperature distribution for two phases. Also the program calculates the heat transfer coefficient. Besides the program predicts the fluidized bed stability and determines the optimum input gas velocity for fluidized bed to achieve the best thermal behavior. The hydrodynamic model is verified by comparing its results with the computational fluid dynamic code MFIX . While the thermal model was tested and compared by the available previous experimental correlations.The model results show good agreement with MFIX results and the thermal model of the present work confirms Zenz and Gunn equations

  13. Measurement and prediction of indoor air quality using a breathing thermal manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Kaczmarczyk, J.

    2007-01-01

    temperature is sensitive enough to perform reliable measurement of characteristics of air as inhaled by occupants. The temperature, humidity, and pollution concentration in the inhaled air can be measured accurately with a thermal manikin without breathing simulation if they are measured at the upper lip...... at a distance of measured inhaled air parameters. Proper simulation of breathing, especially of exhalation, is needed for studying the transport of exhaled air between occupants. A method......The analyses performed in this paper reveal that a breathing thermal manikin with realistic simulation of respiration including breathing cycle, pulmonary ventilation rate, frequency and breathing mode, gas concentration, humidity and temperature of exhaled air and human body shape and surface...

  14. Thermal performance parameters estimation of hot box type solar cooker by using artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt, Hueseyin; Atik, Kemal; Oezkaymak, Mehmet; Recebli, Ziyaddin [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Karabuk Technical Education Faculty, 78200 Karabuk (Turkey)

    2008-02-15

    Work to date has shown that Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has not been used for predicting thermal performance parameters of a solar cooker. The objective of this study is to predict thermal performance parameters such as absorber plate, enclosure air and pot water temperatures of the experimentally investigated box type solar cooker by using the ANN. Data set is obtained from the box type solar cooker which was tested under various experimental conditions. A feed-forward neural network based on back propagation algorithm was developed to predict the thermal performance of solar cooker with and without reflector. Mathematical formulations derived from the ANN model are presented for each predicting temperatures. The experimental data set consists of 126 values. These were divided into two groups, of which the 96 values were used for training/learning of the network and the rest of the data (30 values) for testing/validation of the network performance. The performance of the ANN predictions was evaluated by comparing the prediction results with the experimental results. The results showed a good regression analysis with the correlation coefficients in the range of 0.9950-0.9987 and mean relative errors (MREs) in the range of 3.925-7.040% for the test data set. The regression coefficients indicated that the ANN model can successfully be used for the prediction of the thermal performance parameters of a box type solar cooker with a high degree of accuracy. (author)

  15. Thermal inflation with a thermal waterfall scalar field coupled to a light spectator scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Lyth, David H.; Rumsey, Arron

    2017-05-01

    A new model of thermal inflation is introduced, in which the mass of the thermal waterfall field is dependent on a light spectator scalar field. Using the δ N formalism, the "end of inflation" scenario is investigated in order to ascertain whether this model is able to produce the dominant contribution to the primordial curvature perturbation. A multitude of constraints are considered so as to explore the parameter space, with particular emphasis on key observational signatures. For natural values of the parameters, the model is found to yield a sharp prediction for the scalar spectral index and its running, well within the current observational bounds.

  16. Thermal conductivity engineering of bulk and one-dimensional Si-Ge nanoarchitectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, Ali; Ozden, Ayberk; Cagin, Tahir; Sevik, Cem

    2017-01-01

    Various theoretical and experimental methods are utilized to investigate the thermal conductivity of nanostructured materials; this is a critical parameter to increase performance of thermoelectric devices. Among these methods, equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) is an accurate technique to predict lattice thermal conductivity. In this study, by means of systematic EMD simulations, thermal conductivity of bulk Si-Ge structures (pristine, alloy and superlattice) and their nanostructured one dimensional forms with square and circular cross-section geometries (asymmetric and symmetric) are calculated for different crystallographic directions. A comprehensive temperature analysis is evaluated for selected structures as well. The results show that one-dimensional structures are superior candidates in terms of their low lattice thermal conductivity and thermal conductivity tunability by nanostructuring, such as by diameter modulation, interface roughness, periodicity and number of interfaces. We find that thermal conductivity decreases with smaller diameters or cross section areas. Furthermore, interface roughness decreases thermal conductivity with a profound impact. Moreover, we predicted that there is a specific periodicity that gives minimum thermal conductivity in symmetric superlattice structures. The decreasing thermal conductivity is due to the reducing phonon movement in the system due to the effect of the number of interfaces that determine regimes of ballistic and wave transport phenomena. In some nanostructures, such as nanowire superlattices, thermal conductivity of the Si/Ge system can be reduced to nearly twice that of an amorphous silicon thermal conductivity. Additionally, it is found that one crystal orientation, [Formula: see text]100[Formula: see text], is better than the [Formula: see text]111[Formula: see text] crystal orientation in one-dimensional and bulk SiGe systems. Our results clearly point out the importance of lattice thermal conductivity

  17. Fourier and non-Fourier bio-heat transfer models to predict ex vivo temperature response to focused ultrasound heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenghai; Miao, Jiaming; Yang, Kexin; Guo, Xiasheng; Tu, Juan; Huang, Pintong; Zhang, Dong

    2018-05-01

    Although predicting temperature variation is important for designing treatment plans for thermal therapies, research in this area is yet to investigate the applicability of prevalent thermal conduction models, such as the Pennes equation, the thermal wave model of bio-heat transfer, and the dual phase lag (DPL) model. To address this shortcoming, we heated a tissue phantom and ex vivo bovine liver tissues with focused ultrasound (FU), measured the temperature response, and compared the results with those predicted by these models. The findings show that, for a homogeneous-tissue phantom, the initial temperature increase is accurately predicted by the Pennes equation at the onset of FU irradiation, although the prediction deviates from the measured temperature with increasing FU irradiation time. For heterogeneous liver tissues, the predicted response is closer to the measured temperature for the non-Fourier models, especially the DPL model. Furthermore, the DPL model accurately predicts the temperature response in biological tissues because it increases the phase lag, which characterizes microstructural thermal interactions. These findings should help to establish more precise clinical treatment plans for thermal therapies.

  18. VEGA Launch Vehicle: VV02 Flight Campaign Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, D.; Perugini, P.; Mancini, R.; Bonnet, M.

    2014-06-01

    A reliable tool for the prediction of temperature trends vs. time during the operative timeline of a launcher represents one of the key elements for the qualification of a launch vehicle itself.The correct evaluation of the thermal behaviour during the mission, both for the launcher elements (structures, electronic items, tanks, motors...) and for the Payloads carried by the same Launcher, is one of the preliminary activities to be performed before a flight campaign.For such scope AVIO constructed a Thermal Mathematical Model (TMM) by means of the ESA software "ESATAN Thermal Modelling Suite (TMS)" [1] used for the prediction of the temperature trends both on VV01 (VEGA LV Qualification Flight) and VV02 (First VEGA LV commercial flight) with successfully results in terms of post-flight comparison with the sensor data outputs.Aim of this paper is to show the correlation obtained by AVIO VEGA LV SYS TMM in the frame of VV02 Flight.

  19. Heat pipe thermal control of slender optics probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prenger, F.C.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal design for a stereographic viewing system is presented. The design incorporates an annular heat pipe and thermal isolation techniques. Test results are compared with design predictions for a prototype configuration. Test data obtained during heat pipe startup showing temperature gradients along the evaporator wall are presented. Correlations relating maximum wall temperature differences to a liquid Reynolds number were obtained at low power levels. These results are compared with Nusselt's Falling Film theory

  20. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  1. Predication of skin temperature and thermal comfort under two-way transient environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Jing; Lian, Zhiwei

    2017-12-01

    In this study, three transient environmental conditions consisting of one high-temperature phase within two low-temperature phases were developed, thus creating a temperature rise followed by a temperature fall. Twenty-four subjects (including 12 males and 12 females) were recruited and they underwent all three test scenarios. Skin temperature on seven body parts were measured during the whole period of the experiment. Besides, thermal sensation was investigated at specific moments by questionnaires. Thermal sensation models including PMV model, Fiala model and the Chinese model were applied to predict subjects' thermal sensation with comparisons carried out among them. Results show that most predicated thermal sensation by Chinese model lies within the range of 0.5 scale of the observed sensation vote, and it agrees best with the observed thermal sensation in transient thermal environment than PMV and Fiala model. Further studies should be carried out to improve performance of Chinese model for temperature alterations between "very hot" to "hot" environment, for prediction error in the temperature-fall situation of C5 (37-32°C) was over 0.5 scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pressurized-thermal-shock technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    It was recognized at the time the original Issues on Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) studies were conducted that distinct vertical plumes of cooling water form beneath the cold leg inlet nozzles during those particular transients that exhibit fluid/thermal stratification. The formation of these plumes (referred to as thermal streaming) induces a time-dependent circumferential temperature variation on the inner surface of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) wall that creates an axial stress component. This axial stress component is in addition to the axial stress components induced by time-dependent radial temperature variation through the wall thickness and the time-dependent pressure transient. This additional axial stress component will result in a larger axial stress resultant that results in a larger stress-intensity factor acting on circumferential flaws, thus reducing the fracture margin for circumferential flaws. Although this was recognized at the time of the original IPTS study, the contribution appeared to be relatively small; therefore, it was neglected. The original IPTS studies were performed with OCA-P, a computer program developed at ORNL to analyze the cleavage fracture response of a nuclear RPV subjected to PTS loading. OCA-P is a one-dimensional (1-D) finite-element code that analyzes the stresses and stress-intensity factors (axial and tangential) resulting from the pressure and the radial temperature variation through the wall thickness only. The HSST Program is investigating the potential effects of thermal-streaming-induced stresses in circumferential welds on the reactor vessel PTS analyses. The initial phase of this investigation focused on an evaluation of the available thermal-hydraulic data and analyses results. The objective for the initial phase of the investigation is to evaluate thermal-streaming behavior under conditions relevant to the operation of U.S. PWRs and chracterize any predicted thermal-streaming plumes

  3. A neuro-fuzzy model for prediction of the indoor temperature in typical Australian residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alasha' ary, Haitham; Moghtaderi, Behdad; Page, Adrian; Sugo, Heber [Priority Research Centre for Energy, Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, the University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2009-07-15

    The Masonry Research Group at The University of Newcastle, Australia has embarked on an extensive research program to study the thermal performance of common walling systems in Australian residential buildings by studying the thermal behaviour of four representative purpose-built thermal test buildings (referred to as 'test modules' or simply 'modules' hereafter). The modules are situated on the university campus and are constructed from brick veneer (BV), cavity brick (CB) and lightweight (LW) constructions. The program of study has both experimental and analytical strands, including the use of a neuro-fuzzy approach to predict the thermal behaviour. The latter approach employs an experimental adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) which is used in this study to predict the room (indoor) temperatures of the modules under a range of climatic conditions pertinent to Newcastle (NSW, Australia). The study shows that this neuro-fuzzy model is capable of accurately predicting the room temperature of such buildings; thus providing a potential computationally efficient and inexpensive predictive tool for the more effective thermal design of housing. (author)

  4. Thermal comfort study of hospital workers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Y H; Chew, B T

    2009-12-01

    This article presents findings of the thermal comfort study in hospitals. A field survey was conducted to investigate the temperature range for thermal comfort in hospitals in the tropics. Thermal acceptability assessment was conducted to examine whether the hospitals in the tropics met the ASHRAE Standard-55 80% acceptability criteria. A total of 114 occupants in four hospitals were involved in the study. The results of the field study revealed that only 44% of the examined locations met the comfort criteria specified in ASHRAE Standard 55. The survey also examined the predicted percentage of dissatisfied in the hospitals. The results showed that 49% of the occupants were satisfied with the thermal environments in the hospitals. The field survey analysis revealed that the neutral temperature for Malaysian hospitals was 26.4 degrees C. The comfort temperature range that satisfied 90% of the occupants in the space was in the range of 25.3-28.2 degrees C. The results from the field study suggested that a higher comfort temperature was required for Malaysians in hospital environments compared with the temperature criteria specified in ASHRAE Standard (2003). In addition, the significant deviation between actual mean vote and predicted mean vote (PMV) strongly implied that PMV could not be applied without errors in hospitals in the tropics. The new findings on thermal comfort temperature range in hospitals in the tropics could be used as an important guide for building services engineers and researchers who are intending to minimize energy usage in heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems in hospitals operating in the tropics with acceptable thermal comfort level and to improve the performance and well-being of its workers.

  5. Thermal and active fluctuations of a compressible bilayer vesicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachin Krishnan, T. V.; Yasuda, Kento; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2018-05-01

    We discuss thermal and active fluctuations of a compressible bilayer vesicle by using the results of hydrodynamic theory for vesicles. Coupled Langevin equations for the membrane deformation and the density fields are employed to calculate the power spectral density matrix of membrane fluctuations. Thermal contribution is obtained by means of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, whereas active contribution is calculated from exponentially decaying time correlation functions of active random forces. We obtain the total power spectral density as a sum of thermal and active contributions. An apparent response function is further calculated in order to compare with the recent microrheology experiment on red blood cells. An enhanced response is predicted in the low-frequency regime for non-thermal active fluctuations.

  6. Research opportunities in salt hydrates for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, J.

    1983-11-01

    The state of the art of salt hydrates as phase change materials for low temperature thermal energy storage is reviewed. Phase equilibria, nucleation behavior and melting kinetics of the commonly used hydrate are summarized. The development of efficient, reliable inexpensive systems based on phase change materials, especially salt hydrates for the storage (and retrieval) of thermal energy for residential heating is outlined. The use of phase change material thermal energy storage systems is not yet widespread. Additional basic research is needed in the areas of crystallization and melting kinetics, prediction of phase behavior in ternary systems, thermal diffusion in salt hydrate systems, and in the physical properties pertinent to nonequilibrium and equilibrium transformations in these systems.

  7. On the design of thermally loaded fiber optics feedthroughs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Dragan Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermo-mechanical design aspects of various structures exposed to cyclic thermal loading have a crucial impact on their lifetime. This is particularly valid for fiber optics feedthroughs that involve several materials with significantly different thermal expansion ratios. Thermal loading in such structures may give rise to non-trivial thermally induced deformations and therewith stresses, which can be adequately predicted and assessed only by a detailed 3-D numerical simulation. This paper considers a couple of design solutions of fiber optics feedthroughs, which have exhibited certain weaknesses in their application. Numerical simulation by means of the finite element method has been conducted to reveal the weak points of the design.

  8. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-12-09

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m -1 ·K -1 , which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties.

  9. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m−1·K−1, which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties. PMID:27934930

  10. Estimation and optimization of thermal performance of evacuated tube solar collector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, Erkan; Ayaz, Mahir; Ezen, H. Hüseyin; Küçüksille, Ecir U.; Şahin, Arzu Şencan

    2014-05-01

    In this study, artificial neural networks (ANNs) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS) in order to predict the thermal performance of evacuated tube solar collector system have been used. The experimental data for the training and testing of the networks were used. The results of ANN are compared with ANFIS in which the same data sets are used. The R2-value for the thermal performance values of collector is 0.811914 which can be considered as satisfactory. The results obtained when unknown data were presented to the networks are satisfactory and indicate that the proposed method can successfully be used for the prediction of the thermal performance of evacuated tube solar collectors. In addition, new formulations obtained from ANN are presented for the calculation of the thermal performance. The advantages of this approaches compared to the conventional methods are speed, simplicity, and the capacity of the network to learn from examples. In addition, genetic algorithm (GA) was used to maximize the thermal performance of the system. The optimum working conditions of the system were determined by the GA.

  11. Pyroelectric effect and lattice thermal conductivity of InN/GaN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansdah, Gopal; Sahoo, Bijay Kumar

    2018-06-01

    The built-in-polarization (BIP) of InN/GaN heterostructures enhances Debye temperature, phonon mean free path and thermal conductivity of the heterostructure at room temperature. The variation of thermal conductivities (kp: including polarization mechanism and k: without polarization mechanism) with temperature predicts the existence of a transition temperature (Tp) between primary and secondary pyroelectric effect. Below Tp, kp is lower than k; while above Tp, kp is significantly contributed from BIP mechanism due to thermal expansion. A thermodynamic theory has been proposed to explain the result. The room temperature thermal conductivity of InN/GaN heterostructure with and without polarization is respectively 32 and 48 W m-1 K-1. The temperature Tp and room temperature pyroelectric coefficient of InN has been predicted as 120 K and -8.425 μC m-2 K-1, respectively which are in line with prior literature studies. This study suggests that thermal conductivity measurement in InN/GaN heterostructures can help to understand the role of phonons in pyroelectricity.

  12. The Importance of Thermal Heat Bridges in Civil Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Tokar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the heat transfer characteristics of a construction, the expected temperatures along interior surfaces must be evaluated in order to predict (and avoid areas of potential moisture condensation. Beyond preventing damage to building materials caused by mould growth, adequate surface temperatures are also a relevant factor in the thermal comfort of an interior environment. An agreable climate in a room can be obtained, when relative humidity is between 40 and 60%. As the air in a room is warmer, the more vapor can absorb (and vice versa, influencing the thermal comfort index. Heat losses are influenced largely by thermal bridges of construction. The importance of the thermal heat bridges is strongly increasing today. In new developments the thermal optimization of junctions in today common low energy constructions receives very special standing. The subject of avoiding thermal bridges in passive houses became predominant.

  13. First wall thermal hydraulic models for fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Subject to normal and off-normal reactor conditions, thermal hydraulic models of first walls, e.g., a thermal mass barrier, a tubular shield, and a radiating liner are reviewed. Under normal operation the plasma behaves as expected in a predicted way for transient and steady-state conditions. The most severe thermal loading on the first wall occurs when the plasma becomes unstable and dumps its energy on the wall in a very short period of time (milliseconds). Depending on the plasma dump time and area over which the energy is deposited may result in melting of the first wall surface, and if the temperature is high enough, vaporization

  14. Thermal properties of paramagnetic solid helium 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, L.

    1983-01-01

    It was shown in recent work that over a limited molar volume range and at asymptotically high temperatures the thermal modulations of the pressure along isochores of paramagnetic solid 3 He could be accounted for through the formalism of the Heisenberg model of an antiferromagnetically interacting localized spin- 1/2 system. The internal consistency of this formalism requires the characteristic exchange-interaction parameter of the model derived from pressure modulation data to be identical with that appearing in the other thermal properties of this quantum solid. In a restricted temperature region where the spin excitations are the dominant thermal excitations of the solid, heat capacity data yield exchange-interaction parameters in fair agreement with those derived from pressures along isochores of larger molar volume. At higher temperatures, within well-defined limitations, thermal excitations involve both spin and phononexcitations. Here, because of the opposite temperature variations of the spin and phonon heat capacity components, the ensuing heat capacity minimum determines exactly the exchange-energy parameter and the relevant limiting Debye temperature as a function of the measured temperature location and value of the heat capacity extremum along the experimentally explored isochore. The exchange-energy parameters so derived display larger deviations from their predicted pressure-based values than those resulting from the lower temperature but still asymptotic spin-only heat capacities. At the present time, ambiguities in the experimental determinations of the characteristic Weiss temperatures of the asymptotic paramagnetic susceptibilities prevent one from deriving exchange-energy parameters with them. The present work leads to the prediction, within the limitations of the model formalism, of thermal properties of magnetized solid 3 He

  15. Thermal conductivity model of vibro-packed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon Soo, Kim

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium accumulated in the cold war era in the United States and the Russian Federation, one method currently under investigation is the conversion of the plutonium into mixed oxide (MOX) reactor fuel for LWRs and fast reactors in the Russian Federation. A fuel option already partly developed at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad is that of vibro-packed MOX. Fuel rod fabrication using powder vibro-packing is attractive because it includes neither a process too complex to operate in glove boxes (or remotely), nor a waste-producing step necessary for the conventional pellet rod fabrication. However, because of its loose bonding between fuel particles at the beginning of life, vibro-packed MOX fuel has a somewhat less effective thermal conductivity than fully sintered pellet fuel, and undergoes more restructuring. Helium would also likely be pressurized in vibro-packed MOX fuel rods for LWRs to enhance initial fuel thermal conductivity. The combination of these two factors complicates development of an accurate thermal conductivity model. But clearly in order to predict fuel thermomechanical responses during irradiation of vibro-packed MOX fuel, fuel thermal conductivity must be known. The Vibropac fuel of interest in this study refers the fuel that is compacted with irregular fragments of mixed oxide fuel. In this paper, the thermal-conductivity models in the literature that dealt with relatively similar situations to the present case are examined. Then, the best model is selected based on accuracy of prediction and applicability. Then, the selected model is expanded to fit the various situations of interest. (author)

  16. Thermal site descriptive model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations - version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Sundberg, Jan

    2007-09-01

    This report presents a strategy for describing, predicting and visualising the thermal aspects of the site descriptive model. The strategy is an updated version of an earlier strategy applied in all SDM versions during the initial site investigation phase at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The previous methodology for thermal modelling did not take the spatial correlation fully into account during simulation. The result was that the variability of thermal conductivity in the rock mass was not sufficiently well described. Experience from earlier thermal SDMs indicated that development of the methodology was required in order describe the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity in the rock mass in a sufficiently reliable way, taking both variability within rock types and between rock types into account. A good description of the thermal conductivity distribution is especially important for the lower tail. This tail is important for the design of a repository because it affects the canister spacing. The presented approach is developed to be used for final SDM regarding thermal properties, primarily thermal conductivity. Specific objectives for the strategy of thermal stochastic modelling are: Description: statistical description of the thermal conductivity of a rock domain. Prediction: prediction of thermal conductivity in a specific rock volume. Visualisation: visualisation of the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity. The thermal site descriptive model should include the temperature distribution and thermal properties of the rock mass. The temperature is the result of the thermal processes in the repository area. Determination of thermal transport properties can be made using different methods, such as laboratory investigations, field measurements, modelling from mineralogical composition and distribution, modelling from density logging and modelling from temperature logging. The different types of data represent different scales, which has to be

  17. Thermal site descriptive model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations - version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    This report presents a strategy for describing, predicting and visualising the thermal aspects of the site descriptive model. The strategy is an updated version of an earlier strategy applied in all SDM versions during the initial site investigation phase at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The previous methodology for thermal modelling did not take the spatial correlation fully into account during simulation. The result was that the variability of thermal conductivity in the rock mass was not sufficiently well described. Experience from earlier thermal SDMs indicated that development of the methodology was required in order describe the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity in the rock mass in a sufficiently reliable way, taking both variability within rock types and between rock types into account. A good description of the thermal conductivity distribution is especially important for the lower tail. This tail is important for the design of a repository because it affects the canister spacing. The presented approach is developed to be used for final SDM regarding thermal properties, primarily thermal conductivity. Specific objectives for the strategy of thermal stochastic modelling are: Description: statistical description of the thermal conductivity of a rock domain. Prediction: prediction of thermal conductivity in a specific rock volume. Visualisation: visualisation of the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity. The thermal site descriptive model should include the temperature distribution and thermal properties of the rock mass. The temperature is the result of the thermal processes in the repository area. Determination of thermal transport properties can be made using different methods, such as laboratory investigations, field measurements, modelling from mineralogical composition and distribution, modelling from density logging and modelling from temperature logging. The different types of data represent different scales, which has to be

  18. Computational Simulation of Thermal and Spattering Phenomena and Microstructure in Selective Laser Melting of Inconel 625

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Tuğrul; Arısoy, Yiğit M.; Criales, Luis E.

    Computational modelling of Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) processes such as Selective laser Melting (SLM) can reveal information that is hard to obtain or unobtainable by in-situ experimental measurements. A 3D thermal field that is not visible by the thermal camera can be obtained by solving the 3D heat transfer problem. Furthermore, microstructural modelling can be used to predict the quality and mechanical properties of the product. In this paper, a nonlinear 3D Finite Element Method based computational code is developed to simulate the SLM process with different process parameters such as laser power and scan velocity. The code is further improved by utilizing an in-situ thermal camera recording to predict spattering which is in turn included as a stochastic heat loss. Then, thermal gradients extracted from the simulations applied to predict growth directions in the resulting microstructure.

  19. Effects of ion concentration on thermally-chargeable double-layer supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyuck; Lu, Weiyi; Chen, Xi; Qiao, Yu

    2013-11-01

    The concept of thermally-chargeable supercapacitor was discussed and validated experimentally. As two double-layer supercapacitor-type devices were placed at different temperatures and connected, due to the thermal dependence of surface charge structures, the electrode potentials became different, and thermal energy could be harvested and stored as electric energy. The important effect of ion concentration was investigated. The results were quite different from the prediction of conventional surface theory, which should be attributed to the unique behaviors of the ions confined in the nanoporous electrodes.

  20. Evaluation of fatigue damage induced by thermal striping in a T junction using the three dimensional coupling method and frequency response method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Hye; Choi, Jae boong; Kim, Moon Ki [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Nam Su [Seoul Nat' l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Ho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Thermal fatigue cracking induced by thermal stratification, cycling and striping have been observed in several PWR plants. Especially, thermal striping, the highly fluctuating thermal layer, became one of the significant problems, since it can cause un predicted high cycle thermal fatigue (HCTF) at piping systems. This problem are usually found in T junctions of energy cooling systems, where cold and hot flows with high level of turbulence mix together. Thermal striping can cause the networks of fatigue crack at the vicinity of weld parts and these cracks can propagate to significant depth in a relatively short time. Therefore, thermal striping and fatigue crack initiations should be predicted in advance to prevent the severe failure of piping systems. The final goal of this research is to develop a rational thermal and mechanical model considering thermohydraulic characteristics of thermal striping and an evaluation procedure to predict the initiation of thermal fatigue crack. As a first step, we evaluated the fatigue damage in a T junction using two widely used methods. Then, we analyzed the results of each method and conducted comparisons and verifications.

  1. Estimation of effective thermal conductivity tensor from composite microstructure images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M; Boyard, N; Jarny, Y; Delaunay, D

    2008-01-01

    The determination of the effective thermal properties of inhomogeneous materials is a long-standing problem of continuously interest. The impressive number of methods developed to measure or estimate the thermal properties of composite materials clearly exhibits the importance given to their knowledge. Homogenization models are a cheap way to determine or predict them. Many different approaches of homogenization were developed, but the last advances are credited to numerical methods. In this study, a new computational model is developed to estimate the 2D thermal conductivity tensor and the thermal main directions of a pure carbon/epoxy unidirectional composite. This tool is based on real composite microstructure.

  2. Computer Simulation in Problems of Thermal Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga I. Chelyapina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses informative technology of using graphical programming environment LabVIEW 2009 when calculating and predicting the thermal strength of materials with an inhomogeneous structure. Algorithm for processing the experimental data was developed as part of the problem.

  3. High-resolution modeling of thermal thresholds and environmental influences on coral bleaching for local and regional reef management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Naoki H; Yamano, Hiroya

    2018-01-01

    Coral reefs are one of the world's most threatened ecosystems, with global and local stressors contributing to their decline. Excessive sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) can cause coral bleaching, resulting in coral death and decreases in coral cover. A SST threshold of 1 °C over the climatological maximum is widely used to predict coral bleaching. In this study, we refined thermal indices predicting coral bleaching at high-spatial resolution (1 km) by statistically optimizing thermal thresholds, as well as considering other environmental influences on bleaching such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation, water turbidity, and cooling effects. We used a coral bleaching dataset derived from the web-based monitoring system Sango Map Project, at scales appropriate for the local and regional conservation of Japanese coral reefs. We recorded coral bleaching events in the years 2004-2016 in Japan. We revealed the influence of multiple factors on the ability to predict coral bleaching, including selection of thermal indices, statistical optimization of thermal thresholds, quantification of multiple environmental influences, and use of multiple modeling methods (generalized linear models and random forests). After optimization, differences in predictive ability among thermal indices were negligible. Thermal index, UV radiation, water turbidity, and cooling effects were important predictors of the occurrence of coral bleaching. Predictions based on the best model revealed that coral reefs in Japan have experienced recent and widespread bleaching. A practical method to reduce bleaching frequency by screening UV radiation was also demonstrated in this paper.

  4. System performance modeling of extreme ultraviolet lithographic thermal issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, P. A.; Gianoulakis, S. E.; Moen, C. D.; Kanouff, M. P.; Fisher, A.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical simulation is used in the development of an extreme ultraviolet lithography Engineering Test Stand. Extensive modeling was applied to predict the impact of thermal loads on key lithographic parameters such as image placement error, focal shift, and loss of CD control. We show that thermal issues can be effectively managed to ensure that their impact on lithographic performance is maintained within design error budgets. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society

  5. COBRA-SFS predictions of single assembly spent fuel heat transfer data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, N.J.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.; Rector, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    The study reported here is one of several efforts to evaluate and qualify the COBRA-SFS computer code for use in spent fuel storage system thermal analysis. The ability of COBRA-SFS to predict the thermal response of two single assembly spent fuel heat transfer tests was investigated through comparisons of predictions with experimental test data. From these comparisons, conclusions regarding the computational treatment of the physical phenomena occurring within a storage system can be made. This objective was successfully accomplished as reasonable agreement between predictions and data were obtained for the 21 individual test cases of the two experiments

  6. CMB spectral distortion constraints on thermal inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kihyun; Stewart, Ewan D. [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungwook E. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Zoe, Heeseung, E-mail: cho_physics@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: heezoe@dgist.ac.kr, E-mail: jcap@profstewart.org, E-mail: heezoe@dgist.ac.kr [School of Undergraduate Studies, College of Transdisciplinary Studies, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu 42988 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Thermal inflation is a second epoch of exponential expansion at typical energy scales V {sup 1/4} ∼ 10{sup 6} {sup ∼} {sup 8} GeV. If the usual primordial inflation is followed by thermal inflation, the primordial power spectrum is only modestly redshifted on large scales, but strongly suppressed on scales smaller than the horizon size at the beginning of thermal inflation, k > k {sub b} = a {sub b} H {sub b}. We calculate the spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background generated by the dissipation of acoustic waves in this context. For k {sub b} || 10{sup 3} Mpc{sup −1}, thermal inflation results in a large suppression of the μ-distortion amplitude, predicting that it falls well below the standard value of μ ≅ 2× 10{sup −8}. Thus, future spectral distortion experiments, similar to PIXIE, can place new limits on the thermal inflation scenario, constraining k {sub b} ∼> 10{sup 3} Mpc{sup −1} if μ ≅ 2× 10{sup −8} were found.

  7. Environmental/Thermal Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites: Thermal Tradeoff Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. M.; Brewer, David; Shah, Ashwin R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent interest in environmental/thermal barrier coatings (EBC/TBCs) has prompted research to develop life-prediction methodologies for the coating systems of advanced high-temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Heat-transfer analysis of EBC/TBCs for CMCs is an essential part of the effort. It helps establish the resulting thermal profile through the thickness of the CMC that is protected by the EBC/TBC system. This report documents the results of a one-dimensional analysis of an advanced high-temperature CMC system protected with an EBC/TBC system. The one-dimensional analysis was used for tradeoff studies involving parametric variation of the conductivity; the thickness of the EBC/TBCs, bond coat, and CMC substrate; and the cooling requirements. The insight gained from the results will be used to configure a viable EBC/TBC system for CMC liners that meet the desired hot surface, cold surface, and substrate temperature requirements.

  8. Thermo-mechanical simulations of early-age concrete cracking with durability predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlásek, Petr; Šmilauer, Vít; Hájková, Karolina; Baquerizo, Luis

    2017-09-01

    Concrete performance is strongly affected by mix design, thermal boundary conditions, its evolving mechanical properties, and internal/external restraints with consequences to possible cracking with impaired durability. Thermo-mechanical simulations are able to capture those relevant phenomena and boundary conditions for predicting temperature, strains, stresses or cracking in reinforced concrete structures. In this paper, we propose a weakly coupled thermo-mechanical model for early age concrete with an affinity-based hydration model for thermal part, taking into account concrete mix design, cement type and thermal boundary conditions. The mechanical part uses B3/B4 model for concrete creep and shrinkage with isotropic damage model for cracking, able to predict a crack width. All models have been implemented in an open-source OOFEM software package. Validations of thermo-mechanical simulations will be presented on several massive concrete structures, showing excellent temperature predictions. Likewise, strain validation demonstrates good predictions on a restrained reinforced concrete wall and concrete beam. Durability predictions stem from induction time of reinforcement corrosion, caused by carbonation and/or chloride ingress influenced by crack width. Reinforcement corrosion in concrete struts of a bridge will serve for validation.

  9. Using Upper Extremity Skin Temperatures to Assess Thermal Comfort in Office Buildings in Changsha, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhibin; Li, Nianping; Cui, Haijiao; Peng, Jinqing; Chen, Haowen; Liu, Penglong

    2017-09-21

    Existing thermal comfort field studies are mainly focused on the relationship between the indoor physical environment and the thermal comfort. In numerous chamber experiments, physiological parameters were adopted to assess thermal comfort, but the experiments' conclusions may not represent a realistic thermal environment due to the highly controlled thermal environment and few occupants. This paper focuses on determining the relationships between upper extremity skin temperatures (i.e., finger, wrist, hand and forearm) and the indoor thermal comfort. Also, the applicability of predicting thermal comfort by using upper extremity skin temperatures was explored. Field studies were performed in office buildings equipped with split air-conditioning (SAC) located in the hot summer and cold winter (HSCW) climate zone of China during the summer of 2016. Psychological responses of occupants were recorded and physical and physiological factors were measured simultaneously. Standard effective temperature (SET*) was used to incorporate the effect of humidity and air velocity on thermal comfort. The results indicate that upper extremity skin temperatures are good indicators for predicting thermal sensation, and could be used to assess the thermal comfort in terms of physiological mechanism. In addition, the neutral temperature was 24.7 °C and the upper limit for 80% acceptability was 28.2 °C in SET*.

  10. Using Upper Extremity Skin Temperatures to Assess Thermal Comfort in Office Buildings in Changsha, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Existing thermal comfort field studies are mainly focused on the relationship between the indoor physical environment and the thermal comfort. In numerous chamber experiments, physiological parameters were adopted to assess thermal comfort, but the experiments’ conclusions may not represent a realistic thermal environment due to the highly controlled thermal environment and few occupants. This paper focuses on determining the relationships between upper extremity skin temperatures (i.e., finger, wrist, hand and forearm and the indoor thermal comfort. Also, the applicability of predicting thermal comfort by using upper extremity skin temperatures was explored. Field studies were performed in office buildings equipped with split air-conditioning (SAC located in the hot summer and cold winter (HSCW climate zone of China during the summer of 2016. Psychological responses of occupants were recorded and physical and physiological factors were measured simultaneously. Standard effective temperature (SET* was used to incorporate the effect of humidity and air velocity on thermal comfort. The results indicate that upper extremity skin temperatures are good indicators for predicting thermal sensation, and could be used to assess the thermal comfort in terms of physiological mechanism. In addition, the neutral temperature was 24.7 °C and the upper limit for 80% acceptability was 28.2 °C in SET*.

  11. Temperature dependence of thermal pressure for NaCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandra K.; Pande, Brijesh K.; Pandey, Anjani K.

    2018-05-01

    Engineering applications of the materials can be explored upto the desired limit of accuracy with the better knowledge of its mechanical and thermal properties such as ductility, brittleness and Thermal Pressure. For the resistance to fracture (K) and plastic deformation (G) the ratio K/G is treated as an indication of ductile or brittle character of solids. In the present work we have tested the condition of ductility and brittleness with the calculated values of K/G for the NaCl. It is concluded that the nature of NaCl can be predicted upto high temperature simply with the knowledge of its elastic stiffness constant only. Thermoelastic properties of materials at high temperature is directly related to thermal pressure and volume expansion of the materials. An expression for the temperature dependence of thermal pressure is formulated using basic thermodynamic identities. It is observed that thermal pressure ΔPth calculated for NaCl by using Kushwah formulation is in good agreement with the experimental values also the thermal pressure increases with the increase in temperature.

  12. Domestic appliances energy optimization with model predictive control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, E.M.G.; Godina, R.; Pouresmaeil, E.; Ferreira, J.R.; Catalão, J.P.S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An alternative power management control for home appliances that require thermal regulation is presented. • A Model Predictive Control scheme is assessed and its performance studied and compared to the thermostat. • Problem formulation is explored through tuning weights with the aim of reducing energetic consumption and cost. • A modulation scheme of a two-level Model Predictive Control signal as an interface block is presented. • The implementation costs in home appliances with thermal regulation requirements are reduced. - Abstract: A vital element in making a sustainable world is correctly managing the energy in the domestic sector. Thus, this sector evidently stands as a key one for to be addressed in terms of climate change goals. Increasingly, people are aware of electricity savings by turning off the equipment that is not been used, or connect electrical loads just outside the on-peak hours. However, these few efforts are not enough to reduce the global energy consumption, which is increasing. Much of the reduction was due to technological improvements, however with the advancing of the years new types of control arise. Domestic appliances with the purpose of heating and cooling rely on thermostatic regulation technique. The study in this paper is focused on the subject of an alternative power management control for home appliances that require thermal regulation. In this paper a Model Predictive Control scheme is assessed and its performance studied and compared to the thermostat with the aim of minimizing the cooling energy consumption through the minimization of the energy cost while satisfying the adequate temperature range for the human comfort. In addition, the Model Predictive Control problem formulation is explored through tuning weights with the aim of reducing energetic consumption and cost. For this purpose, the typical consumption of a 24 h period of a summer day was simulated a three-level tariff scheme was used. The new

  13. Prediction of temperature and thermal inertia effect in the maturation stage and stockpiling of a large composting mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrena, R.; Canovas, C.; Sanchez, A.

    2006-01-01

    A macroscopic non-steady state energy balance was developed and solved for a composting pile of source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid waste during the maturation stage (13,500 kg of compost). Simulated temperature profiles correlated well with temperature experimental data (ranging from 50 to 70 deg. C) obtained during the maturation process for more than 50 days at full scale. Thermal inertia effect usually found in composting plants and associated to the stockpiling of large composting masses could be predicted by means of this simplified energy balance, which takes into account terms of convective, conductive and radiation heat dissipation. Heat losses in a large composting mass are not significant due to the similar temperatures found at the surroundings and at the surface of the pile (ranging from 15 to 40 deg. C). In contrast, thermophilic temperature in the core of the pile was maintained during the whole maturation process. Heat generation was estimated with the static respiration index, a parameter that is typically used to monitor the biological activity and stability of composting processes. In this study, the static respiration index is presented as a parameter to estimate the metabolic heat that can be generated according to the biodegradable organic matter content of a compost sample, which can be useful in predicting the temperature of the composting process

  14. Using a Zonal Model To Assess the Effect of a Heated Floor on Thermal Comfort Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukhris, Yosr; Gharbi, Leila; Ghrab-Morcos, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    People s perceptions of indoor air quality and thermal comfort are affected by air speed and temperature. We have extended the three-dimensional zonal model, ZAER, to be able to predict the temperature fields and the air distributions between and within rooms in the case of natural convection. This paper presents an application of the new zonal model dealing with the influence of a heated floor of one room upon the winter thermal comfort of an unconditioned Tunisian dwelling. Coupling ZAER with a thermal comfort model allows the assessment of the thermal quality of the dwelling through the prediction of a comfort indicator. The obtained results show that a heated floor can be a useful component to improve thermal comfort in the Tunisian context, even in another room

  15. Thermal and thermoelectric transport measurements of an individual boron arsenide microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Sellan, Daniel P.; Ou, Eric; Shi, Li, E-mail: lishi@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Evans, Daniel A.; Williams, Owen M.; Cowley, Alan H. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Recent first principles calculations have predicted that boron arsenide (BAs) can possess an unexpectedly high thermal conductivity that depends sensitively on the crystal size and defect concentration. However, few experimental results have been obtained to verify these predictions. In the present work, we report four-probe thermal and thermoelectric transport measurements of an individual BAs microstructure that was synthesized via a vapor transport method. The measured thermal conductivity was found to decrease slightly with temperature in the range between 250 K and 350 K. The temperature dependence suggests that the extrinsic phonon scattering processes play an important role in addition to intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering. The room temperature value of (186 ± 46) W m{sup −1 }K{sup −1} is higher than that of bulk silicon but still a factor of four lower than the calculated result for a defect-free, non-degenerate BAs rod with a similar diameter of 1.15 μm. The measured p-type Seebeck coefficient and thermoelectric power factor are comparable to those of bismuth telluride, which is a commonly used thermoelectric material. The foregoing results also suggest that it is necessary to not only reduce defect and boundary scatterings but also to better understand and control the electron scattering of phonons in order to achieve the predicted ultrahigh intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of BAs.

  16. Thermal shock considerations for the TFCX limiter and first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, J.R.; Fuller, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Resistance to thermal shock fracture of limiter and first wall surface material candidates during plasma disruption heating conditions is evaluated. A simple, figure-of-merit type thermal shock parameter which provides a mechanism to rank material candidates is derived. Combining this figure-of-merit parameter with the parameters defining specific heating conditions yields a non-dimensional thermal shock parameter. For values of this parameter below a critical value, a given material is expected to undergo thermal shock damage. Prediction of thermal shock damage with this parameter is shown to exhibit good agreement with test data. Applying this critical parameter value approach, all materials examined in this study are expected to experience thermal shock damage for nominal TFCX plasma disruption conditions. Since the extent of this damage is not clear, tests which explore the range of expected conditions for TFCX are recommended

  17. Occupants' adaptive responses and perception of thermal environment in naturally conditioned university classrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Runming [The School of Construction Management and Engineering, The University of Reading, Whiteknights, PO Box 219, Reading RG6 6AW (United Kingdom); The Faculty of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Liu, Jing [The School of Construction Management and Engineering, The University of Reading, Whiteknights, PO Box 219, Reading RG6 6AW (United Kingdom); Li, Baizhan [The Faculty of Urban Construction and Environmental Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Key Laboratory of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region' s Eco-Environment (Ministry of Education), Chongqing University, Chongqing 400042 (China)

    2010-03-15

    A year-long field study of the thermal environment in university classrooms was conducted from March 2005 to May 2006 in Chongqing, China. This paper presents the occupants' thermal sensation votes and discusses the occupants' adaptive response and perception of the thermal environment in a naturally conditioned space. Comparisons between the Actual Mean Vote (AMV) and Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) have been made as well as between the Actual Percentage of Dissatisfied (APD) and Predicted Percentage of Dissatisfied (PPD). The adaptive thermal comfort zone for the naturally conditioned space for Chongqing, which has hot summer and cold winter climatic characteristics, has been proposed based on the field study results. The Chongqing adaptive comfort range is broader than that of the ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 in general, but in the extreme cold and hot months, it is narrower. The thermal conditions in classrooms in Chongqing in summer and winter are severe. Behavioural adaptation such as changing clothing, adjusting indoor air velocity, taking hot/cold drinks, etc., as well as psychological adaptation, has played a role in adapting to the thermal environment. (author)

  18. A Study on infrared tracing and monitoring of thermal discharge from the power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Sun; Hong, Wuk Hee; Kim, Yung Bae; Park, Jang Rae; Choi, Yung An; Park, Yung San [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Center

    1996-08-01

    Massive discharge of cooling water from the nuclear power plants as well as many thermal power plants would cause serious environmental problems. Hence, the task of predicting cooling water dispersion areas has enormous importance for better environmental management related with the power plant operation. For the last two decades, extensive field survey and dispersion modeling have been mainly applied to predict thermal discharge dispersion areas. In this study, the method of infrared thermal sensing was tested as a possible means of measuring the affected areas of thermal discharge at the thermal power plant sites. Many IR images obtained by using the terrestrial camera, or by using the airborne scanner, or from the Landsat iv satellite were analyzed from the pc with the IDRISI and resource software and further enhanced with other image analysis technologies. The result of study proved this IR imaging technology to be an potentially cost-effective tool for assessment of water-temperature increase caused by the thermal discharge from the power plants, however, further elaboration of procedure was highly requested. (author). 9 refs., 24 figs.

  19. Optimization of thermal neutron shield concrete mixture using artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadollahi, A. [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box: 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nazemi, E., E-mail: nazemi.ehsan@yahoo.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zolfaghari, A. [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box: 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ajorloo, A.M. [Water and Environmental Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, P.O. Box: 167651719, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Colemanite was used in fabricating of thermal neutron shield concrete. • The Taguchi method was implemented to obtain the data set required for training the ANN. • Trained ANN predicted quality characteristics of thermal neutron shield. - Abstract: Colemanite is the most convenient boron mineral which has been widely used in construction of radiation shielding concrete in order to improve the capture of thermal neutrons. But utilization of Colemanite in radiation shielding concrete has a deleterious effect on both physical and mechanical properties. In the present work, Taguchi method and artificial neural network (ANN) were employed to find an optimal mixture of Colemanite based concrete in order to improve the boron content of concrete and increase thermal neutron absorption without violating the standards for physical and mechanical properties. Using Taguchi method for experimental design, 27 concrete samples with different mixtures were fabricated and tested. Water/cement ratio, cement quantity, volume fraction of Colemanite aggregate and silica fume quantity were selected as control factors, and compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity and thermal neutron transmission ratio were considered as the quality responses. Obtained data from 27 experiments were used to train 3 ANNs. Four control factors were utilized as the inputs of 3 ANNs and 3 quality responses were used as the outputs, separately (each ANN for one quality response). After training the ANNs, 1024 different mixtures with different quality responses were predicted. At the final, optimum mixture was obtained among the predicted different mixtures. Results demonstrated that the optimal mixture of thermal neutron shielding concrete has a water–cement ratio of 0.38, cement content of 400 kg/m{sup 3}, a volume fraction Colemanite aggregate of 50% and silica fume–cement ratio of 0.15.

  20. Optimization of thermal neutron shield concrete mixture using artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadollahi, A.; Nazemi, E.; Zolfaghari, A.; Ajorloo, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Colemanite was used in fabricating of thermal neutron shield concrete. • The Taguchi method was implemented to obtain the data set required for training the ANN. • Trained ANN predicted quality characteristics of thermal neutron shield. - Abstract: Colemanite is the most convenient boron mineral which has been widely used in construction of radiation shielding concrete in order to improve the capture of thermal neutrons. But utilization of Colemanite in radiation shielding concrete has a deleterious effect on both physical and mechanical properties. In the present work, Taguchi method and artificial neural network (ANN) were employed to find an optimal mixture of Colemanite based concrete in order to improve the boron content of concrete and increase thermal neutron absorption without violating the standards for physical and mechanical properties. Using Taguchi method for experimental design, 27 concrete samples with different mixtures were fabricated and tested. Water/cement ratio, cement quantity, volume fraction of Colemanite aggregate and silica fume quantity were selected as control factors, and compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity and thermal neutron transmission ratio were considered as the quality responses. Obtained data from 27 experiments were used to train 3 ANNs. Four control factors were utilized as the inputs of 3 ANNs and 3 quality responses were used as the outputs, separately (each ANN for one quality response). After training the ANNs, 1024 different mixtures with different quality responses were predicted. At the final, optimum mixture was obtained among the predicted different mixtures. Results demonstrated that the optimal mixture of thermal neutron shielding concrete has a water–cement ratio of 0.38, cement content of 400 kg/m 3 , a volume fraction Colemanite aggregate of 50% and silica fume–cement ratio of 0.15.

  1. A thermal conductivity model for nanofluids including effect of the temperature-dependent interfacial layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitprasert, Chatcharin; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Juntasaro, Varangrat

    2009-01-01

    The interfacial layer of nanoparticles has been recently shown to have an effect on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. There is, however, still no thermal conductivity model that includes the effects of temperature and nanoparticle size variations on the thickness and consequently on the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer. In the present work, the stationary model developed by Leong et al. (J Nanopart Res 8:245-254, 2006) is initially modified to include the thermal dispersion effect due to the Brownian motion of nanoparticles. This model is called the 'Leong et al.'s dynamic model'. However, the Leong et al.'s dynamic model over-predicts the thermal conductivity of nanofluids in the case of the flowing fluid. This suggests that the enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the flowing nanofluids due to the increase in temperature does not come from the thermal dispersion effect. It is more likely that the enhancement in heat transfer of the flowing nanofluids comes from the temperature-dependent interfacial layer effect. Therefore, the Leong et al.'s stationary model is again modified to include the effect of temperature variation on the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer for different sizes of nanoparticles. This present model is then evaluated and compared with the other thermal conductivity models for the turbulent convective heat transfer in nanofluids along a uniformly heated tube. The results show that the present model is more general than the other models in the sense that it can predict both the temperature and the volume fraction dependence of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids for both non-flowing and flowing fluids. Also, it is found to be more accurate than the other models due to the inclusion of the effect of the temperature-dependent interfacial layer. In conclusion, the present model can accurately predict the changes in thermal conductivity of nanofluids due to the changes in volume fraction and temperature for

  2. Fatigue crack growth behavior under cyclic thermal transient stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Kano, Takashi; Yoshitoshi, Atsushi.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal fatigue tests were performed using straight pipe specimens subjected to cyclic thermal shocks of liquid sodium, and crack growth behaviors were estimated using striation patterns observed clearly on any crack surface. Crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain reaches the maximum at one depth, and after that it decreases gradually with crack depth. The peak location of crack growth rate becomes deeper by superposition of constant primary stress. Parallel cracks co-existing in the neighborhood move the peak to shallower location and decrease the maximum crack growth rate. The equivalent stress intensity factor range calculated by Walker's formula is successfully applied to the case of negative stress ratio. Fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain agreed well with that under the constant temperature equal to the maximum value in the thermal cycle. Simplified methods for calculating the stress intensity factor and the crack interference factor have been developed. Crack growth behavior under thermal fatigue could be well predicted using numerical analysis results. (author)

  3. Fatigue crack growth behavior under cyclic transient thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Kano, Takashi; Yoshitoshi, Atsushi.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal fatigue tests were performed using straight pipe specimens subjected to cyclic thermal shocks of liquid sodium, and crack growth behaviors were estimated using striation patterns observed clearly on any crack surface. Crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain reaches the maximum at one depth, and after that it decreases gradually with crack depth. The peak location of crack growth rate becomes deeper by superposition of constant primary stress. Parallel cracks co-existing in the neighborhood move the peak to shallower location and decrease the maximum crack growth rate. The equivalent stress intensity factor range calculated by Walker's formula is successfully applied to the case of negative stress ratio. Fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic thermal strain agreed well with that under the constant temperature equal to the maximum value in the thermal cycle. Simplified methods for calculating the stress intensity factor and the crack interference factor have been developed. Crack growth behavior under thermal fatigue could be well predicted using numerical analysis results. (author)

  4. Entropy generation method to quantify thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boregowda, S. C.; Tiwari, S. N.; Chaturvedi, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper presents a thermodynamic approach to assess the quality of human-thermal environment interaction and quantify thermal comfort. The approach involves development of entropy generation term by applying second law of thermodynamics to the combined human-environment system. The entropy generation term combines both human thermal physiological responses and thermal environmental variables to provide an objective measure of thermal comfort. The original concepts and definitions form the basis for establishing the mathematical relationship between thermal comfort and entropy generation term. As a result of logic and deterministic approach, an Objective Thermal Comfort Index (OTCI) is defined and established as a function of entropy generation. In order to verify the entropy-based thermal comfort model, human thermal physiological responses due to changes in ambient conditions are simulated using a well established and validated human thermal model developed at the Institute of Environmental Research of Kansas State University (KSU). The finite element based KSU human thermal computer model is being utilized as a "Computational Environmental Chamber" to conduct series of simulations to examine the human thermal responses to different environmental conditions. The output from the simulation, which include human thermal responses and input data consisting of environmental conditions are fed into the thermal comfort model. Continuous monitoring of thermal comfort in comfortable and extreme environmental conditions is demonstrated. The Objective Thermal Comfort values obtained from the entropy-based model are validated against regression based Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) values. Using the corresponding air temperatures and vapor pressures that were used in the computer simulation in the regression equation generates the PMV values. The preliminary results indicate that the OTCI and PMV values correlate well under ideal conditions. However, an experimental study

  5. Thermal Properties and Phonon Spectral Characterization of Synthetic Boron Phosphide for High Thermal Conductivity Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joon Sang; Wu, Huan; Hu, Yongjie

    2017-12-13

    Heat dissipation is an increasingly critical technological challenge in modern electronics and photonics as devices continue to shrink to the nanoscale. To address this challenge, high thermal conductivity materials that can efficiently dissipate heat from hot spots and improve device performance are urgently needed. Boron phosphide is a unique high thermal conductivity and refractory material with exceptional chemical inertness, hardness, and high thermal stability, which holds high promises for many practical applications. So far, however, challenges with boron phosphide synthesis and characterization have hampered the understanding of its fundamental properties and potential applications. Here, we describe a systematic thermal transport study based on a synergistic synthesis-experimental-modeling approach: we have chemically synthesized high-quality boron phosphide single crystals and measured their thermal conductivity as a record-high 460 W/mK at room temperature. Through nanoscale ballistic transport, we have, for the first time, mapped the phonon spectra of boron phosphide and experimentally measured its phonon mean free-path spectra with consideration of both natural and isotope-pure abundances. We have also measured the temperature- and size-dependent thermal conductivity and performed corresponding calculations by solving the three-dimensional and spectral-dependent phonon Boltzmann transport equation using the variance-reduced Monte Carlo method. The experimental results are in good agreement with that predicted by multiscale simulations and density functional theory, which together quantify the heat conduction through the phonon mode dependent scattering process. Our finding underscores the promise of boron phosphide as a high thermal conductivity material for a wide range of applications, including thermal management and energy regulation, and provides a detailed, microscopic-level understanding of the phonon spectra and thermal transport mechanisms of

  6. Nanosecond laser pulses for mimicking thermal effects on nanostructured tungsten-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besozzi, E.; Maffini, A.; Dellasega, D.; Russo, V.; Facibeni, A.; Pazzaglia, A.; Beghi, M. G.; Passoni, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we exploit nanosecond laser irradiation as a compact solution for investigating the thermomechanical behavior of tungsten materials under extreme thermal loads at the laboratory scale. Heat flux factor thresholds for various thermal effects, such as melting, cracking and recrystallization, are determined under both single and multishot experiments. The use of nanosecond lasers for mimicking thermal effects induced on W by fusion-relevant thermal loads is thus validated by direct comparison of the thresholds obtained in this work and the ones reported in the literature for electron beams and millisecond laser irradiation. Numerical simulations of temperature and thermal stress performed on a 2D thermomechanical code are used to predict the heat flux factor thresholds of the different thermal effects. We also investigate the thermal effect thresholds of various nanostructured W coatings. These coatings are produced by pulsed laser deposition, mimicking W coatings in tokamaks and W redeposited layers. All the coatings show lower damage thresholds with respect to bulk W. In general, thresholds decrease as the porosity degree of the materials increases. We thus propose a model to predict these thresholds for coatings with various morphologies, simply based on their porosity degree, which can be directly estimated by measuring the variation of the coating mass density with respect to that of the bulk.

  7. Electrohydrodynamic fibrillation governed enhanced thermal transport in dielectric colloids under a field stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Purbarun; Maganti, Lakshmi Sirisha; Harikrishnan, A R

    2018-05-30

    Electrorheological (ER) fluids are known to exhibit enhanced viscous effects under an electric field stimulus. The present article reports the hitherto unreported phenomenon of greatly enhanced thermal conductivity in such electro-active colloidal dispersions in the presence of an externally applied electric field. Typical ER fluids are synthesized employing dielectric fluids and nanoparticles and experiments are performed employing an in-house designed setup. Greatly augmented thermal conductivity under a field's influence was observed. Enhanced thermal conduction alon