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Sample records for pre-trauma increased survival

  1. Increasing incidence and survival in oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karnov, Kirstine Kim Schmidt; Grønhøj, Christian; Jensen, David Hebbelstrup

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oral carcinomas (OCs) make up a significant proportion of head and neck carcinomas (HNCs) and are an important cause of morbidity and mortality globally. The purpose of this population-based study was to determine trends in incidence and survival in OC in the Danish population from 1980...... regression analysis in relation to location, gender, age, and calendar year at diagnosis. Results: Altogether, 8299 patients with oral cancer were identified, 5062 (61%) of whom were males and 3237 (39%) were females. The median age at diagnosis was 63 years. The AAIR of patients with OC increased from 1.......9 per 100,000 in 1980 to 3.5 per 100,000 in 2014, and we observed a significant increase in 5-year OS of 12% points (a relative increase of 38%) from the period 1980–1984 to 2005–2009. Women were found to have a better prognosis than men. Conclusions: We found an unexpected increase in the age...

  2. Pre-trauma individual differences in extinction learning predict posttraumatic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lommen, M.J.J.; Engelhard, I.M.; Sijbrandij, M.; van Hout, M.A.; Hermans, D.

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of a traumatic event, many people suffer from psychological distress, but only a minority develops posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Pre-trauma individual differences in fear conditioning, most notably reduced extinction learning, have been proposed as playing an important role

  3. Fledgling survival increases with development time and adult survival across north and south temperate zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Penn; Martin, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Slow life histories are characterized by high adult survival and few offspring, which are thought to allow increased investment per offspring to increase juvenile survival. Consistent with this pattern, south temperate zone birds are commonly longer-lived and have fewer young than north temperate zone species. However, comparative analyses of juvenile survival, including during the first few weeks of the post-fledging period when most juvenile mortality occurs, are largely lacking. We combined our measurements of fledgling survival for eight passerines in South Africa with estimates from published studies of 57 north and south temperate zone songbird species to test three predictions: (1) fledgling survival increases with length of development time in the nest; (2) fledgling survival increases with adult survival and reduced brood size controlled for development time; and (3) south temperate zone species, with their higher adult survival and smaller brood sizes, exhibit higher fledgling survival than north temperate zone species controlled for development time. We found that fledgling survival was higher among south temperate zone species and generally increased with development time and adult survival within and between latitudinal regions. Clutch size did not explain additional variation, but was confounded with adult survival. Given the importance of age-specific mortality to life history evolution, understanding the causes of these geographical patterns of mortality is important.

  4. [Post-traumatic stress reaction in a sample of bank employees victims of robbery in the workplace: the role of pre-trauma and peri-trauma factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converso, Daniela; Viotti, Sara

    2014-07-24

    Robberies are traumatizing events for workers. Consequently, a number of health problems can arise. In the short term, a common reaction is post-traumatic stress (including intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal symptoms). The aim of the present study was to identify, among pre-trauma factors (personal characteristics: gender, age, educational level, and prior exposure to robberies) and peri-trauma factors (kind of weapon, duration of the event, number of robbers, and numbers of colleagues and clients involved), those that were most likely to cause post-traumatic symptoms in a sample of bank employees who were victims of a robbery. One-hundred-seventy-two employees at two banks in northwest Italy were involved in the research. A month after a robbery, the employees completed a self-report questionnaire including the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) by Weiss and Marmar (39). Analyses found one pre-trauma factor (prior exposure to robbery/ies, and one peri-trauma factor, number of robbers) as significant predictors of intrusion. Two peri-trauma factors (number of robbers and duration of robbery) were identified as predictors of avoidance. Finally, one pre-trauma factor (prior exposure to robbery/ies) and two peri-trauma factors (number of robbers and number of colleagues involved in the robbery) were found to be predictors of hyperarousal. The results showed that several peri-trauma factors can increase the risk of workers developing post-traumatic stress reaction and suggest that these factors should be kept in mind when planning intervention programmes aimed at preventing and contrasting psychological consequences of robbery.

  5. Childhood sexual trauma, cannabis use and psychosis: statistically controlling for pre-trauma psychosis and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jamie; Houston, James Edward; Shevlin, Mark; Adamson, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Recurring evidence seems to suggest that sexual trauma in childhood may moderate associations between cannabis consumption and psychosis. It has also been suggested, however, that poor childhood mental health may explain linkages between these phenomena. The current study, using data from the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication (N = 2,355), sought to revaluate the stability of the childhood trauma-cannabis interaction while statistically controlling for pre-trauma psychotic experiences and psychopathology in childhood. Psychotic experiences that occurred before childhood sexual trauma significantly influenced adult psychosis symptomatology (psychosis pre-rape B = 0.10; psychosis pre-sexual assault B = 0.23). Social phobia (B = 0.07) also conferred risk for adult psychosis. Pre-trauma childhood psychopathology, however, did not account for the interaction between childhood sexual trauma and cannabis consumption in a multivariate model. Childhood experiences of rape (B = 0.15) and an interaction between cannabis use and childhood sexual assault (B = 0.05) independently contributed to adult psychosis. Cannabis use conferred no independent risk. With specific regard to research methodology, the current findings offer further justification for the inclusion of childhood sexual trauma in analyses investigating associations between cannabis use and psychosis.

  6. Increased Sleep Promotes Survival during a Bacterial Infection in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Williams, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: The relationship between sleep and immune function is not well understood at a functional or molecular level. We therefore used a genetic approach in Drosophila to manipulate sleep and evaluated effects on the ability of flies to fight bacterial infection. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Methods and Results: We used a genetic approach to transiently alter neuronal excitability in the mushroom body, a region in the central brain that is known to regulate sleep. Flies with increased sleep for up to two days prior to a bacterial infection showed increased resistance to the infection and improved survival. These flies also had increased expression levels of a subset of anti-microbial peptide mRNA prior to infection, as well as increased NFκB activity during infection as indicated by in vivo luciferase reporter activity. In contrast, flies that experienced reduced sleep for up to two days prior to infection had no effect on survival or on NFκB activity during infection. However, flies with reduced sleep showed an altered defense mechanism, such that resistance to infection was increased, but at the expense of reduced tolerance. This effect was dependent on environmental condition. Conclusions: Increasing sleep enhanced activity of an NFκB transcription factor, increased resistance to infection, and strongly promoted survival. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that sleep is beneficial to the host by maintaining a robust immune system. Citation: Kuo TH, Williams JA. Increased sleep promotes survival during a bacterial infection in Drosophila. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1077-1086. PMID:24882902

  7. Veratridine increases the survival of retinal ganglion cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P.F. Pereira

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cell death is an important phenomenon involving many biochemical pathways. This degenerative event has been studied to understand how the cells activate the mechanisms that lead to self-destruction. Target cells and afferent cells play a relevant role in the regulation of natural cell death. We studied the effect of veratridine (1.5, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0 µM on the survival of neonatal rat retinal ganglion cells in vitro. Veratridine (3.0 µM, a well-known depolarizing agent that opens the Na+ channel, promoted a two-fold increase in the survival of retinal ganglion cells kept in culture for 48 h. This effect was dose-dependent and was blocked by 1.0 µM tetrodotoxin (a classical voltage-dependent Na+ channel blocker and 30.0 µM flunarizine (a Na+ and Ca2+ channel blocker. These results indicate that electrical activity is also important for the maintenance of retinal ganglion cell survival in vitro

  8. Melatonin prevents experimental preterm labor and increases offspring survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Rubio, Ana P; Sordelli, Micaela S; Salazar, Ana I; Aisemberg, Julieta; Bariani, María V; Cella, Maximiliano; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Franchi, Ana M

    2014-03-01

    Preterm delivery is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and contributes to delayed physical and cognitive development in children. At present, there is no efficient therapy to prevent preterm labor. A large body of evidence suggests that intra-amniotic infections may be a significant and potentially preventable cause of preterm birth. This work assessed the effect of melatonin in a murine model of inflammation-associated preterm delivery which mimics central features of preterm infection in humans. For this purpose, preterm labor was induced in BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal injections of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at 10.00 hr (10 μg LPS) and 13.00 hr (20 μg LPS) on day 15 of pregnancy. On day 14 of pregnancy, a pellet of melatonin (25 mg) had been subcutaneously implanted into a group of animals. In the absence of melatonin, a 100% incidence of preterm birth was observed in LPS-treated animals, and the fetuses showed widespread damage. By comparison, treatment with melatonin prevented preterm birth in 50% of the cases, and all pups from melatonin-treated females were born alive and their body weight did not differ from control animals. Melatonin significantly prevented the LPS-induced rises in uterine prostaglandin (PG) E2 , PGF2α, and cyclooxygenase-2 protein levels. In addition, melatonin prevented the LPS-induced increase in uterine nitric oxide (NO) production, inducible NO synthase protein, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) levels. Collectively, our results suggest that melatonin could be a new therapeutic tool to prevent preterm labor and to increase offspring survival. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Novel Resuscitation from Lethal Hemorrhage. Increasing Survival of Combat Casualties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Safar, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Using our novel animal models of severe hemorrhage, focusing on evaluation of outcome to 3-10 days, the following strategies were found superior in terms of intact survival compared to standard resuscitation...

  10. Physical activity increases survival after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, K.; Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Kikkenborg Berg, Selina

    2016-01-01

    physical activity levels 6-12 months after heart valve surgery and (1) survival, (2) hospital readmission 18-24 months after surgery and (3) participation in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. METHODS: Prospective cohort study with registry data from The CopenHeart survey, The Danish National Patient...... readmission. Patients who participated in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (n=297) were more likely than the non-participants (n=200) to have a moderate or high physical activity level than a low physical activity level (fully adjusted OR: 1.52, 95% CI 1.03 to 2.24). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate to high levels...... of physical activity after heart valve surgery are positively associated with higher survival rates and participation in cardiac rehabilitation....

  11. Increased survival of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli inside macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskinyte, Migla; Gordo, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Mutations causing antibiotic resistance usually incur a fitness cost in the absence of antibiotics. The magnitude of such costs is known to vary with the environment. Little is known about the fitness effects of antibiotic resistance mutations when bacteria confront the host's immune system. Here, we study the fitness effects of mutations in the rpoB, rpsL, and gyrA genes, which confer resistance to rifampin, streptomycin, and nalidixic acid, respectively. These antibiotics are frequently used in the treatment of bacterial infections. We measured two important fitness traits-growth rate and survival ability-of 12 Escherichia coli K-12 strains, each carrying a single resistance mutation, in the presence of macrophages. Strikingly, we found that 67% of the mutants survived better than the susceptible bacteria in the intracellular niche of the phagocytic cells. In particular, all E. coli streptomycin-resistant mutants exhibited an intracellular advantage. On the other hand, 42% of the mutants incurred a high fitness cost when the bacteria were allowed to divide outside of macrophages. This study shows that single nonsynonymous changes affecting fundamental processes in the cell can contribute to prolonged survival of E. coli in the context of an infection.

  12. Plant circadian clocks increase photosynthesis, growth, survival, and competitive advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Antony N; Salathia, Neeraj; Hall, Anthony; Kévei, Eva; Tóth, Réka; Nagy, Ferenc; Hibberd, Julian M; Millar, Andrew J; Webb, Alex A R

    2005-07-22

    Circadian clocks are believed to confer an advantage to plants, but the nature of that advantage has been unknown. We show that a substantial photosynthetic advantage is conferred by correct matching of the circadian clock period with that of the external light-dark cycle. In wild type and in long- and short-circadian period mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, plants with a clock period matched to the environment contain more chlorophyll, fix more carbon, grow faster, and survive better than plants with circadian periods differing from their environment. This explains why plants gain advantage from circadian control.

  13. A prospective study of pre-trauma risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, J; Smith, K V; Thompson, E; Béar, F; Lommen, M J J; Ehlers, A

    2016-09-01

    It is unclear which potentially modifiable risk factors best predict post-trauma psychiatric disorders. We aimed to identify pre-trauma risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or major depression (MD) that could be targeted with resilience interventions. Newly recruited paramedics (n = 453) were assessed for history of mental disorders with structured clinical interviews within the first week of their paramedic training and completed self-report measures to assess hypothesized predictors. Participants were assessed every 4 months for 2 years to identify any episodes of PTSD and MD; 386 paramedics (85.2%) participated in the follow-up interviews. In all, 32 participants (8.3%) developed an episode of PTSD and 41 (10.6%) an episode of MD during follow-up. In all but nine cases (2.3%), episodes had remitted by the next assessment 4 months later. At 2 years, those with episodes of PTSD or MD during follow-up reported more days off work, poorer sleep, poorer quality of life, greater burn-out; and greater weight-gain for those with PTSD. In line with theories of PTSD and depression, analyses controlling for psychiatric and trauma history identified several pre-trauma predictors (cognitive styles, coping styles and psychological traits). Logistic regressions showed that rumination about memories of stressful events at the start of training uniquely predicted an episode of PTSD. Perceived resilience uniquely predicted an episode of MD. Participants at risk of developing episodes of PTSD or depression could be identified within the first week of paramedic training. Cognitive predictors of episodes of PTSD and MD are promising targets for resilience interventions.

  14. Prolonged hypoxia increases survival even in Zebrafish (Danio rerio showing cardiac arrhythmia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Kopp

    Full Text Available Tolerance towards hypoxia is highly pronounced in zebrafish. In this study even beneficial effects of hypoxia, specifically enhanced survival of zebrafish larvae, could be demonstrated. This effect was actually more pronounced in breakdance mutants, which phenotypically show cardiac arrhythmia. Breakdance mutants (bre are characterized by chronically reduced cardiac output. Despite an about 50% heart rate reduction, they become adults, but survival rate significantly drops to 40%. Normoxic bre animals demonstrate increased hypoxia inducible factor 1 a (Hif-1α expression, which indicates an activated hypoxic signaling pathway. Consequently, cardiovascular acclimation, like cardiac hypertrophy and increased erythrocyte concentration, occurs. Thus, it was hypothesized, that under hypoxic conditions survival might be even more reduced. When bre mutants were exposed to hypoxic conditions, they surprisingly showed higher survival rates than under normoxic conditions and even reached wildtype values. In hypoxic wildtype zebrafish, survival yet exceeded normoxic control values. To specify physiological acclimation, cardiovascular and metabolic parameters were measured before hypoxia started (3 dpf, when the first differences in survival rate occurred (7 dpf and when survival rate plateaued (15 dpf. Hypoxic animals expectedly demonstrated Hif-1α accumulation and consequently enhanced convective oxygen carrying capacity. Moreover, bre animals showed a significantly enhanced heart rate under hypoxic conditions, which reached normoxic wildtype values. This improvement in convective oxygen transport ensured a sufficient oxygen and nutrient supply and was also reflected in the significantly higher mitochondrial activity. The highly optimized energy metabolism observed in hypoxic zebrafish larvae might be decisive for periods of higher energy demand due to organ development, growth and increased activity. However, hypoxia increased survival only during a

  15. Increasing Winter Maximal Metabolic Rate Improves Intrawinter Survival in Small Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Magali; Clavijo-Baquet, Sabrina; Vézina, François

    Small resident bird species living at northern latitudes increase their metabolism in winter, and this is widely assumed to improve their chances of survival. However, the relationship between winter metabolic performance and survival has yet to be demonstrated. Using capture-mark-recapture, we followed a population of free-living black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) over 3 yr and evaluated their survival probability within and among winters. We also measured the size-independent body mass (M s ), hematocrit (Hct), basal metabolic rate (BMR), and maximal thermogenic capacity (Msum) and investigated how these parameters influenced survival within and among winters. Results showed that survival probability was high and constant both within (0.92) and among (0.96) winters. They also showed that while M s , Hct, and BMR had no significant influence, survival was positively related to Msum-following a sigmoid relationship-within but not among winter. Birds expressing an Msum below 1.26 W (i.e., similar to summer levels) had a winter. Our data therefore suggest that black-capped chickadees that are either too slow or unable to adjust their phenotype from summer to winter have little chances of survival and thus that seasonal upregulation of metabolic performance is highly beneficial. This study is the first to document in an avian system the relationship between thermogenic capacity and winter survival, a proxy of fitness.

  16. Increased Lymph Node Yield Is Associated with Improved Survival in Rectal Cancer Irrespective of Neoadjuvant Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jakob; Jess, Per; Roikjaer, Ole

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that the lymph node yield achieved during rectal cancer resection is associated with survival. It is debated whether a high lymph node yield improves survival, per se, or whether it does so by diminishing the International Union Against Cancer stage drifting effect....... OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic implications of the lymph node yield in curative resected rectal cancer. DESIGN: This study was based on data from a prospectively maintained colorectal cancer database. SETTINGS: This was a national cohort study. PATIENTS: All 6793...... are associations rather than causal relationships. CONCLUSIONS: Increased lymph node yield was associated with better overall survival in rectal cancer, irrespective of neoadjuvant treatment. Stage migration was observed....

  17. Extracorporeal Life Support Increases Survival After Prolonged Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, Ingrid Anna Maria; Ettl, Florian; Schober, Andreas; Warenits, Alexandra-Maria; Grassmann, Daniel; Wagner, Michael; Schriefl, Christoph; Clodi, Christian; Teubenbacher, Ursula; Högler, Sandra; Weihs, Wolfgang; Sterz, Fritz; Janata, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may increase end organ perfusion and thus survival when conventional CPR fails. The aim was to investigate, if after ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest in rodents ECLS improves outcome compared with conventional CPR. In 24 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (460-510 g) resuscitation was started after 10 min of no-flow with ECLS (consisting of an open reservoir, roller pump, and membrane oxygenator, connected to cannulas in the jugular vein and femoral artery, n = 8) or CPR (mechanical chest compressions plus ventilations, n = 8) and compared with a sham group (n = 8). After return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), all rats were maintained at 33°C for 12 h. Survival to 14 days, neurologic deficit scores and overall performance categories were assessed. ECLS leads to sustained ROSC in 8 of 8 (100%) and neurological intact survival to 14 days in 7 of 8 rats (88%), compared with 5 of 8 (63%) and 1 of 8 CPR rats. The median survival time was 14 days (IQR: 14-14) in the ECLS and 1 day (IQR: 0 to 5) for the CPR group (P = 0.004). In a rat model of prolonged ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest, ECLS with mild hypothermia produces 100% resuscitability and 88% long-term survival, significantly better than conventional CPR.

  18. Combined cisplatin and aurora inhibitor treatment increase neuroblastoma cell death but surviving cells overproduce BDNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Polacchini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistance to chemotherapics in aggressive neuroblastoma (NB is characterized by enhanced cell survival mediated by TrkB and its ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; thus reduction in BDNF levels represent a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance, but how chemotherapics regulate BDNF is unknown. Here, cisplatin treatment in SK-N-BE neuroblastoma upregulated multiple BDNF transcripts, except exons 5 and 8 variants. Cisplatin increased BDNF mRNA and protein, and enhanced translation of a firefly reporter gene flanked by BDNF 5′UTR exons 1, 2c, 4 or 6 and 3′UTR-long. To block BDNF translation we focused on aurora kinases inhibitors which are proposed as new chemotherapeutics. NB cell survival after 24 h treatment was 43% with cisplatin, and 22% by cisplatin+aurora kinase inhibitor PHA-680632, while the aurora kinases inhibitor alone was less effective; however the combined treatment induced a paradoxical increase of BDNF in surviving cells with strong translational activation of exon6-3′UTR-long transcript, while translation of BDNF transcripts 1, 2C and 4 was suppressed. In conclusion, combined cisplatin and aurora kinase inhibitor treatment increases cell death, but induces BDNF overproduction in surviving cells through an aurora kinase-independent mechanism.

  19. Human and Autologous Adipose-derived Stromal Cells Increase Flap Survival in Rats Independently of Host Immune Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline

    2018-01-01

    evaluated after 7 days. RESULTS: The mean survival rates for SVF treatment regardless of human or autologous origin were significantly increased as compared with the control group. Adipose stem/stromal cell and SVF lysate injection did not increase flap survival. Vessel density was increased for human...... injections lead to increased vessel density, but it did not necessarily lead to increased flap survival. Further research should elaborate which molecular events make SVF treatment more efficacious than ASC....

  20. Aromatase expression increases the survival and malignancy of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keya De Mukhopadhyay

    Full Text Available In postmenopausal women, local estrogen produced by adipose stromal cells in the breast is believed to support estrogen receptor alpha (ERα positive breast cancer cell survival and growth. This raises the question of how the ERα positive metastatic breast cancer cells survive after they enter blood and lymph circulation, where estrogen level is very low in postmenopausal women. In this study, we show that the aromatase expression increased when ERα positive breast cancer cells were cultured in suspension. Furthermore, treatment with the aromatase substrate, testosterone, inhibited suspension culture-induced apoptosis whereas an aromatase inhibitor attenuated the effect of testosterone suggesting that suspended circulating ERα positive breast cancer cells may up-regulate intracrine estrogen activity for survival. Consistent with this notion, a moderate level of ectopic aromatase expression rendered a non-tumorigenic ERα positive breast cancer cell line not only tumorigenic but also metastatic in female nude mice without exogenous estrogen supplementation. The increased malignant phenotype was confirmed to be due to aromatase expression as the growth of orthotopic tumors regressed with systemic administration of an aromatase inhibitor. Thus, our study provides experimental evidence that aromatase plays an important role in the survival of metastatic ERα breast cancer cells by suppressing anoikis.

  1. Plasmodium Parasitemia Associated With Increased Survival in Ebola Virus-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenke, Kyle; Adjemian, Jennifer; Munster, Vincent J; Marzi, Andrea; Falzarano, Darryl; Onyango, Clayton O; Ochieng, Melvin; Juma, Bonventure; Fischer, Robert J; Prescott, Joseph B; Safronetz, David; Omballa, Victor; Owuor, Collins; Hoenen, Thomas; Groseth, Allison; Martellaro, Cynthia; van Doremalen, Neeltje; Zemtsova, Galina; Self, Joshua; Bushmaker, Trenton; McNally, Kristin; Rowe, Thomas; Emery, Shannon L; Feldmann, Friederike; Williamson, Brandi N; Best, Sonja M; Nyenswah, Tolbert G; Grolla, Allen; Strong, James E; Kobinger, Gary; Bolay, Fatorma K; Zoon, Kathryn C; Stassijns, Jorgen; Giuliani, Ruggero; de Smet, Martin; Nichol, Stuart T; Fields, Barry; Sprecher, Armand; Massaquoi, Moses; Feldmann, Heinz; de Wit, Emmie

    2016-10-15

    The ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa has resulted in 28 646 suspected, probable, and confirmed Ebola virus infections. Nevertheless, malaria remains a large public health burden in the region affected by the outbreak. A joint Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institutes of Health diagnostic laboratory was established in Monrovia, Liberia, in August 2014, to provide laboratory diagnostics for Ebola virus. All blood samples from suspected Ebola virus-infected patients admitted to the Médecins Sans Frontières ELWA3 Ebola treatment unit in Monrovia were tested by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for the presence of Ebola virus and Plasmodium species RNA. Clinical outcome in laboratory-confirmed Ebola virus-infected patients was analyzed as a function of age, sex, Ebola viremia, and Plasmodium species parasitemia. The case fatality rate of 1182 patients with laboratory-confirmed Ebola virus infections was 52%. The probability of surviving decreased with increasing age and decreased with increasing Ebola viral load. Ebola virus-infected patients were 20% more likely to survive when Plasmodium species parasitemia was detected, even after controlling for Ebola viral load and age; those with the highest levels of parasitemia had a survival rate of 83%. This effect was independent of treatment with antimalarials, as this was provided to all patients. Moreover, treatment with antimalarials did not affect survival in the Ebola virus mouse model. Plasmodium species parasitemia is associated with an increase in the probability of surviving Ebola virus infection. More research is needed to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this remarkable phenomenon and translate it into treatment options for Ebola virus infection. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Variation in dicer gene is associated with increased survival in T-cell lymphoma.

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    Xi Li

    Full Text Available Dicer, an endonuclease in RNase III family, is essential for the RNA interference (RNAi pathway. Aberrant expression of Dicer has been shown in various cancers including some subtypes of T cell lymphoma (TCL, which influences patient prognosis. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs3742330A>G has been identified in the Dicer gene, located in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR that is important for mRNA transcript stability. We investigated whether rs3742330 is associated with the survival in 163 TCL patients. Significant association between Dicer rs3742330 and TCL survival were found. Patients carrying the GG genotype (n = 12 had a significantly increased overall survival (OS compared with those carrying the GA and AA genotypes (n = 70 and n = 81, respectively; p = 0.031. Moreover, the significant association was maintained for patients with mature T type (n = 134; p = 0.026. In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, rs3742330 proved to be an independent predictor for OS, together with the commonly used International Prognostic Index (IPI and BAFF rs9514828, another SNP we have previously reported to be associated with TCL survival, with hazard ratios (HRs for patient death rate of 8.956 (95% CI, 1.210 to 66.318; p = 0.032 for the GA genotype and 10.145 (95% CI, 1.371 to 75.084; p = 0.023 for the AA genotype. Furthermore, we observed cumulative effects of Dicer rs3742330 and BAFF rs9514828 on TCL survival. Compared with patients carrying zero unfavorable genotype, those carrying one and two unfavorable genotypes had an increased risk of death with a HR of 7.104 (95% CI, 0.969-53.086; p = 0.054 and 14.932 (95% CI, 1.950-114.354; p = 0.009, respectively, with a significant dose-response trend (p(trend  = 0.004. In conclusion, Dicer rs3742330 is associated with TCL survival, suggesting that genetic variation might play a role in predicting prognosis of TCL patients.

  3. L-carnitine increases survival in a murine model of severe verapamil toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Eric; Chu, Jason; Bania, Theodore; Medlej, Kamal

    2011-11-01

    L-carnitine is an essential compound involved in cellular energy production through free fatty acid metabolism. It has been theorized that severe verapamil toxicity "shifts" heart energy production away from free fatty acids and toward other sources, contributing to profound cardiogenic shock. The primary study objective was to determine whether intravenous (IV) L-carnitine affects survival in severe verapamil toxicity. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects on hemodynamic parameters. The authors hypothesized that IV L-carnitine would increase both survival and hemodynamic parameters in severe verapamil toxicity. This was a controlled, blinded animal investigation. Sixteen male rats were anesthetized, ventilated, and instrumented to record mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate. Verapamil toxicity was achieved by a constant infusion of 5 mg/kg/hr. After 5 minutes a bolus of 50 mg/kg of either L-carnitine or normal saline was given. The experiment concluded when either 10% of baseline MAP was achieved or 150 minutes had elapsed. The data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis, log rank test, and analysis of variance. The median survival for the animals in the L-carnitine group was 140.75 minutes (interquartile range [IQR] = 98.6 to 150 minutes), and for those in the normal saline group it was 49.19 minutes (IQR = 39.02 to 70.97 minutes; p = 0.0001). At 15 minutes the MAP was 20.45 mm Hg greater in the animals in the L-carnitine group than in the animals in the normal saline group (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.25 to 40.65; p = 0.047). When compared with saline, IV L-carnitine increases survival and MAP in a murine model of severe verapamil toxicity. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. Measles Vaccination Supports Millennium Development Goal 4: Increasing Coverage and Increasing Child Survival in Northern Ghana, 1996-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welaga, Paul; Hodgson, Abraham; Debpuur, Cornelius; Aaby, Peter; Binka, Fred; Azongo, Daniel; Oduro, Abraham

    2018-01-01

    Measles vaccine (MV) administered as the last vaccine after the third dose of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) may be associated with better child survival unrelated to prevention of measles infection. Other studies have shown that MV administered after DTP was more beneficial and was associated with lower mortality compared with DTP administered after MV or DTP administered simultaneously with MV. We compared the difference in mortality between measles vaccinated after DTP3 and measles-unvaccinated children in Navrongo, Ghana. This was a follow-up study involving annual cohort of children aged 9-23 months from 1996 to 2012. We assessed survival in relation to the measles vaccination status within the first 12 months from interview date and until 5 years of age using Cox proportional hazards models. In all, 38,333 children were included in the study. The proportion of children vaccinated with MV-after-DTP3 increased from 45% in 1996 to 95% in 2012. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for measles unvaccinated compared with MV-after-DTP3 vaccinated children was 1.38 (1.15-1.66) in the first 12 months after assessment of vaccination status and 1.22 (1.05-1.41) with follow-up to 5 years of age. The national immunization days campaigns with oral polio vaccine or MV might have reduced the effect of being MV-after-DTP3 vaccinated vs MV-unvaccinated. For 12 months of follow-up, the HR before a campaign for MV-unvaccinated children was 1.63 (1.23-2.17) compared to those who received MV-after-DTP3. After the campaign, the HR reduced to 1.23 (0.97-1.54). Stratifying the analysis by sex, measles-unvaccinated boys had a HR of 1.69 (1.33-2.61) compared to measles-unvaccinated girls who had a HR 1.06 (0.79-1.40) during 1-year follow-up. In 1989, only 7% of children in the area had received MV-after-DTP3; the increase in MV-after-DTP3 coverage from 1989 to 2012 may have lowered mortality rate among children aged 9 months to 3 years by 24%. Though an observational

  5. Protein kinase G1 α overexpression increases stem cell survival and cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Wang

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that overexpression of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type 1α (PKG1α could mimic the effect of tadalafil on the survival of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs contributing to regeneration of the ischemic heart.MSCs from male rats were transduced with adenoviral vector encoding for PKG1α ((PKG1αMSCs.Controls included native MSCs ((NatMSCs and MSCs transduced with an empty vector ((NullMSCs. PKG1α activity was increased approximately 20, 5 and 16 fold respectively in (PKG1αMSCs. (PKG1αMSCs showed improved survival under oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD which was evidenced by lower LDH release, caspase-3/7 activity and number of positive TUNEL cells. Anti-apoptotic proteins pAkt, pGSK3β, and Bcl-2 were significantly increased in (PKG1αMSCs compared to (NatMSCs and (NullMSCs. Higher release of multiple prosurvival and angiogenic factors such as HGF, bFGF, SDF-1 and Ang-1 was observed in (PKG1αMSCs before and after OGD. In a female rat model of acute myocardial infarction, (PKG1αMSCs group showed higher survival compared with (NullMSCs group at 3 and 7 days after transplantation as determined by TUNEL staining and sry-gene quantitation by real-time PCR. Increased anti-apoptotic proteins and paracrine factors in vitro were also identified. Immunostaining for cardiac troponin I combined with GFP showed increased myogenic differentiation of (PKG1αMSCs. At 4 weeks after transplantation, compared to DMEM group and (NullMSCs group, (PKG1αMSCs group showed increased blood vessel density in infarct and peri-infarct areas (62.5±7.7; 68.8±7.3 per microscopic view, p<0.05 and attenuated infarct size (27.2±2.5%, p<0.01. Heart function indices including ejection fraction (52.1±2.2%, p<0.01 and fractional shortening (24.8%±1.3%, p<0.01 were improved significantly in (PKG1αMSCs group.Overexpression of PKG1α transgene could be a powerful approach to improve MSCs survival and their angiomyogenic potential in the

  6. Inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 enhances endochondral bone formation by increasing chondrocyte survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, G J; Zhang, Q-S; Diallo, C; Matsuzawa, A; Ichijo, H; Steinbeck, M J; Freeman, T A

    2014-01-01

    Endochondral ossification is the result of chondrocyte differentiation, hypertrophy, death and replacement by bone. The careful timing and progression of this process is important for normal skeletal bone growth and development, as well as fracture repair. Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is activated by reactive oxygen species and other cellular stress events. Activation of ASK1 initiates a signaling cascade known to regulate diverse cellular events including cytokine and growth factor signaling, cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation, hypertrophy, survival and apoptosis. ASK1 is highly expressed in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but the role of ASK1 in skeletal tissues has not been investigated. Herein, we report that ASK1 knockout (KO) mice display alterations in normal growth plate morphology, which include a shorter proliferative zone and a lengthened hypertrophic zone. These changes in growth plate dynamics result in accelerated long bone mineralization and an increased formation of trabecular bone, which can be attributed to an increased resistance of terminally differentiated chondrocytes to undergo cell death. Interestingly, under normal cell culture conditions, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from ASK1 KO mice show no differences in either MAPK signaling or osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation when compared with wild-type (WT) MEFs. However, when cultured with stress activators, H2O2 or staurosporine, the KO cells show enhanced survival, an associated decrease in the activation of proteins involved in death signaling pathways and a reduction in markers of terminal differentiation. Furthermore, in both WT mice treated with the ASK1 inhibitor, NQDI-1, and ASK1 KO mice endochondral bone formation was increased in an ectopic ossification model. These findings highlight a previously unrealized role for ASK1 in regulating endochondral bone formation. Inhibition of ASK1 has

  7. Recombinant human erythropoietin increases survival and reduces neuronal apoptosis in a murine model of cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Lothar; Hempel, Casper; Penkowa, Milena

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM) is an acute encephalopathy with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes and localized ischaemia. In children CM induces cognitive impairment in about 10% of the survivors. Erythropoietin (Epo) has - besides of its well known...... with recombinant human Epo (rhEpo; 50-5000 U/kg/OD, i.p.) at different time points. The effect on survival was measured. Brain pathology was investigated by TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-digoxigenin nick end labelling), as a marker of apoptosis. Gene...

  8. Diabetic foot reconstruction using free flaps increases 5-year-survival rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae Suk; Lee, Ho Seung; Hong, Joon Pio

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of the diabetic foot reconstructed with free flaps and analyse the preoperative risk factors. This study reviews 121 cases of reconstructed diabetic foot in 113 patients over 9 years (average follow-up of 53.2 months). Patients' age ranged from 26 to 78 years (average, 54.6 years). Free flaps used were anterolateral thigh (ALT, 90), superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP, 20), anteromedial thigh (AMT, 5), upper medial thigh (UMT, 3), and other perforator free flaps (3). Correlation between the surgical outcome and preoperative risk factors were analysed using logistic regression model. Total loss was seen in 10 cases and 111 free-tissue transfers were successful (flap survival rate of 91.7%). During follow-up, limb was eventually lost in 17 patients and overall limb salvage rate was 84.9% and the 5-year survival was 86.8%. Correlation between flap loss and 14 preoperative risk factors (computed tomography (CT) angiogram showing intact numbers of major vessels, history of previous angioplasty, peripheral arterial disease (PAD), heart problem, chronic renal failure (CRF), American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification system, smoking, body mass index (BMI), HBA1c, lymphocyte count, ankle-brachial index (ABI), osteomyelitis, C-reactive protein (CRP) level and whether taking immunosuppressive agents) were analysed. Significant odds ratio were seen in patients who underwent lower extremity angioplasties (odds ratio: 17.590, pDiabetic foot reconstruction using free flaps has a high chance for success and significantly increases the 5-year survival rate. Risk factors such as PAD, history of angioplasties in the extremity and using immunosuppressive agents after transplant may increase the chance for flap loss. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ciprofloxacin Derivatives Affect Parasite Cell Division and Increase the Survival of Mice Infected with Toxoplasma gondii.

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    Erica S Martins-Duarte

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis, caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, is a worldwide disease whose clinical manifestations include encephalitis and congenital malformations in newborns. Previously, we described the synthesis of new ethyl-ester derivatives of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin with ~40-fold increased activity against T. gondii in vitro, compared with the original compound. Cipro derivatives are expected to target the parasite's DNA gyrase complex in the apicoplast. The activity of these compounds in vivo, as well as their mode of action, remained thus far uncharacterized. Here, we examined the activity of the Cipro derivatives in vivo, in a model of acute murine toxoplasmosis. In addition, we investigated the cellular effects T. gondii tachyzoites in vitro, by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. When compared with Cipro treatment, 7-day treatments with Cipro derivatives increased mouse survival significantly, with 13-25% of mice surviving for up to 60 days post-infection (vs. complete lethality 10 days post-infection, with Cipro treatment. Light microscopy examination early (6 and 24h post-infection revealed that 6-h treatments with Cipro derivatives inhibited the initial event of parasite cell division inside host cells, in an irreversible manner. By TEM and immunofluorescence, the main cellular effects observed after treatment with Cipro derivatives and Cipro were cell scission inhibition--with the appearance of 'tethered' parasites--malformation of the inner membrane complex, and apicoplast enlargement and missegregation. Interestingly, tethered daughter cells resulting from Cipro derivatives, and also Cipro, treatment did not show MORN1 cap or centrocone localization. The biological activity of Cipro derivatives against C. parvum, an apicomplexan species that lacks the apicoplast, is, approximately, 50 fold lower than that in T. gondii tachyzoites, supporting that these compounds targets the apicoplast. Our results

  10. Measles Vaccination Supports Millennium Development Goal 4: Increasing Coverage and Increasing Child Survival in Northern Ghana, 1996–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Welaga

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMeasles vaccine (MV administered as the last vaccine after the third dose of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP may be associated with better child survival unrelated to prevention of measles infection. Other studies have shown that MV administered after DTP was more beneficial and was associated with lower mortality compared with DTP administered after MV or DTP administered simultaneously with MV. We compared the difference in mortality between measles vaccinated after DTP3 and measles-unvaccinated children in Navrongo, Ghana.MethodsThis was a follow-up study involving annual cohort of children aged 9–23 months from 1996 to 2012. We assessed survival in relation to the measles vaccination status within the first 12 months from interview date and until 5 years of age using Cox proportional hazards models.ResultsIn all, 38,333 children were included in the study. The proportion of children vaccinated with MV-after-DTP3 increased from 45% in 1996 to 95% in 2012. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR for measles unvaccinated compared with MV-after-DTP3 vaccinated children was 1.38 (1.15–1.66 in the first 12 months after assessment of vaccination status and 1.22 (1.05–1.41 with follow-up to 5 years of age. The national immunization days campaigns with oral polio vaccine or MV might have reduced the effect of being MV-after-DTP3 vaccinated vs MV-unvaccinated. For 12 months of follow-up, the HR before a campaign for MV-unvaccinated children was 1.63 (1.23–2.17 compared to those who received MV-after-DTP3. After the campaign, the HR reduced to 1.23 (0.97–1.54. Stratifying the analysis by sex, measles-unvaccinated boys had a HR of 1.69 (1.33–2.61 compared to measles-unvaccinated girls who had a HR 1.06 (0.79–1.40 during 1-year follow-up. In 1989, only 7% of children in the area had received MV-after-DTP3; the increase in MV-after-DTP3 coverage from 1989 to 2012 may have lowered mortality rate among children aged 9 months to

  11. Conditionally replicating adenovirus expressing TIMP2 increases survival in a mouse model of disseminated ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry W Yang

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer remains difficult to treat mainly due to presentation of the disease at an advanced stage. Conditionally-replicating adenoviruses (CRAds are promising anti-cancer agents that selectively kill the tumor cells. The present study evaluated the efficacy of a novel CRAd (Ad5/3-CXCR4-TIMP2 containing the CXCR4 promoter for selective viral replication in cancer cells together with TIMP2 as a therapeutic transgene, targeting the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs in a murine orthotopic model of disseminated ovarian cancer. An orthotopic model of ovarian cancer was established in athymic nude mice by intraperitonal injection of the human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3-Luc, expressing luciferase. Upon confirmation of peritoneal dissemination of the cells by non-invasive imaging, mice were randomly divided into four treatment groups: PBS, Ad-ΔE1-TIMP2, Ad5/3-CXCR4, and Ad5/3-CXCR4-TIMP2. All mice were imaged weekly to monitor tumor growth and were sacrificed upon reaching any of the predefined endpoints, including high tumor burden and significant weight loss along with clinical evidence of pain and distress. Survival analysis was performed using the Log-rank test. The median survival for the PBS cohort was 33 days; for Ad-ΔE1-TIMP2, 39 days; for Ad5/3-CXCR4, 52.5 days; and for Ad5/3-CXCR4-TIMP2, 63 days. The TIMP2-armed CRAd delayed tumor growth and significantly increased survival when compared to the unarmed CRAd. This therapeutic effect was confirmed to be mediated through inhibition of MMP9. Results of the in vivo study support the translational potential of Ad5/3-CXCR4-TIMP2 for treatment of human patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

  12. Evaluation of medical treatments to increase survival of ebullism in guinea pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, Barbara J.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.; Wolf, E. G.; Derion, Toniann; Fanton, J. W.; Davis, H.; Kemper, G. B.; Scoggins, Terrell E.

    1993-01-01

    Spaceflight carriers run a constant risk of exposure to vacuum. Above 63,000 ft (47 mmHg), the ambient pressure falls below the vapor pressure of water at 37 C, and tissue vaporization (ebullism) begins. Little is know about appropriate resuscitative protocols after such an ebullism exposure. This study identified injury patterns and mortality rates associated with ebullism while verifying effectiveness of traditional pulmonary resuscitative techniques. Male Hartley guinea pigs were exposed to 87,000 ft for periods of 40 to 115 sec. After descent, those animals that did not breathe spontaneously were given artificial ventilation by bag and mask for up to 15 minutes. Those animals surviving were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups--hyperbaric oxygen (HBO), ground-level oxygen (GLO2), and ground-level air (GLAIR). The HBO group was treated on a standard treatment table 6A while the GLO2 animals received O2 for an equivalent length of time. Those animals in the GLAIR group were observed only. All surviving animals were humanely sacrified at 48 hours. Inflation of the animal's lungs after the exposure was found to be difficult and, at times, impossible. This may be due to surfactant disruption at the alveolar lining. Electron microscopy identified a disruption of the surfactant layer in animals that did not survive initial exposure. Mortality was found to increase with exposure time: 40 sec--0 percent; 60 sec--6 percent; 70 sec--40 percent; 80 sec--13 percent; 100 sec--38 percent; 110 sec--40 percent; and 115 sec--100 percent. There was no difference in the delayed mortality among the treatment groups (HBO--15 percent, GLO2--11 percent, GLAIR--11 percent). However, since resuscitation was ineffective, the effectiveness of any post-exposure treatment was severely limited. Preliminary results indicate that reuscitation of guinea pigs following ebullism exposure is difficult, and that current techniques (such as traditional CPR) may not be appropriate.

  13. Adaptive Memory: Survival Processing Increases Both True and False Memory in Adults and Children

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    Otgaar, Henry; Smeets, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that processing information in a survival context can enhance the information's memorability. The current study examined whether survival processing can also decrease the susceptibility to false memories and whether the survival advantage can be found in children. In Experiment 1, adults rated semantically related words in a…

  14. Rutin increases neural crest stem cell survival against damage caused by aflatoxin B1

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    Jader Nones

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2015v28n4p1 The neural crest (NC corresponds to a collection of multipotent and oligopotent progenitors endowed with both neural and mesenchymal potential. The derivatives of the NC at the trunk level include neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, melanocytes, smooth muscle cells and some endocrine cells. The present work investigated, for the first time, the influence of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 and the flavonoid rutin on the survival and proliferation of NC and NC-derived melanocytes. Quail NC cell cultures were treated with AFB1 (30 μM and/or rutin (20 μM for 6 days. Cell viability was assessed by MTT and trypan blue analyses and cell proliferation by BrdU staining. Melanocytes were identified by immunocytochemistry against the melanocyte-specific cellular marker MelEM. The AFB1 treatment decreased both NC cell viability and proliferation. The total number of MelEM-positive cells was also reduced after this treatment, an effect partially prevented by the addition of rutin. On the other hand, rutin added alone did not influence the NC cell population. Our results demonstrated that rutin increases the survival of the NC after damage caused by AFB1. However, additional studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms involved in AFB1 and rutin interactions.

  15. Increased beta1 integrin is associated with decreased survival in invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Evelyn S; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Lee, Brian; Chew, Karen; Moore, Dan; Park, Catherine

    2007-01-15

    Aberrant microenvironments and loss of balance in cell-extracellular matrix signaling are associated with breast cancer invasion, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. We have recently shown that increased beta1 integrin signaling is involved in malignant progression and that inhibitory antibody to beta1 integrin leads to selective apoptosis and decreased proliferation in three-dimensional cultures and in xenograft models of breast cancer in vivo. To investigate the clinical importance of these findings, in the present study we examined the expression of beta1 integrin and extracellular beta1 integrin ligands fibronectin and laminin-1 in a cohort of 249 breast cancer patients who had a median follow-up of 8.4 years. Among the 149 scorable cases, the highest beta1 integrin intensity score (3+ versus 0-2+) was associated with significantly decreased 10-year overall survival of 48% versus 71% (Pintegrin intensity score was significantly correlated with fibronectin expression (Kendall's tau-b=0.19; P=0.03). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, beta1 integrin intensity score remained a significant independent predictor of overall survival [hazard ratio (HR), 1.69; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.19-2.38; Pintegrin expression has potential prognostic value in invasive breast cancer and that coexpression of fibronectin may help identify patients with more aggressive tumors who may benefit from targeted therapy.

  16. Free Base Lysine Increases Survival and Reduces Metastasis in Prostate Cancer Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; de Lourdes Coelho Ribeiro, Maria; Estrella, Veronica; Bailey, Kate M; Cornnell, Heather H; Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J

    2011-11-19

    Malignant tumor cells typically metabolize glucose anaerobically to lactic acid even under normal oxygen tension, a phenomenon called aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. This results in increased acid production and the acidification of the extracellular microenvironment in solid tumors. H + ions tend to flow along concentration gradients into peritumoral normal tissue causing extracellular matrix degradation and increased tumor cell motility thus promoting invasion and metastasis. We have shown that reducing this acidity with sodium bicarbonate buffer decreases the metastatic fitness of circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer and other cancer models. Mathematical models of the tumor-host dynamics predicted that buffers with a pka around 7 will be more effective in reducing intra- and peri-tumoral acidosis and, thus, and possibly more effective in inhibiting tumor metastasis than sodium bicarbonate which has a pKa around 6. Here we test this prediction the efficacy of free base lysine; a non-bicarbonate/non-volatile buffer with a higher pKa (~10), on prostate tumor metastases model. Oxygen consumption and acid production rate of PC3M prostate cancer cells and normal prostate cells were determined using the Seahorse Extracellular Flux (XF-96) analyzer. In vivo effect of 200 mM lysine started four days prior to inoculation on inhibition of metastasis was examined in PC3M-LUC-C6 prostate cancer model using SCID mice. Metastases were followed by bioluminescence imaging. PC3M prostate cancer cells are highly acidic in comparison to a normal prostate cell line indicating that reduction of intra- and perit-tumoral acidosis should inhibit metastases formation. In vivo administration of 200 mM free base lysine increased survival and reduced metastasis. PC3M prostate cancer cells are highly glycolytic and produce large amounts of acid when compared to normal prostate cells. Administration of non-volatile buffer decreased growth of metastases and improved survival

  17. Splenectomy increases the survival time of heart allograft via developing immune tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The spleen is an active lymphoid organ. The effect of splenectomy on the immune response remains unclear. This study investigated whether splenectomy can induce immune tolerance and has a beneficial role in cardiac allograft. Methods Wistar rats were used for heart donors. The Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats designated as the recipients of heart transplantation (HT) were randomly assigned into four groups: sham, splenectomy, HT, splenectomy + HT. The survival of transplanted hearts was assessed by daily checking of abdominal palpation. At various time points after transplantation, the transplanted hearts were collected and histologically examined; the level of CD4+CD25+ T regulatory lymphocytes (Tregs) and rate of lymphocyte apoptosis (annexin-v+ PI+ cells) in the blood were analyzed by using flow cytometric method. Results 1) Splenectomy significantly prolonged the mean survival time of heart allografts (7 ± 1.1 days and 27 ± 1.5 days for HT and splenectomy + HT, respectively; n = 12-14/group, HT vs. splenectomy + HT, p Splenectomy delayed pathological changes (inflammatory cell infiltration, myocardial damage) of the transplanted hearts in splenectomy + HT rats; 3) The level of CD4+CD25+ Tregs in the blood of splenectomized rats was significantly increased within 7 days (2.4 ± 0.5%, 4.9 ± 1.3% and 5.3 ± 1.0% for sham, splenectomy and splenectomy + HT, respectively; n = 15/group, sham vs. splenectomy or splenectomy + HT, p splenectomy surgery and gradually decreased to baseline level; 4) Splenectomy increased the rate of lymphocyte apoptosis (day 7: 0.3 ± 0.05%, 3.9 ± 0.9% and 4.1 ± 0.9% for sham, splenectomy and splenectomy + HT, respectively; n = 15/group, sham vs. splenectomy or splenectomy + HT, p Splenectomy inhibits the development of pathology and prolongs the survival time of cardiac allograft. The responsible mechanism is associated with induction of immune

  18. Use of Preservative Agents and Antibiotics for Increased Poliovirus Survival on Positively Charged Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagnant, Christine Susan; Kossik, Alexandra Lynn; Zhou, Nicolette Angela; Sánchez-Gonzalez, Liliana; Falman, Jill Christin; Keim, Erika Karen; Linden, Yarrow; Scheibe, Alana; Barnes, Kilala Sayisha; Beck, Nicola Koren; Boyle, David S; Meschke, John Scott

    2017-12-01

    Environmental surveillance of poliovirus (PV) and other non-enveloped viruses can help identify silent circulation and is necessary to certify eradication. The bag-mediated filtration system is an efficient method to filter large volumes of environmental waters at field sites for monitoring the presence of viruses. As filters may require long transit times to off-site laboratories for processing, viral inactivation or overgrowth of bacteria and fungi can interfere with virus detection and quantification (Miki and Jacquet in Aquatic Microb Ecol 51(2):195-208, 2008). To evaluate virus survival over time on ViroCap ™ filters, the filters were seeded with PV type 1 (PV1) and/or MS2 and then dosed with preservatives or antibiotics prior to storage and elution. These filters were stored at various temperatures and time periods, and then eluted for PV1 and MS2 recovery quantification. Filters dosed with the preservative combination of 2% sodium benzoate and 0.2% calcium propionate had increased virus survival over time when stored at 25 °C, compared to samples stored at 25 °C with no preservatives. While elution within 24 h of filtration is recommended, if storage or shipping is required then this preservative mixture can help preserve sample integrity. Addition of an antibiotic cocktail containing cephapirin, gentamicin, and Proclin ™ 300 increased recovery after storage at 4 and 25 °C, when compared to storage with no antibiotics. The antibiotic cocktail can aid sample preservation if access to appropriate antibiotics storage is available and sample cold chain is unreliable. This study demonstrated that the use of preservatives or antibiotics is a simple, cost-effective method to improve virus detection from ViroCap cartridge filters over time.

  19. Itraconazole treatment reduces Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis prevalence and increases overwinter field survival in juvenile Cascades frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Bennett M; Pope, Karen L; Piovia-Scott, Jonah; Brown, Richard N; Foley, Janet E

    2015-01-15

    The global spread of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has led to widespread extirpation of amphibian populations. During an intervention aimed at stabilizing at-risk populations, we treated wild-caught Cascades frogs Rana cascadae with the antifungal drug itraconazole. In fall 2012, we collected 60 recently metamorphosed R. cascadae from 1 of the 11 remnant populations in the Cascades Mountains (CA, USA). Of these, 30 randomly selected frogs were treated with itraconazole and the other 30 frogs served as experimental controls; all were released at the capture site. Bd prevalence was low at the time of treatment and did not differ between treated frogs and controls immediately following treatment. Following release, Bd prevalence gradually increased in controls but not in treated frogs, with noticeable (but still non-significant) differences 3 wk after treatment (27% [4/15] vs. 0% [0/13]) and strong differences 5 wk after treatment (67% [8/12] vs. 13% [1/8]). We did not detect any differences in Bd prevalence and load between experimental controls and untreated wild frogs during this time period. In spring 2013, we recaptured 7 treated frogs but none of the experimental control frogs, suggesting that over-winter survival was higher for treated frogs. The itraconazole treatment did appear to reduce growth rates: treated frogs weighed 22% less than control frogs 3 wk after treatment (0.7 vs. 0.9 g) and were 9% shorter than control frogs 5 wk after treatment (18.4 vs. 20.2 mm). However, for critically small populations, increased survival of the most at-risk life stage could prevent or delay extinction. Our results show that itraconazole treatment can be effective against Bd infection in wild amphibians, and therefore the beneficial effects on survivorship may outweigh the detrimental effects on growth.

  20. Intermittent hypoxia selects for genotypes and phenotypes that increase survival, invasion, and therapy resistance.

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    Daniel Verduzco

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in tumors correlates with greater risk of metastases, increased invasiveness, and resistance to systemic and radiation therapy. The evolutionary dynamics that links specific adaptations to hypoxia with these observed tumor properties have not been well investigated. While some tumor populations may experience fixed hypoxia, cyclical and stochastic transitions from normoxia to hypoxia are commonly observed in vivo. Although some phenotypic adaptations to this cyclic hypoxia are likely reversible, we hypothesize that some adaptations may become fixed through mutations promoted by hypoxia-induced genomic instability. Here we seek to identify genetic alterations and corresponding stable phenotypes that emerge following cyclic hypoxia. Although these changes may originate as adaptations to this specific environmental stress, their fixation in the tumor genome may result in their observation in tumors from regions of normoxia, a condition known as pseudohypoxia. We exposed several epithelial cell lines to 50 cycles of hypoxia-normoxia, followed by culture in normoxia over a period of several months. Molecular analyses demonstrated permanent changes in expression of several oncogenes and tumor-suppressors, including p53, E-cadherin, and Hif-1α. These changes were associated with increased resistance to multiple cytotoxins, increased survival in hypoxia and increased anchorage-independent growth. These results suggest cycles of hypoxia encountered in early cancers can select for specific and stable genotypic and phenotypic properties that persist even in normoxic conditions, which may promote tumor progression and resistance to therapy.

  1. Biofilms Formed by Gram-Negative Bacteria Undergo Increased Lipid A Palmitoylation, Enhancing In Vivo Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalabaev, Sabina; Chauhan, Ashwini; Novikov, Alexey; Iyer, Pavithra; Szczesny, Magdalena; Beloin, Christophe; Caroff, Martine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial biofilm communities are associated with profound physiological changes that lead to novel properties compared to the properties of individual (planktonic) bacteria. The study of biofilm-associated phenotypes is an essential step toward control of deleterious effects of pathogenic biofilms. Here we investigated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structural modifications in Escherichia coli biofilm bacteria, and we showed that all tested commensal and pathogenic E. coli biofilm bacteria display LPS modifications corresponding to an increased level of incorporation of palmitate acyl chain (palmitoylation) into lipid A compared to planktonic bacteria. Genetic analysis showed that lipid A palmitoylation in biofilms is mediated by the PagP enzyme, which is regulated by the histone-like protein repressor H-NS and the SlyA regulator. While lipid A palmitoylation does not influence bacterial adhesion, it weakens inflammatory response and enhances resistance to some antimicrobial peptides. Moreover, we showed that lipid A palmitoylation increases in vivo survival of biofilm bacteria in a clinically relevant model of catheter infection, potentially contributing to biofilm tolerance to host immune defenses. The widespread occurrence of increased lipid A palmitoylation in biofilms formed by all tested bacteria suggests that it constitutes a new biofilm-associated phenotype in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25139899

  2. Greater mass increases annual survival of Prothonotary Warblers wintering in northeastern Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jared D. Wolfe; Matthew D. Johnson; C. John Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of survival of nearctic-neotropic migrants have broadened our understanding of life-history variation across taxa and latitudes. Despite the importance of assessing migrants' survival through all phases of their life-cycle, data from their tropical winter ranges are few. In this study we used 14 years of data on captured birds to quantify the influence...

  3. Can sorafenib increase survival for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, Angel E; Makris, Alexia; Nenos, Vasilios; Sucre, Eduardo; Arrobas, Jade; Franco, Edson; Kemmer, Nyingi

    2014-07-01

    Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a main detriment to long-term survival in liver transplants (LTx) for HCC. The study aims to review the use of sorafenib in recurrent HCC LTx in the Model End Stage Liver Disease era. Two hundred forty-seven patients with HCC LTx from 2002 to 2013 were included. Survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier (KM) method and Cox multivariate model. Twenty-two patients recurred (11%). By KM, overall survival was 27 months (standard deviation [SD], 3.2 months; median, 28.4 months). Mean time to recurrence was 16.9 months (SD, 2.8 months; median, 12 months). Nine patients were treated with sorafenib after recurrence. Median survival for sorafenib-treated patients was 42 months compared with a median of 16.2 months without sorafenib (-2 log likelihood ratio, P = 0.0582). By Cox, only sorafenib (P = 0.0233; hazard ratio, 8.528) and pathologic stage had a significant impact on survival. The recurrence rates of HCC LTx remain acceptable considering understaging and expansion of beyond Stage A. This pilot study of sorafenib in recurrent HCC demonstrates improved survival over historic controls. Many other factors affecting improved survival are explained. However, treatment remains palliative. Quality-of-life years and cost analysis need to be performed in this population.

  4. Continues administration of Nano-PSO significantly increased survival of genetic CJD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binyamin, Orli; Keller, Guy; Frid, Kati; Larush, Liraz; Magdassi, Shlomo; Gabizon, Ruth

    2017-12-01

    We have shown previously that Nano-PSO, a nanodroplet formulation of pomegranate seed oil, delayed progression of neurodegeneration signs when administered for a designated period of time to TgMHu2ME199K mice, modeling for genetic prion disease. In the present work, we treated these mice with a self-emulsion formulation of Nano-PSO or a parallel Soybean oil formulation from their day of birth until a terminal disease stage. We found that long term Nano-PSO administration resulted in increased survival of TgMHu2ME199K lines by several months. Interestingly, initiation of treatment at day 1 had no clinical advantage over initiation at day 70, however cessation of treatment at 9months of age resulted in the rapid loss of the beneficial clinical effect. Pathological studies revealed that treatment with Nano-PSO resulted in the reduction of GAG accumulation and lipid oxidation, indicating a strong neuroprotective effect. Contrarily, the clinical effect of Nano-PSO did not correlate with reduction in the levels of disease related PrP, the main prion marker. We conclude that long term administration of Nano-PSO is safe and may be effective in the prevention/delay of onset of neurodegenerative conditions such as genetic CJD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Sugar administration to newly emerged Aedes albopictus males increases their survival probability and mating performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Romeo; Puggioli, Arianna; Balestrino, Fabrizio; Brunelli, Paolo; Medici, Anna; Urbanelli, Sandra; Carrieri, Marco

    2014-04-01

    Aedes albopictus male survival in laboratory cages is no more than 4-5 days when kept without any access to sugar indicating their need to feed on a sugar source soon after emergence. We therefore developed a device to administer energetic substances to newly emerged males when released as pupae as part of a sterile insect technique (SIT) programme, made with a polyurethane sponge 4 cm thick and perforated with holes 2 cm in diameter. The sponge was imbibed with the required sugar solution and due to its high retention capacity the sugar solution was available for males to feed for at least 48 h. When evaluated in lab cages, comparing adults emerged from the device with sugar solution vs the device with water only (as negative control), about half of the males tested positive for fructose using the Van Handel anthrone test, compared to none of males in the control cage. We then tested the tool in semi-field and in field conditions with different sugar concentrations (10%, 15%, and 20%) and compared results to the controls fed with water only. Males were recaptured by a battery operated manual aspirator at 24 and 48 h after pupae release. Rather high share 10-25% of captured males tested positive for fructose in recollections in the vicinity of the control stations, while in the vicinity of the sugar stations around 40-55% of males were positive, though variability between replicates was large. The sugar positive males in the control test may have been released males that had access to natural sugar sources found close to the release station and/or wild males present in the environment. Only a slight increase in the proportion of positive males was obtained by increasing the sugar concentration in the feeding device from 10% to 20%. Surprisingly, modification of the device to add a black plastic inverted funnel above the container reduced rather than increased the proportion of fructose positive males collected around the station. No evidence of difference in the

  6. Outbreeding increases offspring survival in wild greater horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum).

    OpenAIRE

    Rossiter, S. J.; Jones, G.; Ransome, R. D.; Barratt, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    The factors influencing the survival of greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) offspring born over seven years at a maternity colony in south-west Britain were studied. The effects of a range of phenotypic and maternal variables were analysed using a historical data set. In addition, the influence of two genetic measures on mortality, individual heterozygosity and a new measure of outbreeding, termed mean d(2), was assessed. Logistic regressions were undertaken with survival modell...

  7. Aggressive Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Increases Survival: A Scandinavian Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Watten Brudvik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We examined overall and disease-free survivals in a cohort of patients subjected to resection of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRLM in a 10-year period when new treatment strategies were implemented. Methods. Data from 239 consecutive patients selected for liver resection of CRLM during the period from 2002 to 2011 at a single center were used to estimate overall and disease-free survival. The results were assessed against new treatment strategies and established risk factors. Results. The 5-year cumulative overall and disease-free survivals were 46 and 24%. The overall survival was the same after reresection, independently of the number of prior resections and irrespectively of the location of the recurrent disease. The time intervals between each recurrence were similar (11 ± 1 months. Patients with high tumor load given neoadjuvant chemotherapy had comparable survival to those with less extensive disease without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Positive resection margin or resectable extrahepatic disease did not affect overall survival. Conclusion. Our data support that one still, and perhaps to an even greater extent, should seek an aggressive therapeutic strategy to achieve resectable status for recurrent hepatic and extrahepatic metastases. The data should be viewed in the context of recent advances in the understanding of cancer biology and the metastatic process.

  8. A natural form of learning can increase and decrease the survival of new neurons in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olariu, Ana; Cleaver, Kathryn M; Shore, Lauren E; Brewer, Michelle D; Cameron, Heather A

    2005-01-01

    Granule cells born in the adult dentate gyrus undergo a 4-week developmental period characterized by high susceptibility to cell death. Two forms of hippocampus-dependent learning have been shown to rescue many of the new neurons during this critical period. Here, we show that a natural form of associative learning, social transmission of food preference (STFP), can either increase or decrease the survival of young granule cells in adult rats. Increased numbers of pyknotic as well as phospho-Akt-expressing BrdU-labeled cells were seen 1 day after STFP training, indicating that training rapidly induces both cell death and active suppression of cell death in different subsets. A single day of training for STFP increased the survival of 8-day-old BrdU-labeled cells when examined 1 week later. In contrast, 2 days of training decreased the survival of BrdU-labeled cells and the density of immature neurons, identified with crmp-4. This change from increased to decreased survival could not be accounted for by the ages of the cells. Instead, we propose that training may initially increase young granule cell survival, then, if continued, cause them to die. This complex regulation of cell death could potentially serve to maintain granule cells that are actively involved in memory consolidation, while rapidly using and discarding young granule cells whose training is complete to make space for new naïve neurons. Published 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. L-proline increases survival of tilapias infected by Streptococcus agalactiae in higher water temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xian-Liang; Han, Yi; Ren, Shi-Tong; Ma, Yan-Mei; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcosis causes massive tilapia kills, which results in heavy economic losses of tilapia farming industry. Out of the Streptococcosis, Streptococcus agalactiae is the major pathogen. The bacterium causes higher mortality of tilapias in higher than lower temperatures. However, effect of temperature on metabolic regulation which is related to the mortality is largely unknown. The present study showed 50% and 70% mortality of tilapias cultured in 25 °C and 30 °C, respectively, in comparison with no death in 20 °C following infection caused by S. agalactiae. Then, GC/MS based metabolomics was used to investigate a global metabolic response of tilapia liver to the two higher water temperatures compared to 20 °C. Thirty-six and forty-five varied abundance of metabolites were identified in livers of tilapias cultured at 25 °C and 30 °C, respectively. More decreasing abundance of amino acids and increasing abundance of carbohydrates were detected in 30 °C than 25 °C groups. On the other hand, out of the pathways enriched, the first five biggest impact pathways belong to amino acid metabolism. Decreasing abundance of l-proline was identified as a crucial biomarker for indexing higher water temperature and a potential modulator to reduce the high death. This was validated by engineering injection or oral addition of l-proline. Exogenous l-proline led to elevated amino acid metabolism, which contributes to the elevated survivals. Our findings provide a potential metabolic modulator for controlling the disease, and shed some light on host metabolic prevention to infectious diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Causes and consequences of increase in child survival rates: ethnoepidemiology among the Hmong of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstadter, P; Kunstadter, S L; Leepreecha, P; Podhisita, C; Laoyang, M; Thao, C S; Thao, R S; Yang, W S

    1992-12-01

    The Hmong "hill tribe" minority in Thailand has much higher exposure to factors usually associated with risk of child mortality (high fertility, low status of women, low education, less use of modern medical care for births, exposure to warfare, economic and physical disruption, and poor hygienic conditions) than the rural ethnic Thai population. Nonetheless, infant mortality has declined from over 120 per 1000 to under 50 per 1000 live births among both these populations in the past 30 years. The reason for the rapid increase in child survival among the Hmong appears to be better access to and more use of modern curative and preventive medical care associated with road construction rather than major changes in social or hygienic conditions. Conventional wisdom suggests that high fertility is both a cause and a consequence of high infant and child mortality and that parents will not reduce fertility until they see that mortality has declined. Most Hmong parents recognize the decline in child mortality and attribute it to better access to modern medical care. Most Hmong parents also say that, if they were starting to have children now, they would want to have fewer children. Fear of child death is infrequently mentioned as a motive for having more children, and the perceived decline in child mortality is rarely mentioned as a reason for reduced fertility. Most Hmong parents explain their desired family size in terms of economic conditions rather than perceived risk of child mortality. Results of this study suggest that fertility and child mortality can vary independently of one another and that major reductions in child mortality can be accomplished without waiting for major social changes (e.g., improved education or status of women) or major reductions in fertility.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE18 Protein Reduces Inflammation and Increases Survival in Animal Model of Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Asma; Dolasia, Komal; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2018-04-18

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE18 is a member of the PPE family. Previous studies have shown that recombinant PPE18 (rPPE18) protein binds to TLR2 and triggers a signaling cascade which reduces levels of TNF-α and IL-12, and increases IL-10 in macrophages. Because TNF-α is a major mediator of the pathophysiology of sepsis and blocking inflammation is a possible line of therapy in such circumstances, we tested the efficacy of rPPE18 in reducing symptoms of sepsis in a mouse model of Escherichia coli- induced septic peritonitis. rPPE18 significantly decreased levels of serum TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 and reduced organ damage in mice injected i.p. with high doses of E. coli Peritoneal cells isolated from rPPE18-treated mice had characteristics of M2 macrophages which are protective in excessive inflammation. Additionally, rPPE18 inhibited disseminated intravascular coagulation, which can cause organ damage resulting in death. rPPE18 was able to reduce sepsis-induced mortality when given prophylactically or therapeutically. Additionally, in a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis, rPPE18 reduced TNF-α, alanine transaminase, and creatinine, attenuated organ damage, prevented depletion of monocytes and lymphocytes, and improved survival. Our studies show that rPPE18 has potent anti-inflammatory properties and can serve as a novel therapeutic to control sepsis. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Increased HDAC1 deposition at hematopoietic promoters in AML and its association with patient survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tickenbrock, Lara; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Trento, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    was established, that revealed an AML specific pattern of HDAC1 distribution. Many of the HDAC1-binding altered promoters regulate genes involved in hematopoiesis, transcriptional regulation and signal transduction. HDAC1 binding patterns were associated with patients' event free survival. This is the first study...... to determine HDAC1 modification patterns in a large number of AML and ALL specimens. Our findings suggest that dyslocalization of HDAC1 is a common feature in AML. Importantly, HDAC1 modifications possess prognostic power for patient survival. Our findings suggest that altered HDAC1 localization...

  13. Survival of male Tengmalm’s owls increases with cover of old forest in the territory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hakkarainen, H.; Korpimäki, E.; Laaksonen, T.; Nikula, A.; Suorsa, P.

    2008-01-01

    The loss and fragmentation of forest habitats have been considered to pose a worldwide threat to the viability of forest-dwelling animals, especially to species that occupy old forests. We investigated whether the annual survival of sedentary male Tengmalm’s owls Aegolius funereus was associated

  14. Fasting increases survival to cold in FOXO, DIF, autophagy mutants and in other genotypes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourg, Éric; Massou, Isabelle

    2015-08-01

    Fasting increases survival to a severe cold stress in young and middle-aged wild-type flies, this effect being lowered or absent at old age. As an attempt to determine the mechanisms of this effect, genes involved in metabolism (dFOXO), autophagy (Atg7), innate immunity (Dif (1) ), and resistance to cold (Frost) were studied. The 12 mutant, RNAi and control lines tested in this study displayed an increased survival to cold after fasting. This shows that fasting has a robust effect on survival to cold in many genotypes, but the mechanism of this effect remains unknown. This mechanism does not seem to be linked to metabolic pathways often considered to play a critical role in ageing and longevity determinations (insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathway and autophagy).

  15. Chemotherapy increases long-term survival in patients with adult medulloblastoma--a literature-based meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocakaya, Selin; Beier, Christoph Patrick; Beier, Dagmar

    2016-03-01

    Adult medulloblastoma is a potentially curable malignant entity with an incidence of 0.5-1 per million. Valid data on prognosis, treatment, and demographics are lacking, as most current knowledge stems from retrospective studies. Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy are accepted parts of treatment regimes; however, established prognostic factors and data clarifying the role of chemotherapy are missing. We investigated 227 publications from 1969-2013, with 907 identifiable, individual patients being available for meta-analysis. Demographic data, risk stratification, and treatment of these patients were similar to previous cohorts. The median overall survival (mOS) was 65 months (95% CI: 54.6-75.3) , the 5-year overall survival was 50.9% with 16% of the patients dying more than 5 years after diagnosis. Incomplete resection, clinical and radiological signs for brainstem infiltration, and abstinence from radiotherapy were predictive of worse outcome. Metastatic disease at tumor recurrence was identified as a new prognostic factor, while neither metastasis at initial diagnosis nor desmoplastic/classic histology was correlated with survival. Patients receiving chemotherapy first-line survived significantly longer (mOS: 108 mo, 95% CI: 68.6-148.4) than patients treated with radiation alone (mOS: 57 mo, 95% CI: 39.6-74.4) or patients who received chemotherapy at tumor recurrence. This effect was not biased by tumor stage or decade of treatment. Importantly, (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy also significantly increased the chance for long-term survival (>5 y) compared with radiotherapy alone or chemotherapy at tumor recurrence. This meta-analysis clarifies relevant prognostic factors and suggests that chemotherapy as part of first-line therapy improves overall survival and increases the proportion of patients with long-term survival. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions

  16. Volunteering is associated with increased survival in able-bodied participants of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Nina Trivedy; Demakakos, Panayotes; Taylor, Mark Steven; Steptoe, Andrew; Hamer, Mark; Shankar, Aparna

    2016-06-01

    Volunteering has been linked to reduced mortality in older adults, but the mechanisms explaining this effect remain unclear. This study investigated whether volunteering is associated with increased survival in participants of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing and whether differences in survival are modified by functional disabilities. A multivariate Cox Proportional Hazards model was used to estimate the association of volunteering with survival over a period of 10.9 years in 10 324 participants, while controlling for selected confounders. To investigate effect modification by disability, the analyses were repeated in participants with and without self-reported functional disabilities. Volunteering was associated with a reduced probability of death from all causes in univariate analyses (HR=0.65, CI 0.58 to 0.73, pvolunteers had significantly increased survival compared with able-bodied non-volunteers (HR=0.81, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.95, p=0.009). There was no significant survival advantage among disabled volunteers, compared with disabled non-volunteers (HR=1.06, CI 0.88 to 1.29, p=0.53). Volunteering is associated with reduced mortality in older adults in England, but this effect appears to be limited to volunteers who report no disabilities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. From utopia to reality: increased survival in peritoneal carcinomatosis treated with cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Sampedro, Juan José; Morales-Soriano, Rafael

    2017-11-01

    We have read with great interest the article by Illán et al.1 entitled "Long survival in a patient with metastatic colorectal carcinoma: reality or utopia?" This article describes the case of a 42 year old patient with mucinous-type colon adenocarcinoma who had tumor recurrence with peritoneal metastases 18 months after resection of the primary tumor and adjuvant chemotherapy. After multiple metastasectomies and several lines of chemotherapy, the patient died 27 months after the recurrence.

  18. Improvements in logistics could increase survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömsöe, A; Afzelius, S; Axelsson, C; Södersved Källestedt, M L; Enlund, M; Svensson, L; Herlitz, J

    2013-06-01

    In a review based on estimations and assumptions, to report the estimated number of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was started and to speculate about possible future improvements in Sweden. An observational study. All ambulance organisations in Sweden. Patients included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry who suffered an OHCA between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010. Approximately 80% of OHCA cases in Sweden in which CPR was started are included. None In 11 005 patients, the 1-month survival rate was 9.4%. There are approximately 5000 OHCA cases annually in which CPR is started and 30-day survival is achieved in up to 500 patients yearly (6 per 100 000 inhabitants). Based on findings on survival in relation to the time to calling for the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and the start of CPR and defibrillation, it was estimated that, if the delay from collapse to (i) calling EMS, (ii) the start of CPR, and (iii) the time to defibrillation were reduced to <2 min, <2 min, and <8 min, respectively, 300-400 additional lives could be saved. Based on findings relating to the delay to calling for the EMS and the start of CPR and defibrillation, we speculate that 300-400 additional OHCA patients yearly (4 per 100 000 inhabitants) could be saved in Sweden. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  19. Increased cell survival of cells exposed to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles through biomaterial substrate-induced autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ting-Chen; Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2016-04-01

    The cellular uptake of nanoparticles (NPs) can be promoted by NP surface modification but cell viability is often sacrificed. Our previous study has shown that intracellular uptake of iron oxide NPs was significantly increased for cells cultured on chitosan. However, the mechanism for having the higher cellular uptake as well as better cell survival on the chitosan surface remains unclear. In this study, we sought to clarify if the autophagic response may contribute to cell survival under excessive NP exposure conditions on chitosan. L929 fibroblasts and neural stem cells (NSCs) were challenged with different concentrations (0-300 μg ml(-1)) of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs. The autophagic response as well as the metabolic activity of cells was evaluated. Results showed that culturing both types of cells on chitosan substrates significantly enhanced the cellular uptake of NPs. At higher NP concentrations, cells on chitosan showed a greater survival rate than those on TCPS. The expression levels of autophagy-related genes (Atg5 and Atg7 genes) and autophagy associated protein (LC3-II) on chitosan were higher than that on TCPS. The NP exposure further increased the expressions. We suggest that cells cultured on chitosan were more tolerant to NP cytotoxicity because of the increased autophagic response. Moreover, NP exposure increased the metabolic activity of cells grown on chitosan, while it decreased the metabolism of cells cultured on TCPS. In animal studies, iron oxide-labeled NSCs were injected in zebrafish embryos. Results also showed that cells grown on chitosan had better survival after transplantation than those grown on TCPS. Taken together, chitosan as a culture substrate can induce cell autophagy to increase cell survival in particular for NP-labeled cells. This will be valuable for the biomedical application of NPs in cell therapy.

  20. Nutritional intra-amniotic therapy increases survival in a rabbit model of fetal growth restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illa, Miriam; Pla, Laura; Zamora, Monica; Crispi, Fatima; Gratacos, Eduard

    2018-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the perinatal effects of a prenatal therapy based on intra-amniotic nutritional supplementation in a rabbit model of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Methods IUGR was surgically induced in pregnant rabbits at gestational day 25 by ligating 40–50% of uteroplacental vessels of each gestational sac. At the same time, modified-parenteral nutrition solution (containing glucose, amino acids and electrolytes) was injected into the amniotic sac of nearly half of the IUGR fetuses (IUGR-T group n = 106), whereas sham injections were performed in the rest of fetuses (IUGR group n = 118). A control group without IUGR induction but sham injection was also included (n = 115). Five days after the ligation procedure, a cesarean section was performed to evaluate fetal cardiac function, survival and birth weight. Results Survival was significantly improved in the IUGR fetuses that were treated with intra-amniotic nutritional supplementation as compared to non-treated IUGR animals (survival rate: controls 71% vs. IUGR 44% p = 0.003 and IUGR-T 63% vs. IUGR 44% p = 0.02), whereas, birth weight (controls mean 43g ± SD 9 vs. IUGR 36g ± SD 9 vs. IUGR-T 35g ± SD 8, p = 0.001) and fetal cardiac function were similar among the IUGR groups. Conclusion Intra-amniotic injection of a modified-parenteral nutrient solution appears to be a promising therapy for reducing mortality among IUGR. These results provide an opportunity to develop new intra-amniotic nutritional strategies to reach the fetus by bypassing the placental insufficiency. PMID:29466434

  1. Pancreatic Digestive Enzyme Blockade in the Intestine Increases Survival After Experimental Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLano, Frank A.; Hoyt, David B.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2015-01-01

    Shock, sepsis, and multiorgan failure are associated with inflammation, morbidity, and high mortality. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests that pancreatic enzymes in the intestinal lumen autodigest the intestine and generate systemic inflammation. Blocking these enzymes in the intestine reduces inflammation and multiorgan dysfunction. We investigated whether enzymatic blockade also reduces mortality after shock. Three rat shock models were used here: hemorrhagic shock, peritonitis shock induced by placement of cecal material into the peritoneum, and endotoxin shock. One hour after initiation of hemorrhagic, peritonitis, or endotoxin shock, animals were administered one of three different pancreatic enzyme inhibitors—6-amidino-2-naphtyl p-guanidinobenzoate di-methanesulfate, tranexamic acid, or aprotinin—into the lumen of the small intestine. In all forms of shock, blockade of digestive proteases with protease inhibitor attenuated entry of digestive enzymes into the wall of the intestine and subsequent autodigestion and morphological damage to the intestine, lung, and heart. Animals treated with protease inhibitors also survived in larger numbers than untreated controls over a period of 12 weeks. Surviving animals recovered completely and returned to normal weight within 14 days after shock. The results suggest that the active and concentrated digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine play a central role in shock and multi-organ failure, which can be treated with protease inhibitors that are currently available for use in the clinic. PMID:23345609

  2. Surgical fusion of early onset severe scoliosis increases survival in Rett syndrome: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Jenny; Torode, Ian; Wong, Kingsley; Ellaway, Carolyn; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Izatt, Maree T; Askin, Geoffrey N; Mcphee, Bruce I; Cundy, Peter; Leonard, Helen

    2016-06-01

    Scoliosis is a common comorbidity in Rett syndrome and spinal fusion may be recommended if severe. We investigated the impact of spinal fusion on survival and risk of severe lower respiratory tract infection in Rett syndrome. Data were ascertained from hospital medical records, the Australian Rett Syndrome Database, a longitudinal and population-based registry, and from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare National Death Index database. Cox regression and generalized estimating equation models were used to estimate the effects of spinal surgery on survival and severe respiratory infection respectively in 140 females who developed severe scoliosis (Cobb angle ≥45°) before adulthood. After adjusting for mutation type and age of scoliosis onset, the rate of death was lower in the surgery group (hazard ratio [HR] 0.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12-0.74; p=0.009) compared to those without surgery. Rate of death was particularly reduced for those with early onset scoliosis (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06-0.52; p=0.002). There was some evidence to suggest that spinal fusion was associated with a reduction in risk of severe respiratory infection among those with early onset scoliosis (risk ratio 0.41, 95% CI 0.16-1.03; p=0.06). With appropriate cautions, spinal fusion confers an advantage to life expectancy in Rett syndrome. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  3. Increased Subventricular Zone Radiation Dose Correlates With Survival in Glioblastoma Patients After Gross Total Resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Linda [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ye, Xiaobu [Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); McNutt, Todd; Kleinberg, Lawrence [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lim, Michael; Chaichana, Kaisorn [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo, E-mail: aquinon2@jhmi.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Redmond, Kristin, E-mail: kjanson3@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Neural progenitor cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) have a controversial role in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) as potential tumor-initiating cells. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between radiation dose to the SVZ and survival in GBM patients. Methods and Materials: The study included 116 patients with primary GBM treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 2006 and 2009. All patients underwent surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiation therapy with intensity modulated radiation therapy (60 Gy/30 fractions) and concomitant temozolomide. Ipsilateral, contralateral, and bilateral SVZs were contoured on treatment plans by use of coregistered magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. Multivariate Cox regression was used to examine the relationship between mean SVZ dose and progression-free survival (PFS), as well as overall survival (OS). Age, Karnofsky Performance Status score, and extent of resection were used as covariates. The median age was 58 years (range, 29-80 years). Results: Of the patients, 12% underwent biopsy, 53% had subtotal resection (STR), and 35% had gross total resection (GTR). The Karnofsky Performance Status score was less than 90 in 54 patients and was 90 or greater in 62 patients. The median ipsilateral, contralateral, and bilateral mean SVZ doses were 48.7 Gy, 34.4 Gy, and 41.5 Gy, respectively. Among patients who underwent GTR, a mean ipsilateral SVZ dose of 40 Gy or greater was associated with a significantly improved PFS compared with patients who received less than 40 Gy (15.1 months vs 10.3 months; P=.028; hazard ratio, 0.385 [95% confidence interval, 0.165-0.901]) but not in patients undergoing STR or biopsy. The subgroup of GTR patients who received an ipsilateral dose of 40 Gy or greater also had a significantly improved OS (17.5 months vs 15.6 months; P=.027; hazard ratio, 0.385 [95% confidence interval, 0.165-0.895]). No association was found between SVZ radiation dose and PFS

  4. Increased survival rate by local release of diclofenac in a murine model of recurrent oral carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will OM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Olga Maria Will,1,* Nicolai Purcz,2,* Athena Chalaris,3 Carola Heneweer,4,5 Susann Boretius,1 Larissa Purcz,2 Lila Nikkola,6 Nureddin Ashammakhi,6 Holger Kalthoff,7 Claus-Christian Glüer,1 Jörg Wiltfang,2 Yahya Açil,2 Sanjay Tiwari1 1Section Biomedical Imaging, Clinic for Radiology and Neuroradiology, MOIN CC, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, 3Institute of Biochemistry, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, 4Clinic for Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, 5Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 6Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland; 7Institute for Experimental Cancer Research, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Despite aggressive treatment with radiation and combination chemotherapy following tumor resection, the 5-year survival rate for patients with head and neck cancer is at best only 50%. In this study, we examined the therapeutic potential of localized release of diclofenac from electrospun nanofibers generated from poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide polymer. Diclofenac was chosen since anti-inflammatory agents that inhibit cyclooxygenase have shown great potential in their ability to directly inhibit tumor growth as well as suppress inflammation-mediated tumor growth. A mouse resection model of oral carcinoma was developed by establishing tumor growth in the oral cavity by ultrasound-guided injection of 1 million SCC-9 cells in the floor of the mouth. Following resection, mice were allocated into four groups with the following treatment: 1 no treatment, 2 implanted scaffolds without diclofenac, 3 implanted scaffolds loaded with diclofenac, and 4 diclofenac given orally. Small animal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging were utilized for longitudinal

  5. Enhanced malignant transformation is accompanied by increased survival recovery after ionizing radiation in Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothman, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Transformed Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts (CHEF), which gradually increase in tumor-forming ability in nude mice, were isolated from normal diploid CHEF/18 cells. Transformed CHEF cells (i.e., T30-4 > 21-2M3 > 21-2 > normal CHEF/18) showed gradual increases in potentially lethal damage (PLD) survival recovery. β-Lapachone and camptothecin, modulators of topoisomerase I (Topo I) activity, not only prevented survival recovery in normal as well as in tumor cells, but enhanced unscheduled DNA synthesis. These seemingly conflicting results are due to the fact that Topo I activity can be modulated by inhibitors to convert single-stranded DNA lesions into double-stranded breaks. Increases in unscheduled DNA synthesis may result from a continual supply of free ends, on which DNA repair processes may act. Altering Topo I activity with modulators appears to increase X-ray lethality via a DNA lesion modification suicide pathway. Cells down-regulate Topo I immediately after ionizing radiation to prevent Topo I-mediated lesion modification and to enhance survival recovery. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. Continuous Quality Improvement Efforts Increase Survival with Favorable Neurologic Outcome after Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, Karl; Jacobs, Michael; Derevin, Leo; Duval, Sue; Pointer, James

    2017-01-01

    To assess system-wide implementation of specific therapies focused on perfusion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and cerebral recovery after Return of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC). Before and after retrospective analysis of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest database. Implementation trial in the urban/suburban community of Alameda County, California, USA, population 1.6 million, from November 2009-December 2012. Adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) who received CPR and/or defibrillation. The impedance threshold device was used throughout this study and there was an increased use of mechanical CPR (mCPR) and in-hospital therapeutic hypothermia (HTH). Rates of ROSC, survival to hospital discharge and Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scores were compared using univariate and multivariable analyses. A total of 2,926 adult non-traumatic patients with OHCA received CPR during the study period. From 2009-2011 to 2012, there was an increase in ROSC from 29.0% to 34.4% (p = 0.003) and a non-significant increase in hospital discharge from 10.2% to 12.0% (p = 0.16). There was a 76% relative increase in survival with favorable neurologic function between the two periods, as determined by CPC ≤ 2, from 4.5% to 7.9% (unadjusted OR = 1.80; CI = 1.31, 2.48; p improved survival by 74% with favorable neurologic function following OHCA.

  7. Sexual conflict and ecology: Species composition and male density interact to reduce male mating harassment and increase female survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Llano, Miguel A; Bensch, Hanna M; Svensson, Erik I

    2018-02-21

    Sexual conflict is a pervasive evolutionary force that can reduce female fitness. Experimental evolution studies in the laboratory might overestimate the importance of sexual conflict because the ecological conditions in such settings typically include only a single species. Here, we experimentally manipulated conspecific male density (high or low) and species composition (sympatric or allopatric) to investigate how ecological conditions affect female survival in a sexually dimorphic insect, the banded demoiselle (Calopteryx splendens). Female survival was strongly influenced by an interaction between male density and species composition. Specifically, at low conspecific male density, female survival increased in the presence of heterospecific males (C. virgo). Behavioral mating experiments showed that interspecific interference competition reduced conspecific male mating success with large females. These findings suggest that reproductive interference competition between con- and heterospecific males might indirectly facilitate female survival by reducing mating harassment from conspecific males. Hence, interspecific competitors can show contrasting effects on the two sexes thereby influencing sexual conflict dynamics. Our results call for incorporation of more ecological realism in sexual conflict research, particularly how local community context and reproductive interference competition between heterospecific males can affect female fitness. © 2018 The Author(s). Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Increased level of hemoglobin 1 enhances survival of hypoxic stress and promotes early growth in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, P. W.; Klok, E. J.; Trevaskis, B.; Watts, R. A.; Ellis, M. H.; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E. S.

    2002-01-01

    Overexpression of a class 1 Hb (GLB1) protects Arabidopsis thaliana plants from the effects of severe hypoxia. Overexpression of the bifunctional symbiotic Hb (GLB1S) from Parasponia andersonii in A. thaliana also increases survival after hypoxia. Plants overexpressing the Hb 1 protein, mutated to have a low oxygen affinity, are as susceptible to hypoxia as WT plants, suggesting that the protection against hypoxia depends on the ability of the Hb to bind ligands, such as oxygen, with high aff...

  9. Increased Expression of the GLUT-1 Gene is Associated With Worse Overall Survival in Resected Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Yadley, Ashley H.; Abbott, Andrea M.; Pimiento, Jose M.; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Malafa, Mokenge P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is currently no reliable method to predict the risk of relapse after curative resection of early-stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Increased glucose metabolism observed on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) by malignant cells, the Warburg effect, is a well-known characteristic of the malignant phenotype. We investigated the role of glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) gene expression, a glucose cell plasma membrane transporter, in early-stage pancreatic cancer. Methods Associations between GLUT-1 gene expression with PET maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and histologic grade were investigated in early-stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Multivariate analysis was conducted to determine predictors of prognosis. Cox proportional hazards model was used for survival analysis. Results Sixty-three patients had GLUT-1 gene analysis performed, and 50 patients had both GLUT-1 analysis and PET scan. Patients with high GLUT-1 gene expression had a decreased overall survival by univariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model (HR=2.82, p=0.001) and remained significant on multivariate analysis (HR=2.54, p=0.03). There was no correlation of GLUT-1 gene expression with histologic grade or PET SUVmax. Conclusion Increased GLUT-1 gene expression was associated with a decreased overall survival in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This supports increased GLUT-1 gene expression as a potential prognostic marker in resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26692443

  10. Honokiol Increases CD4+ T Cell Activation and Decreases TNF but Fails to Improve Survival Following Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingensmith, Nathan J; Chen, Ching-Wen; Liang, Zhe; Burd, Eileen M; Farris, Alton B; Arbiser, Jack L; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2017-10-11

    Honokiol is a biphenolic isolate extracted from the bark of the magnolia tree that has been used in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine, and has more recently been investigated for its anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties. Honokiol has previously been demonstrated to improve survival in sepsis models that have rapid 100% lethality. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of Honokiol on the host response in a model of sepsis that more closely approximates human disease. Male and female C57BL/6 mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce polymicrobial intraabdominal sepsis. Mice were then randomized to receive an injection of either Honokiol (120 mg/kg/day) or vehicle and were sacrificed after 24 hours for functional studies or followed 7 days for survival. Honokiol treatment after sepsis increased the frequency of CD4 T cells and increased activation of CD4 T cells as measured by the activation marker CD69. Honokiol also increased splenic dendritic cells. Honokiol simultaneously decreased frequency and number of CD8 T cells. Honokiol decreased systemic TNF without impacting other systemic cytokines. Honokiol did not have a detectable effect on kidney function, lung physiology, liver function or intestinal integrity. In contrast to prior studies of Honokiol in a lethal model of sepsis, Honokiol did not alter survival at seven days (70% mortality for Honokiol vs. 60% mortality for vehicle). Honokiol is thus effective in modulating the host immune response and inflammation following a clinically relevant model of sepsis but is not sufficient to alter survival.

  11. Supplementation with turmeric residue increased survival of the Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) under high ambient temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Qian, Hao-Cheng; Wang, Jing-Liang; Chen, Zhe; Ordovas, Jose M; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Shen, Li-Rong

    Turmeric residue (TR), containing residual levels of curcumin, is a solid by-product waste generated after the extraction and separation of curcumin from turmeric root. A feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of TR on the survival of Chinese soft-shelled turtles (SSTs), Pelodiscus sinensis, under a high ambient temperature. A total of 320 female SSTs were assigned randomly to two diets: basal diet (the control group, n=160) and an interventional diet supplemented with 10% TR (the TR group, n=160). Our results demonstrated that supplementation of TR increased the SST survival rate by 135.5%, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of SST liver by 112.8%, and decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content of SST liver by 36.4%, compared to the control group. The skin of the SST fed TR showed a golden color. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the concentrations of curcumin in TR and the skin of the SST fed TR were (1.69±0.30) and (0.14±0.03) μg/g, respectively. Our observation suggests that supplementation of TR increased the survival rate of SST under high ambient temperatures. We speculated that the increased survival rate and tolerance at the high ambient temperature were associated with the anti-oxidation activity of curcumin from TR. Moreover, curcumin in TR could be deposited in SST skin, which made it more favored in the market of China. Our findings provide new knowledge and evidence to effectively reuse TR as a feed additive in animal and aquatic farming.

  12. Empiric potassium supplementation and increased survival in users of loop diuretics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles E Leonard

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of the clinical strategy of empiric potassium supplementation in reducing the frequency of adverse clinical outcomes in patients receiving loop diuretics is unknown. We sought to examine the association between empiric potassium supplementation and 1 all-cause death and 2 outpatient-originating sudden cardiac death (SD and ventricular arrhythmia (VA among new starters of loop diuretics, stratified on initial loop diuretic dose.We conducted a one-to-one propensity score-matched cohort study using 1999-2007 US Medicaid claims from five states. Empiric potassium supplementation was defined as a potassium prescription on the day of or the day after the initial loop diuretic prescription. Death, the primary outcome, was ascertained from the Social Security Administration Death Master File; SD/VA, the secondary outcome, from incident, first-listed emergency department or principal inpatient SD/VA discharge diagnoses (positive predictive value = 85%.We identified 654,060 persons who met eligibility criteria and initiated therapy with a loop diuretic, 27% of whom received empiric potassium supplementation (N = 179,436 and 73% of whom did not (N = 474,624. The matched hazard ratio for empiric potassium supplementation was 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.98, p = 0.003 for all-cause death. Stratifying on initial furosemide dose, hazard ratios for empiric potassium supplementation with furosemide < 40 and ≥ 40 milligrams/day were 0.93 (0.86-1.00, p = 0.050 and 0.84 (0.79-0.89, p < 0.0001. The matched hazard ratio for empiric potassium supplementation was 1.02 (0.83-1.24, p = 0.879 for SD/VA.Empiric potassium supplementation upon initiation of a loop diuretic appears to be associated with improved survival, with a greater apparent benefit seen with higher diuretic dose. If confirmed, these findings support the use of empiric potassium supplementation upon initiation of a loop diuretic.

  13. Lovastatin delays infection and increases survival rates in AG129 mice infected with dengue virus serotype 2.

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    Marlen Martinez-Gutierrez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been reported that treatment of DENV-infected cultures with Lovastatin (LOV, can affect viral assembly. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of LOV on the survival rate and viremia levels of DENV-2-infected AG129 mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were inoculated with 1 × 10(6 plaque-forming units (PFU/ml of DENV-2 and treated with LOV (200 mg/kg/day. Pre-treatment with one or three doses of LOV increased the survival rate compared to untreated mice (7.3 and 7.1 days, respectively, compared to 4.8 days. Viremia levels also decreased by 21.8% compared to untreated mice, but only in the group administered three doses prior to inoculation. When LOV was administered after viral inoculation, the survival rate increased (7.3 days in the group treated at 24 hpi, 6.8 days in the group treated at 48 hpi and 6.5 days in the group treated with two doses compared to the untreated group (4.8 days. Interestingly, the serum viral titer increased by 24.6% in mice treated at 48 hpi with a single dose of LOV and by 21.7% in mice treated with two doses (at 24 and 48 hpi of LOV compared to untreated mice. Finally histopathological changes in the liver and spleen in infected and untreated mice included massive extramedullary erythropoiesis foci and inflammatory filtration, and these characteristics were decreased or absent in LOV-treated mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the effect of LOV on viremia depends on the timing of treatment and on the number of doses administered. We observed a significant increase in the survival rate in both schemes due to a delay in the progression of the disease. However, the results obtained in the post-treatment scheme must be handled carefully because this treatment scheme increases viremia and we do not know how this increase could affect disease progression in humans.

  14. Agrochemicals indirectly increase survival of E. coli O157:H7 and indicator bacteria by reducing ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Zachery R; Rohr, Jason R; Senkbeil, Jacob K; Harwood, Valerie J

    Storm water and agricultural runoff frequently contain agrochemicals, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), and zoonotic pathogens. Entry of such contaminants into aquatic ecosystems may affect ecology and human health. This study tested the hypothesis that the herbicide atrazine and the fungicide chlorothalonil indirectly affect the survival of FIB (Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis) and a pathogen (E. coli O157:H7) by altering densities of protozoan predators or by altering competition from autochthonous bacteria. Streptomycin-resistant E. coli, En. faecalis, and E. coli O157:H7 were added to microcosms composed of Florida river water containing natural protozoan and bacterial populations. FIB, pathogen, and protozoan densities were monitored over six days. Known metabolic inhibitors, cycloheximide and streptomycin, were used to inhibit autochthonous protozoa or bacteria, respectively. The inhibitors made it possible to isolate the effects of predation or competition on survival of allochthonous bacteria, and each treatment increased the survival of FIB and pathogens. Chlorothalonil's effect was similar to that of cycloheximide, significantly reducing protozoan densities and elevating densities of FIB and pathogens relative to the control. Atrazine treatment did not affect protozoan densities, but, through an effect on competition, resulted in significantly greater densities of En. faecalis and E. coli O157:H7. Hence, by reducing predaceous protozoa and bacterial competitors that facilitate purifying water bodies of FIBs and human pathogens, chlorothalonil and atrazine indirectly diminished an ecosystem service of fresh water.

  15. IDO1 inhibition synergizes with radiation and PD-1 blockade to durably increase survival against advanced glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladomersky, Erik; Zhai, Lijie; Lenzen, Alicia; Lauing, Kristen L; Qian, Jun; Scholtens, Denise M; Gritsina, Galina; Sun, Xuebing; Liu, Ye; Yu, Fenglong; Gong, Wenfeng; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Beibei; Tang, Zhiyu; Patel, Ricky; Platanias, Leonidas C; James, C David; Stupp, Roger; Lukas, Rimas V; Binder, David C; Wainwright, Derek A

    2018-03-02

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in adults with a median survival of 15-20 months. Numerous approaches and novel therapeutics for treating GBM have been investigated in the setting of phase III clinical trials, including a recent analysis of the immune checkpoint inhibitor, Nivolumab (anti-PD-1), which failed to improve recurrent GBM patient survival. However, rather than abandoning immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment for GBM, which has shown promise in other types of cancer, ongoing studies are currently evaluating this therapeutic class when combined with other agents. Here, we investigated immunocompetent orthotopic mouse models of GBM treated with the potent CNS-penetrating IDO1 enzyme inhibitor, BGB-5777, combined with anti-PD1 mAb, as well as radiation therapy (RT), based on our recent observation that tumor-infiltrating T cells directly increase immunosuppressive IDO1 levels in human GBM, the previously-described enhancement of immune cell functions after PD-1 blockade, as well as the pro-inflammatory effects of radiation. Our results demonstrate a durable survival benefit from this novel three-agent treatment, but not for any single- or dual-agent combination. Unexpectedly, treatment efficacy required IDO1 enzyme inhibition in non-GBM cells, rather than tumor cells. Timing of effector T cell infiltration, animal subject age and usage of systemic chemotherapy, all directly impacted therapy-mediated survival benefit.  These data highlight a novel and clinically-relevant immunotherapeutic approach with associated mechanistic considerations that have formed the basis of a newly-initiated phase I/II trial for GBM patients. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Increased survival and proliferation of the epidemic strain Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense CRM0019 in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Giovanni Monteiro; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Real, Fernando; Teixeira, Daniela; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane

    2017-09-13

    Outbreaks of infections caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria have been reported worldwide generally associated with medical procedures. Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense CRM0019 was obtained during an epidemic of postsurgical infections and was characterized by increased persistence in vivo. To better understand the successful survival strategies of this microorganism, we evaluated its infectivity and proliferation in macrophages (RAW and BMDM) and alveolar epithelial cells (A549). For that, we assessed the following parameters, for both M. abscessus CRM0019 as well as the reference strain M. abscessus ATCC 19977: internalization, intracellular survival for up 3 days, competence to subvert lysosome fusion and the intracellular survival after cell reinfection. CRM0019 and ATCC 19977 strains showed the same internalization rate (approximately 30% after 6 h infection), in both A549 and RAW cells. However, colony forming units data showed that CRM0019 survived better in A549 cells than the ATCC 19977 strain. Phagosomal characteristics of CRM0019 showed the bacteria inside tight phagosomes in A549 cells, contrasting to the loosely phagosomal membrane in macrophages. This observation holds for the ATCC 19977 strain in both cell types. The competence to subvert lysosome fusion was assessed by acidification and acquisition of lysosomal protein. For M. abscessus strains the phagosomes were acidified in all cell lines; nevertheless, the acquisition of lysosomal protein was reduced by CRM0019 compared to the ATCC 19977 strain, in A549 cells. Conversely, in macrophages, both M. abscessus strains were located in mature phagosomes, however without bacterial death. Once recovered from macrophages M. abscessus could establish a new intracellular infection. Nevertheless, only CRM0019 showed a higher growth rate in A549, increasing nearly 10-fold after 48 and 72 h. M. abscessus CRM0019 creates a protective and replicative niche in alveolar epithelial cells mainly by

  17. Captopril Increases Survival after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation but Decreases Survival when Combined with Skin-Burn Trauma in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Aminul; Bolduc, David L; Zhai, Min; Kiang, Juliann G; Swift, Joshua M

    2015-09-01

    Past and recent radiation events have involved a high incidence of radiation combined injury where victims often succumb to serious infections as a consequence of bacterial translocation and subsequent sepsis. The risk of infection is exacerbated in radiation combined skin-burn injury (RCI), which increase vulnerability. Furthermore, no suitable countermeasures for radiation combined skin-burn injury have been established. In this study, we evaluated captopril as a potential countermeasure to radiation combined skin-burn injury. Captopril is an FDA-approved angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor that was previously reported to stimulate hematopoietic recovery after exposure to ionizing radiation. Female B6D2F1/J mice were whole-body bilateral (60)Co gamma-photon irradiated (dose rate of 0.4 Gy/min) with 9.5 Gy (LD70/30 for RCI), followed by nonlethal dorsal skin-burn injury under anesthesia (approximately 15% total-body surface-area burn). Mice were provided with acidified drinking water with or without dissolved captopril (0.55 g/l) for 30 days immediately after injury and were administered topical gentamicin (0.1% cream; day 1-10) and oral levofloxacin (90-100 mg/kg; day 3-16). Surviving mice were euthanized on day 30 after analyses of water consumption, body weight and survival. Our data demonstrate that, while treatment with captopril did mitigate mortality induced by radiation injury (RI) alone (55% captopril vs. 80% vehicle; n = 20, P captopril vs. 41% vehicle; n = 22, P captopril administration via drinking water produced an uneven dosage pattern among the different injury groups ranging from 74 ± 5.4 to 115 ± 2.2 mg/kg/day. Captopril treatment also did not counteract the negative alterations in hematology, splenocytes or bone marrow cellularity after either radiation injury or radiation combined skin-burn injury. These data suggest that captopril may exert its actions differently between the two injury models (RI vs. RCI) and that captopril dosing, when

  18. Increased actin polymerization and stabilization interferes with neuronal function and survival in the AMPKγ mutant Loechrig.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Cook

    Full Text Available loechrig (loe mutant flies are characterized by progressive neuronal degeneration, behavioral deficits, and early death. The mutation is due to a P-element insertion in the gene for the γ-subunit of the trimeric AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK complex, whereby the insertion affects only one of several alternative transcripts encoding a unique neuronal isoform. AMPK is a cellular energy sensor that regulates a plethora of signaling pathways, including cholesterol and isoprenoid synthesis via its downstream target hydroxy-methylglutaryl (HMG-CoA reductase. We recently showed that loe interferes with isoprenoid synthesis and increases the prenylation and thereby activation of RhoA. During development, RhoA plays an important role in neuronal outgrowth by activating a signaling cascade that regulates actin dynamics. Here we show that the effect of loe/AMPKγ on RhoA prenylation leads to a hyperactivation of this signaling pathway, causing increased phosphorylation of the actin depolymerizating factor cofilin and accumulation of filamentous actin. Furthermore, our results show that the resulting cytoskeletal changes in loe interfere with neuronal growth and disrupt axonal integrity. Surprisingly, these phenotypes were enhanced by expressing the Slingshot (SSH phosphatase, which during development promotes actin depolymerization by dephosphorylating cofilin. However, our studies suggest that in the adult SSH promotes actin polymerization, supporting in vitro studies using human SSH1 that suggested that SSH can also stabilize and bundle filamentous actin. Together with the observed increase in SSH levels in the loe mutant, our experiments suggest that in mature neurons SSH may function as a stabilization factor for filamentous actin instead of promoting actin depolymerization.

  19. Precise Temperature Measurement for Increasing the Survival of Newborn Babies in Incubator Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Frischer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Precise temperature measurement is essential in a wide range of applications in the medical environment, however the regarding the problem of temperature measurement inside a simple incubator, neither a simple nor a low cost solution have been proposed yet. Given that standard temperature sensors don’t satisfy the necessary expectations, the problem is not measuring temperature, but rather achieving the desired sensitivity. In response, this paper introduces a novel hardware design as well as the implementation that increases measurement sensitivity in defined temperature intervals at low cost.

  20. Sumatran tiger survival threatened by deforestation despite increasing densities in parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luskin, Matthew Scott; Albert, Wido Rizki; Tobler, Mathias W

    2017-12-05

    The continuing development of improved capture-recapture (CR) modeling techniques used to study apex predators has also limited robust temporal and cross-site analyses due to different methods employed. We develop an approach to standardize older non-spatial CR and newer spatial CR density estimates and examine trends for critically endangered Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) using a meta-regression of 17 existing densities and new estimates from our own fieldwork. We find that tiger densities were 47% higher in primary versus degraded forests and, unexpectedly, increased 4.9% per yr from 1996 to 2014, likely indicating a recovery from earlier poaching. However, while tiger numbers may have temporarily risen, the total potential island-wide population declined by 16.6% from 2000 to 2012 due to forest loss and degradation and subpopulations are significantly more fragmented. Thus, despite increasing densities in smaller parks, we conclude that there are only two robust populations left with >30 breeding females, indicating Sumatran tigers still face a high risk of extinction unless deforestation can be controlled.

  1. Association of early PSA failure time with increased distant metastasis and decreased survival in prostate brachytherapy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Eric C.; Liu, Jerry T.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: We investigated whether earlier PSA failure following prostate brachytherapy is associated with increased rates of distant metastases (DM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), and overall mortality. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 2818 patients who underwent brachytherapy ± external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) ± androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). With median follow-up of 5.52 years, 264 patients experienced PSA failure at a median time of 3.25 years. Patients were stratified to early vs. late PSA failures at cutoffs of 1.5 years, 3 years, or 5 years, and tested in univariate/multivariate analyses for freedom from DM, cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Among patients with PSA failures, 69 (26%) patients experienced DM, 47 (18%) PCSM, and 56 (21%) deaths from other causes. Patients with rapid PSA failures demonstrated increased rates of DM, PCSM, and overall mortality, despite higher total BED and longer ADT. In multivariate analysis with a PSA failure interval <3 years, the hazard ratio (HR) for DM was 3.92 (95% CI: 2.34–6.55; p = 0.000); HR for PCSM was 2.79 (95% CI: 1.45–5.38; p = 0.002); and HR for overall mortality was 2.28 (95% CI: 1.50–3.48; p = 0.000). Conclusion: Early PSA failure following radiation is a poor prognostic factor, as it is associated with increased DM, PCSM, and overall mortality

  2. Antenatal corticosteroids trial in preterm births to increase neonatal survival in developing countries: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Althabe Fernando

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is a major cause of neonatal mortality, responsible for 28% of neonatal deaths overall. The administration of antenatal corticosteroids to women at high risk of preterm birth is a powerful perinatal intervention to reduce neonatal mortality in resource rich environments. The effect of antenatal steroids to reduce mortality and morbidity among preterm infants in hospital settings in developed countries with high utilization is well established, yet they are not routinely used in developing countries. The impact of increasing antenatal steroid use in hospital or community settings with low utilization rates and high infant mortality among premature infants due to lack of specialized services has not been well researched. There is currently no clear evidence about the safety of antenatal corticosteroid use for community-level births. Methods We hypothesize that a multi country, two-arm, parallel cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether a multifaceted intervention to increase the use of antenatal corticosteroids, including components to improve the identification of pregnancies at high risk of preterm birth and providing and facilitating the appropriate use of steroids, will reduce neonatal mortality at 28 days of life in preterm newborns, compared with the standard delivery of care in selected populations of six countries. 102 clusters in Argentina, Guatemala, Kenya, India, Pakistan, and Zambia will be randomized, and around 60,000 women and newborns will be enrolled. Kits containing vials of dexamethasone, syringes, gloves, and instructions for administration will be distributed. Improving the identification of women at high risk of preterm birth will be done by (1 diffusing recommendations for antenatal corticosteroids use to health providers, (2 training health providers on identification of women at high risk of preterm birth, (3 providing reminders to health providers on the use of the kits, and

  3. Antenatal corticosteroids trial in preterm births to increase neonatal survival in developing countries: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althabe, Fernando; Belizán, José M; Mazzoni, Agustina; Berrueta, Mabel; Hemingway-Foday, Jay; Koso-Thomas, Marion; McClure, Elizabeth; Chomba, Elwyn; Garces, Ana; Goudar, Shivaprasad; Kodkany, Bhalchandra; Saleem, Sarah; Pasha, Omrana; Patel, Archana; Esamai, Fabian; Carlo, Waldemar A; Krebs, Nancy F; Derman, Richard J; Goldenberg, Robert L; Hibberd, Patricia; Liechty, Edward A; Wright, Linda L; Bergel, Eduardo F; Jobe, Alan H; Buekens, Pierre

    2012-09-19

    Preterm birth is a major cause of neonatal mortality, responsible for 28% of neonatal deaths overall. The administration of antenatal corticosteroids to women at high risk of preterm birth is a powerful perinatal intervention to reduce neonatal mortality in resource rich environments. The effect of antenatal steroids to reduce mortality and morbidity among preterm infants in hospital settings in developed countries with high utilization is well established, yet they are not routinely used in developing countries. The impact of increasing antenatal steroid use in hospital or community settings with low utilization rates and high infant mortality among premature infants due to lack of specialized services has not been well researched. There is currently no clear evidence about the safety of antenatal corticosteroid use for community-level births. We hypothesize that a multi country, two-arm, parallel cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether a multifaceted intervention to increase the use of antenatal corticosteroids, including components to improve the identification of pregnancies at high risk of preterm birth and providing and facilitating the appropriate use of steroids, will reduce neonatal mortality at 28 days of life in preterm newborns, compared with the standard delivery of care in selected populations of six countries. 102 clusters in Argentina, Guatemala, Kenya, India, Pakistan, and Zambia will be randomized, and around 60,000 women and newborns will be enrolled. Kits containing vials of dexamethasone, syringes, gloves, and instructions for administration will be distributed. Improving the identification of women at high risk of preterm birth will be done by (1) diffusing recommendations for antenatal corticosteroids use to health providers, (2) training health providers on identification of women at high risk of preterm birth, (3) providing reminders to health providers on the use of the kits, and (4) using a color-coded tape to measure

  4. Decreased Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Content Contributes to Increased Survival in Human Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Oraldi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Among diet components, some fatty acids are known to affect several stages of colon carcinogenesis, whereas others are probably helpful in preventing tumors. In light of this, our aim was to determine the composition of fatty acids and the possible correlation with apoptosis in human colon carcinoma specimens at different Duke's stages and to evaluate the effect of enriching human colon cancer cell line with the possible reduced fatty acid(s. Specimens of carcinoma were compared with the corresponding non-neoplastic mucosa: a significant decrease of arachidonic acid, PPARα, Bad, and Bax and a significant increase of COX-2, Bcl-2, and pBad were found. The importance of arachidonic acid in apoptosis was demonstrated by enriching a Caco-2 cell line with this fatty acid. It induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner via induction of PPARα that, in turn, decreased COX-2. In conclusion, the reduced content of arachidonic acid is likely related to carcinogenic process decreasing the susceptibility of cancer cells to apoptosis.

  5. Cancer cells increase endothelial cell tube formation and survival by activating the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hao-Wei; Chen, Yi-Fang; Wong, Jau-Min; Weng, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chen, Huei-Wen; Yuan, Ang; Chen, Jeremy J W

    2017-02-07

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer and plays a critical role in lung cancer progression, which involves interactions between cancer cells, endothelial cells and the surrounding microenvironment. However, the gene expression profiles and the changes in the biological phenotype of vascular endothelial cells after interactions with lung cancer cells remain unclear. An indirect transwell co-culture system was used to survey the interaction between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human lung adenocarcinoma CL1-5 cells, as well as to investigate the morphological and molecular changes of HUVECs. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in HUVECs after co-culture with cancer cells were identified by microarray. Moreover, a publicly available microarray dataset of 293 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients was employed to evaluate the prognostic power of the gene signatures derived from HUVECs. The interaction between HUVECs and lung cancer cells changes the morphology of HUVECs, causing them to have a mesenchymal-like morphology and alter their cytoskeleton organization. Furthermore, after co-culture with lung cancer cells, HUVECs showed increased cell motility and microvessel tube formation ability and a decreased apoptotic percentage. Transcriptomic profiling of HUVECs revealed that many survival-, apoptosis- and angiogenesis-related genes were differentially expressed after interactions with lung cancer cells. Further investigations showed that the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway and COX-2 are involved in endothelial tube formation under the stimulation of lung cancer cells. Moreover, Rac-1 activation might promote endothelial cell motility through the increased formation of lamellipodia and filopodia. The inhibitors of PI3K and COX-2 could reverse the increased tube formation and induce the apoptosis of HUVECs. In addition, the gene signatures derived from the DEGs in HUVECs could predict overall survival and disease-free survival in NSCLC

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor number predicts increase in amygdala activity after severe stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuze, Elbert; van Wingen, Guido A.; van Zuiden, Mirjam; Rademaker, Arthur R.; Vermetten, Eric; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Fernández, Guillén; Heijnen, Cobi J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals who are exposed to a traumatic event are at increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Studies have shown that increased amygdala activity is frequently found in patients with PTSD. In addition, pre-trauma glucocorticoid

  7. Flexible Survival Strategies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Biofilms Result in Increased Fitness Compared with Candida albicans *

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    Purschke, Frauke Gina; Hiller, Ekkehard; Trick, Iris; Rupp, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    The majority of microorganisms persist in nature as surface-attached communities often surrounded by an extracellular matrix, called biofilms. Most natural biofilms are not formed by a single species but by multiple species. Microorganisms not only cooperate as in some multispecies biofilms but also compete for available nutrients. The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans are two opportunistic pathogens that are often found coexisting in a human host. Several models of mixed biofilms have been reported for these organisms showing antagonistic behavior. To investigate the interaction of P. aeruginosa and C. albicans in more detail, we analyzed the secretome of single and mixed biofilms of both organisms using MALDI-TOF MS/MS at several time points. Overall 247 individual proteins were identified, 170 originated from P. aeruginosa and 77 from C. albicans. Only 39 of the 131 in mixed biofilms identified proteins were assigned to the fungus whereby the remaining 92 proteins belonged to P. aeruginosa. In single-species biofilms, both organisms showed a higher diversity of proteins with 73 being assigned to C. albicans and 154 to P. aeruginosa. Most interestingly, P. aeruginosa in the presence of C. albicans secreted 16 proteins in significantly higher amounts or exclusively among other virulence factors such as exotoxin A and iron acquisition systems. In addition, the high affinity iron-binding siderophore pyoverdine was identified in mixed biofilms but not in bacterial biofilms, indicating that P. aeruginosa increases its capability to sequester iron in competition with C. albicans. In contrast, C. albicans metabolism was significantly reduced, including a reduction in detectable iron acquisition proteins. The results obtained in this study show that microorganisms not only compete with the host for essential nutrients but also strongly with the present microflora in order to gain a competitive advantage. PMID

  8. Mesenterico-portal vein resection in patients with pancreatico-duodenal cancer is safe and may increase survival.

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    Storkholm, Jan Henrik; Hansen, Carsten Palnæs

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most serious gastrointestinal cancers, and in the US and Europe it is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Radical surgery is the only option available for long-term survival. The aim of this study was to describe the surgical technique and the results of portal vein/superior mesenteric vein resection in patients with pancreatic cancer. Between 1 April 2009 and 1 April 2013, 354 patients underwent resection for pancreatic malignancy. A total of 47 portal vein/superior mesenteric vein resections were performed in 22 men and 25 women. A total of 44 patients (93.7%) had ductal adenocarcinomas. In all, 39 patients (83%) had T3 tumours, and 38 patients (80.9%) had involvement of lymph nodes. Furthermore, 29 patients (62%) had a pancreaticoduodenectomy, 15 patients (32%) a total pancreatectomy and three patients (6%) had a distal pancreatectomy. Six patients (17%) were reconstructed with interposition grafts, and vessels (83%) were reconstructed with an end-to-end anastomosis in the remaining 39 patients. Surgical morbidity was 29.8%, and 19.1% had non-surgical complications. The perioperative mortality (30 days) was 0%. The median survival was 25.2 months (confidence interval: 19-31.4). Resection of the portal vein/superior mesenteric vein is a safe procedure. It is not associated with an increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. This latter finding is in accordance with the findings in other high-volume centres. The median survival was far better than expected, especially since our material included a considerable number of patients with lymph node metastases. not relevant. not relevant.

  9. Mandible-Powered Escape Jumps in Trap-Jaw Ants Increase Survival Rates during Predator-Prey Encounters.

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    Fredrick J Larabee

    Full Text Available Animals use a variety of escape mechanisms to increase the probability of surviving predatory attacks. Antipredator defenses can be elaborate, making their evolutionary origin unclear. Trap-jaw ants are known for their rapid and powerful predatory mandible strikes, and some species have been observed to direct those strikes at the substrate, thereby launching themselves into the air away from a potential threat. This potential escape mechanism has never been examined in a natural context. We studied the use of mandible-powered jumping in Odontomachus brunneus during their interactions with a common ant predator: pit-building antlions. We observed that while trap-jaw ant workers escaped from antlion pits by running in about half of interactions, in 15% of interactions they escaped by mandible-powered jumping. To test whether escape jumps improved individual survival, we experimentally prevented workers from jumping and measured their escape rate. Workers with unrestrained mandibles escaped from antlion pits significantly more frequently than workers with restrained mandibles. Our results indicate that some trap-jaw ant species can use mandible-powered jumps to escape from common predators. These results also provide a charismatic example of evolutionary co-option, where a trait that evolved for one function (predation has been co-opted for another (defense.

  10. Mandible-Powered Escape Jumps in Trap-Jaw Ants Increase Survival Rates during Predator-Prey Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larabee, Fredrick J; Suarez, Andrew V

    2015-01-01

    Animals use a variety of escape mechanisms to increase the probability of surviving predatory attacks. Antipredator defenses can be elaborate, making their evolutionary origin unclear. Trap-jaw ants are known for their rapid and powerful predatory mandible strikes, and some species have been observed to direct those strikes at the substrate, thereby launching themselves into the air away from a potential threat. This potential escape mechanism has never been examined in a natural context. We studied the use of mandible-powered jumping in Odontomachus brunneus during their interactions with a common ant predator: pit-building antlions. We observed that while trap-jaw ant workers escaped from antlion pits by running in about half of interactions, in 15% of interactions they escaped by mandible-powered jumping. To test whether escape jumps improved individual survival, we experimentally prevented workers from jumping and measured their escape rate. Workers with unrestrained mandibles escaped from antlion pits significantly more frequently than workers with restrained mandibles. Our results indicate that some trap-jaw ant species can use mandible-powered jumps to escape from common predators. These results also provide a charismatic example of evolutionary co-option, where a trait that evolved for one function (predation) has been co-opted for another (defense).

  11. Survival Impact of Increasing Time to Treatment Initiation for Patients With Head and Neck Cancer in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Colin T; Galloway, Thomas J; Handorf, Elizabeth A; Egleston, Brian L; Wang, Lora S; Mehra, Ranee; Flieder, Douglas B; Ridge, John A

    2016-01-10

    To estimate the overall survival (OS) impact from increasing time to treatment initiation (TTI) for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), we examined patients who received curative therapy for the following sites: oral tongue, oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx. TTI was the number of days from diagnosis to initiation of curative treatment. The effect of TTI on OS was determined by using Cox regression models (MVA). Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) identified TTI thresholds via conditional inference trees to estimate the greatest differences in OS on the basis of randomly selected training and validation sets, and repeated this 1,000 times to ensure robustness of TTI thresholds. A total of 51,655 patients were included. On MVA, TTI of 61 to 90 days versus less than 30 days (hazard ratio [HR], 1.13; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.19) independently increased mortality risk. TTI of 67 days appeared as the optimal threshold on the training RPA, statistical significance was confirmed in the validation set (P < .001), and the 67-day TTI was the optimal threshold in 54% of repeated simulations. Overall, 96% of simulations validated two optimal TTI thresholds, with ranges of 46 to 52 days and 62 to 67 days. The median OS for TTI of 46 to 52 days or fewer versus 53 to 67 days versus greater than 67 days was 71.9 months (95% CI, 70.3 to 73.5 months) versus 61 months (95% CI, 57 to 66.1 months) versus 46.6 months (95% CI, 42.8 to 50.7 months), respectively (P < .001). In the most recent year with available data (2011), 25% of patients had TTI of greater than 46 days. TTI independently affects survival. One in four patients experienced treatment delay. TTI of greater than 46 to 52 days introduced an increased risk of death that was most consistently detrimental beyond 60 days. Prolonged TTI is currently affecting survival. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Novel Oncogenic Mutations of CBL in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia That Activate Growth and Survival Pathways Depend on Increased Metabolism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Margret S.; Reddy, Mamatha M.; Croteau, Nicole J.; Walz, Christoph; Weisbach, Henry; Podar, Klaus; Band, Hamid; Carroll, Martin; Reiter, Andreas; Larson, Richard A.; Salgia, Ravi; Griffin, James D.; Sattler, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by multiple mutagenic events that affect proliferation, survival, as well as differentiation. Recently, gain-of-function mutations in the α helical structure within the linker sequence of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CBL have been associated with AML. We identified four novel CBL mutations, including a point mutation (Y371H) and a putative splice site mutation in AML specimens. Characterization of these two CBL mutants revealed that coexpression with the receptor tyrosine kinases FLT3 (Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3) or KIT-induced ligand independent growth or ligand hyperresponsiveness, respectively. Growth of cells expressing mutant CBL required expression and kinase activity of FLT3. In addition to the CBL-dependent phosphorylation of FLT3 and CBL itself, transformation was associated with activation of Akt and STAT5 and required functional expression of the small GTPases Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. Furthermore, the mutations led to constitutively elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, which is commonly linked to increased glucose metabolism in cancer cells. Inhibition of hexokinase with 2-deoxyglucose blocked the transforming activity of CBL mutants and reduced activation of signaling mechanisms. Overall, our data demonstrate that mutations of CBL alter cellular biology at multiple levels and require not only the activation of receptor proximal signaling events but also an increase in cellular glucose metabolism. Pathways that are activated by CBL gain-of-function mutations can be efficiently targeted by small molecule drugs. PMID:20622007

  13. An incomplete TCA cycle increases survival of Salmonella Typhimurium during infection of resting and activated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Steven D; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Knudsen, Gitte M; Hinton, Jay C D; Thompson, Arthur

    2010-11-08

    In comparison to the comprehensive analyses performed on virulence gene expression, regulation and action, the intracellular metabolism of Salmonella during infection is a relatively under-studied area. We investigated the role of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in the intracellular replication of Salmonella Typhimurium in resting and activated macrophages, epithelial cells, and during infection of mice. We constructed deletion mutations of 5 TCA cycle genes in S. Typhimurium including gltA, mdh, sdhCDAB, sucAB, and sucCD. We found that the mutants exhibited increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated murine macrophages compared to the wild-type. In contrast, an epithelial cell infection model showed that the S. Typhimurium ΔsucCD and ΔgltA strains had reduced net intracellular replication compared to the wild-type. The glyoxylate shunt was not responsible for the net increased replication of the TCA cycle mutants within resting macrophages. We also confirmed that, in a murine infection model, the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD strains are attenuated for virulence. Our results suggest that disruption of the TCA cycle increases the ability of S. Typhimurium to survive within resting and activated murine macrophages. In contrast, epithelial cells are non-phagocytic cells and unlike macrophages cannot mount an oxidative and nitrosative defence response against pathogens; our results show that in HeLa cells the S. Typhimurium TCA cycle mutant strains show reduced or no change in intracellular levels compared to the wild-type. The attenuation of the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD mutants in mice, compared to their increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated macrophages suggest that Salmonella may encounter environments within the host where a complete TCA cycle is advantageous.

  14. Increased cell survival and cytogenetic integrity by spatial dose redistribution at a compact synchrotron X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilicic, Katarina; Dierolf, Martin; Günther, Benedikt; Walsh, Dietrich W. M.; Schmid, Ernst; Eggl, Elena; Achterhold, Klaus; Gleich, Bernhard; Combs, Stephanie E.; Molls, Michael; Schmid, Thomas E.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray microbeam radiotherapy can potentially widen the therapeutic window due to a geometrical redistribution of the dose. However, high requirements on photon flux, beam collimation, and system stability restrict its application mainly to large-scale, cost-intensive synchrotron facilities. With a unique laser-based Compact Light Source using inverse Compton scattering, we investigated the translation of this promising radiotherapy technique to a machine of future clinical relevance. We performed in vitro colony-forming assays and chromosome aberration tests in normal tissue cells after microbeam irradiation compared to homogeneous irradiation at the same mean dose using 25 keV X-rays. The microplanar pattern was achieved with a tungsten slit array of 50 μm slit size and a spacing of 350 μm. Applying microbeams significantly increased cell survival for a mean dose above 2 Gy, which indicates fewer normal tissue complications. The observation of significantly less chromosome aberrations suggests a lower risk of second cancer development. Our findings provide valuable insight into the mechanisms of microbeam radiotherapy and prove its applicability at a compact synchrotron, which contributes to its future clinical translation. PMID:29049300

  15. Different loci and mRNA copy number of the increased serum survival gene of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang-Ye; Li, Yi-Jing; Fan, Chen

    2018-02-01

    The increased serum survival gene (iss) has been identified as a virulence trait associated with the virulence of Escherichia coli, causing colibacillosis in poultry. However, it remains unclear as to whether iss mRNA copy number and sequence affect virulence. To examine these influences, we assessed the presence of iss, sequence analysis, iss mRNA copy number, and serum resistance. The iss gene was detected in 88 (all) E. coli isolates from different sources, and sequencing identified 16 alleles (32 different loci) and 10 amino acid sequences (10 different loci). Nested polymerase chain reaction improved iss detection. The isolates from sick chickens had >68% livability in serum resistance tests and higher iss mRNA copy number. The iss mRNA copy number highly correlated with mortality and E. coli livability. Student's t tests confirmed the relationship between the different loci to iss transcription, serum resistance, and virulence. These data suggest that iss mRNA copy number and different loci affect the virulence and serum resistance. These findings could be useful in further studies on the prevalence of iss among E. coli isolates and other virulence factors.

  16. Increased cell survival and cytogenetic integrity by spatial dose redistribution at a compact synchrotron X-ray source.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Burger

    Full Text Available X-ray microbeam radiotherapy can potentially widen the therapeutic window due to a geometrical redistribution of the dose. However, high requirements on photon flux, beam collimation, and system stability restrict its application mainly to large-scale, cost-intensive synchrotron facilities. With a unique laser-based Compact Light Source using inverse Compton scattering, we investigated the translation of this promising radiotherapy technique to a machine of future clinical relevance. We performed in vitro colony-forming assays and chromosome aberration tests in normal tissue cells after microbeam irradiation compared to homogeneous irradiation at the same mean dose using 25 keV X-rays. The microplanar pattern was achieved with a tungsten slit array of 50 μm slit size and a spacing of 350 μm. Applying microbeams significantly increased cell survival for a mean dose above 2 Gy, which indicates fewer normal tissue complications. The observation of significantly less chromosome aberrations suggests a lower risk of second cancer development. Our findings provide valuable insight into the mechanisms of microbeam radiotherapy and prove its applicability at a compact synchrotron, which contributes to its future clinical translation.

  17. Lundep, a sand fly salivary endonuclease increases Leishmania parasite survival in neutrophils and inhibits XIIa contact activation in human plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza C Chagas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the host's first line of defense against infections, and their extracellular traps (NET were recently shown to kill Leishmania parasites. Here we report a NET-destroying molecule (Lundep from the salivary glands of Lutzomyia longipalpis. Previous analysis of the sialotranscriptome of Lu. longipalpis showed the potential presence of an endonuclease. Indeed, not only was the cloned cDNA (Lundep shown to encode a highly active ss- and dsDNAse, but also the same activity was demonstrated to be secreted by salivary glands of female Lu. longipalpis. Lundep hydrolyzes both ss- and dsDNA with little sequence specificity with a calculated DNase activity of 300000 Kunitz units per mg of protein. Disruption of PMA (phorbol 12 myristate 13 acetate- or parasite-induced NETs by treatment with recombinant Lundep or salivary gland homogenates increases parasite survival in neutrophils. Furthermore, co-injection of recombinant Lundep with metacyclic promastigotes significantly exacerbates Leishmania infection in mice when compared with PBS alone or inactive (mutagenized Lundep. We hypothesize that Lundep helps the parasite to establish an infection by allowing it to escape from the leishmanicidal activity of NETs early after inoculation. Lundep may also assist blood meal intake by lowering the local viscosity caused by the release of host DNA and as an anticoagulant by inhibiting the intrinsic pathway of coagulation.

  18. Low dystrophin levels increase survival and improve muscle pathology and function in dystrophin/utrophin double-knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, Maaike; Hulsker, Margriet; Young, Courtney; Nadarajah, Vishna D.; Heemskerk, Hans; van der Weerd, Louise; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke M.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle-wasting disorder caused by the lack of functional dystrophin. There is no cure, but several clinical trials aimed to restore the synthesis of functional dystrophin are underway. The dystrophin levels needed for improvement of muscle pathology, function, and overall vitality are not known. Here, we describe the mdx/utrn−/−/XistΔhs mouse model, which expresses a range of low dystrophin levels, depending on the degree of skewing of X inactivation in a utrophin-negative background. Mdx/utrn−/− mice develop severe muscle weakness, kyphosis, respiratory and heart failure, and premature death closely resembling DMD pathology. We show that at dystrophin levels 4% dystrophin, histopathology is ameliorated, as well. These findings suggest that the dystrophin levels needed to benefit vitality and functioning of patients with DMD might be lower than those needed for full protection against muscle damage.—Van Putten, M., Hulsker, M., Young, C., Nadarajah, V. D., Heemskerk, H., van der Weerd, L., 't Hoen, P. A. C., van Ommen, G. J. B., Aartsma-Rus, A. M. Low dystrophin levels increase survival and improve muscle pathology and function in dystrophin/utrophin double-knockout mice. PMID:23460734

  19. Pioglitazone treatment increases survival and prevents body weight loss in tumor-bearing animals: possible anti-cachectic effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mércia Beluzi

    Full Text Available Cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by profound involuntary weight loss, fat depletion, skeletal muscle wasting, and asthenia; all symptoms are not entirely attributable to inadequate nutritional intake. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle loss during cancer cachexia development has been described systematically. The former was proposed to precede and be more rapid than the latter, which presents a means for the early detection of cachexia in cancer patients. Recently, pioglitazone (PGZ was proposed to exhibit anti-cancer properties, including a reduction in insulin resistance and adipose tissue loss; nevertheless, few studies have evaluated its effect on survival. For greater insight into a potential anti-cachectic effect due to PGZ, 8-week-old male Wistar rats were subcutaneously inoculated with 1 mL (2×107 of Walker 256 tumor cells. The animals were randomly assigned to two experimental groups: TC (tumor + saline-control and TP5 (tumor + PGZ/5 mg. Body weight, food ingestion and tumor growth were measured at baseline and after removal of tumor on days 7, 14 and 26. Samples from different visceral adipose tissue (AT depots were collected on days 7 and 14 and stored at -80o C (5 to 7 animals per day/group. The PGZ treatment showed an increase in the survival average of 27.3% (P< 0.01 when compared to TC. It was also associated with enhanced body mass preservation (40.7 and 56.3%, p< 0.01 on day 14 and 26 compared with the TC group. The treatment also reduced the final tumor mass (53.4%, p<0.05 and anorexia compared with the TC group during late-stage cachexia. The retroperitoneal AT (RPAT mass was preserved on day 7 compared with the TC group during the same experimental period. Such effect also demonstrates inverse relationship with tumor growth, on day 14. Gene expression of PPAR-γ, adiponectin, LPL and C/EBP-α from cachectic rats was upregulated after PGZ. Glucose uptake from adipocyte cells (RPAT was entirely re

  20. Calcineurin inhibition at the clinical phase of prion disease reduces neurodegeneration, improves behavioral alterations and increases animal survival.

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    Abhisek Mukherjee

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by a long pre-symptomatic phase followed by rapid and progressive clinical phase. Although rare in humans, the unconventional infectious nature of the disease raises the potential for an epidemic. Unfortunately, no treatment is currently available. The hallmark event in prion diseases is the accumulation of a misfolded and infectious form of the prion protein (PrP(Sc. Previous reports have shown that PrP(Sc induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes in calcium homeostasis in the brain of affected individuals. In this study we show that the calcium-dependent phosphatase Calcineurin (CaN is hyperactivated both in vitro and in vivo as a result of PrP(Sc formation. CaN activation mediates prion-induced neurodegeneration, suggesting that inhibition of this phosphatase could be a target for therapy. To test this hypothesis, prion infected wild type mice were treated intra-peritoneally with the CaN inhibitor FK506 at the clinical phase of the disease. Treated animals exhibited reduced severity of the clinical abnormalities and increased survival time compared to vehicle treated controls. Treatment also led to a significant increase in the brain levels of the CaN downstream targets pCREB and pBAD, which paralleled the decrease of CaN activity. Importantly, we observed a lower degree of neurodegeneration in animals treated with the drug as revealed by a higher number of neurons and a lower quantity of degenerating nerve cells. These changes were not dependent on PrP(Sc formation, since the protein accumulated in the brain to the same levels as in the untreated mice. Our findings contribute to an understanding of the mechanism of neurodegeneration in prion diseases and more importantly may provide a novel strategy for therapy that is beneficial at the clinical phase of the disease.

  1. (+)-Nootkatone and (+)-valencene from rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus increase survival rates in septic mice due to heme oxygenase-1 induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoyi, Konstantin; Jang, Hwa Jin; Lee, Young Soo; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Hye Jung; Seo, Han Geuk; Lee, Jae Heun; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Lee, Dong-Ung; Chang, Ki Churl

    2011-10-11

    The rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus have been used as traditional folk medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanism by which extract of rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus (ECR) elicits anti-inflammation has not been extensively investigated so far. The aim of the present study was to test whether heme oxygenase (HO)-1 induction is involved in the anti-inflammatory action of ECR. Induction of HO-1 and inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)/NO production by ECR and its 12 constituents (3 monoterpenes, 5 sesquiterpenes, and 4 aromatic compounds) were investigated using RAW264.7 cells in vitro. In addition, anti-inflammatory action of ECR and its two active ingredients (nookkatone, valencene) were confirmed in sepsis animal model in vivo. ECR increased HO-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner, which was correlated with significant inhibition of iNOS/NO production in LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. Among 12 compounds isolated from ECR, mostly sesquiterpenes induced stronger HO-1 expression than monoterpenes in macrophage cells. Nootkatone and valencene (sesquiterpenes) significantly inhibited iNOS expression and NO production in LPS-simulated RAW264.7 cells. Inhibition of iNOS expression by nootkatone, valencene, and ECR were significantly reduced in siHO-1 RNA transfected cells. Furthermore, all three showed marked inhibition of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in LPS-activated macrophages and increased survival rates in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice. Taken together, we concluded that possible anti-inflammatory mechanism of ECR is, at least, due to HO-1 induction, in which sesquiterpenes such as nootkatone and valencene play a crucial role. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased mortality among HIV-positive men on antiretroviral therapy: survival differences between sexes explained by late initiation in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanters S

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Steve Kanters,1,3 Margaret Nansubuga,2 Daniel Mwehire,2 Mary Odiit,2 Margaret Kasirye,2 William Musoke,2 Eric Druyts,3 Sanni Yaya,3 Anna Funk,3 Nathan Ford,4,5 Edward J Mills3,61Faculty of Health Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada, 2Mildmay Uganda, Kampala, Uganda; 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 4Médecins Sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland; 5Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town, South Africa; 6Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USABackground: We aimed to assess the relationship between gender and survival among adult patients newly enrolled on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Uganda. We also specifically examined the role of antenatal services in favoring women's access to HIV care.Methods: From an observational cohort study, we assessed survival and used logistic regression and differences in means to compare men and women who did not access care through antenatal services. Differences were assessed on measures of disease progression (WHO stage and CD4 count and demographic (age, marital status, and education, behavioral (sexual activity, disclosure to partner, and testing, and clinical variables (hepatitis B and C, syphilis, malaria, and anemia. A mediational analysis that considered gender as the initial variable, time to death as the outcome, initial CD4 count as the mediator, and age as a covariate was performed using an accelerated failure time model with a Weibull distribution.Results: Between 2004 and 2011, a total of 4775 patients initiated ART, and after exclusions 4537 (93.2% were included in analysis. Men initiating ART were more likely to have a WHO disease stage III or IV (odds ratio: 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.29–1.66, and lower CD4 cell counts compared to women (median baseline CD4 124 cells/mm3, interquartile range [IQR]: 43–205

  3. LIGHT (TNFSF14 Increases the Survival and Proliferation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Kyoung Heo

    Full Text Available LIGHT (HVEM-L, TNFSF14, or CD258, an entity homologous to lymphotoxins, with inducible nature and the ability to compete with herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM/tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related 2, is a member of the TNF superfamily. It is expressed as a homotrimer on activated T cells and dendritic cells (DCs, and has three receptors: HVEM, LT-β receptor (LTβR, and decoy receptor 3 (DcR3. So far, three receptors with distinct cellular expression patterns are known to interact with LIGHT. Follicular DCs and stromal cells bind LIGHT through LTβR. We monitored the effects of LIGHT on human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. At first, we checked the negative and positive differentiation markers of BM-MSCs. And we confirmed the quality of MSCs by staining cells undergoing adipogenesis (Oil Red O staining, chondrogenesis (Alcian blue staining, and osteogenesis (Alizarin red staining. After rhLIGHT treatment, we monitored the count, viability, and proliferation of cells and cell cycle distribution. PDGF and TGFβ production by rhLIGHT was examined by ELISA, and the underlying biological mechanisms were studied by immunoblotting by rhLIGHT treatment. LTβR was constitutively expressed on the surface of human BM-MSCs. Cell number and viability increased after rhLIGHT treatment. BM-MSC proliferation was induced by an increase in the S/G2/M phase. The expression of not only diverse cyclins such as cyclin B1, D1, D3, and E, but also CDK1 and CDK2, increased, while that of p27 decreased, after rhLIGHT treatment. RhLIGHT-induced PDGF and TGFβ production mediated by STAT3 and Smad3 activation accelerated BM-MSC proliferation. Thus, LIGHT and LTβR interaction increases the survival and proliferation of human BM-MSCs, and therefore, LIGHT might play an important role in stem cell therapy.

  4. Assessment of immunity against avian colibacillosis induced by an aroA mutant containing increased serum survival gene in broilers

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    Taghi Zahraei Salehi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Colibacillosis is an important disease in the poultry industry which causes serious economic damages. As it is suggested that vaccination is one of the means to control colibacillosis, we tried to investigate the vaccine potential of a ΔaroA derivative of an O78:K80 avian pathogenic Escherichia coli containing increased serum survival gene. 490 chicks were selected as follows: For assessment of virulence of ΔaroA mutant, 30 chicks were divided into three groups and injected with 0.5ml of PBS or bacterial suspension containing either10(7colony forming units (CFU of mutant or parent strains via subcutaneous route. Macroscopic lesions and mortality rate were recorded in different groups during the week after challenge. For assessment of safety and immunogenicity of the ΔaroA mutant, three groups of 20 chicks were vaccinated by aerosol administration of 250 ml of suspension containing 10(8 CFU of mutant strain at days 1 and 14, while the two other groups received PBS or wild type strain. Macroscopic lesions and mortality rate were recorded in different groups until day 21. To determine whether the vaccination is protective against challenges or not, the chickens were vaccinated at days 1 and 14 and challenged intramuscularly with either a homologous or heterologous strains at day 21. Macroscopic lesions and mortality rate were recorded in different groups during the week after challenge. The results revealed that the ΔaroA mutant was slightly virulent, however it was safe and did not cause mortality, lesions or weight loss after vaccination. Antibody responses were similar in the control and mutant groups and vaccination did not induce a significant humoral immunity. The mutant could not protect chickens against both homologous and heterologous challenges. This could be due to several factors such as the high amount of maternal antibodies in the first two weeks of life, and the vaccination procedure.

  5. Effect of Increased Radiotoxicity on Survival of Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Curatively Intended Radiotherapy.

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    Holgersson, Georg; Bergström, Stefan; Liv, Per; Nilsson, Jonas; Edlund, Per; Blomberg, Carl; Nyman, Jan; Friesland, Signe; Ekman, Simon; Asklund, Thomas; Henriksson, Roger; Bergqvist, Michael

    2015-10-01

    To elucidate the impact of different forms of radiation toxicities (esophagitis, radiation pneumonitis, mucositis and hoarseness), on the survival of patients treated with curatively intended radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Data were individually collected retrospectively for all patients diagnosed with NSCLC subjected to curatively intended radiotherapy (≥50 Gy) in Sweden during the time period 1990 to 2000. Esophagitis was the only radiation-induced toxicity with an impact on survival (hazard ratio=0.83, p=0.016). However, in a multivariate model, with clinical- and treatment-related factors taken into consideration, the impact of esophagitis on survival was no longer statistically significant (hazard ratio=0.88, p=0.17). The effect on survival seen in univariate analysis may be related to higher radiation dose and to the higher prevalence of chemotherapy in this group. The results do not suggest that the toxicities examined have any detrimental effect on overall survival. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of mouse interferon alpha/beta compared to single-agent chemotherapy in increasing survival time of mice after intravenous inoculation of Friend erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresser, I; Maury, C; Belardelli, F; Maunoury, M T; Machover, D

    1988-03-16

    DBA/2 mice received an iv injection of 2 X 10(6) Friend erythroleukemia cells (FLCs; approximately equal to 4 X 10(5) lethal dose50), which multiplied rapidly in the liver and spleen and killed all untreated or control treated mice between 7 and 12 days. Daily interferon (IFN) treatment resulted in a very marked increase in survival time and apparent cure of 4 of 22 tumor-inoculated mice. In contrast, treatment of tumor-injected (iv) mice with cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and methotrexate increased survival time by only a few days; and treatment of mice with cisplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, bleomycin, or etoposide was ineffective. However, when FLCs were injected ip, both cytostatic drugs and IFN exerted an antitumor effect. We conclude that IFN alpha/beta was particularly effective in inhibiting the development of liver and spleen metastases and in increasing mouse survival time after iv inoculation of FLCs.

  7. Aging as an evolvability-increasing program which can be switched off by organism to mobilize additional resources for survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulachev, Maxim V; Severin, Fedor F; Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, several pieces of convincing evidence were published indicating that aging of living organisms is programmed, being a particular case of programmed death of organism (phenoptosis). Among them, the following observations can be mentioned. (1) Species were described that show negligible aging. In mammals, the naked mole rat is the most impressive example. This is a rodent of mouse size living at least 10-fold longer than a mouse and having fecundity higher than a mouse and no agerelated diseases. (2) In some species with high aging rate, genes responsible for active organization of aging by poisoning of the organism with endogenous metabolites have been identified. (3) In women, standard deviations divided by the mean are the same for age of menarche (an event controlled by the ontogenetic program) and for age of menopause (an aging-related event). (4) Inhibitors of programmed cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) retard and in certain cases even reverse the development of age-dependent pathologies. (5) In aging species, the rate of aging is regulated by the individual which responds by changes in this rate to changes in the environmental conditions. In this review, we consider point (5) in detail. Data are summarized suggesting that inhibition of aging rate by moderate food restriction can be explained assuming that such restriction is perceived by the organism as a signal of future starvation. In response to this dramatic signal, the organism switches off such an optional program as aging, mobilizing in such a way additional reserves for survival. A similar explanation is postulated for geroprotective effects of heavy muscle work, a lowering or a rise in the external temperature, small amounts of metabolic poisons (hormesis), low doses of radiation, and other deleterious events. On the contrary, sometimes certain positive signals can prolong life by inhibiting the aging program in individuals who are useful for the community (e

  8. Survival from Traumatic Injury Does Not End at Hospital Discharge: Hospital-Acquired Infections Increase Post-Discharge Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Nitasha; Rimal, Ram C; Hamill, Mark; Love, Katie M; Lollar, Daniel; Collier, Bryan

    2017-07-01

    Hospital-acquired infections (HAI) in trauma patients increase inpatient morbidity and mortality. However, their impact on long-term mortality is not well understood. A retrospective trauma registry analysis of all patients admitted to an academic level I trauma center between July 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012 was performed. Patients included survived to discharge and were 18 years of age or older. Age, gender, Injury Severity Score (ISS), ventilator use, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and HAI were reviewed. Name, social security number, and date of birth were used to extract National Death Index data from 2008-2013 for an outcome of mortality after discharge, time to death, and cause of death. Unadjusted logistic regression was performed. Multiple logistic regression was used to adjust for patient and injury characteristics and to determine odds of mortality in the post-discharge period. A total of 8,275 patients met inclusion criteria; 65.4% were male and the median age was 47. The mean ISS was 11 ± 8.9. Nine hundred seventeen patients (11.1%) died after discharge; 4.8% of patients had hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and 4.2% had a urinary tract infection (UTI). The unadjusted odds ratio (OR) of mortality after discharge in patients who had pneumonia and UTI were 1.77 (1.35, 2.31, p mortality after discharge remained significant for pneumonia (OR = 1.57 (1.09, 2.23), p = 0.013) but not for UTI (OR = 1.25 (0.93, 1.68), p = 0.147). The top causes of death after discharge in patients with HAP were COPD (11.4%) and falls (7.1%). Trauma patients with HAP have higher mortality after hospital discharge. Prevention strategies for HAP including pulmonary toilet, early mobility, pain control, and early extubation must be a priority. Unfortunately, patients who develop pneumonia may have a decreased reserve, or ability to recover from their traumatic injuries and HAI. Further characterization of HAP and its subsequent

  9. Increased cell survival by inhibition of BRCA1 using an antisense approach in an estrogen responsive ovarian carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annab, Lois A; Hawkins, Rebecca E; Solomon, Greg; Barrett, J Carl; Afshari, Cynthia A

    2000-01-01

    antisense clone that had significantly low levels of BRCA1 protein was able to form twice as many tumors in ovariectomized nude mice with a decreased latency compared with a control clone. In multicellular mammalian organisms, a balance between cell proliferation and cell death is extremely important for the maintenance of normal healthy tissues. In support of this hypothesis, it has been shown that p53 and BRCA1 can form stable complexes, and can coactivate p21 and bax genes, which may lead to the activation of the apoptosis pathway [15]. The present data, which show that cells with a reduction of BRCA1 have a survival advantage in conditions where control cells fail to thrive, also supports this hypothesis. BRCA1 levels appear to affect the ability of cells to arrest growth or die in the absence of estrogenic growth-inducing conditions. Although mutations in this gene are uncommon in sporadic breast and ovarian tumors, BRCA1 expression levels and protein levels have been found to be reduced in sporadic human breast carcinomas [16,17,18,19]. In addition it has been demonstrated [20] that hormone-dependent tumors such as breast and ovarian cancers have a decreased ability to undergo apoptosis. Other mechanisms involving gene regulation may allow for decreased expression of BRCA1 in sporadic tumors. The response of BRCA1 mRNA and protein levels to mitogens and hormones in vitro suggests that BRCA1 may play a role in regulation of cell growth or maintenance [21]. The BRCA1 gene product may be involved in the regulation of hormone response pathways, and the present results demonstrate that loss of BRCA1 may result in loss of inhibitory control of these mitogenic pathways. These studies show that reduction in BRCA1 mRNA and protein can result in increased proliferation of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells in both in vitro and in vivo conditions, suggesting that BRCA1 may normally be acting as a growth inhibitor. Low BRCA1 levels found in sporadic cancers may be an important factor in

  10. The abundant free-living amoeba, Acanthamoeba polyphaga, increases the survival of Campylobacter jejuni in milk and orange juice

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    Jenny Olofsson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Campylobacter jejuni is a common cause of human bacterial diarrhea in most parts of the world. Most C. jejuni infections are acquired from contaminated poultry, milk, and water. Due to health care costs and human suffering, it is important to identify all possible sources of infection. Unpasteurized milk has been associated with several outbreaks of C. jejuni infection. Campylobacter has been identified on fresh fruit, and other gastrointestinal pathogens such as Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7 and Cryptosporidium have been involved in fruit juice outbreaks. C. jejuni is sensitive to the acidic environment of fruit juice, but co-cultures with the amoeba, Acanthamoeba polyphaga, have previously been shown to protect C. jejuni at low pH. Methods: To study the influence of A. polyphaga on the survival of C. jejuni in milk and juice, the bacteria were incubated in the two products at room temperature and at 4°C with the following treatments: A C. jejuni preincubated with A. polyphaga before the addition of product, B C. jejuni mixed with A. polyphaga after the addition of product, and C C. jejuni in product without A. polyphaga. Bacterial survival was assessed by colony counts on blood agar plates. Results: Co-culture with A. polyphaga prolonged the C. jejuni survival both in milk and juice. The effect of co-culture was most pronounced in juice stored at room temperature. On the other hand, A. polyphaga did not have any effect on C. jejuni survival during pasteurization of milk or orange juice, indicating that this is a good method for eliminating C. jejuni in these products. Conclusion: Amoebae-associated C. jejuni in milk and juice might cause C. jejuni infections.

  11. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of increased hepatic sequestration after splenectomy on the survival and osmotic fragility of red cells in rats, with reference to protein levels in diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisaoka, Fumiko; Shiraki, Keizo; Sagawa, Sueko

    1977-01-01

    The sequestration of erythrocytes in rats was studied using an isologous 51-Cr labeled population of either normal or N-ethyl-maleimide treated red cells. Experiments were performed for observing the effects of the change in the hepatic sequestration of altered red cells on the osmotic fragility and the survival time of circulating red cells. The rate of sequestration in liver at different period after splenectomy was measured with respect to the survival time and osmotic fragility of red cells. The parameters of the proliferative response imposed on liver were also observed. The spleen sequestered selectively damaged red cells, while the liver compensated and overshot the sequestration for spleen after splenectomy. The sequestering response in liver increased gradually and reached the maximum level around 8 weeks after splenectomy, and then declined toward the control level. This compensatory response in liver was not observed in the rats fed with low protein diet. Therefore, the proliferative response imposed on liver by an extra work after splenectomy was not stimulated in the rats fed with low protein diet. Splenectomy prolonged erythrocyte survival and reduced the osmotic fragility of normal red cells, but the compensatory increase in the sequestration of damaged red cells in liver did not alter the survival and osmotic fragility of normal red cells. This fact indicates that the increased sequestration of reticuloendothelial cells in liver is basically reparative, and it is impossible to compensate for the absence of the spleen because of the inability to duplicate certain anatomic features peculiar to the spleen. (Iwakiri, K.)

  13. Sodium chloride inhibits the growth and infective capacity of the amphibian chytrid fungus and increases host survival rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Pirrie Stockwell

    Full Text Available The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a recently emerged pathogen that causes the infectious disease chytridiomycosis and has been implicated as a contributing factor in the global amphibian decline. Since its discovery, research has been focused on developing various methods of mitigating the impact of chytridiomycosis on amphibian hosts but little attention has been given to the role of antifungal agents that could be added to the host's environment. Sodium chloride is a known antifungal agent used routinely in the aquaculture industry and this study investigates its potential for use as a disease management tool in amphibian conservation. The effect of 0-5 ppt NaCl on the growth, motility and survival of the chytrid fungus when grown in culture media and its effect on the growth, infection load and survivorship of infected Peron's tree frogs (Litoria peronii in captivity, was investigated. The results reveal that these concentrations do not negatively affect the survival of the host or the pathogen. However, concentrations greater than 3 ppt significantly reduced the growth and motility of the chytrid fungus compared to 0 ppt. Concentrations of 1-4 ppt NaCl were also associated with significantly lower host infection loads while infected hosts exposed to 3 and 4 ppt NaCl were found to have significantly higher survival rates. These results support the potential for NaCl to be used as an environmentally distributed antifungal agent for the prevention of chytridiomycosis in susceptible amphibian hosts. However, further research is required to identify any negative effects of salt exposure on both target and non-target organisms prior to implementation.

  14. Hydroxyurea-Increased Fetal Hemoglobin Is Associated with Less Organ Damage and Longer Survival in Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzhugh, Courtney D; Hsieh, Matthew M; Allen, Darlene; Coles, Wynona A; Seamon, Cassie; Ring, Michael; Zhao, Xiongce; Minniti, Caterina P; Rodgers, Griffin P; Schechter, Alan N; Tisdale, John F; Taylor, James G

    2015-01-01

    Adults with sickle cell anemia (HbSS) are inconsistently treated with hydroxyurea. We retrospectively evaluated the effects of elevating fetal hemoglobin with hydroxyurea on organ damage and survival in patients enrolled in our screening study between 2001 and 2010. An electronic medical record facilitated development of a database for comparison of study parameters based on hydroxyurea exposure and dose. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00011648. Three hundred eighty-three adults with homozygous sickle cell disease were analyzed with 59 deaths during study follow-up. Cox regression analysis revealed deceased subjects had more hepatic dysfunction (elevated alkaline phosphatase, Hazard Ratio = 1.005, 95% CI 1.003-1.006, phydroxyurea, although only 66% of those received a dose within the recommended therapeutic range. Hydroxyurea use was associated with improved survival (Hazard Ratio = 0.58, 95% CI 0.34-0.97, p = 0.040). This effect was most pronounced in those taking the recommended dose of 15-35 mg/kg/day (Hazard Ratio 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.73, p = 0.0050). Hydroxyurea use was not associated with changes in organ function over time. Further, subjects with higher fetal hemoglobin responses to hydroxyurea were more likely to survive (p = 0.0004). While alkaline phosphatase was lowest in patients with the best fetal hemoglobin response (95.4 versus 123.6, p = 0.0065 and 96.1 versus 113.6U/L, p = 0.041 at first and last visits, respectively), other markers of organ damage were not consistently improved over time in patients with the highest fetal hemoglobin levels. Our data suggest that adults should be treated with the maximum tolerated hydroxyurea dose, ideally before organ damage occurs. Prospective studies are indicated to validate these findings.

  15. First feeding of Eugerres brasilianus (Carapeva larvae with Acartia tonsa (Copepod nauplii increases survival and resistance to acute stress

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    Wanessa de Melo Costa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rotifer Brachionus sp. is commonly used for larval feeding in marine fish hatcheries. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the inclusion of Acartia tonsa nauplii in the initial diet of carapeva larvae improves their survival, growth and resistance to stress when compared to the regimen containing only rotifers. Adult copepods were collected in the wild and cultured with the microalgae Chaetoceros muelleri, Isochrysis galbana and Nannochloropsis oculata to obtain nauplii. Carapeva larvae were grown for 15 days using four treatments and three replicates: 1 Brachionus plicatilis rotifers (10 to 15/mL; 2 A. tonsa nauplii (0.25 to 0.5/mL; 3 Brachionus plicatilis rotifers (5 to 7.5/mL + A. tonsa nauplii (0.12 to 0.25/mL, and 4 no supply of live feed. After 15 days, the carapeva larvae were subjected to stress by exposure to air for 10 seconds and then returned to the source tank to evaluate survival after 24 h. Survival and stress resistance were higher in carapeva larvae fed B. plicatilis + A. tonsa nauplii (P<0.05, 20.9 ± 11.2% and 88.9%, respectively. These results confirm the positive effect of the inclusion of copepod nauplii in the diet of fish larvae. However, more research is needed to validate these results.

  16. Escin Increases the Survival Rate of LPS-Induced Septic Mice Through Inhibition of HMGB1 Release from Macrophages

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    Yajun Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have described the effects of Escin on improving the survival rate of endotoxemic animals. The purpose of this study was to explore the molecular mechanisms of this potentially beneficial treatment. Methods: First, the survival rate of endotoxemic mice was monitored for up to 2 weeks after Escin pretreatment, Escin post-treatment, or Escin post-treatment + rHMGB1. The effects of Escin on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 and HMGB1 in the serum of endotoxemic mice and LPS-induced macrophages were evaluated by ELISA. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of HMGB1 in LPS-induced macrophages were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Additionally, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 was evaluated by ELISA in rHMGB1-induced macrophages. Finally, the protein levels and the activity of NF-κB in macrophages were checked by Western blot and ELISA, respectively. Results: Both pretreatment and post-treatment with Escin could improve the survival rate of endotoxemic mice, while exogenous rHMGB1 reversed this effect. In addition, Escin decreased the level of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 and HMGB1 in endotoxemic mice and in LPS-induced macrophages. Escin could also inhibit the mRNA levels and activity of HMGB1. The release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-a, IL-1ß, IL-6 could be suppressed in rHMGB1-induced macrophages by Escin. Finally, Escin could suppress the activation of NF-κB in LPS-induced macrophages. Conclusion: Escin could improve the survival of mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia. This effect maybe meditated by reducing the release of HMGB1, resulting in the suppression of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  17. Escin Increases the Survival Rate of LPS-Induced Septic Mice Through Inhibition of HMGB1 Release from Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yajun; Wang, Hongrui; Mao, Min; Liang, Chao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Deijun; Wei, Ziran; Gao, Shunxiang; Hu, Bo; Wang, Lianghua; Cai, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have described the effects of Escin on improving the survival rate of endotoxemic animals. The purpose of this study was to explore the molecular mechanisms of this potentially beneficial treatment. First, the survival rate of endotoxemic mice was monitored for up to 2 weeks after Escin pretreatment, Escin post-treatment, or Escin post-treatment + rHMGB1. The effects of Escin on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and HMGB1 in the serum of endotoxemic mice and LPS-induced macrophages were evaluated by ELISA. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of HMGB1 in LPS-induced macrophages were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Additionally, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 was evaluated by ELISA in rHMGB1-induced macrophages. Finally, the protein levels and the activity of NF-κB in macrophages were checked by Western blot and ELISA, respectively. Both pretreatment and post-treatment with Escin could improve the survival rate of endotoxemic mice, while exogenous rHMGB1 reversed this effect. In addition, Escin decreased the level of the pro-inflammatory cytokinesTNF-α,IL-1β, IL-6 and HMGB1 in endotoxemic mice and in LPS-induced macrophages. Escin could also inhibit the mRNA levels and activity of HMGB1. The release of the pro-inflammatory cytokinesTNF-α,IL-1β, IL-6 could be suppressed in rHMGB1-induced macrophages by Escin. Finally, Escin could suppress the activation of NF- κB in LPS-induced macrophages. Escin could improve the survival of mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia. This effect maybe meditated by reducing the release of HMGB1, resulting in the suppression of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Hemangiosarcoma in a Dog: Unusual Presentation and Increased Survival Using a Complementary/Holistic Approach Combined with Metronomic Chemotherapy

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    Philip Chaikin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report documents the clinical and pathologic findings in a 12-year-old terrier mix with intraocular and splenic hemangiosarcoma. Pathologic findings in both the spleen and globe were consistent with hemangiosarcoma with a low mitotic count. Initial treatment consisted of enucleation and then splenectomy followed by one cycle of conventional doxorubicin chemotherapy. Due to poor tolerance, a subsequent treatment regimen consisted of metronomic chemotherapy with chlorambucil combined with an alternative/complementary regimen of I’m-Yunity (polysaccharopeptide and Yunnan Baiyao. Follow-up thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasounds over a period of 24 months showed no evidence of pulmonary, hepatic, or right atrial metastases, during which time the patient had an excellent quality of life. However, shortly after achieving two-year survival, the patient developed new onset seizures unresponsive to anticonvulsant therapy. Therefore, a decision was made to euthanize the dog given that the most likely etiology of the seizures was a brain tumor. Overall, this is an exceptional treatment response given the poor survival statistics of hemangiosarcoma even with conventional chemotherapy. However, additional clinical pharmacology and clinical trial data are needed to further support the use of a complementary/holistic approach in combination with metronomic chemotherapy.

  19. Distinct Effects of miR-210 Reduction on Neurogenesis: Increased Neuronal Survival of Inflammation But Reduced Proliferation Associated with Mitochondrial Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloboueva, Ludmila A; Sun, Xiaoyun; Xu, Lijun; Ouyang, Yi-Bing; Giffard, Rona G

    2017-03-15

    Neurogenesis is essential to brain development and plays a central role in the response to brain injury. Stroke and head trauma stimulate proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs); however, the survival of young neurons is sharply reduced by postinjury inflammation. Cellular mitochondria are critical to successful neurogenesis and are a major target of inflammatory injury. Mitochondrial protection was shown to improve survival of young neurons. This study tested whether reducing cellular microRNA-210 (miR-210) would enhance mitochondrial function and improve survival of young murine neurons under inflammatory conditions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of miR-210 inhibition to enhance and protect mitochondrial function through upregulation of mitochondrial proteins. Here, miR-210 inhibition significantly increased neuronal survival and protected the activity of mitochondrial enzymes cytochrome c oxidase and aconitase in differentiating NSC cultures exposed to inflammatory mediators. Unexpectedly, we found that reducing miR-210 significantly attenuated NSC proliferation upon induction of differentiation. Further investigation revealed that increased mitochondrial function suppressed the shift to primarily glycolytic metabolism and reduced mitochondrial length characteristic of dividing cells. Activation of AMP-regulated protein kinase-retinoblastoma signaling is important in NSC proliferation and the reduction of this activation observed by miR-210 inhibition is one mechanism contributing to the reduced proliferation. Postinjury neurogenesis occurs as a burst of proliferation that peaks in days, followed by migration and differentiation over weeks. Our studies suggest that mitochondrial protective miR-210 inhibition should be delayed until after the initial burst of proliferation, but could be beneficial during the prolonged differentiation stage. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Increasing the success of endogenous neurogenesis after brain injury

  20. Hydroxyurea-Increased Fetal Hemoglobin Is Associated with Less Organ Damage and Longer Survival in Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney D Fitzhugh

    Full Text Available Adults with sickle cell anemia (HbSS are inconsistently treated with hydroxyurea.We retrospectively evaluated the effects of elevating fetal hemoglobin with hydroxyurea on organ damage and survival in patients enrolled in our screening study between 2001 and 2010.An electronic medical record facilitated development of a database for comparison of study parameters based on hydroxyurea exposure and dose. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00011648.Three hundred eighty-three adults with homozygous sickle cell disease were analyzed with 59 deaths during study follow-up. Cox regression analysis revealed deceased subjects had more hepatic dysfunction (elevated alkaline phosphatase, Hazard Ratio = 1.005, 95% CI 1.003-1.006, p<0.0.0001, kidney dysfunction (elevated creatinine, Hazard Ratio = 1.13, 95% CI 1.00-1.27, p = 0.043, and cardiopulmonary dysfunction (elevated tricuspid jet velocity on echocardiogram, Hazard Ratio = 2.22, 1.23-4.02, p = 0.0082. Sixty-six percent of subjects were treated with hydroxyurea, although only 66% of those received a dose within the recommended therapeutic range. Hydroxyurea use was associated with improved survival (Hazard Ratio = 0.58, 95% CI 0.34-0.97, p = 0.040. This effect was most pronounced in those taking the recommended dose of 15-35 mg/kg/day (Hazard Ratio 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.73, p = 0.0050. Hydroxyurea use was not associated with changes in organ function over time. Further, subjects with higher fetal hemoglobin responses to hydroxyurea were more likely to survive (p = 0.0004. While alkaline phosphatase was lowest in patients with the best fetal hemoglobin response (95.4 versus 123.6, p = 0.0065 and 96.1 versus 113.6U/L, p = 0.041 at first and last visits, respectively, other markers of organ damage were not consistently improved over time in patients with the highest fetal hemoglobin levels.Our data suggest that adults should be treated with the maximum tolerated hydroxyurea dose

  1. Edema-induced increase in tumour cell survival for 125I and 103Pd prostate permanent seed implants - a bio-mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Ning; Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2002-01-01

    Edema caused by the surgical procedure of prostate seed implantation expands the source-to-point distances within the prostate and hence decreases the dose coverage. The decrease of dose coverage results in an increase in tumour cell survival. To investigate the effects of edema on tumour cell survival, a bio-mathematical model of edema and the corresponding cell killing by continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) was developed so that tumour cell surviving fractions can be estimated in an edematous prostate for both 125 I and 103 Pd seed implants. The dynamic nature of edema and its resolution were modelled with an exponential function V(T)=V p (1+M exp(-0.693T/T e )) where V p is the prostate volume before implantation, M is the edema magnitude and T e is edema half-life (EHL). The dose rate of a radioactive seed was calculated according to AAPM TG43, i.e. D radical S k Δg(r) φ-bar an /r 2 , where r is the distance between a seed and a given point. The distance r is now a function of time because of edema. The g(r) was approximated as 1/r 0.4 and 1/r 0.8 for 125 I and 103 Pd, respectively. By expanding the mathematical expression of the resultant dose rate in a Taylor series of exponential functions of time, the dose rate was made equivalent to that produced from multiple fictitious radionuclides of different decay constants and strengths. The biologically effective dose (BED) for an edematous prostate implant was then calculated using a generalized Dale equation. The cell surviving fraction was computed as exp(-αBED), where α is the linear coefficient of the survival curve. The tumour cell survival was calculated for both 125 I and 103 Pd seed implants and for different tumour potential doubling time (TPDT) (from 5 days to 30 days) and for edemas of different magnitudes (from 0% to 95%) and edema half-lives (from 4 days to 30 days). Tumour cell survival increased with the increase of edema magnitude and EHL. For a typical edema of a half-life of 10 days

  2. Edema-induced increase in tumour cell survival for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd prostate permanent seed implants - a bio-mathematical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue Ning; Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2002-04-01

    Edema caused by the surgical procedure of prostate seed implantation expands the source-to-point distances within the prostate and hence decreases the dose coverage. The decrease of dose coverage results in an increase in tumour cell survival. To investigate the effects of edema on tumour cell survival, a bio-mathematical model of edema and the corresponding cell killing by continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) was developed so that tumour cell surviving fractions can be estimated in an edematous prostate for both {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seed implants. The dynamic nature of edema and its resolution were modelled with an exponential function V(T)=V{sub p} (1+M exp(-0.693T/T{sub e})) where V{sub p} is the prostate volume before implantation, M is the edema magnitude and T{sub e} is edema half-life (EHL). The dose rate of a radioactive seed was calculated according to AAPM TG43, i.e. D radical S{sub k}{delta}g(r) {phi}-bar{sub an}/r{sup 2}, where r is the distance between a seed and a given point. The distance r is now a function of time because of edema. The g(r) was approximated as 1/r{sup 0.4} and 1/r{sup 0.8} for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, respectively. By expanding the mathematical expression of the resultant dose rate in a Taylor series of exponential functions of time, the dose rate was made equivalent to that produced from multiple fictitious radionuclides of different decay constants and strengths. The biologically effective dose (BED) for an edematous prostate implant was then calculated using a generalized Dale equation. The cell surviving fraction was computed as exp(-{alpha}BED), where {alpha} is the linear coefficient of the survival curve. The tumour cell survival was calculated for both {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seed implants and for different tumour potential doubling time (TPDT) (from 5 days to 30 days) and for edemas of different magnitudes (from 0% to 95%) and edema half-lives (from 4 days to 30 days). Tumour cell survival increased

  3. Mesenterico-portal vein resection in patients with pancreatico-duodenal cancer is safe and may increase survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storkholm, Jan Henrik; Hansen, Carsten Palnæs

    2014-01-01

    and 25 women. RESULTS: A total of 44 patients (93.7%) had ductal adenocarcinomas. In all, 39 patients (83%) had T3 tumours, and 38 patients (80.9%) had involvement of lymph nodes. Furthermore, 29 patients (62%) had a pancreaticoduodenectomy, 15 patients (32%) a total pancreatectomy and three patients (6......INTRODUCTION: Pancreatic cancer is one of the most serious gastrointestinal cancers, and in the US and Europe it is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Radical surgery is the only option available for long-term survival. The aim of this study was to describe the surgical technique...... and the results of portal vein/superior mesenteric vein resection in patients with pancreatic cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between 1 April 2009 and 1 April 2013, 354 patients underwent resection for pancreatic malignancy. A total of 47 portal vein/superior mesenteric vein resections were performed in 22 men...

  4. The small-molecule TNF-α inhibitor, UTL-5g, delays deaths and increases survival rates for mice treated with high doses of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jiajiu; Media, Joseph; Chen, Ben; Valeriote, Fredrick

    2013-09-01

    UTL-5g is a novel small-molecule chemoprotector that lowers hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and myelotoxicity induced by cisplatin through TNF-α inhibition among other factors. The objective of this study was to investigate whether UTL-5g can reduce the overall acute toxicity of cisplatin and increase cisplatin tolerability in mice. BDF1 female mice were treated individually with UTL-5g (suspended in Ora-Plus) by oral gavage at 60 mg/kg, 30 min before i.p. injection of cisplatin at 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg, respectively, on Day 0. Starting from Day 1, individual mice were again treated daily by the same dose of UTL-5g for 4 consecutive days. Survivals and body weights were monitored. UTL-5g treatment increased the survival rate and delayed the time to death for mice treated with 150 % of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of cisplatin (15 mg/kg). Likewise, at 200 % of the MTD of cisplatin (20 mg/kg), treatment of UTL-5g increased the survival rate and delayed the time to death. Treatment of UTL-5g did not have a significant effect on weight loss induced by cisplatin, indicating that body weight may not be a sensitive-enough measure for chemoprotection of UTL-5g against cisplatin. In summary, UTL-5g delayed deaths and increased survival rates of mice treated by high doses of cisplatin, indicating that UTL-5g is capable of reducing the overall acute toxicity of cisplatin and increased cisplatin tolerability in mice; this is in line with the specific chemoprotective effects of UTL-5g previously reported. Further investigation of UTL-5g in combination with cisplatin is warranted.

  5. Endovascular Thrombectomy for Ischemic Stroke Increases Disability-Free Survival, Quality of Life, and Life Expectancy and Reduces Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce C. V. Campbell

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEndovascular thrombectomy improves functional outcome in large vessel occlusion ischemic stroke. We examined disability, quality of life, survival and acute care costs in the EXTEND-IA trial, which used CT-perfusion imaging selection.MethodsLarge vessel ischemic stroke patients with favorable CT-perfusion were randomized to endovascular thrombectomy after alteplase versus alteplase-only. Clinical outcome was prospectively measured using 90-day modified Rankin scale (mRS. Individual patient expected survival and net difference in Disability/Quality-adjusted life years (DALY/QALY up to 15 years from stroke were modeled using age, sex, 90-day mRS, and utility scores. Level of care within the first 90 days was prospectively measured and used to estimate procedure and inpatient care costs (US$ reference year 2014.ResultsThere were 70 patients, 35 in each arm, mean age 69, median NIHSS 15 (IQR 12–19. The median (IQR disability-weighted utility score at 90 days was 0.65 (0.00–0.91 in the alteplase-only versus 0.91 (0.65–1.00 in the endovascular group (p = 0.005. Modeled life expectancy was greater in the endovascular versus alteplase-only group (median 15.6 versus 11.2 years, p = 0.02. The endovascular thrombectomy group had fewer simulated DALYs lost over 15 years [median (IQR 5.5 (3.2–8.7 versus 8.9 (4.7–13.8, p = 0.02] and more QALY gained [median (IQR 9.3 (4.2–13.1 versus 4.9 (0.3–8.5, p = 0.03]. Endovascular patients spent less time in hospital [median (IQR 5 (3–11 days versus 8 (5–14 days, p = 0.04] and rehabilitation [median (IQR 0 (0–28 versus 27 (0–65 days, p = 0.03]. The estimated inpatient costs in the first 90 days were less in the thrombectomy group (average US$15,689 versus US$30,569, p = 0.008 offsetting the costs of interhospital transport and the thrombectomy procedure (average US$10,515. The average saving per patient treated with thrombectomy was US$4

  6. Predominance of Th1 response, increase of megakaryocytes and Kupffer cells are related to survival in Trypanosoma cruzi infected mice treated with Lycopodium clavatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski-Temporini, Gislaine Janaina; Lopes, Carina Ribeiro; Massini, Paula Fernanda; Brustolin, Camila Fernanda; Sandri, Patricia Flora; Ferreira, Érika Cristina; Aleixo, Denise Lessa; Pala, Nelson Roberto; de Araújo, Silvana Marques

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the number of megakaryocytes, Kupffer cells and ratios of Th1/Th2 and Th1/Th17 cytokines in survival of mice infected with Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and treated with Lycopodium clavatum. In a blind, randomized and controlled assay, Swiss male mice, 8weeks-old, infected with 1400 trypomastigotes (Y strain) were divided into groups and treated with: GLy - Lycopodium clavatum dynamization13c and GCI - alcohol solution 7° GL (vehicle medicine). The treatment was offered two days before infection and on the 2nd, 4th and 6th days after infection, overnight (1mL/100mL) and ad libitum. Parameters assessed were: survival rate, number of megakaryocytes and Kupffer cells, cytokines dosage (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17), Th1/Th2 and Th1/Th17 ratios. The increase in megakaryocytes, Kupffer cells, predominance of Th1 response, with increased TNF-α, IL-10, TNF-α/IL-4, TNF-α/IL-17 and decreased IL-6 IL-6/IL-4, are related to increased survival in mice infected with T. cruzi and treated with Lycopodium clavatum 13c. This result demonstrates the possibility of an alternative approach for the treatment of Chagas disease with dynamized drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bee bread increases honeybee haemolymph protein and promote better survival despite of causing higher Nosema ceranae abundance in honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basualdo, Marina; Barragán, Sergio; Antúnez, Karina

    2014-08-01

    Adequate protein nutrition supports healthy honeybees and reduces the susceptibility to disease. However little is known concerning the effect of the diet on Nosema ceranae development, an obligate intracellular parasite that disturbs the protein metabolism of honeybees (Apis mellifera). Here we tested the effect of natural (bee bread) and non-natural protein diets (substitute) on haemolymph proteins titers of honeybee and N. ceranae spore production. The natural diet induced higher levels of protein and parasite development, but the survival of bees was also higher than with non-natural diets. The data showed that the administration of an artificially high nutritious diet in terms of crude protein content is not sufficient to promote healthy bees; rather the protein ingested should be efficiently assimilated. The overall results support the idea that the physiological condition of the bees is linked to protein levels in the haemolymph, which affects the tolerance to parasite; consequently the negative impact of the parasite on host fitness is not associated only with the level of infection. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Postoperative Delirium After Liver Transplantation is Associated With Increased Length of Stay and Lower Survival in a Prospective Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Sonja; Schubert, Maria; Burkhalter, Hanna; Dutkowski, Philipp; De Geest, Sabina

    2017-03-01

    Although postoperative delirium (POD) is a common in-hospital complication associated with negative outcomes, evidence in liver transplantation (LT) is scarce. We examined the incidence and duration of POD, its impact on outcomes and health-care utilization, and described predisposing and precipitating factors favoring POD development. This prospective cohort study included adults undergoing transplantation in a tertiary hospital. Postoperative delirium was assessed 3 times daily until 24 days post-LT, with the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist on the intensive care unit (ICU) and the Delirium Observation Screening Scale on the ward. Postoperative delirium was noted if any of the daily measurements was positive. Forty-two patients (69% male, mean age 55 years, median Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score 15 [interquartile range 8-26]) were included. The incidence of POD was 45.2%, with a median duration of 5 days. Patients with POD had longer ICU (median 8 vs 2 days, P = .000) and hospital stays (median 32 vs 14 days, P = .000) as well as shorter survival (Breslow test P = .045, log-rank test P = .150). Pre-LT comorbidities and perioperative factors might be related to POD development. Nurses are key persons in the detection of POD in the daily clinical routine. The high incidence of POD and its negative association with patient outcomes highlight not only the relevance of systematic assessment of POD after LT but also the need for preventive interventions.

  9. Elevated plasma YKL-40 predicts increased risk of gastrointestinal cancer and decreased survival after any cancer diagnosis in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J.S.; Bojesen, S.E.; Mylin, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Elevated plasma YKL-40 is a biomarker of poor prognosis in cancer patients. We tested the hypotheses that elevated plasma YKL-40 predicts risk of cancer as well as survival after a cancer diagnosis in the general population. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective cohort study of 8......,899 subjects (20 to 95 years) from the Danish general population, the Copenhagen City Heart Study, observed for 11 years for cancer incidence and 14 years for death: 1,432 participants had a first incident cancer, 968 of these died. Hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer events and death after events according......) after any cancer and 2.4 (95% CI, 1.3 to 4.3; P = .005) after gastrointestinal cancer in participants with YKL-40 category 91% to 100% versus 0% to 33%. CONCLUSION: In the general population, elevated plasma YKL-40 predicts increased risk of gastrointestinal cancer and decreased survival after any...

  10. Racemic oleracein E increases the survival rate and attenuates memory impairment in D-galactose/NaNO₂-induced senescent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Pei; Sun, Hong-Xiang; Liu, Ce-Jia; Hu, Ming-Hong; He, Xiu-Quan; Yue, Su; Jiao, Ze-Zhao; Xiang, Lan

    2016-05-15

    Compounds that possess a pyrrolidone skeleton are a rich resource for the discovery of nootropic drugs. Oleracein E (OE), which possesses both tetrahydroisoquinoline and pyrrolidone skeletons, was first isolated from the medicinal plant Portulaca oleracea L. and was thought to be an active component in the cognition-improvement effect induced by this herb. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of OE on cognitive impairment in senescent mice and its underlying mechanism of action. Senescent Kunming mice were established by the intraperitoneal injection of D-galactose (D-gal, 1250 mg/kg/d) and NaNO2 (90 mg/kg/d) for 8 weeks. OE (3 mg/kg/d, 15 mg/kg/d) was orally administered for 8 weeks, and the nootropic drug piracetam (PA, 400 mg/kg/d) was used as a positive control. A Morris water maze was used to assess cognitive ability. GSH and MDA levels and T-AOC, SOD, and CAT activities in the brain or plasma were determined. Hippocampal morphology was observed by HE staining, and expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Caspase-3 was observed by immunohistochemical staining. Large-dosage treatments with D-gal/NaNO2 for 8 weeks significantly reduced survival, impaired spatial memory capacity, compensatorily up-regulated GSH level and T-AOC and SOD activities, decreased CAT activity, and induced hippocampal neuronal damage and apoptosis as reflected by the apparent low expression of Bcl-2 and high expression of Bax and Caspase-3. OE significantly prolonged lifespan and was more potent than PA. Similar to PA, OE at 15 mg/kg/d improved memory capacity. The underlying mechanism of action was related to the reversal of abnormal brain antioxidant biomarkers (GSH, T-AOC, and SOD) to normal levels and the inhibition of hippocampal neuronal apoptosis. OE from P. oleracea is an active compound for improving cognitive function and is also a candidate nootropic drug for the treatment of age-related dementia. Copyright © 2016

  11. Lack of potassium channel induces proliferation and survival causing increased neurogenesis and two-fold hippocampus enlargement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almgren, Malin; Persson, Ann-Sophie; Fenghua, Chen

    2007-01-01

    -fold within dentate gyrus (DG), CA2/3, and hilus of 12-week-old mceph/mceph versus wild type mice. In CA1, there was a tendency toward an increase in volume and in number of astrocytes. The volume estimates in newborn and p14 mice suggest that the overgrowth in mceph/mceph hippocampus starts between birth...

  12. Survival analysis of increases in care needs associated with dementia and living alone among older long-term care service users in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huei-Ru; Otsubo, Tetsuya; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2017-08-15

    Japan is known for its long life expectancy and rapidly aging society that there are various demands of older adults need to be fulfilled with, and one of them is long-term care needs. Therefore, Japan implemented the Long-Term Care Insurance in year 2000 for citizens who are above 65-year old and citizens who are above 40-year old in needs of long-term care services. This study was undertaken to longitudinally examine the influence of dementia and living alone on care needs increases among older long-term care insurance service users in Japan. Long-term care insurance claims data were used to identify enrollees who applied for long-term care services between October 2010 and September 2011, and subjects were tracked until March 2015. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was conducted to examine increases in care needs over time in months. Cox regression models were used to examine the effects of dementia and living alone on care needs increases. The cumulative survival rates before care needs increased over the 4.5-year observation period were 17.6% in the dementia group and 31.9% in the non-dementia group. After adjusting for age, sex, care needs level, and status of living alone, the risk of care needs increases was found to be 1.5 times higher in the dementia group. Living alone was not a significant risk factor of care needs increases, but people with dementia who lived alone had a higher risk of care needs increases than those without dementia. Dementia, older age, the female sex, and lower care needs levels were associated with a higher risk of care needs increases over the study period. Among these variables, dementia had the strongest impact on care needs increases, especially in persons who lived alone.

  13. Increased Effectiveness of Microbiological Verification by Concentration-Dependent Neutralization of Sanitizers Used in Poultry Slaughter and Fabrication Allowing Salmonella enterica Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra H. Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sanitizer neutralizers can assist foodborne pathogen detection during routine testing by counteracting sanitizer residues carried over into fluids collected and tested from food samples. This study tested sanitizer-matched neutralizers applied at increasing concentrations to facilitate Salmonella enterica survival following exposure to cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC or peracetic acid (PAA, identifying minimum required concentrations of neutralizers to facilitate pathogen survival. Salmonella isolates were individually inoculated into a non-selective medium followed immediately by CPC (0.1 to 0.8% v/v or PAA (0.0125 to 0.2% v/v application, followed by neutralizers application. CPC was neutralized by lecithin and polysorbate 80, each supplemented into buffered peptone water (BPW at 0.125 to 2.0X its respective content in Dey-Engley (D/E neutralizing buffer. PAA was neutralized in BPW supplemented with disodium phosphate, potassium monophosphate, and sodium thiosulfate, each at 0.25 to 3.0X its respective concentration in BPW (phosphates or D/E buffer (thiosulfate. Addition of neutralizers at 1X their respective concentrations in D/E buffer was required to allow Salmonella growth at the maximum CPC concentration (0.8%, while 2X neutralizer addition was required for Salmonella growth at the maximum PAA level (0.2%. Sanitizer neutralizers can assist pathogen survival and detection during routine food product testing.

  14. Increased tolerance and resistance to virus infections: a possible factor in the survival of Varroa destructor-resistant honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Barbara; Forsgren, Eva; de Miranda, Joachim R

    2014-01-01

    The honey bee ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has a world-wide distribution and inflicts more damage than all other known apicultural diseases. However, Varroa-induced colony mortality is more accurately a result of secondary virus infections vectored by the mite. This means that honey bee resistance to Varroa may include resistance or tolerance to virus infections. The aim of this study was to see if this is the case for a unique population of mite-resistant (MR) European honey bees on the island of Gotland, Sweden. This population has survived uncontrolled mite infestation for over a decade, developing specific mite-related resistance traits to do so. Using RT-qPCR techniques, we monitored late season virus infections, Varroa mite infestation and honey bee colony population dynamics in the Gotland MR population and compared this to mite-susceptible (MS) colonies in a close by apiary. From summer to autumn the deformed wing virus (DWV) titres increased similarly between the MR and MS populations, while the black queen cell virus (BQCV) and sacbrood virus (SBV) titres decreased substantially in the MR population compared to the MS population by several orders of magnitude. The MR colonies all survived the following winter with high mite infestation, high DWV infection, small colony size and low proportions of autumn brood, while the MS colonies all perished. Possible explanations for these changes in virus titres and their relevance to Varroa resistance and colony winter survival are discussed.

  15. Increased tolerance and resistance to virus infections: a possible factor in the survival of Varroa destructor-resistant honey bees (Apis mellifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Locke

    Full Text Available The honey bee ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has a world-wide distribution and inflicts more damage than all other known apicultural diseases. However, Varroa-induced colony mortality is more accurately a result of secondary virus infections vectored by the mite. This means that honey bee resistance to Varroa may include resistance or tolerance to virus infections. The aim of this study was to see if this is the case for a unique population of mite-resistant (MR European honey bees on the island of Gotland, Sweden. This population has survived uncontrolled mite infestation for over a decade, developing specific mite-related resistance traits to do so. Using RT-qPCR techniques, we monitored late season virus infections, Varroa mite infestation and honey bee colony population dynamics in the Gotland MR population and compared this to mite-susceptible (MS colonies in a close by apiary. From summer to autumn the deformed wing virus (DWV titres increased similarly between the MR and MS populations, while the black queen cell virus (BQCV and sacbrood virus (SBV titres decreased substantially in the MR population compared to the MS population by several orders of magnitude. The MR colonies all survived the following winter with high mite infestation, high DWV infection, small colony size and low proportions of autumn brood, while the MS colonies all perished. Possible explanations for these changes in virus titres and their relevance to Varroa resistance and colony winter survival are discussed.

  16. Ciprofloxacin Enhances Stress Erythropoiesis in Spleen and Increases Survival after Whole-Body Irradiation Combined with Skin-Wound Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-28

    rheumatoid arthritis [10], and chemotherapy-induced neutropenia [11]. These observations convincingly demonstrate that immunomodulation is a result of...Introduction Victims of nuclear disasters often suffer from a combination of radiation injury (RI) along with other insults such as physical wounds and...from 40% to 50%, but the increase was not significant (Figure 1A top left panel). In addition, none of the CI mice died after completion of CIP therapy

  17. Increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio after neoadjuvant therapy is associated with worse survival after resection of borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Evan S; Rashid, Omar M; Pimiento, Jose M; Hodul, Pamela J; Malafa, Mokenge P

    2016-11-01

    The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (neutrophil count divided by lymphocyte count) is a marker of inflammation associated with poor cancer outcomes. The role of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is unknown. We hypothesized that increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant therapy is inversely associated with survival. We used our borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma database to identify patients who had completed neoadjuvant therapy and underwent resection. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio difference was calculated as the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio after neoadjuvant therapy minus the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio before neoadjuvant therapy. Patients were assigned to the increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort if the difference was ≥2.5 units; all others were assigned to the stable neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort. Statistical analyses were performed with t test and regression. Of 62 patients identified, 43 were assigned to the stable neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort, and 19 to the increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort. There were no differences in stage, age, or sex. The preneoadjuvant neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was 3.1 ± 2.4, whereas the postneoadjuvant neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was 4.4 ± 3.5 (P = .002). Overall survival was worse in the increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort compared with the stable neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort (P = .009) with a Cox hazard ratio of 2.9 (P = .02). N0 disease conferred a survival advantage over N1 disease (Cox hazard ratio = 0.3, P = .01). On multivariate Cox hazard regression analysis, both increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and N1 stage were associated with worse survival (P ratio in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. These findings support exploring

  18. Increasing the cracking resistance and the survivability of the elements the joints of the sections of the jib crane-manipulating installations of mobile machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagerev I.A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The new constructive method of increasing the cracking resistance and survivability of eyes swivel boom crane with hydraulic cylinders. Analysis of its efficiency on the basis of predicting the growth of fatigue cracks for the conven-tional and modified variants of the constructive execution of the connection nodes of the cylinders with the boom sec-tions. This research was supported by the grant no. MK-92.2014.8 of the President of Russian Federation for young scientist support.

  19. Heterosis Increases Fertility, Fecundity, and Survival of Laboratory-Produced F1 Hybrid Males of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles coluzzii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekechukwu, Nkiru E; Baeshen, Rowida; Traorè, Sékou F; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Diabate, Abdoulaye; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Tripet, Frédéric

    2015-10-23

    The success of vector control strategies aiming to decrease disease transmission via the release of sterile or genetically-modified male mosquitoes critically depends on mating between laboratory-reared males and wild females. Unfortunately, mosquito colonization, laboratory rearing, and genetic manipulations can all negatively affect male competitiveness. Heterosis is commonly used to produce domestic animals with enhanced vigor and homogenous genetic background and could therefore potentially improve the mating performance of mass-reared male mosquitoes. Here, we produced enhanced hybrid males of the malaria mosquito Anopheles coluzzii by crossing two strains colonized >35 and 8 years ago. We compared the amount of sperm and mating plug proteins they transferred to females, as well as their insemination rate, reproductive success and longevity under various experimental conditions. Across experiments, widespread adaptations to laboratory mating were detected in the older strain. In large-group mating experiments, no overall hybrid advantage in insemination rates and the amount of sperm and accessory gland proteins transferred to females was detected. Despite higher sperm activity, hybrid males did not appear more fecund. However, individual-male mating and laboratory-swarm experiments revealed that hybrid males, while inseminating fewer females than older inbred males, were significantly more fertile, producing larger mating plugs and drastically increasing female fecundity. Heterotic males also showed increased longevity. These results validate the use of heterosis for creating hybrid males with improved fitness from long-established inbred laboratory strains. Therefore, this simple approach could facilitate disease control strategies based on male mosquito releases with important ultimate benefits to human health. Copyright © 2015 Ekechukwu et al.

  20. Surviving workplace adversity: a qualitative study of nurses and midwives and their strategies to increase personal resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Glenda; Jackson, Debra; Vickers, Margaret H; Wilkes, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    To explore the experiences of Australian nurses and midwives who perceived themselves as resilient. The focus of this paper is to report the strategies used by a group of nurses and midwives to develop and maintain their resilience, despite encountering serious workplace adversity. Despite the potentially adverse effects of nursing work, many nurses and midwives thrive through exercising self-efficacy and coping skills. The relationship between thriving and resilience is clear, as resilience refers to the ability to cope well with adversity and change. The participants were part of an instrumental, collective case study investigation of personal resilience amongst nurses and midwives. Prior to an innovative, work-based intervention including workshops and mentoring, participants were interviewed to collect baseline perceptions and experiences of personal resilience and workplace adversity. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically. Participants attributed their ability to thrive in the workplace to three major influences: support networks, personal characteristics and ability to organise work for personal resilience. Participant insights contributed to a deeper understanding of personal resilience and highlight future initiatives to enhance the ability of nurses and midwives to thrive within health organisations and systems. It is vital that resilience-enhancing initiatives, such as peer mentoring and tailored work options to increase autonomy, are implemented at earlier career phases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Hypoxic Preconditioning Increases Survival and Pro-Angiogenic Capacity of Human Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stromal Cells In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Matthäus Bader

    preconditioning might be a translationally relevant strategy to increase the tolerance of cord blood MSCs to ischemia and improve their therapeutic efficacy in clinical applications.

  2. Increase of Power System Survivability with the Decision Support Tool CRIPS Based on Network Planning and Simulation Program PSS®SINCAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaegerl, Christine; Seifert, Olaf; Buschmann, Robert; Dellwing, Hermann; Geretshuber, Stefan; Leick, Claus

    The increased interconnection and automation of critical infrastructures enlarges the complexity of the dependency structures and - as consequence - the danger of cascading effects, e.g. causing area-wide blackouts in power supply networks that are currently after deregulation operated closer to their limits. New tools or an intelligent combination of existing approaches are required to increase the survivability of critical infrastructures. Within the IRRIIS project the expert system CRIPS was developed based on network simulations realised with PSS®SINCAL, an established tool to support the analysis and planning of electrical power, gas, water or heat networks. CRIPS assesses the current situation in power supply networks analysing the simulation results of the physical network behaviour and recommends corresponding decisions.

  3. Association with pregnancy increases the risk of local recurrence but does not impact overall survival in breast cancer: A case-control study of 87 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, A S; De Rycke, Y; Stevens, D; Donnadieu, A; Langer, A; Rouzier, R; Lerebours, F

    2016-12-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) constitutes 7% of all BCs in young women. The prognosis of PABC remains controversial. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the association of pregnancy with BC on the rates of overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and distant and local recurrence-free survival. We conducted a retrospective unicenter case-control study. We enrolled PABC patients treated at our institution between 1992 and 2009. For each case, 2 BC controls were matched for age and year of diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the parameters associated with prognosis. Eighty-seven PABC patients were enrolled and matched with 174 controls. The univariate analysis did not reveal any significant differences in OS, DFS or distant recurrence rates between the 2 groups. Pregnancy associated status, a tumor larger than T2 and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as the primary treatment were significantly associated with an increased risk of local relapse. The multivariate analysis showed that the pregnancy associated status and the tumor size were strong prognostic factors of local recurrence. Pregnancy associated status negates the prognostic value of tumor size, as both T0-T2 and T3-T4 PABC patients have the same poor prognosis as control BC patients with T3-T4 tumors. Interestingly, although PABC patients have more locally advanced tumors, they did not have a higher rate of radical surgery than the control BC patients. Pregnancy associated status is a strong prognostic factor of local relapse in BC. In PABC patients, when possible, radical surgery should be the preferred first treatment step. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transition in Survival From Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity to Increased Radioresistance Is Independent of Activation of ATM SER1981 Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, Sarah A.; Collis, Spencer J.; Joiner, Michael C.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The molecular basis of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the roles of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activity and the downstream ATM-dependent G 2 -phase cell cycle checkpoint in overcoming HRS and triggering radiation resistance. Methods and Materials: Survival was measured using a high-resolution clonogenic assay. ATM Ser1981 activation was measured by Western blotting. The role of ATM was determined in survival experiments after molecular (siRNA) and chemical (0.4 mM caffeine) inhibition and chemical (20 μg/mL chloroquine, 15 μM genistein) activation 4-6 h before irradiation. Checkpoint responsiveness was assessed in eight cell lines of differing HRS status using flow cytometry to quantify the progression of irradiated (0-2 Gy) G 2 -phase cells entering mitosis, using histone H3 phosphorylation analysis. Results: The dose-response pattern of ATM activation was concordant with the transition from HRS to radioresistance. However, ATM activation did not play a primary role in initiating increased radioresistance. Rather, a relationship was discovered between the function of the downstream ATM-dependent early G 2 -phase checkpoint and the prevalence and overcoming of HRS. Four cell lines that exhibited HRS failed to show low-dose ( 2 -phase checkpoint. These data suggest that clinical exploitation of HRS could be achieved by combining radiotherapy with chemotherapeutic agents that modulate this cell cycle checkpoint

  5. Increasing levels of wild-type CREB up-regulates several activity-regulated inhibitor of death (AID genes and promotes neuronal survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yan-Wei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein is the prototypical signal-regulated transcription factor. In neurons, it is the target of the synaptic activity-induced nuclear calcium-calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CaMK IV signaling pathway that controls the expression of genes important for acquired neuroprotection as well as other long-lasting adaptive processes in the nervous system. The function of CREB as a transcriptional activator is controlled by its phosphorylation on serine 133, which can be catalyzed by CaMKIV and leads to the recruitment of the co-activator, CREB binding protein (CBP. Activation of CBP function by nuclear calcium-CaMKIV signaling is a second regulatory step required for CREB/CBP-mediated transcription. Results Here we used recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV to increase the levels of wild type CREB or to overexpress a mutant version of CREB (mCREB containing a serine to alanine mutation at position amino acid 133 in mouse hippocampal neurons. Increasing the levels of CREB was sufficient to boost neuroprotective activity even under basal conditions (i.e., in the absence of stimulation of synaptic activity. In contrast, overexpression of mCREB increased cell death. The ratio of phospho(serine 133CREB to CREB immunoreactivity in unstimulated hippocampal neurons was similar for endogenous CREB and overexpressed wild type CREB and, as expected, dramatically reduced for overexpressed mCREB. A gene expression analysis revealed that increased expression of CREB but not that of mCREB in hippocampal neurons led to elevated expression levels of bdnf as well as that of several members of a previously characterized set of Activity-regulated Inhibitor of Death (AID genes, which include atf3, btg2, gadd45β, and gadd45γ. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the expression levels of wild type CREB are a critical determinant of the ability of hippocampal neurons to survive harmful conditions

  6. Increased circulating VCAM-1 correlates with advanced disease and poor survival in patients with multiple myeloma: reduction by post-bortezomib and lenalidomide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpos, E; Migkou, M; Christoulas, D; Gavriatopoulou, M; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, E; Kanellias, N; Iakovaki, M; Panagiotidis, I; Ziogas, D C; Fotiou, D; Kastritis, E; Dimopoulos, M A

    2016-05-27

    Circulating vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and selectins were prospectively measured in 145 newly-diagnosed patients with symptomatic myeloma (NDMM), 61 patients with asymptomatic/smoldering myeloma (SMM), 47 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and 87 multiple myeloma (MM) patients at first relapse who received lenalidomide- or bortezomib-based treatment (RD, n=47; or VD, n=40). Patients with NDMM had increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 compared with MGUS and SMM patients. Elevated VCAM-1 correlated with ISS-3 and was independently associated with inferior overall survival (OS) (45 months for patients with VCAM-1 >median vs 75 months, P=0.001). MM patients at first relapse had increased levels of ICAM-1 and L-selectin, even compared with NDMM patients and had increased levels of VCAM-1 compared with MGUS and SMM. Both VD and RD reduced dramatically serum VCAM-1 after four cycles of therapy, but only VD reduced serum ICAM-1, irrespective of response to therapy. The reduction of VCAM-1 was more pronounced after RD than after VD. Our study provides evidence for the prognostic value of VCAM-1 in myeloma patients, suggesting that VCAM-1 could be a suitable target for the development of anti-myeloma therapies. Furthermore, the reduction of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 by RD and VD supports the inhibitory effect of these drugs on the adhesion of MM cells to stromal cells.

  7. Low-Dose Aspirin Use Does Not Increase Survival in 2 Independent Population-Based Cohorts of Patients With Esophageal or Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Andrew D; Busby, John; Johnston, Brian T; Baron, John A; Hughes, Carmel M; Coleman, Helen G; Cardwell, Chris R

    2018-03-01

    esophageal cancer (pooled adjusted HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.85-1.25) or gastric cancer (pooled adjusted HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.85-1.32). In analyses of 2 large independent cohorts in the United Kingdom, low-dose aspirin usage was not associated with increased survival of patients diagnosed with esophageal or gastric cancer. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Splenic vein thrombosis is associated with an increase in pancreas-specific complications and reduced survival in patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic exocrine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedania, Nishi; Agrawal, Nidhi; Winter, Jordan M; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Rosato, Ernest L; Sauter, Patricia K; Leiby, Ben; Pequignot, Edward; Yeo, Charles J; Lavu, Harish

    2013-08-01

    Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy (DPS) is the procedure of choice for the surgical treatment of pancreatic exocrine cancer localized to the body and tail of the pancreas. Splenic vein thrombosis (SVT) can occur in patients with malignant pancreatic exocrine tumors secondary to direct tumor invasion or compression of the splenic vein by mass effect. This study examines the effect of preoperative SVT on postoperative outcomes. In this retrospective cohort study, we queried our pancreatic surgery database to identify patients who underwent DPS from October 2005 to June 2011. These cases were evaluated for evidence of preoperative SVT on clinical records and cross-sectional imaging (CT,MRI, endoscopic US). Outcomes for patients with and without SVT were compared. From an overall cohort of 285 consecutive patients who underwent DPS during the study period, data were evaluated for 70 subjects who underwent surgery for pancreatic exocrine cancer (27 with SVT, 43 without SVT). The preoperative demographics and co-morbidities were similar between the groups, except the average age was higher for those without SVT (pSVT group (675 versus 250 ml, p=SVT versus 56% no SVT, p=NS), the group with SVT had a significantly higher rate of pancreas-specific complications, including pancreatic fistula (33 versus 7 %,pSVT had a trend toward longer median survival (40 versus 20.8 months),although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.1). DPS for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma can be performed safely in patients with SVT, but with higher intraoperative blood loss, increased pancreas-specific complications, and a trend towards lower long-term survival rates. This paper was presented as a poster at the 53rd annual meeting of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract and at the 46th annual meeting of the Pancreas Club, San Diego, CA, May 2012.

  9. Laninamivir octanoate and artificial surfactant combination therapy significantly increases survival of mice infected with lethal influenza H1N1 Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Fukushi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with influenza virus infection can develop severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS which have a high mortality. Influenza virus infection is treated worldwide mainly by neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs. However, monotherapy with NAIs is insufficient for severe pneumonia secondary to influenza virus infection. We previously demonstrated that mice infected with a lethal dose of influenza virus develop diffuse alveolar damage (DAD with alveolar collapse similar to that seen in ARDS in humans. Additionally, pulmonary surfactant proteins were gradually increased in mouse serum, suggesting a decrease in pulmonary surfactant in the lung. Therefore, the present study examined whether combination therapy of NAI with exogenous artificial surfactant affects mortality of influenza virus-infected mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c mice were inoculated with several viral doses of influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8 virus (H1N1. The mice were additionally administered exogenous artificial surfactant in the presence or absence of a new NAI, laninamivir octanoate. Mouse survival, body weight and general condition were observed for up to 20 days after inoculation. Viral titer and cytokine/chemokine levels in the lungs, lung weight, pathological analysis, and blood O(2 and CO(2 pressures were evaluated. Infected mice treated with combination therapy of laninamivir octanoate with artificial surfactant showed a significantly higher survival rate compared with those that received laninamivir octanoate monotherapy (p = 0.003. However, virus titer, lung weight and cytokine/chemokine responses were not different between the groups. Histopathological examination, a hydrostatic lung test and blood gas analysis showed positive results in the combination therapy group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Combination therapy of laninamivir octanoate with artificial surfactant reduces lethality in mice infected with influenza virus, and

  10. Nation-Scale Adoption of Shorter Breast Radiation Therapy Schedules Can Increase Survival in Resource Constrained Economies: Results From a Markov Chain Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Atif J.; Rafique, Raza; Zafar, Waleed; Shah, Chirag; Haffty, Bruce G.; Vicini, Frank; Jamshed, Arif; Zhao, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) offer women options for shorter courses of breast radiation therapy. The impact of these shorter schedules on the breast cancer populations of emerging economies with limited radiation therapy resources is unknown. We hypothesized that adoption of these schedules would improve throughput in the system and, by allowing more women access to life-saving treatments, improve patient survival within the system. Methods and Materials: We designed a Markov chain model to simulate the different health states that a postlumpectomy or postmastectomy patient could enter over the course of a 20-year follow-up period. Transition rates between health states were adapted from published data on recurrence rates. We used primary data from a tertiary care hospital in Lahore, Pakistan, to populate the model with proportional use of mastectomy versus breast conservation and to estimate the proportion of patients suitable for APBI. Sensitivity analyses on the use of APBI and relative efficacy of APBI were conducted to study the impact on the population. Results: The shorter schedule resulted in more women alive and more women remaining without evidence of disease (NED) compared with the conventional schedule, with an absolute difference of about 4% and 7% at 15 years, respectively. Among women who had lumpectomies, the chance of remaining alive and with an intact breast was 62% in the hypofractionation model and 54% in the conventional fractionation model. Conclusions: Increasing throughput in the system can result in improved survival, improved chances of remaining without evidence of disease, and improved chances of remaining alive with a breast. These findings are significant and suggest that adoption of hypofractionation in emerging economies is not simply a question of efficiency and cost but one of access to care and patient survivorship.

  11. Nation-Scale Adoption of Shorter Breast Radiation Therapy Schedules Can Increase Survival in Resource Constrained Economies: Results From a Markov Chain Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Atif J; Rafique, Raza; Zafar, Waleed; Shah, Chirag; Haffty, Bruce G; Vicini, Frank; Jamshed, Arif; Zhao, Yao

    2017-02-01

    Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) offer women options for shorter courses of breast radiation therapy. The impact of these shorter schedules on the breast cancer populations of emerging economies with limited radiation therapy resources is unknown. We hypothesized that adoption of these schedules would improve throughput in the system and, by allowing more women access to life-saving treatments, improve patient survival within the system. We designed a Markov chain model to simulate the different health states that a postlumpectomy or postmastectomy patient could enter over the course of a 20-year follow-up period. Transition rates between health states were adapted from published data on recurrence rates. We used primary data from a tertiary care hospital in Lahore, Pakistan, to populate the model with proportional use of mastectomy versus breast conservation and to estimate the proportion of patients suitable for APBI. Sensitivity analyses on the use of APBI and relative efficacy of APBI were conducted to study the impact on the population. The shorter schedule resulted in more women alive and more women remaining without evidence of disease (NED) compared with the conventional schedule, with an absolute difference of about 4% and 7% at 15 years, respectively. Among women who had lumpectomies, the chance of remaining alive and with an intact breast was 62% in the hypofractionation model and 54% in the conventional fractionation model. Increasing throughput in the system can result in improved survival, improved chances of remaining without evidence of disease, and improved chances of remaining alive with a breast. These findings are significant and suggest that adoption of hypofractionation in emerging economies is not simply a question of efficiency and cost but one of access to care and patient survivorship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nation-Scale Adoption of Shorter Breast Radiation Therapy Schedules Can Increase Survival in Resource Constrained Economies: Results From a Markov Chain Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Atif J., E-mail: atif.j.khan@rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Rafique, Raza [Suleman Dawood School of Business, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Zafar, Waleed [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore (Pakistan); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Vicini, Frank [Michigan HealthCare Professionals, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Jamshed, Arif [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore (Pakistan); Zhao, Yao [Rutgers University School of Business, Newark, New Jersey (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) offer women options for shorter courses of breast radiation therapy. The impact of these shorter schedules on the breast cancer populations of emerging economies with limited radiation therapy resources is unknown. We hypothesized that adoption of these schedules would improve throughput in the system and, by allowing more women access to life-saving treatments, improve patient survival within the system. Methods and Materials: We designed a Markov chain model to simulate the different health states that a postlumpectomy or postmastectomy patient could enter over the course of a 20-year follow-up period. Transition rates between health states were adapted from published data on recurrence rates. We used primary data from a tertiary care hospital in Lahore, Pakistan, to populate the model with proportional use of mastectomy versus breast conservation and to estimate the proportion of patients suitable for APBI. Sensitivity analyses on the use of APBI and relative efficacy of APBI were conducted to study the impact on the population. Results: The shorter schedule resulted in more women alive and more women remaining without evidence of disease (NED) compared with the conventional schedule, with an absolute difference of about 4% and 7% at 15 years, respectively. Among women who had lumpectomies, the chance of remaining alive and with an intact breast was 62% in the hypofractionation model and 54% in the conventional fractionation model. Conclusions: Increasing throughput in the system can result in improved survival, improved chances of remaining without evidence of disease, and improved chances of remaining alive with a breast. These findings are significant and suggest that adoption of hypofractionation in emerging economies is not simply a question of efficiency and cost but one of access to care and patient survivorship.

  13. Insights on the antitumor effects of kahweol on human breast cancer: Decreased survival and increased production of reactive oxygen species and cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cárdenas, Casimiro [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Málaga, E-29071 Málaga (Spain); IBIMA (Biomedical Research Institute of Málaga), E-29071 Málaga (Spain); Research Support Central Services (SCAI) of the University of Málaga, E-29071 Málaga (Spain); Quesada, Ana R. [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Málaga, E-29071 Málaga (Spain); IBIMA (Biomedical Research Institute of Málaga), E-29071 Málaga (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), E-29071 Málaga (Spain); Medina, Miguel Ángel, E-mail: medina@uma.es [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Málaga, E-29071 Málaga (Spain); IBIMA (Biomedical Research Institute of Málaga), E-29071 Málaga (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), E-29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Kahweol inhibits growth and attachment-independent proliferation of tumor cells. • Kahweol induces apoptosis in MDA-MB231 human breast cancer cells. • Kahweol-induced apoptosis involves caspase activation and cytochrome c release. • Kahweol does not protect against hydrogen peroxide cytotoxicity. • Kahweol increases hydrogen peroxide production by human breast cancer cells. - Abstract: The present study aims to identify the modulatory effects of kahweol, an antioxidant diterpene present in coffee beans, on a panel of human tumor cell lines. Kahweol inhibits tumor cell proliferation and clonogenicity and induces apoptosis in several kinds of human tumor cells. In the estrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB231 human breast cancer, the mentioned effects are accompanied by caspases 3/7 and 9 activation and cytochrome c release. On the other hand, kahweol increases the production of reactive oxygen species and their cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells but not in normal cells. Taken together, our data suggest that kahweol is an antitumor compound with inhibitory effects on tumor cell growth and survival, especially against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

  14. Increase of autophagy and attenuation of apoptosis by Salvigenin promote survival of SH-SY5Y cells following treatment with H₂O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafatian, Ghazaleh; Khodagholi, Fariba; Farimani, Mahdi Moridi; Abraki, Shahnaz Babaei; Gardaneh, Mossa

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a major component of harmful cascades activated in neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we tried to elucidate the possible neuroprotective effect of Salvigenin, a natural polyphenolic compound, on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and autophagy in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. We measured cell viability by MTT test and found that 25 μM is the best protective concentration of Salvigenin. GSH and SOD assays suggested that Salvigenin activates antioxidant factors. At the same time, measurement of ER stress-associated proteins including calpain and caspase-12 showed the ability of Salvigenin to decrease ER stress. We found that Salvigenin could decrease the apoptotic factors. Salvigenin inhibited H(2)O(2)-induced caspase-3 which is a hallmark of apoptosis in addition to reducing Bax\\Bcl-2 ratio by 1.45 fold. Additionally, Salvigenin increased the levels of autophagic factors. Our results showed an increase in LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, Atg7, and Atg12 in the presence of 25 μM of Salvigenin by about 1.28, 1.25, and 1.54 folds, respectively, compared to H(2)O(2)-treated cells. So it seems that H(2)O(2) cytotoxicity mainly results from apoptosis. Besides, Salvigenin helps cells to survive by inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing autophagy that opens a new horizon for the future experiments.

  15. Microencapsulation increases survival of the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum IS-10506, but not Enterococcus faecium IS-27526 in a dynamic, computer-controlled in vitro model of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surono, I; Verhoeven, J; Verbruggen, S; Venema, K

    2018-02-23

    To test the effect of microencapsulation on the survival of two probiotic strains isolated from Dadih, Indonesian fermented buffalo milk, in a dynamic, computer-controlled in vitro model of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract (TIM-1), simulating human adults. Free or microencapsulated probiotics, Lactobacillus plantarum IS-10506 or Enterococcus faecium IS-27526, resuspended in milk were studied for survival in the complete TIM-1 system (stomach + small intestine) or in the gastric compartment of TIM-1 only. Hourly samples collected after the ileal-caecal valve or after the pylorus were plated on MRS agar (for Lactobacillus) or S&B agar (for Enterococcus). Survival of the free cells after transit through the complete TIM-1 system was on average for the E. faecium and L. plantarum 15·0 and 18·5% respectively. Survival of the microencapsulated E. faecium and L. plantarum was 15·7 and 84·5% respectively. The free cells were further assessed in only the gastric compartment of TIM-1. E. faecium and L. plantarum showed an average survival of 39 and 32%, respectively, after gastric passage. There is similar sensitivity to gastric acid as well as survival after complete upper GI tract transit of free cells, but microencapsulation only protected L. plantarum. Survival of microencapsulated L. plantarum IS-10506 is increased compared to free cells in a validated in vitro model of the upper GI tract. It increases its use as an ingredient of functional foods. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Hypoxia inhibits mineralization ability of human dental pulp cells treated with TEGDMA but increases cell survival in accordance with the culture time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öncel Torun, Zeynep; Torun, Deniz; Demirkaya, Kadriye; Yavuz, Süleyman Tolga; Sarper, Meral; Avcu, Ferit

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity and mineralization effects of TEGDMA in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) under hypoxic and normoxic culture conditions. Cell viability was evaluated using XTT assay after incubation periods of 24, 48, or 72h. The expression of mineralization-related genes (osteonectin, osteopontin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, collagen type 1) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction at 24 and 72h. In XTT assay, viability was higher in 0.3, 1, 2, 4, and 5mM groups in the presence of 21% O 2 after 24h (p0.05). In the gene expression study, TEGDMA-treated hDPCs showed lower mineralization potential in the presence of 3% than with 21% O 2 (p<0.05). hDPCs revealed higher HO 1 expression in 0.3 and 1mM groups under hypoxic than under normoxic conditions after a 72-h time period (p<0.001). Hypoxic conditions increased cell survival in accordance with the culture period but inhibited the odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs treated with TEGDMA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased Circulating Level of the Survival Factor GP88 (Progranulin in the Serum of Breast Cancer Patients When Compared to Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rak Tkaczuk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction GP88 (PC-Cell Derived Growth Factor, progranulin is a glycoprotein overexpressed in breast tumors and involved in their proliferation and survival. Since GP88 is secreted, an exploratory study was established to compare serum GP88 level between breast cancer patients (BC and healthy volunteers (HV. Methods An IRB approved prospective study enrolled 189 stage 1–4 BC patients and 18 HV. GP88 serum concentration was determined by immunoassay. Results Serum GP88 level was 28.7+ 5.8 ng/ml in HV and increased to 40.7+ 16.0 ng/ml ( P = 0.007 for stage 1-3 and 45.3 +23.3 ng/ml ( P = 0.0007 for stage 4 BC patients. There was no correlation between the GP88 level and BC characteristics such as age, race, tumor grade, ER, PR and HER-2 expression. Conclusion These data suggest that serial testing of serum GP88 levels may have value as a circulating biomarker for detection, monitoring and follow up of BC.

  18. Pretreatment with Cry1Ac Protoxin Modulates the Immune Response, and Increases the Survival of Plasmodium-Infected CBA/Ca Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Legorreta-Herrera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a major global health problem that kills 1-2 million people each year. Despite exhaustive research, naturally acquired immunity is poorly understood. Cry1A proteins are potent immunogens with adjuvant properties and are able to induce strong cellular and humoral responses. In fact, it has been shown that administration of Cry1Ac protoxin alone or with amoebic lysates induces protection against the lethal infection caused by the protozoa Naegleria fowleri. In this work, we studied whether Cry1Ac is able to activate the innate immune response to induce protection against Plasmodium berghei ANKA (lethal and P. chabaudi AS (nonlethal parasites in CBA/Ca mice. Treatment with Cry1Ac induced protection against both Plasmodium species in terms of reduced parasitaemia, longer survival time, modulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and increased levels of specific antibodies against Plasmodium. Understanding how to boost innate immunity to Plasmodium infection should lead to immunologically based intervention strategies.

  19. Human papillomavirus-16 infection in advanced oral cavity cancer patients is related to an increased risk of distant metastases and poor survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ang Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV is an oncogenic virus causing oropharyngeal cancers and resulting in a favorable outcome after the treatment. The role of HPV in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC remains ambiguous. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the effect of HPV infection on disease control among patients with OSCC following radical surgery with radiation-based adjuvant therapy. PATIENTS AND METHOD: We prospectively followed 173 patients with advanced OSCC (96% were stage III/IV who had undergone radical surgery and adjuvant therapy between 2004 and 2006. They were followed between surgery and death or up to 60 months. Surgical specimens were examined using a PCR-based HPV blot test. The primary endpoints were the risk of relapse and the time to relapse; the secondary endpoints were disease-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. RESULTS: The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCC was 22%; HPV-16 (9% and HPV-18 (7% were the genotypes most commonly encountered. Solitary HPV-16 infection was a poor predictor of 5-year distant metastases (hazard ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-8.0; P = 0.005, disease-free survival (P = 0.037, disease-specific survival (P = 0.006, and overall survival (P = 0.010, whereas HPV-18 infection had no impact on 5-year outcomes. The rate of 5-year distant metastases was significantly higher in the HPV-16 or level IV/V metastasis group compared with both the extracapsular spread or tumor depth ≥ 11-mm group and patients without risk factors (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: HPV infections in advanced OSCC patients are not uncommon and clinically relevant. Compared with HPV-16-negative advanced OSCC patients, those with a single HPV-16 infection are at higher risk of distant metastases and poor survival despite undergoing radiation-based adjuvant therapy and require a more aggressive adjuvant treatment and a more thorough follow-up.

  20. Survival analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badwe, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The primary endpoint in the majority of the studies has been either disease recurrence or death. This kind of analysis requires a special method since all patients in the study experience the endpoint. The standard method for estimating such survival distribution is Kaplan Meier method. The survival function is defined as the proportion of individuals who survive beyond certain time. Multi-variate comparison for survival has been carried out with Cox's proportional hazard model

  1. Surgery in high-volume hospitals not commission on cancer accreditation leads to increased cancer-specific survival for early-stage lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Elizabeth A; Cooke, David T; Chen, Yingjia; Perry, Andrew; Canter, Robert J; Cress, Rosemary

    2015-10-01

    Quality of oncologic outcomes is of paramount importance in the care of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We sought to evaluate the relationship of hospital volume for lobectomy on cancer-specific survival in NSCLC patients treated in California, as well as the influence of Commission on Cancer (CoC) accreditation. The California Cancer Registry was queried from 2004 to 2011 for cases of Stage I NSCLC and 8,345 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was used to determine prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival. A total of 7,587 patients were treated surgically. CoC accreditation was not significant for cancer-specific survival, but treatment in high-volume centers was associated with longer survival when compared with low- and medium-volume centers (hazard ratio 1.77, 1.474 to 2.141 and hazard ratio 1.23, 1.058 to 1.438). These data suggest that surgical treatment in high-volume hospitals is associated with longer cancer-specific survival for early-stage NSCLC, but that CoC accreditation is not. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Increased litter survival rates, reduced clinical illness and better lactogenic immunity against TGEV in gilts that were primed as neonates with porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Ronald D; Lager, Kelly M

    2003-09-01

    Establishing immunological memory in female piglets at a young age with PRCV was effective in inducing a secondary immune response to a limiting dose of virulent TGEV given orally 13-18 days prior to farrowing. Subsequently, because of passive antibody transfer, the offspring of these primed gilts were more efficient in surviving a lethal TGEV challenge. An average survival rate of 89% occurred in 6 litters of piglets from primed gilts that were boosted with 2.8 x 10(6) plaque forming units (PFU) of TGEV whereas 76% of the piglets survived in three litters that suckled primed gilts boosted with 3.0 x 10(5)PFU of TGEV. Non-primed gilts given identical pre-farrowing doses of TGEV had litter survival rates of 63 and 55%, respectively. Moreover, both groups of litters from primed gilts suffered less clinical illness (as measured by the extent of weight loss post-challenge) than control litters. Priming of the piglets as neonates and boosting the pregnant gilts produced an anamnestic systemic immune response and correspondingly higher milk titers in the primed gilts compared to control animals. Thus, priming piglets with PRCV was beneficial in providing resistance to TGEV and could be incorporated into a vaccine strategy that yields better protection against TGEV.

  3. Procalcitonin-guided interventions against infections to increase early appropriate antibiotics and improve survival in the intensive care unit: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens U; Hein, Lars; Lundgren, Bettina

    2011-01-01

    For patients in intensive care units, sepsis is a common and potentially deadly complication and prompt initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy improves prognosis. The objective of this trial was to determine whether a strategy of antimicrobial spectrum escalation, guided by daily...... measurements of the biomarker procalcitonin, could reduce the time to appropriate therapy, thus improving survival....

  4. Increased tumour ascorbate is associated with extended disease-free survival and decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1 activation in human colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eKuiper

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbate is a co-factor for the hydroxylases that regulate the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1, which provides cancer cells with a metabolic and survival advantage in the hypoxic environment of solid tumors. However, whether ascorbate affects tumor development is a highly debated issue. We aimed to determine whether tumor ascorbate was associated with HIF-1 activation and patient disease-free survival. In this study we undertook a retrospective observational analysis of tissue-banked tumor and paired normal tissue from 49 colorectal cancer patients, measuring ascorbate levels, HIF-1α and its downstream gene products BNIP3 and VEGF. Patient survival was monitored for the first six years after surgery. We found that ascorbate levels were lower in tumor tissue compared to normal tissue (p< 0.001 but overall levels varied considerably. HIF-1α, VEGF and BNIP3 were elevated in tumor samples (p< 0.01. There was an inverse relationship between tumor ascorbate content and HIF-1 pathway activation (p=0.002 and tumor size (p=0.018. Higher tumor ascorbate content was associated with significantly improved disease-free survival in the first 6 years after surgery (p=0.006, with 141 - 1,094 additional disease free days. This was independent of tumor grade and stage. Survival advantage was associated with the amount of ascorbate in the tumor, but not with the amount in adjacent normal tissue. Our results demonstrate that higher tumor ascorbate content is associated decreased HIF-1 activation, most likely due to the co-factor activity of ascorbate for the regulatory HIF hydroxylases. Our findings support the need for future studies to determine whether raising tumor ascorbate is possible with clinical intervention and whether this results in modification of hydroxylase-dependent pathways in the tumor.

  5. Increasing CPR duration prior to first defibrillation does not improve return of spontaneous circulation or survival in a swine model of prolonged ventricular fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenberger, Jon C.; Suffoletto, Brian; Salcido, David; Logue, Eric; Menegazzi, James J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The optimum duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) prior to first rescue shock is unknown. Clinical trials have used 90s and 180s. Neither of these durations may be optimal. We sought to determine the optimum duration of CPR prior to first defibrillation attempt and whether this varied depending on the duration of ventricular fibrillation (VF). In this porcine model of basic life support, our outcomes were rates of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival, and coronary perfusion pressure (CPP). Methods We anesthetized and instrumented 45 swine and then induced VF. After 5 or 8 minutes of untreated VF, we randomized the swine to mechanical CPR for 90, 180, or 300s. A single rescue shock (150J biphasic) was then administered. If this shock failed, 2 minutes of mechanical CPR were completed prior to the next rescue shock. CPP was calculated for each 30 second epoch. ROSC was defined as a blood pressure >80mmHg sustained for 60s. Survival was defined as sustained ROSC for 20 minutes. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Fisher’s exact test, and ANOVA. Results In the 5 minute VF cohort, the rate of ROSC did not differ between the three groups (90s: 25%; 180s: 38%; 300s: 38%, p>.05). Survival rates did not differ (90s: 25%; 180s: 25%; 300s: 25%, p>0.05). In the 8 minute VF cohort, no animals experienced ROSC or survival. CPP were calculated by 30 second epoch and did not differ between the three groups (p>0.05). CPPs decline after 180s of CPR. Conclusions ROSC and survival were equivalent regardless of VF duration and CPR duration. When CPR begins late, CPPs are low, stressing the importance of early CPR. We do not recommend 300s of CPR unless a defibrillator is unavailable. PMID:18620793

  6. Up-regulation of cell cycle arrest protein BTG2 correlates with increased overall survival in breast cancer, as detected by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirström Karin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that the ADIPOR1, ADORA1, BTG2 and CD46 genes differ significantly between long-term survivors of breast cancer and deceased patients, both in levels of gene expression and DNA copy numbers. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression of the corresponding proteins in breast carcinoma and to determine their correlation with clinical outcome. Methods Protein expression was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in an independent breast cancer cohort of 144 samples represented on tissue microarrays. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the differences in protein expression between dead and alive patients. We used Cox-regression multivariate analysis to assess whether the new markers predict the survival status of the patients better than the currently used markers. Results BTG2 expression was demonstrated in a significantly lower proportion of samples from dead patients compared to alive patients, both in overall expression (P = 0.026 and cell membrane specific expression (P = 0.013, whereas neither ADIPOR1, ADORA1 nor CD46 showed differential expression in the two survival groups. Furthermore, a multivariate analysis showed that a model containing BTG2 expression in combination with HER2 and Ki67 expression along with patient age performed better than a model containing the currently used prognostic markers (tumour size, nodal status, HER2 expression, hormone receptor status, histological grade, and patient age. Interestingly, BTG2 has previously been described as a tumour suppressor gene involved in cell cycle arrest and p53 signalling. Conclusions We conclude that high-level BTG2 protein expression correlates with prolonged survival in patients with breast carcinoma.

  7. Data for increase of Lymantria dispar male survival after topical application of single-stranded RING domain fragment of IAP-3 gene of its nuclear polyhedrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberemok, Volodymyr V.; Laikova, Kateryna V.; Zaitsev, Aleksei S.; Gushchin, Vladimir A.; Skorokhod, Oleksii A.

    2016-01-01

    This data article is related to the research article entitled “The RING for gypsy moth control: topical application of fragment of its nuclear polyhedrosis virus anti-apoptosis gene as insecticide” [1]. This article reports on significantly higher survival of gypsy moth Lymantria dispar male individuals in response to topical application of single-stranded DNA, based on RING (really interesting new gene) domain fragment of LdMNPV (L. dispar multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus) IAP-3 (inhibitor of apoptosis) gene and acted as DNA insecticide. PMID:27054151

  8. In situ normoxia enhances survival and proliferation rate of human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells without increasing the risk of tumourigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Ru Choi

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs natively reside in a relatively low-oxygen tension (i.e., hypoxic microenvironment in human body. Low oxygen tension (i.e., in situ normoxia, has been known to enhance the growth and survival rate of ASCs, which, however, may lead to the risk of tumourigenesis. Here, we investigated the tumourigenic potential of ASCs under their physiological condition to ensure their safe use in regenerative therapy. Human ASCs isolated from subcutaneous fat were cultured in atmospheric O2 concentration (21% O2 or in situ normoxia (2% O2. We found that ASCs retained their surface markers, tri-lineage differentiation potential, and self-renewal properties under in situ normoxia without altering their morphology. In situ normoxia displayed a higher proliferation and viability of ASCs with less DNA damage as compared to atmospheric O2 concentration. Moreover, low oxygen tension significantly up-regulated VEGF and bFGF mRNA expression and protein secretion while reducing the expression level of tumour suppressor genes p16, p21, p53, and pRb. However, there were no significant differences in ASCs telomere length and their relative telomerase activity when cultured at different oxygen concentrations. Collectively, even with high proliferation and survival rate, ASCs have a low tendency of developing tumour under in situ normoxia. These results suggest 2% O2 as an ideal culture condition for expanding ASCs efficiently while maintaining their characteristics.

  9. BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To study possible nerve regeneration of a damaged auditory nerve by the use of stem cell transplantation. Methods. We transplanted HNPCs to the rat AN trunk by the internal auditory meatus (IAM. Furthermore, we studied if addition of BDNF affects survival and phenotypic differentiation of the grafted HNPCs. A bioactive nanofiber gel (PA gel, in selected groups mixed with BDNF, was applied close to the implanted cells. Before transplantation, all rats had been deafened by a round window niche application of β-bungarotoxin. This neurotoxin causes a selective toxic destruction of the AN while keeping the hair cells intact. Results. Overall, HNPCs survived well for up to six weeks in all groups. However, transplants receiving the BDNF-containing PA gel demonstrated significantly higher numbers of HNPCs and neuronal differentiation. At six weeks, a majority of the HNPCs had migrated into the brain stem and differentiated. Differentiated human cells as well as neurites were observed in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus. Conclusion. Our results indicate that human neural precursor cells (HNPC integration with host tissue benefits from additional brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF treatment and that these cells appear to be good candidates for further regenerative studies on the auditory nerve (AN.

  10. The Silencing of a 14-3-3ɛ Homolog in Tenebrio molitor Leads to Increased Antimicrobial Activity in Hemocyte and Reduces Larval Survivability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Gi Won; Jo, Yong Hun; Seong, Jeong Hwan; Park, Ki Beom; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Tindwa, Hamisi; Kim, Sun-Am; Lee, Yong Seok; Kim, Yu Jung; Han, Yeon Soo

    2016-08-20

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphorylated serine-binding proteins acts as signaling molecules in biological processes such as metabolism, division, differentiation, autophagy, and apoptosis. Herein, we report the requirement of 14-3-3ɛ isoform from Tenebrio molitor (Tm14-3-3ɛ) in the hemocyte antimicrobial activity. The Tm14-3-3ɛ transcript is 771 nucleotides in length and encodes a polypeptide of 256 amino acid residues. The protein has the typical 14-3-3 domain, the nuclear export signal (NES) sequence, and the peptide binding residues. The Tm14-3-3ɛ transcript shows a significant three-fold expression in the hemocyte of T. molitor larvae when infected with Escherichia coli Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced larvae show significantly lower survival rates when infected with E. coli. Under Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced condition, a strong antimicrobial activity is elicited in the hemocyte of the host inoculated with E. coli. This suggests impaired secretion of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) into the hemolymph. Furthermore, a reduction in AMP secretion under Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced condition would be responsible for loss in the capacity to kill bacteria and might explain the reduced survivability of the larvae upon E. coli challenge. This shows that Tm14-3-3ɛ is required to maintain innate immunity in T. molitor by enabling antimicrobial secretion into the hemolymph and explains the functional specialization of the isoform.

  11. The Silencing of a 14-3-3ɛ Homolog in Tenebrio molitor Leads to Increased Antimicrobial Activity in Hemocyte and Reduces Larval Survivability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi Won Seo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The 14-3-3 family of phosphorylated serine-binding proteins acts as signaling molecules in biological processes such as metabolism, division, differentiation, autophagy, and apoptosis. Herein, we report the requirement of 14-3-3ɛ isoform from Tenebrio molitor (Tm14-3-3ɛ in the hemocyte antimicrobial activity. The Tm14-3-3ɛ transcript is 771 nucleotides in length and encodes a polypeptide of 256 amino acid residues. The protein has the typical 14-3-3 domain, the nuclear export signal (NES sequence, and the peptide binding residues. The Tm14-3-3ɛ transcript shows a significant three-fold expression in the hemocyte of T. molitor larvae when infected with Escherichia coli Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced larvae show significantly lower survival rates when infected with E. coli. Under Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced condition, a strong antimicrobial activity is elicited in the hemocyte of the host inoculated with E. coli. This suggests impaired secretion of antimicrobial peptides (AMP into the hemolymph. Furthermore, a reduction in AMP secretion under Tm14-3-3ɛ silenced condition would be responsible for loss in the capacity to kill bacteria and might explain the reduced survivability of the larvae upon E. coli challenge. This shows that Tm14-3-3ɛ is required to maintain innate immunity in T. molitor by enabling antimicrobial secretion into the hemolymph and explains the functional specialization of the isoform.

  12. Interferon gamma increases survival in urine experimental cryptococcosis El Interferon gamma incrementa la sobrevida de un modelo experimental murino de criptococosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadeo J. Bava

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic disease by Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans is a common opportunistic infection in immunodeficient patients. Cellular immunity seems to be the most important determinant of resistance. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of recombinant rat interferon gamma (IFN-gamma in murine cryptococcosis (Balb/c mice infected by IP route with the Rivas strain of C. neoformans, evaluating survival time, macroscopic and microscopic examination of the organs, and massive seeding of brain homogenate. IFN-gamma treatment, at a daily dose of 10,000 IU, did not modify significantly these variables when mice were challenged with a high inoculum (10(7 yeasts and treatment was delayed to 5 days after infection (median survival 21 days in control mice vs. 23 days in IFN-treated. Another set of experiments suggested that IFN-gamma treatment, at a dose of 10,000 IU/day, begun at the moment of infection could be useful (it prolonged survival from 20 to 28 days, although the difference did not achieve statistical signification. When used simultaneously with infection by 3.5 x 10(5 yeasts, IFN-gamma at 10,000 IU/day for 15 days significantly prolonged survival of mice (p = 0.004. These results suggest that, depending on the experimental conditions, IFN-gamma can improve survival of mice infected with a lethal dose of C. neoformans.Se evaluó la efectividad del interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma recombinante de rata en un modelo experimental de criptococosis desarollado en ratones Balb/C inoculados por vía intraperitoneal con la cepa Rivas de Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans. Se tuvieron en cuenta el tiempo de sobrevida de los animales, el aspecto macroscópico de los órganos en la autopsia, la presencia de levaduras capsuladas en los tejidos y la siembra masiva de un homogenato de cerebro. El tratamiento con IFN-gamma, en dosis diarias de 10.000 UI, no modificó estos parámetros cuando la dosis infectante fue de 10(7 levaduras y el tratamiento se

  13. Glutamate Increases In Vitro Survival and Proliferation and Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death in Adult Spinal Cord-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells via Non-NMDA Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Laureen D; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a cascade of secondary chemical insults, including oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity, which damage host neurons and glia. Transplantation of exogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has shown promise in enhancing regeneration after SCI, although survival of transplanted cells remains poor. Understanding the response of NSPCs to the chemical mediators of secondary injury is essential in finding therapies to enhance survival. We examined the in vitro effects of glutamate and glutamate receptor agonists on adult rat spinal cord-derived NSPCs. NSPCs isolated from the periventricular region of the adult rat spinal cord were exposed to various concentrations of glutamate for 96 h. We found that glutamate treatment (500 μM) for 96 h significantly increased live cell numbers, reduced cell death, and increased proliferation, but did not significantly alter cell phenotype. Concurrent glutamate treatment (500 μM) in the setting of H2O2 exposure (500 μM) for 10 h increased NSPC survival compared to H2O2 exposure alone. The effects of glutamate on NSPCs were blocked by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist GYKI-52466, but not by the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist MK-801 or DL-AP5, or the mGluR3 antagonist LY-341495. Furthermore, treatment of NSPCs with AMPA, kainic acid, or the kainate receptor-specific agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid mimicked the responses seen with glutamate both alone and in the setting of oxidative stress. These findings offer important insights into potential mechanisms to enhance NSPC survival and implicate a potential role for glutamate in promoting NSPC survival and proliferation after traumatic SCI.

  14. Agile Objects: Component-Based Inherent Survivability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chien, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a framework called Agile Objects which leverages component object models and enables the construction of survivable systems that support increased application survivability through elusive technologies...

  15. Increased expression of IRF8 in tumor cells inhibits the generation of Th17 cells and predicts unfavorable survival of diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weijie; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Zhigang; Du, Qinghua; Du, Hong; Yang, Li; Ling, Yanying; Xiong, Huabao; Li, Qingshan

    2017-07-25

    The immunological pathogenesis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains elusive. Searching for new prognostic markers of DLBCL is a crucial focal point for clinical scientists. The aim of the present study was to examine the prognostic value of interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) expression and its effect on the development of Th17 cells in the tumor microenvironment of DLBCL patients. Flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR were used to detect the distribution of Th17 cells and related cytokines and IRF8 in tumor tissues from DLBCL patients. Two DLBCL cell lines (OCI-LY10 and OCI-LY1) with IRF8 knockdown or overexpression and two human B lymphoblast cell lines were co-cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro to determine the effect of IRF8 on the generation of Th17 cells. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to investigate the involvement of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) in the effect of IRF8 on Th17 cell generation. The survival of 67 DLBCL patients was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank analysis. The percentage of Th17 cells was lower in DLBCL tumor tissues than in PBMCs and corresponding adjacent benign tissues. Relative expression of interleukin (IL)-17A was lower, whereas that of interferon (IFN)-γ was higher in tumor tissues than in benign tissues. Co-culture with DLBCL cell lines inhibited the generation of Th17 cells in vitro. IRF8 upregulation was detected in DLBCL tumor tissues, and it was associated with decreased DLBCL patient survival. Investigation of the underlying mechanism suggested that IRF8 upregulation in DLBCL, through an unknown mechanism, inhibited Th17 cell generation by suppressing RORγt in neighboring CD4+ T cells. Tumor cells may express soluble or membrane-bound factors that inhibit the expression of RORγt in T cells within the tumor microenvironment. Our findings suggest that IRF8 expression could

  16. Intraspinal administration of human spinal cord-derived neural progenitor cells in the G93A-SOD1 mouse model of ALS delays symptom progression, prolongs survival and increases expression of endogenous neurotrophic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippenberg, Sarah; Rath, Klaus Jan; Böselt, Sebastian; Thau-Habermann, Nadine; Schwarz, Sigrid C; Dengler, Reinhard; Wegner, Florian; Petri, Susanne

    2017-03-01

    Neural stem or progenitor cells are considered to be a novel therapeutic strategy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), based on their potential to generate a protective environment rather than to replace degenerating motor neurons. Following local injection to the spinal cord, neural progenitor cells may generate glial cells and release neurotrophic factors. In the present study, human spinal cord-derived neural progenitor cells (hscNPCs) were injected into the lumbar spinal cord of G93A-SOD1 ALS transgenic mice. We evaluated the potential effect of hscNPC treatment by survival analysis and behavioural/phenotypic assessments. Immunohistological and real-time PCR experiments were performed at a defined time point to study the underlying mechanisms. Symptom progression in hscNPC-injected mice was significantly delayed at the late stage of disease. On average, survival was only prolonged for 5 days. Animals treated with hscNPCs performed significantly better in motor function tests between weeks 18 and 19. Increased production of GDNF and IGF-1 mRNA was detectable in spinal cord tissue of hscNPC-treated mice. In summary, treatment with hscNPCs led to increased endogenous production of several growth factors and increased the preservation of innervated motor neurons but had only a small effect on overall survival. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Survival of Low-pH Stress by Escherichia coli O157:H7: Correlation between Alterations in the Cell Envelope and Increased Acid Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kieran N.; Oxford, Lynn; O’Byrne, Conor P.

    1999-01-01

    Survival of a nontoxigenic isolate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 at low pH (pH 3.0) was examined over prolonged time periods for each of three population types: exponential-phase cells, stationary-phase cells, and acid-adapted exponential-phase cells. In each population, approximately 5 × 104 CFU ml−1 were detected after a 24-h incubation at pH 3.0. Even after 3 days at pH 3.0, significant numbers of survivors from each of the three populations could be detected. The high level of acid tolerance exhibited by these survivors was found to be quickly lost once they were transferred to conditions which permitted growth to resume, indicating that they were not mutants. Proton flux measurements on the three populations of cells revealed that the initial rates of viability loss at pH 3.0 correlated well with net proton accumulation. Cells showing a high initial rate of viability loss (exponential-phase cells) accumulated protons at the highest rate, whereas resistant populations (adapted or stationary-phase cells) accumulated protons only slowly. Differences in the protein composition of the cell envelope between the three populations were studied by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Complex differences in the pattern of proteins expressed by each population were uncovered. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of a possible model accounting for acid tolerance in this important food-borne pathogen. PMID:10388702

  18. The rs16906252:C>T SNP is not associated with increased overall survival or temozolomide response in a Han-Chinese glioma cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chen Wei

    Full Text Available The methylation status of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT is associated with the prognosis in gliomas and in other cancers. Recent studies showed that rs16906252, an SNP in the MGMT promoter, is associated with promoter methylation and is a predictor of the overall survival time (OST and the response to temozolomide (TMZ treatment. However, these findings haven't been systematically investigated in the Han-Chinese population. We analyzed the relevance between rs16906252 polymorphisms, the MGMT methylation status, and the OST in 72 Han-Chinese gliomas patients. The MGMT promoter methylation was measured by bisulfite conversion followed by pyro-sequencing, while rs16906252 was measured by restriction endonuclease digestion. Contrary to the previous findings, we found no association between rs16906252 genotypes and promoter methylation on MGMT. The lower-grade glioma (LGGs patients carrying the C allele with rs16906252 showed a surprisingly better OST (P = 0.04. Furthermore, the LGG patients carrying hypo-methylated MGMT promoter and rs16906252 T allele showed significantly poorer prognosis. The prognostic benefit of MGMT promoter methylation and genotypes on gliomas patients is marginal. A new molecular stratified patient grouping of LGGs is potentially associated with poorer OST. Active MGMT might have a protective role in LGG tumors, enabling evolution to severe malignancy.

  19. RX-207, a Small Molecule Inhibitor of Protein Interaction with Glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), Reduces Experimentally Induced Inflammation and Increases Survival Rate in Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP)-Induced Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Stefan; Harris, Nicholas; Il'kova, Gabriela; Rehák, Pavol; Zsila, Ferenc; Yurgenzon Kogan, Faina; Lahmy, Orly; Zhuk, Regina; Gregor, Paul; Koppel, Juraj

    2018-02-01

    The fused quinazolinone derivative, RX-207, is chemically and functionally related to small molecule inhibitors of protein binding to glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs). Composed of a planar aromatic amine scaffold, it inhibits protein binding to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). RX-207 reduced neutrophil migration in thioglycollate-induced peritonitis (37%), inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema (32%) and cerulein-induced pancreatitis (28%), and increased animal survival in the mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis (60%). The mechanism of RX-207 action, analyzed by UV spectroscopy, confirmed that which was elucidated for chemically related anti-inflammatory SMIGs. RX-207 binding to cell surface GAGs can account for the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment via the micro-vasculature and as a consequence, the reduction of neutrophil mediated tissue damage in the animal models of inflammation and improved survival of mice in CLP-induced sepsis.

  20. Modelling survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight

    2016-01-01

    well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates...

  1. Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rupert G

    2011-01-01

    A concise summary of the statistical methods used in the analysis of survival data with censoring. Emphasizes recently developed nonparametric techniques. Outlines methods in detail and illustrates them with actual data. Discusses the theory behind each method. Includes numerous worked problems and numerical exercises.

  2. Rituximab induction therapy, survival benefits, and the increasing selection of radiotherapy as the postinduction treatment in patients with primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hsiang Yang

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Rituximab improved the CR and OS rates of patients with PMBCL, but these improvements may be attributable to the increased use of radiotherapy (which may have also resulted from FDG-PET evaluation.

  3. Ensuring survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadik, N

    1992-12-01

    The global population growth rate has been 1.7% since 1975, while for developing countries it is 2.1%. UN projections are for population to grow from 5.5 billion in 1992 to 10 billion by 2050. Sustainable development is only possible when population growth is balanced with available resources. UN medium population projections of 7.8 billion by 2050 can be reached with 187 million more couples practicing family planning (FP) by the year 2000. Within the past 20 years, 1 billion people, mostly from developed countries, have enjoyed economic growth, but have contributed polluting technologies, excessive waste, and environmentally dangerous economic practices. The generations to come will be affected by the continuance of these practices by the 1 billion affluent population. The bottom billion are mired in poverty and high population growth and survival, needs that hinder their country's economic development, upset fragile ecosystems, and destroy the balance between human beings and the environment. International migration on a large scale could be the by-product of population growth. Progress has been made since the 1974 UN Conference on Population in Bucharest. There are still, however, vulnerable populations, the poorest households, the landless and small-holder families, urban squatters and slum dwellers, those living in low lying deltas and along coasts, and women. Women control family resources and their micro environment. Sustainable development is not possible without the elimination of prejudice against women. Reproductive freedom for women must be a priority. High quality, readily available FP services are also needed for those desiring this. The difficulty is in providing FP services that conform to a woman's social and cultural background and personal needs; success is dependent on involving women in the process and holding men more responsible for FP. Development means allowing for the legitimate aspirations of the majority not just the specialized

  4. Bentonite modified with zinc enhances aflatoxin B1 adsorption and increase survival of fibroblasts (3T3) and epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nones, Janaína; Solhaug, Anita; Eriksen, Gunnar Sundstøl; Macuvele, Domingos Lusitâneo Pier; Poli, Anicleto; Soares, Cíntia; Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves; Riella, Humberto Gracher; Nones, Jader

    2017-09-05

    Bentonites are commonly used as feed additives to reduce the bioavailability and thus the toxicity of aflatoxins by adsorbing the toxins in the gastrointestinal tract. Aflatoxins are particular harmful mycotoxins mainly found in areas with hot and humid climates. They occur in food and feedstuff as a result of fungal contamination before and after harvest. The aim of this study was to modify Brazilian bentonite clay by incorporation of zinc (Zn) ions in order to increase the adsorption capacity and consequently reduce the toxicity of aflatoxins. The significance of Zn intercalating conditions such as concentration, temperature and reaction time were investigated. Our results showed that the Zn treatment of the bentonite increased the aflatoxin B 1 (AFB 1 ) adsorption and that Zn concentration had a negative effect. Indeed, temperature and time had no significant effect in the binding capacity. The modified bentonite (Zn-Bent1) was not cytotoxic to either fibroblasts (3T3) nor epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2) cell lines. Interestingly, Zn-Bent1 has higher protective effect against AFB 1 induced cytotoxicity than the unmodified bentonite. In conclusion, the Zn modified bentonite, Zn-Bent1, represent an improved tool to prevent aflatoxicosis in animals fed on AFB 1 contaminated feed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Systemic thrombolysis increases hemorrhagic stroke risk without survival benefit compared with catheter-directed intervention for the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Nathan L; Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Singh, Michael J; Makaroun, Michel S; Chaer, Rabih A

    2017-03-01

    Systemic thrombolysis (ST) and catheter-directed intervention (CDI) are both used in the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), but the comparative outcomes of these two therapies remain unclear. The objective of this study was to compare short-term mortality and safety outcomes between the two treatments using a large national database. Patients presenting with acute PE were identified in the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) from 2009 to 2012. Comorbidities, clinical characteristics, and invasive procedures were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD) codes and the Elixhauser comorbidity index. To adjust for anticipated baseline differences between the two treatment groups, propensity score matching was used to create a matched ST cohort with clinical and comorbid characteristics similar to those of the CDI cohort. Subgroups of patients with and without hemodynamic shock were analyzed separately. Primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality, overall bleeding risk, and hemorrhagic stroke risk. Of 263,955 subjects with acute PE, 1.63% (n = 4272) received ST and 0.55% (n = 1455) received CDI. ST subjects were older, had more chronic comorbidities, and had higher rates of respiratory failure (ST, 27.9% [n = 1192]; CDI, 21.2% [n = 308]; P hemorrhagic stroke rates (ST, 2.2% [n = 96]; CDI, 1.4% [n = 20]; P = .041). After propensity matching, 1430 patients remained in each cohort; baseline characteristics of the matched cohorts did not differ significantly using standardized difference comparisons. Analysis of the matched cohorts did not demonstrate a significant effect of CDI on in-hospital mortality or overall bleeding risk but did show a significant protective effect against hemorrhagic stroke compared with ST (odds ratio, 0.47; 95% confidence interval, 0.27-0.82; P = .01). Subgroup analysis showed decreased odds of hemorrhagic stroke for CDI in the nonshock subgroup and increased procedural bleeding for CDI but no

  6. Active immunization of cattle with a bothropic toxoid does not abrogate envenomation by Bothrops asper venom, but increases the likelihood of survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, María; González, Katherine; Rodríguez, Carlos; Gómez, Aarón; Segura, Álvaro; Vargas, Mariángela; Villalta, Mauren; Estrada, Ricardo; León, Guillermo

    2017-03-01

    This study assessed the protective effect of active immunization of cattle to prevent the envenomation induced by B. asper venom. Two groups of oxen were immunized with a bothropic toxoid and challenged by an intramuscular injection of either 10 or 50 mg B. asper venom, to induce moderate or severe envenomations, respectively. Non-immunized oxen were used as controls. It was found that immunized oxen developed local edema similar to those observed in non-immunized animals. However, systemic effects were totally prevented in immunized oxen challenged with 10 mg venom, and therefore antivenom treatment was not required. When immunized oxen were challenged with 50 mg venom, coagulopathy was manifested 3-16 h later than in non-immunized oxen, demonstrating a delay in the onset of systemic envenomation. In these animals, active immunization did not eliminate the need for antivenom treatment, but increased the time lapse in which antivenom administration is still effective. All experimentally envenomed oxen completely recovered after a week following venom injection. Our results suggest that immunization of cattle with a bothropic toxoid prevents the development of systemic effects in moderate envenomations by B. asper, but does not abrogate these effects in severe envenomation. Copyright © 2016 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased survival of human free fat grafts with varying densities of human adipose-derived stem cells and platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Li, Feng; Li, Jie; Wang, Hang; Zheng, Xiaohui; Long, Jie; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    The high absorption rate of transplanted fat has limited the application of autogenous fat grafts in the clinical setting. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) on fat regeneration by investigating the impact of PRP and conditioned medium on the biological characteristics of ASCs. Fat grafts were prepared with ASCs at densities of 10 7 /ml, 10 6 /ml, 10 5 /ml, 10 4 /ml and 0/ml with and without PRP and injected subcutaneously into nude mice. Liquid overflow method, haematoxylin and eosin staining, and immunohistochemical analyses were used to examine the fat grafts. The residual fat volume of the 10 5 /ml ASC + PRP group was significantly higher than that of other treatment conditions after 90 days. Furthermore, histological examination revealed that in 10 5 /ml ASCs-treated grafts normal adipocyte area and capillary formation were increased dramatically compared with other treatment conditions. It is concluded that fat grafts consisting of PRP and 10 5 /ml ASCs constitute an ideal transplant strategy, which may result in decreased absorption and accelerated fat regeneration. This simple and reliable method could provide a valuable and needed tool in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Network ties and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acheampong, George; Narteh, Bedman; Rand, John

    2017-01-01

    of the SCPFs in Ghana. Distribution ties are associated with negative survival chances and this is not even reversed if the human capital of the owner increases although managers with higher human capital and higher distribution ties experience positive effects. Industry ties are associated with positive ties...

  9. Global Activities and Plant Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2014-01-01

    the highest exit rates. Moreover, the exit rates of globally engaged plants seem to be unaffected by increased foreign presence, whereas there appears to be a negative impact on the survival rates of non-exporting non-MNE plants. Finally, the result reveals that the survival ratio of plants of acquired...

  10. A New Polymorphism Biomarker rs629367 Associated with Increased Risk and Poor Survival of Gastric Cancer in Chinese by Up-Regulated miRNA-let-7a Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Dong, Qiguan; He, Caiyun; Liu, Wenjing; Sun, Liping; Liu, Jingwei; Xing, Chengzhong; Li, Xiaohang; Wang, Bengang; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Variant in pri-miRNA could affect miRNA expression and mature process or splicing efficiency, thus altering the hereditary susceptibility and prognosis of cancer. We aimed to assess miRNA-let-7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with the risk and prognosis of gastric cancer (GC) as predicting biomarkers, and furthermore, its possible mechanisms. Methods A two-stage case-control study was designed to screen four miRNA SNPs (pri-let-7a-2 rs629367 and rs1143770, pri-let-7a-1 rs10739971, pri-let-7f-2 rs17276588) in 107 GC patients, 107 atrophic gastritis (AG), and matched 124 controls using PCR-RFLP. Two promising SNPs were validated in another independent 1949 samples (including 579 gastric cancer patients, 649 atrophic gastritis and 721 controls) using Sequenom MassARRAY platform and sequencing. Results We found that pri-let-7a-2 rs629367 CC variant genotype was associated with increased risks of gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis by 1.83-fold and 1.86-fold, respectively. For gastric cancer prognosis, patients with rs629367 CC genotype had significantly poorer survival than patients with AA genotype (log-rank P = 0.004). We further investigated the let-7a expression levels in serum and found that let-7a expression elevated gradually for rs629367 AA, CA, CC genotype in the atrophic gastritis group (P = 0.043). Furthermore, we confirmed these findings in vitro study by overexpressing let-7a carrying pri-let-7a-2 wild-type A or polymorphic-type C allele (Pcancer as well as atrophic gastritis and was also associated with poor survival of gastric cancer, which possibly by affecting the mature let-7a expression, and could serve as a predicting biomarker for high-risk and poor prognosis of gastric cancer. PMID:24760009

  11. Surviving downsizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, A.C.; Schulz, J.W.; Holmes, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Utilities along with other companies are under increasing pressure to operate in a leaner, more efficient way. Companies with excess personnel costs consider downsizing as one solution. Developments in communication and technology along with more team-oriented management approaches further fuel the move to downsize as these developments permit smaller, flatter organizations. Downsizing is often, however, a difficult and even hazardous path. Reducing the size of a workforce does not automatically translate into lower costs or improved operations. The hidden costs of downsizing, i.e., the psychological impacts on the entire organization, may, in fact, overwhelm the anticipated gains. Yet, utilities facing deregulation and increasing competition ma be forced to follow this difficult course

  12. Survival after blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Ahlgren, Martin; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first...... the SMR remained significantly 1.3-fold increased. CONCLUSION: The survival and relative mortality patterns among blood transfusion recipients were characterized with unprecedented detail and precision. Our results are relevant to assessments of the consequences of possible transfusion-transmitted disease......BACKGROUND: Long-term survival of transfusion recipients has rarely been studied. This study examines short- and long-term mortality among transfusion recipients and reports these as absolute rates and rates relative to the general population. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Population-based cohort study...

  13. Australasian randomised trial to evaluate the role of maternal intramuscular dexamethasone versus betamethasone prior to preterm birth to increase survival free of childhood neurosensory disability (A*STEROID): study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Both dexamethasone and betamethasone, given to women at risk of preterm birth, substantially improve short-term neonatal health, increase the chance of the baby being discharged home alive, and reduce childhood neurosensory disability, remaining safe into adulthood. However, it is unclear which corticosteroid is of greater benefit to mother and child. This study aims to determine whether giving dexamethasone to women at risk of preterm birth at less than 34 weeks’ gestation increases the chance of their children surviving free of neurosensory disability at two years’ corrected age, compared with betamethasone. Methods/Design Design randomised, multicentre, placebo controlled trial. Inclusion criteria women at risk of preterm birth at less than 34 weeks’ gestation with a singleton or twin pregnancy and no contraindications to the use of antenatal corticosteroids and who give informed consent. Trial entry & randomisation at telephone randomisation eligible women will be randomly allocated to either the dexamethasone group or the betamethasone group, allocated a study number and corresponding treatment pack. Study groups women in the dexamethasone group will be administered two syringes of 12 mg dexamethasone (dexamethasone sodium phosphate) and women in the betamethasone group will be administered two syringes of 11.4 mg betamethasone (Celestone Chronodose). Both study groups consist of intramuscular treatments 24 hours apart. Primary study outcome death or any neurosensory disability measured in children at two years’ corrected age. Sample size a sample size of 1449 children is required to detect either a decrease in death or any neurosensory disability from 27.0% to 20.1% with dexamethasone compared with betamethasone, or an increase from 27.0% to 34.5% (two-sided alpha 0.05, 80% power, 5% loss to follow up, design effect 1.2). Discussion This study will provide high-level evidence of direct relevance for clinical practice. If one drug clearly

  14. Fusion of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1-derived glycine-alanine repeat to trans-dominant HIV-1 Gag increases inhibitory activities and survival of transduced cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Diana; Wild, Jens; Ludwig, Christine; Asbach, Benedikt; Notka, Frank; Wagner, Ralf

    2008-06-01

    Trans-dominant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag derivatives have been shown to efficiently inhibit late steps of HIV-1 replication in vitro by interfering with Gag precursor assembly, thus ranking among the interesting candidates for gene therapy approaches. However, efficient antiviral activities of corresponding transgenes are likely to be counteracted in particular by cell-mediated host immune responses toward the transgene-expressing cells. To decrease this potential immunogenicity, a 24-amino acid Gly-Ala (GA) stretch derived from Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) and known to overcome proteasomal degradation was fused to a trans-dominant Gag variant (sgD1). To determine the capacity of this fusion polypeptide to repress viral replication, PM-1 cells were transduced with sgD1 and GAsgD1 transgenes, using retroviral gene transfer. Challenge of stably transfected permissive cell lines with various viral strains indicated that N-terminal GA fusion even enhanced the inhibitory properties of sgD1. Further studies revealed that the GA stretch increased protein stability by blocking proteasomal degradation of Gag proteins. Immunization of BALB/c mice with a DNA vaccine vector expressing sgD1 induced substantial Gag-specific immune responses that were, however, clearly diminished in the presence of GA. Furthermore, recognition of cells expressing the GA-fused transgene by CD8(+) T cells was drastically reduced, both in vitro and in vivo, resulting in prolonged survival of the transduced cells in recipient mice.

  15. Nuclear War Survival Skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearny, C.H.

    2002-06-24

    The purpose of this book is to provide Americans with information and instructions that will significantly increase their chances of surviving a possible nuclear attack. It brings together field-tested instructions that, if followed by a large fraction of Americans during a crisis that preceded an attack, could save millions of lives. The author is convinced that the vulnerability of our country to nuclear threat or attack must be reduced and that the wide dissemination of the information contained in this book would help achieve that objective of our overall defense strategy.

  16. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop an advanced reflexive structure technology system to increase the survivability of future systems constructed of...

  17. Survival pathways under stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Survival pathways under stress. Bacteria survive by changing gene expression. pattern. Three important pathways will be discussed: Stringent response. Quorum sensing. Proteins performing function to control oxidative damage.

  18. S.O.S. Surviving or Surviving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Richard H.; Whiteman, James

    1973-01-01

    A High School course, General Studies Survival Curriculum, was designed to aid students in problem solving in a complex society. Areas of concern were psychology, consumer economics, environmental studies, law and society, religion and values, ethnic studies, applied aesthetics, creative studies, occupations and futurism. (JB)

  19. Body mass index and breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qi; Burgess, Stephen; Turman, Constance

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence that elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with reduced survival for women with breast cancer. However, the underlying reasons remain unclear. We conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis to investigate a possible causal role of BMI in survival f...

  20. Advanced techniques for modeling avian nest survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsmore, S.J.; White, Gary C.; Knopf, F.L.

    2002-01-01

    Estimation of avian nest survival has traditionally involved simple measures of apparent nest survival or Mayfield constant-nest-survival models. However, these methods do not allow researchers to build models that rigorously assess the importance of a wide range of biological factors that affect nest survival. Models that incorporate greater detail, such as temporal variation in nest survival and covariates representative of individual nests represent a substantial improvement over traditional estimation methods. In an attempt to improve nest survival estimation procedures, we introduce the nest survival model now available in the program MARK and demonstrate its use on a nesting study of Mountain Plovers (Charadrius montanus Townsend) in Montana, USA. We modeled the daily survival of Mountain Plover nests as a function of the sex of the incubating adult, nest age, year, linear and quadratic time trends, and two weather covariates (maximum daily temperature and daily precipitation) during a six-year study (1995–2000). We found no evidence for yearly differences or an effect of maximum daily temperature on the daily nest survival of Mountain Plovers. Survival rates of nests tended by female and male plovers differed (female rate = 0.33; male rate = 0.49). The estimate of the additive effect for males on nest survival rate was 0.37 (95% confidence limits were 0.03, 0.71) on a logit scale. Daily survival rates of nests increased with nest age; the estimate of daily nest-age change in survival in the best model was 0.06 (95% confidence limits were 0.04, 0.09) on a logit scale. Daily precipitation decreased the probability that the nest would survive to the next day; the estimate of the additive effect of daily precipitation on the nest survival rate was −1.08 (95% confidence limits were −2.12, −0.13) on a logit scale. Our approach to modeling daily nest-survival rates allowed several biological factors of interest to be easily included in nest survival models

  1. Aircraft Survivability. Spring 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    panel exhibiting telltale signs and critical fragments were identified and collected. The weapon employed against the aircraft was correctly assessed...701C engines (for FCR- equipped Apache Longbows), and a fully integrated cockpit. In addition, the aircraft received improved survivability...sustained analytical contributions to improve the survivability and effectiveness of US military aircraft and weapon systems. These contributions

  2. Attributing death to cancer: cause-specific survival estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew A

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer survival estimation is an important part of assessing the overall strength of cancer care in a region. Generally, the death of a patient is taken as the end point in estimation of overall survival. When calculating the overall survival, the cause of death is not taken into account. With increasing demand for better survival of cancer patients it is important for clinicians and researchers to know about survival statistics due to disease of interest, i.e. net survival. It is also important to choose the best method for estimating net survival. Increase in the use of computer programmes has made it possible to carry out statistical analysis without guidance from a bio-statistician. This is of prime importance in third- world countries as there are a few trained bio-statisticians to guide clinicians and researchers. The present communication describes current methods used to estimate net survival such as cause-specific survival and relative survival. The limitation of estimation of cause-specific survival particularly in India and the usefulness of relative survival are discussed. The various sources for estimating cancer survival are also discussed. As survival-estimates are to be projected on to the population at large, it becomes important to measure the variation of the estimates, and thus confidence intervals are used. Rothman′s confidence interval gives the most satisfactory result for survival estimate.

  3. Prostate cancer: net survival and cause-specific survival rates after multiple imputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisot, Adeline; Bessaoud, Faïza; Landais, Paul; Rébillard, Xavier; Trétarre, Brigitte; Daurès, Jean-Pierre

    2015-07-28

    Estimations of survival rates are diverse and the choice of the appropriate method depends on the context. Given the increasing interest in multiple imputation methods, we explored the interest of a multiple imputation approach in the estimation of cause-specific survival, when a subset of causes of death was observed. By using European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), 20 multiply imputed datasets were created and analyzed with a Multivariate Imputation by Chained Equation (MICE) algorithm. Then, cause-specific survival was estimated on each dataset with two methods: Kaplan-Meier and competing risks. The two pooled cause-specific survival and confidence intervals were obtained using Rubin's rules after complementary log-log transformation. Net survival was estimated using Pohar-Perme's estimator and was compared to pooled cause-specific survival. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was performed to test the robustness of our constructed multiple imputation model. Cause-specific survival performed better than net survival, since this latter exceeded 100 % for almost the first 2 years of follow-up and after 9 years whereas the cause-specific survival decreased slowly and than stabilized at around 94 % at 9 years. Sensibility study results were satisfactory. On our basis of prostate cancer data, the results obtained by cause-specific survival after multiple imputation appeared to be better and more realistic than those obtained using net survival.

  4. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012". DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meeting...

  5. Does biological relatedness affect child survival?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We studied child survival in Rakai, Uganda where many children are fostered out or orphaned. Methods: Biological relatedness is measured as the average of the Wright's coefficients between each household member and the child. Instrumental variables for fostering include proportion of adult males in household, age and gender of household head. Control variables include SES, religion, polygyny, household size, child age, child birth size, and child HIV status. Results: Presence of both parents in the household increased the odds of survival by 28%. After controlling for the endogeneity of child placement decisions in a multivariate model we found that lower biological relatedness of a child was associated with statistically significant reductions in child survival. The effects of biological relatedness on child survival tend to be stronger for both HIV- and HIV+ children of HIV+ mothers. Conclusions: Reductions in the numbers of close relatives caring for children of HIV+ mothers reduce child survival.

  6. Individual social capital and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlskov, Linda; Mortensen, Rikke N; Overgaard, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concept of social capital has received increasing attention as a determinant of population survival, but its significance is uncertain. We examined the importance of social capital on survival in a population study while focusing on gender differences. METHODS: We used data from...... a Danish regional health survey with a five-year follow-up period, 2007-2012 (n = 9288, 53.5% men, 46.5% women). We investigated the association between social capital and all-cause mortality, performing separate analyses on a composite measure as well as four specific dimensions of social capital while...... controlling for covariates. Analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazard models by which hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: For women, higher levels of social capital were associated with lower all-cause mortality regardless of age, socioeconomic status, health...

  7. Saudi sands, SCUDS, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendon, M P

    1993-01-01

    SCUD attacks were one of many challenges this pediatric nurse practitioner (NP) and Air Force Reserve flight nurse faced daily during Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Providing nursing care to sick and injured patients on board a C141 transport plane en route from Saudi Arabia to Germany was her primary responsibility. Additionally, many hours were spent filling sandbags, attending in-service classes, and practicing putting on a gas mask and protective suit. Although the war has been over for almost 3 years, the effects are long lasting. The author was able to use her wartime experience positively to gain insight into survival in today's violent society. As violence increases, NPs must reshape their focus and educate their clients about survival.

  8. Foreign Ownership and Long-term Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Dorte; Thomsen, Steen

    2006-01-01

    Does foreign ownership enhance or decrease a firm's chances of survival? Over the 100 year period 1895-2001 this paper compares the survival of foreign subsidiaries in Denmark to a control sample matched by industry and firm size. We find that foreign-owned companies have higher survival probabil......Does foreign ownership enhance or decrease a firm's chances of survival? Over the 100 year period 1895-2001 this paper compares the survival of foreign subsidiaries in Denmark to a control sample matched by industry and firm size. We find that foreign-owned companies have higher survival...... probability. On average exit risk for domestic companies is 2.3 times higher than for foreign companies. First movers like Siemens, Philips, Kodak, Ford, GM or Goodyear have been active in the country for almost a century. Relative foreign survival increases with company age. However, the foreign survival...... advantage appears to be eroded by globalization, it decreases over time and disappears at the end of the century....

  9. Seasonal survival of adult female mottled ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jena A.; Haukos, David A.; Conway, Warren C.

    2017-01-01

    The mottled duck (Anas fulgivula) is a non-migratory duck dependent on coastal habitats to meet all of its life cycle requirements in the Western Gulf Coast (WGC) of Texas and Louisiana, USA. This population of mottled ducks has experienced a moderate decline during the past 2 decades. Adult survival has been identified as an important factor influencing population demography. Previous work based on band-recovery data has provided only annual estimates of survival. We assessed seasonal patterns of female mottled duck survival from 2009 to 2012 using individuals marked with satellite platform transmitter terminals (PTTs). We used temperature and movement sensors within each PTT to indicate potential mortality events. We estimated cumulative weekly survival and ranked factors influential in patterns of mortality using known-fate modeling in Program MARK. Models included 4 predictors: week; hunting and non-hunting periods; biological periods defined as breeding, brooding, molt, and pairing; and mass at time of capture. Models containing hunt periods, during and outside the mottled duck season, comprised essentially 100% of model weights where both legal and illegal harvest had a negative influence on mottled duck survival. Survival rates were low during 2009–2011 (12–38% annual rate of survival), when compared with the long-term banding average of 53% annual survival. During 2011, survival of female mottled ducks was the lowest annual rate (12%) ever documented and coincided with extreme drought. Management actions maximizing the availability of wetlands and associated upland habitats during hunting seasons and drought conditions may increase adult female mottled duck survival.

  10. Education for Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of current approaches to education and concludes that none of these is sufficient to meet the challenges that now face the human race. It argues instead for a new concept of education for survival. (Contains 1 note.)

  11. Multinationals and plant survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2010-01-01

    -parametric estimates show that domestic MNE plants are more likely to exit the market than other plants, also when controlling for plant-specific differences. Finally, foreign presence in the market seems to have had a negative impact on the survival rate of plants in non-exporting non- MNEs, but not to have affected...

  12. Artists’ Survival Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Trine; Jensen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts. In our research, we have readdressed this question by looking at the artists’ survival in the arts occupations. The results show that an artistic...... education has a significant impact on artists’ careers in the arts and we find important industry differences....

  13. Survivability via Control Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.

    2000-08-11

    Control objectives open an additional front in the survivability battle. A given set of control objectives is valuable if it represents good practices, it is complete (it covers all the necessary areas), and it is auditable. CobiT and BS 7799 are two examples of control objective sets.

  14. Flexible survival regression modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Scheike, Thomas H; Martinussen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Regression analysis of survival data, and more generally event history data, is typically based on Cox's regression model. We here review some recent methodology, focusing on the limitations of Cox's regression model. The key limitation is that the model is not well suited to represent time-varyi...

  15. Education for Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, James E., Jr.

    In this address, James E. Allen, Jr., Assistant Secretary for Education and U.S. Commissioner of Education, discusses the relationship of education to the problem of ecological destruction. He states that the solutions to the problems of air, water, and soil pollution may be found in redirected education. This "education for survival" can serve to…

  16. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop an advanced reflexive structure technology system to increase the survivability of future systems constructed of...

  17. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) proposes to develop an advanced reflexive structure system to increase the survivability of aerostructures. This reflexive...

  18. Body mass index and breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qi; Burgess, Stephen; Turman, Constance

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence that elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with reduced survival for women with breast cancer. However, the underlying reasons remain unclear. We conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis to investigate a possible causal role of BMI in survival...... from breast cancer. Methods: We used individual-level data from six large breast cancer case-cohorts including a total of 36 210 individuals (2475 events) of European ancestry. We created a BMI genetic risk score (GRS) based on genotypes at 94 known BMI-associated genetic variants. Association between...... the BMI genetic score and breast cancer survival was analysed by Cox regression for each study separately. Study-specific hazard ratios were pooled using fixed-effect meta-analysis. Results: BMI genetic score was found to be associated with reduced breast cancer-specific survival for estrogen receptor (ER...

  19. Survival analysis models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xian

    2012-01-01

    Survival analysis concerns sequential occurrences of events governed by probabilistic laws.  Recent decades have witnessed many applications of survival analysis in various disciplines. This book introduces both classic survival models and theories along with newly developed techniques. Readers will learn how to perform analysis of survival data by following numerous empirical illustrations in SAS. Survival Analysis: Models and Applications: Presents basic techniques before leading onto some of the most advanced topics in survival analysis.Assumes only a minimal knowledge of SAS whilst enablin

  20. Chemical Weed Control Increases Survival and Growth in Hardwood Plantings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayne G. Erdmann

    1967-01-01

    In a plantation of four hardwood species on a silt loam soil planted to 1-0 stock, 4 pounds of active atrazine or simazine controlled weeds effectively without injuring the trees. Chemical weed control was better on plowed and disked ground than on unprepared ground. Yellow-poplar and white ash grew faster on prepared ground. Black walnut and red oak did not respond...

  1. Survival From Childhood Hematological Malignancies in Denmark: Is Survival Related to Family Characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Friederike; Winther, Jeanette Falck; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Lightfoot, Tracy; Zeeb, Hajo; Simony, Sofie Bay; Deltour, Isabelle; Ferro, Gilles; Bautz, Andrea; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Schüz, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Due to diverse findings as to the role of family factors for childhood cancer survival even within Europe, we explored a nationwide, register-based cohort of Danish children with hematological malignancies. All children born between 1973 and 2006 and diagnosed with a hematological malignancy before the age of 20 years (N = 1,819) were followed until 10 years from diagnosis. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards models estimating hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to assess the impact of family characteristics on overall survival in children with hematological malignancies. Having siblings and increasing birth order were associated with reduced survival from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Associations with AML were strongest and statistically significant. HRs of 1.62 (CI 0.85; 3.09) and 5.76 (CI 2.01; 16.51) were observed for the fourth or later born children with ALL (N = 41) and AML (N = 9), respectively. Children with older parents showed a tendency toward inferior ALL survival, while for AML young maternal age was related to poorer survival. Based on small numbers, a trend toward poorer survival from non-Hodgkin lymphoma was observed for children having siblings and for children of younger parents. Further research is warranted to gain further knowledge on the impact of family factors on childhood cancer survival in other populations and to elaborate potential underlying mechanisms and pathways of those survival inequalities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Applied survival analysis using R

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Dirk F

    2016-01-01

    Applied Survival Analysis Using R covers the main principles of survival analysis, gives examples of how it is applied, and teaches how to put those principles to use to analyze data using R as a vehicle. Survival data, where the primary outcome is time to a specific event, arise in many areas of biomedical research, including clinical trials, epidemiological studies, and studies of animals. Many survival methods are extensions of techniques used in linear regression and categorical data, while other aspects of this field are unique to survival data. This text employs numerous actual examples to illustrate survival curve estimation, comparison of survivals of different groups, proper accounting for censoring and truncation, model variable selection, and residual analysis. Because explaining survival analysis requires more advanced mathematics than many other statistical topics, this book is organized with basic concepts and most frequently used procedures covered in earlier chapters, with more advanced topics...

  3. Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Donald E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of Burkholderia pseudomallei to survive in water likely contributes to its environmental persistence in endemic regions. To determine the physiological adaptations which allow B. pseudomallei to survive in aqueous environments, we performed microarray analyses of B. pseudomallei cultures transferred from Luria broth (LB to distilled water. Findings Increased expression of a gene encoding for a putative membrane protein (BPSL0721 was confirmed using a lux-based transcriptional reporter system, and maximal expression was noted at approximately 6 hrs after shifting cells from LB to water. A BPSL0721 deficient mutant of B. pseudomallei was able to survive in water for at least 90 days indicating that although involved, BPSL0721 was not essential for survival. BPSL2961, a gene encoding a putative phosphatidylglycerol phosphatase (PGP, was also induced when cells were shifted to water. This gene is likely involved in cell membrane biosynthesis. We were unable to construct a PGP mutant suggesting that the gene is not only involved in survival in water but is essential for cell viability. We also examined mutants of polyhydroxybutyrate synthase (phbC, lipopolysaccharide (LPS oligosaccharide and capsule synthesis, and these mutations did not affect survival in water. LPS mutants lacking outer core were found to lose viability in water by 200 days indicating that an intact LPS core provides an outer membrane architecture which allows prolonged survival in water. Conclusion The results from these studies suggest that B. pseudomallei survival in water is a complex process that requires an LPS molecule which contains an intact core region.

  4. Consultant survival guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Sahena

    2014-04-01

    Taking up a new consultant post can be both exciting and daunting. Once the elation of completing years of training and successfully securing a valued position has subsided, the reality of the task ahead becomes apparent. A new consultant needs to develop a number of skills to develop as a clinical leader and understand the processes within the National Health Service (NHS) that enable service development and innovation. In a programme packed with esteemed speakers, the Royal College of Physicians' one-day conference, Consultants' survival guide: how to succeed as a new consultant provided practical tips and advice for senior trainees and new consultants.

  5. Survival curves for irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    The subject of the lecture is the probability of survival of biological cells which have been subjected to ionising radiation. The basic mathematical theories of cell survival as a function of radiation dose are developed. A brief comparison with observed survival curves is made. (author)

  6. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaicha D. Winters

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea—microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum

  7. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Yaicha D; Lowenstein, Tim K; Timofeeff, Michael N

    2015-11-12

    Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea-microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich) and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena) sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media) from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation) in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1

  8. Democratic survival in Latin America (1945-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal PÉREZ-LIÑÁN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Why do democracies survive or break down? In this paper, it returns to this classic question with an empirical focus on Latin America from 1945 to 2005. The argument deviates from the quantitative literature and a good part of the qualitative literature on democratic survival and breakdown. It is argued that structural variables such as the level of development and inequalities have not shaped prospects for democratic survival in Latin America. Nor, contrary to findings in some of the literature, has economic performance affected the survival of competitive regimes. Instead, it is focused on the regional political environment and on actors’ normative preferences about democracy and dictatorship and their policy radicalism or moderation. It is argued that 1 a higher level of development did not increase the likelihood of democratic survival in Latin America over this long time; 2 if actors have a normative preference for democracy, it is more likely to survive; and 3 policy moderation facilitates democratic survival.

  9. Nuclear war survival skills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearney, C.H.

    1979-09-01

    This book includes chapters on psychological preparations, warning and communications, and evacuation. It describes the building of expedient shelters, their ventilation and cooling, the purification and storage of adequate water, the processing and cooking of whole grains and legumes, fallout meters, protection against fires and carbon monoxide, and expedient furnishings for shelters. Other chapters cover sanitation and preventive medicine, medical advice for nuclear survivors lacking the help of doctors, improvised footwear and clothing, and advice on minimum preparations that can be made at low cost and should be made before a crisis arises. One appendix of the handbook gives detailed, field-tested instructions for building six types of earth-covered expedient fallout shelters, with criteria to guide the choice of which shelter to build. Others contain instructions for making an efficient shelter-ventilating pump and a homemade fallout meter that is accurate and dependable with inexpensive materials found in most households. This report is primarily a compilation and summary of civil defense measures and inventions developed at ORNL over the past 14 years and field-tested in six states, from Florida to Utah. It is the first comprehensive handbook of survival information for use by untrained citizens who want to improve their chances of surviving a possible nuclear attack. Sections may be easily excerpted and reproduced for mass distribution through news media

  10. Prostate cancer: net survival and cause-specific survival rates after multiple imputation

    OpenAIRE

    Morisot, Adeline; Bessaoud, Fa?za; Landais, Paul; R?billard, Xavier; Tr?tarre, Brigitte; Daur?s, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Estimations of survival rates are diverse and the choice of the appropriate method depends on the context. Given the increasing interest in multiple imputation methods, we explored the interest of a multiple imputation approach in the estimation of cause-specific survival, when a subset of causes of death was observed. Methods By using European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), 20 multiply imputed datasets were created and analyzed with a Multivariate Imput...

  11. SURVIVABILITY THROUGH OPTIMIZING RESILIENT MECHANISMS (STORM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    increases CSP’s revenue and helps lowering the price . This eventually creates a virtuous cycle, which will benefit both the CSP and legitimate...prevention, detection, survivability and recovery. It follows that in security- conscious organizations, the cyber security investment portfolio is

  12. Growth response and survival of Heterobranchus longifilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an effort to utilize feed efficiently, promote growth, increase survival and reduce labour costs associated with feeding, Heterobranchus longifilis ingerlings were placed on one of four feeding frequencies; once/day, twice/day; once every other day, and twice every other day for 56 days. They were fed with a commercial ...

  13. Surviving relatives after suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrelykke, Helle; Cohrt, Pernille

    We would like to focus on the surviving relatives after suicides, because it is generally accepted that it is especially difficult to recover after the loss from suicide and because we know as a fact that one suicide affects five persons on average. Every year approximately 700 people commit...... suicide in Denmark. This means that at least 400 people undergo the trauma it is when one of their near relatives commits suicide. We also know that the loss from suicide involves a lot of conflicting feelings - like anger, shame, guilt and loss and that the lack of therapy/treatment of these difficult...... for treatment for the relatives. In the wake of this policy document a national organization for relatives after suicide and a national network for those who attempt suicide occurred. Both organizations are formed by voluntary subscription and both organizations offer acute emergency relief, conversation groups...

  14. Aumento na sobrevida de crianças de grupos de peso baixo ao nascer em Santa Catarina Aumento en la sobrevida de niños de grupos de peso bajo al nacer en Santa Catarina, Sur de Brasil Increased survival among lower-birthweight children in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Andrade Pinheiro

    2010-10-01

    los grupos de peso, pero aumentó en los grupos de menos de 2.000g (77,7% para 81,2%, p=0,029 entre los cuatrienios de 1999 a 2002 y 2003 a 2006. Hubo aumento de menores de 2.000g en el segundo cuatrienio estudiado. El tipo de hospital fue asociado significativamente con la probabilidad de sobrevida. CONCLUSIONES: Hay mayor probabilidad de sobrevida entre nacidos en hospitales privados y en el hospital de enseñanza para todos los grupos de peso y para el grupo de menos de 2000 g. La sobrevida de los grupos de peso por debajo de 2000g aumentó en el cuadrienio más reciente. Mientras, el coeficiente de mortalidad infantil no disminuyó en ese período, ya que la prevalencia de los nacidos en grupos de menor peso también aumentó.OBJECTIVE: To analyze factors associated with survival in the first year of life. METHODS: A historical cohort study was carried out using data from live birth and mortality information systems, including 90,153 live birth records and 1,053 records of death before age one year in hospitals in the cities of Florianópolis and São José, Southern Brazil, between 1999 and 2006. Survival curves were estimated (Kaplan-Meier for birthweight categories, date of birth (four-year periods, and type of maternity. Proportional hazard ratios for mortality were calculated using Cox regression. RESULTS: Survival (98.8% did not change among all birthweight categories, but increased among babies born weighing under 2,000 g (77.7% to 81.2%, p=0.029, between 1999-2002 and 2003-2006. There was an increase in the proportion of babies under 2,000 g in the second period. Type of hospital was significantly associated with probability of survival. CONCLUSIONS: Probability of survival is higher among babies born in private hospitals and in the teaching hospital in all birthweight categories combined and for babies born weighing under 2,000 g. Survival among the latter increased in the most recent period. However, the infant mortality rate did not change between the

  15. Multiple neoplasms, single primaries, and patient survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, Magid H

    2014-01-01

    Multiple primary neoplasms in surviving cancer patients are relatively common, with an increasing incidence. Their impact on survival has not been clearly defined. This was a retrospective review of clinical data for all consecutive patients with histologically confirmed cancer, with emphasis on single versus multiple primary neoplasms. Second primaries discovered at the workup of the index (first) primary were termed simultaneous, if discovered within 6 months of the index primary were called synchronous, and if discovered after 6 months were termed metachronous. Between 2005 and 2012, of 1,873 cancer patients, 322 developed second malignancies; these included two primaries (n=284), and three or more primaries (n=38). Forty-seven patients had synchronous primaries and 275 had metachronous primaries. Patients with multiple primaries were predominantly of Caucasian ancestry (91.0%), with a tendency to develop thrombosis (20.2%), had a strong family history of similar cancer (22.3%), and usually presented with earlier stage 0 through stage II disease (78.9%). When compared with 1,551 patients with a single primary, these figures were 8.9%, 15.6%, 18.3%, and 50.9%, respectively (P≤0.001). Five-year survival rates were higher for metachronous cancers (95%) than for synchronous primaries (59%) and single primaries (59%). The worst survival rate was for simultaneous concomitant multiple primaries, being a median of 1.9 years. The best survival was for patients with three or more primaries (median 10.9 years) and was similar to the expected survival for the age-matched and sex-matched general population (P=0.06991). Patients with multiple primaries are usually of Caucasian ancestry, have less aggressive malignancies, present at earlier stages, frequently have a strong family history of similar cancer, and their cancers tend to have indolent clinical behavior with longer survival rates, possibly related to genetic predisposition

  16. TERT promoter mutations in melanoma survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagore, Eduardo; Heidenreich, Barbara; Rachakonda, Sívaramakrishna; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Requena, Celia; Soriano, Virtudes; Frank, Christoph; Traves, Victor; Quecedo, Esther; Sanjuan-Gimenez, Josefa; Hemminki, Kari; Landi, Maria Teresa; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-07-01

    Despite advances in targeted therapies, the treatment of advanced melanoma remains an exercise in disease management, hence a need for biomarkers for identification of at-risk primary melanoma patients. In this study, we aimed to assess the prognostic value of TERT promoter mutations in primary melanomas. Tumors from 300 patients with stage I/II melanoma were sequenced for TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations. Cumulative curves were drawn for patients with and without mutations with progression-free and melanoma-specific survival as outcomes. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the effect of the mutations on survivals. Individually, presence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations associated with poor disease-free and melanoma-specific survival with modification of the effect by the rs2853669 polymorphism within the TERT promoter. Hazard ratio (HR) for simultaneous occurrence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations for disease-free survival was 2.3 (95% CI 1.2-4.4) and for melanoma-specific survival 5.8 (95% CI 1.9-18.3). The effect of the mutations on melanoma-specific survival in noncarriers of variant allele of the polymorphism was significant (HR 4.5, 95% CI 1.4-15.2) but could not be calculated for the carriers due to low number of events. The variant allele per se showed association with increased survival (HR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). The data in this study provide preliminary evidence that TERT promoter mutations in combination with BRAF/NRAS mutations can be used to identify patients at risk of aggressive disease and the possibility of refinement of the classification with inclusion of the rs2853669 polymorphism within TERT promoter. © 2016 UICC.

  17. Survival From Childhood Hematological Malignancies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdmann, Friederike; Winther, Jeanette Falck; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2016-01-01

    in children with hematological malignancies. RESULTS: Having siblings and increasing birth order were associated with reduced survival from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Associations with AML were strongest and statistically significant. HRs of 1.62 (CI 0.85; 3.09) and 5...... with a hematological malignancy before the age of 20 years (N = 1,819) were followed until 10 years from diagnosis. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards models estimating hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to assess the impact of family characteristics on overall survival...

  18. Growth and survival of Shigella flexneri in commonly consumed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Survival at 5°C and growth at 25°C and 37°C were quantitated by viable cell counts on MacConkey agar. The organism survived and showed considerable growth in all the foods examined. Cell growth increased from 105 to 1010 within 6 and 24h following inoculation at 25°C and 37°C. Keywords: foods, survival, Shigella ...

  19. Incidence and overall survival of malignant ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Smoll, Nicolas R; Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Malignant ameloblastoma, comprising metastasizing ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma, represents 1.6-2.2% of all odontogenic tumors. Due to its rare nature, malignant ameloblastoma has only been reported in the literature in small case series or case reports. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER) database, we have performed a population-based study to determine the incidence rate and the absolute survival of malignant ameloblastoma. Using the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O) codes 9310/3 and 9270/3, data from the SEER database were used to calculate the incidence rate and absolute survival rate of population with malignant ameloblastoma. The overall incidence rate of malignant ameloblastoma was 1.79 per 10 million person/year. The incidence rate was higher in males than females and also higher in black versus white population. The median overall survival was 17.6 years from the time of diagnosis and increasing age was associated with a statistically significant poorer survival. To our best knowledge, we report the largest population-based series of malignant ameloblastoma. The incidence rate was 1.79 per 10 million person/year and the overall survival was 17.6 years.

  20. Incidence and overall survival of malignant ameloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Rizzitelli

    Full Text Available Malignant ameloblastoma, comprising metastasizing ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma, represents 1.6-2.2% of all odontogenic tumors. Due to its rare nature, malignant ameloblastoma has only been reported in the literature in small case series or case reports. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER database, we have performed a population-based study to determine the incidence rate and the absolute survival of malignant ameloblastoma.Using the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O codes 9310/3 and 9270/3, data from the SEER database were used to calculate the incidence rate and absolute survival rate of population with malignant ameloblastoma.The overall incidence rate of malignant ameloblastoma was 1.79 per 10 million person/year. The incidence rate was higher in males than females and also higher in black versus white population. The median overall survival was 17.6 years from the time of diagnosis and increasing age was associated with a statistically significant poorer survival.To our best knowledge, we report the largest population-based series of malignant ameloblastoma. The incidence rate was 1.79 per 10 million person/year and the overall survival was 17.6 years.

  1. Survival of influenza virus on banknotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Yves; Vogel, Guido; Wunderli, Werner; Suter, Patricia; Witschi, Mark; Koch, Daniel; Tapparel, Caroline; Kaiser, Laurent

    2008-05-01

    Successful control of a viral disease requires knowledge of the different vectors that could promote its transmission among hosts. We assessed the survival of human influenza viruses on banknotes given that billions of these notes are exchanged daily worldwide. Banknotes were experimentally contaminated with representative influenza virus subtypes at various concentrations, and survival was tested after different time periods. Influenza A viruses tested by cell culture survived up to 3 days when they were inoculated at high concentrations. The same inoculum in the presence of respiratory mucus showed a striking increase in survival time (up to 17 days). Similarly, B/Hong Kong/335/2001 virus was still infectious after 1 day when it was mixed with respiratory mucus. When nasopharyngeal secretions of naturally infected children were used, influenza virus survived for at least 48 h in one-third of the cases. The unexpected stability of influenza virus in this nonbiological environment suggests that unusual environmental contamination should be considered in the setting of pandemic preparedness.

  2. Survival of Influenza Virus on Banknotes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Yves; Vogel, Guido; Wunderli, Werner; Suter, Patricia; Witschi, Mark; Koch, Daniel; Tapparel, Caroline; Kaiser, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Successful control of a viral disease requires knowledge of the different vectors that could promote its transmission among hosts. We assessed the survival of human influenza viruses on banknotes given that billions of these notes are exchanged daily worldwide. Banknotes were experimentally contaminated with representative influenza virus subtypes at various concentrations, and survival was tested after different time periods. Influenza A viruses tested by cell culture survived up to 3 days when they were inoculated at high concentrations. The same inoculum in the presence of respiratory mucus showed a striking increase in survival time (up to 17 days). Similarly, B/Hong Kong/335/2001 virus was still infectious after 1 day when it was mixed with respiratory mucus. When nasopharyngeal secretions of naturally infected children were used, influenza virus survived for at least 48 h in one-third of the cases. The unexpected stability of influenza virus in this nonbiological environment suggests that unusual environmental contamination should be considered in the setting of pandemic preparedness. PMID:18359825

  3. Survival response of Sarotheron melanotheron (Ruppel, 1852 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Survival response of Sarotheron melanotheron fingerlings to various concentration levels of perfkthion was studied under laboratory condition using five concentration levels, 0.0mg/l, 0.7mg/l, 1.4mg/l, 2.8mg/l, 5.5mg/l and 11.2mg/l. Mortality increased with increase in concentration level and exposure time. Ten percent ...

  4. Ship Systems Survivability Test Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Area for testing survivability of shipboard systems to include electrical, communications, and fire suppression. Multipurpose test range for supporting gun firing,...

  5. Survival of sea-water-adapted trout, Salmo trutta L. ranched in a Danish fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stig; Rasmussen, Gorm

    2000-01-01

    The effect of seawater adaptation on the survival of coastally released post-smelt trout, Salmo trutta L., was investigated by release: (1) directly (with no adaptation); (2) after retention in net pens in the sea for 29-131 days (delayed release); (3) after feeding with a high salt diet (12...... survival rate. A longer adaptation period did not increase survival. On average, survival was increased by 36%. Survival was not increased by high-salt diets. Until attainment of the legal size for capture, survival was 9.6% higher on average, with extremes as low as 1.7% and as high as 38% in individual...

  6. Survival and clinical outcome of dogs with ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Toft, Nils; Westrup, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate survival time, possible predictors of survival and clinical outcome in dogs with ischaemic stroke. A retrospective study of dogs with a previous diagnosis of ischaemic stroke diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed....... The association between survival and the hypothesised risk factors was examined using univariable exact logistic regression. Survival was examined using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression. Twenty-two dogs were identified. Five dogs (23%) died within the first 30days of the stroke event. Median survival in 30-day...... survivors was 505days. Four dogs (18%) were still alive by the end of the study. Right-sided lesions posed a significantly increased risk of mortality with a median survival time in dogs with right-sided lesions of 24days vs. 602days in dogs with left sided lesions (P=0.006). Clinical outcome was considered...

  7. Lesotho: the politics of survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lye, W F

    1982-01-01

    In this discussion of the politics of survival in Lesotho, attention is directed to the historical foundations; the road to dependency, the emergence of a political economy; and political transitions. The 1.25 million citizens of Lesotho enjoy a precarious independence. In November 1981, the government welcomed Russian military advisers. Presumably the reason for this was to help defend itself against the Republic of South Africa. This action was only the most recent of a series of increasingly hostile acts and verbal barrages which confirm the persistent aversion of Lesotho toward South Africa. The behavior contrasts markedly with an equally persistent pattern, that of continuous consultations between the Prime Minister of Lesotho since independence in 1966 and every leader of South Africa. The fact that some 200,000 Sotho workers, almost 1/6 of the nation's populaton, cross annually into South Africa to earn their only possible means of income lends a special character to this relationship. It reveals both the depth of Lesotho's aversion while equally affirming its reluctant dependence. It also illuminates a reciprocal need on the part of South Africa, which causes them to tolerate the irritant. The key to understanding the recent history of Lesotho lies with this fundamental interdependence and aversion. In the context of declining living standards at home and the demand for labor by South Africa, at first on the nearby farms and after 1867 in the mines and cities, Lesotho's economy became increasingly subject to political forces beyond its control. During even the early days of Moshoeshoe's reign, he encouraged youths to leave their families to obtain work among the aliens. His original objective was to have the youths learn useful new techniques which could be applied to enrich Lesotho beyond the few coins they might earn. The central focus of foreign employment before long became routine jobs in the mines. By the last decade of the 19th century, Lesotho

  8. Survival of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease: Caregiver Coping Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, McKee J.; Smyth, Kathleen A.; Neundorfer, Marcia M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Although persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) require increasingly more assistance with activities of daily living as their disease progresses, the caregiving environment has received little attention as a source of predictors of their survival time. We report here on a study to determine whether variation in survival time of persons…

  9. Survival rates and predictors of survival among colorectal cancer patients in a Malaysian tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, Bello Arkilla; Moy, Foong Ming; Roslani, April Camilla; Law, Chee Wei

    2017-05-18

    Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancy and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death globally. It is the second most common cancer among both males and females in Malaysia. The economic burden of colorectal cancer is likely to increase over time owing to its current trend and aging population. Cancer survival analysis is an essential indicator for early detection and improvement in cancer treatment. However, there was a scarcity of studies concerning survival of colorectal cancer patients as well as its predictors. Therefore, we aimed to determine the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates, compare survival rates among ethnic groups and determine the predictors of survival among colorectal cancer patients. This was an ambidirectional cohort study conducted at the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. All Malaysian citizens or permanent residents with histologically confirmed diagnosis of colorectal cancer seen at UMMC from 1 January 2001 to 31 December 2010 were included in the study. Demographic and clinical characteristics were extracted from the medical records. Patients were followed-up until death or censored at the end of the study (31st December 2010). Censored patients' vital status (whether alive or dead) were cross checked with the National Registration Department. Survival analyses at 1-, 3- and 5-year intervals were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Log-rank test was used to compare the survival rates, while Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was carried out to determine the predictors of 5-year colorectal cancer survival. Among 1212 patients, the median survival for colorectal, colon and rectal cancers were 42.0, 42.0 and 41.0 months respectively; while the 1-, 3-, and 5-year relative survival rates ranged from 73.8 to 76.0%, 52.1 to 53.7% and 40.4 to 45.4% respectively. The Chinese patients had the lowest 5-year survival compared to Malay and Indian patients. Based on the 814

  10. Actuarial survival of a large Canadian cohort of preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohlsson Arne

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increased survival of preterm and very low birth weight infants in recent years has been well documented but continued surveillance is required in order to monitor the effects of new therapeutic interventions. Gestation and birth weight specific survival rates most accurately reflect the outcome of perinatal care. Our aims were to determine survival to discharge for a large Canadian cohort of preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, and to examine the effect of gender on survival and the effect of increasing postnatal age on predicted survival. Methods Outcomes for all 19,507 infants admitted to 17 NICUs throughout Canada between January 1996 and October 1997 were collected prospectively. Babies with congenital anomalies were excluded from the study population. Gestation and birth weight specific survival for all infants with birth weight Results Survival to discharge at 24 weeks gestation was 54%, compared to 82% at 26 weeks and 95% at 30 weeks. In infants with birth weights 600–699, survival to discharge was 62%, compared to 79% at 700–799 g and 96% at 1,000–1,099 g. In infants born at 24 weeks gestational age, survival was higher in females but there were no significant gender differences above 24 weeks gestation. Actuarial analysis showed that risk of death was highest in the first 5 days. For infants born at 24 weeks gestation, estimated survival probability to 48 hours, 7 days and 4 weeks were 88 (CI 84,92%, 70 (CI 64, 76% and 60 (CI 53,66% respectively. For smaller birth weights, female survival probabilities were higher than males for the first 40 days of life. Conclusion Actuarial analysis provides useful information when counseling parents and highlights the importance of frequently revising the prediction for long term survival particularly after the first few days of life.

  11. Radionuclide blood cell survival studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, S.A.; Miller, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    Platelet and red cell survival studies are reviewed. The use of 51 Cr and di-isopropylfluoridate labelled with tritium or 32 P is discussed for red cell survival study and 51 Cr and 111 In-oxine are considered as platelet labels. (UK)

  12. Marketing child survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J P

    1984-01-01

    Growth monitoring charts, packets of oral rehydration salts (ORS), and vaccines, are inexpensive, life-saving, growth-protecting technologies which can enable parents to protect their children against the worst effects of poverty. Similarly, a matrix of current and easily understandable information about pregnancy, breast feeding, weaning, feeding during and immediately after illness, child spacing, and preparing and using home-made oral rehydration solutions, also could empower parents to protect the lives and the health of their children. The question arises as to how can these technologies and this information be put at the disposal of millions of families in the low-income world. The initial task of the Child Survival and Development Revolution is the communication of what is now possible, yet little is known about how to communicate information whose principal value is to the poor. There are 2 large-scale precedents: the Green Revolution, which in many instances succeeded in putting into the hands of thousands of small and large farmers the techniques and the knowledge which enabled them to double and treble the yields from their lands; and the campaign to put the knowledge and the means of family planning at the disposal of many millions of people. There are 2 lessons to be learned from these precedents: they have shown that the way to promote a people's technology and to put information at the disposal of the majority is by mobilizing all possible resources and working through all possible channels both to create the demand and to meet it; and neither the Green Revolution nor the family planning movement rally took off until they were viewed as political and economic priorities and given the full support of the nation's political leadership. Nowhere are these 2 lessons more clearly illustrated than in present-day Indonesia. Because the campaign for family planning was given high personal and political priority by the President, and because 85% of all family

  13. Studies on survival, biological activities and behavior of Biomphalaria glabrata, the host snail of Schistosomiasis, submitted to increased hydrostatic pressure: a technique Estudos sobre a sobrevivência, atividades biológicas e comportamento de Biomphalaria glabrata, hospedeiro intermediário da esquistossomose, submetido a aumento da pressão hidrostática: uma técnica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jurberg

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available To study changes in survival, in biological activities and behavior of planorbids submitted to increased hydrostatic pressure, we developed a technique using two transparent chambers and a hydraulic piston. The apparatus permitted renewal of the liquid medium without substantial variations in pressure, thus eliminating excretion products and maintaining the desired O2 level and thereby permitting us to evaluate the effects of pressure independently of the occurrence of anoxia. Pressure was maintained without any contact of the liquid medium with compressed air, a situation which reproduced with relative fidelity what occurs in nature and assured the presence of the same amounts of gases in the two observation chambers (Control and Experimental. Biomphalaria glabrata was found to be able to survive at least 48 hours when submitted to 49.02 x 10**4 Pa (equivalent to a water depth of 48.8 m, continuing to day egg masses and showing few behavioral changes when compared with the control group.Para estudar mudanças na sobrevivência, atividades biológicas e comportamento de planorbídeos submetidos a aumento de pressão hidrostática, desenvolvemos uma técnica que utiliza duas câmaras transparentes e um pistão hidráulico. O aparelho permitiu a renovação do meio líquido sem variações substanciais na pressão, eliminando assim os produtos de excreção e mantendo o nível de O2 disseolvido desejado, e desse modo permitido-nos avaliar o efeito da pressão independente da ocorrência de anoxia. A pressão foi mantida sem nenhum contato do meio líquido com o ar comprimido, situação que produziu com relativa fidelildade o que ocorre na natureza, e assegurou a presença da mesma quantidade de gases nas duas câmaras de observação. Biomphalaria glabrata foi capaz de sobreviver pelo menos 48 horas quando submetida a 49,02 x 10 Pa (equivalente a 48 m de profundidade continuando a pôr massas ovíferas, e mostrando poucas modifica

  14. Multiple neoplasms, single primaries, and patient survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer MH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Magid H Amer Department of Medicine, St Rita's Medical Center, Lima, OH, USA Background: Multiple primary neoplasms in surviving cancer patients are relatively common, with an increasing incidence. Their impact on survival has not been clearly defined. Methods: This was a retrospective review of clinical data for all consecutive patients with histologically confirmed cancer, with emphasis on single versus multiple primary neoplasms. Second primaries discovered at the workup of the index (first primary were termed simultaneous, if discovered within 6 months of the index primary were called synchronous, and if discovered after 6 months were termed metachronous. Results: Between 2005 and 2012, of 1,873 cancer patients, 322 developed second malignancies; these included two primaries (n=284, and three or more primaries (n=38. Forty-seven patients had synchronous primaries and 275 had metachronous primaries. Patients with multiple primaries were predominantly of Caucasian ancestry (91.0%, with a tendency to develop thrombosis (20.2%, had a strong family history of similar cancer (22.3%, and usually presented with earlier stage 0 through stage II disease (78.9%. When compared with 1,551 patients with a single primary, these figures were 8.9%, 15.6%, 18.3%, and 50.9%, respectively (P≤0.001. Five-year survival rates were higher for metachronous cancers (95% than for synchronous primaries (59% and single primaries (59%. The worst survival rate was for simultaneous concomitant multiple primaries, being a median of 1.9 years. The best survival was for patients with three or more primaries (median 10.9 years and was similar to the expected survival for the age-matched and sex-matched general population (P=0.06991. Conclusion: Patients with multiple primaries are usually of Caucasian ancestry, have less aggressive malignancies, present at earlier stages, frequently have a strong family history of similar cancer, and their cancers tend to have indolent

  15. Gender differences in survival in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeremy M; Cohen, Aaron; Ein-Mor, Eliana; Stessman, Jochanan

    2014-12-01

    Although increased survival among females is observed throughout much of adult life, supporting evidence among the oldest old is lacking. We examined the hypothesis that gender differences in survival diminish with advancing age. The Jerusalem Longitudinal Study follows a representative cohort born 1920-1921, comprehensively assessed at ages 70, 78, 85, and 90 (n=463, 927, 1224, and 673, respectively). Mortality data were collected during 1990-2013. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and mortality hazards ratios (HRs) were determined, adjusting for gender, marital status, education, loneliness, self-rated health, physical activity, functional status, neoplasm, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease. Survival between ages 70-78 was 77.3% (n=358/463), 78-85 was 68.9% (n=635/927), 85-90 years was 71.1% (n=870/1224), and 90-93 years was 80.5% (n=542/673). With advancing age, the survival advantage among females versus men declined-at ages 70-78 (85.6% vs. 71%, p<0.0001), 78-85 (74% vs. 63%, p=0.001), 85-90 (74% vs. 67.5%, p=0.06), and 90-93 (80% vs. 81%, p=0.92). Compared to females (HR=1.0), the adjusted HR for male mortality at ages 70-78 was 2.93 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.75-4.91), ages 78-85 was 2.1 (95% CI 1.5-2.92), ages 85-90 was 1.6 (95% CI 1.2-2.2), and ages 90-93 was 1.1 (95% CI 0.7-1.8). Our findings confirm the hypothesis that the increased longevity observed among females at age 70 gradually diminishes with advancing age, and disappears beyond age 90.

  16. Survival analysis of patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Chandrashekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the continuous improvement of dialysis technology and pharmacological treatment, mortality rates for dialysis patients are still high. A 2-year prospective study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital to determine the factors influencing survival among patients on maintenance hemodialysis. 96 patients with end-stage renal disease surviving more than 3 months on hemodialysis (8-12 h/week were studied. Follow-up was censored at the time of death or at the end of 2-year study period, whichever occurred first. Of the 96 patients studied (mean age 49.74 ± 14.55 years, 75% male and 44.7% diabetics, 19 died with an estimated mortality rate of 19.8%. On an age-adjusted multivariate analysis, female gender and hypokalemia independently predicted mortality. In Cox analyses, patient survival was associated with delivered dialysis dose (single pool Kt/V, hazard ratio [HR] =0.01, P = 0.016, frequency of hemodialysis (HR = 3.81, P = 0.05 and serum albumin (HR = 0.24, P = 0.005. There was no significant difference between diabetes and non-diabetes in relation to death (Relative Risk = 1.109; 95% CI = 0.49-2.48, P = 0.803. This study revealed that mortality among hemodialysis patients remained high, mostly due to sepsis and ischemic heart disease. Patient survival was better with higher dialysis dose, increased frequency of dialysis and adequate serum albumin level. Efforts at minimizing infectious complications, preventing cardiovascular events and improving nutrition should increase survival among hemodialysis patients.

  17. Requirements Engineering for Survivable Systems. Networked Systems Survivability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mead, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the current state of requirements engineering for survivable systems, that is, systems that are able to complete their mission in a timely manner, even if significant portions...

  18. Weight, physical activity and breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, Anne

    2018-02-26

    Weight, weight change and physical activity may affect prognosis among women who are diagnosed with breast cancer. Observational studies show associations between overweight/obesity and weight gain with several measures of reduced prognosis in women with breast cancer, and some suggestions of lower survival in women who are underweight or who experience unexplained weight loss after diagnosis. Observational studies have also shown an association between higher levels of physical activity and reduced breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, although a dose-response relationship has not been established. The effects of purposive dietary weight loss and increase in physical activity on survival or recurrence in breast cancer are not yet established, and randomised controlled trials are needed for definitive data. This paper presents the epidemiologic evidence on weight status, weight change, and physical activity and breast cancer survival; suggests potential mediating mechanisms; summarises evidence on weight loss interventions in breast cancer survivors; describes ongoing randomised clinical trials designed to test the effects of weight loss or physical activity on breast cancer survival; and provides information on available guidelines on weight and physical activity for cancer survivors.

  19. Survival by Dialysis Modality-Who Cares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martin B; Bargman, Joanne M

    2016-06-06

    In light of the recent emphasis on patient-centered outcomes and quality of life for patients with kidney disease, we contend that the nephrology community should no longer fund, perform, or publish studies that compare survival by dialysis modality. These studies have become redundant; they are methodologically limited, unhelpful in practice, and therefore a waste of resources. More than two decades of these publications show similar survival between patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis and those receiving thrice-weekly conventional hemodialysis, with differences only for specific subgroups. In clinical practice, modality choice should be individualized with the aim of maximizing quality of life, patient-reported outcomes, and achieving patient-centered goals. Expected survival is often irrelevant to modality choice. Even for the younger and fitter home hemodialysis population, quality of life, not just duration of survival, is a major priority. On the other hand, increasing evidence suggests that patients with ESRD continue to experience poor quality of life because of high symptom burden, unsolved clinical problems, and unmet needs. Patients care more about how they will live instead of how long. It is our responsibility to align our research with their needs. Only by doing so can we meet the challenges of ESRD patient care in the coming decades. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Aircraft Survivability: Unmanned Aircraft Systems Survivability. Fall 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    airspace coordination, command and control, and reliability are driving UAS use and design. 25 JASP 2008 Survivability Short Courseby Dr. Mark Couch The...Mark Couch , Research Staff Member at the Institute for Defense Analyses. 27 Warfighters Need a Joint Survivability Libraryby Maj Trenton Alexander...best MAC conference in the past two years.” 1stLt James Stephenson, USAF, headed home in May 2008. During his tour, James did a great job

  1. Cardiovascular disease incidence and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Stine; Agyemang, Charles; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    Studies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and survival show varying results between different ethnic groups. Our aim was to add a new dimension by exploring the role of migrant status in combination with ethnic background on incidence of-and survival from-CVD and more specifically acute...... of some types of cardiovascular disease compared to Danish-born. Family-reunified migrants on the other hand had lower rates of CVD. All migrants had better survival than Danish-born indicating that migrants may not always be disadvantaged in health....

  2. Struggling to survive in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadasina, A

    1997-01-01

    Abortion has long been the traditional method of family planning (FP) in Russia. Today, abortions are free, but contraception is not. The birth rate has decreased between 1989 and 1995, and the death rate has increased. The present economic situation has had a marked adverse effect on women who are expected to juggle jobs, household duties, and child care responsibilities. In order to survive, women sometimes must engage in work that compromises their health. Many women have resorted in prostitution, and this has caused an unprecedented explosion in the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases, especially syphilis. The number of people newly registered as HIV-positive in the first half of 1997 exceeded the total for 1996. While sex education is still restricted, erotica and pornography is widely available. Cases of syphilis are increasing among the young, and, in 1996, about 2500 girls under age 15 gave birth and an equal number had abortions. Only 12% of all pregnant women and 25% of newborn infants can be considered healthy. In 1994, the government launched a FP program that is being carried out by a few public and private organizations. One of these, the Russian FP Association, has created more than 50 branches in different regions, opened youth centers, and provided sex education and reproductive health counseling. The overall effort has led to a 27% reduction in abortions, and a 25% reduction in abortion mortality. These efforts, however, have been opposed by "pro-life" forces and by the Communist wing of the government that reduced the budget. The FP Association is fighting back by lobbying and explaining the need for its work.

  3. The Survival of the Wisest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Jonas

    1975-01-01

    Suggests that humans differ from other living organisms in the ability to exercise learned behavior and the individual will, which may allow people to make the changes in values necessary to survive on this planet. (DW)

  4. Probabilistic Survivability Versus Time Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation documents Kennedy Space Center's Independent Assessment work completed on three assessments for the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program to assist the Chief Safety and Mission Assurance Officer during key programmatic reviews and provided the GSDO Program with analyses of how egress time affects the likelihood of astronaut and ground worker survival during an emergency. For each assessment, a team developed probability distributions for hazard scenarios to address statistical uncertainty, resulting in survivability plots over time. The first assessment developed a mathematical model of probabilistic survivability versus time to reach a safe location using an ideal Emergency Egress System at Launch Complex 39B (LC-39B); the second used the first model to evaluate and compare various egress systems under consideration at LC-39B. The third used a modified LC-39B model to determine if a specific hazard decreased survivability more rapidly than other events during flight hardware processing in Kennedy's Vehicle Assembly Building.

  5. Customer service skills for survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAtee, L F

    1999-11-01

    As APICS practitioners, we all must share a common goal. How can we contribute to our company's success? Success can be measured in positive terms of market share, growth, profitability, return on investment, or some combination thereof. Each company must establish its own definition of success. For the purposes of this article, success will be equated to one word that we can all readily identify with: survival. What skills do we need to survive in the marketplace of the next millennium?

  6. The Survival of Tuscan Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Filippo Randelli; Giorgio Ricchiuti

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the survival probability of firms in Tuscany (Italy) in the first decade of the $21^{st}$ century. Using the Official Register of Firms, held by Unioncamere Toscany, we build a panel for the period 1998-2010. Taking into account both individual and context variables, we find that a higher institutional complexity and a lower population density have a positive and significant effect on probability to survive. Moreover, both MAR and Jacob externalities have a nonlinear ...

  7. Micrograft size and subsequent survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, D J

    1997-09-01

    Micrograft survival rates in hair transplantation have been frequently described in private conversations by hair transplant doctors as variable at best. References in medical literature may grossly underestimate the prevalence and magnitude of poor growth. This is probably because most hair transplant surgeons are concerned that publication of a significant incidence of poor growth would reflect negatively on their practice. The purpose of this research was to study micrograft survival rates using microscopic dissection techniques. The author also presents a hypothesis regarding the relatively poor survival rates reported by hair transplant physicians. Two different groups of micrografts were prepared. One group, mainly single-haired with tissue trimmed close to the hair shaft, was planted into one test patch in the bald crown of a patient's scalp. Another group of intact follicular clumps, prepared with more dermis, subcutaneous fat, and intact sebaceous glands, was planted into another test patch. These test patches and their growth were documented with close-up photography. The micrografts prepared as existing follicular clumps had a much higher survival rate (over 100%) than the micrografts cut as slender single hairs. Extremely high survival rates of micrografts are obtainable by transplanting intact follicular clumps with protective tissue around the micrograft, and preserving the follicular clump's sebaceous gland. These survival rates were not achieved when micrografts were produced by splitting individual hairs away from a naturally occurring follicular clump.

  8. Dying to remember, remembering to survive: mortality salience and survival processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Daniel J; Hart, Joshua; Kramer, Melanie E; Burns, Amy D

    2014-01-01

    Processing items for their relevance to survival improves recall for those items relative to numerous other deep processing encoding techniques. Perhaps related, placing individuals in a mortality salient state has also been shown to enhance retention of items encoded after the morality salience manipulation (e.g., in a pleasantness rating task), a phenomenon we dubbed the "dying-to-remember" (DTR) effect. The experiments reported here further explored the effect and tested the possibility that the DTR effect is related to survival processing. Experiment 1 replicated the effect using different encoding tasks, demonstrating that the effect is not dependent on the pleasantness task. In Experiment 2 the DTR effect was associated with increases in item-specific processing, not relational processing, according to several indices. Experiment 3 replicated the main results of Experiment 2, and tested the effects of mortality salience and survival processing within the same experiment. The DTR effect and its associated difference in item-specific processing were completely eliminated when the encoding task required survival processing. These results are consistent with the interpretation that the mechanisms responsible for survival processing and DTR effects are overlapping.

  9. Pesticides: chemicals for survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindquist, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Pesticides are chemicals used to control pests such as insects, weeds, plant diseases, nematodes, and rodents. The increased use of pesticides since 1945 has greatly aided the increase in crop production, protected livestock from diseases such as trypanosomiasis, protected man from diseases such as malaria and filarisis, decreased losses of stored grain, and has generally improved man's welfare. Despite the enormous benefits derived from pesticides these chemicals are not problem-free. Many pesticides are toxic to living organisms and interfere with specific biochemical systems. To measure the very small quantities of a pesticide radiolabelled chemicals are frequently essential, particularly to measure changes in the chemical structure of the pesticide, movement of the pesticide in soil, plants, or animals, amounts of pesticide going through various steps in food processing, etc. The use of radiolabelled pesticides is shortly shown for metabolism of the pesticide in crop species, metabolism in ruminant, in chickens and eggs, in soil, and possibly leaching and sorption in soil, hydrolysis, bio-concentration, microbial and photodegradation, and toxicity studies

  10. Medical advances and racial/ethnic disparities in cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehranifar, Parisa; Neugut, Alfred I; Phelan, Jo C; Link, Bruce G; Liao, Yuyan; Desai, Manisha; Terry, Mary Beth

    2009-10-01

    Although advances in early detection and treatment of cancer improve overall population survival, these advances may not benefit all population groups equally and may heighten racial/ethnic differences in survival. We identified cancer cases in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program, who were ages > or = 20 years and diagnosed with one invasive cancer in 1995 to 1999 (n = 580,225). We used 5-year relative survival rates to measure the degree to which mortality from each cancer is amenable to medical interventions (amenability index). We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate survival differences between each racial/ethnic minority group relative to Whites, by the overall amenability index, and three levels of amenability (nonamenable, partly amenable, and mostly amenable cancers, corresponding to cancers with 5-year relative survival rate or = 70%, respectively), adjusting for gender, age, disease stage, and county-level poverty concentration. As amenability increased, racial/ethnic differences in cancer survival increased for African Americans, American Indians/Native Alaskans, and Hispanics relative to Whites. For example, the hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for African Americans versus Whites from nonamenable, partly amenable, and mostly amenable cancers were 1.05 (1.03-1.07), 1.38 (1.34-1.41), and 1.41 (1.37-1.46), respectively. Asians/Pacific Islanders had similar or longer survival relative to Whites across amenability levels; however, several subgroups experienced increasingly poorer survival with increasing amenability. Cancer survival disparities for most racial/ethnic minority populations widen as cancers become more amenable to medical interventions. Efforts in developing cancer control measures must be coupled with specific strategies for reducing the expected disparities.

  11. Do American dippers obtain a survival benefit from altitudinal migration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Green

    Full Text Available Studies of partial migrants provide an opportunity to assess the cost and benefits of migration. Previous work has demonstrated that sedentary American dippers (residents have higher annual productivity than altitudinal migrants that move to higher elevations to breed. Here we use a ten-year (30 period mark-recapture dataset to evaluate whether migrants offset their lower productivity with higher survival during the migration-breeding period when they occupy different habitat, or early and late-winter periods when they coexist with residents. Mark-recapture models provide no evidence that apparent monthly survival of migrants is higher than that of residents at any time of the year. The best-supported model suggests that monthly survival is higher in the migration-breeding period than winter periods. Another well-supported model suggested that residency conferred a survival benefit, and annual apparent survival (calculated from model weighted monthly apparent survival estimates using the Delta method of residents (0.511 ± 0.038SE was slightly higher than that of migrants (0.487 ± 0.032. Winter survival of American dippers was influenced by environmental conditions; monthly apparent survival increased as maximum daily flow rates increased and declined as winter temperatures became colder. However, we found no evidence that environmental conditions altered differences in winter survival of residents and migrants. Since migratory American dippers have lower productivity and slightly lower survival than residents our data suggests that partial migration is likely an outcome of competition for limited nest sites at low elevations, with less competitive individuals being forced to migrate to higher elevations in order to breed.

  12. Survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Maureen

    2007-12-01

    Survival of preterm infants, which increased dramatically during the years after the introduction of neonatal intensive care, reached a plateau in the mid- to late 1990s. Neonatal morbidity, which increased initially, has decreased since 2000 and resulted in a decrease in the rates of cerebral palsy. Follow-up of preterm infants to early childhood and school age reveals higher rates of asthma, cerebral palsy, subnormal cognitive function, poorer academic achievement, and behavioral problems. Although many of the problems persist into adulthood, preterm survivors regard their overall health and quality of life similar to that of normal birth weight controls.

  13. Probabilistic Survivability Versus Time Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2015-01-01

    This technical paper documents Kennedy Space Centers Independent Assessment team work completed on three assessments for the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program to assist the Chief Safety and Mission Assurance Officer (CSO) and GSDO management during key programmatic reviews. The assessments provided the GSDO Program with an analysis of how egress time affects the likelihood of astronaut and worker survival during an emergency. For each assessment, the team developed probability distributions for hazard scenarios to address statistical uncertainty, resulting in survivability plots over time. The first assessment developed a mathematical model of probabilistic survivability versus time to reach a safe location using an ideal Emergency Egress System at Launch Complex 39B (LC-39B); the second used the first model to evaluate and compare various egress systems under consideration at LC-39B. The third used a modified LC-39B model to determine if a specific hazard decreased survivability more rapidly than other events during flight hardware processing in Kennedys Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB).Based on the composite survivability versus time graphs from the first two assessments, there was a soft knee in the Figure of Merit graphs at eight minutes (ten minutes after egress ordered). Thus, the graphs illustrated to the decision makers that the final emergency egress design selected should have the capability of transporting the flight crew from the top of LC 39B to a safe location in eight minutes or less. Results for the third assessment were dominated by hazards that were classified as instantaneous in nature (e.g. stacking mishaps) and therefore had no effect on survivability vs time to egress the VAB. VAB emergency scenarios that degraded over time (e.g. fire) produced survivability vs time graphs that were line with aerospace industry norms.

  14. Successful implementation of Helping Babies Survive and Helping Mothers Survive programs-An Utstein formula for newborn and maternal survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege L Ersdal

    Full Text Available Globally, the burden of deaths and illness is still unacceptably high at the day of birth. Annually, approximately 300.000 women die related to childbirth, 2.7 million babies die within their first month of life, and 2.6 million babies are stillborn. Many of these fatalities could be avoided by basic, but prompt care, if birth attendants around the world had the necessary skills and competencies to manage life-threatening complications around the time of birth. Thus, the innovative Helping Babies Survive (HBS and Helping Mothers Survive (HMS programs emerged to meet the need for more practical, low-cost, and low-tech simulation-based training. This paper provides users of HBS and HMS programs a 10-point list of key implementation steps to create sustained impact, leading to increased survival of mothers and babies. The list evolved through an Utstein consensus process, involving a broad spectrum of international experts within the field, and can be used as a means to guide processes in low-resourced countries. Successful implementation of HBS and HMS training programs require country-led commitment, readiness, and follow-up to create local accountability and ownership. Each country has to identify its own gaps and define realistic service delivery standards and patient outcome goals depending on available financial resources for dissemination and sustainment.

  15. Cell Survival Signaling in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megison, Michael L.; Gillory, Lauren A.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood and is responsible for over 15% of pediatric cancer deaths. Neuroblastoma tumorigenesis and malignant transformation is driven by overexpression and dominance of cell survival pathways and a lack of normal cellular senescence or apoptosis. Therefore, manipulation of cell survival pathways may decrease the malignant potential of these tumors and provide avenues for the development of novel therapeutics. This review focuses on several facets of cell survival pathways including protein kinases (PI3K, AKT, ALK, and FAK), transcription factors (NF-κB, MYCN and p53), and growth factors (IGF, EGF, PDGF, and VEGF). Modulation of each of these factors decreases the growth or otherwise hinders the malignant potential of neuroblastoma, and many therapeutics targeting these pathways are already in the clinical trial phase of development. Continued research and discovery of effective modulators of these pathways will revolutionize the treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:22934706

  16. How can tropical cyclones survive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi

    2013-04-01

    How can tropical cyclones survive? It is important for understanding the development of tropical cyclones to be able to quantify the exchange of enthalpy and momentum between air and water. Air-sea fluxes are often formulated as drag CD and enthalpy CK exchange coefficients. Emanuel, 1986, derived an expression for potential intensity that depends on local environment parameters and is proportional to the ratio of enthalpy and drag coefficients. This ratio should be larger than 0.75 for a cyclone to develop. There are no direct surface measurements of CK/ CD under hurricane conditions and extrapolation from most open-ocean measurements at 25 m/s gives values of CK/ CD0.75 is in accordance with Emanuel's prediction. The high CK values are observed during situations when there is a regime shift of the structure of turbulence in the boundary layer. From spectral analysis it was found that as the boundary layer approaches neutral stratification, smaller-scale eddies become increasingly important in the turbulent transport of humidity and sensible heat and thus enhance the exchange coefficient CK. This turbulence regime is called the UVCN regime and require high wind speed, small temperature difference between air and water, sufficiently strong wind gradients and growing sea condition ( Smedman et al., 2007, Sahlee et al., 2008). What is the difference between world oceans and enclosed seas? The answer is the waves. The wave field over the open oceans is swell dominated but in enclosed seas and coastal areas swell is restricted mainly to low wind speed conditions, and swell is short lived because of short distances to the shores. When swell is present the MABL will be dominated by large eddies of zi size creating weak gradients of wind, temperature and humidity and thus small scale eddies cannot be formed leading to reduced CK-values. However, during hurricane condition the waves are expected to be young, stratification is close to neutral and gradients are sufficiently

  17. Ownership Strategy and Subsidiary Survival in Foreign Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yi; Larimo, Jorma

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the general effect of acquirers’ ownership strategy on the survival in foreign acquisitions. Furthermore, we attempt to address five potential moderating effects: international, regional, target country experience, cultural distance, as well as host country development....... The developed hypotheses are tested on a sample of 1,345 acquisitions made by 174 Finnish firms in 59 countries during 1980–2005. The results indicate that in general WOS increases the probability of survival of foreign acquired units. We further find that the impact of WOS on the survival of foreign acquired...

  18. Memory and survival after microbeam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueltke, Elisabeth; Juurlink, Bernhard H.J.; Ataelmannan, Khalid; Laissue, Jean; Blattmann, Hans; Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Bravin, Alberto; Minczewska, Joanna; Crosbie, Jeffrey; Taherian, Hadi; Frangou, Evan; Wysokinsky, Tomasz; Chapman, L. Dean; Griebel, Robert; Fourney, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    Background: Disturbances of memory function are frequently observed in patients with malignant brain tumours and as adverse effects after radiotherapy to the brain. Experiments in small animal models of malignant brain tumour using synchrotron-based microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) have shown a promising prolongation of survival times. Materials and methods: Two animal models of malignant brain tumour were used to study survival and memory development after MRT. Thirteen days after implantation of tumour cells, animals were submitted to MRT either with or without adjuvant therapy (buthionine-SR-sulfoximine = BSO or glutamine). We used two orthogonal 1-cm wide arrays of 50 microplanar quasiparallel microbeams of 25 μm width and a center-to-center distance of about 200 μm, created by a multislit collimator, with a skin entrance dose of 350 Gy for each direction. Object recognition tests were performed at day 13 after tumour cell implantation and in monthly intervals up to 1 year after tumour cell implantation. Results: In both animal models, MRT with and without adjuvant therapy significantly increased survival times. BSO had detrimental effects on memory function early after therapy, while administration of glutamine resulted in improved memory

  19. Diverse microbial species survive high ammonia concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Laura C.; Cockell, Charles S.; Summers, Stephen

    2012-04-01

    Planetary protection regulations are in place to control the contamination of planets and moons with terrestrial micro-organisms in order to avoid jeopardizing future scientific investigations relating to the search for life. One environmental chemical factor of relevance in extraterrestrial environments, specifically in the moons of the outer solar system, is ammonia (NH3). Ammonia is known to be highly toxic to micro-organisms and may disrupt proton motive force, interfere with cellular redox reactions or cause an increase of cell pH. To test the survival potential of terrestrial micro-organisms exposed to such cold, ammonia-rich environments, and to judge whether current planetary protection regulations are sufficient, soil samples were exposed to concentrations of NH3 from 5 to 35% (v/v) at -80°C and room temperature for periods up to 11 months. Following exposure to 35% NH3, diverse spore-forming taxa survived, including representatives of the Firmicutes (Bacillus, Sporosarcina, Viridibacillus, Paenibacillus, Staphylococcus and Brevibacillus) and Actinobacteria (Streptomyces). Non-spore forming organisms also survived, including Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas) and Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) that are known to have environmentally resistant resting states. Clostridium spp. were isolated from the exposed soil under anaerobic culture. High NH3 was shown to cause a reduction in viability of spores over time, but spore morphology was not visibly altered. In addition to its implications for planetary protection, these data show that a large number of bacteria, potentially including spore-forming pathogens, but also environmentally resistant non-spore-formers, can survive high ammonia concentrations.

  20. Early survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium enhances activity-dependent survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien eFrançois

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The neuronal olfactory epithelium undergoes permanent renewal because of environmental aggression. This renewal is partly regulated by factors modulating the level of neuronal apoptosis. Among them, we had previously characterized endothelin as neuroprotective. In this study, we explored the effect of cell survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium by intranasal delivery of endothelin receptors antagonists to rat pups. This treatment induced an overall increase of apoptosis in the olfactory epithelium. The responses to odorants recorded by electroolfactogram were decreased in treated animal, a result consistent with a loss of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs. However, the treated animal performed better in an olfactory orientation test based on maternal odor compared to non-treated littermates. This improved performance could be due to activity-dependent neuronal survival of OSNs in the context of increased apoptosis level. In order to demonstrate it, we odorized pups with octanal, a known ligand for the rI7 olfactory receptor (Olr226. We quantified the number of OSN expressing rI7 by RT-qPCR and whole mount in situ hybridization. While this number was reduced by the survival factor removal treatment, this reduction was abolished by the presence of its ligand. This improved survival was optimal for low concentration of odorant and was specific for rI7-expressing OSNs. Meanwhile, the number of rI7-expressing OSNs was not affected by the odorization in non-treated littermates; showing that the activity-dependant survival of OSNs did not affect the OSN population during the 10 days of odorization in control conditions. Overall, our study shows that when apoptosis is promoted in the olfactory mucosa, the activity-dependent neuronal plasticity allows faster tuning of the olfactory sensory neuron population towards detection of environmental odorants.

  1. Price increase

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please take note that after five years of stable prices at Restaurant No 1 a price increase will come into force on 1st January 2006. This increase has been agreed after discussions between the CSR (Comité de Surveillance des Restaurants) and the catering company Novae and will reflect the inflation rate of the last few years. In addition, a new children's menu will be introduced, as well as 'Max Havelaar' fair-trade coffee at a price of 1.70 CHF.

  2. Price increase

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Please take note that after five years of stable prices at Restaurant No 1 a price increase will come into force on 1st January 2006. This increase has been agreed after discussions between the CSR (Comité de Surveillance des Restaurants) and the catering company Novae and will reflect the inflation rate of the last few years. In addition, a new children's menu will be introduced as well as 'Max Havelaar' fair-trade coffee at a price of 1.70 CHF.

  3. Survival analysis II: Cox regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stel, Vianda S.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Tripepi, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine; Jager, Kitty J.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards regression can provide an effect estimate by quantifying the difference in survival between patient groups and can adjust for confounding effects of other variables. The purpose of this article is to explain the basic concepts of the

  4. Long-term haemodialysis survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James; Nielsen, Arne Høj; Hansen, Henrik Post

    2012-01-01

    Haemodialysis (HD) treatment for end-stage renal disease bears a poor prognosis. We present a case of a patient who, apart from two transplant periods lasting 8 months in all, was treated with conventional in-centre HD three times a week and who survived for 41 years. Patients should be aware tha...

  5. Survivability of SCADA Control Loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camacho, José; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Remke, Anne Katharina Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    The endorsement of information technologies for critical infrastructures control introduces new threats in their security and surveillance. Along with certain level of protection against attacks, it is desirable for critical processes to survive even if they succeed. A stochastic Petri Nets-based

  6. Global variations in cancer survival. Study Group on Cancer Survival in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, R; Swaminathan, R; Black, R J

    1996-12-15

    Population-based cancer registries from Algeria, China, Costa Rica, Cuba, India, the Philippines, and Thailand are collaborating with the International Agency for Research on Cancer in a study of cancer survival in developing countries. Comparisons with the SEER program results of the National Cancer Institute in the United States, and the EUROCARE study of survival in European countries revealed considerable differences in the survival of patients with certain tumors associated with intensive chemotherapeutic treatment regimes (Hodgkin's disease and testicular tumors), more modest differences in the survival of patients with tumors for which early diagnosis and treatment confer an improved prognosis (carcinomas of the large bowel, breast, and cervix), and only slight differences for tumors associated with poor prognosis (carcinomas of the stomach, pancreas, and lung). With limited resources to meet the challenge of the increasing incidence of cancer expected in the next few decades, health authorities in developing countries should be aware of the importance of investing in a range of cancer control activities, including primary prevention and early detection programs as well as treatment.

  7. Foreign acquisition, plant survival, and employment growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger; Görg, Holger

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of foreign acquisition on survival and employment growth of targets using data on Swedish manufacturing plants.We separate targeted plants into those within Swedish MNEs, Swedish exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms. The results, controlling for possible...... endogeneity of acquisition using IV and propensity score matching approaches suggest that acquisition by foreign owners increases the lifetime of the acquired plants only if the plant was an exporter. The effect is robust to controlling for domestic acquisitions and differs between horizontal and vertical...

  8. BRAZILIAN EDUCATION AND SURVIVAL STRATEGIES OF CAPITALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Almeida Sales de Melo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In discussing the theme Imperialism, Crisis and education, the essay points out aspects of our historical totality in relation to recent crises through which it passed capitalism, and its relationship to changes in Brazilian educational policies. Education remains at the heart of development projects, as a producer of knowledge, as well as guiding the processes of social conformation. They also discussed the aftermath of the crisis: the rise of social inequality and the increase of labor exploitation. Make clear our project of society and education, as resistance movements to the survival of capitalism is a necessity in building movements of counter-hegemony.

  9. Survival horror games - an uncanny modality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinwell, Angela; Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the perceived eeriness of a virtual character with the perception of human-likeness for some attributes of motion and sound. 100 participants were asked to rate 13 video clips of 12 different virtual characters and one human. The results indicate...... in survival horror games that can be used by game designers seeking to increase the fear factor in the genre and that will form the basis of further experiments which, it is hoped, will lead to a conceptual framework for the uncanny....

  10. Uncanny behaviour in survival horror games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinwell, Angela; Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas; Williams, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the perceived strangeness of a virtual character and the perception of human likeness for some attributes of motion and sound. Participants (N=100) were asked to rate thirteen video clips of twelve different virtual characters and one human...... facial rendering and vocalization in survival horror games that can be used by game designers seeking to increase the fear factor in the genre, and that will form the basis of further experiments, which, it is hoped, will lead to a conceptual framework for the uncanny....

  11. Factors impacting survival in children with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rialon, Kristy L; Gulack, Brian C; Englum, Brian R; Routh, Jonathan C; Rice, Henry E

    2015-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an uncommon tumor in the pediatric population. We examined a large national cancer database to determine outcomes for children with RCC and to identify variables affecting long-term survival. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was queried for patients age 0 to 17 years diagnosed with RCC from 1998-2011. Patient demographics, tumor stage and characteristics, management, and outcomes were evaluated. A total of 304 children met inclusion criteria. Overall, 39% of children had stage I disease, 16% stage II, 33% stage III, and 12% stage IV. One-year and five-year survival for all children was 87% and 70%, respectively. Eighty-six percent of patients underwent surgical resection. In comparison to children who underwent complete nephrectomy, patients undergoing partial nephrectomy had smaller tumors and were of lower clinical stages. Survival following partial resection was 100% at one and five years. Age and gender had no significant impact on survival. Survival was negatively impacted by increasing tumor size (PChildren with renal cell carcinoma who undergo surgical resection have excellent one-year and five-year survival. Overall survival is significantly affected by pathologic stage, tumor size, and nodal status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Survival of chronic hemodialysis patients over 80 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladoje-Martinovic B

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Branka Sladoje-Martinovic, Ivana Mikolasevic, Ivan Bubic, Sanjin Racki, Lidija OrlicDepartment of Nephrology and Dialysis, Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Center Rijeka, Rijeka, CroatiaBackground/aim: The number of elderly patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD stage 5 management with hemodialysis (HD is steadily increasing. Therefore we analyzed the number of new CKD patients ≥80 years managed with HD and their survival through the study period. We aimed also, to identify which of several key variables might be independently associated with survival in this very elderly population of patients.Patients and methods: This was a single-center, retrospective cohort study that took place during the period from January 1987 to September 2012. The study consisted of 78 (50 male and 28 women very elderly patients (≥80 years of age; the mean age at which HD was initiated was 83.2±2.5 years. Survival and factors associated with mortality were studied. Survival was defined as the time from start of HD treatment to death (or end of study, if still alive.Results: In the period from 1987 to 2002, patients ≥80 years of age were only sporadically treated with HD, but since 2003, the number of new patients has been steadily increasing. The mean survival for our group of patients was 25.1±22.4 months (range 1–115 months. Furthermore, 30.8% patients survived <12 months, 29.5% patients survived 12–24 months, 30.8% patients survived 24–60 months, and 9% patients survived >60 months on HD treatment. Older patients were less likely to have diabetes, and primary renal disease did not influence survival. Patients with high C-reactive protein levels and poor nutritional status, as well as those who did not have pre-HD nephrology care and those that had a catheter as vascular access for HD had poor survival. In about half of our patients, the cause of death was cardiovascular disease.Conclusion: Among patients who were ≥80 years of

  13. Are alarm symptoms predictive of cancer survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregan, Alex; Møller, Henrik; Charlton, Judith; Gulliford, Martin C

    2013-01-01

    Background Alarm symptom presentations are predictive of cancer diagnosis but may also be associated with cancer survival. Aim To evaluate diagnostic time intervals, and consultation patterns after presentation with alarm symptoms, and their association with cancer diagnosis and survival. Design and setting Cohort study using the Clinical Practice Research Database, with linked Cancer Registry data, in 158 general practices. Method Participants included those with haematuria, haemoptysis, dysphagia, and rectal bleeding or urinary tract cancer, lung cancer, gastro-oesophageal cancer, and colorectal cancer. Results The median (interquartile range) interval in days from first symptom presentation to the corresponding cancer diagnosis was: haematuria and urinary tract cancer, 59 (28–109); haemoptysis and lung cancer, 35 (18–89); dysphagia and gastro-oesophageal cancer, 25 (12–48); rectal bleeding and colorectal cancer, 49 (20–157). Three or more alarm symptom consultations were associated with increased odds of diagnosis of urinary tract cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.84, 95% CI = 1.50 to 2.27), lung cancer (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.07 to 2.90) and gastro-oesophageal cancer (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.48 to 3.19). Longer diagnostic intervals were associated with increased mortality only for urinary tract cancer (hazard ratio 2.23, 95% CI = 1.35 to 3.69). Patients with no preceding alarm symptom had shorter survival from diagnosis of urinary tract, lung or colorectal cancer than those presenting with a relevant alarm symptom. Conclusion After alarm symptom presentation, repeat consultations are associated with cancer diagnoses. Longer diagnostic intervals appeared to be associated with a worse prognosis for urinary tract cancer only. Mortality is higher when cancer is diagnosed in the absence of alarm symptoms. PMID:24351496

  14. Genetic parameters for social effects on survival in cannibalistic layers: Combining survival analysis and a linear animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerkamp Roel F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality due to cannibalism in laying hens is a difficult trait to improve genetically, because censoring is high (animals still alive at the end of the testing period and it may depend on both the individual itself and the behaviour of its group members, so-called associative effects (social interactions. To analyse survival data, survival analysis can be used. However, it is not possible to include associative effects in the current software for survival analysis. A solution could be to combine survival analysis and a linear animal model including associative effects. This paper presents a two-step approach (2STEP, combining survival analysis and a linear animal model including associative effects (LAM. Methods Data of three purebred White Leghorn layer lines from Institut de Sélection Animale B.V., a Hendrix Genetics company, were used in this study. For the statistical analysis, survival data on 16,780 hens kept in four-bird cages with intact beaks were used. Genetic parameters for direct and associative effects on survival time were estimated using 2STEP. Cross validation was used to compare 2STEP with LAM. LAM was applied directly to estimate genetic parameters for social effects on observed survival days. Results Using 2STEP, total heritable variance, including both direct and associative genetic effects, expressed as the proportion of phenotypic variance, ranged from 32% to 64%. These results were substantially larger than when using LAM. However, cross validation showed that 2STEP gave approximately the same survival curves and rank correlations as LAM. Furthermore, cross validation showed that selection based on both direct and associative genetic effects, using either 2STEP or LAM, gave the best prediction of survival time. Conclusion It can be concluded that 2STEP can be used to estimate genetic parameters for direct and associative effects on survival time in laying hens. Using 2STEP increased the heritable

  15. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  16. Survival and sustainability. Environmental concerns in the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goekcekus, Hueseyin; Tuerker, Umut [Near East Univ., Nicosia, North Cyprus (Turkey). Dept. of Civil Engineering; LaMoreaux, James W. (eds.) [P.E. LaMoreaux and Associates, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The International Conference on Environment: Survival and Sustainability, held at the Near East University, Nicosia, Northern Cyprus 19-24 February 2007, dealt with environmental threats and proposed solutions at all scales. The 21 themes addressed by the conference fell into four broad categories; Threats to Survival and Sustainability; Technological Advances towards Survival and Sustainability; Activities and Tools for Social Change; Defining Goals for Sustainable Societies. Activities and tools that move the society towards greater sustainability were emphasized at the conference. These included environmental law and ethics, environmental knowledge, technology and information systems, media, environmental awareness, education and lifelong learning, the use of literature for environmental awareness, the green factor in politics, international relations and environmental organizations. The breadth of the issues addressed at the conference made clear the need for greatly increased interdisciplinary and international collaboration the survival and sustainability concept. The exchanges at the conference represent a step in this direction. (orig.)

  17. 51Cr - erythrocyte survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva Costa, J. de.

    1982-07-01

    Sixteen patients were studied, being fifteen patients in hemolytic state, and a normal individual as a witness. The aim was to obtain better techniques for the analysis of the erythrocytes, survival curves, according to the recommendations of the International Committee of Hematology. It was used the radiochromatic method as a tracer. Previously a revisional study of the International Literature was made in its aspects inherent to the work in execution, rendering possible to establish comparisons and clarify phonomena observed in cur investigation. Several parameters were considered in this study, hindering both the exponential and the linear curves. The analysis of the survival curves of the erythrocytes in the studied group, revealed that the elution factor did not present a homogeneous answer quantitatively to all, though, the result of the analysis of these curves have been established, through listed programs in the electronic calculator. (Author) [pt

  18. Campylobacter virulence and survival factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Declan J

    2015-06-01

    Despite over 30 years of research, campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent foodborne bacterial infection in many countries including in the European Union and the United States of America. However, relatively little is known about the virulence factors in Campylobacter or how an apparently fragile organism can survive in the food chain, often with enhanced pathogenicity. This review collates information on the virulence and survival determinants including motility, chemotaxis, adhesion, invasion, multidrug resistance, bile resistance and stress response factors. It discusses their function in transition through the food processing environment and human infection. In doing so it provides a fundamental understanding of Campylobacter, critical for improved diagnosis, surveillance and control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Complexity for survival of livings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, Michail

    2007-01-01

    A connection between survivability of livings and complexity of their behavior is established. New physical paradigms-exchange of information via reflections, and chain of abstractions-explaining and describing progressive evolution of complexity in living (active) systems are introduced. A biological origin of these paradigms is associated with a recently discovered mirror neuron that is able to learn by imitation. As a result, an active element possesses the self-nonself images and interacts with them creating the world of mental dynamics. Three fundamental types of complexity of mental dynamics that contribute to survivability are identified. Mathematical model of the corresponding active systems is described by coupled motor-mental dynamics represented by Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations, respectively, while the progressive evolution of complexity is provided by nonlinear evolution of probability density. Application of the proposed formalism to modeling common-sense-based decision-making process is discussed

  20. LATERAL SURVIVAL: AN OT ACCOUNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Yip

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available When laterals are the targets of phonological processes, laterality may or may not survive. In a fixed feature geometry, [lateral] should be lost if its superordinate node is eliminated by either the spreading of a neighbouring node, or by coda neutralization. So if [lateral] is under Coronal (Blevins 1994, it should be lost under Place assimilation, and if [lateral] is under Sonorant Voicing (Rice & Avery 1991 it should be lost by rules that spread voicing. Yet in some languages lateral survives such spreading intact. Facts like these argue against a universal attachment of [lateral] under either Coronal or Sonorant Voicing, and in favour of an account in terms of markedness constraints on feature-co-occurrence (Padgett 2000. The core of an OT account is that IFIDENTLAT is ranked above whatever causes neutralization, such as SHARE-F or *CODAF. laterality will survive. If these rankings are reversed, we derive languages in which laterality is lost. The other significant factor is markedness. High-ranked feature co-occurrence constraints like *LATDORSAL can block spreading from affecting laterals at all.

  1. Child survival and the demographic "trap".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, S

    1992-02-01

    A debate within the UK public health community has centered around the feasibility of campaigns to improve child survival rates in Africa in the absence of equally aggressive efforts to increase family planning acceptance. The central spokesperson in this debate, Maurice King of the University of Leeds, has argued that population growth in sub-Saharan countries is undermining the carrying capacity of available resources and threatening ecological collapse. These countries are not exhibiting the characteristic demographic transition pattern, in which declining death rates eventually create conditions conducive to lower birth rates. Instead, they have fallen into a "demographic trap " in which population increases are outstripping growth in food production. To remedy this situation, King advocates the introduction of the concept of sustainability of the ecological foundations of health into the World Health Organizations's official definition of health. Richard Jolly of UNICEF has countered King's articles with the insistence that UNICEF has long supported child survival within the broader context of family planning provision and advocacy of birth spacing.

  2. The Female Stroke Survival Advantage: Relation to Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Dehlendorff, Christian; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2009-01-01

    Background: Age-related hormonal factors are thought to be related to the gender gap in longevity. Testing the hypothesis that survival is best in young premenopausal women we studied the effect of age on 1-week mortality in stroke patients. Methods: A registry was started in 2001 with the aim...... logistic regression. Results: The probability of death within 1 week adjusted for stroke severity, stroke type and risk factors was highly age-dependent in both men and women. Up to the age of 50 years, the 1-week female/male mortality rates paralleled being slightly (15%) but insignificantly better...... in women. While mortality increased almost linearly in women over the entire age range, it increased steeply in men from the age of 50 and at the age of 80 years survival was 80% better in women. Conclusion: The female stroke survival advantage applies to all ages. It increases with age due to a steeply...

  3. Statistical Methods for Conditional Survival Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho; Lee, Ho Yun; Chow, Shein-Chung

    2017-11-29

    We investigate the survival distribution of the patients who have survived over a certain time period. This is called a conditional survival distribution. In this paper, we show that one-sample estimation, two-sample comparison and regression analysis of conditional survival distributions can be conducted using the regular methods for unconditional survival distributions that are provided by the standard statistical software, such as SAS and SPSS. We conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the finite sample property of these conditional survival analysis methods. We illustrate these methods with real clinical data.

  4. Coyote removal, understory cover, and survival of white-tailed deer neonates: Coyote Control and Fawn Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilgo, John C. [USDA Forest Service; Southern Research Station, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Vukovich, Mark [USDA Forest Service; Southern Research Station, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Ray, H. Scott [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River; New Ellenton, SC (United States); Shaw, Christopher E. [USDA Forest Service; Southern Research Station, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Ruth, Charles [South Carolina Dept. of Natural Resources, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Predation by coyotes (Canis latrans) on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) neonates has led to reduced recruitment in many deer populations in southeastern North America. This low recruitment combined with liberal antlerless deer harvest has resulted in declines in some deer populations, and consequently, increased interest in coyote population control. We investigated whether neonate survival increased after coyote removal, whether coyote predation on neonates was additive to other mortality sources, and whether understory vegetation density affected neonate survival. We monitored neonate survival for 4 years prior to (2006–2009) and 3 years during (2010–2012) intensive coyote removal on 3 32-km2 units on the United States Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site, South Carolina. We removed 474 coyotes (1.63 coyotes/km2 per unit per year), reducing coyote abundance by 78% from pre-removal levels. The best model (wi = 0.927) describing survival probability among 216 radio-collared neonates included a within-year quadratic time trend variable, date of birth, removal treatment, and a varying removal year effect. Under this model, survival differed between pre-treatment and removal periods and it differed among years during the removal period, being >100% greater than pre-treatment survival (0.228) during the first removal year (0.513), similar to pre-treatment survival during the second removal year (0.202), and intermediate during the third removal year (0.431). Despite an initial increase, the overall effect of coyote removal on neonate survival was modest. Mortality rate attributable to coyote predation was lowest during the first removal year (0.357) when survival was greatest, but the mortality rate from all other causes did not differ between the pretreatment period and any year during removals, indicating that coyote predation acted as an additive source of mortality. Survival probability was not related to

  5. Stage at diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maringe, Camille; Walters, Sarah; Butler, John

    2012-01-01

    We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival.......We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival....

  6. Probability of Survival Decision Aid (PSDA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Amin, Mitesh; Santee, William R

    2008-01-01

    A Probability of Survival Decision Aid (PSDA) is developed to predict survival time for hypothermia and dehydration during prolonged exposure at sea in both air and water for a wide range of environmental conditions...

  7. Life-Cycle Models for Survivable Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Linger, Richard

    2002-01-01

    .... Current software development life-cycle models are not focused on creating survivable systems, and exhibit shortcomings when the goal is to develop systems with a high degree of assurance of survivability...

  8. The effect of donor gender on renal allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugarten, J; Srinivas, T; Tellis, V; Silbiger, S; Greenstein, S

    1996-02-01

    Donor gender plays a role in the outcome of renal transplantation, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are unclear. In this study, actuarial graft survival in 1049 recipients transplanted at Montefiore Medical Center between 1979 and 1994 was examined. It was found that donor gender had no influence on graft survival in recipients treated with precyclosporine immunosuppressive agents. In contrast, graft survival time was greater in cyclosporine-treated recipients of male donor kidneys compared with female kidneys (p demand results in hyperfiltration-mediated glomerular injury and that this is responsible for reduced survival time of female allografts. Any hypothesis purporting to explain gender-related differences in graft survival time must take into account this study's observations that the donor-gender effect was observed only in cyclosporine-treated recipients, was not seen in African-American donors, appeared soon after renal transplantation, and did not increase progressively with time. These observations are most consistent with the hypothesis that gender-related differences in graft survival time may reflect differences in susceptibility to cyclosporine nephrotoxicity or differences in the therapeutic response to cyclosporine.

  9. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Niamh H.; Read, Danielle E.; Gorman, Adrienne M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75 NTR , a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75 NTR . For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75 NTR . This latter signaling through p75 NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75 NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  10. Impact of radiotherapy delay on survival in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valduvieco, Izaskun; Verger, Eugènia; Bruna, Jordi; Caral, Lluís; Pujol, Teresa; Ribalta, Teresa; Boget, Teresa; Oleaga, Laura; Pineda, Estela; Graus, Francesc

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies in glioblastoma have concluded that there is no decrease in survival with increasing time to initiation of RT up to 6 weeks after surgery. Unfortunately, the number of glioblastoma patients who start RT beyond 6 weeks is not small in some countries. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of RT delay beyond 6 weeks on survival of patients who have undergone completed resection of a glioblastoma. We reviewed 107 consecutive glioblastoma patients who had a complete surgical resection at our hospital. Clinical data, including delay in initiation of RT, were prospectively collected. The impact of single parameters on overall survival was determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. According to univariate analysis, variables that had a prognostic influence on survival were age (p = 0.036), KPS (p = 0.031), additional treatment with CHT (p < 0.0001), and initiation of RT before 42 days (p = 0.009). Multivariate analysis indicated that Karnofsky performance scale, additional treatment with chemotherapy, and initiation of RT before 6 weeks after surgery were favorable, independent prognostic factors of survival. Survival is significantly reduced in glioblastoma patients if RT is not initiated within the 6 weeks after complete resection of the tumor.

  11. Socioeconomic position and survival after cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, E H; Kjær, S K; Høgdall, C

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to decrease social disparities in cancer survival, it is important to consider the mechanisms by which socioeconomic position influences cancer prognosis. We aimed to investigate whether any associations between socioeconomic factors and survival after cervical cancer could be expla......In an attempt to decrease social disparities in cancer survival, it is important to consider the mechanisms by which socioeconomic position influences cancer prognosis. We aimed to investigate whether any associations between socioeconomic factors and survival after cervical cancer could...

  12. Survival analysis following dynamic randomization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Luo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a method to analyze survival data from a clinical trial that utilizes a dynamic randomization for subject enrollment. The method directly accounts for dynamic subject randomization process using a marked point process (MPP. Its corresponding martingale process is used to formulate an equation for estimating the treatment effect size and for hypothesis testing. We perform simulation analyses to evaluate the outcomes of the proposed method as well as the conventional log rank method and re-randomized testing procedure.

  13. Traumatic atlantooccipital dislocation with survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodring, J H; Selke, A C; Duff, D E

    1981-07-01

    Traumatic atlantooccipital dislocation is generally considered incompatible with life. However, there have been isolated survivals from this injury, and a few patients initially have minimal neurologic deficits disproportionate to the gravity of their injury, a feature that has not been adequately stressed. The potentially catastrophic results of delayed therapy make early radiographic detection imperative. Marked retropharyngeal soft-tissue swelling, an abnormal basion-odontoid alignment, and posterior displacement of the atlas are diagnostic of anterior atlantooccipital dislocation. In the more uncommon posterior atlantooccipital dislocation an abnormal basion-odontoid alignment associated with marked soft-tissue swelling should suggest the correct diagnosis. Conventional tomography can be confirmatory.

  14. Long-term survival after perforated diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vermeulen (Jan); M.P. Gosselink (Martijn Pieter); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); E. van der Harst (Erwin); B.E. Hansen (Bettina); G.H.H. Mannaerts (Guido); P-P. Coene (Peter Paul); W.F. Weidema (Wibo); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAim: Short-term survival after emergency surgery for perforated diverticulitis is poor. Less is known about long-term survival. The aims of this study were to evaluate long-term survival after discharge from hospital and to identify factors associated with prognosis. Method: All patients

  15. Surviving the crash: T-cell homeostasis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TOSHIBA

    Spatial and temporal elements. – Cellular sites for the integration of cell death and survival cues. – Spatial regulation of Notch activity for cell survival. Page 4. Cell survival is determined by the availability and uptake of nutrients live dead. Activated T-cells. T-cells. Page 5. dead wildtype. Bax active -6A7. Nucleus – H33342.

  16. 46 CFR 133.105 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 133.105 Section 133.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS LIFESAVING SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.105 Survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be approved and equipped as...

  17. 46 CFR 199.201 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 199.201 Section 199.201 Shipping COAST... craft. (a) Each survival craft must be approved and equipped as follows: (1) Each lifeboat must be... addition to the survival craft required in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, additional liferafts must be...

  18. 46 CFR 199.261 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 199.261 Section 199.261 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Cargo Vessels § 199.261 Survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be approved and equipped as follows: (1) Each lifeboat must be a totally...

  19. Comparison of survival of patients with metastases from known versus unknown primaries: survival in metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimäki, Matias; Thomsen, Hauke; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Kristina; Hemminki, Kari

    2013-01-28

    Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP) is considered an aggressive metastatic disease but whether the prognosis differs from metastatic cancers of known primary site is not known. Such data may give insight into the biology of CUP and the metastatic process in general. 6,745 cancer patients, with primary metastatic cancer at diagnosis, were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry, and were compared with 2,881 patients with CUP. Patients were diagnosed and died between 2002 and 2008. The influence of the primary site, known or unknown, on survival in patients with metastases at specific locations was investigated. Hazard ratios (HRs) of death were estimated for several sites of metastasis, where patients with known primary sites were compared with CUP patients. Overall, patients with metastatic cancers with known primary sites had decreased hazards of death compared to CUP patients (HR = 0.69 [95% CI = 0.66-0.72]). The exceptions were cancer of the pancreas (1.71 [1.54-1.90]), liver (1.58 [1.36-1.85]), and stomach (1.16 [1.02-1.31]). For individual metastatic sites, patients with liver or bone metastases of known origin had better survival than those with CUP of the liver and bone. Patients with liver metastases of pancreatic origin had an increased risk of death compared with patients with CUP of the liver (1.25 [1.06-1.46]). The median survival time of CUP patients was three months. Patients with CUP have poorer survival than patients with known primaries, except those with brain and respiratory system metastases. Of CUP sites, liver metastases had the worst prognosis. Survival in CUP was comparable to that in metastatic lung cancer. The aggressive behavior of CUP may be due to initial immunosuppression and immunoediting which may allow accumulation of mutations. Upon escape from the suppressed state an unstoppable tumor spread ensues. These novel data on the epidemiology of the metastatic process at the population level demonstrated large survival differences

  20. Comparison of survival of patients with metastases from known versus unknown primaries: survival in metastatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riihimäki Matias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP is considered an aggressive metastatic disease but whether the prognosis differs from metastatic cancers of known primary site is not known. Such data may give insight into the biology of CUP and the metastatic process in general. Methods 6,745 cancer patients, with primary metastatic cancer at diagnosis, were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry, and were compared with 2,881 patients with CUP. Patients were diagnosed and died between 2002 and 2008. The influence of the primary site, known or unknown, on survival in patients with metastases at specific locations was investigated. Hazard ratios (HRs of death were estimated for several sites of metastasis, where patients with known primary sites were compared with CUP patients. Results Overall, patients with metastatic cancers with known primary sites had decreased hazards of death compared to CUP patients (HR = 0.69 [95% CI = 0.66–0.72]. The exceptions were cancer of the pancreas (1.71 [1.54–1.90], liver (1.58 [1.36–1.85], and stomach (1.16 [1.02–1.31]. For individual metastatic sites, patients with liver or bone metastases of known origin had better survival than those with CUP of the liver and bone. Patients with liver metastases of pancreatic origin had an increased risk of death compared with patients with CUP of the liver (1.25 [1.06–1.46]. The median survival time of CUP patients was three months. Conclusions Patients with CUP have poorer survival than patients with known primaries, except those with brain and respiratory system metastases. Of CUP sites, liver metastases had the worst prognosis. Survival in CUP was comparable to that in metastatic lung cancer. The aggressive behavior of CUP may be due to initial immunosuppression and immunoediting which may allow accumulation of mutations. Upon escape from the suppressed state an unstoppable tumor spread ensues. These novel data on the epidemiology of the

  1. Animal reintroductions: an innovative assessment of survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, Erin L.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Watry, Mary Kay

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative evaluations of reintroductions are infrequent and assessments of milestones reached before a project is completed, or abandoned due to lack of funding, are rare. However, such assessments, which are promoted in adaptive management frameworks, are critical. Quantification can provide defensible estimates of biological success, such as the number of survivors from a released cohort, with associated cost per animal. It is unlikely that the global issues of endangered wildlife and population declines will abate, therefore, assurance colonies and reintroductions are likely to become more common. If such endeavors are to be successful biologically or achieve adequate funding, implementation must be more rigorous and accountable. We use a novel application of a multistate, robust design capture-recapture model to estimate survival of reintroduced tadpoles through metamorphosis (i.e., the number of individuals emerging from the pond) and thereby provide a quantitative measure of effort and success for an "in progress" reintroduction of toads. Our data also suggest that tadpoles released at later developmental stages have an increased probability of survival and that eggs laid in the wild hatched at higher rates than eggs laid by captive toads. We illustrate how an interim assessment can identify problems, highlight successes, and provide information for use in adjusting the effort or implementing a Decision-Theoretic adaptive management strategy.

  2. Climate policy, asymmetric information and firm survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagem, C.

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the effect of different domestic climate policy instruments under asymmetric information when the regulator wants to secure the survival of a specific firm. It is a well-known result from economic theory that emission taxes lead to a cost-effective distribution of abatement across polluters. However, if the regulator wants to ensure the survival of a specific firm, it may need to design policy instruments that reduce the firm's cost of complying with an emission tax regime. The climate policy instruments considered in this paper are tradable emission permits with distribution of free permits, emission taxes in combination with a fixed subsidy, and two types of voluntary agreements. It demonstrates first that if distributing free tradable permits shall have a preventing effect, the allocation of permits has to be made contingent on production. It further shows that a voluntary agreement where a specific abatement target is set by the regulator can prevent a shutdown but leads to lower welfare than the use of emission taxes in combination with a fixed subsidy. And finally it illustrates that a voluntary agreement designed as a menu of abatement contracts increases social welfare compared to an emission tax regime

  3. Survival strategies of a sterol auxotroph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria; Schwudke, Dominik; Sampaio, Julio L.; Palm, Wilhelm; Riezman, Isabelle; Dey, Gautam; Gupta, Gagan D.; Mayor, Satyajit; Riezman, Howard; Shevchenko, Andrej; Kurzchalia, Teymuras V.; Eaton, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The high sterol concentration in eukaryotic cell membranes is thought to influence membrane properties such as permeability, fluidity and microdomain formation. Drosophila cannot synthesize sterols, but do require them for development. Does this simply reflect a requirement for sterols in steroid hormone biosynthesis, or is bulk membrane sterol also essential in Drosophila? If the latter is true, how do they survive fluctuations in sterol availability and maintain membrane homeostasis? Here, we show that Drosophila require both bulk membrane sterol and steroid hormones in order to complete adult development. When sterol availability is restricted, Drosophila larvae modulate their growth to maintain membrane sterol levels within tight limits. When dietary sterol drops below a minimal threshold, larvae arrest growth and development in a reversible manner. Strikingly, membrane sterol levels in arrested larvae are dramatically reduced (dropping sixfold on average) in most tissues except the nervous system. Thus, sterols are dispensable for maintaining the basic membrane biophysical properties required for cell viability; these functions can be performed by non-sterol lipids when sterols are unavailable. However, bulk membrane sterol is likely to have essential functions in specific tissues during development. In tissues in which sterol levels drop, the overall level of sphingolipids increases and the proportion of different sphingolipid variants is altered. These changes allow survival, but not growth, when membrane sterol levels are low. This relationship between sterols and sphingolipids could be an ancient and conserved principle of membrane homeostasis. PMID:20940226

  4. Breast Cancer in Developing Countries: Opportunities for Improved Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence N. Shulman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survival in the USA has continually improved over the last six decades and has largely been accredited to the use of mammography, advanced surgical procedures, and adjuvant therapies. Data indicate, however, that there were substantial improvements in survival in the USA even prior to these technological and diagnostic advances, suggesting important opportunities for early detection and treatment in low- and middle-income countries where these options are often unavailable and/or unaffordable. Thus, while continuing to strive for increased access to more advanced technology, improving survival in these settings should be more immediately achievable through increased awareness of breast cancer and of the potential for successful treatment, a high-quality primary care system without economic or cultural barriers to access, and a well-functioning referral system for basic surgical and hormonal treatment.

  5. [Intensive care medicine-survival and prospect of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, A

    2017-10-01

    Intensive care medicine has achieved a significant increase in survival rates from critical illness. In addition to short-term outcomes like intensive care unit or hospital mortality, long-term prognosis and prospect of life of intensive care patients have recently become increasingly important. Pure survival is no longer a sole goal of intensive care medicine. The prediction of an intensive care patient's individual course should include the period after intensive care. A relevant proportion of all intensive care patients is affected by physical, psychological, cognitive, and social limitations after discharge from the intensive care unit. The prognosis of the status of the patient after discharge from the intensive care unit is an important part of the decision-making process with respect to the implementation or discontinuation of intensive care measures. The heavy burden of intensive care treatment should not solely be argued by pure survival but an anticipated sound prospect of life.

  6. Seasonal survival rates and causes of mortality of Little Owls in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Kasper; Pedersen, Dorthe; Sunde, Peter

    2013-01-01

    the causes of current survival rates, we estimated age- and season-specific survival rates and causes of mortality in Danish Little Owls on the basis of ringed birds 1920–2002, radio tagged adult and juveniles 2005–2008 and nest surveys 2006–2008. We estimate that 32 % of all eggs fledge and survive to 2...... weeks post hatching (age of ringing) and 47 %of the nestlings from ringing to fledging. Fifty-five percentage of the radio-tracked fledged young survived to dispersal, i.e. a total survival rate from egg to dispersal of 8 %. Analyses of combined ringing and radio tracking data showed a lower survival......Survival rate is an essential component of population dynamics; therefore, identification of variation in mortality rates and the factors that influence them might be of key importance in understanding why populations increase or decrease. In Denmark, the Little Owl Athene noctua, a species...

  7. Survival and clinical outcome of dogs with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredal, H; Toft, N; Westrup, U; Motta, L; Gideon, P; Arlien-Søborg, P; Skerritt, G C; Berendt, M

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate survival time, possible predictors of survival and clinical outcome in dogs with ischaemic stroke. A retrospective study of dogs with a previous diagnosis of ischaemic stroke diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. The association between survival and the hypothesised risk factors was examined using univariable exact logistic regression. Survival was examined using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression. Twenty-two dogs were identified. Five dogs (23%) died within the first 30days of the stroke event. Median survival in 30-day survivors was 505days. Four dogs (18%) were still alive by the end of the study. Right-sided lesions posed a significantly increased risk of mortality with a median survival time in dogs with right-sided lesions of 24days vs. 602days in dogs with left sided lesions (P=0.006). Clinical outcome was considered excellent in seven of 17 (41%) 30-day survivors. Another seven 30-day survivors experienced new acute neurological signs within 6-17months of the initial stroke event; in two of those cases a new ischaemic stroke was confirmed by MRI. In conclusion, dogs with ischaemic stroke have a fair to good prognosis in terms of survival and clinical outcome. However, owners should be informed of the risk of acute death within 30days and of the possibility of new neurological events in survivors. Mortality was increased in dogs with right-sided lesions in this study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving fish survival through turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Much of what is known about fish passage through hydroturbines has been developed by studying migratory species of fish passing through large Kaplan turbine units. A review of the literature on previous fish passage research presented in the accompanying story illustrates that studies have focused on determining mortality levels, rather than identifying the causal mechanism involved. There is a need for understanding how turbine designs could be altered to improve fish passage conditions, how to retrofit existing units, and how proposed hydro plant operational changes may affect fish survival. The US Army Corps of Engineers has developed a research program to define biologically based engineering criteria for improving fish passage conditions. Turbine designs incorporating these criteria can be evaluated for their effects on fish survival, engineering issues, costs, and power production. The research program has the following objectives: To gain a thorough knowledge of the mechanisms of fish mortality; To define the biological sensitivities of key fish species to these mechanisms of mortality; To develop new turbine design criteria to reduce fish mortality; To construct prototype turbine designs, and to test these designs for fish passage, hydro-mechanical operation, and power production; and To identify construction and power costs associated with new turbine designs

  9. Survival strategies in arctic ungulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. C. Tyler

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctic ungulates usually neither freeze nor starve to death despite the rigours of winter. Physiological adaptations enable them to survive and reproduce despite long periods of intense cold and potential undernutrition. Heat conservation is achieved by excellent insulation combined with nasal heat exchange. Seasonal variation in fasting metabolic rate has been reported in several temperate and sub-arctic species of ungulates and seems to occur in muskoxen. Surprisingly, there is no evidence for this in reindeer. Both reindeer and caribou normally maintain low levels of locomotor activity in winter. Light foot loads are important for reducing energy expenditure while walking over snow. The significance and control of selective cooling of the brain during hard exercise (e.g. escape from predators is discussed. Like other cervids, reindeer and caribou display a pronounced seasonal cycle of appetite and growth which seems to have an intrinsic basis. This has two consequences. First, the animals evidently survive perfectly well despite enduring negative energy balance for long periods. Second, loss of weight in winter is not necessarily evidence of undernutrition. The main role of fat reserves, especially in males, may be to enhance reproductive success. The principal role of fat reserves in winter appears to be to provide a supplement to, rather than a substitute for, poor quality winter forage. Fat also provides an insurance against death during periods of acute starvation.

  10. Incidence and survival of gynecologic sarcomas in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Matthew; Dennis, Nicola L; Hirschowitz, Lynn; Grimer, Robert; Poole, Jason; Lawrence, Gill; Nordin, Andy

    2015-06-01

    Gynecologic sarcomas account for approximately 3% to 4% of all gynecologic malignancies and are associated with poor outcomes compared with gynecologic carcinomas. The aim of this study is to report the incidence and survival rates of the main gynecologic sarcomas using national English cancer registration data. Records of gynecologic sarcomas diagnosed between 1985 and 2008 were extracted from the English National Cancer Data Repository. ICD-O3 morphology codes were used to assign tumor records to specific histologic subgroups. Incidence and 5-year relative survival rates were calculated. There were 5316 new cases of gynecologic sarcoma diagnosed in England between 1985 and 2008. Incidence rates increased significantly in the early 1990s, probably due to coding changes. Age-specific incidence rates were highest in women aged between 45 and 64 years. In the most recent period studied (2001-2008), incidence rates fluctuated between 8 and 9.6 per million. The most common anatomical site was the uterus (83% of all diagnoses), and the most common histologic diagnosis was leiomyosarcoma (52% of all diagnoses). Overall 5-year relative survival increased significantly between 1985-1989 and 2000-2004, from 34% to 48%. Gynecologic sarcoma incidence rates have varied little since 1993, whereas survival has improved significantly. These results are consistent with previously published small series and case studies, and provide a more complete picture of gynecologic sarcoma incidence and survival patterns in England.

  11. Estimation of age- and stage-specific Catalan breast cancer survival functions using US and Catalan survival data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos-Gragera Rafael

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last part of the 1990s the chance of surviving breast cancer increased. Changes in survival functions reflect a mixture of effects. Both, the introduction of adjuvant treatments and early screening with mammography played a role in the decline in mortality. Evaluating the contribution of these interventions using mathematical models requires survival functions before and after their introduction. Furthermore, required survival functions may be different by age groups and are related to disease stage at diagnosis. Sometimes detailed information is not available, as was the case for the region of Catalonia (Spain. Then one may derive the functions using information from other geographical areas. This work presents the methodology used to estimate age- and stage-specific Catalan breast cancer survival functions from scarce Catalan survival data by adapting the age- and stage-specific US functions. Methods Cubic splines were used to smooth data and obtain continuous hazard rate functions. After, we fitted a Poisson model to derive hazard ratios. The model included time as a covariate. Then the hazard ratios were applied to US survival functions detailed by age and stage to obtain Catalan estimations. Results We started estimating the hazard ratios for Catalonia versus the USA before and after the introduction of screening. The hazard ratios were then multiplied by the age- and stage-specific breast cancer hazard rates from the USA to obtain the Catalan hazard rates. We also compared breast cancer survival in Catalonia and the USA in two time periods, before cancer control interventions (USA 1975–79, Catalonia 1980–89 and after (USA and Catalonia 1990–2001. Survival in Catalonia in the 1980–89 period was worse than in the USA during 1975–79, but the differences disappeared in 1990–2001. Conclusion Our results suggest that access to better treatments and quality of care contributed to large improvements in

  12. The Caenorhabditis elegans nicotinamidase PNC-1 enhances survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, Armando; Schavemaker, Jolanda M; Pellis-van Berkel, Wendy; Burgering, Boudewijn M T

    2007-04-01

    In yeast, increasing the copy number of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent deacetylase Sir2 extends lifespan, which can be inhibited by nicotinamide (Nam), the end-product of Sir2-mediated NAD-breakdown. Furthermore, the yeast pyrazinamidase/nicotinamidase PNC-1 can extend yeast lifespan by converting Nam. In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), increased dosage of the gene encoding SIR-2.1 also increases lifespan. Here, we report that knockdown of the C. elegans homologue of yeast PNC-1 as well as growing worms on Nam-containing medium significantly decreases adult lifespan. Accordingly, increased gene dosage of pnc-1 increases adult survival under conditions of oxidative stress. These data show for the first time the involvement of PNC-1/Nam in the survival of a multicellular organism and may also contribute to our understanding of lifespan regulation in mammals.

  13. Peripheral Neuron Survival and Outgrowth on Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Convertino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene displays properties that make it appealing for neuroregenerative medicine, yet its interaction with peripheral neurons has been scarcely investigated. Here, we culture on graphene two established models for peripheral neurons: PC12 cells and DRG primary neurons. We perform a nano-resolved analysis of polymeric coatings on graphene and combine optical microscopy and viability assays to assess the material cytocompatibility and influence on differentiation. We find that differentiated PC12 cells display a remarkably increased neurite length on graphene (up to 27% with respect to controls. Notably, DRG primary neurons survive both on bare and coated graphene. They present dense axonal networks on coated graphene, while they form cell islets characterized by dense axonal bundles on uncoated graphene. These findings indicate that graphene holds potential for nerve tissue regeneration and might pave the road to novel concepts of active nerve conduits.

  14. Effect Of Permethrin On Survival And Reproduction Of Bulinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of permethrin on reproduction and survival of Bulinus globosus and Bulinus Truncatus are reported. Serial dilutons of the chemical were used in 96 h exposure tests on the molluscs, followed by postexposure maintenance in the laboratory for 8 weeks. There was significant decrease in oviposition with increase ...

  15. Surviving Scientific Academia . . . and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-03

    It's been 16 years since I first took a physics class at Weber State University. Since them, I've survived graduate school in Nuclear Engineering, and a postdoc appointment doing nuclear nonproliferation. Now I'm a Technical Staff Member at Los Alamos National Laboratory working with nuclear data, the physics behind the numerical simulations of nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons. Along the way, I've learned a few things. First, scientific computing is everywhere in science. If you are not writing codes, you will be analyzing their output, and generally there will be more output than a human can correctly and accurately interpret in a timely manner. Second, a career in science or engineering can be very rewarding with opportunities to collaborate with and generate friendships with very bright people from all over the world.

  16. Additive interaction in survival analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Lange, Theis; Andersen, Ingelise

    2012-01-01

    It is a widely held belief in public health and clinical decision-making that interventions or preventive strategies should be aimed at patients or population subgroups where most cases could potentially be prevented. To identify such subgroups, deviation from additivity of absolute effects...... of additive interaction derived from multiplicative models-an approach that is both counter-intuitive and sometimes invalid. This paper presents a straightforward and intuitive way of assessing deviation from additivity of effects in survival analysis by use of the additive hazards model. The model directly...... an empirical example of interaction between education and smoking on risk of lung cancer. We argue that deviations from additivity of effects are important for public health interventions and clinical decision-making, and such estimations should be encouraged in prospective studies on health. A detailed...

  17. Fingertip replantation: determinants of survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Guo, Zheng; Zhu, Qingsheng; Lei, Wei; Han, Yisheng; Li, Mingquan; Wang, Zhen

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors for an unsuccessful replanted fingertip. Two hundred eleven complete fingertip amputations in 211 patients who underwent replantation surgery between August of 1990 and March of 2006 were included in this study. The patients' age, gender, smoking history, digit position, dominant hand, amputation level, injury mechanism, platelet count, ischemia time, preservation method of the amputated part, anesthesia, number of arteries repaired, venous drainage, use of vein grafting, neurorrhaphy, bone shortening, and smoking after operation were tested for their impact on fingertip survival. One hundred seventy-two of 211 patients (81.5 percent) had a successful replantation. Univariate analysis showed crush or avulsion injury, high platelet count, and inappropriate preservation of the amputated part in saline solution or ethanol to be associated with a high incidence of replantation failure. Twenty-two of 54 patients (41 percent) who had a crush or avulsion trauma had failed replantation. Logistic regression analysis identified injury mechanism, platelet count, smoking after operation, preservation method of the amputated part, and the use of vein grafting as statistically significant predictive factors for success or failure. Injury mechanism, platelet count, smoking after operation, preservation method of amputated part, and the use of vein grafting were found to be the main predictors for the survival of the replanted fingertip. Applying external bleeding in zone 1 and venous drainage through the medullary cavity in zone 2 or venous anastomosis combined with vein grafting rather than venous anastomosis alone were strongly recommended in the fingertip replantation of crush or avulsion injury.

  18. MRI survival guide; MRT Basiskurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoza, J. [Alta Imaging Medical Group and Magnetic Imaging Affiliates, Berkeley, CA (United States); Herfkens, R.J. [eds.] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Medical Center

    1999-07-01

    The book is a German translation of an American textbook with the original title ''MRI Survival Guide'' and is intended to serve as an introductory guide for beginners or a reference book for quick information. Readers will find information on the fundamentals of the technology and methodology of MRI as well as all details of relevance to practice in a precise and easy-to-grasp arrangement, covering all anatomic areas of interest, illustrations and descriptions of characteristic signs of pathologic processes, high-quality and unusually large-sized diagnostic pictures, a modern didactic concept for quick orientiation, including surveys, tables, and reproductions for visualisation of contents. (orig./CB) [German] Praktisch jeder Mediziner wird im Laufe seiner Berufstaetigkeit mit der MRT konfrontiert - unabhaengig davon ob in der Radiologie, Orthopaedie, Gynaekologie, Chirurgie, Neurologie oder sonstigen Fachrichtung. Das Buch ist eine Uebersetzung eines amerikanischen Lehrbuches mit dem Originaltitel ''MRI Survival Guide'' und will eine wesentliche Erleichterung als 'Ueberlebenshandbuch fuer die MRT' bieten: - Darstellung aller relevanten Grundlagen zu Technik, verschiedenen Sequenzen und Methodik der MRT - knapp und mit maximalem Praxisbezug - Beruecksichtigung aller moeglichen Untersuchungsregionen und strukturierte Orientierung daran (Gehirn, Wirbelsaeule, Kopf/Nacken, Brustkorb, Bauch, Becken, Muskel-Skelett-Bereich) - Illustration und Beschreibung der charakteristischen Erscheinungsmerkmale aller haeufigen pathologischen Prozesse im MRT, inklusive direkt umsetzbarer differentialdiagnostischer Abgrenzungskriterien - hochwertiges und aussergewoehnlich gross dimensioniertes Bildmaterial - modernes, didaktisches Konzept fuer die rasche Orientierung mit vielen Uebersichten, Tabellen und Abbildungen zur Visualisierung der Inhalte, Praxistips und Aufzeigen von Fehlermoeglichkeiten - zum Einstieg, zur Rekapitulation

  19. Interdisciplinary ICU cardiac arrest debriefing improves survival outcomes*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Heather; Zebuhr, Carleen; Topjian, Alexis A; Nishisaki, Akira; Niles, Dana E; Meaney, Peter A; Boyle, Lori; Giordano, Rita T; Davis, Daniela; Priestley, Margaret; Apkon, Michael; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Sutton, Robert M

    2014-07-01

    In-hospital cardiac arrest is an important public health problem. High-quality resuscitation improves survival but is difficult to achieve. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel, interdisciplinary, postevent quantitative debriefing program to improve survival outcomes after in-hospital pediatric chest compression events. Single-center prospective interventional study of children who received chest compressions between December 2008 and June 2012 in the ICU. Structured, quantitative, audiovisual, interdisciplinary debriefing of chest compression events with front-line providers. Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included survival of event (return of spontaneous circulation for ≥ 20 min) and favorable neurologic outcome. Primary resuscitation quality outcome was a composite variable, termed "excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation," prospectively defined as a chest compression depth ≥ 38 mm, rate ≥ 100/min, ≤ 10% of chest compressions with leaning, and a chest compression fraction > 90% during a given 30-second epoch. Quantitative data were available only for patients who are 8 years old or older. There were 119 chest compression events (60 control and 59 interventional). The intervention was associated with a trend toward improved survival to hospital discharge on both univariate analysis (52% vs 33%, p = 0.054) and after controlling for confounders (adjusted odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.91-6.8; p = 0.075), and it significantly increased survival with favorable neurologic outcome on both univariate (50% vs 29%, p = 0.036) and multivariable analyses (adjusted odds ratio, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.01-7.5; p = 0.047). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation epochs for patients who are 8 years old or older during the debriefing period were 5.6 times more likely to meet targets of excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (95% CI, 2.9-10.6; p < 0.01). Implementation of an interdisciplinary, postevent quantitative debriefing

  20. Survivability design guidelines for Fly-By-Wire Flight Control Systems development.

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, Daniel Timothy.

    1983-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Survivability of military combat aircraft has received increased emphasis by the U.S. Armed Services in recent years. The primary objective of the U.S. Military Survivability Policy is to ensure that effective survivability enhancement features are incorporated in current and all future U.S. combat aircraft. Technology advances in Fly-By-Wire Flight Control Systems have significantly enhanced the performance capabilities...

  1. Culture conditions affecting the survival response of Chinese hamster ovary cells treated by hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highfield, D.P.; Holahan, E.V.; Dewey, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Using lethally irradiated feeder cells to control cell population densities, researchers investigated the survival of Chinese hamster ovary cells heated between 42.2 and 45.5 degrees C. Test cells were plated into T25 flasks with or without feeder cells, incubated 2 hours at 37 degrees C, and then given various heat treatments. Under all heating conditions, survival increased in those flasks containing feeder cells. Increased survival (by as much as a factor of 100 for cells heated at 42.4 degrees C for 6-10 hr) was most apparent when cells were heated to thermotolerance. By adjustment of test and feeder cell numbers, survival increased as density increased; however, maximum survival followed a transition period that occurred between the plating of 1 X 10(4) and 6 X 10(4) cells. Experimental artifacts due to improper control of cell density was demonstrated

  2. Will Incremental Hemodialysis Preserve Residual Function and Improve Patient Survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The progressive loss of residual renal function in peritoneal dialysis patients is associated with increased mortality. It has been suggested that incremental dialysis may help preserve residual renal function and improve patient survival. Residual renal function depends upon both patient related and dialysis associated factors. Maintaining patients in an over-hydrated state may be associated with better preservation of residual renal function but any benefit comes with a significant risk of cardiovascular consequences. Notably, it is only observational studies that have reported an association between dialysis patient survival and residual renal function; causality has not been established for dialysis patient survival. The tenuous connections between residual renal function and outcomes and between incremental hemodialysis and residual renal function should temper our enthusiasm for interventions in this area. PMID:25385441

  3. Effect of refuge supplement on Audouin's gull chick survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Prieto

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the main threats to Audouin´s gull (Larus audouinii at Chafarinas Islands is predation on eggs and chicks by the yellow-legged gull (Larus cachinnans. During the 1999 and 2000 breeding seasons we tested the effects of supplementary refuge availability on chick survival. Well before the laying period, nine adjacent enclosures were erected inside Audouin´s gull´s breeding grounds and some of them were supplied with artificial refuges. Our results showed significantly greater chick survival in the enclosures with artificial refuges than in control ones. In 2000, an overall lower breeding success of Audouin´s gull and a dilution of the refuge effect were observed. These results were probably related to food-shortage that year. We suggest that, along with other factors, an increase in refuge availability may significantly enhance Audouin´s gull chick survival.

  4. IGFBP2 expression predicts IDH-mutant glioma patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin Eric; Cohen, Adam L; Colman, Howard; Jensen, Randy L; Fults, Daniel W; Couldwell, William T

    2017-01-03

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2 genes occur in ~80% of lower-grade (WHO grade II and grade III) gliomas. Mutant IDH produces (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate, which induces DNA hypermethylation and presumably drives tumorigenesis. Interestingly, IDH mutations are associated with improved survival in glioma patients, but the underlying mechanism for the difference in survival remains unclear. Through comparative analyses of 286 cases of IDH-wildtype and IDH-mutant lower-grade glioma from a TCGA data set, we report that IDH-mutant gliomas have increased expression of tumor-suppressor genes (NF1, PTEN, and PIK3R1) and decreased expression of oncogenes(AKT2, ARAF, ERBB2, FGFR3, and PDGFRB) and glioma progression genes (FOXM1, IGFBP2, and WWTR1) compared with IDH-wildtype gliomas. Furthermore, each of these genes is prognostic in overall gliomas; however, within the IDH-mutant group, none remains prognostic except IGFBP2 (encodinginsulin-like growth factor binding protein 2). Through validation in an independent cohort, we show that patients with low IGFBP2 expressiondisplay a clear advantage in overall and disease-free survival, whereas those with high IGFBP2 expressionhave worse median survival than IDH-wildtype patients. These observations hold true across different histological and molecular subtypes of lower-grade glioma. We propose therefore that an unexpected biological consequence of IDH mutations in glioma is to ameliorate patient survival by promoting tumor-suppressor signaling while inhibiting that of oncogenes, particularly IGFBP2.

  5. Impact of housing on the survival of persons with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Sandra K; Hsu, Ling C; Vittinghoff, Eric; Vu, Annie; Bamberger, Joshua D; Katz, Mitchell H

    2009-07-07

    Homeless persons with HIV/AIDS have greater morbidity and mortality, more hospitalizations, less use of antiretroviral therapy, and worse medication adherence than HIV-infected persons who are stably housed. We examined the effect of homelessness on the mortality of persons with AIDS and measured the effect of supportive housing on AIDS survival. The San Francisco AIDS registry was used to identify homeless and housed persons who were diagnosed with AIDS between 1996 and 2006. The registry was computer-matched with a housing database of homeless persons who received housing after their AIDS diagnosis. The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was used to compare survival between persons who were homeless at AIDS diagnosis and those who were housed. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate the independent effects of homelessness and supportive housing on survival after AIDS diagnosis. Of the 6,558 AIDS cases, 9.8% were homeless at diagnosis. Sixty-seven percent of the persons who were homeless survived five years compared with 81% of those who were housed (p Homelessness increased the risk of death (adjusted relative hazard [RH] 1.20; 95% confidence limits [CL] 1.03, 1.41). Homeless persons with AIDS who obtained supportive housing had a lower risk of death than those who did not (adjusted RH 0.20; 95% CL 0.05, 0.81). Supportive housing ameliorates the negative effect of homelessness on survival with AIDS.

  6. Design for Survivability: An Approach to Assured Autonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Natalia M.; Ozoroski, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly expanding unmanned air traffic includes and will continue to include non-cooperative participants. Non-cooperative behavior may be due to technical failure, a lack of appropriate equipment, a careless or malicious operator. Regardless of the cause, the outcome remains: growing density of non-cooperative traffic will increase the risk of collision between unmanned vehicles and aircraft carrying humans. As a result, the degraded safety of airspace may limit access to airspace, with adverse consequences for the traveling public and the economy. Because encounters with small non-cooperative objects, such as birds or wayward drones, can happen too rapidly for an external control system to mitigate them, it is imperative that the aircraft that carry humans survive encounters with non-cooperative vehicles. To-date, design for survivability has been practiced explicitly in the military domain. Survivability against collisions in civil aviation has been limited to tolerances against bird strikes; and these tolerances have proved inadequate on occasion. The growing risk of collision with unmanned vehicles now requires the development of survivability discipline for civilian transport aircraft. The new discipline must be infused into multidisciplinary design methods, on par with traditional disciplines. In this paper, we report on a preliminary study of survivability considerations for the civil aviation domain.

  7. Food web changes under ocean acidification promote herring larvae survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sswat, Michael; Stiasny, Martina H; Taucher, Jan; Algueró-Muñiz, Maria; Bach, Lennart T; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Riebesell, Ulf; Clemmesen, Catriona

    2018-05-01

    Ocean acidification-the decrease in seawater pH due to rising CO 2 concentrations-has been shown to lower survival in early life stages of fish and, as a consequence, the recruitment of populations including commercially important species. To date, ocean-acidification studies with fish larvae have focused on the direct physiological impacts of elevated CO 2 , but largely ignored the potential effects of ocean acidification on food web interactions. In an in situ mesocosm study on Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) larvae as top predators in a pelagic food web, we account for indirect CO 2 effects on larval survival mediated by changes in food availability. The community was exposed to projected end-of-the-century CO 2 conditions (~760 µatm pCO 2 ) over a period of 113 days. In contrast with laboratory studies that reported a decrease in fish survival, the survival of the herring larvae in situ was significantly enhanced by 19 ± 2%. Analysis of the plankton community dynamics suggested that the herring larvae benefitted from a CO 2 -stimulated increase in primary production. Such indirect effects may counteract the possible direct negative effects of ocean acidification on the survival of fish early life stages. These findings emphasize the need to assess the food web effects of ocean acidification on fish larvae before we can predict even the sign of change in fish recruitment in a high-CO 2 ocean.

  8. CT findings associated with survival in chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jonathan H.; Montner, Steven M. [University of Chicago Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Adegunsoye, Ayodeji; Vij, Rekha; Noth, Imre; Strek, Mary E. [University of Chicago Medical Center, Section of Pulmonary/Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Oldham, Justin M. [University of California at Davis, Section of Pulmonary/Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Husain, Aliya N. [University of Chicago Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-12-15

    To identify CT findings in chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (cHP) associated with survival. Two thoracic radiologists assessed CT scans for specific imaging findings and patterns in 132 subjects with cHP. Survival analyses were performed. The majority of subjects had an inconsistent with usual interstitial pneumonitis pattern on CT (55.3%,73/132). Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) diagnosis on CT was less common in those with fibrosis (66.1%, 74/112) than those without fibrosis (85%,17/20). Smoking was associated with a lower prevalence of HP on CT (p=0.04). CT features of pulmonary fibrosis, especially traction bronchiectasis (HR 8.34, 95% CI 1.98-35.21) and increased pulmonary artery (PA)/aorta ratio (HR 2.49, 95% CI 1.27-4.89) were associated with worse survival, while ground-glass opacity (HR 0.31, 95% CI 0.12-0.79) was associated with improved survival. Survival association with imaging was less pronounced after adjustment for gender, age and physiology score. A substantial proportion of cHP cases have a non-HP-like appearance. Ground-glass opacity, pulmonary fibrosis features and elevated PA/aorta ratio on CT likely reflect varying degrees of disease severity in cHP and may inform future clinical prediction models. (orig.)

  9. Lung cancer survival in Norway, 1997-2011: from nihilism to optimism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilssen, Yngvar; Strand, Trond Eirik; Fjellbirkeland, Lars; Bartnes, Kristian; Møller, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    We examine changes in survival and patient-, tumour- and treatment-related factors among resected and nonresected lung cancer patients, and identify subgroups with the largest and smallest survival improvements.National population-based data from the Cancer Registry of Norway, Statistics Norway and the Norwegian Patient Register were linked for lung cancer patients diagnosed during 1997-2011. The 1- and 5-year relative survival were estimated, and Cox proportional hazard regression, adjusted for selected patient characteristics, was used to assess prognostic factors for survival in lung cancer patients overall and stratified by resection status.We identified 34 157 patients with lung cancer. The proportion of histological diagnoses accompanied by molecular genetics testing increased from 0% to 26%, while those accompanied by immunohistochemistry increased from 8% to 26%. The 1-year relative survival among nonresected and resected patients increased from 21.7% to 34.2% and 75.4% to 91.5%, respectively. The improved survival remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, stage and histology. The largest improvements in survival occurred among resected and adenocarcinoma patients, while patients ≥80 years experienced the smallest increase.Lung cancer survival has increased considerably in Norway. The explanation is probably multifactorial, including improved attitude towards diagnostic work-up and treatment, and more accurate diagnostic testing that allows for improved selection for resection and improved treatment options. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  10. Platelet survival in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and response to splenectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, M.E.; Verhaeghe, R.; Devos, P.

    Platelet survival combined with surface counting was performed in 9 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, resistent to steroid therapy. All patients had a markedly enhanced platelet turnover, five of them showed an augmented trapping of radioactivity over the spleen compared to liver and heart. These five patients underwent splenectomy: the platelet count increased in all of them but this increase was not always sustained. (Author) [pt

  11. Surviving severe traumatic brain injury in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Poulsen, Ingrid; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify all hospitalized patients surviving severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Denmark and to compare these patients to TBI patients admitted to highly specialized rehabilitation (HS-rehabilitation). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients surviving severe TBI were identified from...... severe TBI were admitted to HS-rehabilitation. Female sex, older age, and non-working status pre-injury were independent predictors of no HS-rehabilitation among patients surviving severe TBI. CONCLUSION: The incidence rate of hospitalized patients surviving severe TBI was stable in Denmark...

  12. Clustered survival data with left-truncation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Frank; Martinussen, Torben; Scheike, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Left-truncation occurs frequently in survival studies, and it is well known how to deal with this for univariate survival times. However, there are few results on how to estimate dependence parameters and regression effects in semiparametric models for clustered survival data with delayed entry....... Surprisingly, existing methods only deal with special cases. In this paper, we clarify different kinds of left-truncation and suggest estimators for semiparametric survival models under specific truncation schemes. The large-sample properties of the estimators are established. Small-sample properties...

  13. Improving Survival in Decompensated Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Nath Mukerji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mortality in cirrhosis is consequent of decompensation, only treatment being timely liver transplantation. Organ allocation is prioritized for the sickest patients based on Model for End Stage Liver Disease (MELD score. In order to improve survival in patients with high MELD score it is imperative to preserve them in suitable condition till transplantation. Here we examine means to prolong life in high MELD score patients till a suitable liver is available. We specially emphasize protection of airways by avoidance of sedatives, avoidance of Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure, elective intubation in grade III or higher encephalopathy, maintaining a low threshold for intubation with lesser grades of encephalopathy when undergoing upper endoscopy or colonoscopy as pre transplant evaluation or transferring patient to a transplant center. Consider post-pyloric tube feeding in encephalopathy to maintain muscle mass and minimize risk of aspiration. In non intubated and well controlled encephalopathy, frequent physical mobility by active and passive exercises are recommended. When renal replacement therapy is needed, night-time Continuous Veno-Venous Hemodialysis may be useful in keeping the daytime free for mobility. Sparing and judicious use of steroids needs to be borne in mind in treatment of ARDS and acute hepatitis from alcohol or autoimmune process.

  14. Trends in colorectal cancer survival in northern Denmark: 1985-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Nørgaard, Mette; Jepsen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    for age and gender. A total of 19,515 CRC patients were identified and linked with the Central Office of Civil Registration to ascertain survival through January 2005. Results: From 1985 to 2004, 1-year and 5-year survival improved both for patients with colon and rectal cancer. From 1995-1999 to 2000......-2004, overall 1-year survival of 65% for colon cancer did not improve, and some age groups experienced a decreasing 1-year survival probability. For rectal cancer, overall 1-year survival increased from 71% in 1995-1999 to 74% in 2000-2004. Using 1985-1989 as reference period, 30-day mortality did not decrease...... after implementation of the National Cancer Plan in 2000, neither for patients with colon nor rectal cancer. However, 1-year mortality for patients with rectal cancer did decline after its implementation. CONCLUSION: Survival and mortality from colon and rectal cancer improved before the National Cancer...

  15. [Effect of resection margin and tumor number on survival of patients with small liver cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Weiqi; Yu, Weibo; Wu, Fan; Wu, Jianxiong; Wang, Liming; Tian, Fei; An, Songlin; Feng, Li; Liu, Faqiang

    2015-12-01

    To explore the significance of resection margin and tumor number on survival of patients with small liver cancer after hepatectomy. We collected 219 cases with small liver cancer undergoing hepatectomy in Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between December 2003 to July 2013. The survival rates were compared by log-rank test between two resection margin groups (≥ 1 cm vs. number groups (single tumor vs. multiple tumors). We also performed a multifactor analysis by Cox model. The 1-, 3-, 5- and 10- year overall survival rates were 95.9%, 85.3%, 67.8% and 53.3%, respectively, in all patients. The median survival time was 28 months in the group of number on the patients' survival. For small liver cancer, the resection margin of 1 cm might be advised. Increasing resection margin in further could probably not improve therapeutic effect. Standardized operation and combined treatment will decrease the negative influence of multiple tumors on overall survival.

  16. Does framing of cancer survival affect perceived value of care? A willingness-to-pay survey of US residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Jung; Concannon, Thomas W; Greenberg, Dan; Cohen, Joshua T; Rossi, Gregory; Hille, Jeffrey; Auerbach, Hannah R; Fang, Chi-Hui; Nadler, Eric S; Neumann, Peter J

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between the framing of survival gains and the perceived value of cancer care. Through a population-based survey of 2040 US adults, respondents were randomized to one of the two sets of hypothetical scenarios, each of which described the survival benefit for a new treatment as either an increase in median survival time (median survival), or an increase in the probability of survival for a given length of time (landmark survival). Each respondent was presented with two randomly selected scenarios with different prognosis and survival improvements, and asked about their willingness to pay (WTP) for the new treatments. Predicted WTP increased with survival benefits and respondents' income, regardless of how survival benefits were described. Framing therapeutic benefits as improvements in landmark rather than median time survival increased the proportion of the population willing to pay for that gain by 11-35%, and the mean WTP amount by 42-72% in the scenarios we compared. How survival benefits are described may influence the value people place on cancer care.

  17. The effect of carbon dioxide therapy on composite graft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durães, Eliana Ferreira Ribeiro; Durães, Leonardo de Castro; Carneiro, Fabiana Pirani; Lino, Ruy de Souza; Sousa, João Batista de

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effect of carboxytherapy in auricular composite grafts in rabbits. An experimental study was conducted using 20 rabbits randomly assigned to a treatment group of carboxytherapy or a control group of saline solution. In each ear, a circular graft with 1.5 cm or 2 cm of diameter was amputated and reattached. Animals underwent carbon dioxide or saline injection four times during the experiment. We analyzed clinical evolution of the animals, grafts survival, histopathology features and histomorphometry of collagen. The treated group had a significantly lower weight gain (p=0.038). Histopathology was not significantly different between groups. There was an increase in amount of collagen in 2 cm grafts submitted to carbon dioxide therapy (p=0.003). Carboxytherapy didn't influence graft survival rate for 1.5 cm grafts or 2 cm grafts (p=0.567 and p=0.777, respectively). Carbon dioxide therapy increased the amount of collagen in 2 cm grafts. CO2 was not significantly different from saline infusion on composite grafts survival, but this study suggests that there is a mechanical effect caused by distension which favored graft survival.

  18. Arrested recovery of Diadema antillarum population: Survival or recruitment limitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Barreras, Ruber; Pérez, María E.; Mercado-Molina, Alex E.; Sabat, Alberto M.

    2015-09-01

    Densities of the long-spined sea urchin Diadema antillarum remain significantly below pre mass-mortality levels at most Caribbean localities. The arrested recovery of this formerly abundant herbivore has been attributed to low supply of recruits and high post settlement mortality. There is, however, some debate as to which of these factors is determinant of the local dynamics of this echinoid. In this study, we use demographic modeling to analyze the contribution of recruitment and post settlement survival on the dynamics of D. antillarum in four localities of Puerto Rico Archipelago. Our results indicate relatively high adult survival, and low stasis but high growth transition in the small individuals. Recruitment rates were low and exhibited high spatial and temporal variability. The four populations exhibited asymptotic growth rates (λ) below 1.0, with λ varying from 0.918 to 0.964. The elasticity analysis showed that the survival of large-sized Diadema can potentially contribute most to the changes in λ for all sites. Numerical projections of the populations indicate that no site would exhibit an increase in density under current recruitment rates, but doubling recruitment would produce an increase in sea urchin density in three of the four sites. Recovery of D. antillarum populations would require the spatial and temporal co-occurrence of high recruitment and survival rates.

  19. Does colour polymorphism enhance survival of prey populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennersten, Lena; Forsman, Anders

    2009-01-01

    That colour polymorphism may protect prey populations from predation is an old but rarely tested hypothesis. We examine whether colour polymorphic populations of prey exposed to avian predators in an ecologically valid visual context were exposed to increased extinction risk compared with monomorphic populations. We made 2976 artificial pastry prey, resembling Lepidoptera larvae, in four different colours and presented them in 124 monomorphic and 124 tetramorphic populations on tree trunks and branches such that they would be exposed to predation by free-living birds, and monitored their ‘survival’. Among monomorphic populations, there was a significant effect of prey coloration on survival, confirming that coloration influenced susceptibility to visually oriented predators. Survival of polymorphic populations was inferior to that of monomorphic green populations, but did not differ significantly from monomorphic brown, yellow or red populations. Differences in survival within polymorphic populations paralleled those seen among monomorphic populations; the red morph most frequently went extinct first and the green morph most frequently survived the longest. Our findings do not support the traditional protective polymorphism hypothesis and are in conflict with those of earlier studies. As a possible explanation to our findings, we offer a competing ‘giveaway cue’ hypothesis: that polymorphic populations may include one morph that attracts the attention of predators and that polymorphic populations therefore may suffer increased predation compared with some monomorphic populations. PMID:19324729

  20. Improved survival of patients with nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, S.; Kondo, M.; Inuyama, Y.; Hashimoto, S.

    1986-03-01

    One hundred and one patients with nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (NPC) were treated with irradiation. The UICC TNM staging system (1978) was used: 6 patients were T1N0, 10 T2N0, 5 T3N0, 13 T4N0, 11 T1N+, 18 T2N+, 19 T3N+ and 19 T4N+. Since 1978, 34 patients were examined with computed tomography (CT) at first presentation. Fourteen (41%) of the 34 tumors were upstaged based on the CT findings alone. The technique of radiation therapy was markedly changed around 1978. The fields to the primary site and neck were enlarged. Two-year relapse-free survival was significantly better for the post-CT era than pre-CT era. This was mainly because of improved local-recurrence-free survival, and cervical-relapse-free survival. Improved local-recurrence-free survival, however, was appreciated in only T3 + T4 patients; there was no difference in T1 + T2 patients. It is suggested that merely enlarging radiation fields or increasing radiation doses could not be curative for some subpopulations. In order to increase local control rates further, we have started to use intracavitary irradiation with an after-loading technique as a boost. Preliminary results are encouraging.

  1. Activation of CHK1 in Supporting Cells Indirectly Promotes Hair Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Jadali

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The sensory hair cells of the inner ear are exquisitely sensitive to ototoxic insults. Loss of hair cells after exposure to ototoxic agents causes hearing loss. Chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin causes hair cell loss. Cisplatin forms DNA mono-adducts as well as intra- and inter-strand DNA crosslinks. DNA cisplatin adducts are repaired through the DNA damage response. The decision between cell survival and cell death following DNA damage rests on factors that are involved in determining damage tolerance, cell survival and apoptosis. Cisplatin damage on hair cells has been the main focus of many ototoxic studies, yet the effect of cisplatin on supporting cells has been largely ignored. In this study, the effects of DNA damage response in cochlear supporting cells were interrogated. Supporting cells play a major role in the development, maintenance and oto-protection of hair cells. Loss of supporting cells may indirectly affect hair cell survival or maintenance. Activation of the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase (PI3K signaling was previously shown to promote hair cell survival. To test whether activating PI3K signaling promotes supporting cell survival after cisplatin damage, cochlear explants from the neural subset (NS Cre Pten conditional knockout mice were employed. Deletion of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN activates PI3K signaling in multiple cell types within the cochlea. Supporting cells lacking PTEN showed increased cell survival after cisplatin damage. Supporting cells lacking PTEN also showed increased phosphorylation of Checkpoint Kinase 1 (CHK1 levels after cisplatin damage. Nearest neighbor analysis showed increased numbers of supporting cells with activated PI3K signaling in close proximity to surviving hair cells in cisplatin damaged cochleae. We propose that increased PI3K signaling promotes supporting cell survival through phosphorylation of CHK1 and increased survival of supporting cells indirectly increases hair cell

  2. Strategies for surviving a shakeout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, G S

    1997-01-01

    Shakeouts are a fact of life in almost every industry-witness the shrinking number of players in areas as diverse as banking, software, and hospital supply distribution. The key to survival is sensing your industry's shakeout before the competition does. And the first hurdle for managers to overcome is the belief that it can't happen to them. It can and it probably will. George Day describes two shakeout syndromes that affect different types of industries. A boom-and-bust shakeout afflicts hot emerging markets or highly cyclical businesses. A glut of competitors enter the market during boom times, but many of them fail when growth slows or a dominant design emerges. A seismic-shift shakeout strikes mature industries that have enjoyed years of protected prosperity as a result of, for example, local regulations or import barriers. But deregulation, globalization, or technological change can pull the rug out from under them. Day outlines how companies can detect the early warning signs of a shakeout. He explains how adaptive survivors, such as Dell Computer, successfully adjust their businesses in the midst of a bust, and how aggressive amalgamators, such as Arrow Electronics, cut costs and acquire smaller rivals in order to remain standing after a seismic shift. But the fact remains that most companies will get squeezed out during a consolidation. Although it is enormously difficult for executives to come to terms with the grim news, the sooner they do so, the better. And, as Day points out, all is not necessarily lost: with the right timing, also-rans can make a profitable exit from an industry.

  3. Ecological factors influencing nest survival of greater sage-grouse in Mono County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolada, Eric J.; Casazza, Michael L.; Sedinger, James S.

    2009-01-01

    We studied nest survival of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in 5 subareas of Mono County, California, USA, from 2003 to 2005 to 1) evaluate the importance of key vegetation variables for nest success, and 2) to compare nest success in this population with other greater sage-grouse populations. We captured and radiotracked females (n  =  72) to identify nest sites and monitor nest survival. We measured vegetation at nest sites and within a 10-m radius around each nest to evaluate possible vegetation factors influencing nest survival. We estimated daily nest survival and the effect of explanatory variables on daily nest survival using nest-survival models in Program MARK. We assessed effects on daily nest survival of total, sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), and nonsagebrush live shrub-cover, Robel visual obstruction, the mean of grass residual height and grass residual cover measurements within 10 m of the nest shrub, and area of the shrub, shrub height, and shrub type at the nest site itself. Assuming a 38-day exposure period, we estimated nest survival at 43.4%, with percent cover of shrubs other than sagebrush as the variable most related to nest survival. Nest survival increased with increasing cover of shrubs other than sagebrush. Also, daily nest survival decreased with nest age, and there was considerable variation in nest survival among the 5 subareas. Our results indicate that greater shrub cover and a diversity of shrub species within sagebrush habitats may be more important to sage-grouse nest success in Mono County than has been reported elsewhere.

  4. EFFECT OF SALINITY ON SURVIVAL AND LARVAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory investigations was conducted to gain a better insight into the effect of changing salinity regime on the development and survival of Macrobrachium vollenhoveli larvae. At water temperature of 28 ± 2oC, larvae reared in the salinity range of 0 to 10 ppt showed low survival (<48%), whereas those reared at 12 ...

  5. Survival Prognosis in Very Old Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thinggaard, Mikael; McGue, Matt; Jeune, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    performance, cognition, depression symptomatology, self-rated health, and all-cause mortality, evaluated as average remaining lifespan and chance of surviving to 100 years. RESULTS: Men aged 92 to 93 had an overall 6.0% chance of surviving to 100 years, whereas the chance for women was 11.4%. Being able...

  6. How can survival processing improve memory encoding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Meng; Geng, Haiyan

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the psychological mechanism of survival processing advantage from the perspective of false memory in two experiments. Using a DRM paradigm in combination with analysis based on signal detection theory, we were able to separately examine participants' utilization of verbatim representation and gist representation. Specifically, in Experiment 1, participants rated semantically related words in a survival scenario for a survival condition but rated pleasantness of words in the same DRM lists for a non-survival control condition. The results showed that participants demonstrated more gist processing in the survival condition than in the pleasantness condition; however, the degree of item-specific processing in the two encoding conditions did not significantly differ. In Experiment 2, the control task was changed to a category rating task, in which participants were asked to make category ratings of words in the category lists. We found that the survival condition involved more item-specific processing than did the category condition, but we found no significant difference between the two encoding conditions at the level of gist processing. Overall, our study demonstrates that survival processing can simultaneously promote gist and item-specific representations. When the control tasks only promoted either item-specific representation or gist representation, memory advantages of survival processing occurred.

  7. 46 CFR 28.120 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... fishing operations will satisfy the requirements of this section for survival craft, except for an... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 28.120 Section 28.120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY...

  8. Survival Processing and the Stroop Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Kazanas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the impact of survival processing with a novel task for this paradigm: the Stroop color-naming task. As the literature is mixed with regard to task generalizability, with survival processing promoting better memory for words, but not better memory for faces or paired associates, these types of task investigations are important to a growing field of research. Using the Stroop task provides a unique contribution, as identifying items by color is an important evolutionary adaptation and not specific to humans as is the case with word recall. Our results indicate that survival processing, with its accompanying survival-relevance rating task, remains the best mnemonic strategy for word memory. However, our results also indicate that presenting the survival passage does not motivate better color-naming performance than color-naming alone. In addition, survival processing led to a larger amount of Stroop interference, though not significantly larger than the other conditions. Together, these findings suggest that considering one’s survival when performing memory and attention-based tasks does not enhance cognitive performance generally, although greater allocation of attentional resources to color-incongruent concrete objects could be considered adaptive. These findings support the notion that engaging in deeper processing via survival-relevance ratings may preserve these words across a variety of experimental manipulations.

  9. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  10. Nematode survival in relation to soil moisture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, W.R.

    1973-01-01

    Established nematode populations are very persistent in the soil. It is known that they need sufficient soil moisture for movement, feeding and reproduction (fig. 5), and that there are adverse soil moisture conditions which they cannot survive. The influence of soil moisture on survival

  11. Survival after in-hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Adib Hajbaghery

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: During recent years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in hospital has received much attention. However, the survival rate of CPR in Iran’s hospitals is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate outcome of in-hospital CPR in Kashan. Methods: A longitudinal case registry study was conducted on all cases of in-hospital CPR during 6 months at 2002. Necessary data including; age, sex, underlying disease, working shift, time from cardiac arrest until initiating of CPR and until defibrillation, duration and result of CPR, frequency of tracheal intubations and time served for it were collected in a checklist. Results: In six months study, 206 cases of cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempted. The survival rate was similar for both sexes. Short-term survival observed in19.9% of cases and only 5.3% survived to discharge. Conclusions: Duration of CPR, time of the first defibrillation, response time and the location of cardiac arrest are the key predictors of survival to hospital discharge and in-hospital CPR strategies require improvement. This study promotes a national study on post CPR survival for accurate data on our performance in attention to chain of survival. KeyWords: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR, Survival rate, Iran

  12. Long-term survival in Patau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Y; Kadandale, J S; Pivnick, E K

    2001-04-01

    A female patient with an extra chromosome 13 (Patau syndrome) is described. There are only five previous reports of patients with trisomy 13 who have survived past the first decade. It is concluded that non-lethal congenital anomalies and aggressive medical care play an important role in the survival of patients with trisomy 13.

  13. The effects of hunting on survival rates of American black ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krementz, D.G.; Conroy, M.J.; Hines, J.E.; Percival, H.F.

    1988-01-01

    Using data from 10 preseason and 10 winter major reference areas from 1950-83, the authors tested hypotheses regarding the effects of hunting on the survival and recovery rates of the American black duck (Anas rubripes ). Although estimates of the proportion of total annual mortality due to hunting are low (35% for ad and 45% for young) compared to Blandin's (1982) estimates, mean mortality and kill rates have increased since 1982. When hunting regulations were liberalized, recovery rates increased and survival rates decreased in males whereas only recovery rates increased in females. Changes in hunting regulations appeared to affect survival rates of adult males and young American black ducks.

  14. Cougar survival and source-sink structure on Greater Yellowstone's Northern Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, T.K.; Haroldson, M.A.; Murphy, K.M.; Buotte, P.C.; Hornocker, M.G.; Quigley, H.B.

    2011-01-01

    We studied survival and causes of mortality of radiocollared cougars (Puma concolor) on the Greater Yellowstone Northern Range (GYNR) prior to (1987–1994) and after wolf (Canis lupus) reintroduction (1998–2005) and evaluated temporal, spatial, and environmental factors that explain variation in adult, subadult, and kitten survival. Using Program MARK and multimodel inference, we modeled cougar survival based on demographic status, season, and landscape attributes. Our best models for adult and independent subadults indicated that females survived better than males and survival increased with age until cougars reached older ages. Lower elevations and increasing density of roads, particularly in areas open to cougar hunting north of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), increased mortality risks for cougars on the GYNR. Indices of ungulate biomass, cougar and wolf population size, winter severity, rainfall, and individual characteristics such as the presence of dependent young, age class, and use of Park or Wilderness were not important predictors of survival. Kitten survival increased with age, was lower during winter, increased with increasing minimum estimates of elk calf biomass, and increased with increasing density of adult male cougars. Using our best model, we mapped adult cougar survival on the GYNR landscape. Results of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated a good model fit for both female (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.81, 95%CI = 0.70–0.92, n = 35 locations) and male cougars (AUC = 0.84, 95%CI = 0.74–0.94, n = 49 locations) relative to hunter harvest locations in our study area. Using minimum estimates of survival necessary to sustain the study population, we developed a source-sink surface and we identify several measures that resource management agencies can take to enhance cougar population management based on a source-sink strategy.

  15. Multivariate survival analysis and competing risks

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, Martin J

    2012-01-01

    Multivariate Survival Analysis and Competing Risks introduces univariate survival analysis and extends it to the multivariate case. It covers competing risks and counting processes and provides many real-world examples, exercises, and R code. The text discusses survival data, survival distributions, frailty models, parametric methods, multivariate data and distributions, copulas, continuous failure, parametric likelihood inference, and non- and semi-parametric methods. There are many books covering survival analysis, but very few that cover the multivariate case in any depth. Written for a graduate-level audience in statistics/biostatistics, this book includes practical exercises and R code for the examples. The author is renowned for his clear writing style, and this book continues that trend. It is an excellent reference for graduate students and researchers looking for grounding in this burgeoning field of research.

  16. The influence of climatic variation and density on the survival of an insular passerine Zosterops lateralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvig, Erik M; Coulson, Tim; Kikkawa, Jiro; Clegg, Sonya M

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the influence of environmental factors on population dynamics is fundamental to many areas in biology. Survival is a key factor of population biology, as it is thought to be the predominant driver of growth in long-lived passerines, which can be influenced by both biotic and abiotic environmental conditions. We used mark-recapture methods and generalized linear mixed models to test the influence of density and climatic variation, measured at a regional and local scale (Southern Oscillation Index [SOI] and rainfall, respectively), on seasonal variation in survival rates of an insular population of Silvereyes (Zosterops lateralis chlorocephalus), during a 15-year study period, off the east coast of Australia. We found overall high survival rates for adults and juveniles (81% and 59%, respectively). Local scale climate (i.e. rainfall) and density were the principal environmental factors influencing their survival, both with a negative relationship. A significant interactive effect of density and rainfall influenced survival as they both increased. However, survival remained low when density was at it highest, independent of the amount of rainfall. Nestling survival was negatively influenced by rainfall and density, positively by SOI, and chicks that hatched later in the breeding season had higher survival rates. The regional scale climate variable (i.e. SOI) did not explain survival rates as strongly as rainfall in any age class. Our results contribute to the understanding of insular avian population dynamics and the differential effects of environmental factors across age classes. Climatic predictions expect El Niño events to increase, meaning dryer conditions in eastern Australia, potentially increasing Silvereye survival across age classes. However, the long-term effect of lower rainfall on food availability is unknown; consequently, the outcome of lower rainfall on Silvereye survival rates is uncertain.

  17. Survival Comparison of Patients With Cystic Fibrosis in Canada and the United States: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Anne L; Sykes, Jenna; Stanojevic, Sanja; Quon, Bradley S; Marshall, Bruce C; Petren, Kristofer; Ostrenga, Josh; Fink, Aliza K; Elbert, Alexander; Goss, Christopher H

    2017-04-18

    In 2011, the median age of survival of patients with cystic fibrosis reported in the United States was 36.8 years, compared with 48.5 years in Canada. Direct comparison of survival estimates between national registries is challenging because of inherent differences in methodologies used, data processing techniques, and ascertainment bias. To use a standardized approach to calculate cystic fibrosis survival estimates and to explore differences between Canada and the United States. Population-based study. 42 Canadian cystic fibrosis clinics and 110 U.S. cystic fibrosis care centers. Patients followed in the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Registry (CCFR) and U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR) between 1990 and 2013. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare survival between patients followed in the CCFR (n = 5941) and those in the CFFPR (n = 45 448). Multivariable models were used to adjust for factors known to be associated with survival. Median age of survival in patients with cystic fibrosis increased in both countries between 1990 and 2013; however, in 1995 and 2005, survival in Canada increased at a faster rate than in the United States (P cystic fibrosis survival between Canada and the United States persisted after adjustment for risk factors associated with survival, except for private-insurance status among U.S. patients. Differential access to transplantation, increased posttransplant survival, and differences in health care systems may, in part, explain the Canadian survival advantage. U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  18. Survival benefits of remote ischemic conditioning in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Khalil, Mazhar; Hashmi, Ammar; Hecker, Louise; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Tang, Andrew; Friese, Randall S; Rhee, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in the surgical intensive care unit. Prior studies have demonstrated a survival benefit of remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) in many disease states. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of RIC on survival in sepsis in an animal model and to assess alterations in inflammatory biochemical profiles. We hypothesized that RIC alters inflammatory biochemical profiles resulting in decreased mortality in a septic mouse model. Eight to 12 week C57BL/6 mice received intra-peritoneal injection of 12.5-mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Septic animals in the experimental group underwent RIC at 0, 2, and 6 h after LPS by surgical exploration and alternate clamping of the femoral artery. Six 4-min cycles of ischemia-reperfusion were performed. Primary outcome was survival at 5-d after LPS injection. Secondary outcome was to assess the following serum cytokine levels: interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-10, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factoralpha (TNFα) at the baseline before LPS injection, 0 hour after LPS injection, and at 2, 4, 24 hours after induction of sepsis (RIC was performed at 2 h after LPS injection). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank test were used. ANOVA test was used to compare cytokine measurements. We performed experiments on 44 mice: 14 sham and 30 RIC mice (10 at each time point). Overall survival was higher in the experimental group compared to the sham group (57% versus 21%; P = 0.02), with the highest survival rate observed in the 2-hour post-RIC group (70%). On Kaplan-Meier analysis, 2-h post-RIC group had increased survival at 5 days after LPS (P = 0.04) with hazard ratio of 0.3 (95% confidence interval = 0.09-0.98). In the RIC group, serum concentrations of IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-1β, and TNFα peaked at 2 h after LPS and then decreased significantly over 24 hours (P sepsis and has the potential for implementation in the clinical practice. Early implementation of RIC may play an

  19. Parents' Death and its Implications for Child Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrash, Hani K

    Reduction of child mortality is a global public health priority. Parents can play an important role in reducing child mortality. The inability of one or both parents to care for their children due to death, illness, divorce or separation increases the risk of death of their children. There is increasing evidence that the health, education, and socioeconomic status of mothers and fathers have significant impact on the health and survival of their children. We conducted a literature review to explore the impact of the death of parents on the survival and wellbeing of their children and the mechanisms through which this impact is mediated. Studies have generally concluded that the death of a mother significantly increased the risk of death of her children, especially during the early years; the effect continues but is significantly reduced with increasing age through the age of 15 years. The effect of the loss of a father had less impact than the effect of losing a mother although it too had negative consequences for the survival prospect of the child. A mother's health, education, socioeconomic status, fertility behavior, environmental health conditions, nutritional status and infant feeding, and the use of health services all play an important role in the level of risk of death of her children. Efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goal No. 4 of reducing children's under-5 mortality in developing countries by two thirds by 2015 should include promoting the health and education of women.

  20. Cancer survival classification using integrated data sets and intermediate information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shinuk; Park, Taesung; Kon, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Although numerous studies related to cancer survival have been published, increasing the prediction accuracy of survival classes still remains a challenge. Integration of different data sets, such as microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA, might increase the accuracy of survival class prediction. Therefore, we suggested a machine learning (ML) approach to integrate different data sets, and developed a novel method based on feature selection with Cox proportional hazard regression model (FSCOX) to improve the prediction of cancer survival time. FSCOX provides us with intermediate survival information, which is usually discarded when separating survival into 2 groups (short- and long-term), and allows us to perform survival analysis. We used an ML-based protocol for feature selection, integrating information from miRNA and mRNA expression profiles at the feature level. To predict survival phenotypes, we used the following classifiers, first, existing ML methods, support vector machine (SVM) and random forest (RF), second, a new median-based classifier using FSCOX (FSCOX_median), and third, an SVM classifier using FSCOX (FSCOX_SVM). We compared these methods using 3 types of cancer tissue data sets: (i) miRNA expression, (ii) mRNA expression, and (iii) combined miRNA and mRNA expression. The latter data set included features selected either from the combined miRNA/mRNA profile or independently from miRNAs and mRNAs profiles (IFS). In the ovarian data set, the accuracy of survival classification using the combined miRNA/mRNA profiles with IFS was 75% using RF, 86.36% using SVM, 84.09% using FSCOX_median, and 88.64% using FSCOX_SVM with a balanced 22 short-term and 22 long-term survivor data set. These accuracies are higher than those using miRNA alone (70.45%, RF; 75%, SVM; 75%, FSCOX_median; and 75%, FSCOX_SVM) or mRNA alone (65.91%, RF; 63.64%, SVM; 72.73%, FSCOX_median; and 70.45%, FSCOX_SVM). Similarly in the glioblastoma multiforme data, the accuracy of miRNA/mRNA using IFS

  1. Training the brain to survive stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff F Dunn

    Full Text Available Presently, little can be done to repair brain tissue after stroke damage. We hypothesized that the mammalian brain has an intrinsic capacity to adapt to low oxygen which would improve outcome from a reversible hypoxic/ischemic episode. Acclimation to chronic hypoxia causes increased capillarity and tissue oxygen levels which may improve the capacity to survive ischemia. Identification of these adaptations will lead to protocols which high risk groups could use to improve recovery and reduce costs.Rats were exposed to hypoxia (3 weeks living at ½ an atmosphere. After acclimation, capillary density was measured morphometrically and was increased by 30% in the cortex. Novel implantable oxygen sensors showed that partial pressure of oxygen in the brain was increased by 40% in the normal cortex. Infarcts were induced in brain with 1 h reversible middle cerebral artery occlusions. After ischemia (48 h behavioural scores were improved and T2 weighted MRI lesion volumes were reduced by 52% in acclimated groups. There was a reduction in inflammation indicated by reduced lymphocytes (by 27-33%, and ED1 positive cells (by 35-45%.It is possible to stimulate a natural adaptive mechanism in the brain which will reduce damage and improve outcome for a given ischemic event. Since these adaptations occur after factors such as HIF-1α have returned to baseline, protection is likely related more to morphological changes such as angiogenesis. Such pre-conditioning, perhaps with exercise or pharmaceuticals, would not necessarily reduce the incidence of stroke, but the severity of damage could be reduced by 50%.

  2. Overall Survival in Spine Myeloma Metastases: Difficulties in Predicting With Prognostic Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelot, Aymeric; Cristini, Joseph; Salaud, Céline; Moles, Alexis; Hamel, Olivier; Moreau, Philippe; Bord, Eric; Buffenoir, Kevin

    2017-03-15

    Fifty-one patients with spinal multiple myeloma (MM) metastases were operated and followed between January 2004 and July 2014. The aim of this study was to consider the efficiency of surgical prognosis scores in the management of spinal metastases myelomas. The spine is the most common site of bone metastases in MM. Surgery in spine metastases MM is a matter of debate and its impact on the increase of a patient's survival time is not clear. Several surgical survival scores have been developed to determine the best treatment in these patients. We studied 51 patients operated for spinal MM metastases between January 2004 and July 2014. We determined the Tokuhashi and Tomita survival scores and compared them with documented patient survivals. The two scores were also compared with the International Staging System (ISS). Median survival (MS) was 108 months [standard deviation (SD) 62] for ISS I, 132.2 (SD 40) for ISS II, and 45.5 months (SD 16.3) for ISS III (P = 0.09). According to Tokuhashi survival score, 21 patients (41.2%) will survive 12 months. According to Tomita et al., 50 patients (98%) will survive >49.9 months and 1 patient (2%) spine surgical prognosis scores are not accurate and are not able to predict the survival of patients with spine myeloma metastases. Spine surgeons have to be guided not by the initial ISS stage but rather by spinal instability and neurological status. N/A.

  3. Survival in systemic lupus erythematosus, 1995-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A; Laustrup, H; Hjelmborg, J

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveThe objective of this paper is to investigate survival and causes of death in a Danish lupus population.MethodsTwo hundred and fifteen SLE patients (94% Caucasians) were followed prospectively for up to 16 years. Thirty-eight patients died. Survival rate and causes of death were analysed......%) and malignancies (13%). Deaths due to infections and active SLE were rare and predominated within the first seven years after diagnosis and before age 40, while cardiovascular deaths prevailed after 20 years' follow-up.ConclusionThis study shows that despite progress in lupus management, including direct access...... to specialized hospital care and increased use of hydroxychloroquine, mortality in lupus patients is still increased. Main causes of death were active disease and infections among the young and newly diagnosed, while cardiovascular deaths prevailed in longstanding disease....

  4. Loco-regional treatment in metastatic breast cancer patients: is there a survival benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Bevan H; Nguyen, Nam P; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Rapiti, Elisabetta; Vlastos, Georges

    2010-02-01

    A number of studies have recently demonstrated a survival benefit in stage IV breast cancer patients following surgical resection of the primary tumor. Here, we investigate the relationship between loco-regional treatment and survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer and evaluate the impact of different loco-regional treatments. We conducted a systematic review of the literature using PubMed to analyze studies with the following criteria: Type of loco-regional treatment (surgery alone or combined with radiation, radiotherapy), overall survival, progression-free survival, selection factors for local treatment, and complication rates. Thirteen studies evaluated the effect of loco-regional treatment on overall survival with overall median survival increasing from a range of 12.6-28.3 months among patients without surgery to a range of 25-42 months among patients with surgery. In addition, six studies reported a 3-year survival benefit of 28-95% and 17-79% in women with and without locoregional therapy respectively. Two studies did not find any improvement in overall survival. One study found an improvement in 5-year breast cancer-specific survival of 27% with negative surgical margins versus 12% with no surgery. Three studies reported an advantage in progression-free survival in the treatment group compared with the non-treatment group. Loco-regional treatment for breast cancer patients with distant metastases at diagnosis is an important issue because of possible improvement of survival or disease-free survival. The possibility of surgery and/or radiotherapy following induction chemotherapy should be weighed and left to individual practice. Participation in randomized controlled trials should be encouraged.

  5. Blood Lead, Bone Turnover, and Survival in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Peters, Tracy L; Beard, John D; Umbach, David M; Keller, Jean; Mariosa, Daniela; Allen, Kelli D; Ye, Weimin; Sandler, Dale P; Schmidt, Silke; Kamel, Freya

    2017-11-01

    Blood lead and bone turnover may be associated with the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We aimed to assess whether these factors were also associated with time from ALS diagnosis to death through a survival analysis of 145 ALS patients enrolled during 2007 in the National Registry of Veterans with ALS. Associations of survival time with blood lead and plasma biomarkers of bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX)) and bone formation (procollagen type I amino-terminal peptide (PINP)) were estimated using Cox models adjusted for age at diagnosis, diagnostic certainty, diagnostic delay, site of onset, and score on the Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale. Hazard ratios were calculated for each doubling of biomarker concentration. Blood lead, plasma CTX, and plasma PINP were mutually adjusted for one another. Increased lead (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.84) and CTX (HR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.42, 2.89) were both associated with shorter survival, whereas higher PINP was associated with longer survival (HR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.83), after ALS diagnosis. No interactions were observed between lead or bone turnover and other prognostic indicators. Lead toxicity and bone metabolism may be involved in ALS pathophysiology. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. Emerging pharmacological agents to improve survival from traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosevich, John J; Patanwala, Asad E; Erstad, Brian L

    2013-01-01

    To review emerging pharmacological agents for the treatment of traumatic brain injury with regard to survival outcomes and provide recommendations regarding their use. An Ovid MEDLINE (up to May 2013) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (up to May 2013) search was conducted to identify emerging pharmacological therapies for the treatment of traumatic brain injury. The search was limited to English language and humans. Pharmacological agents that were evaluated with respect to survival as an outcome were included. Based on the search, the investigators identified the following new therapies: beta-receptor antagonists, erythropoiesis stimulating agents, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and progesterone. With the exception of progesterone, which was studied in several small, randomized, controlled trials, the remaining agents were primarily studied in observational retrospective cohorts. For each of the agents identified, a potential increase in survival was noted. Emerging pharmacological agents represent promising treatment options for traumatic brain injury to improve survival. Most of these agents are commercially available for other indications. However, limitations in study design, sample size, duration of treatment, timing of treatment and inclusion of heterogeneous patient populations make it difficult to draw definitive conclusions from the literature.

  7. Driving pressure and survival in the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Marcelo B P; Meade, Maureen O; Slutsky, Arthur S; Brochard, Laurent; Costa, Eduardo L V; Schoenfeld, David A; Stewart, Thomas E; Briel, Matthias; Talmor, Daniel; Mercat, Alain; Richard, Jean-Christophe M; Carvalho, Carlos R R; Brower, Roy G

    2015-02-19

    Mechanical-ventilation strategies that use lower end-inspiratory (plateau) airway pressures, lower tidal volumes (VT), and higher positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEPs) can improve survival in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the relative importance of each of these components is uncertain. Because respiratory-system compliance (CRS) is strongly related to the volume of aerated remaining functional lung during disease (termed functional lung size), we hypothesized that driving pressure (ΔP=VT/CRS), in which VT is intrinsically normalized to functional lung size (instead of predicted lung size in healthy persons), would be an index more strongly associated with survival than VT or PEEP in patients who are not actively breathing. Using a statistical tool known as multilevel mediation analysis to analyze individual data from 3562 patients with ARDS enrolled in nine previously reported randomized trials, we examined ΔP as an independent variable associated with survival. In the mediation analysis, we estimated the isolated effects of changes in ΔP resulting from randomized ventilator settings while minimizing confounding due to the baseline severity of lung disease. Among ventilation variables, ΔP was most strongly associated with survival. A 1-SD increment in ΔP (approximately 7 cm of water) was associated with increased mortality (relative risk, 1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31 to 1.51; PAmparo e Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo and others.).

  8. Personality drives physiological adjustments and is not related to survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijleveld, Allert I; Massourakis, Georgina; van der Marel, Annemarie; Dekinga, Anne; Spaans, Bernard; van Gils, Jan A; Piersma, Theunis

    2014-05-22

    The evolutionary function and maintenance of variation in animal personality is still under debate. Variation in the size of metabolic organs has recently been suggested to cause and maintain variation in personality. Here, we examine two main underlying notions: (i) that organ sizes vary consistently between individuals and cause consistent behavioural patterns, and (ii) that a more exploratory personality is associated with reduced survival. Exploratory behaviour of captive red knots (Calidris canutus, a migrant shorebird) was negatively rather than positively correlated with digestive organ (gizzard) mass, as well as with body mass. In an experiment, we reciprocally reduced and increased individual gizzard masses and found that exploration scores were unaffected. Whether or not these birds were resighted locally over the 19 months after release was negatively correlated with their exploration scores. Moreover, a long-term mark-recapture effort on free-living red knots with known gizzard masses at capture confirmed that local resighting probability (an inverse measure of exploratory behaviour) was correlated with gizzard mass without detrimental effects on survival. We conclude that personality drives physiological adjustments, rather than the other way around, and suggest that physiological adjustments mitigate the survival costs of exploratory behaviour. Our results show that we need to reconsider hypotheses explaining personality variation based on organ sizes and differential survival.

  9. Cancer survival in Busan, Republic of Korea, 1996-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, H R; Lee, D H; Lee, S Y; Lee, J T; Park, H K; Rha, S H; Whang, I K; Jung, K W; Won, Y J; Kong, H J

    2011-01-01

    The Busan cancer registry was established in 1996; cancer registration is done by passive and active methods. The registry contributed survival data for 48 cancer sites or types registered during 1996-2001. Follow-up information has been gleaned predominantly by passive methods with median follow-up ranging between 1-57 months for various cancers. The proportion with histologically verified diagnosis for different cancers ranged between 20-100%; death certificates only (DCOs) comprised 0-53%; 47-100% of total registered cases were included for survival analysis. The top-ranking cancers on 5-year age-standardized relative survival rates were penis (94%), thyroid (91%), non-melanoma skin (89%), placenta (86%), breast (76%), Hodgkin lymphoma (75%) and testis (72%). Five-year relative survival by age group showed a decreasing trend with increasing age groups for cancers of the nasopharynx, gall bladder, lung, bone, soft tissue, breast, cervix, corpus uteri, thyroid, multiple myeloma, lymphoid leukaemia and myeloid leukaemia or was fluctuating for other cancers.

  10. Planning for and surviving a BCM audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freestone, Mandy; Lee, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Business continuity management (BCM) is moving progressively higher up the agendas of boardroom executives due to growing regulator, insurer and investor interest in risk management and BCM activity. With increasing pressure across all sectors, BCM has become an integral part of any effective corporate governance framework. Boardroom executives and senior management are thus now expected to provide an appropriate level of business continuity preparedness to better protect shareholder, investor and other stakeholder interests. The purpose of this paper is to build a link across the 'chasm' that separates the auditee from the auditor. The paper attempts to illuminate understanding about the process undertaken by an auditor when reviewing the BCM process. It details the steps the BCM auditor typically undertakes, and provides practical guidance as to the types of documentation and other supporting evidence required during the process. Additionally, the paper attempts to dispel commonly-held misconceptions about the BCM audit process. Executives, senior management and BCM practitioners will all benefit from the practical guidance offered in this paper, to assist in planning for and surviving a BCM audit.

  11. North-South cooperation for survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiyaki, M

    1989-12-01

    Affirming that international cooperation along North-North, North-South, and South-South lines is essential for mutual survival, Mr. Waiyaki calls upon international understanding, good w ill, determination, and compromise in achieving mutually beneficial socioeconomic development for developing nations, while avoiding serious international confrontation and internal civil strife. He cites remaining instances of colonialism and the debate over Africa's debt repayment as potential conflict areas, then provides previously suggested resolving steps involving the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the Economic Commission for Africa. Regarding internal strife, he discusses the hardships imposed upon African populations by structural adjustment programs. Should such exacerbatory measures be implemented in the hope of fostering development, negative international ramifications are possible. Specifically, the potential failure of measures to redress regional population and environmental problems should not be discounted. Improved communications and increasing interdependence continue to make the world seem smaller, allowing regional changes to affect the world on a broader scale. Key issues in high population growth, especially in Africa, Latin America, and Oceania, and environmental concerns are explored. The address includes specific mention of determinant factors and suggestions for Northern country interventions in finding solutions to these comprehensive concerns.

  12. Survival of captive-reared Hispaniolan Parrots released in Parque Nacional del Este, Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazo, J.A.; White, T.H.; Vilella, F.J.; Guerrero, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    We report first-year survival rates of 49 captive-reared Hispaniolan Parrots (Amazona ventralis) released in Parque Nacional del Este, Dominican Republic. Our goal was to learn about factors affecting postrelease survival. Specifically, we tested if survival was related to movements and whether modifying prerelease protocols influenced survival rates. We also estimated survival in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges (22 September 1998). Twenty-four parrots, fitted with radio-transmitters, were released between 14 September and 12 December 1997. Twenty-five more were released between 29 June and 16 September 1998. First-year survival rates were 30% in 1997 and 29% in 1998. Survival probability was related to bird mobility. In contrast to birds released in 1997, none of the 25 parrots released in 1998 suffered early postrelease mortality (i.e., 3-5 days after release). Two adjustments to prerelease protocols (increased exercise and reduced blood sampling) made in 1998 may have contributed to differences in mobility and survival between years. The reduction of early postrelease mortality in 1998 was encouraging, as was the prospect for higher first-year survival (e.g., 30% to 65%). Only one death was attributed to the immediate impact of the hurricane. Loss of foraging resources was likely a major contributor to ensuing mortality. Birds increased their mobility, presumably in search of food. Survival rates dropped 23% in only eight weeks posthurricane. This study underscores the value of standardized prerelease protocols, and of estimating survival and testing for factors that might influence it. Inferences from such tests will provide the best basis to make adjustments to a release program.

  13. Survivability of space assets in the long term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses the threats to strategic defense satellites over the next 20-30 years. It describes the purposes and sizes of the satellites, the types of attacks on them, the counters to those attacks, and the likely outcomes of the encounters. It concludes that their survivability and contribution to stability should increase over then next 20-30 years because of the advanced technologies that should become available then. 47 refs., 14 figs.

  14. 38 CFR 3.10 - Dependency and indemnity compensation rate for a surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... entitlement to this increase shall be made in accordance with paragraph (f) of this section. (d) Alternative... the deceased veteran (including a child not in the surviving spouse's actual or constructive custody...

  15. Strengthened currents override the effect of warming on lobster larval dispersal and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cetina-Heredia, Paulina; Roughan, Moninya; van Sebille, Erik; Feng, Ming; Coleman, Melinda A.

    2015-01-01

    Human-induced climate change is projected to increase ocean temperature and modify circulation patterns, with potential widespread implications for the transport and survival of planktonic larvae of marine organisms. Circulation affects the dispersal of larvae, whereas temperature impacts larval

  16. What Makes a Book Survive? Or, "Wild Tales Which Made the Child A Man"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Brian

    1972-01-01

    There is almost a revivalist movement in English children's classics, but the author questions their ability to survive in an increasingly mechanical age, and cautions against the negative effects of the new media and insensitive techniques of publishers. (SJ)

  17. Colorectal cancer, diabetes and survival : Epidemiological insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanders, M. M. J.; Vissers, P. A. J.; Haak, H. R.; van de Poll-Franse, L.

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with pre-existing diabetes have significantly lower rates of overall survival compared with patients without diabetes. Against this backdrop, the American Diabetes Association and American Cancer Society in 2010 reviewed the scientific literature concerning diabetes

  18. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Survival Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records of survival factors recorded by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists as part of the ongoing monk seal population assessment...

  19. Oceanographic Trawl Data - Ocean Survival of Salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A study to evaluate the role of changing ocean conditions on growth and survival of juvenile salmon from the Columbia River basin as they enter the Columbia River...

  20. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  1. Zooplankton Data - Ocean Survival of Salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A study to evaluate the role of changing ocean conditions on growth and survival of juvenile salmon from the Columbia River basin as they enter the Columbia River...

  2. Juvenile Salmonid Metrics - Ocean Survival of Salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A study to evaluate the role of changing ocean conditions on growth and survival of juvenile salmon from the Columbia River basin as they enter the Columbia River...

  3. Achieving Critical System Survivability Through Software Architectures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knight, John C; Strunk, Elisabeth A

    2006-01-01

    .... In a system with a survivability architecture, under adverse conditions such as system damage or software failures, some desirable function will be eliminated but critical services will be retained...

  4. CTD Oceanographic Data - Ocean Survival of Salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A study to evaluate the role of changing ocean conditions on growth and survival of juvenile salmon from the Columbia River basin as they enter the Columbia River...

  5. Parent's Guide to Surviving the Teen Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual ... English Español A Parent's Guide to Surviving the Teen Years KidsHealth / For Parents / A Parent's Guide to ...

  6. Schoolyard Trees: Planning and Planting for Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Considers factors that affect the fate of schoolyard trees and focuses on the importance of what is considered during tree selection. Includes of list of characteristics of tree projects that have a low survival rate. (DDR)

  7. Surviving Sepsis: Taming a Deadly Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe August 2014 Print this issue Surviving Sepsis Taming a Deadly Immune Response En español Send ... Mouth? Looking at Lupus Wise Choices Signs of Sepsis Sepsis can be hard to spot, because its ...

  8. Anoxic survival potential of bivalves: (arte)facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwaan, Albertus; Babarro, Jose M F; Monari, Marta; Cattani, Otello

    2002-03-01

    The anoxic survival time of the bivalves Chamelea gallina, Cerastoderma edule and Scapharca inaequivalvis from two different ecosystems and differing anoxia tolerances was studied in static (closed) and flow-through systems. The antibiotics chloramphenicol, penicillin and polymyxin were added, and molybdate (specific inhibitor of the process of sulfate reduction). Survival in (near) anoxic seawater of Chamelea was studied in a static system by comparing untreated seawater with autoclaved seawater and untreated clams with clams incubated in well-aerated seawater, containing the broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol, prior to the anoxic survival test. With untreated clams and natural seawater (median mortality time 2.4 days) a decrease in pH and exponential accumulation of sulfide and ammonium was observed in the anoxic medium, indicating excessive growth of (sulfate reducing) bacteria. In sterilized seawater LT50 (2.1 days) was not significantly different and again considerable amounts of ammonium and sulfide accumulated. However, pre-treatment of clams with chloramphenicol resulted in an increase of LT50 (11.0 days) by approximately fivefold. Accumulation of ammonium and sulfide was retarded, but was finally even stronger than in the medium containing untreated clams. Median mortality times were 2.5 and 2.4 days for Chamelea and 2.7 and 2.9 days for Cerastoderma for static and flow-through incubations, respectively. Addition of chloramphenicol increased strongly survival time in both systems with corresponding values of 11.0 and 16.3 days for Chamelea, and 6.4 and 6.5 days for Cerastoderma. LT50 of Scapharca in anoxic seawater was 14.4 days. Chloramphenicol and penicillin increased median survival time to 28.5 and 28.7 days, respectively, whereas polymyxin displayed no effect (LT50=13.6 days). Molybdate added to artificial sulfate free seawater blocked biotic sulfide formation, but did not improve survival time (LT50=13.7 days). Overall the results indicate

  9. 46 CFR 117.200 - Survival craft-general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft-general. 117.200 Section 117.200 Shipping... Number and Type of Survival Craft § 117.200 Survival craft—general. (a) Each survival craft required on a... craft they replace. (c) A summary of survival craft requirements is provided in Table 117.200(c). Table...

  10. Survival – Selected Determinants Of Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Płoskonka Przemysław

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A growing interest in survival as a tourist and recreational activity raises the need for empirical research into this issue. Unfortunately, a vast majority of authors focus on the technical aspects of survival, ignoring the determinants of this activity. The few existing studies are mostly based on observation and involve small samples. This paper will help complement the body of knowledge concerning this issue.

  11. Cognitive function in families with exceptional survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barral, Sandra; Cosentino, Stephanie; Costa, Rosann

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated whether cognitive function may be used as an endophenotype for longevity by assessing the cognitive performance of a family-based cohort consisting of 1380 individuals from 283 families recruited for exceptional survival in field centers in Boston, New York, Pittsburgh...... members in the offspring generation demonstrate significantly better performance on multiple tasks requiring attention, working memory, and semantic processing when compared with individuals without a family history of exceptional survival, suggesting that cognitive performance may serve as an important...

  12. NMDA receptor signaling: death or survival?

    OpenAIRE

    LUO, Tong; WU, Wei-Hua; CHEN, Bo-Shiun

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate-induced neuronal damage is mainly caused by overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Conversely, normal physiological brain function and neuronal survival require adequate activation of NMDA receptors. Studies have revealed that NMDA receptor-induced neuronal death or survival is mediated through distinct subset of NMDA receptors triggering different intracellular signaling pathways. Here we discuss recent advances in the characterization of NMDA receptors in neurona...

  13. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Ostergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and ambul......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants...

  14. Biologic drug survival in Israeli psoriasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalom, Guy; Cohen, Arnon D; Ziv, Michael; Eran, Cohen Barak; Feldhamer, Ilan; Freud, Tamar; Berman, Eitan; Oren, Shirley; Hodak, Emmilia; Pavlovsky, Lev

    2017-04-01

    Drug survival is defined as the time period of treatment with a certain drug until its cessation. The role of previous exposure to traditional systemic treatments in biologic survival is still unknown. To investigate the drug survival rates of biologic treatments in patients with psoriasis and to identify predictor factors. Survival analysis was performed on patients with severe psoriasis who received adalimumab, infliximab, etanercept, and ustekinumab for treatment of psoriasis, drawn from the Clalit Health Services database. Multivariate analysis was performed adjusting for demographic variables; metabolic syndrome and its components; psoriatic arthritis; biologic naivety; coadministration of methotrexate, acitretin, or cyclosporine; and previous standard systemic treatment exposure. Among 907 patients treated with 1575 biologic treatments, ustekinumab had a significantly higher survival rate than tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. Biologic naivety and concomitant methotrexate intake were positive predictors for drug survival, whereas the female sex and the duration of previous systemic treatments were negative predictors. Data regarding disease severity or duration could not be drawn from the Clalit Health Services database. Ustekinumab had better retention rates in comparison with other investigated biologics in patients with severe psoriasis, most of whom used it as a third line therapy. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus fomite survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christa; Davis, Diane L

    2009-01-01

    To assess survival of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on fomites encountered by health students. Three suspensions of MRSA were made to mimic lab splashes: a 0.5 McFarland trypticase soy broth, whole blood with 50 colony forming units/mL and body fluid/serum with 2000 colony forming units/mL. These were seeded onto three environmental surfaces (glass, vinyl floor tile, and countertop) and wet swabbed for 60 days. High touch areas of student stethoscopes were also wet swabbed. MRSA selective CHROMagar was used to identify organism survival. Salisbury University, Salisbury MD PARTICIPANTS: Salisbury University nursing and respiratory therapy students who volunteered to have their stethoscopes swabbed anonymously. Detection of pink colonies on MRSA-selective CHROMagar. MRSA in 0.5 McFarland broth lived for > or =60 days on all surfaces. MRSA in blood was undetectable on any surface, and MRSA in serum survived 41 days on glass, 45 days on tile, and > or =60 days on countertop. Five of thirty-three stethoscopes (15%) tested were positive for MRSA. Previous studies showed fomite survival of MRSA for about two weeks using contact plate sampling and MRSA on 7.4% of stethoscopes. We showed longer MRSA survival times by wet swab sampling and a higher stethoscope contamination rate. As expected, higher organism loads survived longer.

  16. The formula for survival in resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, Eldar; Morrison, Laurie; Hillman, Ken; Monsieurs, Koen; Sunde, Kjetil; Zideman, David; Eisenberg, Mickey; Sterz, Fritz; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Soar, Jasmeet; Nolan, Jerry P

    2013-11-01

    The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) Advisory Statement on Education and Resuscitation in 2003 included a hypothetical formula--'the formula for survival' (FfS)--whereby three interactive factors, guideline quality (science), efficient education of patient caregivers (education) and a well-functioning chain of survival at a local level (local implementation), form multiplicands in determining survival from resuscitation. In May 2006, a symposium was held to discuss the validity of the formula for survival hypothesis and to investigate the influence of each of the multiplicands on survival. This commentary combines the output from this symposium with an updated illustration of the three multiplicands in the FfS using rapid response systems (RRS) for medical science, therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for local implementation, and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for educational efficiency. International differences between hospital systems made it difficult to assign a precise value for the multiplicand medical science using RRS as an example. Using bystander CPR as an example for the multiplicand educational efficiency, it was also difficult to provide a precise value, mainly because of differences between compression-only and standard CPR. The local implementation multiplicand (exemplified by therapeutic hypothermia) is probably the easiest to improve, and is likely to have the most immediate improvement in observed survival outcome in most systems of care. Despite the noted weaknesses, we believe that the FfS will be useful as a mental framework when trying to improve resuscitation outcome in communities worldwide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Microbial survival and odor in laundry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Signe Munk; Johansen, Charlotte; Stahnke, Louise Heller

    2001-01-01

    The survival and distribution of microflora during laundering at 30 or 40 degreesC in commercial U.S. and European Union (E.U.) detergents were determined in laboratory wash experiments. Four test strains-Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa-were eva......The survival and distribution of microflora during laundering at 30 or 40 degreesC in commercial U.S. and European Union (E.U.) detergents were determined in laboratory wash experiments. Four test strains-Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa......-were evaluated on cotton textile. A significant survival and transfer between textiles were found for all four test strains washed in E.U. and U.S. color detergents (without bleach), whereas no survival was observed in bleach-containing detergents. Gram-negative strains generally survived in greater numbers than...... Gram-positive strains. A greater survival was observed in U.S. detergents at U.S. conditions (30 degreesC, 12 min) than in E.U. detergents at E.U. conditions (40 degreesC, 30 min). The adhesion of odorants to cotton and polyester textiles during washing and drying was studied using six previously...

  18. From Survival to Healthy Aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte Orr; Wind, Gitte

    2018-01-01

    and the spouses built their mutual and individual lives focusing on their relationship and strived to return to their usual everyday life. Within three to six months the couples went from “survival” where the diagnosis dominated to “wellbeing” where healthy aging/lifestyle dominated. All eight couples led...... a relatively healthy lifestyle before surgery, but increased their healthy life style significantly after surgery. However, the couples did not mention their rather radical changes in everyday life such as exercising for 12 hours weekly, excluding meat in their diet or taking high doses of C...

  19. Perioperative blood transfusion does not decrease survival after surgical treatment of spinal metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Caroline; Lönn, Lars; Morgen, Søren Schmidt

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess whether perioperative allogenic blood transfusions in patients undergoing surgical treatment for spinal metastases independently influence patient survival. METHODS: A retrospective study including 170 consecutive patients undergoing surgical treatment for spinal metastases...... in 2009 and 2010 at a tertiary referral center. Variables related to postoperative survival were all included in the same multivariable logistic regression analysis with either 3- or 12-month survival as the dependent variable. The independent variables were: transfusion of allogenic red blood cells, age...... at surgery, gender, preoperative hemoglobin, revised Tokuhashi score and no. of instrumented levels. RESULTS: Perioperative allogenic blood transfusion of 1-2 units was associated with increased 12-month survival [p = 0.049, odds ratio 2.619 (confidence interval 1.004-6.831)], but not with 3-month survival...

  20. Keep the nest clean: survival advantages of corpse removal in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Lise; Lejeune, Philippe; Detrain, Claire

    2014-07-01

    Sociality increases exposure to pathogens. Therefore, social insects have developed a wide range of behavioural defences, known as 'social immunity'. However, the benefits of these behaviours in terms of colony survival have been scarcely investigated. We tested the survival advantage of prophylaxis, i.e. corpse removal, in ants. Over 50 days, we compared the survival of ants in colonies that were free to remove corpses with those that were restricted in their corpse removal. From Day 8 onwards, the survival of adult workers was significantly higher in colonies that were allowed to remove corpses normally. Overall, larvae survived better than adults, but were slightly affected by the presence of corpses in the nest. When removal was restricted, ants removed as many corpses as they could and moved the remaining corpses away from brood, typically to the nest corners. These results show the importance of nest maintenance and prophylactic behaviour in social insects.

  1. [Pathological complete response: A predictive survival factor after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milleron, Bernard; Westeel, Virginie; Gounant, Valérie; Wislez, Marie; Quoix, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    The phase III trials of adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy showed a 5 % increase survival but the clinical research in this area is difficult because the duration of the trials with overall survival as primary end point is around 10years. To shorten the duration of these studies, the use of surrogate end points such as disease-free survival or relapse-free survival is possible, but does not significantly reduce the duration of studies. Several studies in and outside the lung cancer showed histological complete response or the percentage of viable tumor cells after chemotherapy could be correlated with survival and thus become an interesting alternative criterion. If this is verified, clinical studies of preoperative chemotherapy should be shortened which would allow patients faster access to innovative treatment in the perioperative situation. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Survival of persons with and without HIV infection in Denmark, 1995-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Nicolai; Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Pedersen, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    .3) among patients with HIV infection and 51.1 years (CI, 50.9 to 51.5) among the general population. For HIV-infected patients, survival increased to 32.5 years (CI, 29.4 to 34.7) during the 2000 to 2005 period. In the subgroup that excluded persons with known hepatitis C coinfection (16%), median survival......BACKGROUND: The expected survival of HIV-infected patients is of major public health interest. OBJECTIVE: To estimate survival time and age-specific mortality rates of an HIV-infected population compared with that of the general population. DESIGN: Population-based cohort study. SETTING: All HIV...... tables with age as the time scale to estimate survival from age 25 years. Patients with HIV infection and corresponding persons from the general population were observed from the date of the patient's HIV diagnosis until death, emigration, or 1 May 2005. RESULTS: 3990 HIV-infected patients and 379...

  3. Boosted TCA cycle enhances survival of zebrafish to Vibrio alginolyticus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Man-Jun; Cheng, Zhi-Xue; Jiang, Ming; Zeng, Zao-Hai; Peng, Bo; Peng, Xuan-Xian; Li, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus is a waterborne pathogen that infects a wide variety of hosts including fish and human, and the outbreak of this pathogen can cause a huge economic loss in aquaculture. Thus, enhancing host's capability to survive from V. alginolyticus infection is key to fighting infection and this remains still unexplored. In the present study, we established a V. alginolyticus-zebrafish interaction model by which we explored how zebrafish survived from V. alginolyticus infection. We used GC-MS based metabolomic approaches to characterize differential metabolomes between survival and dying zebrafish upon infection. Pattern recognition analysis identified the TCA cycle as the most impacted pathway. The metabolites in the TCA cycle were decreased in the dying host, whereas the metabolites were increased in the survival host. Furthermore, the enzymatic activities of the TCA cycle including pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), α-ketoglutaric dehydrogenase (KGDH) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) also supported this conclusion. Among the increased metabolites in the TCA cycle, malic acid was the most crucial biomarker for fish survival. Indeed, exogenous malate promoted zebrafish survival in a dose-dependent manner. The corresponding activities of KGDH and SDH were also increased. These results indicate that the TCA cycle is a key pathway responsible for the survival or death in response to infection caused by V. alginolyticus, and highlight the way on development of metabolic modulation to control the infection.

  4. [Effects of algae and kaolinite particles on the survival of bacteriophage MS2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Wu, Qing-Qing; Ma, Hong-Fang; Zhou, Zhen-Ming; Yuan, Bao-Ling

    2014-08-01

    In this study, Bacteriophage MS2, Kaolinite and Microcystis aeruginosa were selected as model materials for human enteric viruses, inorganic and organic particles, respectively. The influence of the inorganic (Kaolinite) or organic (Microcystis aeruginosa) particles on the survival of MS2 at different conditions, such as particles concentration, pH, ion concentration and natural organic matter (NOM) were studied. The results showed that Kaolinite had no effect on the survival of phage MS2 except that apparent survival of MS2 increased 1 logarithm in higher hardness water. Microcystis aeruginosa addition reduced 1 logarithm of MS2 survival. However, when the pH value was greater than 4.0 or the concentration of Microcystis aeruginosa was less than 1.0 x 10(6) cells x L(-1), Microcystis aeruginosa addition had no influence on the survival of MS2. In higher hardness water, Microcystis aeruginosa protected MS2 viruses and then increased the survival of MS2. In drinking water, resource containing higher concentration of particles, the survival ability of virus would be enhanced with the increase of the hardness and then elevated the risks of drinking water safety.

  5. Marital history and survival after a heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupre, Matthew E; Nelson, Alicia

    2016-12-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and nearly one million Americans will have a heart attack this year. Although the risks associated with a heart attack are well established, we know surprisingly little about how marital factors contribute to survival in adults afflicted with heart disease. This study uses a life course perspective and longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study to examine how various dimensions of marital life influence survival in U.S. older adults who suffered a heart attack (n = 2197). We found that adults who were never married (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73), currently divorced (OR = 1.70), or widowed (OR = 1.34) were at significantly greater risk of dying after a heart attack than adults who were continuously married; and the risks were not uniform over time. We also found that the risk of dying increased by 12% for every additional marital loss and decreased by 7% for every one-tenth increase in the proportion of years married. After accounting for more than a dozen socioeconomic, psychosocial, behavioral, and physiological factors, we found that current marital status remained the most robust indicator of survival following a heart attack. The implications of the findings are discussed in the context of life course inequalities in chronic disease and directions for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Histamine effect on melanocyte proliferation and vitiliginous keratinocyte survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nan-Hyung; Lee, Ai-Young

    2010-12-01

    Repigmention of vitiligo requires melanocyte proliferation and migration. Keratinocytes have been shown to play a role in this process. Data from this laboratory showed that bee venom (BV) stimulated melanocyte proliferation and migration as well as melanogenesis. As histamine release is associated with BV, its effect on melanocyte proliferation and migration was examined. Cultured normal human melanocytes treated with histamine were studied with and without receptor-specific antagonists or agonists. The effect of histamine on vitiliginous keratinocytes, in cultured cells treated with a PI3K inhibitor in the presence of TNF-α, was also examined. Histamine exerted a more significant effect on melanocyte proliferation than on melanogenesis. This occurred through the H2 receptor with complex signalling to ERK, CREB, and Akt activation, which stimulated melanocyte migration. Histamine and the H2 receptor agonist also increased survival of vitiliginous, but not normal, keratinocytes, with NF-κB activation. Because expression levels of the H2 receptor was significantly decreased in depigmented compared to normally pigmented epidermis, in patients with vitiligo, histamine may increase the survival of vitiliginous keratinocytes. Overall, histamine stimulated the proliferation and migration of melanocytes and the vitiliginous keratinocyte survival, providing the basis for novel therapeutic approaches to vitiligo repigmentation. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Challenges in the estimation of Net SURvival: The CENSUR working survival group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, R

    2016-10-01

    Net survival, the survival probability that would be observed, in a hypothetical world, where the cancer of interest would be the only possible cause of death, is a key indicator in population-based cancer studies. Accounting for mortality due to other causes, it allows cross-country comparisons or trends analysis and provides a useful indicator for public health decision-making. The objective of this study was to show how the creation and formalization of a network comprising established research teams, which already had substantial and complementary experience in both cancer survival analysis and methodological development, make it possible to meet challenges and thus provide more adequate tools, to improve the quality and the comparability of cancer survival data, and to promote methodological transfers in areas of emerging interest. The Challenges in the Estimation of Net SURvival (CENSUR) working survival group is composed of international researchers highly skilled in biostatistics, methodology, and epidemiology, from different research organizations in France, the United Kingdom, Italy, Slovenia, and Canada, and involved in French (FRANCIM) and European (EUROCARE) cancer registry networks. The expected advantages are an interdisciplinary, international, synergistic network capable of addressing problems in public health, for decision-makers at different levels; tools for those in charge of net survival analyses; a common methodology that makes unbiased cross-national comparisons of cancer survival feasible; transfer of methods for net survival estimations to other specific applications (clinical research, occupational epidemiology); and dissemination of results during an international training course. The formalization of the international CENSUR working survival group was motivated by a need felt by scientists conducting population-based cancer research to discuss, develop, and monitor implementation of a common methodology to analyze net survival in order

  8. Improved Survival Among Children with Spina Bifida in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mikyong; Kucik, James E.; Siffel, Csaba; Lu, Chengxing; Shaw, Gary M.; Canfield, Mark A.; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate trends in survival among children with spina bifida by race/ethnicity and possible prognostic factors in 10 regions of the United States. Study design A retrospective cohort study was conducted of 5165 infants with spina bifida born during 1979-2003, identified by 10 birth defects registries in the United States. Survival probabilities and adjusted hazard ratios were estimated for race/ethnicity and other characteristics using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results During the study period, the 1-year survival probability among infants with spina bifida showed improvements for whites (from 88% to 96%), blacks (from 79% to 88%), and Hispanics (from 88% to 93%). The impact of race/ethnicity on survival varied by birth weight, which was the strongest predictor of survival through age 8. There was little racial/ethnic variation in survival among children born of very low birth weight. Among children born of low birth weight, the increased risk of mortality to Hispanics was approximately 4-6 times that of whites. The black-white disparity was greatest among children born of normal birth weight. Congenital heart defects did not affect the risk of mortality among very low birth weight children but increased the risk of mortality 4-fold among children born of normal birth weight. Conclusions The survival of infants born with spina bifida has improved; however, improvements in survival varied by race/ethnicity, and blacks and Hispanics continued to have poorer survival than whites in the most recent birth cohort from 1998-2002. Further studies are warranted to elucidate possible reasons for the observed differences in survival. PMID:22727874

  9. Seaweed survival after consumption by the greenbeak parrotfish, Scarus trispinosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tâmega, F. T. S.; Figueiredo, M. A. O.; Ferreira, C. E. L.; Bonaldo, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    We assessed the survival of seaweed (macroalgae and cyanobacteria) after consumption by the greenbeak parrotfish, Scarus trispinosus, in northeastern Brazil. Samples of S. trispinosus feces were collected, inoculated on filter paper, and kept in the laboratory and field for 60 and 30 d, respectively. Comparisons of samples inoculated with feces to those without (controls) revealed a marked increase in the abundance and diversity of seaweed in samples inoculated with feces in both laboratory and field experiments. These results were consistent between summer and winter, although the seaweed species differed. A total of one cyanobacterium and 16 macroalgal taxa (nine rhodophytes, five heterokontophytes, and two chlorophytes) were recorded in the inoculated samples. Rhodophyta also presented the highest abundance across treatments, possibly because of their higher resistance to parrotfish digestion, greater ingestion, or both. The survival of cyanobacteria and macroalgae after consumption by S. trispinosus suggests that parrotfishes may contribute to seaweed dispersion on tropical reefs.

  10. Survival Benefit in Renal Transplantation Despite High Comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Vibeke Rømming; Heaf, James Goya; Wehberg, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The age and degree of comorbidity among transplant candidates is increasing. Knowledge of survival benefit in relation to recipient age and comorbidity is important, considering the scarcity of organs available for transplantation. The aim of the present study was to analyze the chances...... and survival benefit of transplantation among patients in different age groups and with different degrees of comorbidity score at the time of entering the waiting list. METHODS: Data from the Danish Nephrology Registry and Scandiatransplant were merged. Charlson Comorbidity Index scores were derived from...... the National Danish Admissions Registry. Study period is from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2011. A multistate model was used to analyze the chance of having a renal transplantation and the effect of transplantation in different patients groups. RESULTS: Patients older than 65 years and patients with high...

  11. Oral squamous cell carcinoma: survival, recurrence and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Camilo Souza Cruz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper was based in data survey from macro and microscopic oral lesions characteristics, personal data and medical history of patients diagnosed with oral squamous cell carcinoma in the Lab of Pathological Anatomy from the Federal University of Alfenas from January 2000 to December 2010, establishing comparative parameters among clinical data, type of treatment, recurrence, survival and anatomic pathological characteristics of the lesions. Were analyzed the histopathological reports, dental and hospital records. The highest incidence was in white men, age between 50 and 60 years, married, with low education and socioeconomic levels. The beginning of treatment occurred in average 67 days after the histopathological diagnosis. The estimated survival of patients at five years was 42%. The consumption of alcohol and tobacco and the occurrence of metastasis were statistically significant for the increase of recurrence and lethality.

  12. Soluble L-selectin levels predict survival in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole H; Strøm, Jens

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate serum soluble L-selectin as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with sepsis. DESIGN: A prospective study of mortality in patients with sepsis whose serum levels of sL-selectin were measured on admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) and 4 days later. Follow-up data......, and 3 and 12 months after admission. Serum sL-selectin levels were significantly lower in the patients than in the controls. Sepsis nonsurvivors had significantly lower levels than survivors. Efficiency analysis and receiver operation characteristics showed that the ideal cutoff point for s......L-selectin as a test for sepsis survival was 470 ng/ml. The accumulated mortality in patients with subnormal sL-selectin levels on admission was significantly increased. No correlation was found between clinical or paraclinical markers, including SAPS II and sL-selectin, and no relationship to the microbial diagnosis...

  13. Survival pattern among extreme preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, S

    2000-02-01

    To look at the survival pattern of extreme preterm Omani infants (23-26 weeks gestation) and compare it with the western countries. All extreme preterm Omani infants (gestational age of 23 to 26 weeks) admitted from November 1991 to February 1998 at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Sultan Qaboos University Hospital were reviewed. The detailed records of the infants, including name of mother, age, gravidity, parity, route of delivery, Apgar score, time of birth, inborn or outborn, birth weight, gestational age, sex, need for resuscitation, course in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, admission and discharge diagnosis, and outcome were collected from the register. The infants were stratified according to the gestational age and then analyzed for the survival rate among the different gestational ages. A total of 32 extreme preterm infants were admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Sultan Qaboos University Hospital from November 1991 to February 1998. The mean birth weight of the cohort was noted to be 798+123 gram (Range 480-1015 grams). The mean gestational age was noted to be 25.5+0.95 weeks (Range 23-26 weeks). An equal number of males and females were noted in the cohort, with male to female ratio of 1:1. A total of 13 infants survived out of 32 infants. The overall survival rate for the cohort was noted to be 41%. For the present study, the western statistics are averaged and than compared with the Omani statistics. The survival rate for western 26 week preterm infants was (on average) 61% as compared to 44% among Omani preterm infants. The same trend of low survival was noted for 23 and 24 week Omani infants, except for only one 25 week infant. The significant lower survival rate suggests the need for more attention and improvement in the management and care provided to the extreme preterm Omani infants.

  14. SURVIVAL ANALYSIS AND LENGTH-BIASED SAMPLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Asgharian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When survival data are colleted as part of a prevalent cohort study, the recruited cases have already experienced their initiating event. These prevalent cases are then followed for a fixed period of time at the end of which the subjects will either have failed or have been censored. When interests lies in estimating the survival distribution, from onset, of subjects with the disease, one must take into account that the survival times of the cases in a prevalent cohort study are left truncated. When it is possible to assume that there has not been any epidemic of the disease over the past period of time that covers the onset times of the subjects, one may assume that the underlying incidence process that generates the initiating event times is a stationary Poisson process. Under such assumption, the survival times of the recruited subjects are called “lengthbiased”. I discuss the challenges one is faced with in analyzing these type of data. To address the theoretical aspects of the work, I present asymptotic results for the NPMLE of the length-biased as well as the unbiased survival distribution. I also discuss estimating the unbiased survival function using only the follow-up time. This addresses the case that the onset times are either unknown or known with uncertainty. Some of our most recent work and open questions will be presented. These include some aspects of analysis of covariates, strong approximation, functional LIL and density estimation under length-biased sampling with right censoring. The results will be illustrated with survival data from patients with dementia, collected as part of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA.

  15. Association Among Blood Transfusion, Sepsis, and Decreased Long-term Survival After Colon Cancer Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquina, Christopher T; Blumberg, Neil; Becerra, Adan Z; Boscoe, Francis P; Schymura, Maria J; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Fleming, Fergal J

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the potential additive effects of blood transfusion and sepsis on colon cancer disease-specific survival, cardiovascular disease-specific survival, and overall survival after colon cancer surgery. Perioperative blood transfusions are associated with infectious complications and increased risk of cancer recurrence through systemic inflammatory effects. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested an association among sepsis, subsequent systemic inflammation, and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, no study has investigated the association among transfusion, sepsis, and disease-specific survival in postoperative patients. The New York State Cancer Registry and Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System were queried for stage I to III colon cancer resections from 2004 to 2011. Propensity-adjusted survival analyses assessed the association of perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion, sepsis, and 5-year colon cancer disease-specific survival, cardiovascular disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Among 24,230 patients, 29% received a transfusion and 4% developed sepsis. After risk adjustment, transfusion and sepsis were associated with worse colon cancer disease-specific survival [(+)transfusion: hazard ratio (HR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.30; (+)sepsis: HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.44-2.35; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.87-2.76], cardiovascular disease-specific survival [(+)transfusion: HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04-1.33; (+)sepsis: HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.14-2.31; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.04, 95% CI 1.58-2.63], and overall survival [(+)transfusion: HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.14-1.29; (+)sepsis: HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.48-2.09; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.36, 95% CI 2.07-2.68] relative to (-)transfusion/(-)sepsis. Additional analyses suggested an additive effect with those who both received a blood transfusion and developed sepsis having even worse survival. Perioperative blood transfusions are associated with shorter survival

  16. Can beaches survive climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, Sean; Barnard, Patrick L.; Limber, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is driving sea level rise, leading to numerous impacts on the coastal zone, such as increased coastal flooding, beach erosion, cliff failure, saltwater intrusion in aquifers, and groundwater inundation. Many beaches around the world are currently experiencing chronic erosion as a result of gradual, present-day rates of sea level rise (about 3 mm/year) and human-driven restrictions in sand supply (e.g., harbor dredging and river damming). Accelerated sea level rise threatens to worsen coastal erosion and challenge the very existence of natural beaches throughout the world. Understanding and predicting the rates of sea level rise and coastal erosion depends on integrating data on natural systems with computer simulations. Although many computer modeling approaches are available to simulate shoreline change, few are capable of making reliable long-term predictions needed for full adaption or to enhance resilience. Recent advancements have allowed convincing decadal to centennial-scale predictions of shoreline evolution. For example, along 500 km of the Southern California coast, a new model featuring data assimilation predicts that up to 67% of beaches may completely erode by 2100 without large-scale human interventions. In spite of recent advancements, coastal evolution models must continue to improve in their theoretical framework, quantification of accuracy and uncertainty, computational efficiency, predictive capability, and integration with observed data, in order to meet the scientific and engineering challenges produced by a changing climate.

  17. Human survival depends on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbertson, J.

    1977-01-01

    Both the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times published feature articles Dec. 1 advertising a report by the U.S. government's General Accounting Office as evidence that the breeder reactor component of this nation's nuclear energy program was properly on its way to the scrap heap. According to the author, these and similar press accounts are intended to further legitimize the widely believed (and totally false) notion that increased plutonium use and nuclear fission generally represent a danger to humanity. Purposefully ignored in such accounts, he says, is the evidence that the elimination of plutonium as a nuclear fuel will mean the demise of the entire U.S. nuclear power industry and ultimately the human race itself. At stake in the short term, in addition to the breeder reactor program, is the well-established use of light water reactors for generating electricity, since these must, within a matter of years, be fueled with plutonium. The attack is also directed at the more advanced, more capital-intensive nuclear fusion technology, since the elimination of fission programs will wipe out the trained cadre force of engineers, scientists, technicians, and skilled workers needed to develop fusion power. The growth of fission power over the next two decades is absolutely necessary for the transition to a full fusion-based economy, according to Mr. Gilbertson. Only nuclear fusion has the inherent capability of transforming industry to the necessary higher mode of production and output, as well as providing a limitless source of usable power in several forms, thus insuring the survival of the human race beyond this century. Fission power and conventional fossil power must be expanded and possibly even exhausted during this transition in order to guarantee the achievement of this goal, he says

  18. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onkar Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase. When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO, and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells.

  19. Factors Associated with Survival in 97 Horses with Septic Pleuropneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, M G; Slovis, N M; Moore, G E; Taylor, S D

    2017-05-01

    Septic pleuropneumonia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in horses, but there is limited data available regarding factors associated with survival. To identify factors predictive of survival in horses with septic pleuropneumonia. A total of 97 horses with septic pleuropneumonia at 2 referral institutions. A retrospective study was performed. A diagnosis of septic pleuropneumonia was based on the presence of sepsis, pleural effusion, and positive bacterial culture from tracheal aspiration (TA) or pleural fluid (PF). Thirty-one percent of horses had a recent history of travel. Clinical signs included lethargy (78%), tachycardia (75%), tachypnea (60%), fever (43%), prolonged capillary refill time (22%), and ventral edema (14%). The most common clinicopathologic abnormality was hyperfibrinogenemia (79%). Increased serum creatinine concentration at presentation was negatively associated with survival (OR, 5.13; CI, 1.88-14.01; P = .001) and return to work (OR, 6.46; CI, 1.10-37.92; P = .034). Eighty-four TA and 67 PF samples were submitted for culture, 98 and 84% of which were positive, respectively. The most common isolate was Streptococcus equi subsp zooepidemicus. Tracheal aspirates were more sensitive than PF for bacterial growth, but some organisms isolated from PF were not isolated from TA. Thoracotomy was positively associated with survival (OR, 0.13; CI, 0.01-0.83; P = .028). Increased serum creatinine concentration is a negative prognostic indicator and is likely a reflection of dehydration. Submission of TA and PF is recommended. Thoracotomy should be considered as a treatment for pleuropneumonia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. [Medulloblastoma: improved survival in recent decades. Unicentric experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igual Estellés, Lucía; Berlanga Charriel, Pablo; Cañete Nieto, Adela

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to analyse variations in the treatment of medulloblastoma, the most common childhood brain tumour, and its impact on survival over the past two decades, as well as its clinical and pathological features. Survival analysis of all patients under 14 years old diagnosed with medulloblastoma between January 1990 and December 2013 in a Paediatric Oncology Unit. Sixty-three patients were diagnosed and treated for medulloblastoma, with a median follow-up of 5.1 years (range 0.65-21.7 years). The overall survival (OS) at 3 and 5 years was 66±13% and 55±14%, respectively. The OS at 5 years was 44%±25% in patients diagnosed in the 1990's, showing an increase to 70%±23% (p=0.032) since 2000. Clinical prognosis factors were included in the logistic regression model: age (p=0.008), presence of metastases and/or residual tumour (p=0.007), and receiving chemotherapy with radiotherapy after surgery (p=0.008). Statistically significant differences were observed for all of them. In our institution there has been a significant increase in medulloblastoma survival in the last decades. Multivariate analysis showed that this improvement was not related to the date of diagnosis, but with the introduction of chemotherapy in adjuvant treatment. This study confirmed that clinical factors significantly associated with worse outcome were age and presence of metastases at diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. A multi-year analysis of passage and survival at McNary Dam, 2004-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Noah S.; Walker, C.E.; Perry, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed 6 years (2004–09) of passage and survival data collected at McNary Dam to determine how dam operations and environmental conditions affect passage and survival of juvenile salmonids. A multinomial logistic regression was used to examine how environmental variables and dam operations relate to passage behavior of juvenile salmonids at McNary Dam. We used the Cormack-Jolly-Seber release-recapture model to determine how the survival of juvenile salmonids passing through McNary Dam relates to environmental variables and dam operations. Total project discharge and the proportion of flow passing the spillway typically had a positive effect on survival for all species and routes. As the proportion of water through the spillway increased, the number of fish passing the spillway increased, as did overall survival. Additionally, survival generally was higher at night. There was no meaningful difference in survival for fish that passed through the north or south portions of the spillway or powerhouse. Similarly, there was no difference in survival for fish released in the north, middle, or south portions of the tailrace. For subyearling Chinook salmon migrating during the summer season, increased temperatures had a drastic effect on passage and survival. As temperature increased, survival of subyearling Chinook salmon decreased through all passage routes and the number of fish that passed through the turbines increased. During years when the temporary spillway weirs (TSWs) were installed, passage through the spillway increased for spring migrants. However, due to the changes made in the location of the TSW between years and the potential effect of other confounding environmental conditions, it is not certain if the increase in spillway passage was due solely to the presence of the TSWs. The TSWs appeared to improve forebay survival during years when they were operated.

  2. Attenuation caused by infrequently updated covariates in survival analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Liestøl, Knut

    2003-01-01

    Attenuation; Cox regression model; Measurement errors; Survival analysis; Time-dependent covariates......Attenuation; Cox regression model; Measurement errors; Survival analysis; Time-dependent covariates...

  3. Culture, survival, and family size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-02

    Judith Jacobson, senior researcher at the Worldwatch Institute which analyzes economic and social issues, states that people have large families for about as many reasons as there are different cultures. The reasons include carrying on the family name, show of "macho" by the father, or force of habit, i.e., doing what their poverty stricken families and neighbors have always done. These traditions did not simply develop by chance. Throughout history, a high death rate coincided with the high birthrate. If a couple wanted 2 or 3 children, they had several more, assuming -- often correctly -- that at least a few of their children would die of any number of diseases. In addition there were and continue to be economic reasons for big families. Working children add to thefamily income, and they are a kind of pension plan, looked to for support during old age. Thus, the desire for big families is deeply rooted in many cultures. At present, in less developed nations, medicines and pesticides have eradicated many diseases and increased life expectancy. Infant mortality has dropped markedly in the last 25 years, but there has not been a matching drop in birthrates, especially in rural areas. The result is that poor nations' populations are growing about twice as fast as needed to replace those dying. The result in some rural areas has been hunger and even starvation. Rural people and their problems are often easier to ignore than the unrest of city dwellers. Many governments provide jobs and keep food prices low in cities where political opposition is more likely to start. This urban rural gap tends to widen as population grows. Low wages for the poorest rural residents drop when there are more available workers for the same amount of land. This creates another dimension of the population problem -- migration to the cities and to foreign countries.

  4. Survivability of a metapopulation under local extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Srilena; Majhi, Soumen; Sasmal, Sourav Kumar; Ghosh, Dibakar; Rakshit, Biswambhar

    2017-12-01

    A metapopulation structure in landscape ecology comprises a group of interacting spatially separated subpopulations or patches of the same species that may experience several local extinctions. This makes the investigation of survivability (in the form of global oscillation) of a metapopulation on top of diverse dispersal topologies extremely crucial. However, among various dispersal topologies in ecological networks, which one can provide higher metapopulation survivability under local extinction is still not well explored. In this article, we scrutinize the robustness of an ecological network consisting of prey-predator patches having Holling type I functional response, against progressively extinct population patches. We present a comprehensive study on this while considering global, small-world, and scale-free dispersal of the subpopulations. Furthermore, we extend our work in enhancing survivability in the form of sustained global oscillation by introducing asymmetries in the dispersal rates of the considered species. Our findings affirm that the asynchrony among the patches plays an important role in the survivability of a metapopulation. In order to demonstrate the model independence of the observed phenomenon, we perform a similar analysis for patches exhibiting Holling type II functional response. On the grounds of the obtained results, our work is expected to provide a better perception of the influence of dispersal arrangements on the global survivability of ecological networks.

  5. Multidimensional poverty and child survival in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay K Mohanty

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Though the concept of multidimensional poverty has been acknowledged cutting across the disciplines (among economists, public health professionals, development thinkers, social scientists, policy makers and international organizations and included in the development agenda, its measurement and application are still limited. OBJECTIVES AND METHODOLOGY: Using unit data from the National Family and Health Survey 3, India, this paper measures poverty in multidimensional space and examine the linkages of multidimensional poverty with child survival. The multidimensional poverty is measured in the dimension of knowledge, health and wealth and the child survival is measured with respect to infant mortality and under-five mortality. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and the life table methods are used in the analyses. RESULTS: The estimates of multidimensional poverty are robust and the inter-state differentials are large. While infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate are disproportionately higher among the abject poor compared to the non-poor, there are no significant differences in child survival among educationally, economically and health poor at the national level. State pattern in child survival among the education, economical and health poor are mixed. CONCLUSION: Use of multidimensional poverty measures help to identify abject poor who are unlikely to come out of poverty trap. The child survival is significantly lower among abject poor compared to moderate poor and non-poor. We urge to popularize the concept of multiple deprivations in research and program so as to reduce poverty and inequality in the population.

  6. Multidimensional Poverty and Child Survival in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjay K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Though the concept of multidimensional poverty has been acknowledged cutting across the disciplines (among economists, public health professionals, development thinkers, social scientists, policy makers and international organizations) and included in the development agenda, its measurement and application are still limited. Objectives and Methodology Using unit data from the National Family and Health Survey 3, India, this paper measures poverty in multidimensional space and examine the linkages of multidimensional poverty with child survival. The multidimensional poverty is measured in the dimension of knowledge, health and wealth and the child survival is measured with respect to infant mortality and under-five mortality. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and the life table methods are used in the analyses. Results The estimates of multidimensional poverty are robust and the inter-state differentials are large. While infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate are disproportionately higher among the abject poor compared to the non-poor, there are no significant differences in child survival among educationally, economically and health poor at the national level. State pattern in child survival among the education, economical and health poor are mixed. Conclusion Use of multidimensional poverty measures help to identify abject poor who are unlikely to come out of poverty trap. The child survival is significantly lower among abject poor compared to moderate poor and non-poor. We urge to popularize the concept of multiple deprivations in research and program so as to reduce poverty and inequality in the population. PMID:22046384

  7. Starvation-survival of subsurface bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magill, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of four subsurface isolates to survive starvation was examined and the results were compared to survival curves obtained for Escherichia coli B and Serratia marcescens. To examine the starvation-survival phenomenon further, several experimental parameters including nutritional history, initial cell density, growth phase, temperature of growth and starvation, and aeration. Nutritional history, initial cell density, and growth phases of the cells had some effect on the ability of these bacteria to survive whereas temperature and limited aeration had no effect under the conditions tested. No conditions were found where E. coli B or Serratia marcescens died rapidly or where less than 10% of the original cell number of viable cells remained. Because the apparent survival of these bacteria may be due to cryptic growth, cross-feeding experiments with 14 C-labeled cells and unlabeled cells were carried out with E. coli B and Pseudomonas Lula V. Leaked extracellular 14 C-compounds were not used for growth or maintenance energy, and were not taken up by either bacterium. Cryptic growth did not occur; the cells were truly starving under the experimental conditions used

  8. Multidimensional poverty and child survival in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjay K

    2011-01-01

    Though the concept of multidimensional poverty has been acknowledged cutting across the disciplines (among economists, public health professionals, development thinkers, social scientists, policy makers and international organizations) and included in the development agenda, its measurement and application are still limited. OBJECTIVES AND METHODOLOGY: Using unit data from the National Family and Health Survey 3, India, this paper measures poverty in multidimensional space and examine the linkages of multidimensional poverty with child survival. The multidimensional poverty is measured in the dimension of knowledge, health and wealth and the child survival is measured with respect to infant mortality and under-five mortality. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and the life table methods are used in the analyses. The estimates of multidimensional poverty are robust and the inter-state differentials are large. While infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate are disproportionately higher among the abject poor compared to the non-poor, there are no significant differences in child survival among educationally, economically and health poor at the national level. State pattern in child survival among the education, economical and health poor are mixed. Use of multidimensional poverty measures help to identify abject poor who are unlikely to come out of poverty trap. The child survival is significantly lower among abject poor compared to moderate poor and non-poor. We urge to popularize the concept of multiple deprivations in research and program so as to reduce poverty and inequality in the population.

  9. Encounter with mesoscale eddies enhances survival to settlement in larval coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulzitski, Kathryn; Sponaugle, Su; Hauff, Martha; Walter, Kristen D; Cowen, Robert K

    2016-06-21

    Oceanographic features, such as eddies and fronts, enhance and concentrate productivity, generating high-quality patches that dispersive marine larvae may encounter in the plankton. Although broad-scale movement of larvae associated with these features can be captured in biophysical models, direct evidence of processes influencing survival within them, and subsequent effects on population replenishment, are unknown. We sequentially sampled cohorts of coral reef fishes in the plankton and nearshore juvenile habitats in the Straits of Florida and used otolith microstructure analysis to compare growth and size-at-age of larvae collected inside and outside of mesoscale eddies to those that survived to settlement. Larval habitat altered patterns of growth and selective mortality: Thalassoma bifasciatum and Cryptotomus roseus that encountered eddies in the plankton grew faster than larvae outside of eddies and likely experienced higher survival to settlement. During warm periods, T. bifasciatum residing outside of eddies in the oligotrophic Florida Current experienced high mortality and only the slowest growers survived early larval life. Such slow growth is advantageous in nutrient poor habitats when warm temperatures increase metabolic demands but is insufficient for survival beyond the larval stage because only fast-growing larvae successfully settled to reefs. Because larvae arriving to the Straits of Florida from distant sources must spend long periods of time outside of eddies, our results indicate that they have a survival disadvantage. High productivity features such as eddies not only enhance the survival of pelagic larvae, but also potentially increase the contribution of locally spawned larvae to reef populations.

  10. Improved survival for rectal cancer compared to colon cancer: the four cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Pamela; Hall, Claire; Davidson, Callum; Dixon, Liane; Dobbs, Bruce; Robinson, Bridget; Frizelle, Frank

    2018-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. This study was undertaken to evaluate survival outcomes and changes of disease outcomes of CRC patients over the last decades. A retrospective analysis of CRC patients in Christchurch was performed in four patient cohorts at 5 yearly intervals; 1993-94, 1998-99, 2004-05 and 2009. Data on cancer location, stage, surgical and oncological treatment and survival were collected. Univariate, multivariate and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were performed. There were 1391 patients (355, 317, 419 and 300 per cohort), 1037 colon and 354 rectal cancers, respectively. For colon cancer, right-sided cancers appeared more common in later cohorts (P = 0.01). There was a significant decrease in the number of permanent stomas for colon cancer patients (P = 0.001). There was an analogous trend for rectal cancers (P = 0.075). More CRC patients with stage IV disease were treated surgically (P = 0.001) and colon cancer stages I and II tended to have increased survival if operated by a colorectal surgeon (P = 0.06). Oncology referrals have increased remarkably (P = 0.001). Overall 56% of patients were alive at 5 years however rectal cancer patients had significantly better 5-year survival than those with colon cancer (P rectal cancer patients have a better 5-year survival than colon cancer patients. The improved survival with early stage colon cancers operated on by specialist colorectal surgeons needs further exploration. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  11. Effect of restrictive harvest regulations on survival and recovery rates of American black ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, C.M.; Sauer, J.R.; Serie, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Population management of waterfowl requires an understanding of the effects of changes in hunting regulations on harvest and survival rates. Mean survival and recovery rates of American black ducks (Anas rubripes) were estimated during 3 periods of increasingly restrictive harvest regulations: 1950-66, 1967-82, and 1983-93. From the first to the second period, direct recovery rates declined for at least 1 age class in 4 of 6 reference areas, with a mean decline of 14% for adult and 7% for immature black ducks. From the second to the third period, direct recovery rates declined in all areas, declines averaging 37% for adults and 27% for immatures. Estimated mean survival rates increased from the first to the second period, consistent with a model of additivity of hunting mortality. Limited evidence existed for increases in survival rates from the second to the third period for immature males. For adults, however, survival increased less between these periods than would be expected if hunting mortality were additive and changes in recovery rates were proportional to changes in hunting mortality. Changes in survival and recovery rates of black ducks banded postseason were similar to those of adults banded preseason. Comparisons among estimates by degree blocks of latitude and longitude indicate that, at least between 1967 and 1983, estimated survival rates of immature and adult black ducks were lower in areas with high direct recovery rates. Smaller samples of banded birds and changes in banding locations in recent years may be limiting ability to evaluate consequences of recent changes in harvest rates. These correlation-based studies are limited in their ability to explain causes of observed changes in survival rates, suggesting the need for alternative approaches such as adaptive harvest management to increase understanding of the effects of hunting on black duck populations.

  12. Effects of natal departure and water level on survival of juvenile snail kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis) in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreitz, V.J.; Kitchens, W.M.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Survival rate from fledging to breeding, or juvenile survival, is an important source of variation in lifetime reproductive success in birds. Therefore, determining the relationship between juvenile survival and environmental factors is essential to understanding fitness consequences of reproduction in many populations. With increases in density of individuals and depletion of food resources, quality of most habitats deteriorates during the breeding season. Individuals respond by dispersing in search of food resources. Therefore, to understand the influence of environmental factors on juvenile survival, it is also necessary to know how natal dispersal influences survival of juveniles. We examined effects of various environmental factors and natal dispersal behavior on juvenile survival of endangered Snail Kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis) in central and southern Florida, using a generalized estimating equations (GEEs) approach and model selection criteria. Our results suggested yearly effects and an influence of age and monthly minimum hydrologic levels on juvenile Snail Kite survival. Yearly variation in juvenile survival has been reported by other studies, and other reproductive components of Snail Kites also exhibit such variation. Age differences in juvenile survival have also been seen in other species during the juvenile period. Our results demonstrate a positive relationship between water levels and juvenile survival. We suggest that this is not a direct linear relationship, such that higher water means higher juvenile survival. The juvenile period is concurrent with onset of the wet season in the ecosystem we studied, and rainfall increases as juveniles age. For management purposes, we believe that inferences suggesting increasing water levels during the fledging period will increase juvenile survival may have short-term benefits but lead to long-term declines in prey abundance and possibly wetland vegetation structure.

  13. Physical activity and survival in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Gunn; Søgaard, Karen; Karlsen, Randi V

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Knowledge about lifestyle factors possibly influencing survival after breast cancer (BC) is paramount. We examined associations between two types of postdiagnosis physical activity (PA) and overall survival after BC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used prospective data on 959 BC survivors from...... the Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort, all enrolled before diagnosis. Self-reported PA was measured as time per activity, and estimated metabolic equivalent task (MET)-hours per week were summed for each activity. We constructed measures for household, exercise, and total PA. The association between...... from all causes during the study period. In adjusted analyses, exercise PA above eight MET h/week compared to lower levels of activity was significantly associated with improved overall survival (HR, 0.68; confidence interval [CI]: 0.47-0.99). When comparing participation in exercise to non...

  14. Survival of ovarian cancer patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen McKinnon; Noer, Mette Calundann; Sperling, Cecilie Dyg

    2016-01-01

    linked via the patients' personal identification number and the analyses included data on cancer stage, age, survival, surgery status and comorbidity. The computed outcome measures were age-adjusted mortality rates and age-adjusted overall and relative survival rates for one and five years. RESULTS: We......BACKGROUND: Ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate, especially in Denmark where mortality rates have been reported higher than in adjacent countries with similar demographics. This study therefore examined recent survival and mortality among Danish ovarian cancer patients over an 18-year study...... period. METHODS: This nationwide registry-based observational study used data from the Danish Gynecology Cancer Database, Danish Pathology Registry, and Danish National Patient Registry. All patients with ovarian cancer diagnosed between 1995 and 2012 were included in the study. The data sources were...

  15. Performance Evaluation of Survivability Strategies for Elastic Optical Networks under Physical Layer Impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurandir Lacerda Jr

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper carried out a performance evaluation study that compares two survivability strategies (DPP and SM-RSA for elastic optical networks with and without physical layer impairments. The evaluated scenarios include three representative topologies for elastic optical network, NSFNET, EON and USA. It also analyzes the increase of blocking probability when the survivability strategies are evaluated under the realistic scenario that assumes physical layer impairments. For all studied topologies under physical layer impairments, the survivability strategies achieved blocking probability above 80%.

  16. Panspermia Survival Scenarios for Organisms that Survive Typical Hypervelocity Solar System Impact Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, D.

    2014-04-01

    Previous experimental studies have demonstrated the survivability of living cells during hypervelocity impact events, testing the panspermia and litho-panspermia hypotheses [1]. It has been demonstrated by the authors that Nannochloropsis Oculata Phytoplankton, a eukaryotic photosynthesizing autotroph found in the 'euphotic zone' (sunlit surface layers of oceans [2]), survive impacts up to 6.93 km s-1 (approx. shock pressure 40 GPa) [3, 4]. Also shown to survive impacts up to 5.49 km s-1 is the tardigrade species Hypsibius dujardini (a complex micro-animal consisting of 40,000 cells) [5, 6]. It has also been shown that they can survive sustained pressures up to 600 MPa using a water filled pressure capsule [7]. Additionally bacteria can survive impacts up to 5.4 km s-1 (~30 GPa) - albeit with a low probability of survival [1], and the survivability of yeast spores in impacts up to 7.4 km s-1 (~30 GPa) has also recently been demonstrated [8]. Other groups have also reported that the lichen Xanthoria elegans is able to survive shocks in similar pressure ranges (~40 GPa) [9]. Here we present various simulated impact regimes to show which scenarios are condusive to the panspermia hypothesis of the natural transfer of life (via an icy body) through space to an extraterrestrial environment.

  17. Age-specific survival and annual variation in survival of female chamois differ between populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleu, Josefa; Herfindal, Ivar; Loison, Anne; Kwak, Anne M G; Garel, Mathieu; Toïgo, Carole; Rempfler, Thomas; Filli, Flurin; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2015-12-01

    In many species, population dynamics are shaped by age-structured demographic parameters, such as survival, which can cause age-specific sensitivity to environmental conditions. Accordingly, we can expect populations with different age-specific survival to be differently affected by environmental variation. However, this hypothesis is rarely tested at the intra-specific level. Using capture-mark-recapture models, we quantified age-specific survival and the extent of annual variations in survival of females of alpine chamois in two sites. In one population, survival was very high (>0.94; Bauges, France) until the onset of senescence at approximately 7 years old, whereas the two other populations (Swiss National Park, SNP) had a later onset (12 years old) and a lower rate of senescence. Senescence patterns are therefore not fixed within species. Annual variation in survival was higher in the Bauges (SD = 0.26) compared to the SNP populations (SD = 0.20). Also, in each population, the age classes with the lowest survival also experienced the largest temporal variation, in accordance with inter-specific comparisons showing a greater impact of environmental variation on these age classes. The large difference between the populations in age-specific survival and variation suggests that environmental variation and climate change will affect these populations differently.

  18. Survival and complication free survival in Marfan's syndrome: implications of current guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenink, M.; Lohuis, T. A.; Tijssen, J. G.; Naeff, M. S.; Hennekam, R. C.; van der Wall, E. E.; Mulder, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate survival and complication free survival in patients with Marfan's syndrome and to assess the possible influence of recently revised guidelines for prophylactic aortic root replacement in these patients. METHODS: 130 patients who had been attending one institution over 14 years

  19. Changing Pattern in Malignant Mesothelioma Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Faig

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Survival for mesothelioma has been shown to be poor, with marginal improvement over time. Recent advances in the understanding of pathophysiology and treatment of mesothelioma may impact therapy to improve survival that may not be evident from available clinical trials that are often small and not randomized. Therapies may affect survival differently based on mesothelioma location (pleural vs peritoneal. Data are conflicting regarding the effect of asbestos exposure on mesothelioma location. OBJECTIVES: We examined survival in a large cohort of mesothelioma subjects analyzed by tumor location and presence and mode of asbestos exposure. METHODS: Data were analyzed from cases (n = 380 diagnosed with mesothelioma from 1992 to 2012. Cases were either drawn from treatment referrals, independent medical evaluation for medical legal purposes, or volunteers who were diagnosed with mesothelioma. Subjects completed an occupational medical questionnaire, personal interview with the examining physician, and physician review of the medical record. RESULTS: This study reports better survival for mesothelioma than historical reports. Survival for peritoneal mesothelioma was longer than that for pleural mesothelioma (hazard ratio = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.24-0.54, P < .001 after adjusting for gender and age at diagnosis. Non-occupational cases were more likely to be 1 diagnosed with peritoneal mesothelioma, 2 female, 3 exposed, and 4 diagnosed at a younger age and to have a 5 shorter latency compared to occupational cases (P < .001. CONCLUSION: Peritoneal mesothelioma was more likely associated with non-occupational exposure, thus emphasizing the importance of exposure history in enhancing early diagnosis and treatment impact.

  20. Sumatran tiger survival threatened by deforestation despite increasing densities in parks

    OpenAIRE

    Luskin, Matthew Scott; Albert, Wido Rizki; Tobler, Mathias W.

    2017-01-01

    The continuing development of improved capture–recapture (CR) modeling techniques used to study apex predators has also limited robust temporal and cross-site analyses due to different methods employed. We develop an approach to standardize older non-spatial CR and newer spatial CR density estimates and examine trends for critically endangered Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) using a meta-regression of 17 existing densities and new estimates from our own fieldwork. We find that tige...

  1. Publisher Correction: Sumatran tiger survival threatened by deforestation despite increasing densities in parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luskin, Matthew Scott; Albert, Wido Rizki; Tobler, Mathias W

    2018-02-12

    In the original version of the Article, reference 18 was incorrectly numbered as reference 30, and references 19 to 30 were incorrectly numbered as 18 to 29. These errors have now been corrected in the PDF and HTML versions of the manuscript.

  2. The U.S. Automobile Industry: Will It Survive Increasing International Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-22

    Motors and production deci- sions were under the cor, rol of GM Chairman William Crapo Durant. The day after Congress declared war on Germany, Wilfred...news- paper advertisements attacking "preparedness" and "munitions inter- ests" which he believed was motivated by excess profit made from supporting...over a quarter of this number being female, e.g. "Rosie the Riveter." The requirement for "manpower" spread prosperity across gender lines to men and

  3. Increased survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer receiving chemo and hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at the start of standard hormone therapy lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a NIH-supporte

  4. Antibody administration in experimental influenza increases survival and enhances the effect of oseltamivir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pourroy, Brit Naldahl Jessen; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2012-01-01

    and treatment of a number of infectious diseases. In this experimental study anti-influenza antibodies were passively administrated to mice, subsequently they were infected with influenza virus and treated with oseltamivir. The aim was to investigate, if anti-influenza antibodies influenced the out come...... be considered in the in control of influenza....

  5. Higher levels of multiple paternities increase seedling survival in the long-lived tree Eucalyptus gracilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin F Breed

    Full Text Available Studying associations between mating system parameters and fitness in natural populations of trees advances our understanding of how local environments affect seed quality, and thereby helps to predict when inbreeding or multiple paternities should impact on fitness. Indeed, for species that demonstrate inbreeding avoidance, multiple paternities (i.e. the number of male parents per half-sib family should still vary and regulate fitness more than inbreeding--named here as the 'constrained inbreeding hypothesis'. We test this hypothesis in Eucalyptus gracilis, a predominantly insect-pollinated tree. Fifty-eight open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected from trees in three populations. Progeny were planted in a reciprocal transplant trial. Fitness was measured by family establishment rates. We genotyped all trees and their progeny at eight microsatellite loci. Planting site had a strong effect on fitness, but seed provenance and seed provenance × planting site did not. Populations had comparable mating system parameters and were generally outcrossed, experienced low biparental inbreeding and high levels of multiple paternity. As predicted, seed families that had more multiple paternities also had higher fitness, and no fitness-inbreeding correlations were detected. Demonstrating that fitness was most affected by multiple paternities rather than inbreeding, we provide evidence supporting the constrained inbreeding hypothesis; i.e. that multiple paternity may impact on fitness over and above that of inbreeding, particularly for preferentially outcrossing trees at life stages beyond seed development.

  6. Cytoplasmic BRMS1 expression in malignant melanoma is associated with increased disease-free survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slipicevic Ana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/aims Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1 blocks metastasis in melanoma xenografts; however, its usefulness as a biomarker in human melanomas has not been widely studied. The goal was to measure BRMS1 expression in benign nevi, primary and metastatic melanomas and evaluate its impact on disease progression and prognosis. Methods Paraffin-embedded tissue from 155 primary melanomas, 69 metastases and 15 nevi was examined for BRMS1 expression using immunohistochemistry. siRNA mediated BRMS1 down-regulation was used to study impact on invasion and migration in melanoma cell lines. Results A significantly higher percentage of nevi (87%, compared to primary melanomas (20% and metastases (48%, expressed BRMS1 in the nucelus (p Waf1/Cip1 (p = 0.009. Cytoplasmic score index was inversely associated with nuclear p-Akt (p = 0.013 and positively associated with cytoplasmic p-ERK1/2 expression (p = 0.033. Nuclear BRMS1 expression in ≥ 10% of primary melanoma cells was associated with thicker tumors (p = 0.016 and decreased relapse-free period (p = 0.043. Nuclear BRMS1 was associated with expression of fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7; p = 0.011, a marker of invasion in melanomas. In line with this, repression of BRMS1 expression reduced the ability of melanoma cells to migrate and invade in vitro. Conclusion Our data suggest that BRMS1 is localized in cytoplasm and nucleus of melanocytic cells and that cellular localization determines its in vivo effect. We hypothesize that cytoplasmic BRMS1 restricts melanoma progression while nuclear BRMS1 possibly promotes melanoma cell invasion. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/19

  7. Increasing Survivability on the Battlefield: Hemorrhage Control and the Joint Theater Trauma System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    QuikCiot is a granular zeolite mineral that is composed of oxides of silicon, aluminum , sodium, magnesium and quartz.Z9 It is manufactured in a...with minimal effective pressure applied, a tourniquet may cause significant pain and should be managed with intravenous or intramuscular pain

  8. Melatonin increases survival of HaCaT keratinocytes by suppressing UV-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T W; Zbytek, B; Sayre, R M; Apostolov, E O; Basnakian, A G; Sweatman, T W; Wortsman, J; Elsner, P; Slominski, A

    2006-01-01

    Melatonin is a potent antioxidant and direct radical scavenger. As keratinocytes represent the major population in the skin and UV light causes damage to these cells, the possible protective effects of melatonin against UV-induced cell damage in HaCaT keratinocytes were investigated in vitro. Cells were preincubated with melatonin at graded concentrations from 10(-9) to 10(-3) m for 30 min prior to UV irradiation at doses of 25 and 50 mJ/cm2. Biological markers of cellular viability such as DNA synthesis and colony-forming efficiency as well as molecular markers of apoptosis were measured. DNA synthesis was determined by [3H]-thymidine incorporation into insoluble cellular fraction, clonogenicity through plating efficiency experiments and apoptosis by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. DNA synthesis experiments showed a strong protective effect by preincubation with melatonin at concentrations of 10(-4) m (P UV incubation protective effect. These results indicate that preincubation is a requirement for melatonin to exert its protective effects. The mechanism of melatonin's protective effect (10(-6) to 10(-3) m) includes inhibition of apoptosis as measured by TUNEL assay. Moreover, the biological significance of these effects is supported by clonogenic studies showing a significantly higher number of colonies in cultures treated with melatonin compared to controls. Thus, pretreatment with melatonin led to strong protection against UVB-induced damage in keratinocytes.

  9. Chemotherapy increases long-term survival in patients with adult medulloblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocakaya, Selin; Beier, Christoph Patrick; Beier, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adult medulloblastoma is a potentially curable malignant entity with an incidence of 0.5-1 per million. Valid data on prognosis, treatment, and demographics are lacking, as most current knowledge stems from retrospective studies. Surgical resection followed by radiotherapy are accepted...

  10. Antibody administration in experimental influenza increases survival and enhances the effect of oseltamivir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pourroy, Brit Naldahl; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2012-01-01

    Anti-viral chemotherapy plays an important part in treating and preventing influenza illness. However, its effectiveness in severe infections can be debated and a reoccurring problem is the emergence of resistant virus. Passive immunisation has for a long time been and is still used for prophylax...

  11. Increased Survival of Western Corn Rootworm on Transgenic Corn Within Three Generations of Onplant Greenhouse Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The agricultural industry has adopted a high dose/refuge strategy as a means of delaying the onset of insect resistance to transgenic crops. Recently, Bt corn products developed for control of western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, have been introduced with less than high-dose...

  12. Soil salinity increases survival of freezing in the enchytraeid Enchytraeus albidus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Patrício Silva, A. L.; Holmstrup, M.; Košťál, Vladimír; Amorim, M. J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 216, č. 14 (2013), s. 2732-2740 ISSN 0022-0949 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : ice content * freeze tolerance * osmolality Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.002, year: 2013

  13. Effects of modifiable prehospital factors on survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in rural versus urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiesen, Wenche Torunn; Bjørshol, Conrad Arnfinn; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Søreide, Eldar

    2018-04-18

    The modifiable prehospital system factors, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), emergency medical services (EMS), response time, and EMS physician attendance, may affect short- and long-term survival for both rural and urban out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. We studied how such factors influenced OHCA survival in a mixed urban/rural region with a high survival rate after OHCA. We analyzed the association between modifiable prehospital factors and survival to different stages of care in 1138 medical OHCA patients from an Utstein template-based cardiac arrest registry, using Kaplan-Meier type survival curves, univariable and multivariable logistic regression and mortality hazard plots. We found a significantly higher probability for survival to hospital admission (OR: 1.84, 95% CI 1.43-2.36, p rural group. In patients receiving bystander CPR before EMS arrival, the odds of survival to hospital discharge increased more than threefold (OR: 3.05, 95% CI 2.00-4.65, p rural areas, patients with EMS physician attendance had an overall better survival to hospital discharge (survival probability 0.17 with EMS physician vs. 0.05 without EMS physician, p = 0.019). Adjusted for modifiable factors, the survival differences remained. Overall, OHCA survival was higher in urban compared to rural areas, and the effect of bystander CPR, EMS response time and EMS physician attendance on survival differ between urban and rural areas. The effect of modifiable factors on survival was highest in the prehospital stage of care. In patients surviving to hospital admission, there was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality or in 1 year mortality between OHCA in rural versus urban areas.

  14. Improved survival after rectal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, S; Harling, H; Iversen, L H

    2010-01-01

    Objective In 1995, an analysis showed an inferior prognosis after rectal cancer in Denmark compared with the other Scandinavian countries. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) was established with the aim of improving the prognosis, and in this study we present a survival analysis of patients...... treated from 1994 to 2006. Method The study was based on the National Rectal Cancer Registry and the National Colorectal Cancer Database, supplemented with data from the Central Population Registry. The analysis included actuarial overall and relative survival. Results A total of 10 632 patients were...

  15. Graphics and statistics for cardiology: survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Susanne; McKnight, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    Reports of data in the medical literature frequently lack information needed to assess the validity and generalisability of study results. Some recommendations and standards for reporting have been developed over the last two decades, but few are available specifically for survival data. We provide recommendations for tabular and graphical representations of survival data. We argue that data and analytic software should be made available to promote reproducible research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Model selection criterion in survival analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabey, Uǧur; Tutkun, Nihal Ata

    2017-07-01

    Survival analysis deals with time until occurrence of an event of interest such as death, recurrence of an illness, the failure of an equipment or divorce. There are various survival models with semi-parametric or parametric approaches used in medical, natural or social sciences. The decision on the most appropriate model for the data is an important point of the analysis. In literature Akaike information criteria or Bayesian information criteria are used to select among nested models. In this study,the behavior of these information criterion is discussed for a real data set.

  17. Contrasting nest survival patterns for ducks and songbirds in northern mixed-grass prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Todd; Shaffer, Terry L.; Madden, Elizabeth M.; Nenneman, Melvin P.

    2017-01-01

    Management actions intended to protect or improve habitat for ducks may benefit grassland-nesting passerines, but scant information is available to explore this assumption. During 1998–2003, we examined nest survival of ducks and songbirds to determine whether effects of prescribed fire and other habitat features (e.g., shrub cover and distance to habitat edges) were similar for ducks and passerines breeding in North Dakota. We used the logistic-exposure method to estimate survival of duck and songbird nests (n = 3,171). We used an information-theoretic approach to identify factors that most influenced nest survival. Patterns of nest survival were markedly different between taxonomic groups. For ducks, nest survival was greater during the first postfire nesting season (daily survival rate [DSR] = 0.957, 85% CI = 0.951–0.963), relative to later postfire nesting seasons (DSR = 0.946, 85% CI = 0.942–0.950). Furthermore duck nest survival and nest densities were inversely related. Duck nest survival also was greater as shrub cover decreased and as distance from cropland and wetland edges increased. Passerines had lower nest survival during the first postfire nesting season (DSR = 0.934, 85% CI = 0.924–0.944), when densities also were low compared to subsequent postfire nesting seasons (DSR = 0.947, 85% CI = 0.944–0.950). Parasitism by brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) reduced passerine nest survival and this effect was more pronounced during the first postfire nesting season compared to subsequent nesting seasons. Passerine nest survival was greater as shrub cover decreased and perhaps for more concealed nests. Duck and songbird nest survival rates were not correlated during this study and for associated studies that examined additional variables using the same dataset, suggesting that different mechanisms influenced their survival. Based on our results, ducks should not be considered direct surrogates for passerines

  18. The utility of harvest recoveries of marked individuals to assess polar bear (Ursus maritimus) survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Elizabeth; Laake, Jeff; Laidre, Kristin L.; Born, Erik W.; Atkinson, Stephen N.

    2012-01-01

    Management of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) populations requires the periodic assessment of life history metrics such as survival rate. This information is frequently obtained during short-term capture and marking efforts (e.g., over the course of three years) that result in hundreds of marked bears remaining in the population after active marking is finished. Using 10 additional years of harvest recovery subsequent to a period of active marking, we provide updated estimates of annual survival for polar bears in the Baffin Bay population of Greenland and Canada. Our analysis suggests a decline in survival of polar bears since the period of active marking that ended in 1997; some of the decline in survival can likely be attributed to a decline in springtime ice concentration over the continental shelf of Baffin Island. The variance around the survival estimates is comparatively high because of the declining number of marks available; therefore, results must be interpreted with caution. The variance of the estimates of survival increased most substantially in the sixth year post-marking. When survival estimates calculated with recovery-only and recapture-recovery data sets from the period of active marking were compared, survival rates were indistinguishable. However, for the period when fewer marks were available, survival estimates were lower using the recovery-only data set, which indicates that part of the decline we detected for 2003 – 09 may be due to using only harvest recovery data. Nevertheless, the decline in the estimates of survival is consistent with population projections derived from harvest numbers and earlier vital rates, as well as with an observed decline in the extent of sea ice habitat.

  19. Impact of donor-to-recipient weight ratio on survival after bilateral lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delom, F; Danner-Boucher, I; Dromer, C; Thumerel, M; Marthan, R; Nourry-Lecaplain, L; Magnan, A; Jougon, J; Fessart, D

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between donor-to-recipient weight ratio and post-transplantation survival. From February 1988 to November 2006, 255 adult bilateral lung transplantation patients from 2 different centers were retrospectively analyzed. The cohort was divided into 4 groups depending on the quartile ranges of the donor-to-recipient weight ratio. A time-to-event analysis was performed for risk of death after transplantation conditional on 5-year survival using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. The mean weight ratio for the study cohort was 1.23 ± 0.39. For all lung transplant recipients during the study period, survival rate at 5 years was 58%. Median survival was 6.3 years in the cohort subgroup with weight ratio ratio >1.23. Weight ratio >1.23 recipients had a significant survival advantage out to 5 years compared with weight ratio ratio. Weight ratio strata affected overall survival, with quartile 1 (lower weight ratio recipients) experiencing the lowest 5-year survival (39.1%), followed by quartile 2 (57.8%), quartile 4 (68.2%), and quartile 3 (70.3%) recipients. The effect of weight ratio strata on survival was statistically significant for the quartile 1 recipients (lower quartile) as compared with the 3 other quartiles. Our findings show a statistically significant effect of donor-to-recipient weight ratios on bilateral lung transplantation survival. A higher donor-to-recipient weight ratio was associated with improved survival after bilateral lung transplantation and likely reflects a mismatch between a relatively overweight donor vs recipient. In contrast, a lower donor-to-recipient ratio was associated with increased mortality after bilateral lung transplantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Postoperative hemodynamics after cardiopulmonary bypass in survived newborn piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirilomis, Theodor; Nolte, Lars; Liakopoulos, Oliver J; Ballat, Carola; Steinke, Katja; Bensch, Marc; Schoendube, Friedrich A

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac function and hemodynamics are frequently decreased during the first hours after heart surgery, resulting in inotropic support for treatment and prevention of further hemodynamic deterioration. The aim of this study was analysis of hemodynamics of neonatal piglets who survived early postoperative course after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cardioplegic arrest without the use of inotropic drugs. Newborn piglets (younger than 7 days) were placed on mild hypothermic CPB (32 degrees C) for 180 minutes, including 90 minutes of cardioplegic arrest. Hemodynamics were examined after termination of CPB and none of the animals received any inotropic support. After 6 hours, survived animals were euthanized (CPB group, n=4). For control, neonatal piglets were examined for the same time interval after surgery without CPB (control group, n=3). Systolic left-ventricular pressure increased after CPB, mean arterial blood pressure and amplitude of left ventricular wall thickness decreased. Compared with control group, systolic left-ventricular pressure in CPB group was higher (p<0.05). Present data demonstrated hemodynamic depression after cardiac procedures in survived neonatal animals. Although the effects may not be solely attributed to CPB and myocardial ischemia effects may be potentiate by CPB.

  1. Coniferyl Aldehyde Ameliorates Radiation Intestine Injury via Endothelial Cell Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ye Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Lee, Yoonjin; Lee, Haejune [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yunsil [Ewha Woman' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Younggyu [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Cancer treatments related gastrointestinal toxicity has also been recognized as a significant economic burden. Especially, extensive apoptosis of microvascular endothelial cell of the lamina propria is the primary lesion initiating intestinal radiation damage after abdominal radiation therapy. Coniferyl aldehyde (CA) is phenolic compounds isolated from cork stoppers, and one of the major pyrolysis products of lignin. Shi H. was support for the empirical use of CA as a medicinal food for cardiovascular diseases. CA has positive effect in broad way but there is no consequence in radiation induced intestine damage. Here, we investigate effect of CA on small intestine after abdominal IR to mice in this study. In this study, CA increased the survival rate in C3H mice against 13.5 Gy abdominal IR. We found CA protects small intestine via preventing endothelial cell apoptosis and enhancing their angiogenic activity. CA also showed protective effect on crypt cell survival. Endothelial cell survival may affect crypt cell protection against IR. From this data, we concluded that CA is effective for protection against abdominal radiation injury. CA could ameliorate side-effect of radiation therapy.

  2. Hypothyroidism improves random-pattern skin flap survival in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Sina; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Karimian, Negin; Sotoudeh-Anvari, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Farzad; Taleb, Shayandokht; Mirazi, Naser; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2012-11-01

    The protective effect of hypothyroidism against ischemic or toxic conditions has been shown in various tissues. We investigated the effect of propylthiouracil (PTU)/methimazole (MMI)-induced hypothyroidism and acute local effect of MMI on the outcome of lethal ischemia in random-pattern skin flaps. Dorsal flaps with caudal pedicles were elevated at midline and flap survival was measured at the seventh day after surgery. The first group, as control, received 1 mL of 0.9% saline solution in the flap before flap elevation. In groups 2 and 3, hypothyroidism was induced by administration of either PTU 0.05% or MMI 0.04% in drinking water. The next four groups received local injections of MMI (10, 20, 50, or 100 μg/flap) before flap elevation. Local PTU injection was ignored due to insolubility of the agent. Hypothyroidism was induced in chronic PTU- and MMI-treated groups, and animals in these groups showed significant increase in their flap survival, compared to control euthyroid rats (79.47% ± 10.49% and 75.48% ± 12.93% versus 52.26% ± 5.75%, respectively, P hypothyroidism improves survival of random-pattern skin flaps in rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Little Smoky Woodland Caribou Calf Survival Enhancement Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkby G. Smith

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Little Smoky woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus herd is a boreal ecotype located in west central Alberta, Canada. This herd has declined steadily over the past decade and is currently thought to number approximately 80 animals. Factors contributing to the herds' decline appear related to elevated predator-caused mortality rates resulting from industrial caused landscape change. At current rates of decline, the herd is at risk of extirpation. A calf survival enhancement project was initiated in the first half of 2006 as a means of enhancing recruitment while other longer-term approaches were implemented. A total of 10 pregnant females were captured in early March and held in captivity until all calves were at least 3 weeks old. Before release, calves were radiocollared with expandable drop-off collars. Following release, survival of mother and offspring were tracked at intervals until the fall rut. Survival of penned calves was compared to "wild-born" calves at heel of non captive radiocollared females. This approach is compared to other techniques designed to increase recruitment in caribou.

  4. Survival analysis of heart failure patients: A case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir Ahmad

    Full Text Available This study was focused on survival analysis of heart failure patients who were admitted to Institute of Cardiology and Allied hospital Faisalabad-Pakistan during April-December (2015. All the patients were aged 40 years or above, having left ventricular systolic dysfunction, belonging to NYHA class III and IV. Cox regression was used to model mortality considering age, ejection fraction, serum creatinine, serum sodium, anemia, platelets, creatinine phosphokinase, blood pressure, gender, diabetes and smoking status as potentially contributing for mortality. Kaplan Meier plot was used to study the general pattern of survival which showed high intensity of mortality in the initial days and then a gradual increase up to the end of study. Martingale residuals were used to assess functional form of variables. Results were validated computing calibration slope and discrimination ability of model via bootstrapping. For graphical prediction of survival probability, a nomogram was constructed. Age, renal dysfunction, blood pressure, ejection fraction and anemia were found as significant risk factors for mortality among heart failure patients.

  5. Stress-induced cleavage of Myc promotes cancer cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice; Ngouenet, Celine; Anderson, Sarah; Brabletz, Thomas; Eisenman, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis is critical in Myc-induced tumor progression. Here we report that cancer cells evade death under stress by activating calpain-mediated proteolysis of Myc. This generates Myc-nick, a cytoplasmic, transcriptionally inactive cleavage product of Myc. We found conversion of Myc into Myc-nick in cell lines and tissues derived from multiple cancers. In colon cancer, the production of Myc-nick is enhanced under stress conditions such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Under these conditions, ectopic expression of Myc-nick promotes anchorage-independent growth and cell survival at least in part by promoting autophagy. Myc-nick also delays colon cancer cell death after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs such as etoposide, cisplatin, and imatinib. Furthermore, colon cancer cells expressing a cleavage-resistant form of Myc undergo extensive apoptosis but are rescued by overexpression of Myc-nick. We also found that ectopic expression of Myc-nick results in the induction of the actin-bundling protein fascin, formation of filopodia, and increased cell motility—all mediators of tumor metastasis. Myc-nick-induced survival, autophagy, and motility require Myc box II (MBII), a region of Myc-nick that recruits acetyltransferases that in turn modify cytoplasmic proteins, including α-tubulin and ATG3. Our results suggest that Myc-nick-induced survival and motility contribute to colon cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:24696454

  6. Cigarette smoking is associated with adverse survival among women with ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Præstegaard, Camilla; Jensen, Allan; Jensen, Signe M

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of developing mucinous ovarian tumors but whether it is associated with ovarian cancer survival overall or for the different histotypes is unestablished. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the association between cigarette smoking and surviva...... with localized than disseminated disease. The identification of cigarette smoking as a modifiable factor associated with survival has potential clinical importance as a focus area to improve ovarian cancer prognosis....

  7. A model for predicting peritoneal dialysis patients’ survival, using data mining algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Firouzi Jahantigh

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: An accurate prediction model would be a potentially useful way to evaluate patients’ survival at peritoneal dialysis that increased clinical scrutiny and timely intervention could be brought to bear. So, in this research, the multi-space mapped binary tree support vector machine algorithm has a high precision in predicting the survival of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients considering multiple evaluation indices and different class distribution functions.

  8. Effect of gamma rays on growth and survival of three mustard varieties in M1 generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamala, T.; Rao, R.N.B.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of gamma radiation on germination, survival percentage, seedling height, leaf length and breadth, and growth rate in three mustard varieties were studied in M 1 generation. Seeds were exposed to 15, 30, 45, 60 and 80 Kr doses for the study. Germinations and survival percentages and seedling height showed dose-dependent decrease, while growth rate, leaf length and breadth increased at 60, 45 and 30 Kr and decreased at 80 Kr, though varietal differences were observed. (M.G.B.)

  9. Safety, efficacy, and drug survival of biologics and biosimilars for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, A; Ottosen, M B; Gniadecki, R

    2018-01-01

    for all drugs except for adalimumab and secukinumab. Adverse events (predominantly infections) were most frequent for secukinumab and showed an increased (albeit low) incidence of cardiovascular events compared with the other agents. CONCLUSIONS: Ustekinumab was associated with the highest drug survival......BACKGROUND: Real-life data on newer biologic and biosimilar agents for moderate-to-severe psoriasis are lacking. OBJECTIVES: To examine safety, efficacy, and time to discontinuation (drug survival) of biologics (adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, secukinumab, and ustekinumab) and compare...

  10. Venous thromboembolism and survival in patients with high-grade glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Simanek, Ralph; Vormittag, Rainer; Hassler, Marco; Roessler, Karl; Schwarz, Martin; Zielinski, Christoph; Pabinger, Ingrid; Marosi, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Patients with malignancy, particularly patients with high-grade glioma (HGG; WHO grade III/IV), have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). It has been suggested that VTE predicts survival in cancer patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the occurrence of symptomatic VTE and its impact on survival in patients with HGG. Consecutive patients (n = 63; 36 female, 27 male; median age, 58 years) who had neurosurgical intervention between October 2003 and December 2004 were fo...

  11. Five-year survival after surgery in nonagenarian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariña-Castro, Roberto; Roque-Castellano, Cristina; Marchena-Gómez, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Pérez, Aurelio

    2017-12-01

    In countries with longer life expectancies, the nonagenarian population is increasing. Therefore, there is greater demand for healthcare, including surgical procedures. The aim of the present study was to determine the outcomes of surgery carried out on nonagenarians in terms of long-term survival after the procedure. We carried out a cross-longitudinal study on a cohort of 159 nonagenarian patients, who underwent a non-cardiac, non-traumatic surgical procedure in our institution between January 1999 and December 2011. The following variables were recorded: sociodemographic characteristics, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, Charlson Comorbidity Index, surgical site, postoperative complications, operative mortality and long-term survival. The output variable was long-term survival. Of the 159 patients,99 women (62%) and 60 men (38%), with a mean age of 91.8 years (SD ± 2.0 years), 44 cases were operations for malignant disorders (28%), 117 cases (74%) under emergency conditions and 42 cases (26%) were elective treatments. The operative mortality was 29%, 4.8% for elective surgery and 37.6% for emergency surgery (P surgery (HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.05-2.57) and postoperative medical complications (HR 2.58, 95% CI 1.73-3.85) were independently related to 5-year survival. These findings support the perioperative safety of elective general surgery in nonagenarian patients. In selected nonagenarian patients with no cognitive impairment, surgery must not be denied. These data might be useful for surgical decision-making or informed consent for nonagerians. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2389-2395. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. ER and PR expression and survival after endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah; Stewart, Colin J R; Clarke, Edward M; Lose, Felicity; Davies, Claire; Armes, Jane; Obermair, Andreas; Brennan, Donal; Webb, Penelope M; Nagle, Christina M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2018-02-01

    To measure association between endometrial carcinoma ER and PR status and endometrial cancer (EC) survival, accounting for inter-observer variation. The intensity and proportion of tumor cell expression of ER and PR in ECs were assessed independently and semi-quantitatively by two pathologists using digital images of duplicate tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs). Cases with inconsistent initial assessment were reviewed and final scoring agreed. The association between overall and EC-specific survival and hormone receptor expression (intensity, proportion and combined) was assessed using Cox regression analysis. The C-index was used to evaluate model discrimination with addition of ER and PR status. Tumor ER and PR analysis was possible in 659 TMAs from 255 patients, and in 459 TMAs from 243 patients, respectively. Initial ER and PR scoring was consistent in 82% and 80% of cases, respectively. In multivariate analyses decreased ER and PR expression was associated with increased tumor-related mortality. Associations reached statistical significance for ER proportion score (P=0.05), ER intensity score (P=0.003), and PR combined score (P=0.04). Decreased expression of combined ER/PR expression was associated with poorer EC-specific survival than decreased expression of either hormone receptor alone (P=0.005). However, hormone receptor status did not significantly improve mortality prediction in individual cases. ER and PR expression combined, using cut-points that capture variation in scoring and across cores, is significantly associated with EC-specific survival in analyses adjusting for known prognostic factors. However, at the individual level, ER and PR expression does not improve mortality prediction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Blood type, ABO genetic variants, and ovarian cancer survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Gabriella D.; Levinson, Rebecca T.; Toole, Hilary; Snyder, Malcolm-Robert; Deng, Angie; Crispens, Marta A.; Khabele, Dineo; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Objective Blood type A and the A1 allele have been associated with increased ovarian cancer risk. With only two small studies published to date, evidence for an association between ABO blood type and ovarian cancer survival is limited. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of Tumor Registry confirmed ovarian cancer cases from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center with blood type from linked laboratory reports and ABO variants from linked Illumina Exome BeadChip data. Associations with overall survival (OS) were quantified by hazard ratios (HR) and confidence intervals (CI) from proportional hazards regression models; covariates included age, race, stage, grade, histologic subtype, and year of diagnosis. Results ABO phenotype (N = 694) and/or genotype (N = 154) data were available for 713 predominantly Caucasian (89.3%) cases. In multivariable models, blood type A had significantly better OS compared to either O (HR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.60–0.93) or all non-A (HR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.63–0.94) cases. Similarly, missense rs1053878 minor allele carriers (A2) had better OS (HR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.25–0.99). Among Caucasians, this phenotype association was strengthened, but the genotype association was attenuated; instead, four variants sharing moderate linkage disequilibrium with the O variant were associated with better OS (HR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.39–0.99) in unadjusted models. Conclusions Blood type A was significantly associated with longer ovarian cancer survival in the largest such study to date. This finding was supported by genetic analysis, which implicated the A2 allele, although O related variants also had suggestive associations. Further research on ABO and ovarian cancer survival is warranted. PMID:28448592

  14. Kidney transplant survival in pediatric and young adults

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    Acott Phil

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a perception that kidney transplant recipients transferred from pediatric centers to adult care have an increased risk of graft loss. It is not clear whether young adults transplanted in adult centers also suffer from high graft loss rates. Methods We examined death censored graft survival in 3 cohorts of young patients transplanted at a single center. Pediatric (PED patients transplanted at the pediatric center were compared to a cohort of young adults (YAD; age 18- Results In a multivariate Cox model for death-censored graft survival, PED survival was statistically similar to the YAD (HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.44, 1.7, p = 0.66, however the ADL cohort (HR 0.45, 95% CI 0.25, 0.82, p = 0.009 demonstrated better survival. Admitted non-adherence rates were not different among cohorts. Patients were transferred within a narrow age window (18.6 ± 1.0 age in years but at a wide range of times from the date of transplantation (5.1 ± 3.5 years and with a wide range of graft function (serum creatinine 182 ± 81 μmol/L. Conclusions The perception that pediatric transfers do poorly reflects advanced graft dysfunction in some at the time of transfer. The evidence also suggests that it is not the transfer of care that is the critical issue but rather recipients, somewhere between the ages of 11-14 and 25, are a unique and vulnerable cohort. Effective strategies to improve outcomes across this age group need to be identified and applied consistently.

  15. Prediction of 10-year Survival in ITI Implant

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    AR. Rokn 1, 2,1, 3

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Whilst many questions and doubts still remain, today the use of dental im-plants has gained an increasing popularity amongst patients as well as dentists. The aim of this study is to analyze the survival rate in using such implants over a 10 year period.Materials and Methods: In this study, 3050 ITI implants placed in 1000 patients with the mean age of 49.5 years (54.4% males and 44.6% females during 1050 stages were evalu-ated for the survival rate. The present study is a descriptive, time based analysis of all the files of patients that have been treated using dental implants over a period of 10 years. General information, number of implants in each jaw, type of implant surface, type of edentulous area, time span of Prosthodontic therapy and the endurance of the implants were gathered.Results: Incidence of failure was as low as 2% and the number of implant failures was 23 implants (0.7%. These failures were seen in 13 implants in the upper jaw of 12 patients and 10 implants in the lower jaw of nine patients. In other words, the comprehensive sur-vival rate was seen in 98% of the patients and 99.3% of the implants.Conclusion: The use of dental implants in treatment of missing teeth is favorable regard-less of the subject’s age, sex and type of the edentulous area and a very high survival rate seems feasible.

  16. Survival and senescence of human young red cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Angela; Ciana, Annarita; Achilli, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2014-01-01

    A number of experimental investigations in vivo suggest that in humans a decrease of circulating erythrocyte number ensues whenever erythropoietin (EPO) plasma level decreases. Since the process seems to selectively eliminate young red cells (neocytes), it has been named neocytolysis. The experimental models in vivo have revealed and documented multiple forms of neocytolysis but have not fully elucidated the specificity of the target