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Sample records for potential second-messenger role

  1. Neurotoxicity of a Novel Local Anesthetic Agent, Ropivacaine: The Possible Roles of Bursts of Potential and Cytoplasmic Second Messenger

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    Pei-Lin Lin

    2007-10-01

    Conclusion: Ropivacaine reversibly elicited bursts of potential in the central snail neuron. The ropivacaine-elicited bursts of potential were associated with phospholipase C activity in the RP4 snail neuron. Our results suggest that ropivacaine-induced neurotoxicity is highly associated with phospholipase C activity and phospholipase C inhibitor may offer a novel therapeutic approach for managing local anesthetic-induced convulsion or other transient neurologic toxicity.

  2. 3',5'-cIMP as Potential Second Messenger in the Vascular Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Susan W S; Gao, Yuansheng; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, only the 3',5'-cyclic monophosphates of adenosine and guanosine (produced by adenylyl cyclase and guanylyl cyclase, respectively) are regarded as true "second messengers" in the vascular wall, despite the presence of other cyclic nucleotides in different tissues. Among these noncanonical cyclic nucleotides, inosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cIMP) is synthesized by soluble guanylyl cyclase in porcine coronary arteries in response to hypoxia, when the enzyme is activated by endothelium-derived nitric oxide. Its production is associated with augmentation of vascular contraction mediated by stimulation of Rho kinase. Based on these findings, cIMP appears to meet most, if not all, of the criteria required for it to be accepted as a "second messenger," at least in the vascular wall.

  3. Segundos mensajeros Second messengers

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    Diana Patricia Díaz Hernández

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available

    En esta revisión se describen, de manera esquemática, los mecanismos de acción empleados por los SEGUNDOS MENSAJEROS comenzando por el estimulo del receptor y continuando con las reacciones en cadena que conducen finalmente a una respuesta celular.

    This review schematically describes the different mechanisms of action that Second Messengers employ to stimulate receptors and then Initiate a chain of reactions that finally lead to appropriate cellular responses.

  4. Some Metabolites Act as Second Messengers in Yeast Chronological Aging

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    Karamat Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of some key metabolic intermediates play essential roles in regulating the longevity of the chronologically aging yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These key metabolites are detected by certain ligand-specific protein sensors that respond to concentration changes of the key metabolites by altering the efficiencies of longevity-defining cellular processes. The concentrations of the key metabolites that affect yeast chronological aging are controlled spatially and temporally. Here, we analyze mechanisms through which the spatiotemporal dynamics of changes in the concentrations of the key metabolites influence yeast chronological lifespan. Our analysis indicates that a distinct set of metabolites can act as second messengers that define the pace of yeast chronological aging. Molecules that can operate both as intermediates of yeast metabolism and as second messengers of yeast chronological aging include reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH, glycerol, trehalose, hydrogen peroxide, amino acids, sphingolipids, spermidine, hydrogen sulfide, acetic acid, ethanol, free fatty acids, and diacylglycerol. We discuss several properties that these second messengers of yeast chronological aging have in common with second messengers of signal transduction. We outline how these second messengers of yeast chronological aging elicit changes in cell functionality and viability in response to changes in the nutrient, energy, stress, and proliferation status of the cell.

  5. Bacterial nucleotide-based second messengers.

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    Pesavento, Christina; Hengge, Regine

    2009-04-01

    In all domains of life nucleotide-based second messengers transduce signals originating from changes in the environment or in intracellular conditions into appropriate cellular responses. In prokaryotes cyclic di-GMP has emerged as an important and ubiquitous second messenger regulating bacterial life-style transitions relevant for biofilm formation, virulence, and many other bacterial functions. This review describes similarities and differences in the architecture of the cAMP, (p)ppGpp, and c-di-GMP signaling systems and their underlying signaling principles. Moreover, recent advances in c-di-GMP-mediated signaling will be presented and the integration of c-di-GMP signaling with other nucleotide-based signaling systems will be discussed.

  6. 12th International Conference on Second Messengers and Phosphoproteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tuháčková, Zdena

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 3 (2004), s. 89-91 ISSN 1211-2526. [International conference on second messengers and phosphoproteins /12./. Montreal, 03.08.2004-07.08.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/04/0550; GA AV ČR KSK5020115 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : MTOR -PI3-K signalling * p70 S 6 kinase * v-Src Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  7. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring 45 Ca 2+ uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that β-endorphin 1-31 (β-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca 2+ uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that β-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca 2+ uptake was not affected by β-END 1-31. β-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca 2+ uptake by either cell type. Using [ 3 H]thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, β-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E 1 (PGE 1 ) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. β-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by β-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca 2+ influx was not a major mechanism involved

  8. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that {beta}-endorphin 1-31 ({beta}-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca{sup 2+} uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that {beta}-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} uptake was not affected by {beta}-END 1-31. {beta}-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca{sup 2+} uptake by either cell type. Using ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, {beta}-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E{sub 1} (PGE{sub 1}) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. {beta}-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by {beta}-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca{sup 2+} influx was not a major mechanism involved.

  9. cGAS produces a 2'-5'-linked cyclic dinucleotide second messenger that activates STING.

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    Ablasser, Andrea; Goldeck, Marion; Cavlar, Taner; Deimling, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Röhl, Ingo; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Ludwig, Janos; Hornung, Veit

    2013-06-20

    Detection of cytoplasmic DNA represents one of the most fundamental mechanisms of the innate immune system to sense the presence of microbial pathogens. Moreover, erroneous detection of endogenous DNA by the same sensing mechanisms has an important pathophysiological role in certain sterile inflammatory conditions. The endoplasmic-reticulum-resident protein STING is critically required for the initiation of type I interferon signalling upon detection of cytosolic DNA of both exogenous and endogenous origin. Next to its pivotal role in DNA sensing, STING also serves as a direct receptor for the detection of cyclic dinucleotides, which function as second messenger molecules in bacteria. DNA recognition, however, is triggered in an indirect fashion that depends on a recently characterized cytoplasmic nucleotidyl transferase, termed cGAMP synthase (cGAS), which upon interaction with DNA synthesizes a dinucleotide molecule that in turn binds to and activates STING. We here show in vivo and in vitro that the cGAS-catalysed reaction product is distinct from previously characterized cyclic dinucleotides. Using a combinatorial approach based on mass spectrometry, enzymatic digestion, NMR analysis and chemical synthesis we demonstrate that cGAS produces a cyclic GMP-AMP dinucleotide, which comprises a 2'-5' and a 3'-5' phosphodiester linkage >Gp(2'-5')Ap(3'-5')>. We found that the presence of this 2'-5' linkage was required to exert potent activation of human STING. Moreover, we show that cGAS first catalyses the synthesis of a linear 2'-5'-linked dinucleotide, which is then subject to cGAS-dependent cyclization in a second step through a 3'-5' phosphodiester linkage. This 13-membered ring structure defines a novel class of second messenger molecules, extending the family of 2'-5'-linked antiviral biomolecules.

  10. Viruses transfer the antiviral second messenger cGAMP between cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, A; Maelfait, J; Davenne, T; Partridge, T; Peng, Y; Mayer, A; Dong, T; Kaever, V; Borrow, P; Rehwinkel, J

    2015-09-11

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) detects cytosolic DNA during virus infection and induces an antiviral state. cGAS signals by synthesis of a second messenger, cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP), which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING). We show that cGAMP is incorporated into viral particles, including lentivirus and herpesvirus virions, when these are produced in cGAS-expressing cells. Virions transferred cGAMP to newly infected cells and triggered a STING-dependent antiviral program. These effects were independent of exosomes and viral nucleic acids. Our results reveal a way by which a signal for innate immunity is transferred between cells, potentially accelerating and broadening antiviral responses. Moreover, infection of dendritic cells with cGAMP-loaded lentiviruses enhanced their activation. Loading viral vectors with cGAMP therefore holds promise for vaccine development. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. The effect of 648 nm diode laser irradiation on second messengers in senescent human keratinocytes

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    Hawkins Evans, D.; Abrahamse, H.

    2009-02-01

    Background/purpose: Stress induced premature senescence (SIPS) is defined as the long-term effect of subcytotoxic stress on proliferative cell types. Cells in SIPS display differences at the level of protein expression which affect energy metabolism, defense systems, redox potential, cell morphology and transduction pathways. This study aimed to determine the effect of laser irradiation on second messengers in senescent cells and to establish if that effect can be directly linked to changes in cellular function such as cell viability or proliferation. Materials and Methods: Human keratinocyte cell cultures were modified to induce premature senescence using repeated sub-lethal stresses of 200 uM H2O2 or 5% OH every day for four days with two days recovery. SIPS was confirmed by senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Control conditions included normal, repeated stress of 500 uM H2O2 to induce apoptosis and 200 uM PBN as an anti-oxidant or free radical scavenger. Cells were irradiated with 1.5 J/cm2 on day 1 and 4 using a 648 nm diode laser (3.3 mW/cm2) and cellular responses were measured 1 h post irradiation. The affect on second messengers was assessed by measuring cAMP, cGMP, nitric oxide and intracellular calcium (Ca2+) while functional changes were assessed using cell morphology, ATP cell viability, LDH membrane integrity and WST-1 cell proliferation. Results: Results indicate an increase in NO and a decrease in cGMP and Ca2+ in 200 uM H2O2 irradiated cells while PBN irradiated cells showed a decrease in cAMP and an increase in ATP viability and cell proliferation. Conclusion: Laser irradiation influences cell signaling which ultimately changes the biological function of senescent cells. If laser therapy can stimulate the biological function of senescent cells it may be beneficial to conditions such as immune senescence, skin ageing, muscle atrophy, premature ageing of arteries in patients with advanced heart disease, neurodegenerative disorders and

  12. Retinoic acid-induced granulocytic differentiation of HL60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells is preceded by downregulation of autonomous generation of inositol lipid-derived second messengers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porfiri, E.; Hoffbrand, A.V.; Wickremasinghe, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Inositol phosphates (InsPs) and diacyglycerol (DAG) are second messengers derived via the breakdown of inositol phospholipids, and which play important signalling roles in the regulation of proliferation of some cell types. The authors have studied the operation of this pathway during the early stages of retionic acid (RA)-induced granulocytic differentiation of HL60 myeloid leukemia cells. The autonomous breakdown of inositol lipids that occurred in HL60 cells labeled with [3H] inositol was completely abolished following 48 hours of RA treatment. The rate of influx of 45Ca2+ was also significantly decreased at 48 hours, consistent with the role of inositol lipid-derived second messengers in regulating Ca2+ entry into cells. The downregulation of inositol lipid metabolism clearly preceded the onset of reduced proliferation induced by RA treatment, and was therefore not a consequence of decreased cell growth. The generation of InsPs in RA-treated cells was reactivated by the fluoroaluminate ion, a direct activator of guanine nucleotide-binding protein(s) (G proteins) that regulate the inositol lipid signalling pathway. Subtle alterations to a regulatory mechanism may therefore mediate the RA-induced downregulation of this pathway. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the autonomous generation of inositol lipid-derived second messengers may contribute to the continuous proliferation of HL60 cells, and that the RA-induced downregulation of this pathway may, in turn, play a role in signalling the cessation of proliferation that preceedes granulocytic differentiation

  13. A new methodology of second messenger imaging for higher cortical functions by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imahori, Yoshio; Ueda, Satoshi

    1992-01-01

    Neuronal manifestations are driven by second messenger systems in central nervous system through the neuronal transmission process. Receptor-mediated phosphatidylinositol (PI) response images may reflect neuronal activation in higher cortical function with a high sensitivity based on the common amplifying mechanism of the second messenger. Many bioactive compounds related to PI turnover have simple carbohydrate structures without amines and [ 11 C]ethylketene acylation has been found as the most effective labeling method of these compounds for positron emission tomography. [ 11 C]ethylketene was produced by the pyrolytic decomposition of [1- 11 C]butyric acid. This new method was made possible by the reaction under the no-carrier-added condition. To visualize the response in vivo, we synthesized sn-1,2-[ 11 C]diacylglycerols (DAGs) as a specific tracer for the PI response and [ 11 C]phorbol esters as a ligand for protein kinase C. In autoradiographic studies it was demonstrated that sn-1,2-[ 11 C]DAGs incorporation sites were discretely localized especially in the neocortex, which were concomitant with columnar structures. These results suggested that sn-1,2-[ 11 C]DAG can serve as an extrinsic substrate for the PI turnover by the phosphorylation mechanism and intensive neuronal processing, as a higher cortical function, occurs in these areas on the basis of receptor-mediated PI response. (author)

  14. The Bacterial Second Messenger Cyclic di-GMP Regulates Brucella Pathogenesis and Leads to Altered Host Immune Response.

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    Khan, Mike; Harms, Jerome S; Marim, Fernanda M; Armon, Leah; Hall, Cherisse L; Liu, Yi-Ping; Banai, Menachem; Oliveira, Sergio C; Splitter, Gary A; Smith, Judith A

    2016-12-01

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, a chronic debilitating disease significantly impacting global health and prosperity. Much remains to be learned about how Brucella spp. succeed in sabotaging immune host cells and how Brucella spp. respond to environmental challenges. Multiple types of bacteria employ the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) to coordinate responses to shifting environments. To determine the role of c-di-GMP in Brucella physiology and in shaping host-Brucella interactions, we utilized c-di-GMP regulatory enzyme deletion mutants. Our results show that a ΔbpdA phosphodiesterase mutant producing excess c-di-GMP displays marked attenuation in vitro and in vivo during later infections. Although c-di-GMP is known to stimulate the innate sensor STING, surprisingly, the ΔbpdA mutant induced a weaker host immune response than did wild-type Brucella or the low-c-di-GMP guanylate cyclase ΔcgsB mutant. Proteomics analysis revealed that c-di-GMP regulates several processes critical for virulence, including cell wall and biofilm formation, nutrient acquisition, and the type IV secretion system. Finally, ΔbpdA mutants exhibited altered morphology and were hypersensitive to nutrient-limiting conditions. In summary, our results indicate a vital role for c-di-GMP in allowing Brucella to successfully navigate stressful and shifting environments to establish intracellular infection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Second messenger production in avian medullary nephron segments in response to peptide hormones.

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    Goldstein, D L; Reddy, V; Plaga, K

    1999-03-01

    We examined the sites of peptide hormone activation within medullary nephron segments of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) kidney by measuring rates of hormone-induced generation of cyclic nucleotide second messenger. Thin descending limbs, thick ascending limbs, and collecting ducts had baseline activity of adenylyl cyclase that resulted in cAMP accumulation of 207 +/- 56, 147 +/- 31, and 151 +/- 41 fmol. mm-1. 30 min-1, respectively. In all segments, this activity increased 10- to 20-fold in response to forskolin. Activity of adenylyl cyclase in the thin descending limb was stimulated approximately twofold by parathyroid hormone (PTH) but not by any of the other hormones tested [arginine vasotocin (AVT), glucagon, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), or isoproterenol, each at 10(-6) M]. Thick ascending limb was stimulated two- to threefold by both AVT and PTH; however, glucagon and isoproterenol had no effect, and ANP stimulated neither cAMP nor cGMP accumulation. Adenylyl cyclase activity in the collecting duct was stimulated fourfold by AVT but not by the other hormones; likewise, ANP did not stimulate cGMP accumulation in this segment. These data support a tubular action of AVT and PTH in the avian renal medulla.

  16. Cyclic GMP-AMP as an Endogenous Second Messenger in Innate Immune Signaling by Cytosolic DNA.

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    Kato, Kazuki; Omura, Hiroki; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2017-06-20

    The innate immune system functions as the first line of defense against invading bacteria and viruses. In this context, the cGAS/STING [cyclic guanosine monophosphate (GMP)-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) synthase/STING] signaling axis perceives the nonself DNA associated with bacterial and viral infections, as well as the leakage of self DNA by cellular dysfunction and stresses, to elicit the host's immune responses. In this pathway, the noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide 2',3'-cyclic GMP-AMP (2',3'-cGAMP) functions as a second messenger for signal transduction: 2',3'-cGAMP is produced by the enzyme cGAS upon its recognition of double-stranded DNA, and then the 2',3'-cGAMP is recognized by the receptor STING to induce the phosphorylation of downstream factors, including TBK1 (TANK binding kinase 1) and IRF3 (interferon regulatory factor 3). Numerous crystal structures of the components of this cGAS/STING signaling axis have been reported and these clarify the structural basis for their signal transduction mechanisms. In this review, we summarize recent progress made in the structural dissection of this signaling pathway and indicate possible directions of forthcoming research.

  17. Disturbances in lipid second messengers generation by stimulated blood lymphocytes in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galstyan H. M.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The main objective of this study was the comparative investigation of diverse lipid second messenger (LSM generation by human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL at different (5, 10, 30 and 60 s time points of cell co-stimulation by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies in norm and breast cancer (BC. Methods. Ficoll-Hypaque gradient centrifugation. Results. The data obtained indicate that some mechanisms of LSM generation/utilization in stimulated crude HPBL were significantly altered in BC compared to norm. Particularly, the reliable generation of arachidonyl-1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DAG at the initial step (5 s of cell stimulation observed in norm was depressed in BC and reached the value below the basal level in unstimulated cells. It is important that the disturbances in 1,2-DAG formation in HPBL obtained from patients with BC were identical with those observed earlier in other forms of cancer. Conclusions. We conclude that the regularities revealed are common characteristics for all the types of malignancy studied and can be used as additional testing parameters for cancer definition and individual correction of the chemotherapy programs for disease treatment

  18. Is inositol (1,3,4,5)-tetrakisphosphate a new second messenger?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, C.A.; Williamson, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Hormone-stimulated hydrolysis of inositol (Ins) lipids results in the rapid formation of Ins(1,4,5)P 3 , the second messenger for intracellular Ca 2+ mobilization. Recently, a more polar inositol phosphate, Ins(1,3,4,5)P 4 as well as its probable hydrolysis product Ins(1,3,4)P 3 have been reported to accumulate in carbachol-stimulated brain slices. Vasopressin addition to hepatocytes prelabeled with [ 3 H]-Ins also showed a rapid increase of Ins(1,3,4,5)P 4 , which was similar to that of Ins(1,4,5)P 3 , while the accumulation of Ins(1,3,4)P 3 was slower. In order to examine whether Ins(1,3,4,5)P 4 has any functional effects on Ca 2+ homeostasis, it was synthesized enzymatically from [ 3 H]-Ins(1,4,5)P 3 using a partially purified phosphoinositol kinase activity from rat brain cortex. [ 3 H]-labeled inositol phosphates were separated by anion exchange chromatography and analyzed by HPLC using ammonium formate/phosphoric acid gradient elution. Preliminary experiments indicate that Ins(1,3,4,5)P 4 up to 10 μM does not release Ca 2+ from vesicular pools in saponin-permeabilized hepatocytes. It has a slight inhibitory effect on Ins(1,4,5)P 3 -induced Ca 2+ release. The effect of Ins(1,3,4,5)P 4 on plasma membrane Ca 2+ fluxes are presently being investigated

  19. cCMP, cUMP, cTMP, cIMP and cXMP as possible second messengers: development of a hypothesis based on studies with soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1).

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    Beste, Kerstin Y; Seifert, Roland

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate are second messengers that regulate multiple physiological functions. The existence of additional cyclic nucleotides in mammalian cells was postulated many years ago, but technical problems hampered development of the field. Using highly specific and sensitive mass spectrometry methods, soluble guanylyl cyclase has recently been shown to catalyze the formation of several cyclic nucleotides in vitro. This minireview discusses the broad substrate-specificity of soluble guanylyl cyclase and the possible second messenger roles of cyclic nucleotides other than adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. We hope that this article stimulates productive and critical research in an area that has been neglected for many years.

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, estrogenic responses and biotransformation system in the liver of salmon exposed to tributyltin and second messenger activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Kortner, Trond M.; Arukwe, Augustine

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms by which organotin compounds produce modulations of the endocrine systems and other biological responses are not fully understood. In this study, juvenile salmon were force-fed diet containing TBT (0: solvent control, 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg fish) for 72 h. Subsequently, fish exposed to solvent control and 10 mg TBT were exposed to waterborne concentration (200 μg/l) of the adenylate cyclase (AC) stimulator, forskolin for 2 and 4 h. The overall aim of the study was to explore whether TBT endocrine disruptive effects involve second messenger activation. Liver was sampled from individual fish (n = 8) at the end of the exposures. The transcription patterns of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isotype and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1), aromatase isoform, estrogen receptor-α (ERα), pregnane X receptor (PXR), CYP3A and glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Our data showed a consistent increase in PPARα, PPARβ and PPARγ mRNA and protein expression after TBT exposure that were inversely correlated with ACOX1 mRNA levels. Forskolin produced PPAR isotype-specific mRNA and protein effects that were modulated by TBT. ACOX1 expression was decreased (at 2 h) and increased (at 4 h) by forskolin and the presence of TBT potentiated these effects. TBT apparently increased mRNA and protein levels of cyp19a, compared to the solvent control, whereas cyp19b mRNA levels were unaffected by TBT treatment. Combined TBT and forskolin exposure produced respective decrease and increase of mRNA levels of cyp19a and cyp19b, compared with control. TBT decreased ERα mRNA at low dose (1 mg/kg) and forskolin exposure alone produced a consistent decrease of ERα mRNA levels that were not affected by the presence of TBT. Interestingly, PXR and CYP3A mRNA levels were differentially affected, either decreased or increased, after exposure to TBT and forskolin, singly and also in combination. GST mRNA was

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, estrogenic responses and biotransformation system in the liver of salmon exposed to tributyltin and second messenger activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlikova, Nela [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Hogskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); RECETOX Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Masaryk University, Kamenice 3, CZ62500 Brno (Czech Republic); Kortner, Trond M. [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Hogskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Arukwe, Augustine, E-mail: arukwe@bio.ntnu.no [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Hogskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    The mechanisms by which organotin compounds produce modulations of the endocrine systems and other biological responses are not fully understood. In this study, juvenile salmon were force-fed diet containing TBT (0: solvent control, 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg fish) for 72 h. Subsequently, fish exposed to solvent control and 10 mg TBT were exposed to waterborne concentration (200 {mu}g/l) of the adenylate cyclase (AC) stimulator, forskolin for 2 and 4 h. The overall aim of the study was to explore whether TBT endocrine disruptive effects involve second messenger activation. Liver was sampled from individual fish (n = 8) at the end of the exposures. The transcription patterns of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isotype and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1), aromatase isoform, estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}), pregnane X receptor (PXR), CYP3A and glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Our data showed a consistent increase in PPAR{alpha}, PPAR{beta} and PPAR{gamma} mRNA and protein expression after TBT exposure that were inversely correlated with ACOX1 mRNA levels. Forskolin produced PPAR isotype-specific mRNA and protein effects that were modulated by TBT. ACOX1 expression was decreased (at 2 h) and increased (at 4 h) by forskolin and the presence of TBT potentiated these effects. TBT apparently increased mRNA and protein levels of cyp19a, compared to the solvent control, whereas cyp19b mRNA levels were unaffected by TBT treatment. Combined TBT and forskolin exposure produced respective decrease and increase of mRNA levels of cyp19a and cyp19b, compared with control. TBT decreased ER{alpha} mRNA at low dose (1 mg/kg) and forskolin exposure alone produced a consistent decrease of ER{alpha} mRNA levels that were not affected by the presence of TBT. Interestingly, PXR and CYP3A mRNA levels were differentially affected, either decreased or increased, after exposure to TBT and forskolin, singly

  2. Second messenger/signal transduction pathways in major mood disorders: moving from membrane to mechanism of action, part I: major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niciu, Mark J; Ionescu, Dawn F; Mathews, Daniel C; Richards, Erica M; Zarate, Carlos A

    2013-10-01

    The etiopathogenesis and treatment of major mood disorders have historically focused on modulation of monoaminergic (serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine) and amino acid [γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate] receptors at the plasma membrane. Although the activation and inhibition of these receptors acutely alter local neurotransmitter levels, their neuropsychiatric effects are not immediately observed. This time lag implicates intracellular neuroplasticity as primary in the mechanism of action of antidepressants and mood stabilizers. The modulation of intracellular second messenger/signal transduction cascades affects neurotrophic pathways that are both necessary and sufficient for monoaminergic and amino acid-based treatments. In this review, we will discuss the evidence in support of intracellular mediators in the pathophysiology and treatment of preclinical models of despair and major depressive disorder (MDD). More specifically, we will focus on the following pathways: cAMP/PKA/CREB, neurotrophin-mediated (MAPK and others), p11, Wnt/Fz/Dvl/GSK3β, and NFκB/ΔFosB. We will also discuss recent discoveries with rapidly acting antidepressants, which activate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and release of inhibition on local translation via elongation factor stimulation. Throughout this discourse, we will highlight potential intracellular targets for therapeutic intervention. Finally, future clinical implications are discussed.

  3. Structure of Human cGAS Reveals a Conserved Family of Second-Messenger Enzymes in Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Kranzusch

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune recognition of foreign nucleic acids induces protective interferon responses. Detection of cytosolic DNA triggers downstream immune signaling through activation of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS. We report here the crystal structure of human cGAS, revealing an unanticipated zinc-ribbon DNA-binding domain appended to a core enzymatic nucleotidyltransferase scaffold. The catalytic core of cGAS is structurally homologous to the RNA-sensing enzyme, 2′-5′ oligo-adenylate synthase (OAS, and divergent C-terminal domains account for specific ligand-activation requirements of each enzyme. We show that the cGAS zinc ribbon is essential for STING-dependent induction of the interferon response and that conserved amino acids displayed within the intervening loops are required for efficient cytosolic DNA recognition. These results demonstrate that cGAS and OAS define a family of innate immunity sensors and that structural divergence from a core nucleotidyltransferase enables second-messenger responses to distinct foreign nucleic acids.

  4. Cyclic [G(2',5')pA(3',5')p] is the metazoan second messenger produced by DNA-activated cyclic GMP-AMP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pu; Ascano, Manuel; Wu, Yang; Barchet, Winfried; Gaffney, Barbara L; Zillinger, Thomas; Serganov, Artem A; Liu, Yizhou; Jones, Roger A; Hartmann, Gunther; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2013-05-23

    Recent studies identified cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) as a metazoan second messenger triggering an interferon response. cGAMP is generated from GTP and ATP by cytoplasmic dsDNA sensor cGAMP synthase (cGAS). We combined structural, chemical, biochemical, and cellular assays to demonstrate that this second messenger contains G(2',5')pA and A(3',5')pG phosphodiester linkages, designated c[G(2',5')pA(3',5')p]. We show that, upon dsDNA binding, cGAS is activated through conformational transitions, resulting in formation of a catalytically competent and accessible nucleotide-binding pocket for generation of c[G(2',5')pA(3',5')p]. We demonstrate that cyclization occurs in a stepwise manner through initial generation of 5'-pppG(2',5')pA prior to cyclization to c[G(2',5')pA(3',5')p], with the latter positioned precisely in the catalytic pocket. Mutants of cGAS dsDNA-binding or catalytic pocket residues exhibit reduced or abrogated activity. Our studies have identified c[G(2',5')pA(3',5')p] as a founding member of a family of metazoan 2',5'-containing cyclic heterodinucleotide second messengers distinct from bacterial 3',5' cyclic dinucleotides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of Ca+2 and other second messengers in excitatory amino acid receptor mediated neurodegeneration: clinical perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Belhage, B; Frandsen, A

    1997-01-01

    Neurodegeneration associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy, Huntington's Chorea, Alzheimer's disease, and olivoponto cerebellar atrophy or with energy failure such as ischemia, hypoxia, and hypoglycemia proceeds subsequent to overexposure of neurons to excitatory amino acids of which...... glutamate and aspartate may be quantitatively the most important. The toxic action of glutamate and aspartate is mediated through activation of glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA subtypes. Antagonists for these receptors can act as neuroprotectants both in in vitro model...

  6. Cyclic [G(2′,5′)pA(3′,5′)p] Is the Metazoan Second Messenger Produced by DNA-Activated Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Pu; Ascano, Manuel; Wu, Yang; Barchet, Winfried; Gaffney, Barbara L.; Zillinger, Thomas; Serganov, Artem A.; Liu, Yizhou; Jones, Roger A.; Hartmann, Gunther; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies identified cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) as a metazoan second messenger triggering an interferon response. cGAMP is generated from GTP and ATP by cytoplasmic dsDNA sensor cGAMP synthase (cGAS). We combined structural, chemical, biochemical, and cellular assays to demonstrate that this second messenger contains G(2′,5′)pA and A(3′,5′)pG phosphodiester linkages, designated c[G(2′,5′) pA(3′,5′)p]. We show that, upon dsDNA binding, cGAS is activated through conformational transitions, res...

  7. Hydrogen peroxide is a second messenger in the salicylic acid-triggered adventitious rooting process in mung bean seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    Full Text Available In plants, salicylic acid (SA is a signaling molecule that regulates disease resistance responses, such as systemic acquired resistance (SAR and hypertensive response (HR. SA has been implicated as participating in various biotic and abiotic stresses. This study was conducted to investigate the role of SA in adventitious root formation (ARF in mung bean (Phaseolus radiatus L hypocotyl cuttings. We observed that hypocotyl treatment with SA could significantly promote the adventitious root formation, and its effects were dose and time dependent. Explants treated with SA displayed a 130% increase in adventitious root number compared with control seedlings. The role of SA in mung bean hypocotyl ARF as well as its interaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were also elucidated. Pretreatment of mung bean explants with N, N'-dimethylthiourea (DMTU, a scavenger for H2O2, resulted in a significant reduction of SA-induced ARF. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, a specific inhibitor of membrane-linked NADPH oxidase, also inhibited the effect of adventitious rooting triggered by SA treatment. The determination of the endogenous H2O2 level indicated that the seedlings treated with SA could induce H2O2 accumulation compared with the control treatment. Our results revealed a distinctive role of SA in the promotion of adventitious rooting via the process of H2O2 accumulation. This conclusion was further supported by antioxidant enzyme activity assays. Based on these results, we conclude that the accumulation of free H2O2 might be a downstream event in response to SA-triggered adventitious root formation in mung bean seedlings.

  8. Cyclic [G(2′,5′)pA(3′,5′)p] Is the Metazoan Second Messenger Produced by DNA-Activated Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pu; Ascano, Manuel; Wu, Yang; Barchet, Winfried; Gaffney, Barbara L.; Zillinger, Thomas; Serganov, Artem A.; Liu, Yizhou; Jones, Roger A.; Hartmann, Gunther; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent studies identified cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) as a metazoan second messenger triggering an interferon response. cGAMP is generated from GTP and ATP by cytoplasmic dsDNA sensor cGAMP synthase (cGAS). We combined structural, chemical, biochemical, and cellular assays to demonstrate that this second messenger contains G(2′,5′)pA and A(3′,5′)pG phosphodiester linkages, designated c[G(2′,5′) pA(3′,5′)p]. We show that, upon dsDNA binding, cGAS is activated through conformational transitions, resulting in formation of a catalytically competent and accessible nucleotide-binding pocket for generation of c[G(2′,5′)pA(3′,5′)p]. We demonstrate that cyclization occurs in a stepwise manner through initial generation of 5′-pppG(2′,5′)pA prior to cyclization to c[G(2′,5′)pA(3′,5′)p], with the latter positioned precisely in the catalytic pocket. Mutants of cGAS dsDNA-binding or catalytic pocket residues exhibit reduced or abrogated activity. Our studies have identified c[G(2′,5′)pA(3′,5′)p] as a founding member of a family of metazoan 2′,5′-containing cyclic heterodinucleotide second messengers distinct from bacterial 3′,5′ cyclic dinucleotides. PMID:23647843

  9. Customer's potential value: The role of learning

    OpenAIRE

    Komulainen, Hanna; Mainela, Tuija; Tähtinen, Jaana

    2013-01-01

    Current views on value creation emphasize the role of the customer, mutual investments, and value co-creation. Nevertheless, at present the customer-focused research concentrates on value expectations and value experiences as outcomes but disregards the analysis of potential value that is dependent on the customer's activity and learning in the process. The present study explores customer perceived value as a multidimensional phenomenon incorporating expected, realized, and potential dimensio...

  10. Potential coupling effects of ammonia-oxidizing and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria on completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite biofilm formation induced by the second messenger cyclic diguanylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Sitong; Xu, Xiaochen; Zhao, Chuanqi; Yang, Fenglin; Wang, Dong

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) on the coupling effects between ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria for the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) biofilm formation in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR). Analysis of the quantity of EPS and cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) confirmed that the contents of polysaccharides and c-di-GMP were correlated in the AOB sludge, anammox sludge, and CANON biofilm. The anammox sludge secreted more EPS (especially polysaccharides) than AOB with a markedly higher c-di-GMP content, which could be used by the bacteria to regulate the synthesis of exopolysaccharides that are ultimately used as a fixation matrix, for the adhesion of biomass. Indeed, increased intracellular c-di-GMP concentrations in the anammox sludge enhanced the regulation of polysaccharides to promote the adhesion of AOB and formation of the CANON biofilm. Overall, the results of this study provide new comprehensive information regarding the coupling effects of AOB and anammox bacteria for the nitrogen removal process.

  11. Potential physiological role of plant glycosidase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellincampi, D.; Carmadella, L.; Delcour, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes including glycosidases, transglycosidases, glycosyltransferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases are responsible for the enzymatic processing of carbohydrates in plants. A number of carbohydrate-active enzymes are produced by microbial pathogens...... and insects responsible of severe crop losses. Plants have evolved proteinaceous inhibitors to modulate the activity of several of these enzymes. The continuing discovery of new inhibitors indicates that this research area is still unexplored and may lead to new exciting developments. To date, the role...... of the inhibitors is not completely understood. Here we review recent results obtained on the best characterised inhibitors, pointing to their possible biological role in vivo. Results recently obtained with plant transformation technology indicate that this class of inhibitors has potential biotechnological...

  12. Selenium: its potential role in male infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguntibeju, O.O.; Esterhuyse, J.S.; Truter, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, biomedical research is showing interest in the anti-oxidant activity of selenium. This could be due to compelling evidence that reported that oxidative damage to cells and cell membranes is one of the causative agents in the pathogenesis of many disease states including male infertility. Selenium is a trace element which may be found in soil, water and some foods and is considered to be an essential element which plays an active role in several metabolic pathways and is believed to perform several important roles in the human body. These roles include anti-oxidative activities at cellular level and participating in different enzyme systems. Selenium also serves as a vital component in the maintenance of muscle cell and red blood cell integrity, playing a role in the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA). It has also been reported that selenium is essential in the detoxification of toxic metals in the human system, foetal respiration and energy transfer reactions as well as in the production of sperm cells. It is thought that male infertility can be the result of a selenium deficiency as the absence of selenium in the testicular tissues induces degeneration which results in the active impairment of sperm motility as the first indication of impending infertility. This review paper investigates the role of selenium in male infertility. (author)

  13. Daclatasvir: potential role in hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee C

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Choongho Lee College of Pharmacy, Dongguk University-Seoul, Goyang, Republic of Korea  Abstract: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is responsible for the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. It has been a tremendous burden on global health care systems. With the advent of a number of new direct-acting and host-targeting antiviral agents, current interferon-α- and ribavirin-based HCV therapy has started to move towards an interferon-sparing or even interferon-free strategy. In this regard, a recently identified NS5A inhibitor, daclatasvir, showed a great promise in clinical trials as another new class of direct-acting anti-HCV therapeutics, with a distinct mechanism of action. In this review, a variety of preclinical as well as clinical proof-of-concept studies of daclatasvir, including the studies of its discovery, mechanism of action, viral resistance, and host polymorphism profiles are reviewed. In addition, a role of daclatasvir in the future therapy for HCV patients is discussed briefly. Keywords: hepatitis C virus, nonstructural protein 5A, NS5A inhibitor, hepatitis C treatment

  14. Selected soil enzymes: Examples of their potential roles in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil enzymes regulate ecosystem functioning and in particular play a key role in nutrient cycling. In this review we briefly summarise potential roles of selected enzymes such as amylase, arylsulphatases, -glucosidase, cellulose, chitinase, dehydrogenase, phosphatase, protease and urease in the ecosystem. We also ...

  15. Are all pharmacy staff interested in potential future roles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braund, Rhiannon; Chesney, Kate Marie; Keast, Emilia Paulina; Ng, Lye Jinn; Qi, Sarah; Samaranayaka, Sashika; Wang, Eddie

    2012-12-01

    To determine the current perceived roles and responsibilities of pharmacy staff in community pharmacies in New Zealand, and attitudes to proposed new advanced roles for pharmacy staff. Structured interviews were conducted within five community pharmacies, including at least two pharmacists, two dispensary staff and two pharmacy assistants. The interviews were structured to determine previous experience, current roles and responsibilities and the perceived future roles of pharmacy staff within a community pharmacy setting. Thematic analysis from 27 interviews identified key findings. Current roles appeared to be fairly well defined. Pharmacy assistants listed key roles as customer interactions and sales focus, noting that the dispensary was outside their area of responsibility. Technicians identified their role as being dispensary focused while pharmacists saw their role as the 'final check' to ensure accuracy as well as providing dispensing, counselling and managerial roles. With potential future roles, the assistants were less interested than the other groups, citing contentment with current situation and training as a barrier. Some technicians indicated an interest in furthering their roles, but many were reluctant and saw that additional training was too time consuming. Whilst pharmacists appeared to be interested in further scopes of practice, they appeared more reluctant to do this at the expense of handing dispensing responsibility to a non-pharmacist. Whilst there is a push for pharmacists to provide advanced clinical services, it is important to acknowledge that many staff working within community pharmacies are satisfied with their current role. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Potential protective role of hydrogen against cisplatininduced side ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potential protective role of hydrogen against cisplatininduced side effects during chemotherapy: A mini-review of a novel hypothesis for antagonism of hydrogen. ... Molecular hydrogen has been shown to have therapeutic effects against damage to various organs (especially kidney, brain and liver) caused by ischemic ...

  17. The Potential Role of Artificial Intelligence Technology in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Abdel-Badeeh M.

    The field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Education has traditionally a technology-based focus, looking at the ways in which AI can be used in building intelligent educational software. In addition AI can also provide an excellent methodology for learning and reasoning from the human experiences. This paper presents the potential role of AI in…

  18. Potential ecological roles of flavonoids from Stellera chamaejasme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Zeng, Liming; Jin, Hui; Qin, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae), a perennial weed, distributes widely in the grasslands of Russia, Mongolia and China. The plant synthesizes various secondary metabolites including a group of flavonoids. To our knowledge, flavonoids play important roles in the interactions between plants and the environment. So, what are the benefits to S. chamaejasme from producing these flavonoids? Here, we discuss the potential ecological role of flavonoids from S. chamaejasme in protecting the plant from insects and other herbivores, as well as pathogens and competing plant species, and new data are provided on the phytotoxicity of flavonoids from S. chamaejasme toward Poa annua L.

  19. The potential role of electrolytic hydrogen in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.

    1982-03-01

    The potential role of electrolytic hydrogen in Canada is assessed for the period 1980 to 2025 for large-scale uses only. Present uses of hydrogen, and specifically electrolytic hydrogen, are discussed briefly and hydrogen production processes are summarized. Only hydrogen derived from natural gas, coal, or electrolysis of sater are considered. Cost estimates of electrolytic hydrogen are obtained from a parametric equation, comparing values for unipolar water elecctrklyser technologies with those for bipolar electrolysers. Both by-products of electrolytic hydrogen production, namely heavy water and oxygen, are evaluated. Electrolytic hydrogen, based on non-fossil primary energy sources, is also considered as ankther 'liquid fuel option' for Canada along with the alcohols. The market potential for hydrogen in general and electrolytic hydrogen is assessed. Results show that the market potential for electrolytic hydrogen is large by the year 2025

  20. Mast cells: potential positive and negative roles in tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marichal, Thomas; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J

    2013-11-01

    Mast cells are immune cells that reside in virtually all vascularized tissues. Upon activation by diverse mechanisms, mast cells can secrete a broad array of biologically active products that either are stored in the cytoplasmic granules of the cells (e.g., histamine, heparin, various proteases) or are produced de novo upon cell stimulation (e.g., prostaglandins, leukotrienes, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors). Mast cells are best known for their effector functions during anaphylaxis and acute IgE-associated allergic reactions, but they also have been implicated in a wide variety of processes that maintain health or contribute to disease. There has been particular interest in the possible roles of mast cells in tumor biology. In vitro studies have shown that mast cells have the potential to influence many aspects of tumor biology, including tumor development, tumor-induced angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling, and the shaping of adaptive immune responses to tumors. Yet, the actual contributions of mast cells to tumor biology in vivo remain controversial. Here, we review some basic features of mast cell biology with a special emphasis on those relevant to their potential roles in tumors. We discuss how using in vivo tumor models in combination with models in which mast cell function can be modulated has implicated mast cells in the regulation of host responses to tumors. Finally, we summarize data from studies of human tumors that suggest either beneficial or detrimental roles for mast cells in tumors. ©2013 AACR.

  1. [The role of inositol deficiency in the etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimiuk, Artur J; Szamatowicz, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Inositol acts as a second messenger in insulin signaling pathway Literature data suggest inositol deficiency in insulin-resistant women with the polycystic ovary syndrome. Supplementation of myo-inisitol decreases insulin resistance as it works as an insulin sensitizing agent. The positive role of myo-inositol in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome has been of increased evidence recently The present review presents the effects of myo-inositol on the ovarian, hormonal and metabolic parameters in women with PCOS.

  2. Recent Advances on the Role of G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Hypoxia-Mediated Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Lappano, Rosamaria; Rigiracciolo, Damiano; De Marco, Paola; Avino, Silvia; Cappello, Anna Rita; Rosano, Camillo; Maggiolini, Marcello; De Francesco, Ernestina Marianna

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are cell surface proteins mainly involved in signal transmission; however, they play a role also in several pathophysiological conditions. Chemically heterogeneous molecules like peptides, hormones, lipids, and neurotransmitters activate second messengers and induce several biological responses by binding to these seven transmembrane receptors, which are coupled to heterotrimeric G proteins. Recently, additional molecular mechanisms have been involved in GP...

  3. Vitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease: Potential Role in Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaza, Jorge N.; Contreras, Sandra; Garcia, Leah A.; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Gibbons, Gary; Shohet, Ralph; Martins, David; Norris, Keith C.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), which includes coronary artery disease and stroke, is the leading cause of mortality in the nation. Excess CVD morbidity and premature mortality in the African American community is one of the most striking examples of racial/ethnic disparities in health outcomes. African Americans also suffer from increased rates of hypovitaminosis D, which has emerged as an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. This overview examines the potential role of hypovitaminosis D as a contributor to racial and ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD). We review the epidemiology of vitamin D and CVD in African Americans and the emerging biological roles of vitamin D in key CVD signaling pathways that may contribute to the epidemiological findings and provide the foundation for future therapeutic strategies for reducing health disparities. PMID:22102304

  4. Glucocorticoid: A potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiancheng; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Wenbin; Xue, Yanru; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Jingbao; Shang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of animals and humans to conditions of microgravity, including actual spaceflight and simulated microgravity, results in numerous negative alterations to bone structure and mechanical properties. Although there are abundant researches on bone loss in microgravity, the explicit mechanism is not completely understood. At present, it is widely accepted that the absence of mechanical stimulus plays a predominant role in bone homeostasis disorders in conditions of weightlessness. However, aside from mechanical unloading, nonmechanical factors such as various hormones, cytokines, dietary nutrition, etc. are important as well in microgravity induced bone loss. The stress-induced increase in endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) levels is inevitable in microgravity environments. Moreover, it is well known that GCs have a detrimental effect to bone health at excess concentrations. Therefore, GC plays a potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss. This review summarizeds several studies and their prospective solutions to this hypothesis.

  5. Potential Role of Inorganic Confined Environments in Prebiotic Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Avinash Vicholous; Jaber, Maguy; Brack, André; Foucher, Frédéric; Kee, Terence P; Georgelin, Thomas; Westall, Frances

    2018-03-05

    A concise outlook on the potential role of confinement in phosphorylation and phosphate condensation pertaining to prebiotic chemistry is presented. Inorganic confinement is a relatively uncharted domain in studies concerning prebiotic chemistry, and even more so in terms of experimentation. However, molecular crowding within confined dimensions is central to the functioning of contemporary biology. There are numerous advantages to confined environments and an attempt to highlight this fact, within this article, has been undertaken, keeping in context the limitations of aqueous phase chemistry in phosphorylation and, to a certain extent, traditional approaches in prebiotic chemistry.

  6. Potential roles for transposable elements in creating imprinted expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sarah N; Springer, Nathan M

    2018-04-01

    Changes in gene expression can have profound effects on phenotype. Nature has provided many complex patterns of gene regulation such as imprinting. Imprinted genes exhibit differences in the expression of the maternal and paternal alleles, even though they reside in the same nucleus with access to the same trans-acting factors. Significant attention has been focused on the potential reasons that imprinted expression could be beneficial and stabilized by selection. However, less attention has focused on understanding how imprinted expression might arise or decay. We discuss the evidence for frequent turnover of imprinted expression based on evolutionary analyses in plants and the potential role for transposable elements (TEs) in creating imprinted expression patterns. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential role of viruses in white plague coral disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer, Nitzan; Brandt, Marilyn E; Correa, Adrienne M S; Smith, Tyler B; Thurber, Rebecca Vega

    2014-02-01

    White plague (WP)-like diseases of tropical corals are implicated in reef decline worldwide, although their etiological cause is generally unknown. Studies thus far have focused on bacterial or eukaryotic pathogens as the source of these diseases; no studies have examined the role of viruses. Using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 454 pyrosequencing, we compared 24 viral metagenomes generated from Montastraea annularis corals showing signs of WP-like disease and/or bleaching, control conspecific corals, and adjacent seawater. TEM was used for visual inspection of diseased coral tissue. No bacteria were visually identified within diseased coral tissues, but viral particles and sequence similarities to eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA viruses and their associated satellites (SCSDVs) were abundant in WP diseased tissues. In contrast, sequence similarities to SCSDVs were not found in any healthy coral tissues, suggesting SCSDVs might have a role in WP disease. Furthermore, Herpesviridae gene signatures dominated healthy tissues, corroborating reports that herpes-like viruses infect all corals. Nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV) sequences, similar to those recently identified in cultures of Symbiodinium (the algal symbionts of corals), were most common in bleached corals. This finding further implicates that these NCLDV viruses may have a role in bleaching, as suggested in previous studies. This study determined that a specific group of viruses is associated with diseased Caribbean corals and highlights the potential for viral disease in regional coral reef decline.

  8. Trichomonas vaginalis: pathogenicity and potential role in human reproductive failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielczarek, Ewelina; Blaszkowska, Joanna

    2016-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, which colonizes the genitourinary tract of men and women, is a sexually transmitted parasite causing symptomatic or asymptomatic trichomoniasis. The host-parasite relationship is very complex, and clinical symptoms cannot likely be attributed to a single pathogenic effect. Among the many factors responsible for interactions between T. vaginalis and host tissues, contact-dependent and contact-independent mechanisms are important in pathogenicity, as is the immune response. This review focuses on the potential virulence properties of T. vaginalis and its role in female and male infertility. It highlights the association between T. vaginalis infection and serious adverse health consequences experienced by women, including infertility, preterm birth and low-birth-weight infants. Long-term clinical observations and results of in vitro experimental studies indicate that in men, trichomoniasis has been also associated with infertility through inflammatory damage to the genitourinary tract or interference with sperm function. These results contribute significantly to improving our knowledge of the role of parasitic virulence factors in the development of infection and its role in human infertility.

  9. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Edlund

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts.

  10. The role and potential of information technology in agricultural improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Slavoljub

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The agro-industrial sector in developing countriesis faced with challenges, such as requirement for increase of food production and yield and creation of opportunity for employment of rural and poor population. In addition, the agricultural sector is influenced by global factors and fast changes. These facts indicate that there is great need for information and information technologies (IT, which can be used to cope with the challenges and changes and to improve agricultural production and marketing. However, the potential of IT is not fully utilized in agriculture. Implementation of IT in agricultural sector and rural areas is relatively slow in comparison to the other sectors of the economy where contemporary IT has been implemented at high speed. The aim of the paper is to analyze role, potential and contribution of IT in agribusiness and to explain opportunities for use of IT in many fields of agricultural sector. Our findings are based on economic theory and available literature, and they suggest that IT has great potential for supporting farmers and the other stakeholders in improvement of efficiency, effectiveness and productivity of agriculture. However, the stakeholders have to cope with many limitations and problems in IT implementation and use.

  11. The potential protective role of taurine against experimental allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sun-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2017-09-01

    Taurine has been widely evaluated as a potential therapeutic agent in chronic inflammatory disorders and various infections. However, the potential role of taurine in regulating allergic inflammatory responses is currently unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effects of taurine on the levels of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines and activation of caspase-1 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB as well as the phosphorylations of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-triggered human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells. Furthermore, we assessed the therapeutic effects of taurine on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis (AR) animal models. Here, the obtained results showed that taurine dose-dependently inhibited the production and mRNA expression of TSLP and pro-inflammatory cytokines in HMC-1 cells exposed to PMACI. Taurine attenuated the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 in activated HMC-1 cells. Moreover, taurine brought a significant inhibition of the activities of NF-κB and caspase-1. In an OVA-induced AR animal model, the increased levels of nose rubbing, histamine, immunoglobulin E, TSLP, and interleukin IL-1β were dramatically reduced by the administration of taurine. In summary, taurine could serve as potential novel remedy of allergic inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Role Playing Game (RPG on nursing undergraduate course: educational potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Nathale Soares

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of a Role Playing Game as an educational strategy in Undergraduate Nursing course, emphasizing its subjective implications in understanding aspects of the profession. This is a qualitative study, conducted through an evaluative research, of deployment analysis type. Nursing students of the 3rd period participated. The instrument to collection was Memories of Game, reports prepared by students after game sessions. The game is a non-traditional educational strategy that enabled approach to students through professional practice, active participation, self-reflection and reflection on professional practice. This strategy favored individualization processes, allowing students to experience situations similar to the nursing practice and exercise skills such as teamwork and creativity. The expansion of studies that address the subjective processes in higher education, through simulation games, can contribute to better design of health development processes.

  13. The potential role of sclerostin in the development of osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Jianlin; Lin, S.; Dong, Q

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a debilitating degenerative joint disease which is greatly influenced by alterations in the local mechanical loading environment in the joint. The exact aetiology of OA remains unknown, but loss of articular cartilage, subchondral sclerosis, and bone remodeling has been known...... and cartilage/subchondral in both physiological and pathological conditions may lead to development of more effective strategies for treating OA patients. © 2016, E-Century Publishing Corporation. All rights reserved....... of literatures have reported about the relation between Sclerostin and OA. In this review we have tried to summarize the current knowledge on the effect of Sclerostin and to explore the potential role of Sclerostin during the process of OA. A better understanding of the relationship between Sclerostin...

  14. Potential role of nuclear power in developing and transition economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiage, D.; Dierstein, P.

    1995-01-01

    The potential role of nuclear power is different in developing or in transition economies; in developing countries such as China, the growth of electricity consumption is high and the construction of several standardized plants is economically justified; in transitional economies, such as Ukraine, the needs are uncertain, old and unsafe plants have to be decommissioned and uncompleted nuclear plants (due to financial problems) should be completed. Nuclear power may provide the developing and transition economies with several advantages such as energy independence and fuel supply security, minimal environmental pollution, support to local industry and employment. It also means the support of national authorities and the development of a suitable infrastructure for plant safety and waste management, financial help and local population acceptance

  15. The Potential Role of Cache Mechanism for Complicated Design Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriyasu, Hirokawa; Fujita, Kikuo

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential role of cache mechanism for complicated design optimization While design optimization is an application of mathematical programming techniques to engineering design problems over numerical computation, its progress has been coevolutionary. The trend in such progress indicates that more complicated applications become the next target of design optimization beyond growth of computational resources. As the progress in the past two decades had required response surface techniques, decomposition techniques, etc., any new framework must be introduced for the future of design optimization methods. This paper proposes a possibility of what we call cache mechanism for mediating the coming challenge and briefly demonstrates some promises in the idea of Voronoi diagram based cumulative approximation as an example of its implementation, development of strict robust design, extension of design optimization for product variety

  16. The potential role of biomarkers in predicting gestational diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huguette S Brink

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes (GD is a frequent complication during pregnancy and is associated with maternal and neonatal complications. It is suggested that a disturbing environment for the foetus, such as impaired glucose metabolism during intrauterine life, may result in enduring epigenetic changes leading to increased disease risk in adult life. Hence, early prediction of GD is vital. Current risk prediction models are based on maternal and clinical parameters, lacking a strong predictive value. Adipokines are mainly produced by adipocytes and suggested to be a link between obesity and its cardiovascular complications. Various adipokines, including adiponectin, leptin and TNFα, have shown to be dysregulated in GD. This review aims to outline biomarkers potentially associated with the pathophysiology of GD and discuss the role of integrating predictive biomarkers in current clinical risk prediction models, in order to enhance the identification of those at risk.

  17. Expression Patterns and Potential Biological Roles of Dip2a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqing Zhang

    Full Text Available Disconnected (disco-interacting protein 2 homolog A is a member of the DIP2 protein family encoded by Dip2a gene. Dip2a expression pattern has never been systematically studied. Functions of Dip2a in embryonic development and adult are not known. To investigate Dip2a gene expression and function in embryo and adult, a Dip2a-LacZ mouse model was generated by insertion of β-Gal cDNA after Dip2a promoter using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Dip2a-LacZ mouse was designed to be a lacZ reporter mouse as well as a Dip2a knockout mouse. Heterozygous mice were used to study endogenous Dip2a expression and homozygotes to study DIP2A-associated structure and function. LacZ staining indicated that Dip2a is broadly expressed in neuronal, reproductive and vascular tissues, as well as in heart, kidney, liver and lung. Results demonstrate that Dip2a is expressed in ectoderm-derived tissues in developing embryos. Adult tissues showed rich staining in neurons, mesenchymal, endothelial, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes by cell types. The expression pattern highly overlaps with FSTL1 and supports previous report that DIP2A to be potential receptor of FSTL1 and its protective roles of cardiomyocytes. Broad and intense embryonic and adult expression of Dip2a has implied their multiple structural and physiological roles.

  18. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vicari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2, encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  19. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Luisa; Calabrese, Giovanna; Forte, Stefano; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Colarossi, Cristina; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2), encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  20. The potential role of carbon labeling in a green economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Mark A.; Vandenbergh, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, labeling schemes that focus on a wide range of environmental and social metrics have proliferated. Although little empirical evidence has been generated yet with respect to carbon footprint labels, much can be learned from our experience with similar product labels. We first review the theory and evidence on the role of product labeling in affecting consumer and firm behavior. Next, we consider the role of governments and nongovernmental organizations, concluding that international, multistakeholder organizations have a critical part to play in setting protocols and standards. We argue that it is important to consider the entire life cycle of a product being labeled and develop an international standard for measurement and reporting. Finally, we examine the potential impact of carbon product labeling, discussing methodological and trade challenges and proposing a framework for choosing products best suited for labeling. - Highlights: ► Economic theory provides rationale for product information on carbon footprint. ► Small but growing evidence that labels will affect demand and product choice. ► International protocol using multi-stakeholder process is needed. ► Product priority should be based on life-cycle emissions and likely behavior changes. ► International trade law poses low risk for voluntary private carbon footprint labels.

  1. Helicobacter pylori Biofilm Formation and Its Potential Role in Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathroubi, Skander; Servetas, Stephanie L; Windham, Ian; Merrell, D Scott; Ottemann, Karen M

    2018-06-01

    Despite decades of effort, Helicobacter pylori infections remain difficult to treat. Over half of the world's population is infected by H. pylori , which is a major cause of duodenal and gastric ulcers as well as gastric cancer. During chronic infection, H. pylori localizes within the gastric mucosal layer, including deep within invaginations called glands; thanks to its impressive ability to survive despite the harsh acidic environment, it can persist for the host's lifetime. This ability to survive and persist in the stomach is associated with urease production, chemotactic motility, and the ability to adapt to the fluctuating environment. Additionally, biofilm formation has recently been suggested to play a role in colonization. Biofilms are surface-associated communities of bacteria that are embedded in a hydrated matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Biofilms pose a substantial health risk and are key contributors to many chronic and recurrent infections. This link between biofilm-associated bacteria and chronic infections likely results from an increased tolerance to conventional antibiotic treatments as well as immune system action. The role of this biofilm mode in antimicrobial treatment failure and H. pylori survival has yet to be determined. Furthermore, relatively little is known about the H. pylori biofilm structure or the genes associated with this mode of growth. In this review, therefore, we aim to highlight recent findings concerning H. pylori biofilms and the molecular mechanism of their formation. Additionally, we discuss the potential roles of biofilms in the failure of antibiotic treatment and in infection recurrence. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Exploring the Potential of Transient Receptor Potential: Troubleshooting Troublesome Calcium Thoroughfares in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammad Ahmad Farooqi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential-Canonical (TRPC channels are the border guards residing in the supra-molecular assembly of plasma membrane. TRPCs represent a family of channels that have dual functions of store-operated and second messenger-operated channels in a diversity of cell types. Any disruption in the spatio-temporal organization drastically influences the calcium homeostasis. This review summarizes current interpretations on the infrastructure and characteristic divalent ions regulation in molecular anomalies. A specific targeting of these channels will enable us to get a step closer to personalized medicines.

  3. The potential role of amlodipine on experimentally induced bacterial rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Tatar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Antibiotics are frequently used for the treatment of rhinosinusitis. Concerns have been raised regarding the adverse effects of antibiotics and growing resistance. The lack of development of new antibiotic compounds has increased the necessity for exploration of non-antibiotic compounds that have antibacterial activity. Amlodipine is a non-antibiotic compound with anti-inflammatory activity. Objective: In this study we aimed to investigate the potential role of amlodipine in the treatment of rhinosinusitis by evaluating its effects on tissue oxidative status, mucosal histology and inflammation. Methods: Fifteen adult albino guinea pigs were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with saline, cefazolin sodium, or amlodipine for 7 days. The control group was composed by five healthy guinea pigs. Animals were sacrificed after the treatment. Histopathological changes were identified using Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. Inflammation was assessed by Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte infiltration density. Tissue levels of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, glutathione and an oxidative product (malondialdehyde were determined. Results: In rhinosinusitis induced animals, amlodipine reduced loss of cilia, lamina propria edema and collagen deposition compared to placebo (saline and although not superior to cefazolin, amlodipine decreased polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration. The superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were reduced, whereas the malondialdehyde levels were increased significantly in all three-treatment groups compared to the control group. Amlodipine treated group showed significantly increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels and decreased malondialdehyde levels compared to all treatment groups. Conclusion: The non-antibiotic compound amlodipine may have a role in acute rhinosinusitis treatment through tissue protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  4. Metallothioneins in human tumors and potential roles in carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherian, M. George; Jayasurya, A.; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2003-12-10

    Metallothioneins (MT) are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine rich intracellular proteins, which are encoded by a family of genes containing at least 10 functional isoforms in human. The expression and induction of these proteins have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Moreover, MT may potentially activate certain transcriptional factors by donating zinc. Although MT is a cytosolic protein in resting cells, it can be translocated transiently to the cell nucleus during cell proliferation and differentiation. A number of studies have shown an increased expression of MT in various human tumors of the breast, colon, kidney, liver, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, thyroid and urinary bladder. However, MT is down-regulated in certain tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver adenocarcinoma. Hence, the expression of MT is not universal to all human tumors, but may depend on the differentiation status and proliferative index of tumors, along with other tissue factors and gene mutations. In certain tumors such as germ cell carcinoma, the expression of MT is closely related to the tumor grade and proliferative activity. Increased expression of MT has also been observed in less differentiated tumors. Thus, expression of MT may be a potential prognostic marker for certain tumors. There are few reports on the expression of the different isoforms of MT which have been analyzed by specific gene probes. They reveal that certain isoforms are expressed in specific cell types. The factors which can influence MT induction in human tumors are not yet understood. Down-regulation of MT synthesis in hepatic tumors may be related to hypermethylation of the MT-promoter or mutation of other genes such as the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In vitro studies using human cancer cells suggest a possible role for p53 and the estrogen-receptor on the expression and induction of MT in epithelial neoplastic cells

  5. Canada's potential role in the Clean Development Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pape-Salmon, A.

    2000-01-01

    The role that Canada might play in the Kyoto Protocol's Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is discussed. The CDM prescribes the way in which industrialized countries could create emission reduction credits for greenhouse gas emission reduction projects in developing countries which, in turn they could use to meet their own commitments and possibly reduce their cost of compliance with the Kyoto Protocol. While Canada does not see itself as a CDM project investor, it strongly supports private sector involvement in the CDM and believes that it has a role to play in assisting CDM investments by the Canadian private sector by facilitating desirable outcomes via international negotiations on the rules and modalities for the CDM which would minimize transaction costs; give prominence to aspects that Canada recognizes as necessary precursors to mobilizing private sector involvement in CDM activities; maximize the flexibility for use of the CDM; allow for conversion of credits between different Kyoto Mechanisms; allow for the certification of emissions sequestration from sinks; and maximize the environmental and sustainable development benefits of CDM projects. Canada also supports, along with the other members of the 'Umbrella group', the fewest possible restrictions and significant autonomy to the private sector to implement a variety of project activities in developing countries. This report provides a detailed examination of the Canadian government's views on the CDM, Canada's participation in international emission reduction projects, the factors that drive Canadian demand for greenhouse gas emission reduction offsets and the potential demand for CDM offsets, Canada's greenhouse gas emission inventory and projections, the approach of Canadian corporate investors in the CDM and Canadian technology and expertise in greenhouse gas emission reductions. Various appendices to the report contain further details on a number of cooperation agreements between Canada and other

  6. Metallothioneins in human tumors and potential roles in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherian, M. George; Jayasurya, A.; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2003-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MT) are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine rich intracellular proteins, which are encoded by a family of genes containing at least 10 functional isoforms in human. The expression and induction of these proteins have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Moreover, MT may potentially activate certain transcriptional factors by donating zinc. Although MT is a cytosolic protein in resting cells, it can be translocated transiently to the cell nucleus during cell proliferation and differentiation. A number of studies have shown an increased expression of MT in various human tumors of the breast, colon, kidney, liver, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, thyroid and urinary bladder. However, MT is down-regulated in certain tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver adenocarcinoma. Hence, the expression of MT is not universal to all human tumors, but may depend on the differentiation status and proliferative index of tumors, along with other tissue factors and gene mutations. In certain tumors such as germ cell carcinoma, the expression of MT is closely related to the tumor grade and proliferative activity. Increased expression of MT has also been observed in less differentiated tumors. Thus, expression of MT may be a potential prognostic marker for certain tumors. There are few reports on the expression of the different isoforms of MT which have been analyzed by specific gene probes. They reveal that certain isoforms are expressed in specific cell types. The factors which can influence MT induction in human tumors are not yet understood. Down-regulation of MT synthesis in hepatic tumors may be related to hypermethylation of the MT-promoter or mutation of other genes such as the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In vitro studies using human cancer cells suggest a possible role for p53 and the estrogen-receptor on the expression and induction of MT in epithelial neoplastic cells

  7. Potential Role of Honey in Learning and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahiruddin Othman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The composition and physicochemical properties of honey are variable depending on its floral source and often named according to the geographical location. The potential medicinal benefits of Tualang honey, a multifloral jungle honey found in Malaysia, have recently been attracting attention because of its reported beneficial effects in various diseases. This paper reviews the effects of honey, particularly Tualang honey, on learning and memory. Information regarding the effects of Tualang honey on learning and memory in human as well as animal models is gleaned to hypothesize its underlying mechanisms. These studies show that Tualang honey improves morphology of memory-related brain areas, reduces brain oxidative stress, increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and acetylcholine (ACh concentrations, and reduces acetylcholinesterase (AChE in the brain homogenates. Its anti-inflammatory roles in reducing inflammatory trigger and microglial activation have yet to be investigated. It is hypothesized that the improvement in learning and memory following Tualang honey supplementation is due to the significant improvement in brain morphology and enhancement of brain cholinergic system secondary to reduction in brain oxidative damage and/or upregulation of BDNF concentration. Further studies are imperative to elucidate the molecular mechanism of actions.

  8. Potential ecological roles of artemisinin produced by Artemisia annua L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsmark Jessing, Karina; Duke, Stephen O; Cedergreeen, Nina

    2014-02-01

    Artemisia annua L. (annual wormwood, Asteraceae) and its secondary metabolite artemisinin, a unique sesquiterpene lactone with an endoperoxide bridge, has gained much attention due to its antimalarial properties. Artemisinin has a complex structure that requires a significant amount of energy for the plant to synthesize. So, what are the benefits to A. annua of producing this unique compound, and what is the ecological role of artemisinin? This review addresses these questions, discussing evidence of the potential utility of artemisinin in protecting the plant from insects and other herbivores, as well as pathogens and competing plant species. Abiotic factors affecting the artemisinin production, as well as mechanisms of artemisinin release to the surroundings also are discussed, and new data are provided on the toxicity of artemisinin towards soil and aquatic organisms. The antifungal and antibacterial effects reported are not very pronounced. Several studies have reported that extracts of A. annua have insecticidal effects, though few studies have proven that artemisinin could be the single compound responsible for the observed effects. However, the pathogen(s) or insect(s) that may have provided the selection pressure for the evolution of artemisinin synthesis may not have been represented in the research thus far conducted. The relatively high level of phytotoxicity of artemisinin in soil indicates that plant/plant allelopathy could be a beneficial function of artemisinin to the producing plant. The release routes of artemisinin (movement from roots and wash off from leaf surfaces) from A. annua to the soil support the rationale for allelopathy.

  9. Selected soil enzymes: Examples of their potential roles in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-05

    Feb 5, 2008 ... Soil enzymes regulate ecosystem functioning and in particular play a key role in nutrient cycling. In ... A better understanding of the role of these soil enzyme- es activity ..... measure of any disruption caused by pesticides, trace.

  10. Nuclear energy role and potential for global sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, H.; Matsui, K.

    2006-01-01

    The long-term energy supply simulation that optimizes the energy system cost until 2100 for the world is being performed, by using the energy module of GRAPE model, where energy demand under the C02 emission constraint etc. is assumed. The model has been taken up for the trial calculation in I PCC the third report . Role and potential of nuclear energy system in the energy options is discussed here from the viewpoint of sustainable development with protecting from global warming. Taking the effort for energy conservation as major premise, carbon-sequestration for fossil fuel, renewable energy and nuclear energy should be altogether developed under the C02 constraint. Especially, fast breeder reactor will be attached importance to, as the 22nd century is approaching, due to its carbon free and resource limitless features when the nuclear generation cost is cheap as a current light water reactor level. It takes time around 30 years in order for breeding of Pu, a fast breeder reactor will begin to be introduced from around 2030. If the period for the technology establish of nuclear fuel cycle is assumed to be 30 years, it is necessary to start technical development right now. If the Kyoto Protocol, the emission constraint on only the developed countries, is extended in 21st century, it will promote the growth of nuclear power in the developed countries in the first half of the century. After 2050, the developing countries will face the shortage of uranium and plutonium. Carbon emission constraint should be covered all countries in the World not only for the developed countries but also for the developing countries. Therefore, it is important that the developing countries will use nuclear power effectively from the viewpoint of harmonization of energy growth and global environment. The policy that nuclear power is considered as Clean Development Mechanism would mitigate such global warming problems

  11. Potential role of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Hashim H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hatem Abu HashimDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, EgyptAbstract: Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent chronic inflammatory disease affecting 5%–10% of reproductive-age women, with a prevalence of 5%–50% in infertile women and >33% of women with chronic pelvic pain. Third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs are approved adjuvants for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Molecular studies have revealed the presence of aromatase P450, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ovarian estradiol, inside the endometriotic tissue, indicating local synthesis of estradiol. Thereby, AIs represent an appealing medical option for the management of different aspects of this enigmatic disease, especially pelvic pain and infertility. Accordingly, this review aims to evaluate the potential role of AIs in the treatment of endometriosis-associated symptoms, mainly pain and infertility. Notably, several studies have demonstrated that the combination of AIs with conventional therapy as oral contraceptive pills, progestins, or gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs can be used to control endometriosis-associated pain and pain recurrence in premenopausal women, particularly those with pain due to rectovaginal endometriosis refractory to other medical or surgical treatment. Some case reports have shown promising results in the treatment of postmenopausal endometriosis as first-line treatment, when surgery is contraindicated, or as second-line treatment in the case of postoperative recurrence. Third-generation AIs, especially letrozole, have challenged clomiphene citrate as an ovulation-induction agent in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and in cases of unexplained infertility. However, few studies are available regarding the use of AIs to treat endometriosis-associated infertility. Therefore, larger multicenter randomized trials using AIs for the treatment of endometriosis

  12. Characteristics and potential role of M2 macrophages in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shengyang He, Lihua Xie, Junjuan Lu, Shenghua SunDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, The Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China Background: COPD is a multi-pathogenesis disease mainly caused by smoking. A further understanding of the mechanism of smoking-related COPD might contribute to preventions and treatments of this disease in the early stages. This study was designed to identify the characteristics of M2 macrophages in COPD for a better understanding about their potential role.Materials and methods: COPD models were built in the C57BL/6 mouse by cigarette smoke (CS exposure combined with intraperitoneal injection of cigarette smoke extract (CSE. The modeling efficiency was evaluated by lung function and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining. The number of different macrophage phenotypes was detected by immunohistochemical staining (IHS of CD206, CD86 and CD68 on the lung tissue paraffin section. The RAW264.7 cells were polarized toward the M2 phenotype by interleukin IL-4 and confirmed by a flow cytometer. The gene expression levels of TGF-βRII, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 in CSE-treated M2 macrophages were detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The expression levels of TGF-β/Smad pathway-related makers (TGF-βRII, p-Smad2, p-Smad3, Smad7 and TGF-β in alveolar M2 macrophages were detected by two consecutive paraffin section IHS.Results: The COPD model is well established, which is confirmed by the lung function test and lung H&E staining. The whole number of macrophages and the ratio of M2/M1 phenotype are both increased (p<0.05. The level of CD206+ cells in IL-4-stimulated RAW264.7 cells is up to 93.4%, which is confirmed by a flow cytometer. The gene expression of TGF-βRII, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 are all enhanced (p<0.05 in CES-treated M2 macrophages, which is detected by RT-PCR. The protein levels of TGF-β/Smad pathway-related markers are

  13. The role of arachidonic acid metabolites in signal transduction in an identified neural network mediating presynaptic inhibition in Aplysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, E.; Piomelli, D.; Feinmark, S.; Vogel, S.; Chin, G.; Schwartz, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Neuromodulation is a form of signal transduction that results in the biochemical control of neuronal excitability. Many neurotransmitters act through second messengers, and the examination of biochemical cascades initiated by neurotransmitter-receptor interaction has advanced the understanding of how information is acquired and stored in the nervous system. For example, 5-HT and other facilitory transmitters increase cAMP in sensory neurons of Aplysia, which enhances excitability and facilitates transmitter output. The authors have examined the role of arachidonic acid metabolites in a neuronal circuit mediating presynaptic inhibition. L32 cells are a cluster of putative histaminergic neurons that each make dual-action synaptic potentials onto two follower neurons, L10 and L14. The synaptic connections, biophysical properties, and roles in behavior of the L10 and L14 follower cells have been well studied. The types of ion channels causing each component of the L32-L10 and L32-L14 dual actions have been characterized and application of histamine mimics the effects of stimulating L32 in both L10 and L14

  14. The potential role of sports psychology in the obesity epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Vincent; Davis, Carolyn

    2013-06-01

    Sports psychologists play an important role in enhancing performance among athletes. In conjunction with team physicians, they can also shed light on psychological disorders common in athletes, such as mood and eating disorders, and overtraining syndrome. Sports psychologists can also lend their expertise to assist with injury prevention and recovery and compliance issues. Sports psychology has a role in helping to reverse the growing obesity epidemic among school-aged children. These professionals, working with coaches, can increase children's levels of physical activity. Cognitive-behavioral techniques could lead to enhanced enjoyment, increased participation, improved school performance, and a reduction in obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of transient receptor potential channels in metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming; Tepel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is correlated with increased cardiovascular risk and characterized by several factors, including visceral obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Several members of a large family of nonselective cation entry channels, e.g., transient receptor potential (TRP...

  16. A bHLH gene from Tamarix hispida improves abiotic stress tolerance by enhancing osmotic potential and decreasing reactive oxygen species accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Nie, Xianguang; Liu, Yujia; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Bing; Huo, Lin; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-02-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) leucine-zipper transcription factors play important roles in abiotic stress responses. However, their specific roles in abiotic stress tolerance are not fully known. Here, we functionally characterized a bHLH gene, ThbHLH1, from Tamarix hispida in abiotic stress tolerance. ThbHLH1 specifically binds to G-box motif with the sequence of 'CACGTG'. Transiently transfected T. hispida plantlets with transiently overexpressed ThbHLH1 and RNAi-silenced ThbHLH1 were generated for gain- and loss-of-function analysis. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing ThbHLH1 were generated to confirm the gain- and loss-of-function analysis. Overexpression of ThbHLH1 significantly elevates glycine betaine and proline levels, increases Ca(2+) concentration and enhances peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities to decrease reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Additionally, ThbHLH1 regulates the expression of the genes including P5CS, BADH, CaM, POD and SOD, to activate the above physiological changes, and also induces the expression of stress tolerance-related genes LEAs and HSPs. These data suggest that ThbHLH1 induces the expression of stress tolerance-related genes to improve abiotic stress tolerance by increasing osmotic potential, improving ROS scavenging capability and enhancing second messenger in stress signaling cascades. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Potential roles for uncoupling proteins in HIV lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, David; Pace, Craig

    2004-07-01

    The 'HIV lipodystrophy syndrome' consists of several distinct components, including lipoatrophy (pathological subcutaneous fat loss), lipohypertrophy (abdominal/visceral adiposity), and metabolic complications including insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Lipoatrophy appears to represent an adipose tissue-specific form of mitochondrial toxicity associated strongly with stavudine NRTI therapy, whilst the 'metabolic syndrome' phenotype is associated with HIV protease inhibitor therapy. In this context, the role of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in modulating resting energy expenditure in response to elevated fatty acid flux associated with the 'metabolic syndrome' is supported by clinical data as well as findings of elevated adipose tissue UCP expression. The role of UCPs in this syndrome therefore exemplifies the multifactorial nature of these antiretroviral therapy complications.

  18. A potential role for tetranectin in mineralization during osteogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Ibaraki, K; Schjørring, P

    1994-01-01

    approximately fivefold more bone material than those produced by the untransfected PC12 cell line or by the PC12 cells transfected with the expression vector with no insert (Mann Whitney rank sum test, p role during...... to that of bone sialoprotein, which is regarded as one of the late bone differentiation markers. To explore the putative biological role of tetranectin in osteogenesis we established stably transfected cell lines (PC12-tet) overexpressing recombinant tetranectin as evidenced by Northern and Western blot analysis...... and immunoprecipitation. Both control PC12 cells and PC12-tet cells injected into nude mice produced tumors containing bone material, as evidenced by von Kossa staining for calcium and immunostaining with bone sialoprotein and alkaline phosphatase antiserum. Nude mice tumors established from PC12-tet cells contained...

  19. Role of the Transmembrane Potential in the Membrane Proton Leak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruprecht, A.; Sokolenko, E. A.; Beck, V.; Ninnemann, O.; Jabůrek, Martin; Trimbuch, T.; Klishin, S. S.; Ježek, Petr; Skulachev, V. P.; Pohl, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 8 (2010), s. 1503-1511 ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09018; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/07/0105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : proton leak * membrane potential * uncoupling proteins Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.218, year: 2010

  20. Role of ECRH in potential formation for tandem mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T.D.; Matsuda, Y.; Stewart, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The axial ion plugging potential in a tandem mirror is produced by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) applied at two locations in the end mirror cell. A second harmonic (ω = 2ω/sub c/) resonance is used near the midplane to generate hot electrons which yield an electron potential barrier between center cell electrons and electrons outboard of the end cell midplane. The latter group of electrons is then heated at the fundamental resonance (ω = ω/sub c/) on the outboard side of the magnetic well which drives an ion confining potential. Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo calculations show that such a configuration is achievable, and the scaling obeys a rather simple set of equations. Another aspect of this configuration is the experimental observation that the fundamental heating drives the overall potential of the device relative to the wall to approx. 1 kV. An analytic model predicts this behavior for very strong ECRH. Results are given a numerical study of electron confinement in a mirror cell owing to fundamental heating as the level of the rf electric field, E/sub rf/, is increased. For the second part of the paper, we show that moderate levels of uniformly distributed rf fields, called cavity fields, can result in very hot (>250 keV) tails in the electron distribution as seen in the TMX-U experiment

  1. Potential roles for ubiquitin and the proteasome during ribosome biogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stavreva, D. A.; Kawasaki, M.; Dundr, M.; Koberna, Karel; Müller, W. G.; Tsujimura-Takahashi, T.; Komatsu, W.; Hayano, T.; Isobe, T.; Raška, Ivan; Misteli, T.; Takahashi, N.; McNally, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 13 (2006), s. 5131-5145 ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC535; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0374; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/04/0692 Grant - others:NIH(US) Intramural Research Program; Ministry of Education(JP) Pioneer Research grant Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : the role of the ubikvitin * proteasome system in ribosome biogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.773, year: 2006

  2. The role of fullerene shell upon stuffed atom polarization potential

    OpenAIRE

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the polarization of the fullerene shell considerably alters the polarization potential of an atom, stuffed inside a fullerene. This essentially affects the electron elastic scattering phases as well as corresponding cross-sections. We illustrate the general trend by concrete examples of electron scattering by endohedrals of Neon and Argon. To obtain the presented results, we have suggested a simplified approach that permits to incorporate the effect of fullerenes pol...

  3. Towards HIV-1 remission: potential roles for broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-02-01

    Current antiretroviral drug therapies do not cure HIV-1 because they do not eliminate a pool of long-lived cells harboring immunologically silent but replication-competent proviruses - termed the latent reservoir. Eliminating this reservoir and stimulating the immune response to control infection in the absence of therapy remain important but unsolved goals of HIV-1 cure research. Recently discovered broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) exhibit remarkable breadth and potency in their ability to neutralize HIV-1 in vitro, and recent studies have demonstrated new therapeutic applications for passively administered bNAbs in vivo. This Review discusses the roles bNAbs might play in HIV-1 treatment regimens, including prevention, therapy, and cure.

  4. Potential Role of Probiotics in Mechanism of Intestinal Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Rashid Rajput and Wei Fen Li*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are nonpathogenic bacteria exert a constructive influence on health or physiology of the host. Effect of probiotics in the intestinal defense against variety of diseases is well known. The probiotics are involved in the mechanism of intestinal defense, support as antagonist against pathogens, improve intestinal epithelial layer and boost the innate as well as adaptive immunity. However these responses are also exerted by intestinal components. The intestinal components as well as probiotics play a reciprocal role to enhance the immune response of the individual. The possibilities of mechanism of action include the stimulation of epithelial cells, activation of dendritic cells via toll-like receptors (TLRs, conversely produce cytokines. These observations reviewed together advocate that specific immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria should be focusing on mechanism of action via antigen presenting cells (APC.

  5. Universities Potential Role in Local and Regional Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Egon; Rolim, Cassio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The paper will describe experiences from Aalborg University in Denmark on ways to support cooperation between the University and regional civic/business. Design/Methodology: Regional development is exceedingly focused in the world; and as growth is dependent on specialised knowledge...... and highly skilled and competent staff, it could be anticipated that universities should play a key role in facilitating such growth and development. At Aalborg University, such cooperation is taking place, and this paper sums up the practices and experiences gained therefrom. Findings: Universities have...... been and maybe still are seen as bodies focusing on know-how; however, they are now focusing on technology transfer, knowledge transfer and knowledge exchange, and maybe also on co-designing. From such beginnings co-operation can, and in many cases has, further developed into formal partnerships...

  6. A potential role for Drosophila mucins in development and physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfeqhar A Syed

    Full Text Available Vital vertebrate organs are protected from the external environment by a barrier that to a large extent consists of mucins. These proteins are characterized by poorly conserved repeated sequences that are rich in prolines and potentially glycosylated threonines and serines (PTS. We have now used the characteristics of the PTS repeat domain to identify Drosophila mucins in a simple bioinformatics approach. Searching the predicted protein database for proteins with at least 4 repeats and a high ST content, more than 30 mucin-like proteins were identified, ranging from 300-23000 amino acids in length. We find that Drosophila mucins are present at all stages of the fly life cycle, and that their transcripts localize to selective organs analogous to sites of vertebrate mucin expression. The results could allow for addressing basic questions about human mucin-related diseases in this model system. Additionally, many of the mucins are expressed in selective tissues during embryogenesis, thus revealing new potential functions for mucins as apical matrix components during organ morphogenesis.

  7. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease: Potential role of molecular biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Koma, Amosy E

    2014-11-27

    Accurate diagnosis of predominantly colonic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not possible in 30% of patients. For decades, scientists have worked to find a solution to improve diagnostic accuracy for IBD, encompassing Crohn's colitis and ulcerative colitis. Evaluating protein patterns in surgical pathology colectomy specimens of colonic mucosal and submucosal compartments, individually, has potential for diagnostic medicine by identifying integrally independent, phenotype-specific cellular and molecular characteristics. Mass spectrometry (MS) and imaging (I) MS are analytical technologies that directly measure molecular species in clinical specimens, contributing to the in-depth understanding of biological molecules. The biometric-system complexity and functional diversity is well suited to proteomic and diagnostic studies. The direct analysis of cells and tissues by Matrix-Assisted-Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) MS/IMS has relevant medical diagnostic potential. MALDI-MS/IMS detection generates molecular signatures obtained from specific cell types within tissue sections. Herein discussed is a perspective on the use of MALDI-MS/IMS and bioinformatics technologies for detection of molecular-biometric patterns and identification of differentiating proteins. I also discuss a perspective on the global challenge of transferring technologies to clinical laboratories dealing with IBD issues. The significance of serologic-immunometric advances is also discussed.

  8. On the potential role of glutamate transport in mental fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansson Elisabeth

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mental fatigue, with decreased concentration capacity, is common in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, often appearing prior to other major mental or physical neurological symptoms. Mental fatigue also makes rehabilitation more difficult after a stroke, brain trauma, meningitis or encephalitis. As increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines are reported in these disorders, we wanted to explore whether or not proinflammatory cytokines could induce mental fatigue, and if so, by what mechanisms. It is well known that proinflammatory cytokines are increased in major depression, "sickness behavior" and sleep deprivation, which are all disorders associated with mental fatigue. Furthermore, an influence by specific proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1, on learning and memory capacities has been observed in several experimental systems. As glutamate signaling is crucial for information intake and processing within the brain, and due to the pivotal role for glutamate in brain metabolism, dynamic alterations in glutamate transmission could be of pathophysiological importance in mental fatigue. Based on this literature and observations from our own laboratory and others on the role of astroglial cells in the fine-tuning of glutamate neurotransmission we present the hypothesis that the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6 could be involved in the pathophysiology of mental fatigue through their ability to attenuate the astroglial clearance of extracellular glutamate, their disintegration of the blood brain barrier, and effects on astroglial metabolism and metabolic supply for the neurons, thereby attenuating glutamate transmission. To test whether our hypothesis is valid or not, brain imaging techniques should be applied with the ability to register, over time and with increasing cognitive loading, the extracellular concentrations of glutamate and potassium (K+ in humans suffering from

  9. Potential role of advanced fuels in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.

    1981-01-01

    The potential importance of developing advanced (non D-T) fuel pellets for inertial confinement is discussed. Reduced radioactivity due to low tritium involvement and less neutron activation, improved blanket flexibility with the removal of tritium breeding requirements, and improved mating of the output energy spectrum with non-electrical applications such as synthetic fuel production could lead to technical advantages and earlier public acceptance. As a possible first step to advanced-fuel pellets, the A-FLINT concept of a D-T core ignited, deuterium pellet is proposed which would offer tritium self-sufficiency. A design is described that uses 0.1-MJ internal energy in a rhoR1--7 gm/cm2'' compressed pellet, giving a tritium breeding ratio of 1--1.0 and an internal pellet gain of 1--700

  10. The potential role of perfluorocarbon emulsions in decompression illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Bruce D

    2010-03-01

    Decompression illness (DCI) is an occasional occurrence in sport, professional, and military diving as well as a potential catastrophe in high-altitude flight, space exploration, mining, and caisson bridge construction. DCI theoretically could be a success-limiting problem in escape from a disabled submarine (DISSUB). Perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFCs) have previously been investigated as 'blood substitutes' with one approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of myocardial ischaemia. PFCs possess enhanced (as compared to plasma) respiratory gas solubility characteristics, including oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide. This review examines approximately 30 years of research regarding the utilization of PFCs in gas embolism as well as experimental DCI. To date, no humans have been treated with PFCs for DCI.

  11. Sustainable life support on Mars - the potential roles of cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verseux, Cyprien; Baqué, Mickael; Lehto, Kirsi; de Vera, Jean-Pierre P.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Billi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Even though technological advances could allow humans to reach Mars in the coming decades, launch costs prohibit the establishment of permanent manned outposts for which most consumables would be sent from Earth. This issue can be addressed by in situ resource utilization: producing part or all of these consumables on Mars, from local resources. Biological components are needed, among other reasons because various resources could be efficiently produced only by the use of biological systems. But most plants and microorganisms are unable to exploit Martian resources, and sending substrates from Earth to support their metabolism would strongly limit the cost-effectiveness and sustainability of their cultivation. However, resources needed to grow specific cyanobacteria are available on Mars due to their photosynthetic abilities, nitrogen-fixing activities and lithotrophic lifestyles. They could be used directly for various applications, including the production of food, fuel and oxygen, but also indirectly: products from their culture could support the growth of other organisms, opening the way to a wide range of life-support biological processes based on Martian resources. Here we give insights into how and why cyanobacteria could play a role in the development of self-sustainable manned outposts on Mars.

  12. Potential role of resurfacing Subtropical Underwater in ENSO evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, T.; Chi, J.

    2017-12-01

    Results from a model of the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) have shown that the resurfacing of high salinity Subtropical Underwater contributes to the sea surface salinity variability in the equatorial Pacific. On interannual time scale, this contribution can account for as much as 25% of the surface freshwater flux anomalies and is believed to play a role in ENSO evolution. Having these results in mind, this study investigates the surface salinity budget and its primary controls in the equatorial Pacific using ECCO output for the period 1993-2016. Particular attention is paid to 2014/2015 and 2015/2016. Preliminary analyses of the model results suggest that enhanced subsurface processes and in particular enhanced entrainment of Subtropical Underwater are primarily responsible for the positive sea surface salinity anomalies in the central equatorial Pacific during 2014/2015, which represents an opposite phase of El Niño. These subsurface processes weakened during 2015/2016, diretly contributing to the development of the 2015/2016 El Niño. The mechanisms controlling these subsurface processes are discussed.

  13. Potential role of probiotics on colorectal cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uccello Mario

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer represents the most common malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract. Owing to differences in dietary habits and lifestyle, this neoplasm is more common in industrialized countries than in developing ones. Evidence from a wide range of sources supports the assumption that the link between diet and colorectal cancer may be due to an imbalance of the intestinal microflora. Discussion Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host, and they have been investigated for their protective anti-tumor effects. In vivo and molecular studies have displayed encouraging findings that support a role of probiotics in colorectal cancer prevention. Summary Several mechanisms could explain the preventive action of probiotics against colorectal cancer onset. They include: alteration of the intestinal microflora; inactivation of cancerogenic compounds; competition with putrefactive and pathogenic microbiota; improvement of the host’s immune response; anti-proliferative effects via regulation of apoptosis and cell differentiation; fermentation of undigested food; inhibition of tyrosine kinase signaling pathways.

  14. Peripheral artery disease: potential role of ACE-inhibitor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Coppola

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Coppola, Giuseppe Romano, Egle Corrado, Rosa Maria Grisanti, Salvatore NovoDepartment of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Nephro-Urological Diseases, Chair of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Palermo, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Subjects with peripheral arterial disease (PAD of the lower limbs are at high risk for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and the prevalence of coronary artery disease in such patients is elevated. Recent studies have shown that regular use of cardiovascular medications, such as therapeutic and preventive agents for PAD patients, seems to be promising in reducing long-term mortality and morbidity. The angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE system plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis, and ACE-inhibitors (ACE-I seem to have vasculoprotective and antiproliferative effects as well as a direct antiatherogenic effect. ACE-I also promote the degradation of bradykinin and the release of nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator; further, thay have shown important implications for vascular oxidative stress. Other studies have suggested that ACE-I may also improve endothelial dysfunction. ACE-I are useful for reducing the risk of cardiovascular events in clinical and subclinical PAD. Particularly, one agent of the class (ie, ramipril has shown in many studies to able to significantly reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with PAD.Keywords: atherosclerosis, peripheral arterial disease, endothelial dysfunction, ACE-inhibitors

  15. Pathophysiology of hypophosphatasia and the potential role of asfotase alfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orimo, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited systemic bone disease that is characterized by bone hypomineralization. HPP is classified into six forms according to the age of onset and severity as perinatal (lethal), perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult, and odontohypophosphatasia. The causative gene of the disease is the ALPL gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). TNAP is expressed ubiquitously, and its physiological role is apparent in bone mineralization. A defect in bone mineralization can manifest in several ways, including rickets or osteomalacia in HPP patients. Patients with severe forms suffer from respiratory failure because of hypoplastic chest, which is the main cause of death. They sometimes present with seizures due to a defect in vitamin B6 metabolism resulting from the lack of alkaline phosphatase activity in neuronal cells, which is also lethal. Patients with a mild form of the disease exhibit rickets or osteomalacia and a functional defect of exercise. Odontohypophosphatasia shows only dental manifestations. To date, 302 mutations in the ALPL gene have been reported, mainly single-nucleotide substitutions, and the relationships between phenotype and genotype have been partially elucidated. An established treatment for HPP was not available until the recent development of enzyme replacement therapy. The first successful enzyme replacement therapy in model mice using a modified human TNAP protein (asfotase alfa) was reported in 2008, and subsequently success in patients with severe form of the disease was reported in 2012. In 2015, asfotase alfa was approved in Japan in July, followed by in the EU and Canada in August, and then by the US Food and Drug Administration in the USA in October. It is expected that therapy with asfotase alfa will drastically change treatments and prognosis of HPP.

  16. Pathophysiology of hypophosphatasia and the potential role of asfotase alfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orimo H

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hideo Orimo Division of Metabolism and Nutrition, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Hypophosphatasia (HPP is an inherited systemic bone disease that is characterized by bone hypomineralization. HPP is classified into six forms according to the age of onset and severity as perinatal (lethal, perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult, and odontohypophosphatasia. The causative gene of the disease is the ALPL gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP. TNAP is expressed ubiquitously, and its physiological role is apparent in bone mineralization. A defect in bone mineralization can manifest in several ways, including rickets or osteomalacia in HPP patients. Patients with severe forms suffer from respiratory failure because of hypoplastic chest, which is the main cause of death. They sometimes present with seizures due to a defect in vitamin B6 metabolism resulting from the lack of alkaline phosphatase activity in neuronal cells, which is also lethal. Patients with a mild form of the disease exhibit rickets or osteomalacia and a functional defect of exercise. Odontohypophosphatasia shows only dental manifestations. To date, 302 mutations in the ALPL gene have been reported, mainly single-nucleotide substitutions, and the relationships between phenotype and genotype have been partially elucidated. An established treatment for HPP was not available until the recent development of enzyme replacement therapy. The first successful enzyme replacement therapy in model mice using a modified human TNAP protein (asfotase alfa was reported in 2008, and subsequently success in patients with severe form of the disease was reported in 2012. In 2015, asfotase alfa was approved in Japan in July, followed by in the EU and Canada in August, and then by the US Food and Drug Administration in the USA in October. It is expected that therapy with asfotase alfa will drastically change

  17. Salmonella-mediated cancer therapy: Roles and potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Vu Hong [Dept. of Experimental TherapeuticsBeckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte (United States); Min, Jung Joon [Dept. of Nuclear MedicineChonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The use of bacteria for cancer therapy, which was proposed many years ago, was not recognized as a potential therapeutic strategy until recently. Technological advances and updated knowledge have enabled the genetic engineering of bacteria for their safe and effective application in the treatment of cancer. The efficacy of radiotherapy depends mainly on tissue oxygen levels, and low oxygen concentrations in necrotic and hypoxic regions are a common cause of treatment failure. In addition, the distribution of a drug is important for the therapeutic effect of chemotherapy, and the poor vasculature in tumors impairs drug delivery, limiting the efficacy of a drug, especially in necrotic and hypoxic regions. Bacteria-mediated cancer therapy (BMCT) relies on facultative anaerobes that can survive in well or poorly oxygenated regions, and it therefore improves the therapeutic efficacy drug distribution throughout the tumor mass. Since the mid-1990s, the number of published bacterial therapy papers has increased rapidly, with a doubling time of 2.5 years in which the use of Salmonella increased significantly. BMCT is being reevaluated to overcome some of the drawbacks of conventional therapies. This review focuses on Salmonella-mediated cancer therapy as the most widely used type of BMCT.{sub 2}.

  18. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Potential Role of Endocannabinoids Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balapal S. Basavarajappa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the unique features of prenatal alcohol exposure in humans is impaired cognitive and behavioral function resulting from damage to the central nervous system (CNS, which leads to a spectrum of impairments referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD. Human FASD phenotypes can be reproduced in the rodent CNS following prenatal ethanol exposure. Several mechanisms are expected to contribute to the detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing fetus, particularly in the developing CNS. These mechanisms may act simultaneously or consecutively and differ among a variety of cell types at specific developmental stages in particular brain regions. Studies have identified numerous potential mechanisms through which alcohol can act on the fetus. Among these mechanisms are increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, interference with the activity of growth factors, glia cells, cell adhesion molecules, gene expression during CNS development and impaired function of signaling molecules involved in neuronal communication and circuit formation. These alcohol-induced deficits result in long-lasting abnormalities in neuronal plasticity and learning and memory and can explain many of the neurobehavioral abnormalities found in FASD. In this review, the author discusses the mechanisms that are associated with FASD and provides a current status on the endocannabinoid system in the development of FASD.

  19. Salmonella-mediated cancer therapy: Roles and potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Vu Hong; Min, Jung Joon

    2017-01-01

    The use of bacteria for cancer therapy, which was proposed many years ago, was not recognized as a potential therapeutic strategy until recently. Technological advances and updated knowledge have enabled the genetic engineering of bacteria for their safe and effective application in the treatment of cancer. The efficacy of radiotherapy depends mainly on tissue oxygen levels, and low oxygen concentrations in necrotic and hypoxic regions are a common cause of treatment failure. In addition, the distribution of a drug is important for the therapeutic effect of chemotherapy, and the poor vasculature in tumors impairs drug delivery, limiting the efficacy of a drug, especially in necrotic and hypoxic regions. Bacteria-mediated cancer therapy (BMCT) relies on facultative anaerobes that can survive in well or poorly oxygenated regions, and it therefore improves the therapeutic efficacy drug distribution throughout the tumor mass. Since the mid-1990s, the number of published bacterial therapy papers has increased rapidly, with a doubling time of 2.5 years in which the use of Salmonella increased significantly. BMCT is being reevaluated to overcome some of the drawbacks of conventional therapies. This review focuses on Salmonella-mediated cancer therapy as the most widely used type of BMCT._2

  20. The potential roles of endogenous retroviruses in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K; Harrison, L C

    1996-08-01

    tolerant, may also generate new antigenic determinants. Frequently reported humoral immunity to exogenous retrovirus proteins in autoimmune disease could be elicited by cross-reactive ERV proteins. A review of the evidence implicating ERVs in immune dysfunction leads to the conclusion that direct molecular studies are likely to establish a pathogenic role for ERVs in autoimmune disease.

  1. The Potential Role(s) of Writing in Second Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Writing is often seen as having a minor role in second language learning. This article explores recent research that suggests that writing can have a facilitative role in language development. In particular, it focuses on three features of writing: (1) its slower pace, and (2) the enduring record that it leaves, both of which can encourage…

  2. The potential role of neuropathic mechanisms in dry eye syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmonnies, Charles W

    Dry eye syndromes can involve both nociceptive and neuropathic symptoms. Nociceptive symptoms are the normal physiological responses to noxious stimuli. Neuropathic symptoms are caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system and can be the result of hypersensitisation of peripheral or central corneal and conjunctival somatosensory nerves. For example, inflammation could induce neuroplastic peripheral sensitisation of the ocular surface or lid wiper and exacerbate nociceptive symptoms. Neuropathic symptoms may explain the incommensurate relation between signs and symptoms in some dry eye syndromes although absence of signs of a dry eye syndrome may also be a consequence of inappropriate methods used when examining for them. Involvement of neuropathic mechanisms may also help explain dry eye symptoms which occur in association with reduced corneal sensitivity. This review includes a discussion of the potential for ocular symptoms involving neuropathic mechanisms to contribute to psychosocial problems such as depression, stress, anxiety and sleep disorders as well as for these types of psychosocial problems to contribute to neuropathic mechanisms and dry eye syndromes. Failure to consider the possibility that neuropathic mechanisms can contribute to dry eye syndromes may reduce accuracy of diagnosis and the suitability of treatment provided. Dry eye symptoms in the absence of commensurate evidence of tear dysfunction, and unsatisfactory response to tear dysfunction therapies should prompt consideration of neuropathic mechanisms being involved. Symptoms which persist after local anaesthetic instillation are more likely to be neuropathic in origin. Reducing inflammation may help limit any associated neuroplastic hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of transient receptor potential channels in joint diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupkova, O; Zvick, J; Wuertz-Kozak, K

    2017-10-10

    Transient receptor potential channels (TRP channels) are cation selective transmembrane receptors with diverse structures, activation mechanisms and physiological functions. TRP channels act as cellular sensors for a plethora of stimuli, including temperature, membrane voltage, oxidative stress, mechanical stimuli, pH and endogenous, as well as, exogenous ligands, thereby illustrating their versatility. As such, TRP channels regulate various functions in both excitable and non-excitable cells, mainly by mediating Ca2+ homeostasis. Dysregulation of TRP channels is implicated in many pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases, muscular dystrophies and hyperalgesia. However, the importance of TRP channel expression, physiological function and regulation in chondrocytes and intervertebral disc (IVD) cells is largely unexplored. Osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative disc disease (DDD) are chronic age-related disorders that significantly affect the quality of life by causing pain, activity limitation and disability. Furthermore, currently available therapies cannot effectively slow-down or stop progression of these diseases. Both OA and DDD are characterised by reduced tissue cellularity, enhanced inflammatory responses and molecular, structural and mechanical alterations of the extracellular matrix, hence affecting load distribution and reducing joint flexibility. However, knowledge on how chondrocytes and IVD cells sense their microenvironment and respond to its changes is still limited. In this review, we introduced six families of mammalian TRP channels, their mechanisms of activation, as well as, activation-driven cellular consequences. We summarised the current knowledge on TRP channel expression and activity in chondrocytes and IVD cells, as well as, the significance of TRP channels as therapeutic targets for the treatment of OA and DDD.

  4. The role of transient receptor potential channels in joint diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Krupkova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ransient receptor potential channels (TRP channels are cation selective transmembrane receptors with diverse structures, activation mechanisms and physiological functions. TRP channels act as cellular sensors for a plethora of stimuli, including temperature, membrane voltage, oxidative stress, mechanical stimuli, pH and endogenous, as well as, exogenous ligands, thereby illustrating their versatility. As such, TRP channels regulate various functions in both excitable and non-excitable cells, mainly by mediating Ca2+ homeostasis. Dysregulation of TRP channels is implicated in many pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases, muscular dystrophies and hyperalgesia. However, the importance of TRP channel expression, physiological function and regulation in chondrocytes and intervertebral disc (IVD cells is largely unexplored. Osteoarthritis (OA and degenerative disc disease (DDD are chronic age-related disorders that significantly affect the quality of life by causing pain, activity limitation and disability. Furthermore, currently available therapies cannot effectively slow-down or stop progression of these diseases. Both OA and DDD are characterised by reduced tissue cellularity, enhanced inflammatory responses and molecular, structural and mechanical alterations of the extracellular matrix, hence affecting load distribution and reducing joint flexibility. However, knowledge on how chondrocytes and IVD cells sense their microenvironment and respond to its changes is still limited. In this review, we introduced six families of mammalian TRP channels, their mechanisms of activation, as well as, activation-driven cellular consequences. We summarised the current knowledge on TRP channel expression and activity in chondrocytes and IVD cells, as well as, the significance of TRP channels as therapeutic targets for the treatment of OA and DDD.

  5. Potential renovascular hypertension, space missions, and the role of magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Rowe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available William J RoweFormer Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, Medical University of Ohio at Toledo, Keswick, VA, USAAbstract: Space flight (SF and dust inhalation in habitats cause hypertension whereas in SF (alone there is no consistent hypertension but reduced diurnal blood pressure (BP variation instead. Current pharmaceutical subcutaneous delivery systems are inadequate and there is impairment in the absorption, metabolism, excretion, and deterioration of some pharmaceuticals. Data obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Freedom of Information Act shows that Irwin returned from his 12-day Apollo 15 mission in 1971 and was administered a bicycle stress test. With just three minutes of exercise, his BP was >275/125 mm Hg (heart rate of only 130 beats per minute. There was no acute renal insult. Irwin’s apparent spontaneous remission is suggested to be related to the increase of a protective vasodilator, and his atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP reduced with SF because of reduced plasma volume. With invariable malabsorption and loss of bone/muscle storage sites, there are significant (P < 0.0001 reductions of magnesium (Mg required for ANP synthesis and release. Reductions of Mg and ANP can trigger pronounced angiotensin (200%, endothelin, and catecholamine elevations (clearly shown in recent years and vicious cycles between the latter and Mg deficits. There is proteinuria, elevated creatinine, and reduced renal concentrating ability with the potential for progressive inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced renal disease and hypertension with vicious cycles. After SF, animals show myocardial endothelial injuries and increased vascular resistance of extremities in humans. Even without dust, hypertension might eventually develop from renovascular hypertension during very long missions. Without sufficient endothelial protection from pharmaceuticals, a comprehensive gene research program should begin now

  6. The role of house surveys in geological radon potential mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, K.

    1997-01-01

    Because radon levels vary widely between apparently identical buildings on the same geological unit, no map can predict the radon level in an individual building. Maps can, however, give the probability that a building in a particular locality is above a threshold of radon concentration such as a reference or action level. The probability may be calculated for a particular building type or for a mixture of building types. In the latter case the probability is in effect an estimate of the proportion of buildings above the threshold level. Alternatively maps can provide estimates of the mean radon levels in buildings by area. Maps showing the geographical variation in probability that new or existing building will exceed a radon reference level are used to prevent excessive exposures to radon. The information may be used in various ways, such as to target information campaigns encouraging measurement of radon levels in homes or to modify regulations for new buildings. The data which are used to provide the estimates of the proportion of buildings above a threshold may be radon measurements results from a sample of buildings, or may be indirect indicators such as ground radium concentrations, emanation coefficients and permeability measurements. Consistency in radon measurement protocols and detailed positional information are prerequisites for mapping radon prone areas based upon house data. Grouping building radon measurements by geological formation and superficial cover can produce radon potential maps which are more spatially accurate than grid square maps and more accurate in estimating numbers of homes affected than mapping based only on measuring geological and pedagogical properties

  7. Role of sodium tungstate as a potential antiplatelet agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Ruiz R

    2015-05-01

    slightly this response. In human blood, a dose-dependent effect was observed. At 200 µM, closure times in the PFA-100 were prolonged. On denuded vessels, %SC and thrombi formation (%T decreased with Na2O4W. Neither the aggregating response nor the viscoelastic clot properties were affected.Conclusion: Na2O4W decreases consistently the hemostatic capacity of platelets, inhibiting their adhesive and cohesive properties under flow conditions in mice and in human blood, resulting in smaller thrombi. Although Na2O4W may be acting on platelet PTP1B, other potential targets should not be disregarded. Keywords: sodium tungstate, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, platelet adhesion, antiplatelet agents

  8. The potential role of hydrogen energy in India and Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruijven, B.J.; Lakshmikanth, H.D.; van Vuuren, D.P.; de Vries, B.

    2008-01-01

    We used the TIMER energy model to explore the potential role of hydrogen in the energy systems of India and Western Europe, looking at the impacts on its main incentives: climate policy, energy security and urban air pollution. We found that hydrogen will not play a major role in both regions

  9. MicroRNA profiling of antler stem cells in potentiated and dormant states and their potential roles in antler regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Hengxing; Wang, Datao; Li, Chunyi

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can effectively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play a critical role in tissue growth, development and regeneration. Our previous studies showed that antler regeneration is a stem cell-based process and antler stem cells reside in the periosteum of a pedicle, the permanent bony protuberance, from which antler regeneration takes place. Antlers are the only mammalian organ that can fully regenerate and hence provide a unique opportunity to identify miRNAs that are involved in organ regeneration. In the present study, we used next generation sequencing technology sequenced miRNAs of the stem cells derived from either the potentiated or the dormant pedicle periosteum. A population of both conserved and 20 deer-specific miRNAs was identified. These conserved miRNAs were derived from 453 homologous hairpin precursors across 88 animal species, and were further grouped into 167 miRNA families. Among them, the miR-296 is embryonic stem cell-specific. The potentiation process resulted in the significant regulation (>±2 Fold, q value cell potentiation process. This research has identified miRNAs that are associated either with the dormant or the potentiated antler stem cells and identified some target miRNAs for further research into their role played in mammalian organ regeneration.

  10. Amyloid-β Peptide Is Needed for cGMP-Induced Long-Term Potentiation and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeri, Agostino; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Gulisano, Walter; Rivera, Daniela; Rebosio, Claudia; Calcagno, Elisa; Tropea, Maria Rosaria; Conti, Silvia; Das, Utpal; Roy, Subhojit; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Arancio, Ottavio; Fedele, Ernesto; Puzzo, Daniela

    2017-07-19

    High levels of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) have been related to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. However, in the healthy brain, low physiologically relevant concentrations of Aβ are necessary for long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory. Because cGMP plays a key role in these processes, here we investigated whether the cyclic nucleotide cGMP influences Aβ levels and function during LTP and memory. We demonstrate that the increase of cGMP levels by the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors sildenafil and vardenafil induces a parallel release of Aβ due to a change in the approximation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1. Moreover, electrophysiological and behavioral studies performed on animals of both sexes showed that blocking Aβ function, by using anti-murine Aβ antibodies or APP knock-out mice, prevents the cGMP-dependent enhancement of LTP and memory. Our data suggest that cGMP positively regulates Aβ levels in the healthy brain which, in turn, boosts synaptic plasticity and memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a key pathogenetic factor in Alzheimer's disease. However, low concentrations of endogenous Aβ, mimicking levels of the peptide in the healthy brain, enhance hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory. Because the second messenger cGMP exerts a central role in LTP mechanisms, here we studied whether cGMP affects Aβ levels and function during LTP. We show that cGMP enhances Aβ production by increasing the APP/BACE-1 convergence in endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, the cGMP-induced enhancement of LTP and memory was disrupted by blockade of Aβ, suggesting that the physiological effect of the cyclic nucleotide on LTP and memory is dependent upon Aβ. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376926-12$15.00/0.

  11. Linking child maltreatment history with child abuse potential: Relative roles of maltreatment types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitkovic-Voncina Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The independent roles of each childhood maltreatment type on child abuse potential in adults have been insufficiently explored and are inconsistent, with dissociation as one of the possible suggested mediators of intergenerational child abuse. We investigated these effects among 164 non-clinical adult parents, who filled in general questionnaires: Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ, Child Abuse Potential Inventory (CAPI and Dissociative Experience Scale (DES. Among all maltreatment types (emotional, physical and sexual abuse, emotional and physical neglect, emotional abuse was the only independent predictor in the regression model of child abuse potential. The relationship between emotional abuse history and child abuse potential was partially mediated by dissociation. The findings could speak in favor of the potentially unique detrimental role of emotional abuse in intergenerational maltreatment, with dissociation as one of the possible mechanisms.

  12. Transient receptor potential channel superfamily: Role in lower urinary tract function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Teruyuki; Imamura, Tetsuya; Nakazawa, Masaki; Hiragata, Shiro; Nagai, Takashi; Minagawa, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Masakuni; Domen, Takahisa; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms associated with neurogenic bladder and overactive bladder syndrome are mediated in part by members of the transient receptor potential channel superfamily. The best studied member of this superfamily is the vanilloid receptor. Other transient receptor potential channels, such as the melastatin receptor and the ankyrin receptor, are also active in the pathogenesis of lower urinary tract dysfunction. However, the detailed mechanisms by which the transient receptor potential channels contribute to lower urinary tract symptoms are still not clear, and the therapeutic benefits of modulating transient receptor potential channel activity have not been proved in the clinical setting. In the present review, to better understand the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential for lower urinary tract symptoms, we summarize the presence and role of different members of the transient receptor potential channel superfamily in the lower urinary tract. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Potential roles of WRKY transcription factors in resistance to Aspergillus flavus colonization of immature maize kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance to Aspergillus flavus by maize (Zea mays L.) is mediated by several defense proteins; however the mechanism regulating the expression of these defenses is poorly understood. This study examined the potential roles of six maize WRKY transcription factors, ZmWRKY19, ZmWRKY21, ZmWRKY53, ZmW...

  14. The role of various parameters used in proximity potential in heavy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    inal proximity potential 1977 to remove the discrepancy between theory and data. ... In the present study, the main aim is to pin down the role of the above-stated parameters .... The height and position of the barrier are marked, respectively, as VB and RB. .... The small difference is not significant because of the uncertainties.

  15. Safeguards decision making in the public and regulatory environment, and the potential role of quantitative approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherr, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper briefly examines the nature of the safeguards program's objectives and constraints, and the inherent limitations on comprehensive quantification. It discusses the nature of the public and regulatory processes employed in safeguards decision making, and examines their implications regarding the potential role of quantitative approaches to safeguards policy and operational decision making

  16. Developing Effective Earthquake Risk Reduction Strategies: The Potential Role of Academic Institutions in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytiyeh, Hoda

    2015-01-01

    Lebanon faces the risk of powerful earthquakes with potentially devastating effects. However, the Lebanese people in general have not yet recognized this risk, as current educational programs and government officials have failed to inform them about it. This article discusses the essential role that Lebanese institutions of higher education should…

  17. Potential role of biotechnology tools for genetic improvement of “lost ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper considers the potential role of biotechnology applications like DNA markers in understanding the evolution, origin, distribution and diversity of fonio in Africa; somaclonal variation in generating genetic variability in fonio; and genetic transformation in circumventing fonio breeding barriers to introduce alien genes ...

  18. Potential role of propagule banks in the development of aquatic vegetation in backwaters along navigation canals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boedeltje, G; Bakker, JP; ter Heerdt, GNJ

    The diversity and abundance of plant species in propagule banks of backwaters along two navigation canals in The Netherlands were studied in order to assess the relationship with the standing vegetation and the potential role of propagule banks in the establishment of (submerged) aquatic vegetation.

  19. Role of potential scattering in the Shiba-Rusinov theory of the magnetic impurities in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okabe, Y.; Nagi, A.D.S.

    1983-01-01

    The Shiba-Rusinov theory of magnetic impurities in a superconductor is investigated, with special attention paid to the role of the potential scattering term in the electron-impurity interaction. The meaning of Anderson's theorem in the Shiba-Rusinov theory is discussed

  20. Do field-free electromagnetic potentials play a role in biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, A; Vincze, G; Andocs, G; Szasz, O

    2009-01-01

    All bio-systems are imperfect dielectrics. Their general properties however cannot be described by conventional simple electrodynamics; the system is more complex. A central question in our present paper is centered on a controversial debate of the possible effect of the zero fields (only potentials exist). We show that the identical use of the "field-free," "curl-free," and "force-free" terminologies is incorrect, there have definitely different meanings. It is shown that the effective electro-dynamical parameters that describe and modify living systems are the potentials and not the fields. We discuss how the potentials have a role in biological processes even in field-free cases.

  1. Potential protective role of bariatric surgery against breast cancer in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Balescu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major public health problem worldwide especially due to the metabolic disorders which seem to be induced by an excessive amount of adipose tissue. Therefore attention was focused on evaluating the role of bariatric surgery in order to offer a better control of the comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension or dyslipidemia which are widely accepted as causes of increased morbidity and mortality among obese patients. Once these benefits have been widely demonstrated, attention was focused on studying the potential protective role of bariatric surgery against development of various malignancies such a breast, endometrial, pancreatic or even colorectal cancer. This is a literature review regarding the potential protective role of bariatric surgery against breast cancer among obese women worldwide.

  2. RECORDED-ROLE PLAY IN EFL CLASSROOM: A WAY OF MAXIMIZING STUDENTS‟ POTENTIAL IN SPEAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krismiyati Krismiyati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching English for non English Department students will be quite a challenge as the students have various background and interest. Handling those students in a big number in a class that requires them to speak is another impending challenge. This is an action research on role-play in English classroom for Information Technology students. This study tries to see whether recorded-role play could maximize students‘ potential in speaking. This study involved 30 students taking English course in Information Technology Faculty. The students were given a situation in which they had to act the role play. They drafted the role -play before they recorded it. The result shows that students felt less tense in acting the role. They also got more time to practice their pronunciation before recording. It even gave students who felt reluctant and shy in the class to actively participate. In addition, students could play around with the supporting background sound to show their creativity. Surprisingly, most students do their best to show their effort in their speaking as the end-product would be played in the classroom, even the most quiet students performed really well. Finally, this recorded-role play proved to be an effective way to maximize students‘ potential in speaking.

  3. A role for barley calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK2a in the response to drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Cieśla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the drought tolerance of crops is one of the most challenging goals in plant breeding. To improve crop productivity during periods of water deficit, it is essential to understand the complex regulatory pathways that adapt plant metabolism to environmental conditions. Among various plant hormones and second messengers, calcium ions are known to be involved in drought stress perception and signaling. Plants have developed specific calcium-dependent protein kinases that convert calcium signals into phosphorylation events. In this study we attempted to elucidate the role of a calcium-dependent protein kinase in the drought stress response of barley (Hordeum vulgare L., one of the most economically important crops worldwide. The ongoing barley genome project has provided useful information about genes potentially involved in the drought stress response, but information on the role of calcium-dependent kinases is still limited. We found that the gene encoding the calcium-dependent protein kinase HvCPK2a was significantly upregulated in response to drought. To better understand the role of HvCPK2a in drought stress signaling, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants that overexpressed the corresponding coding sequence. Overexpressing lines displayed drought sensitivity, reduced nitrogen balance index, an increase in total chlorophyll content and decreased relative water content. In addition, in vitro kinase assay experiments combined with mass spectrometry allowed HvCPK2a autophosphorylation sites to be identified. Our results suggest that HvCPK2a is a dual-specificity calcium-dependent protein kinase that functions as a negative regulator of the drought stress response in barley.

  4. The Opioid System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Functional Role and Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Burtscher

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy is considered to be one of the most common and severe forms of focal epilepsies. Patients often develop cognitive deficits and emotional blunting along the progression of the disease. The high incidence of resistance to antiepileptic drugs and a frequent lack of admissibility to surgery poses an unmet medical challenge. In the urgent quest of novel treatment strategies, neuropeptides are interesting candidates, however, their therapeutic potential has not yet been exploited. This review focuses on the functional role of the endogenous opioid system with respect to temporal lobe epilepsy, specifically in the hippocampus. The role of dynorphins and kappa opioid receptors (KOPr as modulators of neuronal excitability is well understood: both the reduced release of glutamate as well of postsynaptic hyperpolarization were shown in glutamatergic neurons. In line with this, low levels of dynorphin in humans and mice increase the risk of epilepsy development. The role of enkephalins is not understood so well. On one hand, some agonists of the delta opioid receptors (DOPr display pro-convulsant properties probably through inhibition of GABAergic interneurons. On the other hand, enkephalins play a neuro-protective role under hypoxic or anoxic conditions, most probably through positive effects on mitochondrial function. Despite the supposed absence of endorphins in the hippocampus, exogenous activation of the mu opioid receptors (MOPr induces pro-convulsant effects. Recently-expanded knowledge of the complex ways opioid receptors ligands elicit their effects (including biased agonism, mixed binding, and opioid receptor heteromers, opens up exciting new therapeutic potentials with regards to seizures and epilepsy. Potential adverse side effects of KOPr agonists may be minimized through functional selectivity. Preclinical data suggest a high potential of such compounds to control seizures, with a strong predictive validity toward human

  5. The potential role for a pharmacist in a multidisciplinary general practitioner super clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajorek, Beata; LeMay, Kate; Gunn, Kate; Armour, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The Australian government's General Practitioner (GP) super clinics programme aims to provide well-integrated, multidisciplinary, patient-centred care for people with chronic disease. However, there is no research into the current role of pharmacists in this setting. To explore the perspectives of GP super clinic staff on current and potential (future) pharmacist-led services provided in this setting. Individual interviews (facilitated using a semi-structured interview guide and thematically analysed) were conducted with purposively sampled staff of a GP super clinic in a semirural location in the state of New South Wales, until theme saturation. Participating staff included (n=9): three GPs, one pharmacist, one nurse, one business manager, and three reception staff. Three themes emerged conveying perspectives on: working relationships between staff; a pharmacist's current role; and potential future roles for a pharmacist. All clinic staff actively engaged the pharmacist in their "team approach". Currently established roles for home medicines reviews (HMRs) and drug information were well supported, but needed to be expanded, for example, with formalised case conferences between GPs, pharmacists, and other staff. New roles needed be explored in auditing medication use, optimising medication records, specialised drug information, dispensing, and prescribing. Although GPs had differing views about opportunities for pharmacists' prescribing in this setting, they saw several benefits to this service, such as reducing the time pressure on GPs to enable more effective consultations. Results suggest a pharmacist's services can potentially be better used within the multidisciplinary super clinic model of care to address current gaps within the semi-rural practice setting. Any future role for the pharmacist could be addressed as part of a formalised, strategic approach to creating an integrated healthcare team, with attention to funding and government legislation.

  6. Role of nitric oxide in long-term potentiation of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E

    2000-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the role of nitric oxide in long-term potentiation induced in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by high-frequency stimulation of the primary vestibular afferents. The nitric oxide scavenger [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide ] and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester were administered before and after induction of potentiation. Both drugs completely prevented long-term potentiation, whereas they did not impede the potentiation build-up, or affect the already established potentiation. These results demonstrate that the induction, but not the maintenance of vestibular long-term potentiation, depends on the synthesis and release into the extracellular medium of nitric oxide. In addition, we analysed the effect of the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside on vestibular responses. Sodium nitroprusside induced long-term potentiation, as evidenced through the field potential enhancement and unit peak latency decrease. This potentiation was impeded by D, L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, and was reduced under blockade of synaptosomal platelet-activating factor receptors by ginkgolide B and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors by (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid. When reduced, potentiation fully developed following the washout of antagonist, demonstrating an involvement of platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in its full development. Potentiation induced by sodium nitroprusside was also associated with a decrease in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio, which persisted under ginkgolide B, indicating that nitric oxide increases glutamate release independently of platelet-activating factor-mediated presynaptic events. We suggest that nitric oxide, released after the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, acts as a retrograde messenger leading to an enhancement of glutamate release to a

  7. The potential roles of T-type Ca2+ channels in motor coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Gyun ePark

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Specific behavioral patterns are expressed by complex combinations of muscle coordination. Tremors are simple behavioral patterns and are the focus of studies investigating motor coordination mechanisms in the brain. T-type Ca2+ channels mediate intrinsic neuronal oscillations and rhythmic burst spiking, and facilitate the generation of tremor rhythms in motor circuits. Despite substantial evidence that T-type Ca2+ channels mediate pathological tremors, their roles in physiological motor coordination and behavior remain unknown. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the roles that T-type Ca2+ channels play under pathological conditions, and discuss the potential relevance of these channels in mediating physiological motor coordination.

  8. Schistosomiasis elimination strategies and potential role of a vaccine in achieving global health goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Annie X; Agosti, Jan M; Walson, Judd L; Hall, B Fenton; Gordon, Lance

    2014-01-01

    In March 2013, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation co-sponsored a meeting entitled "Schistosomiasis Elimination Strategy and Potential Role of a Vaccine in Achieving Global Health Goals" to discuss the potential role of schistosomiasis vaccines and other tools in the context of schistosomiasis control and elimination strategies. It was concluded that although schistosomiasis elimination in some focal areas may be achievable through current mass drug administration programs, global control and elimination will face several significant scientific and operational challenges, and will require an integrated approach with other, additional interventions. These challenges include vector (snail) control; environmental modification; water, sanitation, and hygiene; and other future innovative tools such as vaccines. Defining a clear product development plan that reflects a vaccine strategy as complementary to the existing control programs to combat different forms of schistosomiasis will be important to develop a vaccine effectively.

  9. Heat Shock Proteins: Pathogenic Role in Atherosclerosis and Potential Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Kilic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs are a highly conserved group of proteins that are constitutively expressed and function as molecular chaperones, aiding in protein folding and preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins. In the arterial wall, HSPs have a protective role under normal physiologic conditions. In disease states, however, HSPs expressed on the vascular endothelial cell surface can act as targets for detrimental autoimmunity due to their highly conserved sequences. Developing therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis based on HSPs is challenged by the need to balance such physiologic and pathologic roles of these proteins. This paper summarizes the role of HSPs in normal vascular wall processes as well as in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The potential implications of HSPs in clinical therapies for atherosclerosis are also discussed.

  10. Modulation of ceramide metabolism in T-leukemia cell lines potentiates apoptosis induced by the cationic antimicrobial peptide bovine lactoferricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Suzanne J; Ridgway, Neale D; Hoskin, David W

    2008-03-01

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that selectively induces apoptosis in several different types of human cancer cells. However, the potential use of LfcinB as an anticancer agent is presently limited by the need for relatively high concentrations of the peptide to trigger apoptosis. Ceramide is a membrane sphingolipid that is believed to function as a second messenger during apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the role of ceramide in LfcinB-induced apoptosis in CCRF-CEM and Jurkat T-leukemia cell lines. Exposure to LfcinB caused nuclear condensation and fragmentation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and DNA fragmentation in CCRF-CEM and Jurkat T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. Treatment with C6 ceramide, a cell-permeable, short-chain ceramide analog, also induced apoptotic nuclear morphology, PARP cleavage, and DNA fragmentation in T-leukemia cells. Although LfcinB treatment did not cause ceramide to accumulate in CCRF-CEM or Jurkat cells, the addition of C6 ceramide to LfcinB-treated T-leukemia cells resulted in increased DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, modulation of cellular ceramide metabolism either by inhibiting ceramidases with D-erythro-2-(N-myristoylamino)-1-phenyl-1-propanol or N-oleoylethanolamine, or by blocking glucosylceramide synthase activity with 1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol, enhanced the ability of LfcinB to trigger apoptosis in both Jurkat and CCRF-CEM cells. In addition, LfcinB-induced apoptosis of T-leukemia cells was enhanced in the presence of the antiestrogen tamoxifen, which has multiple effects on cancer cells, including inhibition of glucosylceramide synthase activity. We conclude that manipulation of cellular ceramide levels in combination with LfcinB therapy warrants further investigation as a novel strategy for the treatment of T cell-derived leukemias.

  11. Role of depth and location of minima of a double-well potential on vibrational resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekar, S; Jeyakumari, S; Chinnathambi, V; Sanjuan, M A F

    2010-01-01

    We report our investigation into the role of depth and location of minima of a double-well potential on vibrational resonance in both underdamped and overdamped Duffing oscillators. The systems are driven by both low- and high-frequency periodic forces. We obtain theoretical expressions for the amplitude g of the high-frequency force at which resonances occur. The depth and location of the minima of the potential wells have a distinct effect on vibrational resonance in the underdamped and overdamped cases. In the underdamped system at least one resonance and at most two resonances occur and the number of resonances can be altered by varying the depth and location of the minima of the potential wells. We show that in the overdamped system there is always one and only one resonance, and the value of g at which resonance occurs is independent of the depth of the wells, but varies linearly with the locations of the minima of the wells.

  12. Role of Family Resilience and Mindfulness in Addiction Potential of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jalili Nikoo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: family and individual factors are involved in addiction potential. The aim of this research was to investigate the role of family resiliency (family communication and problem solving, utilizing social and economic resources, maintaining a positive outlook, family connectedness, family spirituality, ability to make meaning of adversity and mindfulness in addiction potential of students. Method: the research method used in the present study was correlation. A number of 399 students from Yasuj University in 2012-13 academic years were selected through a multi- stage cluster sampling method and responded to the Iranian scale of addiction potential, family resiliency questionnaire, and short form of Freiburg mindfulness inventory. Collected data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and Simultaneous regression. Results: A negative and significant correlation was seen between family resiliency and its dimensions with addiction potential (P>0.01. Between mindfulness and addiction preparation, a significant and negative correlation was observed (P>0.01. The results of simultaneous regression analysis showed that family residency and mindfulness could significantly predict 13% of variance of addiction potential. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated the importance of family resilience and mindfulness as personal and family variables in preparing addiction. Therefore, the family resilience and mindfulness skills training could decrease the addiction potential among students.

  13. Fructose use in clinical nutrition: metabolic effects and potential consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Sandra; Seematter, Gérald; Seyssel, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    The current article presents recent findings on the metabolic effects of fructose. Fructose has always been considered as a simple 'caloric' hexose only metabolized by splanchnic tissues. Nevertheless, there is growing evidence that fructose acts as a second messenger and induces effects throughout the human body. Recent discoveries made possible with the evolution of technology have highlighted that fructose induces pleiotropic effects on different tissues. The fact that all these tissues express the specific fructose carrier GLUT5 let us reconsider that fructose is not only a caloric hexose, but could also be a potential actor of some behaviors and metabolic pathways. The physiological relevance of fructose as a metabolic driver is pertinent regarding recent scientific literature.

  14. Towards a molecular basis of oligometastatic disease: potential role of micro-RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Abhineet; Ferguson, Mark K; Posner, Mitchell C; Hellman, Samuel; Khodarev, Nikolai N; Weichselbaum, Ralph R

    2014-08-01

    Oligometastasis is a cancer disease state characterized by a limited number of metastatic tumors involving single or few organs and with biological properties that make them potentially amenable to locoregional antitumor therapy. Current clinical data show that they are potentially curable with surgical resection or/and radiotherapy. Yet, mechanisms of progression from primary tumor to oligometastasis, rather than to polymetastases, is lacking in detail. In the current review we focus on the role of micro-RNAs in the regulation of metastases development and the role they may play in the differentiation of oligometastatic from polymetastatic progression. We also discuss the analyses of metastatic samples from oligo-and polymetastatic patients, which suggest that oligometastasis is a distinct biologic entity regulated in part by micro-RNAs. In addition, a review of the known functions of oligometastatic-specific micro-RNAs suggest that they regulate multiple steps in the metastatic cascade, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor invasion, intravasation, distant vascular extravasation and proliferation in a distant organ. Understanding the role of micro-RNAs and their target genes in oligometastatic disease may allow for the development of targeted therapies to effectively conrol the spread of metastases.

  15. Mitigation potential and cost in tropical forestry - relative role for agroforestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makundi, Willy R.; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of carbon mitigation potential (MP) and costs of forestry options in seven developing countries with a focus on the role of agroforestry. A common methodological approach known as comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) was used in each study to estimate the potential and costs between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios derived from the demand for forest products and forestland for other uses such as agriculture and pasture. By using data on estimated carbon sequestration, emission avoidance, costs and benefits, the model enables one to estimate cost effectiveness indicators based on monetary benefit per t C, as well as estimates of total mitigation costs and potential when the activities are implemented at equilibrium level. The results show that about half the MP of 6.9 Gt C (an average of 223 Mt C per year) between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries could be achieved at a negative cost, and the other half at costs not exceeding $100 per t C. Negative cost indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of about half of the options. The agroforestry options analyzed bear a significant proportion of the potential at medium to low cost per t C when compared to other options. The role of agroforestry in these countries varied between 6% and 21% of the MP, though the options are much more cost effective than most due to the low wage or opportunity cost of rural labor. Agroforestry options are attractive due to the large number of people and potential area currently engaged in agriculture, but they pose unique challenges for carbon and cost accounting due to the dispersed nature of agricultural activities in the tropics, as well as specific difficulties arising from requirements for monitoring, verification, leakage assessment and the establishment of credible baselines.

  16. The Potential Role of Direct and Indirect Contacts on Infection Spread in Dairy Farm Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Rossi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Animals' exchanges are considered the most effective route of between-farm infectious disease transmission. However, despite being often overlooked, the infection spread due to contaminated equipment, vehicles, or personnel proved to be important for several livestock epidemics. This study investigated the role of indirect contacts in a potential infection spread in the dairy farm network of the Province of Parma (Northern Italy. We built between-farm contact networks using data on cattle exchange (direct contacts, and on-farm visits by veterinarians (indirect contacts. We compared the features of the contact structures by using measures on static and temporal networks. We assessed the disease spreading potential of the direct and indirect network structures in the farm system by using data on the infection state of farms by paratuberculosis. Direct and indirect networks showed non-trivial differences with respect to connectivity, contact distribution, and super-spreaders identification. Furthermore, our analyses on paratuberculosis data suggested that the contributions of direct and indirect contacts on diseases spread are apparent at different spatial scales. Our results highlighted the potential role of indirect contacts in between-farm disease spread and underlined the need for a deeper understanding of these contacts to develop better strategies for prevention of livestock epidemics.

  17. Pokemon proto-oncogene in oral cancer: potential role in the early phase of tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartini, D; Lo Muzio, L; Morganti, S; Pozzi, V; Di Ruscio, G; Rocchetti, R; Rubini, C; Santarelli, A; Emanuelli, M

    2015-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents about 90% of all oral neoplasms with a poor clinical prognosis. To improve survival of OSCC patients, it is fundamental to understand the basic molecular mechanisms characterizing oral carcinogenesis. Dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes seems to play a central role in tumorigenesis, including malignant transformation of the oral cavity. We analyzed the expression levels of the pro-oncogenic transcription factor Pokemon through real-time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry in tumor, and normal oral tissue samples obtained from 22 patients with OSCC. The relationship between tumor characteristics and the level of Pokemon intratumor expression was also analyzed. Pokemon was significantly downregulated in OSCC. In particular, both mRNA and protein levels (tumor vs normal tissue) inversely correlated with histological grading, suggesting its potential role as a prognostic factor for OSCC. Moreover, a significant inverse correlation was found between Pokemon protein expression levels (OSCC vs normal oral mucosa) and tumor size, supporting the hypothesis that Pokemon could play an important role in the early phase of tumor expansion. This work shows that reduced expression of Pokemon is a peculiar feature of OSCC. Additional studies may establish the effective role of Pokemon in oral tumorigenesis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sex-role reversal of a monogamous pipefish without higher potential reproductive rate in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogabe, Atsushi; Yanagisawa, Yasunobu

    2007-12-07

    In monogamous animals, males are usually the predominant competitors for mates. However, a strictly monogamous pipefish Corythoichthys haematopterus exceptionally exhibits a reversed sex role. To understand why its sex role is reversed, we measured the adult sex ratio and the potential reproductive rate (PRR), two principal factors influencing the operational sex ratio (OSR), in a natural population of southern Japan. The adult sex ratio was biased towards females throughout the breeding season, but the PRR, which increased with water temperature, did not show sexual difference. We found that an alternative index of the OSR (Sf/Sm: sex ratio of 'time in') calculated from the monthly data was consistently biased towards females. The female-biased OSR associated with sex-role reversal has been reported in some polyandrous or promiscuous pipefish, but factors biasing the OSR differed between these pipefish and C. haematopterus. We concluded that the similar PRR between the sexes in C. haematopterus does not confer reproductive benefit of polygamous mating on either sex, resulting in strict monogamous mating, and its female-biased adult sex ratio promotes female-female competition for a mate, resulting in sex-role reversal.

  19. Reductive detoxification of acrolein as a potential role for aldehyde reductase (AKR1A) in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Kwon, Myoungsu; Homma, Takujiro; Saito, Yuka; Lee, Jaeyong; Takahashi, Motoko; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Miyata, Satoshi; Fujii, Junichi

    2014-09-12

    Aldehyde reductase (AKR1A), a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily, suppresses diabetic complications via a reduction in metabolic intermediates; it also plays a role in ascorbic acid biosynthesis in mice. Because primates cannot synthesize ascorbic acid, a principle role of AKR1A appears to be the reductive detoxification of aldehydes. In this study, we isolated and immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from wild-type (WT) and human Akr1a-transgenic (Tg) mice and used them to investigate the potential roles of AKR1A under culture conditions. Tg MEFs showed higher methylglyoxal- and acrolein-reducing activities than WT MEFs and also were more resistant to cytotoxicity. Enzymatic analyses of purified rat AKR1A showed that the efficiency of the acrolein reduction was about 20% that of glyceraldehyde. Ascorbic acid levels were quite low in the MEFs, and while the administration of ascorbic acid to the cells increased the intracellular levels of ascorbic acid, it had no affect on the resistance to acrolein. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and protein carbonylation induced by acrolein treatment were less evident in Tg MEFs than in WT MEFs. These data collectively indicate that one of the principle roles of AKR1A in primates is the reductive detoxification of aldehydes, notably acrolein, and protection from its detrimental effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxytocin--its role in male reproduction and new potential therapeutic uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackare, Hemlata; Nicholson, Helen D; Whittington, Kate

    2006-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is traditionally thought of as a "female" neurohypophysis hormone due to its role in parturition and milk ejection. However, OT is recognized as having endocrine and paracrine roles in male reproduction. At ejaculation, a burst of OT is released from the neurohypophysis into the systemic circulation and stimulates contractions of the reproductive tract aiding sperm release. There is conclusive evidence that OT is synthesized within the mammalian testis, epididymis and prostate and the presence of OT receptors (OTRs) through the reproductive tract supports a local action for this peptide. OT has a paracrine role in stimulating contractility of the seminiferous tubules, epididymis and the prostate gland. Interestingly, OT has also been shown to modulate androgen levels in these tissues via stimulation of the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestostone (DHT) by 5alpha-reductase. The elucidation of OT's role in male reproduction has suggested a number of potential therapeutic uses for this hormone. Exogenous administration of OT has, in some cases, been shown to increase the numbers of ejaculated sperm, possibly by stimulating contractions of the reproductive tract and thus aiding sperm passage. Within the prostate, OT has been shown to affect gland growth both directly and via its interaction with androgen metabolism. Prostate pathologies due to unregulated cell proliferation/growth, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and cancer, are unfortunately very common and few effective treatments are available. Greater understanding of paracrine growth mediators, such as OT, is likely to provide new mechanisms for treating such pathologies.

  1. Potential role of a cognitive rehabilitation program following left temporal lobe epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Vasconcelos Geraldi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Research into memory and epilepsy has focused on measuring problems and exploring causes with limited attention directed at the role of neuropsychological rehabilitation in alleviating post-operative memory difficulties. Objectives To assess the effects of a memory rehabilitation program in patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy following surgery. Methods Twenty-four patients agreed to participate and 18 completed the study; nine received memory rehabilitation while nine had no input and were designated as controls. Verbal learning efficiency, naming abilities, memory subjective ratings, ecological activity measures and a language fMRI paradigm were used as outcome measures. Results Improved verbal learning and naming test performance, increase in memory strategy use and improved self-perception were observed following the rehabilitation. Changes in fMRI activation patterns were seen in the rehabilitation group over the long term. Conclusion The findings support the potential role of a cognitive rehabilitation program following left temporal lobe surgery.

  2. The potential role of IGF-I receptor mRNA in rats with diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    匡洪宇; 邹伟; 刘丹; 史榕荇; 程丽华; 殷慧清; 刘晓民

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential role of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor mRNA(IGF-IR mRNA) in the onset and development of retinopathy in diabetic rats.Methods A diabetic model was duplicated in Wistar rats. The early changes in the retina were examined using light and transmission electron microscopy. Expression of IGF-IR mRNA was analyzed using in situ hybridization.Results Weak expression of IGF-IR mRNA(5%) was found in retinas of normal rats, but was significantly increased (15% and 18%) in the retinas of diabetic rats after 3 and 6 months of diabetes (P<0.01). In situ hybridization and morphological study demonstrated that there was a positive correlation between IGF-IR mRNA expression and retinal changes at various stages.Conclusion Increased IGF-IR mRNA might play an important role in the onset and development of diabetic retinopathy.

  3. The potential role of vitamin D for prevention and treatment of tuberculosis and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Catia; Bianchi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is a common condition among several populations in the world. VDD is associated with higher incidence of immune system disorders and faster progression of some infectious diseases. Vitamin D is known to be of physiological importance, it is considered an essential micronutrient for the bone health and plays a beneficial role in the prevention and/or treatment of a number of chronic diseases. Vitamin D has a complex action on the immune system. Evidence that vitamin D protects against tuberculosis has been supported by in vitro, epidemiological and some preliminary clinical studies. Vitamin D has a potential effect on HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) and plays a crucial role in the defence against respiratory infections. Vitamin D supplementation could be a low-cost, practical method to protect groups of people with high incidence of those diseases. Public health education should stress the need for adequate dietary intake of vitamin D in those vulnerable groups.

  4. Flavonoids and Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling: Potential Role in Colorectal Cancer Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália G. Amado

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It is now well documented that natural products have played an important role in anticancer therapy. Many studies focus on the ability of these natural compounds to modulate tumor-related signaling pathways and the relationship of these properties to an anticancer effect. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death among men and women. Therefore, finding strategies to fight against CRC is an emergent health problem. CRC has a strong association with deregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. As some types of natural compounds are capable of modulating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling, one important question is whether they could counteract CRC. In this review, we discuss the role of flavonoids, a class of natural compounds, on Wnt/β-catenin regulation and its possible potential for therapeutic usage on colorectal cancer.

  5. The Potential Role of Yogurt in Weight Management and Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Shirin; Tremblay, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Yogurt is a semisolid fermented milk product that originated centuries ago and is viewed as an essential food and important source of nutrients in the diet of humans. Over the last 30 years, overweight and obesity have become characteristic of Western and developing countries, which has led to deleterious health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and other chronic conditions. Recent epidemiological and clinical evidence suggests that yogurt is involved in the control of body weight and energy homeostasis and may play a role in reducing the risk for type 2 diabetes partly via the replacement of less healthy foods in the diet, its food matrix, the effect of specific nutrients such as calcium and protein on appetite control and glycemia, and alteration in gut microbiota. This review will discuss the specific properties that make yogurt a unique food among the dairy products, epidemiological and clinical evidence supporting yogurt's role in body weight, energy balance, and type 2 diabetes, including its potential mechanisms of action and gaps that need to be explored. Key teaching points • Several epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested a beneficial effect of yogurt consumption in the control of body weight and energy homeostasis, although this remains controversial. • Yogurt possesses unique properties, including its nutritional composition; lactic acid bacteria, which may affect gut microbiota; and food matrix, which may have a potential role in appetite and glycemic control. • Potential mechanisms of action of yogurt include an increase in body fat loss, decrease in food intake and increase in satiety, decrease in glycemic and insulin response, altered gut hormone response, replacement of less healthy foods, and altered gut microbiota. • The relative energy and nutrient content and contribution of a standard portion of yogurt to the overall diet suggest that the percentage daily intake of these nutrients

  6. Linearized potential vorticity mode and its role in transition to baroclinic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieri, Alexandre; Salhi, Aziz; Cambon, Claude; Godeferd, Fabien

    2011-01-01

    Stratified shear flows have been studied using Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) and DNS. If this flow is in addition subjected to vertical rotation, a slaved horizontal stratification is forced and baroclinic instability can occur. In this context, the RDT analysis shows an extention of the unstable domain up to a Richardson number Ri of 1. This work is completed here with new results on transition to baroclinic instability. Especially, the role of k x ≈ 0 modes (small streamwise wavenumbers) and the importance of coupling with the potential vorticity mode u (Ω pot ) is shown to be determinant for dramatic transient growth at intermediate times.

  7. Role of the Hemostatic System on SCD Pathophysiology and Potential Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakbaz, Zahra; Wun, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Recent studies suggest that sickle cell disease is a hypercoagulable state contributing to the vaso-occlusive events in microcirculation resulting in acute and chronic sickle cell related organ damage. In this article, we will review the existing evidence for contribution of hemostatic system perturbation to sickle cell disease pathophysiology. We will also review the data showing increased risk of thromboembolic events, particularly newer information on the incidence of VTE. Finally, the potential role of platelet inhibitors and anticoagulants in SCD will be briefly reviewed. PMID:24589271

  8. Pharmacology of Myopia and Potential Role for Intrinsic Retinal Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Richard A.; Pardue, Machelle T.; Iuvone, P. Michael; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and public health impact of refractive errors, the mechanisms responsible for ametropias are poorly understood. Much evidence now supports the concept that the retina is central to the mechanism(s) regulating emmetropization and underlying refractive errors. Using a variety of pharmacologic methods and well-defined experimental eye growth models in laboratory animals, many retinal neurotransmitters and neuromodulators have been implicated in this process. Nonetheless, an accepted framework for understanding the molecular and/or cellular pathways that govern postnatal eye development is lacking. Here, we review two extensively studied signaling pathways whose general roles in refractive development are supported by both experimental and clinical data: acetylcholine signaling through muscarinic and/or nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and retinal dopamine pharmacology. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine was first studied as an anti-myopia drug some two centuries ago, and much subsequent work has continued to connect muscarinic receptors to eye growth regulation. Recent research implicates a potential role of nicotinic acetycholine receptors; and the refractive effects in population surveys of passive exposure to cigarette smoke, of which nicotine is a constituent, support clinical relevance. Reviewed here, many puzzling results inhibit formulating a mechanistic framework that explains acetylcholine’s role in refractive development. How cholinergic receptor mechanisms might be used to develop acceptable approaches to normalize refractive development remains a challenge. Retinal dopamine signaling not only has a putative role in refractive development, its upregulation by light comprises an important component of the retinal clock network and contributes to the regulation of retinal circadian physiology. During postnatal development, the ocular dimensions undergo circadian and/or diurnal fluctuations in magnitude

  9. Exploring current and potential roles of Australian community pharmacists in gout management: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counsell, Allyce B; Nguyen, Amy D; Baysari, Melissa T; Kannangara, Diluk R W; McLachlan, Andrew J; Day, Richard O

    2018-05-09

    Gout is an increasingly prevalent form of inflammatory arthritis. Although effective treatments for gout exist, current management is suboptimal due to low medication adherence rates and treatments that are non-concordant with guidelines. Medications are the mainstay and most effective form of gout management. Thus, there is potential for community pharmacists to play an important primary health care role in gout management, however their current role and their potential to improve management of gout treatment is currently unclear. The purpose of the study is to explore the views of Australian pharmacists on their roles in gout management and to identify factors influencing their involvement in gout management. A convenience sample of community pharmacists were invited to participate using a snowballing recruitment strategy. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 15 pharmacists of varying age, gender and pharmacy experience. Interviews focused on pharmacists' experiences of managing gout, interactions with people living with gout and their perceived roles and responsibilities in gout management. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and independently analysed by two reviewers to identify themes. The main role of pharmacists reported in gout management was providing patient education. The greatest facilitator to pharmacists involvement in gout management was identified to be pharmacists' good understanding of gout and its management. Barriers to pharmacists involvement were identified to be difficulties in monitoring adherence to gout medications, low priority given to gout in the pharmacy compared to other chronic health conditions, and lack of specific training and/or continuing education in gout prevention and management. Pharmacists can expand their primary health care role in gout management, particularly in the area of ongoing provision of education to people living with gout and in monitoring medication adherence in patients. However, a

  10. The causative role and therapeutic potential of the kynurenine pathway in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Marta; Outeiro, Tiago F; Scrutton, Nigel S; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2013-06-01

    Metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP), which arise from the degradation of tryptophan, have been studied in detail for over a century and garnered the interest of the neuroscience community in the late 1970s and early 1980s with work uncovering the neuromodulatory potential of this pathway. Much research in the following decades has found that perturbations in the levels of KP metabolites likely contribute to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. More recently, it has become apparent that targeting KP enzymes, in particular kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), may hold substantial therapeutic potential for these disorders. Here we provide an overview of the KP, the neuroactive properties of KP metabolites and their role in neurodegeneration. We also discuss KMO as a therapeutic target for these disorders, and our recent resolution of the crystallographic structure of KMO, which will permit the development of new and improved KMO inhibitors which may ultimately expedite clinical application of these compounds.

  11. The Role and Potential Therapeutic Application of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Allo- and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are a heterogeneous population of cells that consists of myeloid progenitor cells and immature myeloid cells. They have been identified as a cell population that may affect the activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells to regulate the immune response negatively, which makes them attractive targets for the treatment of transplantation and autoimmune diseases. Several studies have suggested the potential suppressive effect of MDSCs on allo- and autoimmune responses. Conversely, MDSCs have also been found at various stages of differentiation, accumulating during pathological situations, not only during tumor development but also in a variety of inflammatory immune responses, bone marrow transplantation, and some autoimmune diseases. These findings appear to be contradictory. In this review, we summarize the roles of MDSCs in different transplantation and autoimmune diseases models as well as the potential to target these cells for therapeutic benefit.

  12. THE ROLE OF THE INNOVATION POTENTIAL IN THE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OF ECONOMIC SECURITY OF ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Anisimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the theoretical foundations of innovative potential of the enterprise and its role for sustainable development and economic security. The urgency of the problem of sustainable development innovative capacity, low level of theoretical and practical elaboration, poor methodological and conceptual basis for the development of economic security, increasing competitiveness and strengthening market situation of enterprises, determined the choice of the research topic. Scientific awareness of the key problems of the economy determined the significance of the research topic, the relevance of which is determined by the need for new theoretical concepts, methodological developments and practical recommendations on the role of innovation potential in the management system of economic security of enterprises. The system of economic security management is the basis of the successful functioning and development of enterprises. In market conditions, the economic security of organizations is directly outside-the implementation of innovations into the production process, which is an effective means of increasing competitiveness, improving the quality of products. The innovative capacity of enterprises consists of a unique ability to increase such components as material and investment, information, personnel that will help the organization to achieve new strategic goals. It should be noted that not all products are offered by organizations on the existing market, generates potential, but only one that is potentially profitable. That is, the products created on the basis of innovative technologies, from-while a high quality and should demand amongst consumers. Economic security policy is a system of views, different measures, methods of solutions, specific actions in the area of economic security, which determine the conditions for achieving business goals. Thus, the implemented security policy allocates the organization to carry out economic

  13. K-Cl cotransport function and its potential contribution to cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adragna, Norma C; Lauf, Peter K

    2007-12-01

    K-Cl cotransport is the coupled electroneutral movement of K and Cl ions carried out by at least four protein isoforms, KCC1-4. These transporters belong to the SLC12A family of coupled cotransporters and, due to their multiple functions, play an important role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Significant information exists on the overall function of these transporters, but less is known about the role of the specific isoforms. Most functional studies were done on K-Cl cotransport fluxes without knowing the molecular details, and only recently attention has been paid to the isoforms and their individual contribution to the fluxes. This review summarizes briefly and updates the information on the overall functions of this transporter, and offers some ideas on its potential contribution to the pathophysiological basis of cardiovascular disease. By virtue of its properties and the cellular ionic distribution, K-Cl cotransport participates in volume regulation of the nucleated and some enucleated cells studied thus far. One of the hallmarks in cardiovascular disease is the inability of the organism to maintain water and electrolyte balance in effectors and/or target tissues. Oxidative stress is another compounding factor in cardiovascular disease and of great significance in our modern life styles. Several functions of the transporter are modulated by oxidative stress, which in turn may cause the transporter to operate in either "overdrive" with the purpose to counteract homeostatic changes, or not to respond at all, again setting the stage for pathological changes leading to cardiovascular disease. Intracellular Mg, a second messenger, acts as an inhibitor of K-Cl cotransport and plays a crucial role in regulating the activity of protein kinases and phosphatases, which, in turn, regulate a myriad of cellular functions. Although the role of Mg in cardiovascular disease has been dealt with for several decades, this chapter is evolving nowadays at a faster

  14. Compressed-air energy storage: Commercialization potential and EPRI roles in the commercialization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, D. W.; Buckley, O. E.; Clark, C. E.

    1982-12-01

    This report describes an assessment of potential roles that EPRI might take to facilitate the commercial acceptance of compressed air energy storage (CAES) systems. The assessment is based on (1) detailed analyses of the market potential of utility storage technologies, (2) interviews with representatives of key participants in the CAES market, and (3) a decision analysis synthesizing much of the information about market and technology status. The results indicate a large potential market for CAES systems if the overall business environment for utilities improves. In addition, it appears that EPRI can have a valuable incremental impact in ensuring that utilities realize the potential of CAES by (1) continuing an aggressive information dissemination and technology transfer program, (2) working to ensure the success of the first United States CAES installation at Soyland Power Cooperative, (3) developing planning methods to allow utilities to evaluate CAES and other storage options more effectively and more realistically, and (4) supporting R and D to resolve residual uncertainties in first-generation CAES cost and performance characteristics.

  15. Role and potential of renewable energy and energy efficiency for global energy supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krewitt, Wolfram; Nienhaus, Kristina [German Aerospace Center e.V. (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany); Klessmann, Corinna; Capone, Carolin; Stricker, Eva [Ecofys Germany GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Graus, Wina; Hoogwijk, Monique [Ecofys Netherlands BV, Utrecht (Netherlands); Supersberger, Nikolaus; Winterfeld, Uta von; Samadi, Sascha [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy GmbH, Wuppertal (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    The analysis of different global energy scenarios in part I of the report confirms that the exploitation of energy efficiency potentials and the use of renewable energies play a key role in reaching global CO2 reduction targets. An assessment on the basis of a broad literature research in part II shows that the technical potentials of renewable energy technologies are a multiple of today's global final energy consumption. The analysis of cost estimates for renewable electricity generation technologies and even long term cost projections across the key studies in part III demonstrates that assumptions are in reasonable agreement. In part IV it is shown that by implementing technical potentials for energy efficiency improvements in demand and supply sectors by 2050 can be limited to 48% of primary energy supply in IEA's ''Energy Technology Perspectives'' baseline scenario. It was found that a large potential for cost-effective measures exists, equivalent to around 55-60% of energy savings of all included efficiency measures (part V). The results of the analysis on behavioural changes in part VI show that behavioural dimensions are not sufficiently included in energy scenarios. Accordingly major research challenges are revealed. (orig.)

  16. The role of spin-orbit potential in nuclear prolate-shape dominance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, Satoshi, E-mail: staka@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Kyorin University, School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Onishi, Naoki [University of Tokyo (Japan); University of Yamanashi (Japan); Shimizu, Yoshifumi R. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Tajima, Naoki [Department of Applied Physics, University of Fukui, 3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

    2011-08-26

    It is confirmed, in terms of the Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky method, that the spin-orbit potential plays a decisive role in the predominance of prolate deformation, which has been a long standing problem in nuclear physics. It is originated from the combined effects of the spin-orbit coupling and the diffused surface of the potential, in agreement with the previous work based on a more schematic Nilsson-Strutinsky method. The degree of prolate-shape dominance exhibits an oscillatory behavior with respect to the strength of spin-orbit potential and, the prolate-shape dominance is realized at the proper strength of the spin-orbit potential together with the standard surface diffuseness; this oscillatory behavior disappears in case of small diffuseness corresponding to ellipsoidal cavity. The calculated energy differences between oblate and prolate minima in this Letter are consistent with those of our extensive self-consistent calculations of the Hartree-Fock + BCS method with the Skyrme interaction.

  17. The role of spin-orbit potential in nuclear prolate-shape dominance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahara, Satoshi; Onishi, Naoki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Tajima, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    It is confirmed, in terms of the Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky method, that the spin-orbit potential plays a decisive role in the predominance of prolate deformation, which has been a long standing problem in nuclear physics. It is originated from the combined effects of the spin-orbit coupling and the diffused surface of the potential, in agreement with the previous work based on a more schematic Nilsson-Strutinsky method. The degree of prolate-shape dominance exhibits an oscillatory behavior with respect to the strength of spin-orbit potential and, the prolate-shape dominance is realized at the proper strength of the spin-orbit potential together with the standard surface diffuseness; this oscillatory behavior disappears in case of small diffuseness corresponding to ellipsoidal cavity. The calculated energy differences between oblate and prolate minima in this Letter are consistent with those of our extensive self-consistent calculations of the Hartree-Fock + BCS method with the Skyrme interaction.

  18. Potential Role of Extracellular Vesicles in the Pathophysiology of Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P S S; O'Connell, Kelly; Finnerty, Thomas Kyle

    2018-01-23

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small vesicles secreted by cells and are known to carry sub-cellular components including microRNA, proteins, and lipids. Due to their ability to transport cargo between cells, EVs have been identified as important regulators of various pathophysiological conditions and can therefore influence treatment outcomes. In particular, the significance of microRNAs in EV-mediated cell-cell communication is well-documented. While the influence of EVs and the cargo delivered by EVs has been extensively reviewed in other neurological disorders, the available literature on the potential role of EVs in the pathophysiology of drug addiction has not been reviewed. Hence, in this article, the known effects of commonly abused drugs (ethanol, nicotine, opiates, cocaine, and cannabinoids) on EV secretion have been reviewed. In addition, the potential role of drugs of abuse in affecting the delivery of EV-packaged microRNAs, and the subsequent impact on neuronal health and continued drug dependence, has been discussed.

  19. An analysis of the potential role of chest tomosynthesis in optimising imaging resources in thoracic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersson, Cecilia; Baath, Magnus; Vikgren, Jenny; Allansdotter Johnsson, Aase

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential role of chest tomosynthesis (CTS) at a tertiary referral centre by exploring to what extent CTS could substitute chest radiography (CXR) and computed tomography (CT). The study comprised 1433 CXR, 523 CT and 216 CTS examinations performed 5 years after the introduction of CTS. For each examination, it was decided if CTS would have been appropriate instead of CXR (CXR cases), if CTS could have replaced the performed CT (CT cases) or if CT would have been performed had CTS not been available (CTS cases). It was judged that (a) CTS had been appropriate in 15 % of the CXR examinations, (b) CTS could have replaced additionally 7 % of the CT examinations and (c) CT would have been carried out in 63 % of the performed CTS examinations, had CTS not been available. In conclusion, the potential role for CTS to substitute other modalities during office hours at a tertiary referral centre may be in the order of 20 and 25 % of performed CXR and chest CT, respectively. (authors)

  20. AN ANALYSIS OF THE POTENTIAL ROLE OF CHEST TOMOSYNTHESIS IN OPTIMISING IMAGING RESOURCES IN THORACIC RADIOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Cecilia; Båth, Magnus; Vikgren, Jenny; Johnsson, Åse Allansdotter

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential role of chest tomosynthesis (CTS) at a tertiary referral centre by exploring to what extent CTS could substitute chest radiography (CXR) and computed tomography (CT). The study comprised 1433 CXR, 523 CT and 216 CTS examinations performed 5 years after the introduction of CTS. For each examination, it was decided if CTS would have been appropriate instead of CXR (CXR cases), if CTS could have replaced the performed CT (CT cases) or if CT would have been performed had CTS not been available (CTS cases). It was judged that (a) CTS had been appropriate in 15 % of the CXR examinations, (b) CTS could have replaced additionally 7 % of the CT examinations and (c) CT would have been carried out in 63 % of the performed CTS examinations, had CTS not been available. In conclusion, the potential role for CTS to substitute other modalities during office hours at a tertiary referral centre may be in the order of 20 and 25 % of performed CXR and chest CT, respectively. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. AN ANALYSIS OF THE POTENTIAL ROLE OF CHEST TOMOSYNTHESIS IN OPTIMISING IMAGING RESOURCES IN THORACIC RADIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Cecilia; Båth, Magnus; Vikgren, Jenny; Johnsson, Åse Allansdotter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential role of chest tomosynthesis (CTS) at a tertiary referral centre by exploring to what extent CTS could substitute chest radiography (CXR) and computed tomography (CT). The study comprised 1433 CXR, 523 CT and 216 CTS examinations performed 5 years after the introduction of CTS. For each examination, it was decided if CTS would have been appropriate instead of CXR (CXR cases), if CTS could have replaced the performed CT (CT cases) or if CT would have been performed had CTS not been available (CTS cases). It was judged that (a) CTS had been appropriate in 15 % of the CXR examinations, (b) CTS could have replaced additionally 7 % of the CT examinations and (c) CT would have been carried out in 63 % of the performed CTS examinations, had CTS not been available. In conclusion, the potential role for CTS to substitute other modalities during office hours at a tertiary referral centre may be in the order of 20 and 25 % of performed CXR and chest CT, respectively. PMID:26979807

  2. The potential role of hydrogen energy in India and Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruijven, Bas van; Hari, Lakshmikanth; Vuuren, Detlef P. van; Vries, Bert de

    2008-01-01

    We used the TIMER energy model to explore the potential role of hydrogen in the energy systems of India and Western Europe, looking at the impacts on its main incentives: climate policy, energy security and urban air pollution. We found that hydrogen will not play a major role in both regions without considerable cost reductions, mainly in fuel cell technology. Also, energy taxation policy is essential for hydrogen penetration and India's lower energy taxes limit India's capacity to favour hydrogen. Once available to the (European) energy system, hydrogen can decrease the cost of CO 2 emission reduction by increasing the potential for carbon capture technology. However, climate policy alone is insufficient to speed up the transition. Hydrogen diversifies energy imports; especially for Europe it decreases oil imports, while increasing imports of coal and natural gas. For India, it provides an opportunity to decrease oil imports and use indigenous coal resources in the transport sector. Hydrogen improves urban air quality by shifting emissions from urban transport to hydrogen production facilities. However, for total net emissions we found a sensitive trade-off between lower emissions at end-use (in transport) and higher emissions from hydrogen production, depending on local policy for hydrogen production facilities

  3. Triggers of oral lichen planus flares and the potential role of trigger avoidance in disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hannah X; Blasiak, Rachel; Kim, Edwin; Padilla, Ricardo; Culton, Donna A

    2017-09-01

    Many patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) report triggers of flares, some of which overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, including oral allergy syndrome and oral contact dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of commonly reported triggers of OLP flares, their overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, and the potential role of trigger avoidance as a management strategy. Questionnaire-based survey of 51 patients with biopsy-proven lichen planus with oral involvement seen in an academic dermatology specialty clinic and/or oral pathology clinic between June 2014 and June 2015. Of the participants, 94% identified at least one trigger of their OLP flares. Approximately half of the participants (51%) reported at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral allergy syndrome, and 63% identified at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral contact dermatitis. Emotional stress was the most commonly reported trigger (77%). Regarding avoidance, 79% of the study participants reported avoiding their known triggers in daily life. Of those who actively avoided triggers, 89% reported an improvement in symptoms and 70% reported a decrease in the frequency of flares. Trigger identification and avoidance can play a potentially effective role in the management of OLP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The link between otitis media with effusion and allergy: a potential role for intranasal corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack, Gideon; Caulfield, Helen; Penagos, Martin

    2011-05-01

    We reviewed the evidence linking otitis media with effusion (OME) and atopy, with the goal of clarifying the possible role of intranasal corticosteroids (INSs) in OME treatment. In August 2009, the MEDLINE database was searched for primary studies on OME epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment. Relevant clinical guidelines were obtained. Interpreting OME research is complicated by variable disease definitions, patient populations, methodologies, and outcomes assessments, along with the possibility of spontaneous resolution. However, evidence links OME with atopic conditions including allergic rhinitis; observed prevalence of allergic rhinitis in patients with chronic or recurrent OME ranges from 24% to 89%. Such findings have prompted evaluations of common allergy medications for OME treatment. While short-term use of INSs alone or combined with antibiotics has shown benefit in some studies, more prolonged treatment protocols and long-term clinical outcomes will require critical assessment. Evidence suggesting epidemiologic and pathophysiologic links between allergy and OME has prompted investigation into a potential role for INSs in OME management, with promising initial results. Benefits of considering medical treatment in patients with OME prior to surgery include both the potential reductions in allergic inflammation and the naturally occurring spontaneous resolution of OME in these patients. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. The role of social media in schizophrenia: evaluating risks, benefits, and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torous, John; Keshavan, Matcheri

    2016-05-01

    Patients with schizophrenia suffer from numerous social problems often because of negative symptoms of the illness and impairments in social cognition. Social media and social networks now offer a novel tool to engage and help patients navigate and potentially improve social functioning. In this review, we aim to explore how impaired neural networks in schizophrenia impair social functioning, examine the evidence base for social networks and social media to help in the role, consider the evidence for current risks and benefits of use, and discuss the future of social media and social networks for schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia are increasingly connected to and engaged with social media. There is strong evidence that they own, use, and accept digital tools like smartphones and already use social media services like Facebook at high rates, especially among those who are younger. Less is known about the clinical risks and benefits of social media use in schizophrenia, although there are increasingly more social networking platforms being designed specifically for those with mental illness. Social media tools have the potential to offer a plethora of new services to patients with schizophrenia, although the clinical evidence base for such is still nascent. It is important to ensure that both clinicians and patients are aware of and educated about the risks of using social media. Going forward, it is likely that social media will have an expanding role in care, with social media offering new pathways to address negative symptoms and impairments in social cognition in schizophrenia.

  6. Nuclear power in developing countries: Its potential role and strategies for its deployment. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The demand for energy, especially electricity, in developing countries is expected to grow rapidly in the coming decades as these countries seek to improve the living standards of their growing populations. Substantial growth in developing country energy demand plus a continued heavy reliance of the power sector on fossil fuels is likely to result in an increased dependence of these countries on energy imports and thus to potential deterioration of their terms-of-trade, reduced energy security and, in the absence of costly mitigation measures, severe degradation of the environment and public health, and will also lead to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. If supply security, health and environmental protection and climate change become pressing policy issues, nuclear power is, in the short to medium term, the only viable non-fossil base load electricity generating alternative (other than hydro where growth potential is limited) that is already meeting 17% of global electricity needs and contributing more than 30% of electricity supplies in 14 countries. It is in the above context that the International Atomic Energy Agency organized this seminar to explore the role of nuclear power in meeting the growing demand for electricity in the developing world, and to identify and discuss suitable ways and means for proper implementation of nuclear power programmes in these countries. Several issues were discussed, in particular, the need and role of nuclear power; economic and financial aspects; technology transfer and national participation; safety, regulation and safeguards; and public acceptance

  7. Nuclear power in developing countries: Its potential role and strategies for its deployment. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    The demand for energy, especially electricity, in developing countries is expected to grow rapidly in the coming decades as these countries seek to improve the living standards of their growing populations. Substantial growth in developing country energy demand plus a continued heavy reliance of the power sector on fossil fuels is likely to result in an increased dependence of these countries on energy imports and thus to potential deterioration of their terms-of-trade, reduced energy security and, in the absence of costly mitigation measures, severe degradation of the environment and public health, and will also lead to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. If supply security, health and environmental protection and climate change become pressing policy issues, nuclear power is, in the short to medium term, the only viable non-fossil base load electricity generating alternative (other than hydro where growth potential is limited) that is already meeting 17% of global electricity needs and contributing more than 30% of electricity supplies in 14 countries. It is in the above context that the International Atomic Energy Agency organized this seminar to explore the role of nuclear power in meeting the growing demand for electricity in the developing world, and to identify and discuss suitable ways and means for proper implementation of nuclear power programmes in these countries. Several issues were discussed, in particular, the need and role of nuclear power; economic and financial aspects; technology transfer and national participation; safety, regulation and safeguards; and public acceptance.

  8. Anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota): advances in understanding their taxonomy, life cycle, ecology, role and biotechnological potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruninger, Robert J; Puniya, Anil K; Callaghan, Tony M; Edwards, Joan E; Youssef, Noha; Dagar, Sumit S; Fliegerova, Katerina; Griffith, Gareth W; Forster, Robert; Tsang, Adrian; McAllister, Tim; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2014-10-01

    Anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota) inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of mammalian herbivores, where they play an important role in the degradation of plant material. The Neocallimastigomycota represent the earliest diverging lineage of the zoosporic fungi; however, understanding of the relationships of the different taxa (both genera and species) within this phylum is in need of revision. Issues exist with the current approaches used for their identification and classification, and recent evidence suggests the presence of several novel taxa (potential candidate genera) that remain to be characterised. The life cycle and role of anaerobic fungi has been well characterised in the rumen, but not elsewhere in the ruminant alimentary tract. Greater understanding of the 'resistant' phase(s) of their life cycle is needed, as is study of their role and significance in other herbivores. Biotechnological application of anaerobic fungi, and their highly active cellulolytic and hemi-cellulolytic enzymes, has been a rapidly increasing area of research and development in the last decade. The move towards understanding of anaerobic fungi using -omics based (genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic) approaches is starting to yield valuable insights into the unique cellular processes, evolutionary history, metabolic capabilities and adaptations that exist within the Neocallimastigomycota. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Potential Role for Exosomal TCTP Export in Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Elisabet; Dunmore, Benjamin J; Hassan, Dhiya; Ormiston, Mark L; Moore, Stephen; Deighton, John; Long, Lu; Yang, Xu Dong; Stewart, Duncan J; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2018-04-20

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by increased proliferation and resistance to apoptosis of pulmonary vascular cells. Increased expression of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), a pro-survival and anti-apoptotic mediator, has recently been demonstrated in patients with hereditary PAH (HPAH) although its role in the pathobiology of PAH remains unclear. Silencing of TCTP in blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) isolated from control subjects led to significant changes in morphology, cytoskeletal organization, increased apoptosis and decreased directionality during migration. As TCTP is also localized in extracellular vesicles (EVs), we isolated BOEC-derived EVs (exosomes and microparticles) by sequential ultracentrifugation. BOECs isolated from patients harboring BMPR2 mutations released more exosomes than controls in pro-apoptotic conditions. Furthermore, TCTP protein expression was significantly higher in exosomes compared to microparticles, indicating that TCTP is mainly exported via exosomes. Co-culture assays demonstrated that exosomes transferred TCTP from endothelial cells (ECs) to pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) suggesting a role for endothelial-derived TCTP in conferring proliferation and apoptotic resistance. In an experimental model of PAH, rats treated with monocrotaline demonstrated increased concentrations of TCTP in the lung and plasma. Consistent with this finding, we observed increased circulating TCTP levels in patients with IPAH compared with controls. Therefore, our data suggests an important role for TCTP in regulating the critical vascular cell phenotypes implicated in the pathobiology of PAH. In addition, this research implicates TCTP as a potential biomarker for the onset and development of PAH.

  10. Potential adjunctive role of radiosynovectomy in primary synovial osteochondromatosis of the knee: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadi, Shelvin Kumar; Chouhan, Devendra Kumar; Gorla, Arun Kumar Reddy; Shukla, Jaya; Sood, Ashwani; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2017-01-01

    Primary synovial osteochondromatosis (PSOC) is a rare but clinically significant cause of morbidity especially in the male population. Surgery is the primary treatment of choice, but the recurrence rate is reported to be high. Moreover, the presence of widespread loose bodies makes it a cumbersome procedure. The complete removal of the disease is tough at times and results in early recurrence. Radiosynovectomy is an established technique for treating various joint arthropathies. The role of radiosynovectomy in case of PSOC has not yet been explored. This case report described the case of a young male with PSOC of the knee joint who was treated with radiosynovectomy for pain relief. The patient reported complete relief from the pain along with significant improvement in joint mobility. The post-therapy three-phase bone scan also validated the reduction in joint inflammation. The patient was taken for surgical removal of the redundant loose bodies after a significant improvement in the pain and reduction in inflammation. Post-therapy radiation fibrosis of the synovium also helped in the en bloc removal of the disease. The role of radiosynovectomy in PSOC needs to be further explored concerning its potential role as an adjuvant to surgical procedures

  11. NK cell recruitment and exercise: Potential immunotherapeutic role of shear stress and endothelial health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William

    2017-11-01

    Positive cancer patient outcomes, including increased time to recurrent events, have been associated with increased counts and function of natural killer (NK) cells. NK cell counts and function are elevated following acute exercise, and the generally accepted mechanism of increased recruitment suggests that binding of epinephrine releases NK cells from endothelial tissue via decreases in adhesion molecules following. I propose that blood flow-induced shear stress may also play a role in NK cell recruitment from the endothelium. Additionally, shear stress may play a role in improving NK cell function by decreasing oxidative stress. The relationship between shear stress and NK cell count and function can be tested by utilizing exercise and local heating with cuff inflation. If shear stress does play an important role, NK cell count and function will be improved in the non-cuffed exercise group, but not the cuffed limb. This paper will explore the mechanisms potentially explaining exercise-induced improvements in NK cell count and function, and propose a model for investigating these mechanisms. This mechanistic insight could aid in providing a novel, safe, relatively inexpensive, and non-invasive target for immunotherapy in cancer patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Relationship of C-reactive protein, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus: potential role of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David T

    2005-12-01

    Atherosclerosis and the metabolic derangements of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are all associated with underlying inflammatory processes. C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, has been shown to be a strong independent predictor of vascular events. It adds to cardiovascular disease risk at all levels of low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and Framingham risk scores, and elevated levels are also associated with increasing severity of the metabolic syndrome. The development of a simple, stable, noninvasive test to measure high-sensitivity CRP has provided a clinical tool that may have an important role in the identification and assessment of individuals likely to develop cardiovascular or metabolic disease. The role of CRP in predicting cardiovascular risk is less clear in African Americans, however, than in white populations. Statins and thiazolidinediones are being investigated for their potential role in the prevention and treatment of the inflammatory processes involved in the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. In the future, assessment of CRP levels may contribute importantly to clinical decision-making in reducing cardiovascular risk.

  13. Liberating the potential: the role of non-nurses in adding value to nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Julie

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, I have attempted to explore the role of non-nurse lecturers in adding value to nurse education programmes. In measuring "added-value" in higher education, I have embraced a more comprehensive approach including investigating the views of "Experts"; including the nurse and non-nurse lecturers themselves, and various United Kingdom stakeholders such as the Government, the Nursing and Midwifery Council and the Quality Assurance Agency. The students' views are also taken into account, when considering both the content of the programmes and how they are delivered. The complexity of "objective measurement" is considered, and the requirements of a "good" teaching experience. The potential areas for adding value include: health and social care policy priorities which encourage partnership working, the blurring of professional boundaries, and inter-professional working. Professional-specific changes embracing extended and enhanced roles and the concepts of specialist and assistant practitioners. Other areas include the Higher Education agendas including transferable skills and adult and student-centred learning. I conclude by discussing the latest policy changes and suggest that the role of the non-nurse lecturer needs more exploration to provide the best value for all.

  14. Potential adjunctive role of radiosynovectomy in primary synovial osteochondromatosis of the knee: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadi, Shelvin Kumar; Chouhan, Devendra Kumar; Gorla, Arun Kumar Reddy; Shukla, Jaya; Sood, Ashwani; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India)

    2017-09-15

    Primary synovial osteochondromatosis (PSOC) is a rare but clinically significant cause of morbidity especially in the male population. Surgery is the primary treatment of choice, but the recurrence rate is reported to be high. Moreover, the presence of widespread loose bodies makes it a cumbersome procedure. The complete removal of the disease is tough at times and results in early recurrence. Radiosynovectomy is an established technique for treating various joint arthropathies. The role of radiosynovectomy in case of PSOC has not yet been explored. This case report described the case of a young male with PSOC of the knee joint who was treated with radiosynovectomy for pain relief. The patient reported complete relief from the pain along with significant improvement in joint mobility. The post-therapy three-phase bone scan also validated the reduction in joint inflammation. The patient was taken for surgical removal of the redundant loose bodies after a significant improvement in the pain and reduction in inflammation. Post-therapy radiation fibrosis of the synovium also helped in the en bloc removal of the disease. The role of radiosynovectomy in PSOC needs to be further explored concerning its potential role as an adjuvant to surgical procedures.

  15. Regulatory roles and therapeutic potential of microRNA in sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hui Jun; Yang, Jia-Lin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded noncoding RNAs involved in various biological processes, including cell differentiation and development. They play multiple key roles as tumour suppressors, oncogenes or both in particular cases. This review aims to summarise current findings of the expression of miRNAs and their role in clinical oncology. Current knowledge regarding the involvement of miRNAs in different sarcoma subtypes will be assessed, in conjunction with their potential application as therapeutic targets. Relevant articles in scientific databases were identified using a combination of search terms, including "microRNA," "deregulation," "sarcoma," and "targeted therapy". These databases included Medline, Embase, Cochrane Review, Pubmed and Scopus. Aberrant miRNA expression patterns have been identified in a range of sarcoma subtypes, and differences in miRNA expression profiles between malignant cells and their normal counterparts suggests that miRNAs play key roles in sarcoma development. The identification of unique miRNA patterns in individual tumour types could possibly be used as a diagnostic tool in sarcoma. Moreover, identification of these miRNAs provides novel targets for the development of therapeutic strategies in distinct sarcoma subtypes. miRNAs hold significant potential as diagnostic biomarkers, as well as therapeutic targets in sarcoma. Possible future clinical applications include the use of miRNA pathways as therapeutic targets or miRNA expression profiling as a means of patient selection. The involvement miRNAs will undoubtedly contribute to the advancement of future targeted therapeutic interventions in sarcoma, and further establishment of appropriate delivery systems is vital for their use in clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Revealing mechanisms of selective, concentration-dependent potentials of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal to induce apoptosis in cancer cells through inactivation of membrane-associated catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling by the expression of membrane-associated catalase. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), a versatile second messenger generated during lipid peroxidation, has been shown to induce apoptosis selectively in malignant cells. The findings described in this paper reveal the strong, concentration-dependent potential of 4-HNE to specifically inactivate extracellular catalase of tumor cells both indirectly and directly and to consequently trigger apoptosis in malignant cells through superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Namely, 4-HNE caused apoptosis selectively in NOX1-expressing tumor cells through inactivation of their membrane-associated catalase, thus reactivating subsequent intercellular signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and HOCl pathways, followed by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Concentrations of 4-HNE of 1.2 µM and higher directly inactivated membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells, whereas at lower concentrations, 4-HNE triggered a complex amplificatory pathway based on initial singlet oxygen formation through H2O2 and peroxynitrite interaction. Singlet-oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8 increased superoxide anion generation by NOX1 and amplification of singlet oxygen generation, which allowed singlet-oxygen-dependent inactivation of catalase. 4-HNE and singlet oxygen cooperate in complex autoamplificatory loops during this process. The finding of these novel anticancer pathways may be useful for understanding the role of 4-HNE in the control of malignant cells and for the optimization of ROS-dependent therapeutic approaches including antioxidant treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Potential Role of Metabolic Intervention in the Management of Advanced Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Harsha Tella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC is the most common endocrine malignancy that has an excellent prognosis with a 5-year survival rate of about 98%. However, approximately 50% of the patients with DTC who present with distant metastases (advanced DTC die from the disease within 5 years of initial diagnosis even after getting the appropriate therapy. Apart from recent advancements in chemotherapy agents, the potential role of metabolic interventions, including the use of metformin, ketogenic diet, and high-dose vitamin C in the management of advanced cancers have been investigated as a less toxic co-adjuvant therapies. The role of vitamin C has been of interest again after a preclinical mice study showed that high-dose vitamin C is selectively lethal to KRAS and BRAF mutant colorectal cancer cells by targeting the glutathione pathway. This raises the possibility of utilizing high-doses of vitamin C in the treatment of aDTC where KRAS and BRAF mutations are common. Similarly, alteration of cellular metabolism by low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets can be an important therapeutic strategy to selectively kill cancer cells that mainly survive on glycolysis. Among the potential adjuvant therapies proposed in this paper, metformin is the only agent that has shown benefit in human model of aDTC, the others have shown benefit but in preclinical/animal studies only and need to be further evaluated in large clinical trials. In conclusion, in addition to concurrent chemotherapy options, these metabolic interventions may have a great potential as co-adjuvant therapy in the management of aDTC.

  18. The potential role of omega-3 fatty acids supplements in increasing athletic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Șerban GLIGOR

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that cannot be produced by the body itself and therefore must be provided through nutrition. Omega-6 and particularly omega-3 fatty acids have important roles in the organism, contributing to the maintenance and promotion of health. The optimal proportion of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids is 2:1, or even better 1:1. They are involved in normal growth and development, play a role in the prevention of coronary and cardiovascular diseases, of diabetes mellitus, of arterial hypertension, arthritis and cancer. Omega-3 fatty acids mainly have an anti-inflammatory effect, but also act as hypolipidemic and antithrombotic agents. A potential role of omega-3 fatty acids is that of increasing physical performance. Their role in the physical activity refers on one side to the global health of athletes and on the other side to their anti-inflammatory effect, as high intensity physical exercise induces increased free-radical production and microtraumas, with the induction of an inflammatory status. The anti-inflammatory effect of these fatty acids manifests through an increased production of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, through decreasing the production of prostaglandins metabolites, decreasing the production of leukotriene B4, etc. They are also effective on reducing muscle pain post eccentric exercise and on decreasing the severity of bronchoconstriction induced by exercise, as well as improving pulmonary function variables. In conclusion it seems that supplementing diets with omega-3 fatty acids, apart from having benefic effects on health and on the prevention and management of certain affections, proves to be a beneficial for physical activity and athletic performance.

  19. Goldfish neurokinin B: Cloning, tissue distribution, and potential role in regulating reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Zhou, Wenyi; Li, Shuisheng; Liu, Yun; Ye, Gang; Liu, Xiaochun; Peng, Chun; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran

    2015-09-15

    Neurokinin B (NKB) is a member of the tackykinin (TAC) family known to play a critical role in the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction in mammals. However, its biological functions in teleosts are less clear. The aim of this study was to determine the role of NKB in fish reproduction using goldfish as a model. Two transcripts, TAC3a and TAC3b, which encode several NKBs, including NKBa-13, NKBa-10, NKBb-13, and NKBb-11, were cloned. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that NKBa-10 and NKBb-11 are closely related to mammalian NKB, while NKB-13s are more conserved in teleosts. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses in various tissues showed that TAC3a and TAC3b mRNAs were mainly expressed in the brain. In situ hybridization further detected TAC3a and TAC3b mRNAs in several regions of the brain known to be involved in the regulation of reproduction and metabolism, as well as in the neurohypophysis of the pituitary. To investigate the potential role of NKBs in reproduction, goldfish were injected intraperitoneally with synthetic NKBa-13, -10, NKBb-13, or -11 peptides and the mRNA levels of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and pituitary gonadotropin subunits were measured. NKBa-13, -10, or NKBb-13, but not -11, significantly increased hypothalamic salmon GnRH and pituitary FSHβ and LHβ mRNA levels in both female and male goldfish. Finally, ovariectomy increased, while estradiol replacement reduced, TAC3a mRNA levels without affecting TAC3b expression in the hypothalamus. These data suggest that NKBa-13, -10, and NKBb-13 play a role in mediating the estrogen negative feedback regulation of gonadotropins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. RAS in the central nervous system: Potential role in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Natalia Pessoa; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Prestes, Thiago Ruiz Rodrigues; Feracin, Victor; Machado, Caroline Amaral; Ferreira, Rodrigo Novaes; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio; de Miranda, Aline Silva

    2018-02-25

    The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) is a key regulator of cardiovascular and renal homeostasis, but also plays important roles in mediating physiological functions in the central nervous system (CNS). The effects of the RAS were classically described as mediated by angiotensin (Ang) II via angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptors. However, another arm of the RAS formed by the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), Ang-(1-7) and the Mas receptor has been a matter of investigation due to its important physiological roles, usually counterbalancing the classical effects exerted by Ang II. We aim to provide an overview of effects elicited by the RAS, especially Ang-(1-7), in the brain. We also aim to discuss the therapeutic potential for neuropsychiatric disorders of the modulation of RAS. We carried out an extensive literature search in PubMed central. Within the brain, Ang-(1-7) contributes to the regulation of blood pressure by acting at regions that control cardiovascular functions. In contrast with Ang II, Ang-(1-7) improves baroreflex sensitivity and plays an inhibitory role in hypothalamic noradrenergic neurotransmission. Ang-(1-7) not only exerts effects related to blood pressure regulation, but also acts as a neuroprotective component of the RAS, for instance, by reducing cerebral infarct size, inflammation, oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis. Pre-clinical evidence supports a relevant role for ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis in several neuropsychiatric conditions, including stress-related and mood disorders, cerebrovascular ischemic and haemorrhagic lesions and neurodegenerative diseases. However, very few data are available regarding the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis in human CNS. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. The role of hypoxia in oral cancer and potentially malignant disorders: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujan, Omar; Shearston, Kate; Farah, Camile S

    2017-04-01

    Oral and oropharyngeal cancer are major health problems globally with over 500 000 new cases diagnosed annually. Despite the fact that oral cancer is a preventable disease and has the potential for early detection, the overall survival rate remains at around 50%. Most oral cancer cases are preceded by a group of clinical lesions designated 'potentially malignant disorders'. It is difficult to predict if and when these lesions may transform to malignancy, and in turn it is difficult to agree on appropriate management strategies. Understanding underlying molecular pathways would help in predicting the malignant transformation of oral potentially malignant disorders and ultimately identifying effective methods for early detection and prevention of oral cancer. Reprogramming energy metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer that is predominantly controlled by hypoxia-induced genes regulating angiogenesis, tumour vascularization, invasion, drug resistance and metastasis. This review aims to highlight the role of hypoxia in oral carcinogenesis and to suggest future research implications in this arena. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Potential role of green tea catechins in the management of oxidative stress-associated infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Agarwal, Ashok; Virk, Gurpriya; Cho, Chak-Lam

    2017-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are present in low concentrations in the genital tracts of males and females. Excessive ROS lead to oxidative stress, which damages DNA, lipids and proteins. Such molecular changes result in compromised vitality, increased morphological defects and decreased sperm motility in the male. In the female, oxidative stress interferes with oocyte maturation, and may inhibit in-vitro maturation of the oocyte. Recently, green tea supplementation has been reported to possess properties that may improve the quality of male and female gametes largely due to the ability of catechin polyphenols to quench ROS. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is considered the most promising bioactive compound in green tea due to its strong antioxidant activity. The unique property of green tea catechins may potentially improve reproductive health and pose an important research area. We present a comprehensive overview on the effects and potential roles of green tea catechins on oxidative stress in male and female reproduction and fertility. In this review, possible mechanisms of action are highlighted to better understand the potential use of green tea catechins in the reduction of oxidative stress and its associated beneficial effects in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The crucial role of cyclic GMP in the eclosion hormone mediated signal transduction in the silkworm metamorphoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibanaka, Y; Hayashi, H; Okada, N; Fujita, N

    1991-10-31

    The signal transduction of the peptide, eclosion hormone, in the silkworm Bombyx mori appears to be mediated via the second messenger cyclic GMP throughout their life cycle. Injection of 8-bromo-cGMP induced the ecdysis behavior in pharate adults with similar latency to eclosion hormone-induced ecdysis; the moulting occurred 50-70 min after the injection. The potency of 8Br-cGMP was 10(2) fold higher than that of cGMP and the efficacy was increased by the co-injection of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX. On the other hand, in the silkworm pupal ecdysis the eclosion hormone and also 8Br-cGMP induced the moulting behavior in a dose-dependent manner. The adult development of the ability to respond to 8Br-cGMP took place concomitantly with the response to the eclosion hormone. Both the developmental time courses were shifted by a shift of light and dark cycles. Accordingly, the sensitivities to the peptide and cyclic nucleotide developed correspondently under the light and dark circadian rhythm. Thus throughout the silkworm life cycle, eclosion hormone is effective to trigger the ecdysis behavior and cGMP plays a crucial role as the second messenger in the eclosion hormone-mediated signal transduction.

  4. pH, redox potential and local biofilm potential microenvironments within Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms and their roles in electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babauta, Jerome T; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Harrington, Timothy D; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-10-01

    The limitation of pH inside electrode-respiring biofilms is a well-known concept. However, little is known about how pH and redox potential are affected by increasing current inside biofilms respiring on electrodes. Quantifying the variations in pH and redox potential with increasing current is needed to determine how electron transfer is tied to proton transfer within the biofilm. In this research, we quantified pH and redox potential variations in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms as a function of respiration rates, measured as current. We also characterized pH and redox potential at the counter electrode. We concluded that (1) pH continued to decrease in the biofilm through different growth phases, showing that the pH is not always a limiting factor in a biofilm and (2) decreasing pH and increasing redox potential at the biofilm electrode were associated only with the biofilm, demonstrating that G. sulfurreducens biofilms respire in a unique internal environment. Redox potential inside the biofilm was also compared to the local biofilm potential measured by a graphite microelectrode, where the tip of the microelectrode was allowed to acclimatize inside the biofilm. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. High resolution melting (HRM) analysis of DNA--its role and potential in food analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druml, Barbara; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2014-09-01

    DNA based methods play an increasing role in food safety control and food adulteration detection. Recent papers show that high resolution melting (HRM) analysis is an interesting approach. It involves amplification of the target of interest in the presence of a saturation dye by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequent melting of the amplicons by gradually increasing the temperature. Since the melting profile depends on the GC content, length, sequence and strand complementarity of the product, HRM analysis is highly suitable for the detection of single-base variants and small insertions or deletions. The review gives an introduction into HRM analysis, covers important aspects in the development of an HRM analysis method and describes how HRM data are analysed and interpreted. Then we discuss the potential of HRM analysis based methods in food analysis, i.e. for the identification of closely related species and cultivars and the identification of pathogenic microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anaesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy: An overview with an update on its role in potentiating electroconvulsive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Kumar Kadiyala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in pharmacotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT remains a mainstay treatment option in psychiatry since its introduction in 1930s. It can be used primarily in severe illnesses when there is an urgent need for treatment or secondarily after failure or intolerance to pharmacotherapy. The 'unmodified' technique of ECT was practised initially, with a high incidence of musculoskeletal complications. Several modifications including general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation are used to increase the safety and patient acceptability of ECT. Various anaesthetic techniques including medications are considered to provide adequate therapeutic seizure, simultaneously controlling seizure-induced haemodynamic changes and side effects. A brief review of literature on choice of these anaesthetic techniques is discussed. This article is intended to reinforce the knowledge of clinicians, who may have limited exposure to ECT procedure. Importance is given to the recent updates on the role of induction agents in potentiating therapeutic response to ECT in psychiatric disorders.

  7. A potential pathophysiological role for galectins and the renin-angiotensin system in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Sandra M; Dechend, Ralf; Barrientos, Gabriela; Staff, Anne Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses a potential role of galectins and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia (PE). Preeclampsia affects between 3 and 5 % of all pregnancies and is a heterogeneous disease, which may be caused by multiple factors. The only cure is the delivery of the placenta, which may result in a premature delivery and baby. Probably due to its heterogeneity, PE studies in human have hitherto only led to the identification of a limited number of factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Animal models, particularly in mice and rats, have been used to gain further insight into the molecular pathology behind PE. In this review, we discuss the picture emerging from human and animal studies pointing to galectins and the RAS being associated with the PE syndrome and affecting a broad range of cellular signaling components. Moreover, we review the epidemiological evidence for PE increasing the risk of future cardiovascular disease later in life.

  8. Smoker identity and its potential role in young adults' smoking behavior: A meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombor, Ildiko; Shahab, Lion; Herbec, Aleksandra; Neale, Joanne; Michie, Susan; West, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Identity is an important influence on behavior. To identify potential targets for smoking cessation interventions in young adults, we synthesized findings from qualitative studies on smoker identity and potential influences on smoking and smoking cessation. A systematic search of 4 electronic databases up to September 19, 2013, was conducted to identify qualitative studies on smoker identity in smokers and ex-smokers aged 16-34. Key concepts were extracted from individual studies and synthesized into higher-order interpretations by following the principles of meta-ethnography. Seventeen relevant papers were identified. At the highest level of interpretation, we identified 4 types of findings: (a) contributory factors to identity, (b) identity in relation to smoking, (c) contextual and temporal patterning, and (d) behavior in relation to smoking. Contributory factors included the desire to establish aspirational individual and social identities, enact a smoker identity appropriate to the momentary social context, and alter personal nonsmoking rules when consuming alcohol. Smoker identity was multifaceted and incorporated individuals' defensive rationalizations, and both positive and negative feelings attached to it. Smoker identities took time to develop, were subject to change, and were context dependent. Identity was found to play a role in quit attempts. Qualitative research into the identity of young adult smokers has established it as a multifaceted phenomenon serving important functions but also involving conflict and defensive rationalizations. It develops over time and contextual factors influence its expression. The nature of a smoker's identity can play an important role in smoking cessation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. The potential role of vitamin D for prevention and treatment of tuberculosis and infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Dini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Vitamin D deficiency (VDD is a common condition among several populations in the world. VDD is associated with higher incidence of immune system disorders and faster progression of some infectious diseases. Vitamin D is known to be of physiological importance, it is considered an essential micronutrient for the bone health and plays a beneficial role in the prevention and/or treatment of a number of chronic diseases. Vitamin D has a complex action on the immune system. RESULTS: Evidence that vitamin D protects against tuberculosis has been supported by in vitro, epidemiological and some preliminary clinical studies. Vitamin D has a potential effect on HIV (human immunodeficiency virus and plays a crucial role in the defence against respiratory infections. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D supplementation could be a low-cost, practical method to protect groups of people with high incidence of those diseases. Public health education should stress the need for adequate dietary intake of vitamin D in those vulnerable groups.

  10. Epigenetic Alterations in Fanconi Anaemia: Role in Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Belo

    Full Text Available Fanconi anaemia (FA is an inherited disorder characterized by chromosomal instability. The phenotype is variable, which raises the possibility that it may be affected by other factors, such as epigenetic modifications. These play an important role in oncogenesis and may be pharmacologically manipulated. Our aim was to explore whether the epigenetic profiles in FA differ from non-FA individuals and whether these could be manipulated to alter the disease phenotype. We compared expression of epigenetic genes and DNA methylation profile of tumour suppressor genes between FA and normal samples. FA samples exhibited decreased expression levels of genes involved in epigenetic regulation and hypomethylation in the promoter regions of tumour suppressor genes. Treatment of FA cells with histone deacetylase inhibitor Vorinostat increased the expression of DNM3Tβ and reduced the levels of CIITA and HDAC9, PAK1, USP16, all involved in different aspects of epigenetic and immune regulation. Given the ability of Vorinostat to modulate epigenetic genes in FA patients, we investigated its functional effects on the FA phenotype. This was assessed by incubating FA cells with Vorinostat and quantifying chromosomal breaks induced by DNA cross-linking agents. Treatment of FA cells with Vorinostat resulted in a significant reduction of aberrant cells (81% on average. Our results suggest that epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in oncogenesis in FA. Epigenetic agents may be helpful in improving the phenotype of FA patients, potentially reducing tumour incidence in this population.

  11. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Autophagy in Periodontitis and Their Potential Linkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that causes damage to periodontal tissues, which include the gingiva, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. The major cause of periodontal tissue destruction is an inappropriate host response to microorganisms and their products. Specifically, a homeostatic imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS and antioxidant defense systems has been implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Elevated levels of ROS acting as intracellular signal transducers result in autophagy, which plays a dual role in periodontitis by promoting cell death or blocking apoptosis in infected cells. Autophagy can also regulate ROS generation and scavenging. Investigations are ongoing to elucidate the crosstalk mechanisms between ROS and autophagy. Here, we review the physiological and pathological roles of ROS and autophagy in periodontal tissues. The redox-sensitive pathways related to autophagy, such as mTORC1, Beclin 1, and the Atg12-Atg5 complex, are explored in depth to provide a comprehensive overview of the crosstalk between ROS and autophagy. Based on the current evidence, we suggest that a potential linkage between ROS and autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  12. The emerging roles and therapeutic potential of exosomes in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xipeng

    2017-05-15

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is one of the three types of malignant tumors in the female reproductive system, and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is its most typical form. Due to the asymptomatic nature of the early stages and resistance to chemotherapy, EOC has both a poor prognosis and a high fatality rate. Current treatments for OC are very limited, and the 5-years survival rate is approximately 30%. Exosomes, which are microvesicles ranging from approximately 30-100 nm in size that are secreted by living cells, can be produced from different cell types and detected in various body fluids. Cancer cells can secrete more exosomes than healthy cells, and more importantly, the content of cancer cell-derived exosomes is distinct. The exosomes shedding from tumor cells are considered to be involved in tumor progression and metastasis. As such, exosomes are expected to be potential tools for tumor diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we briefly present the emerging roles of exosomes in OC and summarize related articles about their roles as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers and in the treatment and drug resistance of OC.

  13. [Carbon capture and storage (CCS) and its potential role to mitigate carbon emission in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Wu, Zong-Xin; Wang, Wei-Zhong

    2007-06-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been widely recognized as one of the options to mitigate carbon emission to eventually stabilize carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. Three parts of CCS, which are carbon capture, transport, and storage are assessed in this paper, covering comparisons of techno-economic parameters for different carbon capture technologies, comparisons of storage mechanism, capacity and cost for various storage formations, and etc. In addition, the role of CCS to mitigate global carbon emission is introduced. Finally, China MARKAL model is updated to include various CCS technologies, especially indirect coal liquefaction and poly-generation technologies with CCS, in order to consider carbon emission reduction as well as energy security issue. The model is used to generate different scenarios to study potential role of CCS to mitigate carbon emissions by 2050 in China. It is concluded that application of CCS can decrease marginal abatement cost and the decrease rate can reach 45% for the emission reduction rate of 50%, and it can lessen the dependence on nuclear power development for stringent carbon constrains. Moreover, coal resources can be cleanly used for longer time with CCS, e.g., for the scenario C70, coal share in the primary energy consumption by 2050 will increase from 10% when without CCS to 30% when with CCS. Therefore, China should pay attention to CCS R&D activities and to developing demonstration projects.

  14. Adipocytes and abdominal aortic aneurysm: Putative potential role of adipocytes in the process of AAA development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugo, Hirona; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Zaima, Nobuhiro

    2018-01-15

    Background Adipose tissue plays a role in the storage of excess energy as triglycerides (TGs). Excess fat accumulation causes various metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. It has been reported that ectopic fat deposition and excess TG accumulation in non-adipose tissue might be important predictors of cardiometabolic and vascular risk. For example, ectopic fat in perivascular tissue promotes atherosclerotic plaque formation in the arterial wall. Objective Recently, it has been reported that ectopic fat (adipocyte) in the vascular wall of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is present in both human and experimental animal models. The pathological significance of adipocytes in the AAA wall has not been fully understood. In this review, we summarized the functions of adipocytes and discussed potential new drugs that target vascular adipocytes for AAA treatment. Result Previous studies suggest that adipocytes in vascular wall play an important role in the development of AAA. Conclusion Adipocytes in the vascular wall could be novel targets for the development of AAA therapeutic drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Verification of a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty (FMCT): The Potential Role of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    The objective of a future verification of a FMCT(Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty) is to deter and detect non-compliance with treaty obligations in a timely and non-discriminatory manner with regard to banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear devices. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has already established the IAEA safeguards as a verification system mainly for Non -Nuclear Weapon States (NNWSs), it is expected that the IAEA's experience and expertise in this field will make a significant contribution to setting up a future treaty's verification regime. This paper is designed to explore the potential role of the IAEA in verifying the future treaty by analyzing verification abilities of the Agency in terms of treaty verification and expected challenges. Furthermore, the concept of multilateral verification that could be facilitated by the IAEA will be examined as a measure of providing a credible assurance of compliance with a future treaty. In this circumstance, it is necessary for the IAEA to be prepared for playing a leading role in FMCT verifications as a form of multilateral verification by taking advantage of its existing verification concepts, methods, and tools. Also, several challenges that the Agency faces today need to be overcome, including dealing with sensitive and proliferative information, attribution of fissile materials, lack of verification experience in military fuel cycle facilities, and different attitude and culture towards verification between NWSs and NNWSs

  16. Bovine mastitis disease/pathogenicity: evidence of the potential role of microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Fernanda; Saavedra, Maria José; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Bovine mastitis (BM) is a disease with high incidence worldwide and one of the most relevant bovine pathologies and the most costly to the dairy industry. BM is an inflammation of the udder and represents one of the most difficult veterinary diseases to control. Biofilm formation is considered a selective advantage for pathogens causing mastitis, facilitating bacterial persistence in the udder. In fact, recently some authors drew attention to the biofilm formation ability presented by several mastitis causing pathogens and to its possible relation with recurrent mastitis infections and with the increased resistance to antimicrobial agents and host immune defence system. Actually, up to now, several researchers reported the potential role of cells in this mode of growth in the previous facts mentioned. As a consequence of the presence of biofilms, the infection here focused is more difficult to treat and eradicate, making this problem a more relevant pressing issue. Thus, we believe that a deeper knowledge of these structures in mastitis can help to determine the best control strategy to be used in veterinary practice in order to reduce losses in the dairy industry and to ensure milk safety and quality. The aim of this paper was to review the existing research and consequently to provide an overview of the role of biofilms in BM infections. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Verification of a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty (FMCT): The Potential Role of the IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin Ho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The objective of a future verification of a FMCT(Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty) is to deter and detect non-compliance with treaty obligations in a timely and non-discriminatory manner with regard to banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear devices. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has already established the IAEA safeguards as a verification system mainly for Non -Nuclear Weapon States (NNWSs), it is expected that the IAEA's experience and expertise in this field will make a significant contribution to setting up a future treaty's verification regime. This paper is designed to explore the potential role of the IAEA in verifying the future treaty by analyzing verification abilities of the Agency in terms of treaty verification and expected challenges. Furthermore, the concept of multilateral verification that could be facilitated by the IAEA will be examined as a measure of providing a credible assurance of compliance with a future treaty. In this circumstance, it is necessary for the IAEA to be prepared for playing a leading role in FMCT verifications as a form of multilateral verification by taking advantage of its existing verification concepts, methods, and tools. Also, several challenges that the Agency faces today need to be overcome, including dealing with sensitive and proliferative information, attribution of fissile materials, lack of verification experience in military fuel cycle facilities, and different attitude and culture towards verification between NWSs and NNWSs.

  18. Caspase-14 Expression Impairs Retinal Pigment Epithelium Barrier Function: Potential Role in Diabetic Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Beasley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that caspase-14 is a novel molecule in retina with potential role in accelerated vascular cell death during diabetic retinopathy (DR. Here, we evaluated whether caspase-14 is implicated in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE dysfunction under hyperglycemia. The impact of high glucose (HG, 30 mM D-glucose on caspase-14 expression in human RPE (ARPE-19 cells was tested, which showed significant increase in caspase-14 expression compared with normal glucose (5 mM D-glucose + 25 mM L-glucose. We also evaluated the impact of modulating caspase-14 expression on RPE cells barrier function, phagocytosis, and activation of other caspases using ARPE-19 cells transfected with caspase-14 plasmid or caspase-14 siRNA. We used FITC-dextran flux assay and electric cell substrate impedance sensing (ECIS to test the changes in RPE cell barrier function. Similar to HG, caspase-14 expression in ARPE-19 cells increased FITC-dextran leakage through the confluent monolayer and decreased the transcellular electrical resistance (TER. These effects of HG were prevented by caspase-14 knockdown. Furthermore, caspase-14 knockdown prevented the HG-induced activation of caspase-1 and caspase-9, the only activated caspases by HG. Phagocytic activity was unaffected by caspase-14 expression. Our results suggest that caspase-14 contributes to RPE cell barrier disruption under hyperglycemic conditions and thus plays a role in the development of diabetic macular edema.

  19. The potential protective role of Physalis peruviana L. fruit in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dkhil, Mohamed A; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Diab, Marwa M S; Othman, Mohamed S; Aref, Ahmed M; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential protective role of Physalis peruviana L. (family Solanaceae) against cadmium-induced hepatorenal toxicity in Wistar rats. Herein, cadmium chloride (CdCl2) (6.5 mg/kg bwt/day) was intraperitoneally injected for 5 days, and methanolic extract of physalis (MEPh) was pre-administered to a group of Cd-treated rats by an oral administration at a daily dose of 200 mg/kg bwt for 5 days. The findings revealed that CdCl2 injection induced significant decreases in kidney weight and kidney index. Cadmium intoxication increased the activities of liver enzymes and the bilirubin level, in addition to the levels of uric acid, urea and creatinine were increased in the serum. The pre-administration of MEPh alleviated hepatorenal toxicity in Cd-treated rats. Physalis was noted to play a good hepatorenal protective role, reducing lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, and enhancing enzymatic activities and non-enzymatic antioxidant molecule, glutathione, in hepatic and renal tissues of Cd-treated rats. Moreover, physalis treatment was able to reverse the histopathological changes in liver and kidney tissues and also increased the expression of Bcl-2 protein in liver and kidney of rats. Overall, the results showed that MEPh can induce antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects and also exerts beneficial effects for the treatment of Cd-induced hepatorenal toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Roles of protein kinase R in cancer: Potential as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takao; Imamura, Takeshi; Hiasa, Yoichi

    2018-04-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase. It was initially identified as an innate immune antiviral protein induced by interferon (IFN) and activated by dsRNA. PKR is recognized as a key executor of antiviral host defense. Moreover, it contributes to inflammation and immune regulation through several signaling pathways. In addition to IFN and dsRNA, PKR is activated by multiple stimuli and regulates various signaling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathways. PKR was initially thought to be a tumor suppressor as a result of its ability to suppress cell growth and interact with major tumor suppressor genes. However, in several types of malignant disease, such as colon and breast cancers, its role remains controversial. In hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the main cause of liver cancer, and PKR inhibits HCV replication, indicating its role as a tumor suppressor. However, PKR is overexpressed in cirrhotic patients, and acts as a tumor promoter through enhancement of cancer cell growth by mediating MAPK or signal transducer and activator of transcription pathways. Moreover, PKR is reportedly required for the activation of inflammasomes and influences metabolic disorders. In the present review, we introduce the multifaceted roles of PKR such as antiviral function, tumor cell growth, regulation of inflammatory immune responses, and maintaining metabolic homeostasis; and discuss future perspectives on PKR biology including its potential as a therapeutic target for liver cancer. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  1. The development of psychotic disorders in adolescence: a potential role for hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, Hanan D; Holtzman, Carrie W; Ryan, Arthur T; Shapiro, Daniel I; MacDonald, Allison N; Goulding, Sandra M; Brasfield, Joy L; Walker, Elaine F

    2013-07-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Puberty and Adolescence". The notion that adolescence is characterized by dramatic changes in behavior, and often by emotional upheaval, is widespread and longstanding in popular western culture. In recent decades, this notion has gained increasing support from empirical research showing that the peri- and post-pubertal developmental stages are associated with a significant rise in the rate of psychiatric symptoms and syndromes. As a result, interest in adolescent development has burgeoned among researchers focused on the origins of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Two factors have fueled this trend: 1) increasing evidence from longitudinal research that adolescence is the modal period for the emergence of "prodromal" manifestations, or precursors of psychotic symptoms, and 2) the rapidly accumulating scientific findings on brain structural and functional changes occurring during adolescence and young adulthood. Further, gonadal and adrenal hormones are beginning to play a more prominent role in conceptualizations of adolescent brain development, as well as in the origins of psychiatric symptoms during this period (Walker and Bollini, 2002; Walker et al., 2008). In this paper, we begin by providing an overview of the nature and course of psychotic disorders during adolescence/young adulthood. We then turn to the role of hormones in modulating normal brain development, and the potential role they might play in the abnormal brain changes that characterize youth at clinical high-risk (CHR) for psychosis. The activational and organizational effects of hormones are explored, with a focus on how hormone-induced changes might be linked with neuropathological processes in the emergence of psychosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Review: MicroRNAs in assisted reproduction and their potential role in IVF failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siristatidis, Charalampos; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Brachnis, Nikos; Liassidou, Aspasia; Iliodromiti, Zoe; Bettocchi, Stefano; Chrelias, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as important regulators of gene expression stability. In the endometrium, miRNAs are involved in the dynamic changes associated with the menstrual cycle, implicated in implantation and in reproductive disorders. We performed a review in an attempt to assess the potential biological pathways linking altered miRNAs profiles with in vitro fertilisation (IVF) failure. Crucially, as miRNAs appear to have a significant role in the course of reproduction, they are excellent research candidates with the potential to enable a better understanding over the underlying molecular activities that prevent implantation and further progression of the embryo. Further steps include in-depth pathway mapping of the implantation process and the characterization of the respective miRNAs and associated links. The efficiency of any intervention should determine whether miRNA profiling could possibly be adopted in routine practice to substantially improve the diagnostic accuracy and, in parallel, the directed treatment of the next-generation IVF. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Curcumin and treatment of melanoma: The potential role of microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Diana; Pedone, Claudio; Sahebkar, Amirhosssein

    2017-04-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer and is characterized by poor prognosis in its advanced stages because treatments are poorly effective and burdened with severe adverse effects. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are implicated in several cellular processes; they are categorized as oncogenic and tumor suppressor miRNAs. Several miRNAs are implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of melanoma, such as the tumor suppressor miR-let7b that targets cyclin D and regulates cell cycle. Curcumin is a natural compound derived from Curcuma longa L. (turmeric) with anti-cancer properties, documented also in melanoma, and is well tolerated in humans. Pharmacological activity of curcumin is mediated by modulation of several pathways, such as JAK-2/STAT3, thus inhibiting melanoma cell migration and invasion and enhancing apoptosis of these cells. The low oral bioavailability of curcumin has led to the development of curcumin analogues, such as EF24, with greater anti-tumor efficacy and metabolic stability. Potential anti-cancer activity of curcumin and its analogues is also mediated by modulation of miRNAs such as miR21, that is implicated in cell cycle regulation and apoptosis through down-regulation of PTEN and PDCD4 proteins. Curcumin has a potential role in the treatment of melanoma, though further studies are necessary to explore its clinical efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Role and Potential of Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer in Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gahyun Baek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion (AD is an effective biological treatment for stabilizing organic compounds in waste/wastewater and in simultaneously producing biogas. However, it is often limited by the slow reaction rates of different microorganisms’ syntrophic biological metabolisms. Stable and fast interspecies electron transfer (IET between volatile fatty acid-oxidizing bacteria and hydrogenotrophic methanogens is crucial for efficient methanogenesis. In this syntrophic interaction, electrons are exchanged via redox mediators such as hydrogen and formate. Recently, direct IET (DIET has been revealed as an important IET route for AD. Microorganisms undergoing DIET form interspecies electrical connections via membrane-associated cytochromes and conductive pili; thus, redox mediators are not required for electron exchange. This indicates that DIET is more thermodynamically favorable than indirect IET. Recent studies have shown that conductive materials (e.g., iron oxides, activated carbon, biochar, and carbon fibers can mediate direct electrical connections for DIET. Microorganisms attach to conductive materials’ surfaces or vice versa according to particle size, and form conductive biofilms or aggregates. Different conductive materials promote DIET and improve AD performance in digesters treating different feedstocks, potentially suggesting a new approach to enhancing AD performance. This review discusses the role and potential of DIET in methanogenic systems, especially with conductive materials for promoting DIET.

  5. Potential role of estrogen receptor beta as a tumor suppressor of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Bossard

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the gynecological cancer exhibiting the highest morbidity and improvement of treatments is still required. Previous studies have shown that Estrogen-receptor beta (ERβ levels decreased along with ovarian carcinogenesis. Here, we present evidence that reintroduction of ERβ in BG-1 epithelial ovarian cancer cells, which express ERα, leads in vitro to a decrease of basal and estradiol-promoted cell proliferation. ERβ reduced the frequency of cells in S phase and increased the one of cells in G2/M phase. At the molecular level, we found that ERβ downregulated total retinoblastoma (Rb, phosphorylated Rb and phospho-AKT cellular content as well as cyclins D1 and A2. In addition, ERβ had a direct effect on ERα, by strongly inhibiting its expression and activity, which could explain part of the anti-proliferative action of ERβ. By developing a novel preclinical model of ovarian cancer based on a luminescent orthotopic xenograft in athymic Nude mice, we further revealed that ERβ expression reduces tumor growth and the presence of tumor cells in sites of metastasis, hence resulting in improved survival of mice. Altogether, these findings unveil a potential tumor-suppressor role of ERβ in ovarian carcinogenesis, which could be of potential clinical relevance for the selection of the most appropriate treatment for patients.

  6. Potential Role of Estrogen Receptor Beta as a Tumor Suppressor of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Françoise; Machelon, Véronique; Brigitte, Madly; Jacquard, Carine; Pillon, Arnaud; Balaguer, Patrick; Balabanian, Karl; Lazennec, Gwendal

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the gynecological cancer exhibiting the highest morbidity and improvement of treatments is still required. Previous studies have shown that Estrogen-receptor beta (ERβ) levels decreased along with ovarian carcinogenesis. Here, we present evidence that reintroduction of ERβ in BG-1 epithelial ovarian cancer cells, which express ERα, leads in vitro to a decrease of basal and estradiol-promoted cell proliferation. ERβ reduced the frequency of cells in S phase and increased the one of cells in G2/M phase. At the molecular level, we found that ERβ downregulated total retinoblastoma (Rb), phosphorylated Rb and phospho-AKT cellular content as well as cyclins D1 and A2. In addition, ERβ had a direct effect on ERα, by strongly inhibiting its expression and activity, which could explain part of the anti-proliferative action of ERβ. By developing a novel preclinical model of ovarian cancer based on a luminescent orthotopic xenograft in athymic Nude mice, we further revealed that ERβ expression reduces tumor growth and the presence of tumor cells in sites of metastasis, hence resulting in improved survival of mice. Altogether, these findings unveil a potential tumor-suppressor role of ERβ in ovarian carcinogenesis, which could be of potential clinical relevance for the selection of the most appropriate treatment for patients. PMID:22970307

  7. On the Potential Role of Species Separation in DT Fuels on Implosion Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Bellei, Claudio; Wilks, Scott; Haines, Malcolm; Casey, Dan; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, Richard

    2012-10-01

    The measurement of strong, self-generated electric fields (1-10 GVolts/m) in imploding capsules [1], their attribution to polarized (plasma) shock fronts [2], and the identification of plasma-enhanced binary species diffusion from barodiffusion and electrodiffusion [3] have led to a growing interest in the potential role of species separation in inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) thermonuclear fuels. The potential for anomalous heating from transient frictional or resistive drag between D and T across a finite thickness shock front will be assessed and applied towards ignition thresholds and understanding some outstanding anomalies in the Omega implosion database.[4pt] [1] J.R. Rygg et al., Science 319, 1223 (2008); C.K. Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225001 (2008).[0pt] [2] P.A. Amendt, J.L. Milovich, S.C. Wilks, C.K. Li, R.D. Petrasso and F.H. S'eguin, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51, 124048 (2009).[0pt] [3] P. Amendt, C. Bellei and S.C. Wilks, Phys. Rev. Lett. (to appear).

  8. The Role of Auditory Evoked Potentials in the Context of Cochlear Implant Provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, Sebastian; Dziemba, Oliver Christian

    2017-12-01

    : Auditory evoked potentials (AEP) are highly demanded during the whole process of equipping patients with cochlear implants (CI). They play an essential role in preoperative diagnostics, intraoperative testing, and postoperative monitoring of auditory performance and success. The versatility of AEP's is essentially enhanced by their property to be evokable by acoustic as well as electric stimuli. Thus, the electric responses of the auditory system following acoustic stimulation and recorded by the conventional surface technique as well as by transtympanic derivation from the promontory (Electrocochleography [ECochG]) are used for the quantitative determination of hearing loss and, additionally, electrically evoked compound actions potentials (ECAP) can be recorded with the intracochlear electrodes of the implant just adjacent to the stimulation electrode to check the functional integrity of the device and its coupling to the auditory system. The profile of ECAP thresholds is used as basis for speech processor fitting, the spread of excitation (SOE) allows the identification of electrode mislocations such as array foldover, and recovery functions may serve to optimize stimulus pulse rate. These techniques as well as those relying on scalp surface activity originating in the brainstem or the auditory cortex accompany the CI recipient during its whole life span and they offer valuable insights into functioning and possible adverse effects of the CI for clinical and scientific purposes.

  9. Emerging Insights on Brazilian Pepper Tree (Schinus terebinthifolius) Invasion: The Potential Role of Soil Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Karim; Esiobu, Nwadiuto

    2016-01-01

    Invasive plant species constitute a major ecological and economic problem worldwide, often distorting trophic levels and ecosystem balance. Numerous studies implicate factors ranging from environmental plasticity, competition for nutrient and space, and allelopathy in the success of invasive species in general. The Brazilian Pepper tree (BP) was introduced to the United States in the 1800s and has since become a category one invasive plant in Florida. It has aggressively spread to about 3000 km2 of terrestrial surface, fueled in part by the prevalence of the hybrid genotypes and environmental perturbations. It displays some of the well-established invasive mechanisms but there is a serious dearth of knowledge on the plant–microbe–soil interactions and whether the rhizobiome plays any roles in the displacement of native flora and the range expansion of BP. Several control measures, including chemical, mechanical, and biological antagonism have been used with limited success while restoration of natives in soils from which BP was removed has proved problematic partly due to a poorly understood phenomenon described as the “BP legacy effect.” Emerging evidence suggests that allelopathy, selective recruitment of beneficial soil microbes, disruption of microbial community structure and alteration of nutrient cycling, exhibited by many other invasive plant species may also be involved in the case of BP. This brief review discusses the well-established BP invasion mechanisms and highlights the current understanding of the molecular, below-ground processes. It also points out the gaps in studies on the potential role of microbial interactions in the success of BP invasion. These hitherto poorly studied mechanisms could further explain the aggressive spread of BP and could potentially contribute significantly to effective control measures and enable appropriate strategies for restoring native plants. The review advocates for the use of cutting-edge techniques in

  10. Estimation of Polar Cap Potential and the Role of PC Index

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    Ga-Hee Moon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Polar cap potential has long been considered as an indicator for the amount of energy flowing in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Thus, the estimation of polar cap potential is important to understand the physical process of the magnetosphere. To estimate the polar cap potential in the Northern Hemisphere, merging electric field by Kan & Lee (1979 is adopted. Relationships between the PC index and calculated merging electric field (E* are examined during full-time and storm-time periods separately. For this purpose Dst, AL, and PC indices and solar wind data are utilized during the period from 1996-2003. From this linear relationship, polar cap potential (Φ* is estimated using the formula by Doyle & Burke (1983. The values are represented as 58.1 ± 26.9 kV for the full-time period and 123.7 ± 84.1 kV for a storm-time period separately. Considering that the average value of polar cap potential of Doyle & Burke (1983 is about 47 kV during moderately quiet intervals with the S3-2 measurements, these results are similar to such. The monthly averaged variation of Dst, AL, and PC indices are then compared. The Dst and AL indices show distinct characteristics with peaks during equinoctial season whereas the average PC index according to the month shows higher values in autumn than in spring. The monthly variations of the linear correlation coefficients between solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices are also examined. The PC-AL linear correlation coefficient is highest, being 0.82 with peaks during the equinoctial season. As with the AL index, the PC index may also prove useful for predicting the intensity of an auroral substorm. Generally, the linear correlation coefficients are shown low in summer due to conductance differences and other factors. To assess the role of the PC index during the recovery phase of a storm, the relation between the cumulative PC index and the duration is examined. Although the correlation coefficient lowers

  11. Management simulations for Lean healthcare: exploiting the potentials of role-playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabè, Federico; Giorgino, Maria Cleofe; Guercini, Jacopo; Bianciardi, Caterina; Mezzatesta, Vincenzo

    2018-04-09

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potentials of role-playing (RP) both in training healthcare (HC) professionals to implement tools and improvement actions based on Lean principles, and in supporting group discussion and the sharing of different competencies for the development of Lean HC. Design/methodology/approach The paper presents the case study of an RP simulation called LEAN HEALTHCARE LAB, which is used to train HC professionals at Siena University Hospital. The paper reports and discusses the results of a specific two-day simulation session and of a questionnaire that was distributed to gather feedback from the participants. Findings The paper verifies the potentials of RP to be a powerful educational and training tool that is able to stimulate the HC participants to apply Lean thinking principles and share their competencies in collaborative decision-making processes. Research limitations/implications The study provides data in reference to one single simulation session, although the game has already been applied several times in different HC organizations with very similar outcomes. Moreover, a more in-depth analysis of players' perceptions and decisions could be performed using different tools in addition to the adopted questionnaire. Practical implications RP games (RPGs) are effective training and educational tools for HC professionals. They offer benefits and learning conditions which are definitely different if compared with more conventional education programs for HC professionals. Originality/value While previous studies have extensively discussed the potentialities of RPG and simulations in training programs, only a few articles have discussed the RP adoption for Lean thinking and even less to educate HC professionals on Lean principles and tools.

  12. The potential role of stethoscopes as a source of nosocomial infection

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    Neetu Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infectious diseases can be transmitted in various ways . Indirect transmission or vehicle-borne transmission of infection can occur through various agents like instruments, utensils, water, or food. In hospital settings, transmission of infection through contaminated medical devices is always a possibility. Stethoscope is the symbol of health professionals. However, the diaphragm and bells of the stethoscopes have been shown to harbor pathogenic and nonpathogenic microorganisms. Aims: 1 To determine the degree of contamination of stethoscopes used by clinicians and nurses. 2 To identify various microbes from such contaminated stethoscopes and to assess their role as potential pathogens. 3 To determine the effectiveness of 70% ethanol as a disinfecting agent. Materials and Methods: Stethoscopes of 50 healthcare workers from different departments were included in the study. Bacteriological cultures of the samples were done on blood agar and MacConkey agar plates. Organisms were identified by conventional phenotypic methods. Antibiotic sensitivity test (ABST of the microorganisms was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Results: Average number of colonies on each stethoscope was 30 . Pathogenic microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter species, Citrobacter species, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Bacillus species, and Aspergillus fumigatus were identified. Among the potential pathogenic organisms, coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated. Numbers of colonies were highest among the stethoscopes sampled from surgery ward and Medical Intensive Care Unit MICU. Conclusion: Stethoscopes harbor potential pathogens capable of surviving on their surfaces. Despite their best intentions, health professionals can act as a vector for transmission of disease. Disinfecting procedures may be necessary between consecutive patients. Attention to simple preventive strategies can reduce the disease transmission rate.

  13. Synaptic neurochemistry: Potential targets for the development of new tracer imaging methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Radiotracer techniques for measuring biochemical and pharmacologic processes unique to the synapse and to chemically defined neuronal populations are now under investigation. These methods make use of neuronal biochemical specializations determined by invasive animal experiments and confirmed by human biopsy and autopsy. Early investigators focused on determination of neurotransmitter receptors. More recently, attention has turned to evaluation of presynaptic markers such as steps in neurotransmitter synthesis, storage and degradation, and to the potential evaluation of new postsynaptic markers, including chemical second-messenger activities and receptor-grated ion channel distributions. In this review, synaptic neurochemistry is presented with attention to potential radiotracer imaging methods. Strategies for selecting and applying neuropharmacologic methods to disorders of the human brain are outlined. The methodological requirements of new radiotracer imaging techniques are summarized according to their desired application. Finally, distinctions between in vitro and in vivo measurements of these processes are outlined, along with strategies for detecting such differences

  14. POTENTIAL CLUSTERS IN BANAT AND THEIR ROLE IN REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

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    Ramona IŞFĂNESCU

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The interest in the study of clusters and their role in the economic development of certain regions has constantly grown in the past years. This interest has also been emphasized by the emergence of successful clusters in many regions; these are clusters that have visibly and they have determined the increase in competitiveness of those particular regions. Clusters are geographic gatherings of firms and institutions, connected to each other and specialized in certain fields of activity. In Romania, due to the low cooperation level among enterprises we cannot say that proper clusters exists, but just some “spatial gatherings” of firms activating in certain domains, connected by the need of using certain natural resources and the existence of a specialized workforce in that particular domain. Natural “clusters” can be identified by means of quantitative analyses, these indicating the possibility to identify certain spatial assemblies of firms in a certain economic sector. Starting from these quantitative analyses, for Banat region have been identified some important spatial gatherings of firms activating in certain domains which could represent potential clusters in this area. As clusters function on the principle of cooperation among enterprises, a strong point of the region is the presence of foreign investors which promoted the model of enterprise cooperation through sub-contracting local enterprises. Among these, we mention the Italian investors which brought to Banat, especially to Timiş County the Italian cluster model. Are there in Banat premises for the emergence of clusters? Which are the fields of activity in which these clusters can emerge? What role will these clusters play in the economic development of the region? These are just some of the questions that we aim answering to through this study.

  15. Determinants of dietary diversity and the potential role of men in improving household nutrition in Tanzania.

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    Justus Ochieng

    Full Text Available Good nutrition is a prerequisite for a healthy and active life, especially for agriculture-dependent households. However, diets in most households in Tanzania lack diversity because the intake of meat, poultry, fish, and vegetables and fruits is low. This study estimates factors influencing dietary diversity of the household, children under five years, and women using primary survey data. It qualitatively assesses male dietary patterns and men's potential role in improving the nutritional status of the entire household. The findings show that the most consumed foods within the household are cereals, vegetables, oils and fats, spices, condiments and beverages. Children (d = 0.4; p<0.05 and women (d = 0.5; p<0.01 in female-headed households have low dietary diversity compared to those in male-headed households. Women and children access less diverse diets since 46% and 26%, achieved minimum dietary diversity respectively. Production of vegetables (coef. 0.34; p<0.05 play an important role in improving the dietary diversity of women. Gender (coef. 0.05; p<0.10 and education of the household head (coef. 0.02; p<0.01, food preparation and nutrition training (coef. 0.10; p<0.05 are important factors influencing dietary diversity of the members of a household. Results suggest that there is a need to support community-based programs to provide information on food and the importance of vegetables, their preparation, consumption and utilization to address food and nutrition challenges. Men can contribute towards improving household nutrition security by reducing consumption of food away from the home, especially during periods of food shortages. We recommend the use of complementary quantitative research to determine the patterns and dynamics of men's dietary diversity and compare it with that of other household members.

  16. Trpv5/6 is vital for epithelial calcium uptake and bone formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanoevelen, J.; Janssens, A.C.; Huitema, L.F.; Hammond, C.J.; Metz, J.R.; Flik, G.; Voets, T.; Schulte-Merker, S.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is an essential ion serving a multitude of physiological roles. Aside from its role as a second messenger, it is an essential component of the vertebrate bone matrix. Efficient uptake and storage of calcium are therefore indispensable for all vertebrates. Transient receptor potential family,

  17. Effect of simvastatin on vascular tone in porcine coronary artery: Potential role of the mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almukhtar, H.; Garle, M.J.; Smith, P.A.; Roberts, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    Statins induce acute vasorelaxation which may contribute to the overall benefits of statins in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. The mechanism underlying this relaxation is unknown. As statins have been shown to alter mitochondrial function, in this study we investigated the role of mitochondria in the relaxation to simvastatin. Relaxation of porcine coronary artery segments by statins was measured using isolated tissue baths. Mitochondrial activity was determined by measuring changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were determined in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells with Fluo-4 using standard epifluorescent imaging techniques. Simvastatin, but not pravastatin, produced a slow relaxation of the coronary artery, which was independent of the endothelium. The relaxation was attenuated by the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (10 μM) and the complex III inhibitor myxothiazol (10 μM), or a combination of the two. The complex III inhibitor antimycin A (10 μM) produced a similar time-dependent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery, which was attenuated by rotenone. Changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence showed that simvastatin (10 μM) depolarized the membrane potential of mitochondria in both isolated mitochondria and intact blood vessels. Simvastatin and antimycin A both inhibited calcium-induced contractions in isolated blood vessels and calcium influx in smooth muscle cells and this inhibition was prevented by rotenone. In conclusion, simvastatin produces an endothelium-independent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery which is dependent, in part, upon effects on the mitochondria. The effects on the mitochondria may lead to a reduction in calcium influx and hence relaxation of the blood vessel. - Highlights: • Simvastatin produces a relaxation of the porcine coronary artery. • This relaxation is inhibited by mitochondrial complex inhibitors. • Simvastatin alters mitochondrial membrane potential

  18. Potential role of TRIM3 as a novel tumour suppressor in colorectal cancer (CRC) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Mei-Yu; Cao, Hai-Long; He, Na-Na; Xu, Meng-Que; Dong, Wen-Xiao; Wang, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Bang-Mao; Zhou, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Recent cancer genome-sequencing efforts and complementary functional studies have led to the identification of a collection of candidate 'driver' genes involved in CRC tumorigenesis. Tripartite motif (TRIM3) is recently identified as a tumour suppressor in glioblastoma but this tumour-suppressive function has not been investigated in CRC. In this study, we investigated the potential role of TRIM3 as a tumour suppressor in CRC development by manipulating the expression of TRIM3 in two authentic CRC cell lines, HCT116 and DLD1, followed by various functional assays, including cell proliferation, colony formation, scratch wound healing, soft agar, and invasion assays. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo tumour-suppressive properties of TRIM3. Small-interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated knockdown of TRIM3 conferred growth advantage in CRC cells. In contrast, overexpression of TRIM3 affected cell survival, cell migration, anchorage independent growth and invasive potential in CRC cells. In addition, TRIM3 was found to be down-regulated in human colon cancer tissues compared with matched normal colon tissues. Overexpression of TRIM3 significantly inhibited tumour growth in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Mechanistic investigation revealed that TRIM3 can regulate p53 protein level through its stabilisation. TRIM3 functions as a tumour suppressor in CRC progression. This tumour-suppressive function is exerted partially through regulation of p53 protein. Therefore, this protein may represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of CRC.

  19. Role of CD248 as a potential severity marker in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartis, Domokos; Crowley, Louise E; D'Souza, Vijay K; Borthwick, Lee; Fisher, Andrew J; Croft, Adam P; Pongrácz, Judit E; Thompson, Richard; Langman, Gerald; Buckley, Christopher D; Thickett, David R

    2016-04-14

    CD248 or Endosialin is a transmembrane molecule expressed in stromal cells binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) components. It has been previously implicated in kidney fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis as well as in tumour-stromal interactions. This study investigates the role of CD248 in the pathogenesis of fibrotic diseases in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). CD248 quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on lung samples from 22 IPF patients and its expression was assayed in cultured pulmonary fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Effects of CD248 silencing was evaluated on fibroblast proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation. IHC revealed strong CD248 expression in mesenchymal cells of normal lung structures such as pleura and adventitia but not in epithelium. Fibrotic areas showed markedly stronger staining than unaffected lung tissue. The extent of CD248 staining showed a significant negative correlation to lung function parameters FEV1, FVC, TLC, and TLCO (r2 > 0 · 35, p < 0 · 01). CD248 protein levels were significantly greater in IPF-derived lung fibroblasts vs normal lung fibroblasts (p < 0 · 01) and CD248 silencing significantly reduced the proliferation of lung fibroblasts, but did not affected myofibroblast differentiation. We conclude that CD248 overexpression is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of IPF and it has potential as a disease severity marker. Given that CD248 ligands are collagen type I, IV and fibronectin, we hypothesise that CD248 signalling represents a novel matrix-fibroblast interaction that may be a potential therapeutic target in IPF.

  20. Effect of simvastatin on vascular tone in porcine coronary artery: Potential role of the mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almukhtar, H.; Garle, M.J.; Smith, P.A.; Roberts, R.E., E-mail: richard.roberts@nottingham.ac.uk

    2016-08-15

    Statins induce acute vasorelaxation which may contribute to the overall benefits of statins in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. The mechanism underlying this relaxation is unknown. As statins have been shown to alter mitochondrial function, in this study we investigated the role of mitochondria in the relaxation to simvastatin. Relaxation of porcine coronary artery segments by statins was measured using isolated tissue baths. Mitochondrial activity was determined by measuring changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were determined in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells with Fluo-4 using standard epifluorescent imaging techniques. Simvastatin, but not pravastatin, produced a slow relaxation of the coronary artery, which was independent of the endothelium. The relaxation was attenuated by the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (10 μM) and the complex III inhibitor myxothiazol (10 μM), or a combination of the two. The complex III inhibitor antimycin A (10 μM) produced a similar time-dependent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery, which was attenuated by rotenone. Changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence showed that simvastatin (10 μM) depolarized the membrane potential of mitochondria in both isolated mitochondria and intact blood vessels. Simvastatin and antimycin A both inhibited calcium-induced contractions in isolated blood vessels and calcium influx in smooth muscle cells and this inhibition was prevented by rotenone. In conclusion, simvastatin produces an endothelium-independent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery which is dependent, in part, upon effects on the mitochondria. The effects on the mitochondria may lead to a reduction in calcium influx and hence relaxation of the blood vessel. - Highlights: • Simvastatin produces a relaxation of the porcine coronary artery. • This relaxation is inhibited by mitochondrial complex inhibitors. • Simvastatin alters mitochondrial membrane potential

  1. Potential Roles of n-3 PUFAs during Skeletal Muscle Growth and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Tachtsis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs, which are commonly found in fish oil supplements, are known to possess anti-inflammatory properties and more recently alter skeletal muscle function. In this review, we discuss novel findings related to how n-3 PUFAs modulate molecular signaling responsible for growth and hypertrophy as well as the activity of muscle stem cells. Muscle stem cells commonly known as satellite cells, are primarily responsible for driving the skeletal muscle repair process to potentially damaging stimuli, such as mechanical stress elicited by exercise contraction. To date, there is a paucity of human investigations related to the effects of n-3 PUFAs on satellite cell content and activity. Based on current in vitro investigations, this review focuses on novel mechanisms linking n-3 PUFA’s to satellite cell activity and how they may improve muscle repair. Understanding the role of n-3 PUFAs during muscle growth and regeneration in association with exercise could lead to the development of novel supplementation strategies that increase muscle mass and strength, therefore possibly reducing the burden of muscle wasting with age.

  2. Combining stereotactic radiosurgery and systemic therapy for brain metastases: a potential role for temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardee, Matthew E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-08-09

    Brain metastases are unfortunately very common in the natural history of many solid tumors and remain a life-threatening condition, associated with a dismal prognosis, despite many clinical trials aimed at improving outcomes. Radiation therapy options for brain metastases include whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). SRS avoids the potential toxicities of WBRT and is associated with excellent local control (LC) rates. However, distant intracranial failure following SRS remains a problem, suggesting that untreated intracranial micrometastatic disease is responsible for failure of treatment. The oral alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ), which has demonstrated efficacy in primary malignant central nervous system tumors such as glioblastoma, has been used in early phase trials in the treatment of established brain metastases. Although results of these studies in established, macroscopic metastatic disease have been modest at best, there is clinical and preclinical data to suggest that TMZ is more efficacious at treating and controlling clinically undetectable intracranial micrometastatic disease. We review the available data for the primary management of brain metastases with SRS, as well as the use of TMZ in treating established brain metastases and undetectable micrometastatic disease, and suggest the role for a clinical trial with the aims of treating macroscopically visible brain metastases with SRS combined with TMZ to address microscopic, undetectable disease.

  3. The potential role of regret in the physician-patient relationship: insights from neuroeconomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coricelli, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the chapter is to show how two important facts of physicians' behavior, (i) their tendency to "create" the demand for medical practices, and (ii) their delay and reluctance in using new treatments and therapies, can be explained with the lens of the neuroeconomics research on the neural and behavioral basis of regret. This chapter adopts a neuroeconomics perspective on decision-making, asking how the brain represents values and generates emotional states, which consequently influence choices. In the line of recent work on emotion-based decision-making, we expect to be able to characterize the brain areas underlying the studied processes and to specify the functional relationship between rational decision-making and the emotional influences that modulate these decisional processes. Neurobiological approaches can contribute significantly to a better understanding of the cognitive and emotional underpinnings of medical decision-making, from how physicians might evaluate and anticipate the effect of alternative therapies, to how patients might anticipate future consequences of their health choice. This can explain some features of the doctor-patient relationship which are not consistent with simple maximization models. Our findings suggest that physicians' behavior can be often explained by regret avoidance. Likewise, they suggest that physicians play as actual agents when they make medical decisions that will affect the future well-being of their patients. We limited our analysis to the potential role of anticipated regret; therefore, this chapter neglects many important factors of the health sector.

  4. Carbon Turnover during Effluent Application to the Land: A Potential Role for Vegetation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios A. Tzanakakis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the effect of plant species (Eucalyptus camaldulensis vs. Arundo donax on carbon (C turnover during wastewater application to the land. The study was carried out in 40-liter pots under field conditions and plant species were treated either with pre-treated municipal wastewater or freshwater. Plant species had a strong effect on soil organic matter with pots planted with E. camaldulensis showing greater values than pots planted with A. donax. In accordance, greater respiration rates were measured in E. camaldulensis pots compared to those planted with A. donax. The respiration rate followed a decreasing trend with the progress of the season for both species. These findings suggest differences in soil microbial community composition and/or activity in the rhizosphere of plant species. Minor effects of plant species or effluent were observed in dissolved organic carbon, protein, and hexoses content. In conclusion, the results of the present study reveal an important role of plant species on C cycling in terrestrial environments with potential implications on the sequestration of C and release of nutrients and pollutants.

  5. A potential role for Helicobacter pylori heat shock protein 60 in gastric tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chen-Si [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); He, Pei-Juin [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Nu-Man [School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Li, Chi-Han; Yang, Shang-Chih; Hsu, Wei-Tung [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Shiang [Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chang-Jer [Department of Food Science, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tain-Lu [Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Liao, Kuang-Wen, E-mail: kitchhen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China)

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori has been found to promote the malignant process leading to gastric cancer. Heat shock protein 60 of H. pylori (HpHSP60) was previously been identified as a potent immunogene. This study investigates the role of HpHSP60 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis. The effect of HpHSP60 on cell proliferation, anti-death activity, angiogenesis and cell migration were explored. The results showed that HpHSP60 enhanced migration by gastric cancer cells and promoted tube formation by umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); however, HpHSP60 did not increase cell proliferation nor was this protein able to rescue gastric cancer cells from death. Moreover, the results also indicated HpHSP60 had different effects on AGS gastric cancer cells or THP-1 monocytic cells in terms of their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important to cancer development. We propose that HpHSP60 may trigger the initiation of carcinogenesis by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine release and by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Thus, this extracellular pathogen-derived HSP60 is potentially a vigorous virulence factor that can act as a carcinogen during gastric tumorigenesis.

  6. Potential Role of Carvedilol in the Cardiac Immune Response Induced by Experimental Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Luciano Horta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi causes a cardiac infection characterized by an inflammatory imbalance that could become the inciting factor of the illness. To this end, we evaluated the role of carvedilol, a beta-blocker with potential immunomodulatory properties, on the immune response in C57BL/6 mice infected with VL-10 strain of T. cruzi in the acute phase. Animals (n=40 were grouped: (i not infected, (ii infected, (iii infected + carvedilol, and (iv not infected + carvedilol. We analyzed parameters related to parasitemia, plasma levels of TNF, IL-10, and CCL2, and cardiac histopathology after the administration of carvedilol for 30 days. We did not observe differences in the maximum peaks of parasitemia in the day of their detection among the groups. The plasma TNF was elevated at 60 days of infection in mice treated or not with carvedilol. However, we observed a decreased CCL2 level and increased IL-10 levels in those infected animals treated with carvedilol, which impacted the reduction of the inflammatory infiltration in cardiac tissue. For this experimental model, carvedilol therapy was not able to alter the levels of circulating parasites but modulates the pattern of CCL2 and IL-10 mediators when the VL10 strain of T. cruzi was used in C57BL6 mice.

  7. Accelerated aging in schizophrenia patients: the potential role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okusaga, Olaoluwa O

    2014-08-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that schizophrenia, a severe mental illness characterized by delusions, hallucinations and thought disorder is associated with accelerated aging. The free radical (oxidative stress) theory of aging assumes that aging occurs as a result of damage to cell constituents and connective tissues by free radicals arising from oxygen-associated reactions. Schizophrenia has been associated with oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, both of which also appear to reciprocally induce each other in a positive feedback manner. The buildup of damaged macromolecules due to increased oxidative stress and failure of protein repair and maintenance systems is an indicator of aging both at the cellular and organismal level. When compared with age-matched healthy controls, schizophrenia patients have higher levels of markers of oxidative cellular damage such as protein carbonyls, products of lipid peroxidation and DNA hydroxylation. Potential confounders such as antipsychotic medication, smoking, socio-economic status and unhealthy lifestyle make it impossible to solely attribute the earlier onset of aging-related changes or oxidative stress to having a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Regardless of whether oxidative stress can be attributed solely to a diagnosis of schizophrenia or whether it is due to other factors associated with schizophrenia, the available evidence is in support of increased oxidative stress-induced cellular damage of macromolecules which may play a role in the phenomenon of accelerated aging presumed to be associated with schizophrenia.

  8. The Role of Canonical Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Seizure and Excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zheng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC channels are a family of polymodal cation channels with some degree of Ca2+ permeability. Although initially thought to be channels mediating store-operated Ca2+ influx, TRPC channels can be activated by stimulation of Gq-coupled G-protein coupled receptors, or by an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. Thus, activation of TRPC channels could be a common downstream event of many signaling pathways that contribute to seizure and excitotoxicity, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx, or metabotropic glutamate receptor activation. Recent studies with genetic ablation of various TRPC family members have demonstrated that TRPC channels, in particular heteromeric TRPC1/4 channels and homomeric TRPC5 channels, play a critical role in both pilocarpine-induced acute seizures and neuronal cell death. However, exact underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated, and selective TRPC modulators and antibodies with better specificity are urgently needed for future research.

  9. Potential role of anticonvulsants in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2014-10-01

    We reviewed the extant literature to evaluate the current evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of anticonvulsants in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Relevant literature was accessed using the Cochrane database, embase and PubMed on 29 October 2013. Prospective studies examining the efficacy of anticonvulsants in obsessive-compulsive and related disorders were included. Case reports, case series, and retrospective studies were excluded. A total of 10 studies were included in this review. The studies of obsessive-compulsive disorder, except for two negative studies, showed favorable efficacy results of anticonvulsants. In one study on body dysmorphic disorder, levetiracetam showed favorable efficacy. In two lamotrigine studies for pathologic skin-picking, the efficacy findings were inconsistent. In one trichotillomania study, topiramate had reduced hair-pulling symptoms. Despite limited evidence, our review suggests that anticonvulsants have a potential role in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  10. Medication calculation: the potential role of digital game-based learning in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Brynjar; Mordt Ba, Petter; Oftedal, Bjørg F; Løkken, Atle

    2013-12-01

    Medication dose calculation is one of several medication-related activities that are conducted by nurses daily. However, medication calculation skills appear to be an area of global concern, possibly because of low numeracy skills, test anxiety, low self-confidence, and low self-efficacy among student nurses. Various didactic strategies have been developed for student nurses who still lack basic mathematical competence. However, we suggest that the critical nature of these skills demands the investigation of alternative and/or supplementary didactic approaches to improve medication calculation skills and to reduce failure rates. Digital game-based learning is a possible solution because of the following reasons. First, mathematical drills may improve medication calculation skills. Second, games are known to be useful during nursing education. Finally, mathematical drill games appear to improve the attitudes of students toward mathematics. The aim of this article was to discuss common challenges of medication calculation skills in nurse education, and we highlight the potential role of digital game-based learning in this area.

  11. The potential role of postsynaptic phospholipase C activity in synaptic facilitation and behavioral sensitization in Aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Daniel; Condro, Michael C; Pearce, Kaycey; Glanzman, David L

    2008-07-01

    Previous findings indicate that synaptic facilitation, a cellular mechanism underlying sensitization of the siphon withdrawal response (SWR) in Aplysia, depends on a cascade of postsynaptic events, including activation of inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptors and release of Ca2+ from postsynaptic intracellular stores. These findings suggest that phospholipase C (PLC), the enzyme that catalyzes IP3 formation, may play an important role in postsynaptic signaling during facilitation and learning in Aplysia. Using the PLC inhibitor U73122, we found that PLC activity is required for synaptic facilitation following a 10-min treatment with 5-HT, as measured at 20 min after 5-HT washout. Prior work has indicated that facilitation at this time is supported primarily by postsynaptic processes. To determine whether postsynaptic PLC activity is involved in 5-HT-mediated facilitatory actions, we examined the effect of U73122 on enhancement of the response of motor neurons isolated in cell culture to glutamate, the sensory neuron transmitter. A 10-min application of 5-HT induced persistent (>40 min) enhancement of glutamate-evoked potentials (Glu-EPs) recorded from isolated motor neurons, and this enhancement was blocked by U73122. Finally, we showed that injecting U73122 into intact animals before behavioral training impaired intermediate-term sensitization, indicating that PLC activity contributes to this form of nonassociative learning.

  12. A potential oncogenic role of the commonly observed E2F5 overexpression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuzhu Jiang; Seon-Hee Yim; Hai-Dong Xu; Seung-Hyun Jung; So Young Yang; Hae-Jin Hu; Chan-Kwon Jung; Yeun-Jun Chung

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression pattern of E2F5 in primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and elucidate the roles of E2F5 in hepatocarcinogenesis. METHODS: E2F5 expression was analyzed in 120 primary HCCs and 29 normal liver tissues by immunohistochemistry analysis. E2F5-small interfering RNA was transfected into HepG2, an E2F5-overexpressed HCC cell line. After E2F5 knockdown, cell growth capacity and migrating potential were examined. RESULTS: E2F5 was significantly overexpressed in primary HCCs compared with normal liver tissues (P = 0.008). The E2F5-silenced cells showed significantly reduced proliferation (P = 0.004). On the colony formation and soft agar assays, the number of colonies was significantly reduced in E2F5-silenced cells (P = 0.004 and P = 0.009, respectively). E2F5 knockdown resulted in the accumulation of G0/G1 phase cells and a reduction of S phase cells. The number of migrating/invading cells was also reduced after E2F5 knockdown (P = 0.021). CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that E2F5 is commonly overexpressed in primary HCC and that E2F5 knockdown significantly repressed the growth of HCC cells.

  13. The role of toxicology to characterize biomarkers for agrochemicals with potential endocrine activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Alberto; Maranghi, Francesca; La Rocca, Cinzia; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Clementi, Maurizio

    2008-09-01

    The paper discusses current knowledge and possible research priorities on biomarkers of exposure, effect and susceptibility for potential endocrine activities of agrochemicals (dicarboximides, ethylene bisdithiocarbammates, triazoles, etc.). Possible widespread, multiple-pathway exposure to agrochemicals highlights the need to assess internal exposure of animals or humans, which is the most relevant exposure measure for hazard and risk estimation; however, exposure data should be integrated by early indicators predictive of possible health effects, particularly for vulnerable groups such as mother-child pairs. Research need include: non-invasive biomarkers for children biomonitoring; novel biomarkers of total exposure to measure whole endocrine disrupter-related burden; characterization of biomarkers of susceptibility, including the role of markers of nutritional status; anchoring early molecular markers to established toxicological endpoints to support their predictivity; integrating "omics"-based approaches in a system-toxicology framework. As biomonitoring becomes increasingly important in the environment-and-health scenario, toxicologists can substantially contribute both to the characterization of new biomarkers and to the predictivity assessment and improvement of the existing ones.

  14. CAM use in dermatology. Is there a potential role for honey, green tea, and vitamin C?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Naiara S; Kalaaji, Amer N

    2014-02-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a group of non-traditional medical practices that includes natural products, manipulations, and mind and body medicine. CAM use has grown and become popular among patients. In dermatology, honey, green tea, and vitamin C have been used as topical treatments for a variety of diseases. We performed a systematic review to explore the cutaneous effects of each of these three products. Honey's unique antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties were shown to contribute to wound healing, especially in ulcers and burns. Green tea, among many health benefits, demonstrated protection from ultraviolet-induced events, such as photoimmunosuppression and skin cancer growth. Vitamin C, known for its antioxidant properties and key role in collagen production, has been shown to produce positive effects on skin hyperpigmentation and aging. Future large well-designed clinical trials are needed in order to further investigate the potential of these agents as dermatological therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential roles of anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation in the nitrogen cycle of wetland ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guibing; Jetten, Mike S M; Kuschk, Peter; Ettwig, Katharina F; Yin, Chengqing

    2010-04-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and anaerobic methane oxidation (ANME coupled to denitrification) with nitrite as electron acceptor are two of the most recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle. Currently the anammox process has been relatively well investigated in a number of natural and man-made ecosystems, while ANME coupled to denitrification has only been observed in a limited number of freshwater ecosystems. The ubiquitous presence of anammox bacteria in marine ecosystems has changed our knowledge of the global nitrogen cycle. Up to 50% of N(2) production in marine sediments and oxygen-depleted zones may be attributed to anammox bacteria. However, there are only few indications of anammox in natural and constructed freshwater wetlands. In this paper, the potential role of anammox and denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria in natural and artificial wetlands is discussed in relation to global warming. The focus of the review is to explore and analyze if suitable environmental conditions exist for anammox and denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria in nitrogen-rich freshwater wetlands.

  16. Potentially three distinct roles for hypoxic cell sensitizers in the clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.D.; Raleigh, J.A.; Pedersen, J.E.; Ngan, J.; Shum, F.Y.

    1979-01-01

    Nitroaromatic drugs have been applied to radiation therapy on the basis of their effectiveness to enhance radiation damages selectively in hypoxic mammalian cells at nontoxic concentration. Such sensitizers could improve the rate of local tumor control by conventional radiotherapy in such cases that the resistance due to hypoxia in a limiting factor. The selective cytotoxicity of the drug to hypoxic cells is the second distinct action. A third potential role for nitroaromatic drugs could involve their use for the diagnosis of the number and location of hypoxic cells within tumors. The gain in therapeutic ratio by a factor from 5 to 10 is necessary before the full clinical impact of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers can be evaluated. The drugs selected for the use as clinical radiosensitizers were originally developed as the antibacterial agents with selective activity against anaerobes. The hypoxic cells in tumors are usually resistant to chemotherapy as well as resistant to radiation, and this specific drug action of sensitizers combined with that of an agent effective against oxygenated and cycling cells could possibly produce improved tumor cures. Electron-affinitive chemicals become selectively bound to the macromolecules of hypoxic mammalian cells by radiation-induced chemical reaction. This technique was used to identify by autoradiographic procedures the location of the radioactive nitrofurazone bound to hypoxic cells within multicellular spheroids. (Yamashita, S.)

  17. Testosterone in the brain: neuroimaging findings and the potential role for neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfer, Peter; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Kasper, Siegfried

    2013-02-01

    Testosterone plays a substantial role in a number of physiological processes in the brain. It is able to modulate the expression of certain genes by binding to androgen receptors. Acting via neurotransmitter receptors, testosterone shows the potential to mediate a non-genomic so-called "neuroactive effect". Various neurotransmitter systems are also influenced by the aromatized form of testosterone, estradiol. The following article summarizes the findings of preclinical and clinical neuroimaging studies including structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/fMRI), voxel based morphometry (VBM), as well as pharmacological fMRI (phfMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) regarding the effects of testosterone on the human brain. The impact of testosterone on the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders and on sex-related prevalence differences have been supported by a wide range of clinical studies. An antidepressant effect of testosterone can be implicitly explained by its effects on the limbic system--especially amygdala, a major target in the treatment of depression--solidly demonstrated by a large body of neuroimaging findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  18. Volatile substance misuse : clinical considerations, neuropsychopharmacology and potential role of pharmacotherapy in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Eric L; Howard, Matthew O

    2012-11-01

    Volatile substance misuse is among the most prevalent and toxic forms of psychoactive drug use, and often results in highly deleterious social, psychological and medical consequences. The prevalence of this pernicious form of substance misuse owes in part to the fact that volatile substances of misuse are ubiquitous in the natural environment. Commonly misused commercial products include glue, shoe polish, nail polish remover, butane lighter fluid, gasoline and computer duster spray. National samples of volatile substance misusers tend to exhibit high rates of psychiatric problems and antisocial behaviour. In addition, cognitive impairments and affective dysregulation are often observed among these individuals. Volatile substances exert their complex neuropharmacological effects on dopaminergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and serotoninergic receptor systems, as well as on cell membranes and ion channels. Concomitantly, pharmacotherapies for volatile substance abuse might profitably target a number of mechanisms, including reward circuitry in the brain, symptoms of craving and withdrawal, neuropsychiatric and emotional impairments that promote volatile substance abuse, and cognitive enhancement to rectify deficits in executive function. This review details the modes of use, subjective effects, epidemiology, adverse consequences, neuropsychopharmacology and drug treatment of volatile substance misuse, and discusses the potential role of novel forms of pharmacological intervention for this oft-overlooked public health threat of epidemic proportions.

  19. Inflammatory cell phenotypes in AAAs: their role and potential as targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Matthew A; Ruhlman, Melissa K; Baxter, B Timothy

    2015-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by chronic inflammatory cell infiltration. AAA is typically an asymptomatic disease and caused ≈15 000 deaths annually in the United States. Previous studies have examined both human and murine aortic tissue for the presence of various inflammatory cell types. Studies show that in both human and experimental AAAs, prominent inflammatory cell infiltration, such as CD4(+) T cells and macrophages, occurs in the damaged aortic wall. These cells have the ability to undergo phenotypic modulation based on microenvironmental cues, potentially influencing disease progression. Proinflammatory CD4(+) T cells and classically activated macrophages dominate the landscape of aortic infiltrates. The skew to proinflammatory phenotypes alters disease progression and plays a role in causing chronic inflammation. The local cytokine production and presence of inflammatory mediators, such as extracellular matrix breakdown products, influence the uneven balance of the inflammatory infiltrate phenotypes. Understanding and developing new strategies that target the proinflammatory phenotype could provide useful therapeutic targets for a disease with no current pharmacological intervention. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Inflammatory cell phenotypes in AAAs; their role and potential as targets for therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Matthew A; Ruhlman, Melissa K.; Baxter, B. Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are characterized by chronic inflammatory cell infiltration. AAA is typically an asymptomatic disease and caused approximately 15,000 deaths annually in the U.S. Previous studies have examined both human and murine aortic tissue for the presence of various inflammatory cell types. Studies show that in both human and experimental AAAs, prominent inflammatory cell infiltration, such as CD4+ T cells and macrophages, occurs in the damaged aortic wall. These cells have the ability to undergo phenotypic modulation based on microenvironmental cues, potentially influencing disease progression. Pro-inflammatory CD4+ T cells and classically activated macrophages dominate the landscape of aortic infiltrates. The skew to pro-inflammatory phenotypes alters disease progression and plays a role in causing chronic inflammation. The local cytokine production and presence of inflammatory mediators, such as extracellular matrix breakdown products, influence the uneven balance of the inflammatory infiltrate phenotypes. Understanding and developing new strategies that target the pro-inflammatory phenotype could provide useful therapeutic targets for a disease with no current pharmacological intervention. PMID:26044582

  1. Frailty and sarcopenia: The potential role of an aged immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daisy; Jackson, Thomas; Sapey, Elizabeth; Lord, Janet M

    2017-07-01

    Frailty is a common negative consequence of ageing. Sarcopenia, the syndrome of loss of muscle mass, quality and strength, is more common in older adults and has been considered a precursor syndrome or the physical manifestation of frailty. The pathophysiology of both syndromes is incompletely described with multiple causes, inter-relationships and complex pathways proposed. Age-associated changes to the immune system (both immunesenescence, the decline in immune function with ageing, and inflammageing, a state of chronic inflammation) have been suggested as contributors to sarcopenia and frailty but a direct causative role remains to be established. Frailty, sarcopenia and immunesenescence are commonly described in older adults but are not ubiquitous to ageing. There is evidence that all three conditions are reversible and all three appear to share common inflammatory drivers. It is unclear whether frailty, sarcopenia and immunesenescence are separate entities that co-occur due to coincidental or potentially confounding factors, or whether they are more intimately linked by the same underlying cellular mechanisms. This review explores these possibilities focusing on innate immunity, and in particular associations with neutrophil dysfunction, inflammation and known mechanisms described to date. Furthermore, we consider whether the age-related decline in immune cell function (such as neutrophil migration), increased inflammation and the dysregulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway in neutrophils could contribute pathogenically to sarcopenia and frailty. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Vitamin D: new roles and therapeutic potential in inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raftery, Tara

    2012-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) encompasses 2 independent but related entities: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn\\'s disease. Crohn\\'s disease is characterised by transmural patchy inflammation which can involve any portion of the gastrointestinal tract. UC is characterised by superficial inflammation that begins in the rectum and extends proximally along the colon. In Europe, approximately 2.2 million people have a diagnosis of IBD. The aetiology of IBD is unknown, however, immune, environmental and genetic factors are thought to be involved. Individuals with IBD are at risk of developing osteoporosis. In line with this, there are clear guidelines that recommend vitamin D supplementation for IBD patients to prevent bone disease, especially when undergoing steroid treatment. Despite an established role for vitamin D in IBD, deficiency is common. More novel effects of vitamin D beyond bone are emerging. It is now well established that vitamin D is an important regulator of the immune system which may have implications for the development, severity and management of immune related disorders such as IBD. The efficacy of vitamin D as an immune modulator in IBD remains to be proven. This review aims to evaluate the evidence implicating vitamin D deficiency in IBD pathogenesis, to examine vitamin D\\'s anti-inflammatory mechanisms and to explore its therapeutic potential, optimal serum levels and dietary intakes which may support immune function in this disease.

  3. Characterization of calpastatin gene in fish: its potential role in muscle growth and fillet quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed; Yao, Jianbo; Rexroad, Caird E; Kenney, P Brett; Semmens, Kenneth; Killefer, John; Nath, Joginder

    2005-08-01

    Calpastatin (CAST), the specific inhibitor of the calpain proteases, plays a role in muscle growth and meat quality. In rainbow trout (RBT), we identified cDNAs coding for two CAST isoforms, a long (CAST-L) and a short isoform (CAST-S), apparently derived from two different genes. Zebrafish and pufferfish CAST cDNA and genomic sequences were retrieved from GenBank and their exon/intron structures were characterized. Fish CASTs are novel in that they have fewer repetitive inhibitory domains as compared to their mammalian counterparts (one or two vs. four). The expressions of CAST mRNAs were measured in three RBT strains with different growth rates and fillet firmness that were fed either high energy or control diets. CAST-L and S expressions were significantly lower (pfillet. Strain or diet did not affect level of calpain mRNAs. However, the decrease in the CAST/calpain ratio at the mRNA level did not lead to a corresponding change in the calpain catalytic activity. Further investigation should reveal a potential use of the CAST gene as a tool to monitor fish muscle growth and fillet firmness.

  4. Kaempferol glycosides from Lobularia maritima and their potential role in plant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Antonio; Ricci, Andreina; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Golino, Annunziata; Izzo, Angelina; Pascarella, Maria Teresa; Piccolella, Simona; Esposito, Assunta

    2009-02-01

    Six kaempferol glycosides, four of them characterized for the first time, were isolated from the leaf extract of Lobularia maritima. The structural elucidation was performed by a combined approach using Electrospray-Ionization Triple-Quadrupole Mass-Spectrometric (ESI/TQ/MS) techniques, and 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments (1H, 13C, DEPT, DQ-COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, NOESY, HSQC, HMBC, and HSQC-TOCSY). The isolated kaempferol derivatives have different disaccharide substituents at C(3) and four of them have a rhamnose unit at C(7). To evaluate their potential allelopathic role within the herbaceous plant community, the compounds, as well as the aglycone obtained from enzymatic hydrolysis, have been tested in vitro on three coexisting plant species, Dactylis hispanica, Petrorhagia velutina, and Phleum subulatum. The results obtained allow us to hypothesize that the type of the sugar modulates the biological response. The bioassay data, analyzed by a multivariate approach, and grouping the compounds on the basis of the number of sugar units and the nature of carbohydrates present in the disaccharide moiety, indicate a structure-activity relationship.

  5. Metformin Alters Gut Microbiota of Healthy Mice: Implication for Its Potential Role in Gut Microbiota Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ma

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the first-line anti-diabetic drug metformin has been shown to be also useful for the treatment of other diseases like cancer. To date, few reports were about the impact of metformin on gut microbiota. To fully understand the mechanism of action of metformin in treating diseases other than diabetes, it is especially important to investigate the impact of long-term metformin treatment on the gut microbiome in non-diabetic status. In this study, we treated healthy mice with metformin for 30 days, and observed 46 significantly changed gut microbes by using the 16S rRNA-based microbiome profiling technique. We found that microbes from the Verrucomicrobiaceae and Prevotellaceae classes were enriched, while those from Lachnospiraceae and Rhodobacteraceae were depleted. We further compared the altered microbiome profile with the profiles under various disease conditions using our recently developed comparative microbiome tool known as MicroPattern. Interestingly, the treatment of diabetes patients with metformin positively correlates with colon cancer and type 1 diabetes, indicating a confounding effect on the gut microbiome in patients with diabetes. However, the treatment of healthy mice with metformin exhibits a negative correlation with multiple inflammatory diseases, indicating a protective anti-inflammatory role of metformin in non-diabetes status. This result underscores the potential effect of metformin on gut microbiome homeostasis, which may contribute to the treatment of non-diabetic diseases.

  6. Role of MicroRNA-1 in Human Cancer and Its Therapeutic Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While the mechanisms of human cancer development are not fully understood, evidence of microRNA (miRNA, miR dysregulation has been reported in many human diseases, including cancer. miRs are small noncoding RNA molecules that regulate posttranscriptional gene expression by binding to complementary sequences in the specific region of gene mRNAs, resulting in downregulation of gene expression. Not only are certain miRs consistently dysregulated across many cancers, but they also play critical roles in many aspects of cell growth, proliferation, metastasis, apoptosis, and drug resistance. Recent studies from our group and others revealed that miR-1 is frequently downregulated in various types of cancer. Through targeting multiple oncogenes and oncogenic pathways, miR-1 has been demonstrated to be a tumor suppressor gene that represses cancer cell proliferation and metastasis and promotes apoptosis by ectopic expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the aberrant expression and functional significance of miR-1 in human cancers and emphasize its significant values for therapeutic potentials.

  7. Potential Role of the Last Half Repeat in TAL Effectors Revealed by a Molecular Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TAL effectors (TALEs contain a modular DNA-binding domain that is composed of tandem repeats. In all naturally occurring TALEs, the end of tandem repeats is invariantly a truncated half repeat. To investigate the potential role of the last half repeat in TALEs, we performed comparative molecular dynamics simulations for the crystal structure of DNA-bound TALE AvrBs3 lacking the last half repeat and its modeled structure having the last half repeat. The structural stability analysis indicates that the modeled system is more stable than the nonmodeled system. Based on the principle component analysis, it is found that the AvrBs3 increases its structural compactness in the presence of the last half repeat. The comparison of DNA groove parameters of the two systems implies that the last half repeat also causes the change of DNA major groove binding efficiency. The following calculation of hydrogen bond reveals that, by stabilizing the phosphate binding with DNA at the C-terminus, the last half repeat helps to adopt a compact conformation at the protein-DNA interface. It further mediates more contacts between TAL repeats and DNA nucleotide bases. Finally, we suggest that the last half repeat is required for the high-efficient recognition of DNA by TALE.

  8. GC Side Event: Africa's Energy Needs and the Potential Role of Nuclear Power. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Energy is central to development, and energy availability, accessibility and affordability are central challenges for most African countries. Due to rapidly growing energy demand, the need for socioeconomic development, persistent concerns over climate change and environmental impacts and dependence on imported supplies of fossil fuels, African Member States are looking into possible options to secure sustainable energy supplies, including nuclear energy. The IAEA assists those countries in assessing the nuclear power option and building the necessary infrastructure for a safe, secure and sustainable nuclear power programme. This year, the IAEA is conducting Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) missions to three African countries (Nigeria, Kenya and Morocco) considering introducing nuclear power. The side event presents recent updates from Africa on the potential role of nuclear power, including the IAEA Third Regional Conference on Energy and Nuclear Power in Africa, held in Mombasa, Kenya, in April 2015, an initiative to launch a new African network for enhancing nuclear power programme development, and others. The event reports on recent developments in several African Member States considering, embarking on, or expanding national nuclear power programmes.

  9. The Spiritually-Based Organization: A Theoretical Review and its Potential Role in the Third Millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselmo Ferreira Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available This paper examines whether the spiritually-based organization (SBO can be regarded as an imperative for the third millennium. As a result, it draws on the literature review of organizational spirituality, psychology of religion, positive psychology, and spirituality leadership theory in order to support its conclusions, as well as it offers some research propositions. Overall, the evidence gathered throughout this paper suggests that the spiritual paradigm starts to play a key role alongside with the concept of SBOs. Rather, it concludes that these topics can be regarded as authentic imperatives for this millennium. Nonetheless, it argues that is likely to take some time until the spirituality topic may mold, so to speak, organizations' character regarding that spiritual theme is starting to become a noteworthy topic. Furthermore, it argues that the logic that has prevailed on business enterprises has been largely economic, except some honorable initiatives. The findings also indicate that the material paradigm is not suited to deal with germane problems that shape our today's world. Finally, it suggests that the concept of SBO embraces positive changes and, as such, it may be potentially conducive to improving people lives and the planet's health and equilibrium.

  10. Three near term commercial markets in space and their potential role in space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavert, Raymond B.

    2001-02-01

    Independent market studies related to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) commercialization have identified three near term markets that have return-on-investment potential. These markets are: (1) Entertainment (2) Education (3) Advertising/sponsorship. Commercial activity is presently underway focusing on these areas. A private company is working with the Russians on a commercial module attached to the ISS that will involve entertainment and probably the other two activities as well. A separate corporation has been established to commercialize the Russian Mir Space Station with entertainment and promotional advertising as important revenue sources. A new startup company has signed an agreement with NASA for commercial media activity on the International Space Station (ISS). Profit making education programs are being developed by a private firm to allow students to play the role of an astronaut and work closely with space scientists and astronauts. It is expected that the success of these efforts on the ISS program will extend to exploration missions beyond LEO. The objective of this paper is to extrapolate some of the LEO commercialization experiences to see what might be expected in space exploration missions to Mars, the Moon and beyond. .

  11. N-Acetylcysteine's Role in Sepsis and Potential Benefit in Patients With Microcirculatory Derangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertoff, Jason

    2018-02-01

    To review the data surrounding the utility of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in sepsis and identify areas needed for additional research. A review of articles describing the mechanisms of action and clinical use of NAC in sepsis. Despite many advances in critical care medicine, still as many as 50% of patients with septic shock die. Treatments thus far have focused on resuscitation and restoration of macrocirculatory targets in the early phases of sepsis, with less focus on microcirculatory dysfunction. N-acetylcysteine, due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties, has been readily investigated in sepsis and has yielded largely incongruous and disappointing results. In addition to its known anti-inflammatory and antioxidative roles, one underappreciated property of NAC is its ability to vasodilate the microcirculation and improve locoregional blood flow. Some investigators have sought to capitalize on this mechanism with promising results, as evidenced by microcirculatory vasodilation, improvements in regional blood flow and oxygen delivery, and reductions in lactic acidosis, organ failure, and mortality. In addition to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, N-acetylcysteine possesses vasodilatory properties that could benefit the microcirculation in sepsis. It is imperative that we investigate these properties to uncover NAC's full potential for benefit in sepsis.

  12. Regulation and regulatory role of WNT signaling in potentiating FSH action during bovine dominant follicle selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S P Gupta

    Full Text Available Follicular development occurs in wave like patterns in monotocous species such as cattle and humans and is regulated by a complex interaction of gonadotropins with local intrafollicular regulatory molecules. To further elucidate potential mechanisms controlling dominant follicle selection, granulosa cell RNA harvested from F1 (largest and F2 (second largest follicles isolated at predeviation (PD and onset of diameter deviation (OD stages of the first follicular wave was subjected to preliminary RNA transcriptome analysis. Expression of numerous WNT system components was observed. Hence experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that WNT signaling modulates FSH action on granulosa cells during follicular waves. Abundance of mRNA for WNT pathway members was evaluated in granulosa cells harvested from follicles at emergence (EM, PD, OD and early dominance (ED stages of the first follicular wave. In F1 follicles, abundance of CTNNB1 and DVL1 mRNAs was higher and AXIN2 mRNA was lower at ED versus EM stages and DVL1 and FZD6 mRNAs were higher and AXIN2 mRNA was lower in F1 versus F2 follicle at the ED stage. Bovine granulosa cells were treated in vitro with increasing doses of the WNT inhibitor IWR-1+/- maximal stimulatory dose of FSH. IWR-1 treatment blocked the FSH-induced increase in granulosa cell numbers and reduced the FSH-induced increase in estradiol. Granulosa cells were also cultured in the presence or absence of FSH +/- IWR-1 and hormonal regulation of mRNA for WNT pathway members and known FSH targets determined. FSH treatment increased CYP19A1, CCND2, CTNNB1, AXIN2 and FZD6 mRNAs and the stimulatory effect on CYP19A1 mRNA was reduced by IWR-1. In contrast, FSH reduced CARTPT mRNA and IWR-1 partially reversed the inhibitory effect of FSH. Results support temporal and hormonal regulation and a potential role for WNT signaling in potentiating FSH action during dominant follicle selection.

  13. Hyperhomocysteinemia potentiates diabetes-impaired EDHF-induced vascular relaxation: Role of insufficient hydrogen sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjian Cheng

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient hydrogen sulfide (H2S has been implicated in Type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM and hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy-related cardiovascular complications. We investigated the role of H2S in T2DM and HHcy-induced endothelial dysfunction in small mesenteric artery (SMA of db/db mice fed a high methionine (HM diet. HM diet (8 weeks induced HHcy in both T2DM db/db mice and non-diabetic db/+ mice (total plasma Hcy: 48.4 and 31.3 µM, respectively, and aggravated the impaired endothelium-derived hyperpolarization factor (EDHF-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh, determined by the presence of eNOS inhibitor N(ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME and prostacyclin (PGI2 inhibitor indomethacin (INDO, in SMA from db/db mice but not that from db/+ mice. A non-selective Ca2+-active potassium channel (KCa opener NS309 rescued T2DM/HHcy-impaired EDHF-mediated vascular relaxation to ACh. EDHF-induced relaxation to ACh was inhibited by a non-selective KCa blocker TEA and intermediate-conductance KCa blocker (IKCa Tram-34, but not by small-conductance KCa (SKCa blocker Apamin. HHcy potentiated the reduction of free sulfide, H2S and cystathionine γ-lyase protein, which converts L-cysteine to H2S, in SMA of db/db mice. Importantly, a stable H2S donor DATS diminished the enhanced O2- production in SMAs and lung endothelial cells of T2DM/HHcy mice. Antioxidant PEG-SOD and DATS improved T2DM/HHcy impaired relaxation to ACh. Moreover, HHcy increased hyperglycemia-induced IKCa tyrosine nitration in human micro-vascular endothelial cells. EDHF-induced vascular relaxation to L-cysteine was not altered, whereas such relaxation to NaHS was potentiated by HHcy in SMA of db/db mice which was abolished by ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker Glycolamide but not by KCa blockers. Conclusions: Intermediate HHcy potentiated H2S reduction via CSE-downregulation in microvasculature of T2DM mice. H2S is justified as an EDHF. Insufficient H2S

  14. Enhancing the care navigation model: potential roles for health sciences librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Jeffrey T.; Shapiro, Robert M.; Burke, Heather J.; Palmer, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the overlap between roles and activities that health care navigators perform and competencies identified by the Medical Library Association's (MLA's) educational policy statement. Roles and activities that health care navigators perform were gleaned from published literature. Once common roles and activities that health care navigators perform were identified, MLA competencies were mapped against those roles and activities to identify areas of overlap. The greatest extent of correspondence occurred in patient empowerment and support. Further research is warranted to determine the extent to which health sciences librarians might assume responsibility for roles and activities that health care navigators perform. PMID:24415921

  15. Identification of metalloprotease/disintegrins in Xenopus laevis testis with a potential role in fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilling, F M; Krätzschmar, J; Cai, H; Weskamp, G; Gayko, U; Leibow, J; Myles, D G; Nuccitelli, R; Blobel, C P

    1997-06-15

    Proteins containing a membrane-anchored metalloprotease domain, a disintegrin domain, and a cysteine-rich region (MDC proteins) are thought to play an important role in mammalian fertilization, as well as in somatic cell-cell interactions. We have identified PCR sequence tags encoding the disintegrin domain of five distinct MDC proteins from Xenopus laevis testis cDNA. Four of these sequence tags (xMDC9, xMDC11.1, xMDC11.2, and xMDC13) showed strong similarity to known mammalian MDC proteins, whereas the fifth (xMDC16) apparently represents a novel family member. Northern blot analysis revealed that the mRNA for xMDC16 was only expressed in testis, and not in heart, muscle, liver, ovaries, or eggs, whereas the mRNAs corresponding to the four other PCR products were expressed in testis and in some or all somatic tissues tested. The xMDC16 protein sequence, as predicted from the full-length cDNA, contains a metalloprotease domain with the active-site sequence HEXXH, a disintegrin domain, a cysteine-rich region, an EGF repeat, a transmembrane domain, and a short cytoplasmic tail. To study a potential role for these xMDC proteins in fertilization, peptides corresponding to the predicted integrin-binding domain of each protein were tested for their ability to inhibit X. laevis fertilization. Cyclic and linear xMDC16 peptides inhibited fertilization in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas xMDC16 peptides that were scrambled or had certain amino acid replacements in the predicted integrin-binding domain did not affect fertilization. Cyclic and linear xMDC9 peptides and linear xMDC13 peptides also inhibited fertilization similarly to xMDC16 peptides, whereas peptides corresponding to the predicted integrin-binding site of xMDC11.1 and xMDC11.2 did not. These results are discussed in the context of a model in which multiple MDC protein-receptor interactions are necessary for fertilization to occur.

  16. The potential role of HMGB1 release in peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirong Cao

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a DNA-binding nuclear protein, has been implicated as an endogenous danger signal in the pathogenesis of infection diseases. However, the potential role and source of HMGB1 in the peritoneal dialysis (PD effluence of patients with peritonitis are unknown. First, to evaluate HMDB1 levels in peritoneal dialysis effluence (PDE, a total of 61 PD patients were enrolled in this study, including 42 patients with peritonitis and 19 without peritonitis. Demographic characteristics, symptoms, physical examination findings and laboratory parameters were recorded. HMGB1 levels in PDE were determined by Western blot and ELISA. The concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 in PDE were quantified by ELISA. By animal model, inhibition of HMGB1 with glycyrrhizin was performed to determine the effects of HMGB1 in LPS-induced mice peritonitis. In vitro, a human peritoneal mesothelial cell line (HMrSV5 was stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, HMGB1 extracellular content in the culture media and intracellular distribution in various cellular fractions were analyzed by Western blot or immunofluorescence. The results showed that the levels of HMGB1 in PDE were higher in patients with peritonitis than those in controls, and gradually declined during the period of effective antibiotic treatments. Furthermore, the levels of HMGB1 in PDE were positively correlated with white blood cells (WBCs count, TNF-α and IL-6 levels. However, pretreatment with glycyrrhizin attenuated LPS-induced acute peritoneal inflammation and dysfunction in mice. In cultured HMrSV5 cells, LPS actively induced HMGB1 nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation and release in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, cytosolic HMGB1 was located in lysosomes and secreted via a lysosome-mediated secretory pathway following LPS stimulation. Our study demonstrates that elevated HMGB1 levels in PDE during PD-related peritonitis, at least partially, from peritoneal mesothelial cells

  17. A Review of Auditory Prediction and Its Potential Role in Tinnitus Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Mithila; O'Keeffe, Mary G; Searchfield, Grant D

    2018-06-01

    The precise mechanisms underlying tinnitus perception and distress are still not fully understood. A recent proposition is that auditory prediction errors and related memory representations may play a role in driving tinnitus perception. It is of interest to further explore this. To obtain a comprehensive narrative synthesis of current research in relation to auditory prediction and its potential role in tinnitus perception and severity. A narrative review methodological framework was followed. The key words Prediction Auditory, Memory Prediction Auditory, Tinnitus AND Memory, Tinnitus AND Prediction in Article Title, Abstract, and Keywords were extensively searched on four databases: PubMed, Scopus, SpringerLink, and PsychINFO. All study types were selected from 2000-2016 (end of 2016) and had the following exclusion criteria applied: minimum age of participants article not available in English. Reference lists of articles were reviewed to identify any further relevant studies. Articles were short listed based on title relevance. After reading the abstracts and with consensus made between coauthors, a total of 114 studies were selected for charting data. The hierarchical predictive coding model based on the Bayesian brain hypothesis, attentional modulation and top-down feedback serves as the fundamental framework in current literature for how auditory prediction may occur. Predictions are integral to speech and music processing, as well as in sequential processing and identification of auditory objects during auditory streaming. Although deviant responses are observable from middle latency time ranges, the mismatch negativity (MMN) waveform is the most commonly studied electrophysiological index of auditory irregularity detection. However, limitations may apply when interpreting findings because of the debatable origin of the MMN and its restricted ability to model real-life, more complex auditory phenomenon. Cortical oscillatory band activity may act as

  18. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 expression and function in splenic dendritic cells: a potential role in immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assas, Bakri M; Wakid, Majed H; Zakai, Haytham A; Miyan, Jaleel A; Pennock, Joanne L

    2016-03-01

    Neuro-immune interactions, particularly those driven by neuropeptides, are increasingly implicated in immune responses. For instance, triggering calcium-channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) on sensory nerves induces the release of calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide known to moderate dendritic cell activation and T helper cell type 1 polarization. Despite observations that CGRP is not confined to the nervous system, few studies have addressed the possibility that immune cells can respond to well-documented 'neural' ligands independently of peripheral nerves. Here we have identified functionally relevant TRPV1 on primary antigen-presenting cells of the spleen and have demonstrated both calcium influx and CGRP release in three separate strains of mice using natural agonists. Furthermore, we have shown down-regulation of activation markers CD80/86 on dendritic cells, and up-regulation of interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in response to CGRP treatment. We suggest that dendritic cell responses to neural ligands can amplify neuropeptide release, but more importantly that variability in CGRP release across individuals may have important implications for immune cell homeostasis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Ventricular action potential adaptation to regular exercise: role of β-adrenergic and KATP channel function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinrui; Fitts, Robert H

    2017-08-01

    Regular exercise training is known to affect the action potential duration (APD) and improve heart function, but involvement of β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) subtypes and/or the ATP-sensitive K + (K ATP ) channel is unknown. To address this, female and male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to voluntary wheel-running or control groups; they were anesthetized after 6-8 wk of training, and myocytes were isolated. Exercise training significantly increased APD of apex and base myocytes at 1 Hz and decreased APD at 10 Hz. Ca 2+ transient durations reflected the changes in APD, while Ca 2+ transient amplitudes were unaffected by wheel running. The nonselective β-AR agonist isoproterenol shortened the myocyte APD, an effect reduced by wheel running. The isoproterenol-induced shortening of APD was largely reversed by the selective β 1 -AR blocker atenolol, but not the β 2 -AR blocker ICI 118,551, providing evidence that wheel running reduced the sensitivity of the β 1 -AR. At 10 Hz, the K ATP channel inhibitor glibenclamide prolonged the myocyte APD more in exercise-trained than control rats, implicating a role for this channel in the exercise-induced APD shortening at 10 Hz. A novel finding of this work was the dual importance of altered β 1 -AR responsiveness and K ATP channel function in the training-induced regulation of APD. Of physiological importance to the beating heart, the reduced response to adrenergic agonists would enhance cardiac contractility at resting rates, where sympathetic drive is low, by prolonging APD and Ca 2+ influx; during exercise, an increase in K ATP channel activity would shorten APD and, thus, protect the heart against Ca 2+ overload or inadequate filling. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our data demonstrated that regular exercise prolonged the action potential and Ca 2+ transient durations in myocytes isolated from apex and base regions at 1-Hz and shortened both at 10-Hz stimulation. Novel findings were that wheel running shifted the

  20. THE TOURISM POTENTIAL OF THE REPUBLIC OF KALMYKIA AND ITS ROLE IN THE REGIONAL ECONOMY

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    Elena S. Avaldykova

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is a sector of the economy, which is constantly evolving and plays a significant role in the formation of GDP. The term ‘destination’ can be interpreted as the territory equipped with facilities and advanced system of services to meet all basic needs of tourists. Richly developed tourist destination within the region is one of the key elements of the system, which is designed to encourage tourists’ interest in a particular area and to motivate their visit there, thus enhancing the tourism system as a whole. Analyzing the tourism potential of the territory of the Republic of Kalmykia, it is difficult to overestimate the unique set of historical, cultural and natural heritage of the Kalmyk people, as well as favorable geographical location of the territory and the uniqueness of the Buddhist people in the European part of Russia. Thus, Kalmykia has a huge potential to become a tourist destination and develop such types of tourism, as gastronomical, cultural, religious, environmental, family, and cognitive. It should be noted that currently the Republic is actively developing the event tourism, which is recreation dedicated to a certain event or participation in any entertainment. According to the results of the competition ranking of International tourism forum Rest (‘Otdykh’, the Republic was ranked 15th in the first National ranking of the development of tourism in Russia in 2016. The development of tourist destinations in the Republic is prospective from the viewpoint of stimulating economic development in the region through participation in Federal target programs ‘Development of domestic and inbound tourism in the Russian Federation (2011–2018’ and ‘Development of culture and tourism of the Russian Federation (2013–2020’, aimed at increasing the competitiveness of domestic tourism market, which would meet the needs of Russian and foreign citizens in high-quality tourist services. The creation of tourist

  1. Fluticasone-formoterol: a systematic review of its potential role in the treatment of asthma

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    Prosser TR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Theresa R Prosser, Suzanne G Bollmeier St Louis College of Pharmacy, St Louis, MO, USA Background: The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize and evaluate the available published data regarding the efficacy and safety of a combination product containing fluticasone propionate/formoterol (FP-F in order to establish its potential role compared with other inhaled combination corticosteroid/long-acting beta2 receptor agonists for the maintenance treatment of asthma.Methods: A PubMed and EMBASE search was conducted using the terms “fluticasone propionate”, “formoterol fumarate”, “Flutiform®”, and “asthma” in July 2014 to identify trials using this combination specifically for the treatment of asthma. Additional information was gathered from references cited in the identified publications, the package insert, and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry. All randomized controlled clinical trials for humans in asthma were evaluated for inclusion. Data from animal trials, clinical trials for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and non-English sources were excluded.Results: Seven short-term safety and efficacy trials of FP-F compared with its individual components and two comparison trials of FP-F versus other combination products were identified. Generally, the incidence of drug-related adverse events was low and consistent with previously reported drug class-related adverse events (ie, pharyngitis, dysphonia, and headache. The combination of FP-F was shown to be noninferior to fluticasone propionate/salmeterol for improving predose forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1 and 2 hours post dose FEV1. FP-F was also noninferior to budesonide/formoterol in improving predose FEV1. Other clinical endpoints, including various symptom scores, asthma control, quality of life, and subjects’ assessment of the medications were not significantly different.Conclusion: Poor asthma control is common. The data from short-term studies

  2. The potential role of phytochemicals in wholegrain cereals for the prevention of type-2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    intervention studies seeking to establish a direct role of phytochemicals in mediating the metabolic health benefits of wholegrains, and their potential for mitigating disease progression, should consider using varieties that deliver the highest possible levels of bioavailable phytochemicals in the context of whole foods and diets. Both postprandial and prolonged responses in systemic phytochemical concentrations and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress should be assessed along with changes related to health outcomes in healthy individuals as well as those with metabolic disease. PMID:23679924

  3. THE ROLE OF THE COMMERCIAL BANKS' CAPITAL IN REALIZATION OF INVESTMENT POTENTIAL OF BANKING SYSTEM OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Lyutiy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article studies modern trends in investment corporate lending in Ukraine and the ultimate role of banking system in context of capital investments funding in Ukraine. The impact of structure and dynamics of commercial banks’ financial resources on realization of investment potential of Ukrainian banking system is analyzed. The role of banks’ capital adequacy as a precondition for expansion of investment corporate lending is determined.

  4. Beyond gender stereotypes in language comprehension: self sex-role descriptions affect the brain's potentials associated with agreement processing

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo eCanal; Paolo eCanal; Alan eGarnham; Jane eOakhill

    2015-01-01

    We recorded Event-Related Potentials to investigate differences in the use of gender information during the processing of reflexive pronouns. Pronouns either matched the gender provided by role nouns (such as king or engineer) or did not. We compared two types of gender information, definitional information, which is semantic in nature (a mother is female), or stereotypical (a nurse is likely to be female). When they followed definitional role-nouns, gender-mismatching pronouns elicited a P60...

  5. Characterisation of Anopheles gambiae heme oxygenase and metalloporphyrin feeding suggests a potential role in reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Christopher S; Yunta, Cristina; de Lima, Glauber Pacelli Gomes; Hemmings, Kay; Lian, Lu-Yun; Lycett, Gareth; Paine, Mark J I

    2018-05-03

    The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is the principal vector for malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. The ability of A. gambiae to transmit malaria is strictly related to blood feeding and digestion, which releases nutrients for oogenesis, as well as substantial amounts of highly toxic free heme. Heme degradation by heme oxygenase (HO) is a common protective mechanism, and a gene for HO exists in the An. gambiae genome HO (AgHO), although it has yet to be functionally examined. Here, we have cloned and expressed An. gambiae HO (AgHO) in E. coli. Purified recombinant AgHO bound hemin stoichiometrically to form a hemin-enzyme complex similar to other HOs, with a K D of 3.9 ± 0.6 μM; comparable to mammalian and bacterial HOs, but 7-fold lower than that of Drosophila melanogaster HO. AgHO also degraded hemin to biliverdin and released CO and iron in the presence of NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CPR). Optimal AgHO activity was observed at 27.5 °C and pH 7.5. To investigate effects of AgHO inhibition, adult female A. gambiae were fed heme analogues Sn- and Zn-protoporphyrins (SnPP and ZnPP), known to inhibit HO. These led to a dose dependent decrease in oviposition. Cu-protoporphyrin (CuPP), which does not inhibit HO had no effect. These results demonstrate that AgHO is a catalytically active HO and that it may play a key role in egg production in mosquitoes. It also presents a potential target for the development of compounds aimed at sterilising mosquitoes for vector control. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Numerical Modelling Study on the Potential Role of Tsunamis in the Biblical Exodus

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    José M. Abril

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of the narrative of the Biblical Exodus has been subject of heated debate for decades. Recent archaeological studies seem to provide new insight of the exodus path, and although with a still controversial chronology, the effects of the Minoan Santorini eruption have been proposed as a likely explanation of the biblical plagues. Particularly, it has been suggested that flooding by the associated tsunamis could explain the first plague and the sea parting. Recent modelling studies have shown that Santorini’s tsunami effects were negligible in the eastern Nile Delta, but the released tectonic stress could have triggered local tsunamigenic sources in sequence. This paper is aimed to a quantitative assessment of the potential role of tsunamis in the biblical parting of the sea. Several “best case” scenarios are tested through the application of a numerical model for tsunami propagation that has been previously validated. The former paleogeographic conditions of the eastern Nile Delta have been implemented based upon recent geological studies; and several feasible local sources for tsunamis are proposed. Tsunamis triggered by submarine landslides of 10–30 km3 could have severely impacted the northern Sinai and southern Levantine coasts but with weak effects in the eastern Nile Delta coastline. The lack of noticeable flooding in this area under the most favorable conditions for tsunamis, along with the time sequence of water elevations, make difficult to accept them as a plausible and literally explanation of the first plague and of the drowning of the Egyptian army in the surroundings of the former Shi-Hor Lagoon.

  7. Powering Africa's sustainable development: The potential role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessides, Ioannis N.

    2014-01-01

    The electricity deficit is one of the most serious contemporary issues facing sub-Saharan Africa. Many countries in the region have insufficient generation capacity to meet rapidly rising demand. Electricity shortages have become a binding and powerful constraint on the continent's sustainable development. Their resolution will require coordinated effort to improve the effectiveness and governance of the region's utilities and to significantly scale-up generation capacity. A broad portfolio of low carbon (low-C) technologies needs to be deployed in order to address the electricity deficit in a cost-effective way and not be disruptive to economic growth. Since nuclear power can deliver low-C electricity in bulk, reliably and without intermittency, it could make a significant contribution towards resolving Africa's power crisis. However, the post-Fukushima safety concerns related to large nuclear plants with substantial radioactive inventories will be especially pronounced in Africa. Moreover, large scale reactors with huge upfront investment requirements are likely to be unsuitable for capital-constrained African countries with small electricity grids. One promising direction for nuclear development in Africa might be to downsize reactors from the gigawatt scale to less-complex smaller units (with substantially smaller radioactive inventory) that are more affordable. - Highlights: • We examine the potential role of nuclear power in Africa. • There is growing African interest in nuclear power. • Nuclear power in Africa will require grid strengthening. • Small modular reactors could enhance Africa's energy security. • There are concerns about Africa's safety culture for nuclear power

  8. The potential role for use of mitochondrial DNA copy number as predictive biomarker in presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falah, Masoumeh; Houshmand, Massoud; Najafi, Mohammad; Balali, Maryam; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Asghari, Alimohamad; Emamdjomeh, Hessamaldin; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment, or presbycusis, is the most common communication disorder and neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Its prevalence is expected to increase, due to the trend of growth of the elderly population. The current diagnostic test for detection of presbycusis is implemented after there has been a change in hearing sensitivity. Identification of a pre-diagnostic biomarker would raise the possibility of preserving hearing sensitivity before damage occurs. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including the production of reactive oxygen species and induction of expression of apoptotic genes, participates in the progression of presbycusis. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation has a critical role in presbycusis. However, the nature of the relationship between mitochondrial DNA copy number, an important biomarker in many other diseases, and presbycusis is undetermined. Fifty-four subjects with presbycusis and 29 healthy controls were selected after ear, nose, throat examination and pure-tone audiometry. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples. The copy number of mitochondrial DNA relative to the nuclear genome was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Subjects with presbycusis had a lower median mitochondrial DNA copy number than healthy subjects and the difference was statistically significant ( P =0.007). Mitochondrial DNA copy number was also significantly associated with degree of hearing impairment ( P =0.025) and audiogram configuration ( P =0.022). The findings of this study suggest that lower mitochondrial DNA copy number is responsible for presbycusis through alteration of mitochondrial function. Moreover, the significant association of mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood samples with the degree of hearing impairment and audiogram configuration has potential for use as a standard test for presbycusis, providing the possibility of the development of an easy-to-use biomarker for the early detection of

  9. Qualitative interviews with mentor mothers living with HIV: potential impacts of role and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhlamini, Lebohang; Knight, Lucia; van Rooyen, Heidi; van Heerden, Alastair; Jane Rotheram-Borus, Mary

    2012-07-11

    In South Africa where HIV prevalence is high, mentor mother programmes have been used to promote the health and wellbeing of women enrolled in government programmes preventing vertical transmission. The Masihambisane Project trained mentors to be educators and facilitators as "expert patients" in self-help groups. While this and other similar interventions demonstrate positive outcomes for mothers and their children, the long-term repercussions for mentors delivering the intervention are seldom considered. This article explores the personal impact of being a mentor, the potentially traumatizing effects of repeatedly sharing their experiences of living with HIV and the coping strategies they adopt. Towards the end of the Masihambisane intervention, 10 semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with locally recruited mentors living with HIV and were thematically analysed. Mentors found the repeated telling of their stories a painful reminder of adverse personal experiences. In some cases, retelling caused a physical reaction. Mentors relied on coping strategies like taking breaks, writing their experiences down and debriefing sessions. Despite the difficulties associated with their role, some mentors found being advisors and the group sessions therapeutic and empowering. These findings indicate that the inclusion of peer mentors comes with certain responsibilities. While the mentors were resilient and some found the experience therapeutic and empowering found creative ways to cope with secondary trauma, the negative implications cannot be ignored. To effectively deliver a mentor-driven intervention to mothers enrolled in a programme to prevent vertical transmission, the possibilities of secondary trauma should be considered and mentors provided with ongoing counselling, training on coping skills and regular debriefing sessions.

  10. [Potential role of the angiogenic factor "EG-VEGF" in gestational trophoblastic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufettal, H; Feige, J-J; Benharouga, M; Aboussaouira, T; Nadifi, S; Mahdaoui, S; Samouh, N; Alfaidy, N

    2013-10-01

    Gestational trophoblastic disease (MGT) includes a wide spectrum of pathologies of the placenta, ranging from benign precancerous lesions, with gestational trophoblastic tumors. Metastases are the leading causes of death as a result of this tumor. They represent a major problem for obstetrics and for the public health system. To date, there is no predictor of the progression of molar pregnancies to gestational trophoblastic tumor (GTT). Only an unfavorable plasma hCG monitoring after evacuation of hydatidiform mole is used to diagnose a TTG. The causes of the development of this cancer are still poorly understood. Increasing data in the literature suggests a close association between the development of this tumor and poor placental vascularization during the first trimester of pregnancy. The development of the human placenta depends on a coordination between the trophoblast and endothelial cells. A disruption in the expression of angiogenic factors could contribute to uterine or extra-uterine tissue invasion by extravillous trophoblast, contributing to the development of TTG. This review sheds lights on the phenomenon of angiogenesis during normal and abnormal placentation, especially during the MGT and reports preliminary finding concerning, the variability of expression of "Endocrine Gland-Derived Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor" (EG-VEGF), a specific placental angiogenic factor, in normal and molar placentas, and the potential role of differentiated expressions of the main placental angiogenic factors in the scalability of hydatidiform moles towards a recovery or towards the development of gestational trophoblastic tumor. Deciphering the mechanisms by which the angiogenic factor influences these processes will help understand the pathophysiology of MGT and to create opportunities for early diagnosis and treatment of the latter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Potential role of coenzyme Q10 in health and disease conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodick TC

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Taylor C Rodick,1 Donna R Seibels,2 Jeganathan Ramesh Babu,1 Kevin W Huggins,1 Guang Ren,3 Suresh T Mathews2 1Department of Nutrition, Dietetics, & Hospitality Management, Auburn University, Auburn, 2Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Samford University, 3Medicine-Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, an endogenously produced compound, is found in all human cells. Within the mitochondria, it plays a substantial role in energy production by acting as a mobile electron carrier in the electron transport chain. Outside the mitochondria, it acts as an excellent antioxidant by sequestering free radicals and working synergistically with other antioxidants, including vitamin E. Dietary contribution is limited, making endogenous production the primary source for optimal function. Now widely available as an over-the-counter supplement, CoQ10 has gained attention for its possible therapeutic use in minimizing the outcomes of certain metabolic diseases, notably cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurodegenerative disease, and cancer. Research has shown positive results in subjects supplemented with CoQ10, especially in relation to upregulating antioxidant capability. Emerging research suggests beneficial effects of CoQ10 supplementation in individuals on statin medications. CoQ10 supplementation in individuals participating in strenuous exercise seems to exert some beneficial effects, although the data are conflicting with other types of physical activity. This broad review of current CoQ10 literature, while outlining its physiological/functional significance in health and disease conditions, also offers a dietitian’s perspective on its potential use as a supplement in the promotion of health and management of disease conditions. Keywords: coenzyme Q, antioxidant, oxidative stress, dietary supplement, statin

  12. Cognitive decline in prostate cancer patients undergoing ADT: a potential role for exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Niamh L; Daly, Robin M; Macpherson, Helen; Fraser, Steve F

    2017-04-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an effective and widely prescribed treatment for prostate cancer (PCa), but it is associated with multiple treatment-induced adverse effects that impact on various musculoskeletal and cardiometabolic health outcomes. Emerging research has shown that ADT is also associated with cognitive impairment, which has been linked to a loss of independence, increased falls and fracture risk and greater use of medical services. The aim of this review is to outline the evidence related to the effect of ADT use on cognitive function, and propose a role for exercise training as part of usual care to prevent and/or manage cognitive impairments for PCa survivors on ADT. The following results have been obtained from this study. ADT has been shown to adversely affect specific cognitive domains, particularly verbal memory, visuomotor function, attention and executive function. However, current clinical guidelines do not recommend routine assessment of cognitive function in these men. No studies have examined whether exercise training can preserve or improve cognitive function in these men, but in healthy adults', multimodal exercise training incorporating aerobic training, progressive resistance training (PRT) and challenging motor control exercises have the potential to attenuate cognitive decline. In conclusion, as treatment with ADT for men with PCa has been associated with a decline in cognition, it is recommended that cognitive function be routinely monitored in these men and that regular exercise training be prescribed to preserve (or improve) cognitive function. Assessment of cognition and individualised exercise training should be considered in the usual treatment plan of PCa patients receiving ADT. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Biological roles and therapeutic potential of hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashan eAhmed

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the recent past, deorphanization studies have described intermediates of energy metabolism to activate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and to thereby regulate metabolic functions. GPR81, GPR109A and GPR109B, formerly known as the nicotinic acid receptor family, are encoded by clustered genes and share a high degree of sequence homology. Recently, hydroxy-carboxylic acids were identified as endogenous ligands of GPR81, GPR109A and GPR109B, and therefore these receptors have been placed into a novel receptor family of hydroxy-carboxylic acid (HCA receptors. The HCA1 receptor (GPR81 is activated by the glycolytic metabolite 2-hydroxy-propionic acid (lactate, the HCA2 receptor is activated by the ketone body 3-hydroxy-butyric acid and the HCA3 receptor (GPR109B is a receptor for the β-oxidation intermediate 3-hydroxy-octanoic acid. While HCA1 and HCA2 receptors are present in most mammalian species, the HCA3 receptor is exclusively found in humans and higher primates. HCA receptors are expressed in adipose tissue and mediate anti-lipolytic effects in adipocytes through Gi-type G-protein-dependent inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. HCA2 and HCA3 inhibit lipolysis during conditions of increased β-oxidation such as prolonged fasting, whereas HCA1 mediates the anti-lipolytic effects of insulin in the fed state. As HCA2 is a receptor for the established anti-dyslipidemic drug nicotinic acid, HCA1 and HCA3 also represent promising drug targets and several synthetic ligands for HCA receptors have been developed. In this article, we will summarize the deorphanization and pharmacological characterization of HCA receptors. Moreover, we will discuss recent progress in elucidating the physiological and pathophysiological role to further evaluate the therapeutic potential of the HCA receptor family for the treatment of metabolic disease.

  14. Adjunctive role of preoperative liver magnetic resonance imaging for potentially resectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Woo; Lee, Jong-Chan; Paik, Kyu-Hyun; Kang, Jingu; Kim, Young Hoon; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Han, Ho-Seong; Kim, Jaihwan; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok

    2017-06-01

    The adjunctive role of magnetic resonance imaging of the liver before pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has been unclear. We evaluated whether the combination of hepatic magnetic resonance imaging with multidetector computed tomography using a pancreatic protocol (pCT) could help surgeons select appropriate candidates and decrease the risk of early recurrence. We retrospectively enrolled 167 patients in whom complete resection was achieved without grossly visible residual tumor; 102 patients underwent pCT alone (CT group) and 65 underwent both hepatic magnetic resonance imaging and pCT (magnetic resonance imaging group). By adding hepatic magnetic resonance imaging during preoperative evaluation, hepatic metastases were newly discovered in 3 of 58 patients (5%) without hepatic lesions on pCT and 17 of 53 patients (32%) with indeterminate hepatic lesions on pCT. Patients with borderline resectability, a tumor size >3 cm, or preoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level >1,000 U/mL had a greater rate of hepatic metastasis on subsequent hepatic magnetic resonance imaging. Among 167 patients in whom R0/R1 resection was achieved, the median overall survival was 18.2 vs 24.7 months (P = .020) and the disease-free survival was 8.5 vs 10.0 months (P = .016) in the CT and magnetic resonance imaging groups, respectively (median follow-up, 18.3 months). Recurrence developed in 82 (80%) and 43 (66%) patients in the CT and magnetic resonance imaging groups, respectively. The cumulative hepatic recurrence rate was greater in the CT group than in the magnetic resonance imaging group (P magnetic resonance imaging should be considered in patients with potentially resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, especially those with high tumor burden. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of the Potential Role of Streptomyces in Cave Moonmilk Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Maciejewska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Moonmilk is a karstic speleothem mainly composed of fine calcium carbonate crystals (CaCO3 with different textures ranging from pasty to hard, in which the contribution of biotic rock-building processes is presumed to involve indigenous microorganisms. The real microbial input in the genesis of moonmilk is difficult to assess leading to controversial hypotheses explaining the origins and the mechanisms (biotic vs. abiotic involved. In this work, we undertook a comprehensive approach in order to assess the potential role of filamentous bacteria, particularly a collection of moonmilk-originating Streptomyces, in the genesis of this speleothem. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM confirmed that indigenous filamentous bacteria could indeed participate in moonmilk development by serving as nucleation sites for CaCO3 deposition. The metabolic activities involved in CaCO3 transformation were furthermore assessed in vitro among the collection of moonmilk Streptomyces, which revealed that peptides/amino acids ammonification, and to a lesser extend ureolysis, could be privileged metabolic pathways participating in carbonate precipitation by increasing the pH of the bacterial environment. Additionally, in silico search for the genes involved in biomineralization processes including ureolysis, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia, active calcium ion transport, and reversible hydration of CO2 allowed to identify genetic predispositions for carbonate precipitation in Streptomyces. Finally, their biomineralization abilities were confirmed by environmental SEM, which allowed to visualize the formation of abundant mineral deposits under laboratory conditions. Overall, our study provides novel evidences that filamentous Actinobacteria could be key protagonists in the genesis of moonmilk through a wide spectrum of biomineralization processes.

  16. Triphenyl phosphate-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish: Potential role of the retinoic acid receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isales, Gregory M.; Hipszer, Rachel A.; Raftery, Tara D. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Chen, Albert; Stapleton, Heather M. [Division of Environmental Sciences and Policy, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Volz, David C., E-mail: volz@mailbox.sc.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Triphenyl phosphate-induced toxicity in zebrafish embryos is enhanced in the presence of a retinoic acid receptor antagonist. • Triphenyl phosphate uptake or metabolism within zebrafish embryos is not altered in the presence of a retinoic acid receptor antagonist. • Triphenyl phosphate decreases expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 in zebrafish embryos. • Triphenyl phosphate inhibits retinoic acid-induced activation of human retinoic acid receptors. - Abstract: Using zebrafish as a model, we previously reported that developmental exposure to triphenyl phosphate (TPP) – a high-production volume organophosphate-based flame retardant – results in dioxin-like cardiac looping impairments that are independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Using a pharmacologic approach, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) – a nuclear receptor that regulates vertebrate heart morphogenesis – in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish. We first revealed that static exposure of zebrafish from 5–72 h post-fertilization (hpf) to TPP in the presence of non-toxic concentrations of an RAR antagonist (BMS493) significantly enhanced TPP-induced toxicity (relative to TPP alone), even though identical non-toxic BMS493 concentrations mitigated retinoic acid (RA)-induced toxicity. BMS493-mediated enhancement of TPP toxicity was not a result of differential TPP uptake or metabolism, as internal embryonic doses of TPP and diphenyl phosphate (DPP) – a primary TPP metabolite – were not different in the presence or absence of BMS493. Using real-time PCR, we then quantified the relative change in expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 (cyp26a1) – a major target gene for RA-induced RAR activation in zebrafish – and found that RA and TPP exposure resulted in a ∼5-fold increase and decrease in cyp26a1 expression, respectively, relative to vehicle-exposed embryos. To address whether TPP may

  17. The Response of Paraburkholderia terrae Strains to Two Soil Fungi and the Potential Role of Oxalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Ul Haq

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Fungal-associated Paraburkholderia terrae strains in soil have been extensively studied, but their sensing strategies to locate fungi in soil have remained largely elusive. In this study, we investigated the behavior of five mycosphere-isolated P. terrae strains [including the type-3 secretion system negative mutant BS001-ΔsctD and the type strain DSM 17804T] with respect to their fungal-sensing strategies. The putative role of oxalic acid as a signaling molecule in the chemotaxis toward soil fungi, as well as a potential carbon source, was assessed. First, all P. terrae strains, including the type strain, were found to sense, and show a chemotactic response toward, the different levels of oxalic acid (0.1, 0.5, and 0.8% applied at a distance. The chemotactic responses were faster and stronger at lower concentrations (0.1% than at higher ones. We then tested the chemotactic responses of all strains toward exudates of the soil fungi Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten and Trichoderma asperellum 302 used in different dilutions (undiluted, 1:10, 1:100 diluted versus the control. All P. terrae strains showed significant directed chemotactic behavior toward the exudate source, with full-strength exudates inciting the strongest responses. In a separate experiment, strain BS001 was shown to be able to grow on oxalate-amended (0.1 and 0.5% mineral medium M9. Chemical analyses of the fungal secretomes using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR, next to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, indeed revealed the presence of oxalic acid (next to glycerol, acetic acid, formic acid, and fumaric acid in the supernatants of both fungi. In addition, citric acid was found in the Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten exudates. Given the fact that, next to oxalic acid, the other compounds can also serve as C and energy sources for P. terrae, the two fungi clearly offer ecological benefits to this bacterium. The oxalic acid released by the two fungi may have

  18. Nitrate transporters in leaves and their potential roles in foliar uptake of nitrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbo eHu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While plant roots are specialized organs for the uptake and transport of water and nutrients, the absorption of gaseous or liquid mineral elements by aerial plant parts has been recognized since more than one century. Nitrogen (N is an essential macronutrient which generally absorbed either as nitrate (NO3- or ammonium (NH4+ by plant roots. Gaseous nitrogen pollutants like N dioxide (NO2 can also be absorbed by plant surfaces and assimilated via the NO3– assimilation pathway. The subsequent NO3– flux may induce or repress the expression of various NO3–-responsive genes encoding for instance, the transmembrane transporters, NO3–/NO2– (nitrite reductase, or assimilatory enzymes involved in N metabolism. Based on the existing information, the aim of this review was to theoretically analyze the potential link between foliar NO2 absorption and N transport and metabolism. For such purpose, an overview of the state of knowledge on the NO3– transporter genes identified in leaves or shoots of various species and their roles for NO3– transport across the tonoplast and plasma membrane, in addition to the process of phloem loading is briefly provided. It is assumed that a NO2-induced ac-cumulation of NO3–/NO2– may alter the expression of such genes, hence linking transmembrane NO3– transporters and foliar uptake of NO2. It is likely that NRT1/NRT2 gene expression and spe-cies-dependent apoplastic buffer capacity may be also related to the species-specific foliar NO2 uptake process. It is concluded that further work focusing on the expression of NRT1 (NRT1.1, NRT1.7, NRT1.11 and NRT1.12, NRT2 (NRT2.1, NRT2.4 and NRT2.5 and chloride channel family genes (CLCa and CLCd may help us elucidate the physiological and metabolic response of plants fumigated with NO2.

  19. The potential role for use of mitochondrial DNA copy number as predictive biomarker in presbycusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falah M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Masoumeh Falah,1,2 Massoud Houshmand,3 Mohammad Najafi,2 Maryam Balali,1 Saeid Mahmoudian,1 Alimohamad Asghari,4 Hessamaldin Emamdjomeh,1 Mohammad Farhadi1 1ENT and Head & Neck Research Center and Department, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Biochemistry Department, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Medical Genetics, National Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran, Iran; 4Skull base research center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Objectives: Age-related hearing impairment, or presbycusis, is the most common communication disorder and neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Its prevalence is expected to increase, due to the trend of growth of the elderly population. The current diagnostic test for detection of presbycusis is implemented after there has been a change in hearing sensitivity. Identification of a pre-diagnostic biomarker would raise the possibility of preserving hearing sensitivity before damage occurs. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including the production of reactive oxygen species and induction of expression of apoptotic genes, participates in the progression of presbycusis. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation has a critical role in presbycusis. However, the nature of the relationship between mitochondrial DNA copy number, an important biomarker in many other diseases, and presbycusis is undetermined.Methods: Fifty-four subjects with presbycusis and 29 healthy controls were selected after ear, nose, throat examination and pure-tone audiometry. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples. The copy number of mitochondrial DNA relative to the nuclear genome was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: Subjects with presbycusis had a lower median mitochondrial DNA copy number than healthy subjects and the difference was statistically significant (P=0.007. Mitochondrial DNA

  20. Nuclear system for problems of environment, economy, and energy. (1) Nuclear energy role and potential for energy system in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, Hiroshi; Matsui, Kazuaki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Role and potential of nuclear energy system in the energy options is discussed from the viewpoint of sustainable development with protecting from global warming. It is important for mitigation of global warming that the developing countries will use nuclear power effectively. The policy that nuclear power is considered as Clean Development Mechanism would be the good measure for that. (author)

  1. Understanding Cortisol Reactivity across the Day at Child Care: The Potential Buffering Role of Secure Attachments to Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badanes, Lisa S.; Dmitrieva, Julia; Watamura, Sarah Enos

    2012-01-01

    Full-day center-based child care has been repeatedly associated with rising cortisol across the child care day. This study addressed the potential buffering role of attachment to mothers and lead teachers in 110 preschoolers while at child care. Using multi-level modeling and controlling for a number of child, family, and child care factors,…

  2. cAMP signalling in the vasculature: the role of Epac (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Owain Llŷr; Dart, Caroline

    2014-02-01

    The second messenger cAMP plays a central role in mediating vascular smooth muscle relaxation in response to vasoactive transmitters and in strengthening endothelial cell-cell junctions that regulate the movement of solutes, cells and macromolecules between the blood and the surrounding tissue. The vasculature expresses three cAMP effector proteins: PKA (protein kinase A), CNG (cyclic-nucleotide-gated) ion channels, and the most recently discovered Epacs (exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP). Epacs are a family of GEFs (guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors) for the small Ras-related GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, and are being increasingly implicated as important mediators of cAMP signalling, both in their own right and in parallel with the prototypical cAMP target PKA. In the present paper, we review what is currently known about the role of Epac within blood vessels, particularly with regard to the regulation of vascular tone, endothelial barrier function and inflammation.

  3. Membrane cholesterol content influences binding properties of muscarinic M2 receptors and differentially impacts activation of second messenger pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michal, Pavel; Rudajev, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 606, 1-3 (2009), s. 50-60 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:National Institutes of Health(US) NS25743; EC(XE) LipiDiDiet Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic * cholesterol * receptors Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.585, year: 2009

  4. An Investigation into the Effects of Peptide Neurotransmitters and Intracellular Second Messengers in Rat Central Neurons in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-04

    Purkinje neurons. 3. Neuromodulation of synaptic efficacy in an invertebrate preparation that may be a useful model system for the actions of histamine in...neurotransmitters, neuromodulators , affect brain function. Nerve cells are the functional units of the brain, and changes in neuronal activity are ultimately

  5. The M1 muscarinic receptor and its second messenger coupling in human neuroblastoma cells and transfected murine fibroblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Lin.

    1989-01-01

    The data of this study indicate that pirenzepine (PZ)-high affinity muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) are coupled to the hydrolysis of inositol lipids and not to the adenylate cyclase system in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The maximal carbachol(CCh)-stimulated [ 3 H]IP 1 accumulation in the SH-SY5Y cells was decreased in the presence of 1μg/ml pertussis toxin, suggesting that a pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein may be involved in the coupling. Several cell clones which express only M 1 mAChR were generated by transfecting the murine fibroblast B82 cells with the cloned rat genomic m 1 gene. The transfected B82 cells (cTB10) showed specific [ 3 H](-)QNB binding activity. The mAChRs in these cells are of the M 1 type defined by their high affinity for PZ and low affinity for AF-DX 116 and coupled to hydrolysis of inositol lipids, possibly via a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein. The relationship between the M 1 mAChR density and the receptor-mediated hydrolysis of inositol lipids was studied in 7 clones. The M 1 mAChR densities in these cells characterized by [ 3 H](-)MQNB binding ranged from 12 fmol/10 6 cells in LK3-1 cells to 260 fmol/10 6 cells in the LK3-8 cells

  6. The potential roles of lime and molybdenum on the growth, nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-26

    Apr 26, 2010 ... and Molybdenum (Mo) are essential plant nutrients; whose role has been well ... interaction on different photosynthetic activities in P. vulgaris grown ..... concentrations of nickel, cadmium lead and molybdenum. J. Plant. Nutr.

  7. Role of Hippoboscidae Flies as Potential Vectors of Bartonella spp. Infecting Wild and Domestic Ruminants

    OpenAIRE

    Halos, Lénaïg; Jamal, Taoufik; Maillard, Renaud; Girard, Benjamin; Guillot, Jacques; Chomel, Bruno; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Boulouis, Henri-Jean

    2004-01-01

    The putative role of biting flies in Bartonella transmission among ruminants was investigated. Amplification of the Bartonella citrate synthase gene from 83 Hippoboscidae was detected in 94% of 48 adult Lipoptena cervi flies, 71% of 17 adult Hippobosca equina flies, 100% of 20 adult Melophagus ovinus flies, and 100% of 10 M. ovinus pupae. Our findings suggest that Hippoboscidae play a role in the transmission of Bartonella among ruminants. The vertical transmission of Bartonella in M. ovinus ...

  8. The role of pancreatic cancer-derived exosomes in cancer progress and their potential application as biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, H; Wu, Y; Tan, X

    2017-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly cancers, with dismal prognosis due to its poor early detection rate and high metastatic rate. Thus, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms accounting for its metastasis and discovery of competent biomarkers is required. Exosomes are multivesicular body-derived small extracellular vesicles released by various cell types that serve as important message carriers during intercellular communication. They are also known to play critical roles during cancer-genesis, cancer-related immune reactions, and metastasis. They also possess promising potential as novel biomarkers for cancer early detection. Therefore, extensive studies on pancreatic cancer-derived exosomes are currently being performed because they hold the promising potential of elevating the overall survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer. In the present review, we focus on the role of exosomes in pancreatic cancer-related immune reactions, metastasis, and complications, and on their potential application as pancreatic cancer biomarkers.

  9. The critical role of logarithmic transformation in Nernstian equilibrium potential calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Jemima E R; Hennebry, James E; Revill, Alexander; Brown, Angus M

    2017-06-01

    The membrane potential, arising from uneven distribution of ions across cell membranes containing selectively permeable ion channels, is of fundamental importance to cell signaling. The necessity of maintaining the membrane potential may be appreciated by expressing Ohm's law as current = voltage/resistance and recognizing that no current flows when voltage = 0, i.e., transmembrane voltage gradients, created by uneven transmembrane ion concentrations, are an absolute requirement for the generation of currents that precipitate the action and synaptic potentials that consume >80% of the brain's energy budget and underlie the electrical activity that defines brain function. The concept of the equilibrium potential is vital to understanding the origins of the membrane potential. The equilibrium potential defines a potential at which there is no net transmembrane ion flux, where the work created by the concentration gradient is balanced by the transmembrane voltage difference, and derives from a relationship describing the work done by the diffusion of ions down a concentration gradient. The Nernst equation predicts the equilibrium potential and, as such, is fundamental to understanding the interplay between transmembrane ion concentrations and equilibrium potentials. Logarithmic transformation of the ratio of internal and external ion concentrations lies at the heart of the Nernst equation, but most undergraduate neuroscience students have little understanding of the logarithmic function. To compound this, no current undergraduate neuroscience textbooks describe the effect of logarithmic transformation in appreciable detail, leaving the majority of students with little insight into how ion concentrations determine, or how ion perturbations alter, the membrane potential. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. The role of CaMKII in cerebellar learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Andreev (Dmitri)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe molecular mechanisms underlying learning and memory are conserved between primitive and higher organized organisms. Memory formation requires plasticity between synaptic connections, and Ca2+ serves as an essential second messenger in the regulation of this plasticity.

  11. Sexing a sex-role-reversed species based on plumage: potential challenges in the red phalarope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Andrée Giroux

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sex-role reversal, in which males care for offspring, can occur when mate competition is stronger between females than males. Secondary sex traits and mate attracting displays in sex-role-reversed species are usually more pronounced in females than in males. The red phalarope (Phalaropus fulicarius is a textbook example of a sex-role-reversed species. It is generally agreed that males are responsible for all incubation and parental care duties, whereas females typically desert males after having completed a clutch and may pair with new males to lay additional clutches. The breeding plumage of female red phalaropes is usually more brightly colored than male plumage, a reversed sexual dichromatism usually associated with sex-role reversal. Here, we confirm with PCR-based sexing that male red phalaropes can exhibit both the red body plumage typical of a female and the incubation behavior typical of a male. Our result, combined with previous observations of brightly colored red phalaropes incubating nests at the same arctic location (Igloolik Island, Nunavut, Canada, suggests that plumage dichromatism alone may not be sufficient to distinguish males from females in this breeding population of red phalaropes. This stresses the need for more systematic genetic sexing combined with standardized description of intersexual differences in red phalarope plumages. Determining whether such female-like plumage on males is a result of phenotypic plasticity or genetic variation could contribute to further understanding sex-role reversal strategies in the short Arctic summer.

  12. A review on potential roles of vitamins in incidence, progression, and improvement of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matin Khosravi-Largani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease, with unknown etiology. Vitamins, as important micronutrients playing different roles in body, seem to be important in MS pathogenesis. In vitro, in vivo and human studies, supports the protective role of some vitamins in MS occurrence or progression. Current study reviews recent insights and reports about the importance of vitamins in MS incidence or progression. In accordance, the importance of all water and fat-soluble vitamins in MS pathogenesis based on observational studies in human population and their role in the function of immune system as well as possible therapeutic opportunities are discussed in depth throughout this review. Keywords: Multiple sclerosis, Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, Vitamin A, Vitamin E, Vitamin D, Folic acid, Vitamin B 12, Vitamins

  13. Role of Hippoboscidae flies as potential vectors of Bartonella spp. infecting wild and domestic ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halos, Lénaïg; Jamal, Taoufik; Maillard, Renaud; Girard, Benjamin; Guillot, Jacques; Chomel, Bruno; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Boulouis, Henri-Jean

    2004-10-01

    The putative role of biting flies in Bartonella transmission among ruminants was investigated. Amplification of the Bartonella citrate synthase gene from 83 Hippoboscidae was detected in 94% of 48 adult Lipoptena cervi flies, 71% of 17 adult Hippobosca equina flies, 100% of 20 adult Melophagus ovinus flies, and 100% of 10 M. ovinus pupae. Our findings suggest that Hippoboscidae play a role in the transmission of Bartonella among ruminants. The vertical transmission of Bartonella in M. ovinus and the presence of Bartonella DNA in all samples suggest a symbiotic association between Bartonella and M. ovinus.

  14. Microstructure and fracture toughness of irradiated stainless steel retrieved from the field: the potential role of radiation-induced clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, P.; Soneda, N.; Nishida, K.; Dohi, K.; Marquis, E.A.; Chen, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructures of six material/fluence combinations of stainless steels retrieved from BWR components (top guide and control rods) have been examined by atom probe tomography; the irradiated microstructure had been already characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fracture toughness of two material/fluence combinations had been previously measured. The aggregate results strongly suggest that radiation-induced clusters play a significant role in the degradation of fracture toughness that occurs at fluences below ∼ 13 dpa. Because TEM has not been able to consistently identify and quantify the nano-sized clusters in this fluence range, it has not highlighted the potential role of radiation-induced clusters. (authors)

  15. Potential for Drug Abuse: the Predictive Role of Parenting Styles, Stress and Type D Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahin soheili

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was an attempt to predict potential for drug abuse on the basis of three predictors of parenting style, stress and type D personality. Method: In this descriptive-correlational study, 200 students (100 males and 100 females of Islamic Azad University of Karaj were selected by convenience sampling. For data collection, perceived parenting styles questionnaire, perceived stress scale, type D personality scale, and addiction potential scale were used. Results: The results showed that rejecting/neglecting parenting style and emotional warmth were positively and negatively correlated with addiction potential, respectively. Conclusion: The child-parent relationship and also the relationship between stress and type D personality can be considered as predictive factors in addiction potential.

  16. Quantifying the potential role of unmeasured confounders : the example of influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenwold, R H H; Hoes, A W; Nichol, K L; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The validity of non-randomized studies using healthcare databases is often challenged because they lack information on potentially important confounders, such as functional health status and socioeconomic status. In a study quantifying the effects of influenza vaccination among

  17. Study role of different dimensions of emotional self-regulation on addiction potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Nikmanesh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate relationship between addiction potentiality and different dimensions of emotional self-regulation.This descriptive and correlational study included students of Sistan and Baluchistan University, Sistan and Baluchestan, Iran. Participants were selected by random sampling method. We applied Addiction Potential Scale (APS and Difficult in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS for this study. For statistical analysis, Pearson correlation and regression analysis methods were used.The results show that there is a positive and significant relationship between the addiction potential and all dimensions of emotional self-regulation (excepting lack of awareness. The enter regression analysis for prediction of the APS by the DERS shows that the DERS predicts 16% of the APS variances.Regard to the results, it is necessary to introduce an especial program in emotional self-regulation for the youth with addiction potential.

  18. The potential role of open source software in overcoming digital poverty

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kinyondo, J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing countries, such as Tanzania, are characterized by digital poverty and a lack of information and communication technology (ICT) acceptance. The use of open source software (OSS) has been proposed as a potential strategy for addressing ICT...

  19. Refractory episodic vertigo: role of intratympanic gentamicin and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Celis-Aguilar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Even today, the treatment of intractable vertigo remains a challenge. Vestibular ablation with intratympanic gentamicin stands as a good alternative in the management of refractory vertigo patients. Objective: To control intractable vertigo through complete saccular and horizontal canal vestibular ablation with intratympanic gentamicin treatment. Methods: Patients with refractory episodic vertigo were included. The inclusion criteria were: unilateral ear disease, moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss, and failure to other treatments. Included patients underwent 0.5-0.8 mL of gentamicin intratympanic application at a 30 mg/mL concentration. Vestibular ablation was confirmed by the absence of response on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and no response on caloric tests. Audiometry, electronystagmography with iced water, and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials were performed in all patients. Results: Ten patients were included; nine patients with Meniere's disease and one patient with (late onset delayed hydrops. Nine patients showed an absent response on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and no response on caloric tests. The only patient with low amplitude on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials had vertigo recurrence. Vertigo control was achieved in 90% of the patients. One patient developed hearing loss >30 dB. Conclusions: Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials confirmed vestibular ablation in patients treated with intratympanic gentamicin. High-grade vertigo control was due to complete saccular and horizontal canal ablation (no response to iced water in electronystagmography and no response on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

  20. Comparative role of potential structure in classical, semiclassical, and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, R.S.; Shi, S.; Rabitz, H.

    1989-01-01

    The corresponding effects of features in the potential on classical, semiclassical, and quantum mechanics are probed using the technique of functional sensitivity analysis. It is shown that the classical and quantum functional sensitivities are equivalent in the classical (small (h/2π)) and harmonic limits. Classical and quantum mechanics are known to react in qualitatively similar ways provided that features on the potential are smooth on the length scale of oscillations in the quantum wave function. By using functional sensitivity analysis, we are able to show in detail how the classical and quantum dynamics differ in the way that they sense the potential. Two examples are given, the first of which is the harmonic oscillator. This problem is well understood by other means but is useful to examine because it illustrates the detailed information about the interaction of the potential and the dynamics which can be provided by functional sensitivity analysis, simplifying the analysis of more complex systems. The second example is the collinear H+H 2 reaction. In that case there are a number of detailed and striking differences between the ways that classical and quantum mechanics react to features on the potential. For features which are broad compared to oscillations in the wave function, the two react in qualitatively the same way. The sensitivities are oscillatory, however, and there are phasing differences between the classical and quantum sensitivity functions. This means that using classical mechanics plus experimental data in an inversion scheme intended to find the ''true'' potential will necessarily introduce sizeable errors

  1. Bridging the Divide: The Potential Role of Contemporary Geographical Research in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Peter; Kazmierczak, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the implementation and impacts of a program intended to improve research-led teaching in schools. Little consideration is given to the role of research-led teaching in schools; the argument is that this is a consequence of fractures between schools and universities. A program was developed to bring contemporary geographical…

  2. Control and role of plateau potential properties in the spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hultborn, Hans; Zhang, Mengliang; Meehan, Claire F

    2013-01-01

    a pivotal role in activating the spinal network generating the rhythm and basic motor pattern of locomotion and scratch - the spinal "central pattern generators" (CPGs). We give a short historical background of this research with a special emphasis on the importance of the descending monoaminergic systems....

  3. Effects of Caloric Restriction on Cardiac Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Bioenergetics: Potential Role of Cardiac Sirtuins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Shinmura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The biology of aging has not been fully clarified, but the free radical theory of aging is one of the strongest aging theories proposed to date. The free radical theory has been expanded to the oxidative stress theory, in which mitochondria play a central role in the development of the aging process because of their critical roles in bioenergetics, oxidant production, and regulation of cell death. A decline in cardiac mitochondrial function associated with the accumulation of oxidative damage might be responsible, at least in part, for the decline in cardiac performance with age. In contrast, lifelong caloric restriction can attenuate functional decline with age, delay the onset of morbidity, and extend lifespan in various species. The effect of caloric restriction appears to be related to a reduction in cellular damage induced by reactive oxygen species. There is increasing evidence that sirtuins play an essential role in the reduction of mitochondrial oxidative stress during caloric restriction. We speculate that cardiac sirtuins attenuate the accumulation of oxidative damage associated with age by modifying specific mitochondrial proteins posttranscriptionally. Therefore, the distinct role of each sirtuin in the heart subjected to caloric restriction should be clarified to translate sirtuin biology into clinical practice.

  4. The copper-transporting ATPase pump and its potential role in copper-tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Ohno; C.A. Clausen; Frederick Green; G. Stanosz

    2016-01-01

    Copper-tolerant brown-rot decay fungi exploit intricate mechanisms to neutralize the efficacy of copper-containing preservative formulations. The production and accumulation oxalate is the most widely recognized theory regarding the mechanism of copper-tolerance in these fungi. The role of oxalate, however, may be only one part of a series of necessary components...

  5. A potential role for CCN2/CTGF in aggressive colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubink, Inge; Verhaar, Elisha R; Kranenburg, Onno; Goldschmeding, Roel

    CCN2, also known as connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a transcriptional target of TGF-β signaling. Unlike its original name ("CTGF") suggested, CCN2 is not an actual growth factor but a matricellular protein that plays an important role in fibrosis, inflammation and connective tissue

  6. Potential role of cadmium in varicocele-associated infertility and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: to study the possible role of cadmium in varicocele-associated infertility and its relation to smoking. Patients: the study was performed on twenty infertile men with clinically evident varicocele (grade II & III); half of them were smokers. In addition to another twenty fertile men without clinical varicocele and with ...

  7. Action potential bursts in central snail neurons elicited by paeonol: roles of ionic currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-hung; Lin, Pei-lin; Hsu, Hui-yu; Wu, Ya-ting; Yang, Han-yin; Lu, Dah-yuu; Huang, Shiang-suo; Hsieh, Ching-liang; Lin, Jaung-geng

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of 2′-hydroxy-4′-methoxyacetophenone (paeonol) on the electrophysiological behavior of a central neuron (right parietal 4; RP4) of the giant African snail (Achatina fulica Ferussac). Methods: Intracellular recordings and the two-electrode voltage clamp method were used to study the effects of paeonol on the RP4 neuron. Results: The RP4 neuron generated spontaneous action potentials. Bath application of paeonol at a concentration of ≥500 μmol/L reversibly elicited action potential bursts in a concentration-dependent manner. Immersing the neurons in Co2+-substituted Ca2+-free solution did not block paeonol-elicited bursting. Pretreatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 or the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor Ro 31-8220 did not affect the action potential bursts. Voltage-clamp studies revealed that paeonol at a concentration of 500 μmol/L had no remarkable effects on the total inward currents, whereas paeonol decreased the delayed rectifying K+ current (IKD) and the fast-inactivating K+ current (IA). Application of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP 5 mmol/L), an inhibitor of IA, or charybdotoxin 250 nmol/L, an inhibitor of the Ca2+-activated K+ current (IK(Ca)), failed to elicit action potential bursts, whereas tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA 50 mmol/L), an IKD blocker, successfully elicited action potential bursts. At a lower concentration of 5 mmol/L, TEA facilitated the induction of action potential bursts elicited by paeonol. Conclusion: Paeonol elicited a bursting firing pattern of action potentials in the RP4 neuron and this activity relates closely to the inhibitory effects of paeonol on the IKD. PMID:21042287

  8. The Role of Mental Health Disease in Potentially Preventable Hospitalizations: Findings From a Large State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medford-Davis, Laura N; Shah, Rohan; Kennedy, Danielle; Becker, Emilie

    2018-01-01

    Preventable hospitalizations are markers of potentially low-value care. Addressing the problem requires understanding their contributing factors. The objective of this study is to determine the correlation between specific mental health diseases and each potentially preventable hospitalization as defined by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The Texas Inpatient Public Use Data File, an administrative database of all Texas hospital admissions, identified 7,351,476 adult acute care hospitalizations between 2005 and 2008. A hierarchical multivariable logistic regression model clustered by admitting hospital adjusted for patient and hospital factors and admission date. A total of 945,280 (12.9%) hospitalizations were potentially preventable, generating $6.3 billion in charges and 1.2 million hospital days per year. Mental health diseases [odds ratio (OR), 1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.22-1.27] and substance use disorders (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.12-1.13) both increased odds that a hospitalization was potentially preventable. However, each mental health disease varied from increasing or decreasing the odds of potentially preventable hospitalization depending on which of the 12 preventable hospitalization diagnoses were examined. Older age (OR, 3.69; 95% CI, 3.66-3.72 for age above 75 years compared with 18-44 y), black race (OR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.43-1.45 compared to white), being uninsured (OR 1.52; 95% CI, 1.51-1.54) or dual-eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.22-1.24) compared with privately insured, and living in a low-income area (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.17-1.23 for lowest income quartile compared with highest) were other patient factors associated with potentially preventable hospitalizations. Better coordination of preventative care for mental health disease may decrease potentially preventable hospitalizations.

  9. The Role of Potential Agents in Making Spatial Perspective Taking Social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Clements-Stephens

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A striking relationship between visual spatial perspective taking (VSPT and social skills has been demonstrated for perspective-taking tasks in which the target of the imagined or inferred perspective is a potential agent, suggesting that the presence of a potential agent may create a social context for the seemingly spatial task of imagining a novel visual perspective. In a series of studies, we set out to investigate how and when a target might be viewed as sufficiently agent-like to incur a social influence on VSPT performance. By varying the perceptual and conceptual features that defined the targets as potential agents, we find that even something as simple as suggesting animacy for a simple wooden block may be sufficient. More critically, we found that experience with one potential agent influenced the performance with subsequent targets, either by inducing or eliminating the influence of social skills on VSPT performance. These carryover effects suggest that the relationship between social skills and VSPT performance is mediated by a complex relationship that includes the task, the target, and the context in which that target is perceived. These findings highlight potential problems that arise when identifying a task as belonging exclusively to a single cognitive domain and stress instead the highly interactive nature of cognitive domains and their susceptibility to cross-domain individual differences.

  10. Potential role of melastatin-related transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M gene expression in the pathogenesis of urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Gülay Güleç; Önalan, Ebru Etem; Kuloğlu, Tuncay; Aydoğ, Gülten; Keleş, İbrahim; Tonyali, Şenol; Ceylan, Cavit

    2016-12-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the urinary tract. Ion channels and calcium homeostasis are involved in almost all basic cellular mechanisms. The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M (TRPM) takes its name from the melastatin protein, which is classified as potential tumor suppressor. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no previous studies in the literature investigating the role of these ion channels in bladder cancer. The present study aimed to determine whether bladder cancer is associated with mRNA expression levels of TRPM ion channel genes, and whether there is the potential to conduct further studies to establish novel treatment modalities. The present study included a total of 47 subjects, of whom 40 were bladder cancer patients and 7 were controls. Following the histopathological evaluation for bladder carcinoma, the mRNA and protein expression of TRPM were examined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunohistochemistry in tumor and normal tissues, in order to determine whether there is a difference in the expression of these channels in tumor and normal tissues. Immunoreactivity for TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPM8 was observed in epithelial bladder cells in the two groups. RT-qPCR revealed a significant increase in TRPM7 expression in bladder cancer tissue compared to the controls (healthy bladder tissue), whereas no differences in TRPM2 or TRPM4 expression levels were observed. There were significant reductions in the expression levels of TRPM5 and TRPM8 in bladder cancer tissues. In the present study, the effects of TRP ion channels on the formation of bladder cancer was investigated. This study is instructive for TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM5, TRPM7 and TRPM8 and their therapeutic role in bladder cancer. The results support the fact that these gens can be novel targets and can also be tested for during the treatment of bladder cancer.

  11. Adrenaline potentiates PI 3-kinase in platelets stimulated with thrombin and SFRLLN: role of secreted ADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selheim, F; Frøyset, A K; Strand, I; Vassbotn, F S; Holmsen, H

    2000-11-17

    Adrenaline significantly potentiated late thrombin- and SFRLLN-induced PtdIns(3,4)P(2) production. Furthermore, the potentiating effect of adrenaline on thrombin-induced PtdIns(3, 4)P(2) production was independent on secreted ADP, whereas, the effect of adrenaline on SFRLLN-induced PtdIns(3,4)P(2) production was completely dependent of secreted ADP. However, the ADP-dependent accumulation of PtdIns(3,4)P(2) was not required for irreversible platelet aggregation induced by SFRLLN in the presence of adrenaline. It is concluded that adrenaline can replace secreted ADP to potentiate PtdIns(3,4)P(2) production in thrombin-stimulated but not in SFRLLN-stimulated platelets, thus demonstrating a qualitative difference between platelet stimulation by thrombin and the thrombin receptor activating peptide SFRLLN.

  12. [Bacterial efflux pumps - their role in antibiotic resistance and potential inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hricová, Kristýna; Kolář, Milan

    2014-12-01

    Efflux pumps capable of actively draining antibiotic agents from bacterial cells may be considered one of potential mechanisms of the development of antimicrobial resistance. The most important group of efflux pumps capable of removing several types of antibiotics include RND (resistance - nodulation - division) pumps. These are three proteins that cross the bacterial cell wall, allowing direct expulsion of the agent out from the bacterial cell. The most investigated efflux pumps are the AcrAB-TolC system in Escherichia coli and the MexAB-OprM system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, efflux pumps are able to export other than antibacterial agents such as disinfectants, thus decreasing their effectiveness. One potential approach to inactivation of an efflux pump is to use the so-called efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Potential inhibitors tested in vitro involve, for example, phenylalanyl-arginyl-b-naphthylamide (PAbN), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or agents of the phenothiazine class.

  13. Potential role of the glycolytic oscillator in acute hypoxia in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fru, Leonard Che; Adamson, Erin B; Campos, David D; Fain, Sean B; Song, Chihwa; Kissick, Michael W; Jacques, Steven L; Van der Kogel, Albert J; Nickel, Kwang P; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Tumor acute hypoxia has a dynamic component that is also, at least partially, coherent. Using blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging, we observed coherent oscillations in hemoglobin saturation dynamics in cell line xenograft models of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. We posit a well-established biochemical nonlinear oscillatory mechanism called the glycolytic oscillator as a potential cause of the coherent oscillations in tumors. These data suggest that metabolic changes within individual tumor cells may affect the local tumor microenvironment including oxygen availability and therefore radiosensitivity. These individual cells can synchronize the oscillations in patches of similar intermediate glucose levels. These alterations have potentially important implications for radiation therapy and are a potential target for optimizing the cancer response to radiation. (paper)

  14. The potential role of sea spray droplets in facilitating air-sea gas transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, E. L.; Vlahos, P.; Monahan, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    For over 30 years, air-sea interaction specialists have been evaluating and parameterizing the role of whitecap bubbles in air-sea gas exchange. To our knowledge, no one, however, has studied the mirror image process of whether sea spray droplets can facilitate air-sea gas exchange. We are therefore using theory, data analysis, and numerical modeling to quantify the role of spray on air-sea gas transfer. In this, our first formal work on this subject, we seek the rate-limiting step in spray-mediated gas transfer by evaluating the three time scales that govern the exchange: τ air , which quantifies the rate of transfer between the atmospheric gas reservoir and the surface of the droplet; τ int , which quantifies the exchange rate across the air-droplet interface; and τ aq , which quantifies gas mixing within the aqueous solution droplet.

  15. Silicon: A Review of Its Potential Role in the Prevention and Treatment of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles T. Price

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians are aware of the benefits of calcium and vitamin D supplementation. However, additional nutritional components may also be important for bone health. There is a growing body of the scientific literature which recognizes that silicon plays an essential role in bone formation and maintenance. Silicon improves bone matrix quality and facilitates bone mineralization. Increased intake of bioavailable silicon has been associated with increased bone mineral density. Silicon supplementation in animals and humans has been shown to increase bone mineral density and improve bone strength. Dietary sources of bioavailable silicon include whole grains, cereals, beer, and some vegetables such as green beans. Silicon in the form of silica, or silicon dioxide (SiO2, is a common food additive but has limited intestinal absorption. More attention to this important mineral by the academic community may lead to improved nutrition, dietary supplements, and better understanding of the role of silicon in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  16. Interleukin-37 expression and its potential role in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Wang, Jiayi; Liu, Dongjuan; Liu, Sai; Xu, Hao; Ji, Ning; Zhou, Min; Zeng, Xin; Zhang, Dunfang; Li, Jing; Chen, Qianming

    2016-05-26

    Interleukin 37 (IL-37) has been reported to play a significant role in innate immune response and to be involved in several kinds of cancers. However, the investigation of association between IL-37 and oral mucosa carcinogenesis hasn't been clearly established. The aim of the study was to assess IL-37 expression and explore its role in oral mucosa carcinogenesis. The expression of IL-37 increased from normal control (NC) to Oral leukoplakia (OLK) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Moreover, statistically highly significant difference was present between scores of OLK with and without mild/moderate dysplasia (P oral mucosa carcinogenesis. Overall, IL-37 can be used as a biomarker for early oral tumorigenesis and for malignant transformation risk assessment of premalignant lesions.

  17. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alix M Denoncourt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging process. It is possible that packaging is more common than suspected and may play a major role in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria. To confirm the role of packaging in the propagation of infections, it is vital that the molecular mechanisms governing the packaging of bacteria by protozoa be identified as well as elements related to the ecology of this process in order to determine whether packaging acts as a Trojan Horse.

  18. Refractory episodic vertigo: role of intratympanic gentamicin and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis-Aguilar, Erika; Hinojosa-González, Ramon; Vales-Hidalgo, Olivia; Coutinho-Toledo, Heloisa

    Even today, the treatment of intractable vertigo remains a challenge. Vestibular ablation with intratympanic gentamicin stands as a good alternative in the management of refractory vertigo patients. To control intractable vertigo through complete saccular and horizontal canal vestibular ablation with intratympanic gentamicin treatment. Patients with refractory episodic vertigo were included. The inclusion criteria were: unilateral ear disease, moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss, and failure to other treatments. Included patients underwent 0.5-0.8mL of gentamicin intratympanic application at a 30mg/mL concentration. Vestibular ablation was confirmed by the absence of response on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and no response on caloric tests. Audiometry, electronystagmography with iced water, and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials were performed in all patients. Ten patients were included; nine patients with Meniere's disease and one patient with (late onset) delayed hydrops. Nine patients showed an absent response on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and no response on caloric tests. The only patient with low amplitude on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials had vertigo recurrence. Vertigo control was achieved in 90% of the patients. One patient developed hearing loss >30dB. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials confirmed vestibular ablation in patients treated with intratympanic gentamicin. High-grade vertigo control was due to complete saccular and horizontal canal ablation (no response to iced water in electronystagmography and no response on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials). Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative assessment of different energy sources and their potential role in long-term sustainable energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagramanian, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    In the debate on sustainable energy future, the role of nuclear power is a contentious issue. Many, who are outside of the nuclear community, do not even consider nuclear, because of public concerns on nuclear safety, radioactive waste and non-proliferation issues. For example, the United Nations Development Program, in its document Energy After Rio does not suggest a specific role for nuclear power except in the most doubtful of terms. On the contrary, most nuclear organisations and related industries see nuclear power as the only mature carbon-free electricity generating option that can be deployed even on a much larger scale than today. This paper analyses the potential role of nuclear power in the context of the global sustainable energy future. The fundamental features of sustainable energy development are examined in terms of the following compatibility constraints: Demand driven compatibility; Natural resource compatibility; Environmental compatibility; Geopolitical compatibility; and Economic compatibility

  20. Potential protective role of bariatric surgery against breast cancer in postmenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Balescu; Nicolae Bacalbasa

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem worldwide especially due to the metabolic disorders which seem to be induced by an excessive amount of adipose tissue. Therefore attention was focused on evaluating the role of bariatric surgery in order to offer a better control of the comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension or dyslipidemia which are widely accepted as causes of increased morbidity and mortality among obese patients. Once these benefits have been widely demonstr...

  1. A potential role for endogenous proteins as sacrificial sunscreens and antioxidants in human tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah A. Hibbert; Rachel E.B. Watson; Neil K. Gibbs; Patrick Costello; Clair Baldock; Anthony S. Weiss; Christopher E.M. Griffiths; Michael J. Sherratt

    2015-01-01

    Excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure of the skin is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Although both exogenous sunscreens and endogenous tissue components (including melanins and tryptophan-derived compounds) reduce UVR penetration, the role of endogenous proteins in absorbing environmental UV wavelengths is poorly defined. Having previously demonstrated that proteins which are rich in UVR-absorbing amino acid residues are readily degraded by broadband UVB-radiation (contain...

  2. Placental growth factor and its potential role in diabetic retinopathy and other ocular neovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quan Dong; De Falco, Sandro; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Lam, Wai-Ching; Li, Xuri; Reichhart, Nadine; Ricci, Federico; Pluim, Jennifer; Li, William W

    2018-02-01

    The role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), including in retinal vascular diseases, has been well studied, and pharmacological blockade of VEGF is the gold standard of treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration, retinal vein occlusion and diabetic macular oedema. Placental growth factor (PGF, previously known as PlGF), a homologue of VEGF, is a multifunctional peptide associated with angiogenesis-dependent pathologies in the eye and non-ocular conditions. Animal studies using genetic modification and pharmacological treatment have demonstrated a mechanistic role for PGF in pathological angiogenesis. Inhibition decreases neovascularization and microvascular abnormalities across different models, including oxygen-induced retinopathy, laser-induced choroidal neovascularization and in diabetic mice exhibiting retinopathies. High levels of PGF have been found in the vitreous of patients with diabetic retinopathy. Despite these strong animal data, the exact role of PGF in pathological angiogenesis in retinal vascular diseases remains to be defined, and the benefits of PGF-specific inhibition in humans with retinal neovascular diseases and macular oedema remain controversial. Comparative effectiveness research studies in patients with diabetic retinal disease have shown that treatment that inhibits both VEGF and PGF may provide superior outcomes in certain patients compared with treatment that inhibits only VEGF. This review summarizes current knowledge of PGF, including its relationship to VEGF and its role in pathological angiogenesis in retinal diseases, and identifies some key unanswered questions about PGF that can serve as a pathway for future basic, translational and clinical research. © 2016 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation and European Association for Vision & Eye Research.

  3. Review article: the potential role of nitric oxide in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Rask-Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    The aetiology of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases-ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease-as well as 'microscopic colitis'-both collagenous (COC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)-remains unknown. Autoimmune mechanisms, cytokine polymorphism, commensal bacteria, infectious agents and vascular...... impairment have all been proposed as playing important roles in the pathogenesis of this spectrum of diseases. A variety of proinflammatory mediators, including tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1beta, interferon gamma, leukotriene B4 and platelet activating factor, promote the adherence...

  4. Role of the low-lying isoscalar dipole modes in the polarization potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal'butsev, E.B.; Unzhakova, A.V.; Lanza, E.G.; Catania Univ.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of the real and imaginary parts of the polarization potential in terms of the relative contributions of the single collective states for the 208 Pb + 208 Pb system has been done. The polarization potential has been calculated within the Feshbach formalism taking into account the collective states calculated with the Wigner function moments method. The contribution of the isoscalar giant dipole resonance states has been estimated being of the order of 10-20% of the total at relatively low incident energy. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. The potential role of life cycle assessment in regulation of chemicals in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Frans Møller; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2004-01-01

    Scope and Background. This paper presents the preliminary results from an ongoing feasibility study, investigating potential application of elements from the life cycle assessment (LCA) framework in European chemicals' policy. Many policy areas affect manufacturing, marketing and use of chemicals...... dialogues with various stakeholders. Results and Discussion. LCAs are comparative and more holistic in view as compared to chemical risk assessments for regulatory purposes1. LCAs may therefore potentially improve the basis for decisions between alternatives in cases where a risk assessment calls for risk...

  6. Multifaceted Role of Neuropilins in the Immune System: Potential Targets for Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sohini; Bag, Arup K; Singh, Rakesh K; Talmadge, James E; Batra, Surinder K; Datta, Kaustubh

    2017-01-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are non-tyrosine kinase cell surface glycoproteins expressed in all vertebrates and widely conserved across species. The two isoforms, such as neuropilin-1 (NRP1) and neuropilin-2 (NRP2), mainly act as coreceptors for class III Semaphorins and for members of the vascular endothelial growth factor family of molecules and are widely known for their role in a wide array of physiological processes, such as cardiovascular, neuronal development and patterning, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, as well as various clinical disorders. Intriguingly, additional roles for NRPs occur with myeloid and lymphoid cells, in normal physiological as well as different pathological conditions, including cancer, immunological disorders, and bone diseases. However, little is known concerning the molecular pathways that govern these functions. In addition, NRP1 expression has been characterized in different immune cellular phenotypes including macrophages, dendritic cells, and T cell subsets, especially regulatory T cell populations. By contrast, the functions of NRP2 in immune cells are less well known. In this review, we briefly summarize the genomic organization, structure, and binding partners of the NRPs and extensively discuss the recent advances in their role and function in different immune cell subsets and their clinical implications.

  7. The potential regulatory roles of NAD(+) and its metabolism in autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Jia-Ping; Hu, Jiong-Yu; Huang, Yue-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    (Macro)autophagy mediates the bulk degradation of defective organelles, long-lived proteins and protein aggregates in lysosomes and plays a critical role in cellular and tissue homeostasis. Defective autophagy processes have been found to contribute to a variety of metabolic diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy are not fully understood. Increasing data indicate that nicotinamide adenine nucleotide (NAD(+)) homeostasis correlates intimately with autophagy. NAD(+) is a ubiquitous coenzyme that functions primarily as an electron carrier of oxidoreductase in multiple redox reactions. Both NAD(+) homeostasis and its metabolism are thought to play critical roles in regulating autophagy. In this review, we discuss how the regulation of NAD(+) and its metabolism can influence autophagy. We focus on the regulation of NAD(+)/NADH homeostasis and the effects of NAD(+) consumption by poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation by sirtuins and NAD(+) metabolites on autophagy processes and the underlying mechanisms. Future studies should provide more direct evidence for the regulation of autophagy processes by NAD(+). A better understanding of the critical roles of NAD(+) and its metabolites on autophagy will shed light on the complexity of autophagy regulation, which is essential for the discovery of new therapeutic tools for autophagy-related diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids: potential role in the management of early Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Jicha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gregory A Jicha, William R MarkesberyUniversity of Kentucky Alzheimer’s Disease Center and the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY, USAbstract: Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for brain growth and development. They play an important role throughout life, as critical modulators of neuronal function and regulation of oxidative stress mechanisms, in brain health and disease. Docosahexanoic acid (DHA, the major omega-3 fatty acid found in neurons, has taken on a central role as a target for therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A plethora of in vitro, animal model, and human data, gathered over the past decade, highlight the important role DHA may play in the development of a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including AD. Cross sectional and prospective cohort data have demonstrated that reduced dietary intake or low brain levels of DHA are associated with accelerated cognitive decline or the development of incipient dementia, including AD. Several clinical trials investigating the effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in AD have been completed and all failed to demonstrate its efficacy in the treatment of AD. However, these trials produced intriguing data suggesting that the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may depend on the stage of disease, other dietary mediators, and apolipoprotein E status.Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, omega-3 fatty acids, oxidative stress, clinical studies, treatment

  9. Potential role for epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in combined-modality therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Choy, Hak

    2004-01-01

    There has been a surge of interest in the translation of discoveries in molecular biology into clinically relevant therapies in the field of hematology/oncology. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been a molecular target of significant interest and investigation, and preclinical and clinical studies support a role for targeted therapy in a variety of cancers, including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) via compounds that specifically inhibit EGFR. ZD1839, IMC-C225, and OSI-774 are the most clinically developed of these compounds. Interestingly, preclinical studies have demonstrated that EGFR inhibitors may have radiation-sensitizing properties, as well as increased cytotoxic activity in combination with chemotherapeutic agents, suggesting a potential role for EGFR inhibitors as an adjunct to the current combined-modality approach for therapy of Stage III NSCLC. Therefore, clinical trials have been proposed and initiated to address the issue of determining the impact of the addition of EGFR inhibitors to the standard combined-modality regimen (chemotherapy/radiation therapy ± surgery) for Stage III NSCLC. This article reviews preclinical and clinical data supporting the role for EGFR inhibitors alone or in combination with chemotherapy/radiation therapy for locally advanced NSCLC. Also, it will provide an overview of ongoing and proposed clinical studies investigating the potential role for EGFR inhibitors in Stage III NSCLC

  10. Beyond Gender Stereotypes in Language Comprehension: Self Sex-Role Descriptions Affect the Brain's Potentials Associated with Agreement Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Paolo; Garnham, Alan; Oakhill, Jane

    2015-01-01

    We recorded Event-Related Potentials to investigate differences in the use of gender information during the processing of reflexive pronouns. Pronouns either matched the gender provided by role nouns (such as "king" or "engineer") or did not. We compared two types of gender information, definitional information, which is semantic in nature (a mother is female), or stereotypical (a nurse is likely to be female). When they followed definitional role-nouns, gender-mismatching pronouns elicited a P600 effect reflecting a failure in the agreement process. When instead the gender violation occurred after stereotypical role-nouns the Event Related Potential response was biphasic, being positive in parietal electrodes and negative in anterior left electrodes. The use of a correlational approach showed that those participants with more "feminine" or "expressive" self sex-role descriptions showed a P600 response for stereotype violations, suggesting that they experienced the mismatch as an agreement violation; whereas less "expressive" participants showed an Nref effect, indicating more effort spent in linking the pronouns with the possible, although less likely, counter-stereotypical referent.

  11. Potential of Field Education as Signature Pedagogy: The Field Director Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyter, Sharon C.

    2012-01-01

    In light of the assertion that field education is the signature pedagogy of social work education, this Internet-based study explores field director demographics and questions the fulfillment of this potential, examining BSW and MSW field education through the lens of the field director position. Field directors (159) and deans/directors (150)…

  12. Coastal recirculation potential affecting air pollutants in Portugal: The role of circulation weather types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ana; Gouveia, Célia; Levy, Ilan; Dayan, Uri; Jerez, Sonia; Mendes, Manuel; Trigo, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Coastal zones are under increasing development and experience air pollution episodes regularly. These episodes are often related to peaks in local emissions from industry or transportation, but can also be associated with regional transport from neighbour urban areas influenced by land-sea breeze recirculation. This study intends to analyze the relation between circulation weather patterns, air mass recirculation and pollution levels in three coastal airsheds of Portugal (Lisbon, Porto and Sines) based on the application of an objective quantitative measure of potential recirculation. Although ventilation events have a dominant presence throughout the studied 9-yrs period on all the three airsheds, recirculation and stagnation conditions occur frequently. The association between NO2, SO2 and O3 levels and recirculation potential is evident during summer months. Under high average recirculation potential and high variability, NO2 and SO2 levels are higher for the three airsheds, whilst for O3 each airshed responds differently. This indicates a high heterogeneity among the three airsheds in (1) the type of emission - traffic or industry - prevailing for each contaminant, and (2) the response to the various circulation weather patterns and recirculation situations. Irrespectively of that, the proposed methodology, based on iterative K-means clustering, allows to identify which prevailing patterns are associated with high recirculation potential, having the advantage of being applicable to any geographical location.

  13. MODULATION OF EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS BY WORD REPETITION - THE ROLE OF VISUAL SELECTIVE ATTENTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OTTEN, LJ; RUGG, MD; DOYLE, MC

    1993-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while subjects viewed visually presented words, some of which occurred twice. Each trial consisted of two colored letter strings, the requirement being to attend to and make a word/nonword discrimination for one of the strings. Attention was manipulated

  14. Opening the Learning Process: The Potential Role of Feature Film in Teaching Employment Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of feature film to encourage more inclusive, participatory and open learning in the area of employment relations. Evaluations of student responses in a single postgraduate course over a five-year period revealed how feature film could encourage participatory learning processes in which students reexamined their…

  15. Role of groundwater oxidation potential and radiolysis on waste glass performance in crystalline repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that groundwater conditions in a Stripa granite repository will be as reducing as those in a basalt repository. The final oxidation potential (Eh) at 70 0 C for Stripa groundwater deaerated and equilibrated with crystalline granite was -0.45V. In contrast, the oxidation potential at 60 0 C for Grande Ronde groundwater equilibrated with basalt was -0.40V. The reducing groundwater conditions were found to slightly decrease the time-dependent release of soluble components from the waste glass. Spectrophotometric analysis of the equilibrated groundwaters indicated the presence of Fe 2+ confirming that the Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ couple is controlling the oxidation potential. It was also shown that in the alkaline pH regime of these groundwaters the iron species are primarily associated with x-ray amorphous precipitates in the groundwater. Gamma radiolysis in the absence of waste glass and in the absence of oxygen further reduces the oxidation potential of both granitic and basaltic groundwaters. The effect is more pronounced in the basaltic groundwater. The mechanism for this decrease is under investigation but appears related to the reactive amorphous precipitate. The results of these tests suggest that H 2 may not escape from the repository system as postulated and that radiolysis may not cause the groundwaters to become oxidizing in a crystalline repository when abundant Fe 2+ species are present. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  16. The potential role of maglev in short-haul airline operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    Intercity travel is predominately by commercial air transport. However, airports are becoming increasingly congested at a time when there is often substantial local opposition to the expansion of airport infrastructure because of the environmental impacts. This paper explores the potential for integrating high-speed maglev systems into the airport infrastructure, but more importantly into airline operations. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  17. The Potential Role of circRNA in Tumor Immunity Regulation and Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zihao; Li, Peiyao; Fan, Li; Wu, Minghua

    2018-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) can be divided into circular non-coding RNAs (circRNAs) and linear ncRNAs. ncRNAs exist in different cell types, including normal cells, tumor cells and immunocytes. Linear ncRNAs, such as long ncRNAs and microRNAs, have been found to play important roles in the regulation of tumor immunity and immunotherapy; however, the functions of circRNAs in tumor immunity and immunotherapy are less known. Here, we review the current status of ncRNAs in the regulation of tumor im...

  18. The potential role for ocrelizumab in the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Blinkenberg, Morten

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis in multiple sclerosis (MS), being involved in the activation of proinflammatory T cells, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and production of autoantibodies directed against myelin. Hence, the usage of B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibodies....... Other anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies have been tested as treatments for MS, including ofatumumab that has shown beneficial results in placebo-controlled phase II trials in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Ocrelizumab is now in phase III development for the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS...

  19. The potential role of HPV vaccination in the prevention of infectious complications of pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ulla; Jøergensen, Jan Stener; Mogensen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    There is now incontrovertible evidence that HPV is the cause of almost all cases of genital warts, cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer. Moreover the current review of the recent literature on HPV in relation to pregnancy found strong indications that HPV plays an important role in adverse...... outcomes of pregnancy. HPV may contribute to infertility and may increase the risk of miscarriage. Recent studies indicate a significant rate of vertical transmission of HPV between mother and child but whether the mode of delivery makes a difference to the risk of transmission remains unknown. HPV...

  20. The physiological functions of central nervous system pericytes and a potential role in pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazley-Long, Nicholas; Durrant, Alexandra M; Swift, Matthew N; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2018-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) pericytes regulate critical functions of the neurovascular unit in health and disease. CNS pericytes are an attractive pharmacological target for their position within the neurovasculature and for their role in neuroinflammation. Whether the function of CNS pericytes also affects pain states and nociceptive mechanisms is currently not understood. Could it be that pericytes hold the key to pain associated with CNS blood vessel dysfunction? This article reviews recent findings on the important physiological functions of CNS pericytes and highlights how these neurovascular functions could be linked to pain states. PMID:29623199

  1. Potential role of biotic transport models in low-level-waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.; Cadwell, L.L.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the initial results of a study being conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to determine the relevance of biotic pathways to the regulation of nuclear waste disposal. Biotic transport is defined as the actions of plants and animals that result in the transport of radioactive materials from a LLW burial ground to a location where they can enter exposure pathways to man. A critical review of the role of modeling in evaluating biotic transport is given. Both current applications and the need for future modeling development are discussed

  2. Roles of Pannexin-1 Channels in Inflammatory Response through the TLRs/NF-Kappa B Signaling Pathway Following Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yun Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accumulating evidence suggests that neuroinflammation plays a critical role in early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Pannexin-1 channels, as a member of gap junction proteins located on the plasma membrane, releases ATP, ions, second messengers, neurotransmitters, and molecules up to 1 kD into the extracellular space, when activated. Previous studies identified that the opening of Pannexin-1 channels is essential for cellular migration, apoptosis and especially inflammation, but its effects on inflammatory response in SAH model have not been explored yet.Methods: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups: sham group (n = 20, SAH group (n = 20, SAH + LV-Scramble-ShRNA group (n = 20, SAH + LV-ShRNA-Panx1 group (n = 20, SAH + LV-NC group (n = 20, and SAH + LV-Panx1-EGFP group (n = 20. The rat SAH model was induced by injection of 0.3 ml fresh arterial, non-heparinized blood into the prechiasmatic cistern in 20 s. In SAH + LV-ShRNA-Panx1 group and SAH + LV-Panx1-EGFP group, lentivirus was administered via intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v. at 72 h before the induction of SAH. The Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunofluorescence staining, and western blotting were performed to explore the potential interactive mechanism between Pannexin-1 channels and TLR2/TLR4/NF-κB-mediated signaling pathway. Cognitive and memory changes were investigated by the Morris water maze test.Results: Administration with LV-ShRNA-Panx1 markedly decreased the expression levels of TLR2/4/NF-κB pathway-related agents in the brain cortex and significantly ameliorated neurological cognitive and memory deficits in this SAH model. On the contrary, administration of LV-Panx1-EGFP elevated the expressions of TLR2/4/NF-κB pathway-related agents, which correlated with augmented neuronal apoptosis.Conclusion: Pannexin-1 channels may

  3. Role of suppressed hepatocellular regeneration and Ca2+ in chlordecone-potentiated CCl4 hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism by which the chlorinated pesticide chlordecone (CD; Kepone) potentiates CCl 4 -induced hepatotoxicity and lethality was investigated. It was hypothesized that perturbations in Ca 2+ homeostasis, greater than those observed with a low dose of CCl 4 alone, in concert with a suppression of hepatocellular regeneration induced by CD alone or by CD + CCl 4 are responsible, at least in part, for CD-potentiated CCl 4 hepatotoxicity. Ca 2+ homeostasis was evaluated by measuring total cell Ca 2+ and 45 Ca 2+ uptake in viable isolated hepatocyte suspension obtained from normal and CD-pretreated rats receiving CCl 4 in vivo. In the normal rats in vivo CCL challenge did not affect 45 Ca 2+ uptake by viable isolated hepatocytes. In contrast, 45 Ca 2+ uptake was inhibited in viable isolated hepatocytes obtained from rats exposed to CD + CCl 4

  4. The Relationship between Childhood Trauma and Suicidal Ideation: Role of Maltreatment and Potential Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Bahk, Yong-Chun; Jang, Seon-Kyeong; Choi, Kee-Hong; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Childhood trauma is recognized as an important risk factor in suicidal ideation, however it is not fully understood how the different types of childhood maltreatment influence suicidal ideation nor what variables mediate the relationship between childhood trauma and suicidal ideation. This study examined the path from childhood trauma to suicidal ideation, including potential mediators. Methods A sample of 211 healthy adults completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Beck s...

  5. Potential role of sea spray generation in the atmospheric transport of perfluorocarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Eva; Ellis, David A

    2010-08-01

    The observed environmental concentrations of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and its conjugate base (PFO) in remote regions such as the Arctic have been primarily ascribed to the atmospheric transport and degradation of fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) and to direct PFO transport in ocean currents. These mechanisms are each capable of only partially explaining observations. Transport within marine aerosols has been proposed and may explain transport over short distances but will contribute little over longer distances. However, PFO(A) has been shown to have a very short half-life in aqueous aerosols and thus sea spray was proposed as a mechanism for the generation of PFOA in the gas phase from PFO in a water body. Using the observed PFO concentrations in oceans of the Northern Hemisphere and estimated spray generation rates, this mechanism is shown to have the potential for contributing large amounts of PFOA to the atmosphere and may therefore contribute significantly to the concentrations observed in remote locations. Specifically, the rate of PFOA release into the gas phase from oceans in the Northern Hemisphere is calculated to be potentially comparable to global stack emissions to the atmosphere. The subsequent potential for atmospheric degradation of PFOA and its global warming potential are considered. Observed isomeric ratios and predicted atmospheric concentrations due to FTOH degradation are used to elucidate the likely relative importance of transport pathways. It is concluded that gas phase PFOA released from oceans may help to explain observed concentrations in remote regions. The model calculations performed in the present study strongly suggest that oceanic aerosol and gas phase field monitoring is of vital importance to obtain a complete understanding of the global dissemination of PFCAs. Copyright 2010 SETAC

  6. Potential Roles of Dental Pulp Stem Cells in Neural Regeneration and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lihua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Key, Brian; Lee, Bae Hoon

    2018-01-01

    This review summarizes current advances in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and their potential applications in the nervous diseases. Injured adult mammalian nervous system has a limited regenerative capacity due to an insufficient pool of precursor cells in both central and peripheral nervous systems. Nerve growth is also constrained by inhibitory factors (associated with central myelin) and barrier tissues (glial scarring). Stem cells, possessing the capacity of self-renewal and multicellular differentiation, promise new therapeutic strategies for overcoming these impediments to neural regeneration. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) derive from a cranial neural crest lineage, retain a remarkable potential for neuronal differentiation, and additionally express multiple factors that are suitable for neuronal and axonal regeneration. DPSCs can also express immunomodulatory factors that stimulate formation of blood vessels and enhance regeneration and repair of injured nerve. These unique properties together with their ready accessibility make DPSCs an attractive cell source for tissue engineering in injured and diseased nervous systems. In this review, we interrogate the neuronal differentiation potential as well as the neuroprotective, neurotrophic, angiogenic, and immunomodulatory properties of DPSCs and its application in the injured nervous system. Taken together, DPSCs are an ideal stem cell resource for therapeutic approaches to neural repair and regeneration in nerve diseases. PMID:29853908

  7. Prediction markets and their potential role in biomedical research--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Thomas; Almenberg, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Predictions markets are marketplaces for trading contracts with payoffs that depend on the outcome of future events. Popular examples are markets on the outcome of presidential elections, where contracts pay $1 if a specific candidate wins the election and $0 if someone else wins. Contract prices on prediction markets can be interpreted as forecasts regarding the outcome of future events. Further attractive properties include the potential to aggregate private information, to generate and disseminate a consensus among the market participants, and to offer incentives for the acquisition of information. It has been argued that these properties might be valuable in the context of scientific research. In this review, we give an overview of key properties of prediction markets and discuss potential benefits for science. To illustrate these benefits for biomedical research, we discuss an example application in the context of decision making in research on the genetics of diseases. Moreover, some potential practical problems of prediction market application in science are discussed, and solutions are outlined. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The potential roles of metallothionein as a therapeutic target for cerebral ischemia and retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yasushi; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Methallothionein (MT) is a low molecular weight cysteine rich metalloprotein. In mammals, there are four isoforms (MT-1, -2, -3, and -4) and they have multiple roles, such as the detoxification of heavy metals, regulating essential metal homeostasis, and protecting against oxidative stress. Recently, accumulating studies have suggested that MTs (especially MT-1, -2, and -3) are an important neuroprotective substance for cerebral ischemia and retinal diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), that are characterized by a progressive retinal degeneration. Oxidative stress and/or zinc toxicity has been implicated as part of the common pathway in these diseases. Studying the expression patterns and functions of MTs may broaden our understanding of the endogenous molecular responses that these diseases trigger, and may help us to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat them. However, the precise roles of MTs within the brain and retina are not fully understood in terms of neuropathological conditions. In this review, we discuss the recent findings focusing on MTs' functions following cerebral ischemia, AMD, and RP.

  9. Potential roles of GPR120 and its agonists in the management of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang D

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dan Zhang, Po Sing Leung School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Abstract: Free fatty acids (FFAs serve not only as nutrients that provide energy but also as extracellular signaling molecules that manipulate intracellular physiological events through FFA receptors (FFARs such as FFAR4. FFAR4 is also known as G-protein coupled receptor 120 (GPR120. The main role of GPR120 is to elicit FFA regulation on metabolism homeostasis. GPR120 agonism correlates with prevention of the occurrence and development of metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. GPR120 activation directly or indirectly inhibits inflammation, modulates hormone secretion from the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas, and regulates lipid and/or glucose metabolism in adipose, liver, and muscle tissues, which may help prevent obesity and diabetes. This review summarizes recent advances in physiological roles of GPR120 in preventing insulin resistance and protecting pancreatic islet function, and examines how resident GPR120 in the pancreas may be involved in modulating pancreatic islet function. Keywords: fatty acid, G protein-coupled receptors, inflammation, pancreas, obesity

  10. Potential role for MATER in cytoplasmic lattice formation in murine oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boram Kim

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Mater and Padi6 are maternal effect genes that are first expressed during oocyte growth and are required for embryonic development beyond the two-cell stage in the mouse. We have recently found that PADI6 localizes to, and is required for the formation of, abundant fibrillar Triton X-100 (Triton insoluble structures termed the oocyte cytoplasmic lattices (CPLs. Given their similar expression profiles and mutant mouse phenotypes, we have been testing the hypothesis that MATER also plays a role in CPL formation and/or function.Herein, we show that PADI6 and MATER co-localize throughout the oocyte cytoplasm following Triton extraction, suggesting that MATER co-localizes with PADI6 at the CPLs. Additionally, the solubility of PADI6 was dramatically increased in Mater(tm/tm oocytes following Triton extraction, suggesting that MATER is involved in CPL nucleation. This prediction is supported by transmission electron microscopic analysis of Mater(+/+ and Mater(tm/tm germinal vesicle stage oocytes which illustrated that volume fraction of CPLs was reduced by 90% in Mater(tm/tm oocytes compared to Mater(+/+ oocytes.Taken together, these results suggest that, similar to PADI6, MATER is also required for CPL formation. Given that PADI6 and MATER are essential for female fertility, these results not only strengthen the hypothesis that the lattices play a critical role in mediating events during the oocyte-to-embryo transition but also increase our understanding of the molecular nature of the CPLs.

  11. Molecular Targets of Nutraceuticals Derived from Dietary Spices: Potential Role in Suppression of Inflammation and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Van Kuiken, Michelle E.; Iyer, Laxmi H.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.; Sung, Bokyung

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact cancer is primarily a preventable disease, recent statistics indicate cancer will become the number one killer worldwide in 2010. Since certain cancers are more prevalent in the people of some countries than others, suggests the role of lifestyle. For instance cancer incidence among people from the Indian subcontinent, where most spices are consumed, is much lower than that in the Western World. Spices have been consumed for centuries for a variety of purposes—as flavoring agents, colorants, and preservatives. However, there is increasing evidence for the importance of plant-based foods in regular diet to lowering the risk of most chronic diseases, so spices are now emerging as more than just flavor aids, but as agents that can not only prevent but may even treat disease. In this article, we discuss the role of 41 common dietary spices with over 182 spice-derived nutraceuticals for their effects against different stages of tumorigenesis. Besides suppressing inflammatory pathways, spice-derived nutraceuticals can suppress survival, proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis of tumor cells. We discuss how spice-derived nutraceuticals mediate such diverse effects and what their molecular targets are. Overall our review suggests “adding spice to your life” may serve as a healthy and delicious way to ward off cancer and other chronic diseases. PMID:19491364

  12. Molecular characterization and expression of Rab7 from Clonorchis sinensis and its potential role in autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feifei; Li, Ye; Huang, Yan; Chen, Tingjin; Li, Shan; Xu, Yanquan; Wu, Zhongdao; Li, Xuerong; Yu, Xinbing

    2013-07-01

    Accumulating evidences suggest that Rab7 GTPase is important for the normal progression of autophagy. However, the role of Rab7 GTPase in regulation of autophagy in Clonorchis sinensis is not known. In this study, a gene encoding Rab7 was isolated from C. sinensis adult cDNA. Recombinant CsRab7 was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. CsRab7 transcripts were detected in the cDNA of adult worm, metacercaria, cercaria, and egg of C. sinensis, and were highly expressed in the metacercaria. Immunohistochemical localization results revealed that CsRab7 was specifically deposited on the vitellarium and eggs of adult worm. Furthermore, EGFP signal of CsRab7WT and the active mutant CsRab7Q67L were associated with autophagic vesicles in transiently transfected 293T cells. It is concluded from the present study that CsRab7 GTPase possibly contributes to the development of C. sinensis and that the autophagy pathway could be an important site of action with respect to the developmental role of CsRab7 in C. sinensis.

  13. Epigenomic Regulation of Androgen Receptor Signaling: Potential Role in Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Cucchiara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR signaling remains the major oncogenic pathway in prostate cancer (PCa. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT is the principle treatment for locally advanced and metastatic disease. However, a significant number of patients acquire treatment resistance leading to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Epigenetics, the study of heritable and reversible changes in gene expression without alterations in DNA sequences, is a crucial regulatory step in AR signaling. We and others, recently described the technological advance Chem-seq, a method to identify the interaction between a drug and the genome. This has permitted better understanding of the underlying regulatory mechanisms of AR during carcinogenesis and revealed the importance of epigenetic modifiers. In screening for new epigenomic modifiying drugs, we identified SD-70, and found that this demethylase inhibitor is effective in CRPC cells in combination with current therapies. The aim of this review is to explore the role of epigenetic modifications as biomarkers for detection, prognosis, and risk evaluation of PCa. Furthermore, we also provide an update of the recent findings on the epigenetic key processes (DNA methylation, chromatin modifications and alterations in noncoding RNA profiles involved in AR expression and their possible role as therapeutic targets.

  14. Diet and Skin Cancer: The Potential Role of Dietary Antioxidants in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Katta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most common cancer among Americans. Ultraviolet (UV radiation exposure is the major risk factor for the development of NMSC. Dietary AOs may prevent free radical-mediated DNA damage and tumorigenesis secondary to UV radiation. Numerous laboratory studies have found that certain dietary AOs show significant promise in skin cancer prevention. These results have been substantiated by animal studies. In human studies, researchers have evaluated both oral AO supplements and dietary intake of AOs via whole foods. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of AOs in preventing tumorigenesis and outline four targeted dietary AOs. We review the results of research evaluating oral AOs supplements as compared to dietary AOs intake via whole foods. While these specific supplements have not shown efficacy, intake of AOs via consumption of whole foods has shown some promise. Lessons learned from the field of hypertension research may provide important guidance in future study design. Further research on the role of dietary AOs in the prevention of NMSC is warranted and should focus on intake via whole food consumption.

  15. Targeted Disruption of ALK Reveals a Potential Role in Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Witek

    Full Text Available Mice lacking ALK activity have previously been reported to exhibit subtle behavioral phenotypes. In this study of ALK of loss of function mice we present data supporting a role for ALK in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in male mice. We observed lower level of serum testosterone at P40 in ALK knock-out males, accompanied by mild disorganization of seminiferous tubules exhibiting decreased numbers of GATA4 expressing cells. These observations highlight a role for ALK in testis function and are further supported by experiments in which chemical inhibition of ALK activity with the ALK TKI crizotinib was employed. Oral administration of crizotinib resulted in a decrease of serum testosterone levels in adult wild type male mice, which reverted to normal levels after cessation of treatment. Analysis of GnRH expression in neurons of the hypothalamus revealed a significant decrease in the number of GnRH positive neurons in ALK knock-out mice at P40 when compared with control littermates. Thus, ALK appears to be involved in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by regulating the timing of pubertal onset and testis function at the upper levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis.

  16. Stress, sex, and addiction: potential roles of corticotropin-releasing factor, oxytocin, and arginine-vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisagno, Verónica; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2014-09-01

    Stress sensitivity and sex are predictive factors for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. Life stresses are not only risk factors for the development of addiction but also are triggers for relapse to drug use. Therefore, it is imperative to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between stress and drug abuse, as an understanding of this may help in the development of novel and more effective therapeutic approaches to block the clinical manifestations of drug addiction. The development and clinical course of addiction-related disorders do appear to involve neuroadaptations within neurocircuitries that modulate stress responses and are influenced by several neuropeptides. These include corticotropin-releasing factor, the prototypic member of this class, as well as oxytocin and arginine-vasopressin that play important roles in affiliative behaviors. Interestingly, these peptides function to balance emotional behavior, with sexual dimorphism in the oxytocin/arginine-vasopressin systems, a fact that might play an important role in the differential responses of women and men to stressful stimuli and the specific sex-based prevalence of certain addictive disorders. Thus, this review aims to summarize (i) the contribution of sex differences to the function of dopamine systems, and (ii) the behavioral, neurochemical, and anatomical changes in brain stress systems.

  17. Targeted Disruption of ALK Reveals a Potential Role in Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Christoffer; Ahlgren, Ulf; Eriksson, Maria; Vernersson-Lindahl, Emma; Helland, Åslaug; Alexeyev, Oleg A.; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth H.

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking ALK activity have previously been reported to exhibit subtle behavioral phenotypes. In this study of ALK of loss of function mice we present data supporting a role for ALK in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in male mice. We observed lower level of serum testosterone at P40 in ALK knock-out males, accompanied by mild disorganization of seminiferous tubules exhibiting decreased numbers of GATA4 expressing cells. These observations highlight a role for ALK in testis function and are further supported by experiments in which chemical inhibition of ALK activity with the ALK TKI crizotinib was employed. Oral administration of crizotinib resulted in a decrease of serum testosterone levels in adult wild type male mice, which reverted to normal levels after cessation of treatment. Analysis of GnRH expression in neurons of the hypothalamus revealed a significant decrease in the number of GnRH positive neurons in ALK knock-out mice at P40 when compared with control littermates. Thus, ALK appears to be involved in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by regulating the timing of pubertal onset and testis function at the upper levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. PMID:25955180

  18. Potential Roles of Amiloride-Sensitive Sodium Channels in Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siguang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ENaC/degenerin ion channel superfamily includes the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC and acid sensitive ionic channel (ASIC. ENaC is a multimeric ion channel formed by heteromultimeric membrane glycoproteins, which participate in a multitude of biological processes by mediating the transport of sodium (Na+ across epithelial tissues such as the kidney, lungs, bladder, and gut. Aberrant ENaC functions contribute to several human disease states including pseudohypoaldosteronism, Liddle syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and salt-sensitive hypertension. Increasing evidence suggests that ion channels not only regulate ion homeostasis and electric signaling in excitable cells but also play important roles in cancer cell behaviors such as proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and migration. Indeed, ENaCs/ASICs had been reported to be associated with cancer characteristics. Given their cell surface localization and pharmacology, pharmacological strategies to target ENaC/ASIC family members may be promising cancer therapeutics.

  19. Epigenetic regulation in the inner ear and its potential roles in development, protection, and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eZuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The burgeoning field of epigenetics is beginning to make a significant impact on our understanding of tissue development, maintenance, and function. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate the structure and activity of the genome in response to intracellular and environmental cues that direct cell-type specific gene networks. The inner ear is comprised of highly specialized cell types with identical genomes that originate from a single totipotent zygote. During inner ear development specific combinations of transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers must function in a coordinated manner to establish and maintain cellular identity. These epigenetic regulatory mechanisms contribute to the maintenance of distinct chromatin states and cell-type specific gene expression patterns. In this review, we highlight emerging paradigms for epigenetic modifications related to inner ear development, and how epigenetics may have a significant role in hearing loss, protection, and regeneration.

  20. The Potential Role of Music in Second Language Learning: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva Zeromskaite

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of musical activities on non-musical domains have recently sparked much research. Whereas the benefits of music for native language abilities are well established, the effect on second language (L2 is not yet fully explored. This review discusses articles suggesting the transfer effect of music on L2 phonological and reading skills. Through the analysis of research literature, it examines; (1 the extent of transfer to specific L2 skills, the nature of necessary music training, the effect of native language on musicality and L2, and the role of working memory in the transfer effect. While the discussed papers provide promising insights into the music-L2 relationship, due to the little research done in this area it is difficult to generalize the results to overall L2 learning.

  1. Potential role of retinoids in ovarian physiology and pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanwen; Li, Chunjin; Chen, Lu; Wang, Fengge; Zhou, Xu

    2017-06-01

    Retinoids (retinol and its derivatives) are required for maintaining vision, immunity, barrier function, reproduction, embryogenesis, cell proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, retinoid signaling plays a key role in initiating meiosis of germ cells of the mammalian fetal ovary. Recently, studies indicated that precise retinoid level regulation in the ovary provides a molecular control of ovarian development, steroidogenesis and oocyte maturation. Besides, abnormal retinoid signaling may be involved in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common ovarian endocrinopathies in reproductive-aged women worldwide. This review primarily summarizes recent advancements made in investigating the action of retinoid signaling in ovarian physiology as well as the abnormal retinoid signaling in PCOS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. A potential role of Chlamydia pneumoniae in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajonuma, Louis Chukwuemeka

    2010-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are among the most common human infections that not only impact oral health but also are associated with adverse systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, stroke, diabetes, and respiratory diseases. Periodontal diseases is a chronic severe inflammatory process of the gingiva leading to the destruction of tooth-supporting structures, alveolar bone, and subsequently tooth loss due to bacteria infection. While it has been reported that several oral biofilm-forming bacteria might be involved, the role of C. pneumoniae infection in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease remains unknown. The present hypothesis proposes that C. pneumoniae is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. This will lead to a better understanding of the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease, better treatment strategy and savings on total health care costs.

  3. Gut microbiota and obesity: role in aetiology and potential therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Carthage P; Shanahan, Fergus

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is epidemic; chronic energy surplus is clearly important in obesity development but other factors are at play. Indigenous gut microbiota are implicated in the aetiopathogenesis of obesity and obesity-related disorders. Evidence from murine models initially suggested a role for the gut microbiota in weight regulation and the microbiota has been shown to contribute to the low grade inflammation that characterises obesity. The microbiota and its metabolites mediate some of the alterations of the microbiota-gut-brain axis, the endocannabinoid system, and bile acid metabolism, found in obesity-related disorders. Modulation of the gut microbiota is an attractive proposition for prevention or treatment of obesity, particularly as traditional measures have been sub-optimal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of plant processing for the cancer preventive potential of Ethiopian kale (Brassica carinata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odongo, Grace Akinyi; Schlotz, Nina; Herz, Corinna; Hanschen, Franziska S; Baldermann, Susanne; Neugart, Susanne; Trierweiler, Bernhard; Frommherz, Lara; Franz, Charles M A P; Ngwene, Benard; Luvonga, Abraham Wahid; Schreiner, Monika; Rohn, Sascha; Lamy, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Background : Ethiopian kale ( Brassica carinata ) is a horticulturally important crop used as leafy vegetable in large parts of East and Southern Africa. The leaves are reported to contain high concentrations of health-promoting secondary plant metabolites. However, scientific knowledge on their health benefits is scarce. Objective : This study aimed to determine the cancer preventive potential of B. carinata using a human liver in vitro model focusing on processing effects on the pattern of secondary plant metabolites and bioactivity. Design : B. carinata was cultivated under controlled conditions and differentially processed (raw, fermented, or cooked) after harvesting. Human liver cancer cells (HepG2) were treated with ethanolic extracts of raw or processed B. carinata leaves and analyzed for their anti-genotoxic, anti-oxidant, and cytostatic potential. Chemical analyses were carried out on glucosinolates including breakdown products, phenolic compounds, carotenoids, and chlorophyll content. Results : Pre-treatment with B. carinata extracts concentration dependently reduced aflatoxin-induced DNA damage in the Comet assay, reduced the production of reactive oxygen species as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and induced Nrf2-mediated gene expression. Increasing extract concentrations also promoted cytostasis. Processing had a significant effect on the content of secondary plant metabolites. However, different processing methodologies did not dramatically decrease bioactivity, but enhanced the protective effect in some of the endpoints studied. Conclusion : Our findings highlight the cancer preventive potential of B. carinata as indicated by the protection of human liver cells against aflatoxin in vitro . In general, consumption of B. carinata should be encouraged as part of chemopreventive measures to combat prevalence of aflatoxin-induced diseases.

  5. Potential role of vegetation dynamics on recent extreme droughts over tropical South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.; Erfanian, A.; Fomenko, L.

    2017-12-01

    Tropical South America is a drought hot spot. In slightly over a decade (2005-2016), the region encountered three extreme droughts (2005, 2010, and 2016). Recurrent extreme droughts not only impact the region's eco-hydrology and socio-economy, but are also globally important as they can transform the planet's largest rainforest, the Amazon, from a carbon sink to a carbon source. Understanding drought drivers and mechanisms underlying extreme droughts in tropical South America can help better project the fate of the Amazon rainforest in a changing climate. In this study we use a regional climate model (RegCM4.3.4) coupled with a comprehensive land-surface model (CLM4.5) to study the present-day hydroclimate of the region, focusing specifically on what might have caused the frequent recurrence of extreme droughts. In the context of observation natural variability of the global oceanic forcing, we tackle the role of land-atmosphere interactions and ran the model with and without dynamic vegetation to study how vegetation dynamics and carbon-nitrogen cycles may have influenced the drought characteristics. Our results demonstrate skillful simulation of the South American climate in the model, and indicate substantial sensitivity of the region's hydroclimatology to vegetation dynamics. This presentation will compare the role of global oceanic forcing versus regional land surface feedback in the recent recurrent droughts, and will characterize the effects of vegetation dynamics in enhancing the drought severity. Preliminary results on future projections of the regional ecosystem and droughts perspective will be also presented.

  6. Corticosteroids stimulate the amphibious behavior in mudskipper: potential role of mineralocorticoid receptors in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Mori, Chie; Minami, Shogo; Takahashi, Hideya; Abe, Tsukasa; Ojima, Daisuke; Ogoshi, Maho; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2011-10-24

    It has long been held that cortisol, a glucocorticoid in many vertebrates, carries out both glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid actions in teleost fish. However, 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) has been identified as a specific endogenous ligand for the teleostean mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Furthermore, the expressions of MR mRNA are modest in the osmoregulatory organs, but considerably higher in the brain of most teleosts. These recent findings suggest that the mineralocorticoid system (DOC/MR) may carry out some behavioral functions in fish. To test this possibility, we examined the effects of cortisol and DOC administration in the amphibious behavior in mudskipper (Periophthalmus modestus) in vivo. It was found that mudskippers remained in the water for an increased period of time when they were immersed into 5 μM DOC or cortisol for 8h. Additionally, an exposure to 25 μM DOC for 4 to 8 h caused a decreased migratory frequency of mudskippers to the water, reflected a tendency to remain in the water. It was further observed that after 8 h of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection with 0.3 pmol DOC or cortisol the staying period in the water increased in fish. The migratory frequency was decreased after ICV DOC injection which indicated that fishes stayed in the water. Concurrent ICV injections of cortisol with RU486 [a specific glucocorticoid-receptor (GR) antagonist] inhibited only the partial effects of cortisol. Together with no changes in the plasma DOC concentrations under terrestrial conditions, these results indicate the involvement of brain MRs as cortisol receptors in the preference for an aquatic habitat of mudskippers. Although the role of GR signaling cannot be excluded in the aquatic preference, our data further suggest that the MR may play an important role in the brain dependent behaviors of teleost fish. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential role of insulin signaling on vascular smooth muscle cell migration, proliferation, and inflammation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cersosimo, Eugenio; Xu, Xiaojing; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-02-15

    To investigate the role of insulin signaling pathways in migration, proliferation, and inflammation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we examined the expression of active components of the phosphatidyl inositol 3 (PI-3) kinase (p-Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (p-Erk) in primary cultures of VSMCs from human coronary arteries. VSMCs were treated in a dose-response manner with insulin (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM) for 20 min, and Akt and Erk phosphorylation were measured by Western blot analysis. In separate experiments, we evaluated the effect of 200 μM palmitate, in the presence and absence of 8 μM pioglitazone, on insulin-stimulated (100 nM for 20 min) Akt and Erk phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of Akt and Erk in VSMCs exhibited a dose dependency with a three- to fourfold increase, respectively, at the highest dose (100 nM). In the presence of palmitate, insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was completely abolished, and there was a threefold increase in p-Erk. With addition of pioglitazone, the phosphorylation of Akt by insulin remained unchanged, whereas insulin-stimulated Erk phosphorylation was reduced by pioglitazone. These data in VSMCs indicate that high palmitate decreases insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and stimulates MAPK, whereas preexposure peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist pioglitazone preserves Akt phosphorylation and simultaneously attenuates MAPK signaling. Our results suggest that metabolic and mitogenic insulin signals have different sensitivity, are independently regulated, and may play a role in arterial smooth muscle cells migration, proliferation, and inflammation in conditions of acute hyperinsulinemia.

  8. Potential role of immunotherapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Mello RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ramon Andrade de Mello,1–3 Ana Flávia Veloso,4 Paulo Esrom Catarina,4 Sara Nadine,5 Georgios Antoniou6 1Department of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine, University of Algarve, Faro, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 3Research Center, Cearense School of Oncology, Instituto do Câncer do Ceará, 4Oncology & Hematology League, School of Medicine, State University of Ceará (UECE, Fortaleza, Brazil; 5Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar (ICBAS, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 6Department of Medical Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Abstract: Immuno checkpoint inhibitors have ushered in a new era with respect to the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Many patients are not suitable for treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (eg, gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib or with anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors (eg, crizotinib and ceritinib. As a result, anti-PD-1/PD-L1 and CTLA-4 inhibitors may play a novel role in the improvement of outcomes in a metastatic setting. The regulation of immune surveillance, immunoediting, and immunoescape mechanisms may play an interesting role in this regard either alone or in combination with current drugs. Here, we discuss advances in immunotherapy for the treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer as well as future perspectives within this framework. Keywords: immunotherapy, non-small-cell lung cancer, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, ipilimumab, clinical trials, PD1, PDL1, CTLA4

  9. Efflux pumps of Mycobacterium tuberculosis play a significant role in antituberculosis activity of potential drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balganesh, Meenakshi; Dinesh, Neela; Sharma, Sreevalli; Kuruppath, Sanjana; Nair, Anju V; Sharma, Umender

    2012-05-01

    Active efflux of drugs mediated by efflux pumps that confer drug resistance is one of the mechanisms developed by bacteria to counter the adverse effects of antibiotics and chemicals. To understand these efflux mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we generated knockout (KO) mutants of four efflux pumps of the pathogen belonging to different classes. We measured the MICs and kill values of two different compound classes on the wild type (WT) and the efflux pump (EP) KO mutants in the presence and absence of the efflux inhibitors verapamil and l-phenylalanyl-l-arginyl-β-naphthylamide (PAβN). Among the pumps studied, the efflux pumps belonging to the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) class, encoded by Rv1218c, and the SMR (small multidrug resistance) class, encoded by Rv3065, appear to play important roles in mediating the efflux of different chemical classes and antibiotics. Efflux pumps encoded by Rv0849 and Rv1258c also mediate the efflux of these compounds, but to a lesser extent. Increased killing is observed in WT M. tuberculosis cells by these compounds in the presence of either verapamil or PAβN. The efflux pump KO mutants were more susceptible to these compounds in the presence of efflux inhibitors. We have shown that these four efflux pumps of M. tuberculosis play a vital role in mediating efflux of different chemical scaffolds. Inhibitors of one or several of these efflux pumps could have a significant impact in the treatment of tuberculosis. The identification and characterization of Rv0849, a new efflux pump belonging to the MFS (major facilitator superfamily) class, are reported.

  10. Arterial elastic fiber structure. Function and potential roles in acute aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, B; Curci, J

    2010-10-01

    The lethality of acute aortic dissection is well recognized. Successful treatment and prevention of aortic dissection is going to be dependent upon an improved understanding of the molecular and physiologic events which predispose to dissection development and propagation. In this review, we will focus on the elastic fiber, one of the critical elements of the aortic wall matrix. Mechanical or functional failure of the elastin in the wall of the aorta likely predisposes to dissection as well as the post-dissection aortic degeneration with aneurysm formation. Insight into the role of the elastin and the elastic fiber in aortic dissection has recently been accelerated by research into the molecular mechanisms associated with hereditary propensity for aortic dissection, such as Marfan syndrome. These studies have implicated both structural and metabolic contributions of alterations in the scaffolding proteins in matrix elastic fibers. In particular, increased transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activity may play a prominent role in predisposing the aortic wall to dissection. The events which predispose to post-dissection aortic degeneration are somewhat less well defined. However, the loss of the structural integrity of the remaining elastic fibers leaves the wall weaker and prone to dilatation and rupture. It appears likely that the upregulation of several potent proteases, particularly those of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family such as MMP-9, are participating in the subsequent matrix damage. Novel medical treatments based on this pathologic data have been proposed and in some cases have made it to clinical trials. The ongoing study evaluating whether therapeutic inhibition of TGF-β may be useful in reducing the risk of aortic dissection in patients at high risk represents one promising new strategy in the treatment of this deadly disease.

  11. The potential role of myocardial serotonin receptor 2B expression in canine dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonfara, Sonja; Hetzel, Udo; Oyama, Mark A; Kipar, Anja

    2014-03-01

    Serotonin signalling in the heart is mediated by receptor subtype 2B (5-HTR2B). A contribution of serotonin to valvular disease has been reported, but myocardial expression of 5-HTR2B and its role in canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is not known. The aim of the present study was to investigate myocardial 5-HTR2B mRNA expression in dogs with DCM and to correlate results with expression of markers for inflammation and remodelling. Myocardial samples from eight healthy dogs, four dogs with DCM, five with cardiac diseases other than DCM and six with systemic non-cardiac diseases were investigated for 5-HTR2B mRNA expression using quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results were compared to mRNA expression of selected cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP). Laser microdissection with subsequent qPCR and immunohistochemistry were employed to identify the cells expressing 5-HTR2B. The myocardium of control dogs showed constitutive 5-HTR2B mRNA expression. In dogs with DCM, 5-HTR2B mRNA values were significantly greater than in all other groups, with highest levels of expression in the left ventricle and right atrium. Myocytes were identified as the source of 5-HTR2B mRNA and protein. A significant positive correlation of 5-HTR2B mRNA with expression of several cytokines, MMPs and TIMPs was observed. The findings suggest that serotonin might play a role in normal cardiac structure and function and could contribute to myocardial remodelling and functional impairment in dogs with DCM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The potential role of waste biomass in the future urban electricity system

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yu; Werf, van der, Edwin; Ierland, van, Ekko C.; Keesman, Karel J.

    2017-01-01

    The share of intermittent renewable electricity (IRE) in the future urban electricity system is expected to increase significantly. Sufficient back-up capacity is needed in the period when IRE output is low. Bioenergy is both dispatchable and carbon-neutral, and can hence be a promising option to back up IRE. The objective of this study is to explore the potential of urban waste biomass in backing up IRE in an urban electricity system. An urban electricity system model is developed to project...

  13. Role of potential fluctuations in phase-change GST memory devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Satish C. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2012-10-15

    The long range potential fluctuations (LRPFs) arising from the defects and heterogeneities in disordered semiconductors are important for understanding their atomic and electronic properties. Here, they are measured in Ge{sub X}Sb{sub Y}Te{sub 1-X-Y} (GST) chalcogenide glasses used in rewritable phase change memory (PCM) devices. It is found that the most commonly used composition Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} has the smallest LRPF amongst its nearby compositions. This finding may be useful in the search for better PCM materials. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Potential role of coenzyme Q10 in facilitating recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L W; Jabbour, A; Hayward, C S; Furlong, T J; Girgis, L; Macdonald, P S; Keogh, A M

    2015-04-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but serious complication of statin therapy, and represents the most severe end of the spectrum of statin-induced myotoxicity. We report a case where coenzyme Q10 facilitated recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, which had initially persisted despite statin cessation and haemodialysis. This observation is biologically plausible due to the recognised importance of coenzyme Q10 in mitochondrial bioenergetics within myocytes, and the fact that statins inhibit farnesyl pyrophosphate production, a biochemical step crucial for coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Coenzyme Q10 is generally well tolerated, and may potentially benefit patients with statin-induced rhabdomyolysis. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  15. HIPPOCAMPAL ADULT NEUROGENESIS: ITS REGULATION AND POTENTIAL ROLE IN SPATIAL LEARNING AND MEMORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Pan, Yongliang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhibin; Wang, Zuoxin

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis, defined here as progenitor cell division generating functionally integrated neurons in the adult brain, occurs within the hippocampus of numerous mammalian species including humans. The present review details various endogenous (e.g., neurotransmitters) and environmental (e.g., physical exercise) factors that have been shown to influence hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In addition, the potential involvement of adult-generated neurons in naturally-occurring spatial learning behavior is discussed by summarizing the literature focusing on traditional animal models (e.g., rats and mice), non-traditional animal models (e.g., tree shrews), as well as natural populations (e.g., chickadees and Siberian chipmunk). PMID:27174001

  16. Role of platelet-activating factor in long-term potentiation of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Francescangeli, E; Goracci, G; Pettorossi, V E

    1998-06-01

    In rat brain stem slices, we investigated the role of platelet activating factor (PAF) in long-term potentiation (LTP) induced in the ventral part of the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferent. The synaptosomal PAF receptor antagonist, BN-52021 was administered before and after HFS. BN-52021 did not modify the vestibular potentials under basal conditions, but it reduced the magnitude of potentiation induced by HFS, which completely developed after the drug wash-out. The same effect was obtained by using CV-62091, a more potent PAF antagonist at microsomal binding sites, but with concentrations higher than those of BN-52021. By contrast both BN-52021 and CV-6209 had no effect on the potentiation once induced. This demonstrates that PAF is involved in the induction but not in the maintenance of vestibular long-term effect through activation of synaptosomal PAF receptors. In addition, we analyzed the effect of the PAF analogue, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O- (methylcarbamyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (MC-PAF) and the inactive PAF metabolite, 1-O-hexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (Lyso-PAF) on vestibular responses. Our results show that MC-PAF, but not Lyso-PAF induced potentiation. This potentiation was prevented by D,L-2-amino 5-phosphonopentanoic acid, suggesting an involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Furthermore, under BN-52021 and CV-6209, the MC-PAF potentiation was reduced or abolished. The dose-effect curve of MC-PAF showed a shift to the right greater under BN-52021 than under CV-6209, confirming the main dependence of MC-PAF potentiation on the activation of synaptosomal PAF receptors. Our results suggest that PAF can be released in the MVN after the activation of postsynaptic mechanisms triggering LTP, and it may act as a retrograde messenger which activates the presynaptic mechanisms facilitating synaptic plasticity.

  17. Potential role of power authorities in offshore wind power development in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanju, Amardeep; Firestone, Jeremy; Kempton, Willett

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how power authorities could facilitate and manage offshore wind power development in US coastal waters. The power authority structure is an American 20th century institution for managing energy resources-a form of a public authority or public corporation dedicated to creating, operating and maintaining electric generation and transmission infrastructure. Offshore wind power is characterized by high capital costs but no fuel costs and thus low operating costs. Therefore a power authority, by virtue of its access to low-cost capital and managerial flexibility, could facilitate offshore wind power development by reducing financial risk of developing and lowering debt payments, thus improving the risk profile and lowering the cost of electricity production. Additionally, power authorities can be made up of multiple states, thus opening the possibility for joint action by neighboring coastal states. Using primary and secondary data, we undertake an in-depth analysis of the potential benefits and shortcomings of a power authority approach. - Highlights: → Proposes an institutional solution in the form of power authority for offshore wind power. → Power authority structure can significantly lower the cost of capital. → Tax-free bond financing available to power authority can significantly reduce the cost of energy. → It can enhance regional collaboration among coastal states to harness the offshore wind potential.

  18. The potential role of nano- and micro-technology in the management of critical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2014-11-20

    In recent years nanomedicine has become an attractive concept for the targeted delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic compounds to injured or inflamed organs. Nanoscale drug delivery systems have the ability to improve the pharmacokinetics and increase the biodistribution of therapeutic agents to target organs, thereby resulting in improved efficacy and reduced drug toxicity. These systems are exploited for therapeutic purposes to carry the drug in the body in a controlled manner from the site of administration to the therapeutic target. The mortality in many of the critical illnesses such as sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome continues to remain high despite of an increased understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of these diseases. Several promising targets that have been identified as potential therapies for these devastating diseases have been limited because of difficulty with delivery systems. In particular, delivery of peptides, proteins, and miRNAs to the lung is an ongoing challenge. Hence, it is an attractive strategy to test potential targets by employing nanotechnology. Here some of the novel nanomedicine approaches that have been proposed and studied in recent years to facilitate the delivery of therapeutic agents in the setting of critical illnesses such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis and ventilator associated pneumonia are reviewed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Thyroid hormone’s role in regulating brain glucose metabolism and potentially modulating hippocampal cognitive processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahagirdar, V; McNay, EC

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive performance is dependent on adequate glucose supply to the brain. Insulin, which regulates systemic glucose metabolism, has been recently shown both to regulate hippocampal metabolism and to be a mandatory component of hippocampally-mediated cognitive performance. Thyroid hormones (TH) regulate systemic glucose metabolism and may also be involved in regulation of brain glucose metabolism. Here we review potential mechanisms for such regulation. Importantly, TH imbalance is often encountered in combination with metabolic disorders, such as diabetes, and may cause additional metabolic dysregulation and hence worsening of disease states. TH’s potential as a regulator of brain glucose metabolism is heightened by interactions with insulin signaling, but there have been relatively few studies on this topic or on the actions of TH in a mature brain. This review discusses evidence for mechanistic links between TH, insulin, cognitive function, and brain glucose metabolism, and suggests that TH is a good candidate to be a modulator of memory processes, likely at least in part by modulation of central insulin signaling and glucose metabolism. PMID:22437199

  20. The Role of the Endothelium in HPS Pathogenesis and Potential Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Gavrilovskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available American hantaviruses cause a highly lethal acute pulmonary edema termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS. Hantaviruses nonlytically infect endothelial cells and cause dramatic changes in barrier functions of the endothelium without disrupting the endothelium. Instead hantaviruses cause changes in the function of infected endothelial cells that normally regulate fluid barrier functions of capillaries. The endothelium of arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels is unique and central to the function of vast pulmonary capillary beds, which regulate pulmonary fluid accumulation. The endothelium maintains vascular barrier functions through a complex series of redundant receptors and signaling pathways that serve to both permit fluid and immune cell efflux into tissues and restrict tissue edema. Infection of the endothelium provides several mechanisms for hantaviruses to alter capillary permeability but also defines potential therapeutic targets for regulating acute pulmonary edema and HPS disease. Here we discuss interactions of HPS causing hantaviruses with the endothelium, potential endothelial cell-directed permeability mechanisms, and therapeutic targeting of the endothelium as a means of reducing the severity of HPS disease.

  1. Otolithic disease: clinical features and the role of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curthoys, Ian S; Manzari, Leonardo

    2013-07-01

    Through selective tests of the function of the canal and otolith sense organs, it is possible to assert that patient conditions are purely otolithic and that the canals are not involved. The video head impulse test selectively tests each semicircular canal; the ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential to 500 Hz Fz (Fz is the location on the forehead in the midline at the hairline) bone-conducted vibration (BCV) selectively tests the utricular macula and the cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential to 500 Hz Fz BCV selectively tests the saccular macula. The development of new specific tests of otolith function has shown that some patients may have specific deficits of just otolithic function. In the authors' experience, patients who complain strongly of postural unsteadiness should be suspected to have otolithic deficits. They may also have vertigo and in some cases have spontaneous nystagmus of peripheral origin, even though their semicircular canal function is normal. The prognosis for such patients is good. They usually appear to regain their postural stability spontaneously over weeks (or longer), even though they still have an otolithic deficit as shown by objective tests when they are free of symptoms. It is not known what procedures may accelerate the recovery of otolith function. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Role of the pair potential for the saturation of generalized Pauli constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeza, Örs; Schilling, Christian

    2018-05-01

    The dependence of the (quasi-)saturation of the generalized Pauli constraints on the pair potential is studied for ground states of few-fermion systems. For this, we consider spinless fermions in one dimension which are harmonically confined and interact by pair potentials of the form | xi-xj|s with -1 ≤s ≤5 . We use the density matrix renormalization group approach and large orbital basis to achieve the convergence on more than ten digits of both the variational energy and the natural occupation numbers. Our results confirm that the conflict between energy minimization and fermionic exchange symmetry results in a universal and nontrivial quasisaturation of the generalized Pauli constraints (quasipinning), implying tremendous structural simplifications of the fermionic ground state for all s . Those numerically exact results are complemented by an analytical study based on a self-consistent perturbation theory which we develop for this purpose. The respective results for the weak-coupling regime eventually elucidate the singular behavior found for the specific values s =2 ,4 ,..., resulting in an extremely strong quasipinning.

  3. Promoting adaptive flood risk management: the role and potential of flood recovery mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priest Sally J

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a high potential for recovery mechanisms to be used to incentivise the uptake of flood mitigation and loss reduction measures, undertake adaptation and promote community resilience. Indeed, creating a resilient response to flooding requires flood risk management approaches to be aligned and it needs to be ensured that recovery mechanisms to not provide disincentives for individuals and business to take proactive action to reduce risk. However, the degree to which it is desirable and effective for insurers and governments providing compensation to promote resilience and risk reduction depends upon how the cover or compensation is organised and the premiums which are charged. A review of international flood recovery mechanisms has been undertaken to identify firstly the types of schemes that exist and their characteristics. Analysis of existing instruments highlights that there are various potential approaches to encourage or require the uptake of flood mitigation and also discourage the construction of new development in high flood risk. However despite the presence of these instruments, those organising recovery mechanisms could be doing much more to incentivise increased resilience.

  4. Potential role of centrioles in determining the morphogenetic status of animal somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkemaladze, J; Chichinadze, K

    2005-05-01

    Irreversible differentiation (change of morphogenetic status) and programmed death (apoptosis) are observed only in somatic cells. Cell division is the only way by which the morphogenetic status of the offspring cells may be modified. It is known that there is a fixed limit to the number of possible cell divisions, the so-called 'Hayflick limit'. Existing links between cell division, differentiation and apoptosis make it possible to conclude that all these processes could be controlled by a single self-reproducing structure. Potential candidates for this replicable structure in a somatic cell are chromosomes, mitochondria (both contain DNA), and centrioles. Centrioles (diplosome) are the most likely unit that can fully regulate the processes of irreversible differentiation, determination and modification of the morphogenetic status. It may contain differently encoded RNA molecules stacked in a definite order. During mitosis, these RNA molecules are released one by one into the cytoplasm. In the presence of reverse transcriptase and endonuclease, RNA can be embedded in nuclear DNA. This process presumably changes the status of repressed and potentially active genes and, subsequently, the morphogenetic status of a cell.

  5. Brownian motion surviving in the unstable cubic potential and the role of Maxwell's demon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornigotti, Luca; Ryabov, Artem; Holubec, Viktor; Filip, Radim

    2018-03-01

    The trajectories of an overdamped particle in a highly unstable potential diverge so rapidly, that the variance of position grows much faster than its mean. A description of the dynamics by moments is therefore not informative. Instead, we propose and analyze local directly measurable characteristics, which overcome this limitation. We discuss the most probable particle position (position of the maximum of the probability density) and the local uncertainty in an unstable cubic potential, V (x ) ˜x3 , both in the transient regime and in the long-time limit. The maximum shifts against the acting force as a function of time and temperature. Simultaneously, the local uncertainty does not increase faster than the observable shift. In the long-time limit, the probability density naturally attains a quasistationary form. We interpret this process as a stabilization via the measurement-feedback mechanism, the Maxwell demon, which works as an entropy pump. The rules for measurement and feedback naturally arise from the basic properties of the unstable dynamics. All reported effects are inherent in any unstable system. Their detailed understanding will stimulate the development of stochastic engines and amplifiers and, later, their quantum counterparts.

  6. Role of groundwater oxidation potential and radiolysis on waste glass performance in crystalline repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that groundwater conditions in a granite repository will be as reducing as those in a basalt repository. Chemical analysis of the reduced groundwaters confirmed that the Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ couple controls the oxidation potential (Eh). The reducing groundwater conditions were found to decrease the time-dependent release of soluble elements (Li and B) from the waste glass. However, due to the lower solubility of multivalent elements released from the glass when the groundwaters are reducing, these elements have significantly lower concentrations in the leachates. Gamma radiolysis reduced the oxidation potential of both granitic and basaltic groundwater in the absence of both waste glass and oxygen. This occurred in tests at atmospheric pressure where H 2 could have escaped from the solution. The mechanism for this decrease in Eh is under investigation but appears related to the reactive amorphous precipitate in both groundwaters. The results of these tests suggest that radiolysis may not cause the groundwaters to become oxidizing in a crystalline repository when abundant Fe 2+ species are present

  7. Understanding the properties of chitosan aryl substituted thioureas in their role and potential as antibacterial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairul, Wan M.; Daud, Adibah Izzati; Ismail, Noraznawati

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effort was to design and synthesize a series of thiourea-chitosan derivatives featuring five aryl substituted members namely N-chitosan-N'-(4-nitrobenzoyl) thiourea (1), N-chitosan-N'-(4-chlorobenzoyl) thiourea (2), N-chitosan-N'-(4-methylbenzoyl) thiourea (3), N-chitosan-N'-(2-iodobenzoyl) thiourea (4), and N-chitosan-N'-(2-methylbenzoyl) thiourea (5) via SN2 reaction pathway having different donating and withdrawing groups. Their molecular structures were then characterised by FT-IR, UV-Vis, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The antimicrobial activities of these derivatives against four species bacteria Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, and Escherichia coli of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative type bacteria at minimum concentration 6mg/ml were carried out to investigate their potential as antibacterial agents. Compound 1 exhibited specific activity as it can only inhibit Gram-positive bacteria while other compounds 2-5 showed broad range spectrum activity as they were able to inhibit both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, 1-5 showed good antibacterial activity and have high potential to be further developed as active materials in pharmaceutical interests.

  8. A short overview of the microbial population in clouds: Potential roles in atmospheric chemistry and nucleation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delort, Anne-Marie; Vaïtilingom, Mickael; Amato, Pierre; Sancelme, Martine; Parazols, Marius; Mailhot, Gilles; Laj, Paolo; Deguillaume, Laurent

    2010-11-01

    Recent studies showed that living microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi and yeasts, are present in the atmospheric water phase (fog and clouds) and their role in chemical processes may have been underestimated. At the interface between atmospheric science and microbiology, information about this field of science suffers from the fact that not all recent findings are efficiently conveyed to both scientific communities. The purpose of this paper is therefore to provide a short overview of recent work linked to living organisms in the atmospheric water phase, from their activation to cloud droplets and ice crystal, to their potential impact on atmospheric chemical processes. This paper is focused on the microorganisms present in clouds and on the role they could play in atmospheric chemistry and nucleation processes. First, the life cycle of microorganisms via the atmosphere is examined, including their aerosolization from sources, their integration into clouds and their wet deposition on the ground. Second, special attention is paid to the possible impacts of microorganisms on liquid and ice nucleation processes. Third, a short description of the microorganisms that have been found in clouds and their variability in numbers and diversity is presented, emphasizing some specific characteristics that could favour their occurrence in cloud droplets. In the last section, the potential role of microbial activity as an alternative route to photochemical reaction pathways in cloud chemistry is discussed.

  9. Sleep, Plasticity and the Pathophysiology of Neurodevelopmental Disorders: The Potential Roles of Protein Synthesis and Other Cellular Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dante Picchioni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is important for neural plasticity, and plasticity underlies sleep-dependent memory consolidation. It is widely appreciated that protein synthesis plays an essential role in neural plasticity. Studies of sleep-dependent memory and sleep-dependent plasticity have begun to examine alterations in these functions in populations with neurological and psychiatric disorders. Such an approach acknowledges that disordered sleep may have functional consequences during wakefulness. Although neurodevelopmental disorders are not considered to be sleep disorders per se, recent data has revealed that sleep abnormalities are among the most prevalent and common symptoms and may contribute to the progression of these disorders. The main goal of this review is to highlight the role of disordered sleep in the pathology of neurodevelopmental disorders and to examine some potential mechanisms by which sleep-dependent plasticity may be altered. We will also briefly attempt to extend the same logic to the other end of the developmental spectrum and describe a potential role of disordered sleep in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. We conclude by discussing ongoing studies that might provide a more integrative approach to the study of sleep, plasticity, and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  10. Interfacial liquid water on Mars and its potential role in formation of hill and dune gullies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossacki, Konrad J.; Markiewicz, Wojciech J.

    2010-11-01

    Gullies are among the most intriguing structures identified on the surface of Mars. Most common are gullies located on the slopes of craters which are probably formed by liquid water transported by shallow aquifers (Heldmann, J.L., Carlsson, E., Johansson, H., Mellon, M.T., Toon, O.B. [2007]. Icarus 188, 324-344). Two particular types of gullies are found on slopes of isolated hills and dunes. The hill-slope gullies are located mostly at 50°S, which is at the high end of latitudes of bulk of the gullies found so far. The dune gullies are found in several locations up to 65°S (Reiss, D., Jaumann, R., Kereszturi, A., Sik, A., Neukum, G. [2007]. Lunar Planet. Sci. XXXVIII. Abstract 1993), but the best known are those in Russel crater at 54°S. The hill and dune gullies are longer than others making the aquifers explanation for their formation unlikely (Balme, M., Mangold, N., Baratoux, D., Costard, F., Gosselin, M., Masson, P., Pnet, P., Neukum, G. [2006]. J. Geophys. Res. 111. doi:10.1029/2005JE002607). Recently it has been noted that thin liquid films of interfacial water can play a role in rheological processes on the surface of Mars (Moehlmann, D. [2008]. Icarus 195, 131-139. Kereszturi, A., Moehlmann, D., Berczi, Sz., Ganti, T., Kuti, A., Sik, A., Horvath, A. [2009]. Icarus 201, 492-503.). Here we try to answer the question whether interfacial liquid water may occur on Mars in quantities large enough to play a role in formation of gullies. To verify this hypothesis we have calculated thermal models for hills and dunes of various steepness, orientation and physical properties. We find that within a range of average expected values of parameters it is not possible to have more than a few monolayers of liquid water at depths greater than a centimeter. To create subsurface interfacial water film significantly thicker and hence to produce conditions for the slope instability, parameters have to be chosen to have their extreme realistic values or an additional source

  11. The potential role of nuclear energy in greenhouse gas abatement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.; Cornish, E.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear energy plays an essential role in avoiding greenhouse gas emissions. The contribution of nuclear power to electricity supplies has grown rapidly since the 1970's. As of July 2000, 432 power reactors were in operation in 31 countries. Nuclear power provided some 2300 TWh. This is about 17% of the world's total electricity, or 7% of total primary energy. This contribution avoids the emissions of about 2300 million tonnes of carbon dioxide annually, assuming that it would otherwise be provided mainly by coal-fired plants. This represents nearly one-third of the carbon dioxide presently emitted by power generation. Since electricity generation accounts for about 30% of all anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, total emissions would be about 10% higher if it were not for nuclear power. In contrast, the objective of the Kyoto Protocol is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in industrialized nations by 5% by 2008-12 compared to a 1990 baseline. In order for atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations to be stabilized at a sustainable level, it will be necessary to reduce emissions by around 60% from the 1990 level. Advocates of a policy of 'convergence and contraction', where developed and developing countries are to be allowed similar levels of emissions on a per capita basis, state that developed countries may have to reduce emissions by as much as 80%. Nuclear energy will make a significant contribution to meeting the world's future electricity demand while helping reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, the scale of that contribution will be strongly influenced by the way in which this contribution is recognized in national and international policies designed to tackle climate change. The debate continues to rage over the science of climate change: is climate change the result of human intervention or is it a naturally occurring phenomenon? The majority of scientists involved in this debate would agree that enhanced global warming, as witnessed in recent

  12. Potential role of vitamin D in prevention of skeletal and extraskeletal diseases in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Montagnani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D and calcium are essential for bone health. An adequate calcium-phosphorus product determines a high quality mineralization long lifetime. In older people, both calcium and vitamin D levels may be lower causing osteomalacia and/or osteoporosis with a higher risk of fracture. Epidemiological data have clearly associated serum vitamin D lower levels (deficiency with bone fracture in older people, however, not univocal data exist in regard to a beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation in general population. Although not systematic, the present review aims to make a narrative synthesis of the most recent published data on vitamin D effect not only on bone, classical target associated with vitamin D studies, but namely on extraskeletal diseases. In fact, recently, there has been an increasing interest on this latter issue with surprising findings. Vitamin D, and in particular its deficiency, seems to have a role in pathophysiological pathways in several diseases involving cardiovascular, central nervous system and neoplastic process. On the other hand, vitamin D supplementation may modify the outcome of a wide range of illnesses. Up to date the data are conflicting mainly because of difficulty to establish a consensus on the threshold of vitamin D deficit. The US Institute of Medicine recommends to distinguish a level of insufficiency [defined as 30-50 nmol/L or 16-25 ng/mL of 25(OHD] and another of deficiency identified by 25(OHD levels lower than 30 nmol/L (or <16 ng/mL. This latter level is considered a minimum level necessary in older adults to minimize the risk of falls, fracture and probably to have some effects of vitamin D supplementation in extraskeletal diseases. Although there are no absolute certainties in such issue, the most recent data suggest that vitamin D deficiency, and its supplementation, may play an important role in a wide range of diseases other than in bone metabolic diseases in older but not in general

  13. Harsh parenting and academic achievement in Chinese adolescents: Potential mediating roles of effortful control and classroom engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingzhong; Deng, Xueli; Du, Xiuxiu

    2018-04-01

    This study examined (a) the potential mediating roles of effortful control and classroom engagement in the association between harsh parenting and adolescent academic achievement, and (b) the potential moderating role of gender. Sixth through eighth graders in rural China (n=815, mean age=12.55years) reported on harsh parenting, effortful control, and classroom engagement. Parents also reported on each other's harsh parenting. Academic achievement was assessed by students' test scores and teacher-rated academic performance. Results of structural equation modeling revealed gender differences in patterns of association among the model variables. Harsh parenting was negatively and directly associated with academic achievement for both boys and girls. It was also negatively and indirectly associated with academic achievement via effortful control and classroom engagement sequentially, forming a common indirect "path" for boys and girls. The indirect negative effect of harsh parenting on boys' academic achievement was mainly realized through the mediator of effortful control, whereas this same indirect effect for girls was mainly realized through the mediator of classroom engagement. Jointly, effortful control and classroom engagement precipitates more indirect effects for boys than for girls in the association between harsh parenting and academic achievement. The discussion analyzes the potential "paths" from harsh parenting to adolescent academic achievement, as well as gender differences in these "paths." The current study has implications for teachers and parents eager to improve students' classroom engagement and academic achievement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. The Potential Role of Non-Traditional Donors' Aid in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Peter

    . Moreover, it is important to bear in mind that for most African countries, Chinese, Indian, Brazilian and South African development assistance is not an alternative to traditional aid but rather complements it. It is therefore of utmost importance that traditional donors continue their efforts to build...... capacity in African countries in order to increase the positive developmental effects of the additional flows of development assistance. Moreover, there are some opportunities for collaboration among the two groups of donors provided that ownership of the interventions is on African hands. This could......The fast growth of big economies like China and India has resulted in a new-found interest in the economic and political consequences for the developed economies. However, the global rise of emerging economies also affects the potentials of South-South collaboration. Emerging economies...

  15. Potential Therapeutic Roles of Tanshinone IIA in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chun Chiu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinone IIA (Tan-IIA, one of the major lipophilic components isolated from the root of Salviae Miltiorrhizae, has been found to exhibit anticancer activity in various cancer cells. We have demonstrated that Tan-IIA induces apoptosis in several human cancer cells through caspase- and mitochondria-dependent pathways. Here we explored the anticancer effect of Tan-IIA in human bladder cancer cell lines. Our results showed that Tan-IIA caused bladder cancer cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Tan-IIA induced apoptosis through the mitochondria-dependent pathway in these bladder cancer cells. Tan-IIA also suppressed the migration of bladder cancer cells as revealed by the wound healing and transwell assays. Finally, combination therapy of Tan-IIA with a lower dose of cisplatin successfully killed bladder cancer cells, suggesting that Tan-IIA can serve as a potential anti-cancer agent in bladder cancer.

  16. The potential role for probiotic yogurt for people living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    In demonstrating that it is feasible to create a community-run kitchen that produces probiotic yogurt, and that this can contribute to the health of people with HIV/AIDS, we embellished the 2001 Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Health Organization (WHO) report on probiotics that recommended efforts be made to take probiotics to developing countries. We proved that driven by humanitarian goals not profit, probiotic yogurt can be produced in the world's poor regions. This food can be safely consumed by HIV/AIDS subjects, and in many of them benefits can be accrued in gut health, nutritional and potentially immune status. Such outcomes have a scientific rationale, many social implications, and perhaps most importantly raise the question, why have developed countries not tried harder to bring nutrition-based probiotics to people in need? PMID:21468226

  17. Lysergic acid diethylamide and psilocybin for the management of patients with persistent pain: a potential role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Andy; Johnson, Mark I

    2018-05-01

    Recently, there has been interest in lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and psilocybin for depression, anxiety and fear of death in terminal illness. The aim of this review is to discuss the potential use of LSD and psilocybin for patients with persistent pain. LSD and psilocybin are 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor agonists and may interact with nociceptive and antinociceptive processing. Tentative evidence from a systematic review suggests that LSD (7 studies, 323 participants) and psilocybin (3 studies, 92 participants) may be beneficial for depression and anxiety associated with distress in life-threatening diseases. LSD and psilocybin are generally safe if administered by a healthcare professional, although further investigations are needed to assess their utility for patients with persistent pain, especially associated with terminal illness.

  18. Action Potential Modulation of Neural Spin Networks Suggests Possible Role of Spin

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, H P

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we show that nuclear spin networks in neural membranes are modulated by action potentials through J-coupling, dipolar coupling and chemical shielding tensors and perturbed by microscopically strong and fluctuating internal magnetic fields produced largely by paramagnetic oxygen. We suggest that these spin networks could be involved in brain functions since said modulation inputs information carried by the neural spike trains into them, said perturbation activates various dynamics within them and the combination of the two likely produce stochastic resonance thus synchronizing said dynamics to the neural firings. Although quantum coherence is desirable and may indeed exist, it is not required for these spin networks to serve as the subatomic components for the conventional neural networks.

  19. Punica granatum: A review on its potential role in treating periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Divyashree; Kunnaiah, Ravi

    2014-07-01

    A wide variety of plants possess enormous treasure of medicinal value. Majority of these medicinal plants have been used to treat various systemic conditions successfully. Over the recent years, use of these medicinal plants has resurfaced to treat oral conditions. Among the oral conditions, periodontal disease remains one of the most common. Alternative and preventive options has become the need of the hour in order to overcome the adverse effects of the antimicrobial agents used in large as an adjunct to mainstream periodontal treatment. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) is one of the oldest edible fruit which has a long history as a medicinal fruit. This review is an attempt to highlight the potential of Punica granatum as a preventive and therapeutic aid to periodontal disease.

  20. Regional Air Transport in Europe: The Potential Role of the Civil Tiltrotor in Reducing Airside Congestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correnti, Vincenzo; Ignaccolo, Matteo; Capri, Salvatore; Inturri, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    The volume of air traffic worldwide is still in constant growth despite unfair events that sometimes occur. The demand for regional air transport is also increasing, thanks in part to the use of new vehicles purposely designed for short range flights which make this means of transport more attractive than in the past. This paper studies the possibility of using aircraft capable of vertical or short takeoff or landing (V/STOL), in particular the tiltrotor, in the regional air transport market and the impact on airport capacity that the use of this craft would have. With this in mind the advantages and disadvantages of using this vehicle are identified, as well as the changes to be made to the air transport system in order to exploit its full potential.

  1. Cannabidiol: Pharmacology and potential therapeutic role in epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinsky, Orrin; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Cross, Helen; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier; French, Jacqueline; Hill, Charlotte; Katz, Russell; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Notcutt, William George; Martinez-Orgado, Jose; Robson, Philip J.; Rohrback, Brian G.; Thiele, Elizabeth; Whalley, Benjamin; Friedman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present a summary of current scientific evidence about the cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD) with regards to their relevance to epilepsy and other selected neuropsychiatric disorders. Methods We summarize the presentations from a conference in which invited participants reviewed relevant aspects of the physiology, mechanisms of action, pharmacology and data from studies with animal models and human subjects. Results Cannabis has been used to treat disease since ancient times. Δ9-THC is the major psychoactive ingredient and cannabidiol (CBD) is the major non-psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. Cannabis and Δ9-THC are anticonvulsant in most animal models but can be proconvulsant in some healthy animals. Psychotropic effects of Δ9-THC limit tolerability. CBD is anticonvulsant in many acute animal models but there is limited data in chronic models. The antiepileptic mechanisms of CBD are not known, but may include effects on the equilibrative nucleoside transporter; the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor GPR55; the transient receptor potential of melastatin type 8 channel; the 5-HT1a receptor; the α3 and α1 glycine receptors; and the transient receptor potential of ankyrin type 1 channel. CBD has neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. CBD appears to be well tolerated in humans but small and methodologically limited studies of CBD in human epilepsy have been inconclusive. More recent anecdotal reports of high-ratio CBD:Δ9-THC medical marijuana have claimed efficacy, but studies were not controlled. Significance CBD bears investigation in epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric disorders, including anxiety, schizophrenia, addiction and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. However, we lack data from well-powered double-blind randomized, controlled studies on the efficacy of pure CBD for any disorder. Initial dose-tolerability and double-blind randomized, controlled studies focusing on target intractable epilepsy populations such as patients with

  2. The potential role of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the restoration of degraded lands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisseha Asmelash Belay

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Experiences worldwide reveal that degraded lands restoration projects achieve little success or fail. Hence, understanding the underlining causes and accordingly, devising appropriate restoration mechanisms is crucial. In doing so, the ever-increasing aspiration and global commitments in degraded lands restoration could be realized. Here we explain that Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF biotechnology is a potential mechanism to significantly improve the restoration success of degraded lands. There are abundant scientific evidences to demonstrate that AMF significantly improve soil attributes, increase above and belowground biodiversity, significantly improve tree/shrub seedlings survival, growth and establishment on moisture and nutrient stressed soils. AMF have also been shown to drive plant succession and may prevent invasion by alien species. The very few conditions where infective AMF are low in abundance and diversity is when the soil erodes, is disturbed and is devoid of vegetation cover. These are all common features of degraded lands. Meanwhile, degraded lands harbor low levels of infective AMF abundance and diversity. Therefore, the successful restoration of infective AMF can potentially improve the restoration success of degraded lands. Better AMF inoculation effects result when inocula are composed of native fungi instead of exotics, early seral instead of late seral fungi, and are consortia instead of few or single species. Future research efforts should focus on AMF effect on plant community primary productivity and plant competition. Further investigation focusing on forest ecosystems and carried out at the field condition is highly recommended. Devising cheap and ethically widely accepted inocula production methods and better ways of AMF in-situ management for effective restoration of degraded lands will also remain to be important research areas. Keywords: AMF, ecological restoration, facilitation, inoculation, land degradation

  3. The Potential Role of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the Restoration of Degraded Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmelash, Fisseha; Bekele, Tamrat; Birhane, Emiru

    2016-01-01

    Experiences worldwide reveal that degraded lands restoration projects achieve little success or fail. Hence, understanding the underlying causes and accordingly, devising appropriate restoration mechanisms is crucial. In doing so, the ever-increasing aspiration and global commitments in degraded lands restoration could be realized. Here we explain that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) biotechnology is a potential mechanism to significantly improve the restoration success of degraded lands. There are abundant scientific evidences to demonstrate that AMF significantly improve soil attributes, increase above and belowground biodiversity, significantly improve tree/shrub seedlings survival, growth and establishment on moisture and nutrient stressed soils. AMF have also been shown to drive plant succession and may prevent invasion by alien species. The very few conditions where infective AMF are low in abundance and diversity is when the soil erodes, is disturbed and is devoid of vegetation cover. These are all common features of degraded lands. Meanwhile, degraded lands harbor low levels of infective AMF abundance and diversity. Therefore, the successful restoration of infective AMF can potentially improve the restoration success of degraded lands. Better AMF inoculation effects result when inocula are composed of native fungi instead of exotics, early seral instead of late seral fungi, and are consortia instead of few or single species. Future research efforts should focus on AMF effect on plant community primary productivity and plant competition. Further investigation focusing on forest ecosystems, and carried out at the field condition is highly recommended. Devising cheap and ethically widely accepted inocula production methods and better ways of AMF in situ management for effective restoration of degraded lands will also remain to be important research areas. PMID:27507960

  4. Nuclear power in Europe today and its potential competitive role for tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmut, B.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power is nowadays one of the cornerstones of the occidental Europe electricity supply system. The electricity European market liberalization as well as the uncertainties resulting from acceptabilities problems (which are due to political risks) represent nevertheless a great challenge for the future use of nuclear power. Concerning the energy consumption, the financial advantage of new nuclear power plants compared with fossil-fired power plants seems to be still possible in the future, but all investment decision should however consider in addition to these less high costs the political financial costs which are difficult to appreciate in a lot of European countries. On account of the current conditions, it would be practically senseless to build new nuclear power plants in these countries. The investment safety required for the construction of new plants is only given unfortunately in a few countries, in France for instance. Without any political conditions modification, new nuclear power plants setting up in most of the occidental European countries will be in a near future probably exceptional and with risks division. However, we must not forget that the nuclear power disposes of the potential which allows to reach objectives of a capital importance on the social plan as for instance the CO 2 decrease, the resources economy, the electric power price stability and the employment protection. In the future, the electric power plants will not be in measure to reach the objectives which have been theirs until now as those will induce disadvantages for competitiveness. After the liberalization, it is then the duty of the political responsible persons to establish a sufficient legal protection for the future use of nuclear power and to create thus the ecological and economical potential bound to these ones. (O.M.)

  5. Potential role of an antimicrobial peptide, KLK in inhibiting lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornpimon Jantaruk

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are attractive alternatives to antibiotics. Due to their immune modulatory properties, AMPs are at present emerging as promising agents for controlling inflammatory-mediated diseases. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of an antimicrobial peptide, KLK (KLKLLLLLKLK and its analogs was evaluated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. The results herein demonstrated that KLK peptide as well as its analogs significantly inhibited the pro-inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO, interleukin-1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages in dose-dependent manners, and such inhibitory effects were not due to direct cytotoxicity. When considering inhibition potency, KLK among the test peptides exhibited the most effective activity. The inhibitory activity of KLK peptide also extended to include suppression of LPS-induced production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. KLK significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 as well as mRNA expression of IL-1β and TNF-α. Moreover, KLK inhibited nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB p65 and blocked degradation and phosphorylation of inhibitor of κB (IκB. Taken together, these results suggested that the KLK peptide inhibited inflammatory response through the down-regulation of NF-κB mediated activation in macrophages. Since peptide analogs with different amino acid sequences and arrangement were investigated for their anti-inflammatory activities, the residues/structures required for activity were also discussed. Our findings therefore proved anti-inflammatory potential of the KLK peptide and provide direct evidence for therapeutic application of KLK as a novel anti-inflammatory agent.

  6. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase: Potential Roles in Promoting Gut Health in Weanling Piglets and Its Modulation by Feed Additives - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, A D B; Silveira, H; Luciano, F B; Andrade, C; Costa, L B; Rostagno, M H

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal environment plays a critical role in maintaining swine health. Many factors such as diet, microbiota, and host intestinal immune response influence the intestinal environment. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) is an important apical brush border enzyme that is influenced by these factors. IAP dephosphorylates bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), unmethylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides, and flagellin, reducing bacterial toxicity and consequently regulating toll-like receptors (TLRs) activation and inflammation. It also desphosphorylates extracellular nucleotides such as uridine diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate, consequently reducing inflammation, modulating, and preserving the homeostasis of the intestinal microbiota. The apical localization of IAP on the epithelial surface reveals its role on LPS (from luminal bacteria) detoxification. As the expression of IAP is reported to be downregulated in piglets at weaning, LPS from commensal and pathogenic gram-negative bacteria could increase inflammatory processes by TLR-4 activation, increasing diarrhea events during this phase. Although some studies had reported potential IAP roles to promote gut health, investigations about exogenous IAP effects or feed additives modulating IAP expression and activity yet are necessary. However, we discussed in this paper that the critical assessment reported can suggest that exogenous IAP or feed additives that could increase its expression could show beneficial effects to reduce diarrhea events during the post weaning phase. Therefore, the main goals of this review are to discuss IAP's role in intestinal inflammatory processes and present feed additives used as growth promoters that may modulate IAP expression and activity to promote gut health in piglets.

  7. Beyond gender stereotypes in language comprehension: self sex-role descriptions affect the brain's potentials associated with agreement processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo eCanal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We recorded Event-Related Potentials to investigate differences in the use of gender information during the processing of reflexive pronouns. Pronouns either matched the gender provided by role nouns (such as king or engineer or did not. We compared two types of gender information, definitional information, which is semantic in nature (a mother is female, or stereotypical (a nurse is likely to be female. When they followed definitional role-nouns, gender-mismatching pronouns elicited a P600 effect reflecting a failure in the agreement process. When instead the gender violation occurred after stereotypical role-nouns the ERP response was biphasic, being positive in parietal electrodes and negative in anterior left electrodes. The use of a correlational approach showed that those participants with more feminine or expressive self sex-role descriptions showed a P600 response for stereotype violations, suggesting that they experienced the mismatch as an agreement violation; whereas less expressive participants showed an Nref effect, indicating more effort spent in linking the pronouns with the possible, although less likely, counter-stereotypical referent.

  8. Heterogeneity of Systemic Oxidative Stress Profiles in COPD: A Potential Role of Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Maury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS plays a key role in the muscle impairment and exercise capacity of COPD patients. However, the literature reveals that systemic OS markers show great heterogeneity, which may hinder the prescription of effective antioxidant supplementation. This study therefore aimed to identify OS markers imbalance of COPD patients, relative to validated normal reference values, and to investigate the possibility of systemic OS profiles. We measured systemic enzymatic/nonenzymatic antioxidant and lipid peroxidation (LP levels in 54 stable COPD patients referred for a rehabilitation program. The main systemic antioxidant deficits in these patients concerned vitamins and trace elements. Fully 89% of the COPD patients showed a systemic antioxidant imbalance which may have caused the elevated systemic LP levels in 69% of them. Interestingly, two patient profiles (clusters 3 and 4 had a more elevated increase in LP combined with increased copper and/or decreased vitamin C, GSH, and GPx. Further analysis revealed that the systemic LP level was higher in COPD women and associated with exercise capacity. Our present data therefore support future supplementations with antioxidant vitamins and trace elements to improve exercise capacity, but COPD patients will probably show different positive responses.

  9. The electricity supply options in Cuba and the potential role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Martin, D.; Lopez Lopez, I.

    2000-01-01

    Cuba is poor in primary energy resources. After an economic crisis initiated in 1990, a recuperation process began in 1994, but in the electric sector we could not reach the 1989 generation level. A comparative assessment of different options to cover electricity demand until 2015 performed using DECADES tools shows that the most important options are: hydro, nuclear, biomass, combined cycle and combustion turbines. The nuclear power option in the evaluated electric system expansion cases can play an important economic and environment role. The introduction of one nuclear power plant will save 330 million dollars in the expansion of the national electricity system. Environment emissions calculations during the study period, taking into consideration only the generation step, show that only the introduction of one NPP until 2015 will produce significant environment benefits. With the assumption that in generation step hydro, nuclear and biomass plants do not produce emissions, if the amount of electricity generated by these plants during study period would be generated in conventional Oil Steam Boilers with typical emission factors for Cuban conditions, the CO 2 emissions would increase in 26 millions tonnes, 576 thousand tonnes of SO x and 102 thousand tonnes of NO x . The NPP cover 80% of these reductions. (author)

  10. Transglutaminase activity in equine strongyles and its potential role in growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, U R; Chapman, M R; Singh, R N; Mehta, K; Klei, T R

    1999-06-01

    Transglutaminases (E.C. 2.3.3.13) are a family of Ca(2+)-dependent enzymes that stabilize protein structure by catalyzing the formation of isopeptide bonds. A novel form of transglutaminase has been identified and characterized that seem to play an important role in growth, development, and molting in adult and larval stages of filarial nematodes. The aim of this study was to identify the ubiquitous nature of this enzyme in other nematodes and to measure its significance to larval growth, molting, and development. For this purpose, equine Strongylus spp. were used. Activity of this enzyme was identified in extracts of larvae and adults of Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus, Parascaris equorum and Cylicocyclus insigne. The significance of transglutaminase in the early growth and development of Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus and S. equinus was tested by adding specific inhibitors, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) or cystamine (CS), to in vitro cultures of third (L3) and fourth stage larvae (L4). The viability, molting and growth of these nematode species were affected by both inhibitors. Cystamine promoted abnormal development of Strongylus edentatus L3, resulting in an aberrant expansion of the anterior end. Addition of these inhibitors to cultures of L4 also reduced growth of the three species. The results indicated that transglutaminase is present in a wide array of nematode parasites and may be important in growth and development of their larval stages.

  11. Houttuynia cordata modulates oral innate immune mediators: potential role of herbal plant on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satthakarn, S; Chung, W O; Promsong, A; Nittayananta, W

    2015-05-01

    Epithelial cells play an active role in oral innate immunity by producing various immune mediators. Houttuynia cordata Thunb (H. cordata), a herbal plant found in Asia, possesses many activities. However, its impacts on oral innate immunity have never been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of H. cordata extract on the expression of innate immune mediators produced by oral epithelial cells. Primary gingival epithelial cells (GECs) were treated with various concentrations of the extract for 18 h. The gene expression of hBD2, SLPI, cytokines, and chemokines was measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The secreted proteins in the culture supernatants were detected by ELISA or Luminex assay. Cytotoxicity of the extract was assessed using CellTiter-Blue Assay. H. cordata significantly induced the expression of hBD2, SLPI, IL-8, and CCL20 in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity. The secreted hBD2 and SLPI proteins were modulated, and the levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and IFN-γ were significantly induced by the extract. Our data indicated that H. cordata can modulate oral innate immune mediators. These findings may lead to the development of new topical agents from H. cordata for the prevention and treatment of immune-mediated oral diseases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A Potential Role for Acrolein in Neutrophil-Mediated Chronic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noerager, Brett D; Xu, Xin; Davis, Virginia A; Jones, Caleb W; Okafor, Svetlana; Whitehead, Alicia; Blalock, J Edwin; Jackson, Patricia L

    2015-12-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are key mediators of inflammatory processes throughout the body. In this study, we investigated the role of acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde that is ubiquitously present in the environment and produced endogenously at sites of inflammation, in mediating PMN-mediated degradation of collagen facilitating proline-glycine-proline (PGP) production. We treated peripheral blood neutrophils with acrolein and analyzed cell supernatants and lysates for matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and prolyl endopeptidase (PE), assessed their ability to break down collagen and release PGP, and assayed for the presence of leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) and its ability to degrade PGP. Acrolein treatment induced elevated production and functionality of collagen-degrading enzymes and generation of PGP fragments. Meanwhile, LTA4H levels and triaminopeptidase activity declined with increasing concentrations of acrolein thereby sparing PGP from enzymatic destruction. These findings suggest that acrolein exacerbates the acute inflammatory response mediated by neutrophils and sets the stage for chronic pulmonary and systemic inflammation.

  13. The Potential Role of Cannabinoids in Modulating Serotonergic Signaling by Their Influence on Tryptophan Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Fuchs

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Phytocannabinoids present in Cannabis plants are well known to exert potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Previously, we have demonstrated that the psychoactive D9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and the non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD modulate mitogen-induced Th1-type immune responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. The suppressive effect of both cannabinoids on mitogen-induced tryptophan degradation mediated by indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, suggests an additional mechanism by which antidepressive effects of cannabinoids might be linked to the serotonergic system. Here, we will review the role of tryptophan metabolism in the course of cell mediated immune responses and the relevance of cannabinoids in serotonergic signaling. We conclude that in particular the non-psychotropic CBD might be useful for the treatment of mood disorders in patients with inflammatory diseases, since this cannabinoid seems to be safe and its effects on activation-induced tryptophan degradation by CBD were more potent as compared to THC.

  14. Malaria vaccines and their potential role in the elimination of malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Brian M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Research on malaria vaccines is currently directed primarily towards the development of vaccines that prevent clinical malaria. Malaria elimination, now being considered seriously in some epidemiological situations, requires a different vaccine strategy, since success will depend on killing all parasites in the community in order to stop transmission completely. The feature of the life-cycles of human malarias that presents the greatest challenge to an elimination programme is the persistence of parasites as asymptomatic infections. These are an important source from which transmission to mosquitoes can occur. Consequently, an elimination strategy requires a community-based approach covering all individuals and not just those who are susceptible to clinical malaria. The progress that has been made in development of candidate malaria vaccines is reviewed. It is unlikely that many of these will have the efficacy required for complete elimination of parasites, though they may have an important role to play as part of future integrated control programmes. Vaccines for elimination must have a high level of efficacy in order to stop transmission to mosquitoes. This might be achieved with some pre-erythrocytic stage candidate vaccines or by targeting the sexual stages directly with transmission-blocking vaccines. An expanded malaria vaccine programme with such objectives is now a priority.

  15. Tissue factor expression in rheumatoid synovium: a potential role in pannus invasion of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lujun; Lu, Yahua; Chu, Yang; Xie, Jun; Ding, Wen'ge; Wang, Fengming

    2013-09-01

    Angiogenesis, as well as pannus formation within the joint, plays an important role in the erosion of articular cartilage and bone in the pathological process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tissue factor (TF), an essential initiator of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation, is also involved in the angiogenesis and the pannus formation of RA progression. In the present study, we used immunofluorescence and confocal scanning methods to characterize TF immunolocalization in RA synovium. We showed that positive staining of TF could be immunolocalized in synoviocytes, CD19(+) B cells and CD68(+) macrophages, whereas weak or negative staining of tissue factor could be found in CD34(+) endothelial cells of neo-vessels, CD3(+) T cells and CD14(+) monocytes in RA synovium tissues. Our study demonstrates a detailed local expression of TF in the rheumatoid synovium, and supports the notion that TF, expressed not only by the synoviocytes themselves, but also the infiltrating CD19(+) B cells and CD68(+) macrophages, is involved in the pannus invasion in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Adult play fighting and potential role of tail signals in ringtailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagi, Elisabetta

    2009-02-01

    Adult strepsirrhines have been completely neglected in the study of animal play. I focused on adult play fighting and the role of tail-play as a signal in ringtailed lemurs (Lemur catta). Tail-play is performed during play fighting, when lemurs anoint or, more rarely, wave their tails toward the playmate. During the prereproductive period, male and female lemurs engaged in play fighting with comparable frequencies, as was expected to occur in monomorphic species such as L. catta. The dyads showing low aggression rates engaged most frequently in play fighting, and polyadic play was frequently performed. Signals seem to be important in avoiding escalation to real aggression, especially when the playfulness of performers can be misunderstood by recipients. Tail-play was most frequent (a) in the dyads with low grooming rates (low familiarity degree) and (b) during the most risky play sessions (polyadic ones). Thus, tail-play can be considered as a useful tool for play communication in ringtailed lemurs. Copyright 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. EGFR targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer: potential role of cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A Reade

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Chad A Reade1, Apar Kishor Ganti1,21Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA; 2Section of Oncology-Hematology, Department of internal Medicine, VA Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USAAbstract: Chemotherapy alone has limited ability to significantly improve survival in non-small lung cancer (NSCLC beyond what has already been achieved. The epidermal growth factor (EGF pathway plays a vital role in the pathogenesis and progression of NSCLC. Two classes of drugs inhibit the EGF receptor (EGFR pathway: small molecules that inhibit the intracellular tyrosine kinase activity of the receptor, and monoclonal antibodies that target the extracellular domain in the ligand-binding region. Cetuximab is a human – mouse chimeric immunoglobulin G1 class monoclonal antibody directed against EGFR. Preclinical studies with cetuximab suggested that there was inhibition of growth of human NSCLC cell lines. Cetuximab is currently the focus of intense investigation in various patient populations with NSCLC. This review focuses on clinical trials of cetuximab in NSCLC and identifies future directions with this agent.Keywords: non-small cell lung cancer, EGFR, cetuximab, monoclonal antibodies

  18. Potential role for dog fleas in the cycle of Leishmania spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marilia Gabriele Prado Albuquerque; Fattori, Karina Reinaldo; Souza, Fausto; Lima, Valéria Marçal Felix

    2009-10-28

    Several species of Leishmania spp. cause diseases in humans that range from self-healing cutaneous lesions to fatal visceral leishmaniosis. It has been observed that besides being transmitted by sand flies, Leishmania spp. may also be transmitted by arthropods such as ticks and fleas. To investigate the possible role of dog fleas in the transmission of Leishmania spp., Ctenocefalides felis were removed from 22 dogs which were positive according to ELISA and rK-39 tests. A C. felis sample from each of the 22 dogs was used to infect a hamster. The 22 hamsters were euthanized 4 months after infection with the fleas and the blood was subjected to ELISA to detect antibody anti-Leishmania spp., and the spleen samples were submitted to PCR for detection of Leishmania spp. DNA. PCR and ELISA were both positive in 18.1% (4/22), with PCR alone being positive in 45% (10/22) and ELISA alone in only 9% (2/22). These results suggest the participation of dog fleas in the Leishmania spp. cycle. Confirmation that C. felis indeed transmit leishmaniosis to dogs requires new strategies against leishmaniosis to be enforced by public health authorities and which focus on better ways to keep dogs free of fleas.

  19. New Perspectives on the Potential Role of Aquaporins (AQPs in the Physiology of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaria Meli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs are emerging, in the last few decades, as critical proteins regulating water fluid homeostasis in cells involved in inflammation. AQPs represent a family of ubiquitous membrane channels that regulate osmotically water flux in various tissues and sometimes the transport of small solutes, including glycerol. Extensive data indicate that AQPs, working as water channel proteins, regulate not only cell migration, but also common events essential for inflammatory response. The involvement of AQPs in several inflammatory processes, as demonstrated by their dysregulation both in human and animal diseases, identifies their new role in protection and response to different noxious stimuli, including bacterial infection. This contribution could represent a new key to clarify the dilemma of host-pathogen communications, and opens up new scenarios regarding the investigation of the modulation of specific AQPs, as target for new pharmacological therapies. This review provides updated information on the underlying mechanisms of AQPs in the regulation of inflammatory responses in mammals and discusses the broad spectrum of options that can be tailored for different diseases and their pharmacological treatment.

  20. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling in Immune Cells and Inflammation: Roles and Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayo Aoki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite involved in many critical cell processes. It is produced by the phosphorylation of sphingosine by sphingosine kinases (SphKs and exported out of cells via transporters such as spinster homolog 2 (Spns2. S1P regulates diverse physiological processes by binding to specific G protein-binding receptors, S1P receptors (S1PRs 1–5, through a process coined as “inside-out signaling.” The S1P concentration gradient between various tissues promotes S1PR1-dependent migration of T cells from secondary lymphoid organs into the lymphatic and blood circulation. S1P suppresses T cell egress from and promotes retention in inflamed peripheral tissues. S1PR1 in T and B cells as well as Spns2 in endothelial cells contributes to lymphocyte trafficking. FTY720 (Fingolimod is a functional antagonist of S1PRs that induces systemic lymphopenia by suppression of lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs. In this review, we summarize previous findings and new discoveries about the importance of S1P and S1PR signaling in the recruitment of immune cells and lymphocyte retention in inflamed tissues. We also discuss the role of S1P-S1PR1 axis in inflammatory diseases and wound healing.

  1. Cognitive Impairment in Chronic Kidney Disease: Vascular Milieu and the Potential Therapeutic Role of Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf G. Bronas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is considered a model of accelerated aging. More specifically, CKD leads to reduced physical functioning and increased frailty, increased vascular dysfunction, vascular calcification and arterial stiffness, high levels of systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress, as well as increased cognitive impairment. Increasing evidence suggests that the cognitive impairment associated with CKD may be related to cerebral small vessel disease and overall impairment in white matter integrity. The triad of poor physical function, vascular dysfunction, and cognitive impairment places patients living with CKD at an increased risk for loss of independence, poor health-related quality of life, morbidity, and mortality. The purpose of this review is to discuss the available evidence of cerebrovascular-renal axis and its interconnection with early and accelerated cognitive impairment in patients with CKD and the plausible role of exercise as a therapeutic modality. Understanding the cerebrovascular-renal axis pathophysiological link and its interconnection with physical function is important for clinicians in order to minimize the risk of loss of independence and improve quality of life in patients with CKD.

  2. The potential role of migratory birds in the transmission of zoonoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Tsiouris

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The instinct for survival leads migratory birds to exploit seasonal opportunities for breeding habitats and food supplies. Consequently, they travel across national and international borders. These birds are distinguished in local migrants, short-distance, long-distance and vagrant and nomadic migrants. They can transfer micro-organisms across the globe and play a significant role in the ecology and circulation of pathogenic organisms. They are implicated in the transmission of zoonoses as biological and mechanical carriers and as hosts and carriers of infected ectoparasites. They can cause water-borne, tick-borne and insect-borne diseases. Favourable agents, such as seasonality and stress due to migration, influence the transmission of pathogens. The migration of birds is a natural phenomenon that is followed by the unavoidable repercussions of the participation of these birds as carriers or hosts in the transmission of pathogens. It is not possible to interrupt this sequence but risks can be minimised by controlling and preventing perilous situations. Surveillance of wetlands, ‘stopovers’, places of destination and wintering regions can be done. Furthermore, the implementation strict biosecurity measures that reduce contact with migratory birds will limit the transmission of pathogens.

  3. Treatment strategies for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: potential role of exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Y. Wonders

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN is a common, dose-limiting effect of cancer therapy that often has negative implications on a patient’s quality of life. The pain associated with CIPN has long been recognized as one of the most difficult types of pain to treat. Historically, much effort has been made to explore pharmacological therapies aimed at reducing symptoms of CIPN. While many of these agents provide a modest relief in the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, many have been shown to have additional negative side effects for cancer patients. Therefore, the authors suggest exercise rehabilitation as one lifestyle modification that may positively impact the lives of patients with CIPN. To our knowledge, there are currently no published clinical trials examining the role of exercise in preserving neurological function following chemotherapy. However, investigations using low-to-moderate intensity exercise as an intervention in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies have produced promising results. Given that cancer patients appear to tolerate exercise, it seems plausible that exercise rehabilitation could be used as an effective strategy to minimize CIPN-induced detriments to quality of life.

  4. Identifying potential engaging leaders within medical education: The role of positive influence on peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalec, Barret; Veloski, J Jon; Hojat, Mohammadreza; Tykocinski, Mark L

    2014-08-26

    Abstract Background: Previous research has paid little to no attention towards exploring methods of identifying existing medical student leaders. Aim: Focusing on the role of influence and employing the tenets of the engaging leadership model, this study examines demographic and academic performance-related differences of positive influencers and if students who have been peer-identified as positive influencers also demonstrate high levels of genuine concern for others. Methods: Three separate fourth-year classes were asked to designate classmates that had significant positive influences on their professional and personal development. The top 10% of those students receiving positive influence nominations were compared with the other students on demographics, academic performance, and genuine concern for others. Results: Besides age, no demographic differences were found between positive influencers and other students. High positive influencers were not found to have higher standardized exam scores but did receive significantly higher clinical clerkship ratings. High positive influencers were found to possess a higher degree of genuine concern for others. Conclusion: The findings lend support to (a) utilizing the engaging model to explore leaders and leadership within medical education, (b) this particular method of identifying existing medical student leaders, and (c) return the focus of leadership research to the power of influence.

  5. The glycoproteins of Marburg and Ebola virus and their potential roles in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, H; Volchkov, V E; Volchkova, V A; Klenk, H D

    1999-01-01

    Filoviruses cause systemic infections that can lead to severe hemorrhagic fever in human and non-human primates. The primary target of the virus appears to be the mononuclear phagocytic system. As the virus spreads through the organism, the spectrum of target cells increases to include endothelial cells, fibroblasts, hepatocytes, and many other cells. There is evidence that the filovirus glycoprotein plays an important role in cell tropism, spread of infection, and pathogenicity. Biosynthesis of the glycoprotein forming the spikes on the virion surface involves cleavage by the host cell protease furin into two disulfide linked subunits GP1 and GP2. GP1 is also shed in soluble form from infected cells. Different strains of Ebola virus show variations in the cleavability of the glycoprotein, that may account for differences in pathogenicity, as has been observed with influenza viruses and paramyxoviruses. Expression of the spike glycoprotein of Ebola virus, but not of Marburg virus, requires transcriptional editing. Unedited GP mRNA yields the nonstructural glycoprotein sGP, which is secreted extensively from infected cells. Whether the soluble glycoproteins GP1 and sGP interfere with the humoral immune response and other defense mechanisms remains to be determined.

  6. Potential roles of cell-derived microparticles in ischemic brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Lawrence L; Jy, Wenche; Bidot, Carlos J; Nordberg, Mary L; Minagar, Alireza; Alexander, J Steven; Kelley, Roger E; Ahn, Yeon S

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study is to review the role of cell-derived microparticles in ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. An extensive PubMed search of literature pertaining to this study was performed in April 2009 using specific keyword search terms related to cell-derived microparticles and ischemic stroke. Some references are not cited here as it is not possible to be all inclusive or due to space limitation. Cell-derived microparticles are small membranous vesicles released from the plasma membranes of platelets, leukocytes, red cells and endothelial cells in response to diverse biochemical agents or mechanical stresses. They are the main carriers of circulating tissue factor, the principal initiator of intravascular thrombosis, and are implicated in a variety of thrombotic and inflammatory disorders. This review outlines evidence suggesting that cell-derived microparticles are involved predominantly with microvascular, as opposed to macrovascular, thrombosis. More specifically, cell-derived microparticles may substantially contribute to ischemic brain disease in several settings, as well as to neuroinflammatory conditions. If further work confirms this hypothesis, novel therapeutic strategies for minimizing cell-derived microparticles-mediated ischemia are available or can be developed, as discussed.

  7. Leptomeningeal contrast enhancement in moyamoya: its potential role in postoperative assessment of circulation through the bypass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yasui, T.; Kitano, S.; Sakamoto, H.

    2001-01-01

    Leptomeningeal contrast enhancement (LMCE) is one of the MRI features of moyamoya. Its clinical significance, however, is not elucidated. Our purpose was to characterise LMCE on MRI and to evaluate its role in the assessment of circulation through a surgically established bypass in moyamoya. We studied 16 patients with idiopathic moyamoya (seven males, nine females, includingt four children, aged 7 to 54 years, mean 24 years) who underwent T1-weighted MRI before and after intravenous contrast medium. The presence of LMCE, its intensity and anatomical distribution, catheter angiographic findings, and relation of LMCE to the bypass surgery were assessed. More LMCE was seen in the cerebrum in most patients with moyamoya than in normal controls. LMCE in the brain stem and cerebellum was minimal, similar to that seen in the controls. LMCE was less prominent following surgery than before operation or in patients who did not undergo surgery. In three patients examined both before and after operation LMCE became less prominent following bypass surgery. As LMCE becomes less prominent after ''effective'' bypass surgery, this may be used for evaluation of effectiveness of surgery in moyamoya. (orig.)

  8. The potential role of nuclear energy in greenhouse gas abatement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.; Cornish, E.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear energy will make a significant contribution to meeting the world's future electricity demand while helping reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However the scale of that contribution will be strongly influenced by the way in which this contribution is recognised in national and international policies designed to tackle climate change. The debate continues to rage over the science of climate change: is climate change the result of human intervention or is it a naturally occurring phenomenon? The majority of scientists involved in this debate would agree that enhanced global warming, as witnessed in recent years, has come about as a result of the massive explosion in greenhouse gas emissions since the beginning of the industrial era. This paper will give an overview of the institutions and organisations involved in the international climate change negotiations. It will describe the political positions of different countries on their perceived role of nuclear power in mechanisms designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The paper will also give an insight into the financial impact of assigning a value to carbon emissions and how that might change the relative economics of nuclear power in comparison to fossil fuel generation

  9. SMAD family proteins: the current knowledge on their expression and potential role in neoplastic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Witkowska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β plays a crucial role and takes part in many processes in the human body both in physiology and pathology. This cytokine is involved in angiogenesis, regulates apoptosis and stimulates divisions of cells, such as hepatocytes, lymphocytes or hematopoietic cells. SMAD proteins family is a unique group of particles responsible for transducting the signal induced by TGF-β into the nucleus. This molecules, after receiving a signal from activated TGF-β, act on transcription factors in the nucleus, leading directly to the expression of the corresponding genes. According to current knowledge, disturbances in the functioning of SMAD proteins are present in a number of diseases. The reduced expression was observed, for example in cardiovascular diseases such as primary pulmonary hypertension or myocardial infarction, autoimmune diseases for instance systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease or osteoporosis. The latest clinical data showed the presence of mutations in SMAD proteins in cancerogenesis. Mutation of SMAD-4 protein can be detected in half of the patients with pancreatic cancer, 20% of patients with colorectal cancer and 10% of patients with lung cancer. However, mutation in SMAD-2 protein was observed in 7% of both patients with colorectal cancer and lung cancer. On the basis of numerous works, SMAD protein expression would be valuable prognostic factor in some of neoplastic diseases.

  10. TRPM7 and TRPM8 Ion Channels in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Potential Roles as Cancer Biomarkers and Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson S. Yee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential (TRP ion channels are essential for normal functions and health by acting as molecular sensors and transducing various stimuli into cellular and physiological responses. Growing evidence has revealed that TRP ion channels play important roles in a wide range of human diseases, including malignancies. In light of recent discoveries, it has been found that TRP melastatin-subfamily members, TRPM7 and TRPM8, are required for normal and cancerous development of exocrine pancreas. We are currently investigating the mechanisms which mediate the functional roles of TRPM7 and TRPM8 and attempting to develop these ion channels as clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets for achieving the goal of personalized therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  11. Potential role of ABC-assisted repositories in U.S. plutonium and high-level waste disposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berwald, D.; Favale, A.; Myers, T. [Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Bethpage, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    This paper characterizes the issues involving deep geologic disposal of LWR spent fuel rods, then presents results of an investigation to quantify the potential role of Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) in an integrated national nuclear materials and high level waste disposition strategy. The investigation used the deep geological repository envisioned for Yucca Mt., Nevada as a baseline and considered complementary roles for integrated ABC transmutation systems. The results indicate that although a U.S. geologic waste repository will continue to be required, waste partitioning and accelerator transmutation of plutonium, the minor actinides, and selected long-lived fission products can result in the following substantial benefits: plutonium burndown to near zero levels, a dramatic reduction of the long term hazard associated with geologic repositories, an ability to place several-fold more high level nuclear waste in a single repository, electricity sales to compensate for capital and operating costs.

  12. Potential role of p21 Activated Kinase 1 (PAK1) in the invasion and motility of oral cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvathy, Muraleedharan; Sreeja, Sreeharshan; Kumar, Rakesh; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer malignancy consists of uncontrolled division of cells primarily in and around the floor of the oral cavity, gingiva, oropharynx, lower lip and base of the tongue. According to GLOBOCAN 2012 report, oral cancer is one of the most common cancers among males and females in India. Even though significant advancements have been made in the field of oral cancer treatment modalities, the overall prognosis for the patients has not improved in the past few decades and hence, this demands a new thrust for the identification of novel therapeutic targets in oral cancer. p21 Activated Kinases (PAKs) are potential therapeutic targets that are involved in numerous physiological functions. PAKs are serine-threonine kinases and they serve as important regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell motility, transcription through MAP kinase cascades, death and survival signalling, and cell-cycle progression. Although PAKs are known to play crucial roles in cancer progression, the role and clinical significance of PAKs in oral cancer remains poorly understood. Our results suggest that PAK1 is over-expressed in oral cancer cell lines. Stimulation of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) cells with serum growth factors leads to PAK1 re-localization and might cause a profound cytoskeletal remodelling. PAK1 was also found to be involved in the invasion, migration and cytoskeletal remodelling of OSCC cells. Our study revealed that PAK1 may play a crucial role in the progression of OSCC. Studying the role of PAK1 and its substrates is likely to enhance our understanding of oral carcinogenesis and potential therapeutic value of PAKs in oral cancer. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2263-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  13. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signalling: Role in bone biology and potential therapeutic target for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartawi, Ziad; Schipani, Ernestina; Ryan, Katie B; Waeber, Christian

    2017-11-01

    The lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) affects cellular functions in most systems. Interest in its therapeutic potential has increased following the discovery of its G protein-coupled receptors and the recent availability of agents that can be safely administered in humans. Although the role of S1P in bone biology has been the focus of much less research than its role in the nervous, cardiovascular and immune systems, it is becoming clear that this lipid influences many of the functions, pathways and cell types that play a key role in bone maintenance and repair. Indeed, S1P is implicated in many osteogenesis-related processes including stem cell recruitment and subsequent differentiation, differentiation and survival of osteoblasts, and coupling of the latter cell type with osteoclasts. In addition, S1P's role in promoting angiogenesis is well-established. The pleiotropic effects of S1P on bone and blood vessels have significant potential therapeutic implications, as current therapeutic approaches for critical bone defects show significant limitations. Because of the complex effects of S1P on bone, the pharmacology of S1P-like agents and their physico-chemical properties, it is likely that therapeutic delivery of S1P agents will offer significant advantages compared to larger molecular weight factors. Hence, it is important to explore novel methods of utilizing S1P agents therapeutically, and improve our understanding of how S1P and its receptors modulate bone physiology and repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential Roles of Swedish Forestry in the Context of Climate Change Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Lundmark

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In Sweden, where forests cover more than 60% of the land area, silviculture and the use of forest products by industry and society play crucial roles in the national carbon balance. A scientific challenge is to understand how different forest management and wood use strategies can best contribute to climate change mitigation benefits. This study uses a set of models to analyze the effects of different forest management and wood use strategies in Sweden on carbon dioxide emissions and removals through 2105. If the present Swedish forest use strategy is continued, the long-term climate change mitigation benefit will correspond to more than 60 million tons of avoided or reduced emissions of carbon dioxide annually, compared to a scenario with similar consumption patterns in society but where non-renewable products are used instead of forest-based products. On average about 470 kg of carbon dioxide emissions are avoided for each cubic meter of biomass harvested, after accounting for carbon stock changes, substitution effects and all emissions related to forest management and industrial processes. Due to Sweden’s large export share of forest-based products, the climate change mitigation effect of Swedish forestry is larger abroad than within the country. The study also shows that silvicultural methods to increase forest biomass production can further reduce net carbon dioxide emissions by an additional 40 million tons of per year. Forestry’s contribution to climate change mitigation could be significantly increased if management of the boreal forest were oriented towards increased biomass production and if more wood were used to substitute fossil fuels and energy-intensive materials.

  15. Sources and Potential Photochemical Roles of Formaldehyde in an Urban Atmosphere in South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Han, Yu; Zhu, Bo; He, Ling-Yan

    2017-11-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important intermediate in tropospheric photochemistry. However, study of its evolution characteristics under heavy pollution conditions in China is limited, especially for high temporal resolutions, making it difficult to analyze its sources and environmental impacts. In this study, ambient levels of HCHO were monitored using a proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometer at an urban site in the Pearl River Delta of China. Continuous monitoring campaigns were conducted in the spring, summer, fall, and winter in 2016. The highest averaged HCHO concentrations were observed in autumn (5.1 ± 3.1 ppbv) and summer (5.0 ± 4.4 ppbv), followed by winter (4.2 ± 2.2 ppbv) and spring (3.4 ± 1.6 ppbv). The daily maximum of HCHO occurs in the early afternoon and shows good correlations with O3 and the secondary organic aerosol tracer during the day, revealing close relationships between ambient HCHO and secondary formations in Shenzhen, especially in summer and autumn. The daytime HCHO is estimated to be the major contributor to O3 formation and OH radical production, indicating that HCHO plays a key role in the urban atmospheric photochemical reactions. Anthropogenic secondary formation was calculated to be the dominant source of HCHO using a photochemical age-based parameterization method, with an average proportion of 39%. The contributions of biogenic sources in summer (41%) and autumn (39%) are much higher than those in spring (26%) and winter (28%), while the contributions of anthropogenic primary sources in spring (20%) and winter (18%) are twice those in summer (9%) and autumn (9%).

  16. Potential role of pemetrexed in metastatic breast cancer patients pre-treated with anthracycline or taxane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yan Zhou; Ye-Hui Shi; Yong-Sheng Jia; Zhong-Sheng Tong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This article reviews pharmacology, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, and safety in metastatic breast cancer patients, as well as the predictive biomarkers for outcome of treatment with pemetrexed-based regimens. Methods: PubMed, Embase, OVID, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched from the beginning of each database without any limitations to the date of publication. Search terms were‘‘pemetrexed’’ or‘‘LY231514’’ or“Alimta”,“metastatic breast cancer”, and“advanced breast cancer”. Results: There were 15 studies (n ¼ 1002) meeting our criteria for evaluation. Eight single-agent trials (n ¼ 551) and seven using combinations with other agents (n ¼ 451) were identified that evaluated pemetrexed for use in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Response rates to pemetrexed as a single agent varied from 8%to 31%, and with combination therapy have been reported to be between 15.8% and 55.7%. With routine supplementation of patients with folic acid, dexamethasone, and vitamin B12, the toxicity profile of these patients was mild, including dose-limiting neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, as well as lower grades of reversible hepatotoxicity and gastrointestinal toxicity. Expression of thymidylate synthase (TS) and other biomarkers are associated with the prognosis and sensitivity for pemetrexed in breast cancer. Conclusion: Pemetrexed has shown remarkable activity with acceptable toxicities for treatment of metastatic breast cancer patients. Translational research on pemetrexed in breast cancer identified biomarkers as well as additional genes important to its clinical activity and toxicity. Further research is needed to clarify the role of pemetrexed in breast cancer treatment in order to guide oncologists. Copyright © 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Com-munications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license

  17. Gender differences in methionine accumulation and metabolism in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes: Potential roles in toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dever, Joseph T.; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2009-01-01

    L-Methionine (Met) is hepatotoxic at high concentrations. Because Met toxicity in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes is gender-dependent, the goal of this study was to assess the roles of Met accumulation and metabolism in the increased sensitivity of male hepatocytes to Met toxicity compared with female hepatocytes. Male hepatocytes incubated with Met (30 mM) at 37 o C exhibited higher levels of intracellular Met at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 h, respectively, compared to female hepatocytes. Conversely, female hepatocytes had higher levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine compared to male hepatocytes. Female hepatocytes also exhibited higher L-methionine-L-sulfoxide levels relative to control hepatocytes, whereas the increases in L-methionine-D-sulfoxide (Met-D-O) levels were similar in hepatocytes of both genders. Addition of aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of Met transamination, significantly increased Met levels at 1.5 h and increased Met-D-O levels at 1.0 and 1.5 h only in Met-exposed male hepatocytes. No gender differences in cytosolic Met transamination activity by glutamine transaminase K were detected. However, female mouse liver cytosol exhibited higher methionine-DL-sulfoxide (MetO) reductase activity than male mouse liver cytosol at low (0.25 and 0.5 mM) MetO concentrations. Collectively, these results suggest that increased cellular Met accumulation, decreased Met transmethylation, and increased Met and MetO transamination in male mouse hepatocytes may be contributing to the higher sensitivity of the male mouse hepatocytes to Met toxicity in comparison with female mouse hepatocytes.

  18. Abdominal obesity in older women: potential role for disrupted fatty acid reesterification in insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeckel, Catherine W; Dziura, James; DiPietro, Loretta

    2008-04-01

    Excess abdominal adiposity is a primary factor for insulin resistance in older age. Our objectives were to examine the role of abdominal obesity on adipose tissue, hepatic, and peripheral insulin resistance in aging, and to examine impaired free fatty acid metabolism as a mechanism in these relations. This was a cross-sectional study. The study was performed at a General Clinical Research Center. Healthy, inactive older (>60 yr) women (n = 25) who were not on hormone replacement therapy or glucose-lowering medication were included in the study. Women with abdominal circumference values above the median (>97.5 cm) were considered abdominally obese. Whole-body peripheral glucose utilization, adipose tissue lipolysis, and hepatic glucose production were measured using in vivo techniques according to a priori hypotheses. In the simple analysis, glucose utilization at the 40 mU insulin dose (6.3 +/- 2.8 vs. 9.1 +/- 3.4; P suppression of lipolysis (35 vs. 54%; P women with and without abdominal obesity, respectively. Using the glycerol appearance rate to free fatty acid ratio as an index of fatty acid reesterification revealed markedly blunted reesterification in the women with abdominal adiposity under all conditions: basal (0.95 +/- 0.29 vs. 1.35 +/- 0.47; P < 0.02); low- (2.58 +/- 2.76 vs. 6.95 +/- 5.56; P < 0.02); and high-dose (4.46 +/- 3.70 vs. 12.22 +/- 7.13; P < 0.01) hyperinsulinemia. Importantly, fatty acid reesterification was significantly (P < 0.01) associated with abdominal circumference and hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance, regardless of total body fat. These findings support the premise of dysregulated fatty acid reesterification with abdominal obesity as a pathophysiological link to perturbed glucose metabolism across multiple tissues in aging.

  19. The potential role of cotinine in the cognitive and neuroprotective actions of nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccafusco, Jerry J; Terry, Alvin V

    2003-05-16

    Cotinine is a primary metabolite of nicotine that has been suggested in many studies in animals and in humans to exert measurable effects on aspects of on-going behavior or on cognitive function. Much of the interest in cotinine derives from its long pharmacological half-life (15-19 hours) relative to nicotine (2-3 hours). Despite decades of study focusing on nicotine as the predominant behaviorally active component of tobacco, there continue to be aspects of the pharmacology of the drug that have yet to be explained. For example, nicotine can evoke a protracted behavioral response, i.e., in great excess of the presence of the drug in the plasma. Also, there is often a striking differential between the potency for nicotine-induced behavioral responses in humans and animals, and its potency as a cholinergic agonist, neurochemically. One possibility that may explain one or more of these properties of nicotine is the presence of a long-lived bioactive metabolite or breakdown product of nicotine such as cotinine. Preliminary data in support of this hypothesis are consistent with the ability of cotinine to improve performance accuracy on delayed matching task by macaque monkeys, and in reversing apomorphine-induced deficits in prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle in rats. The drug also was shown to be as potent as nicotine in the ability to act as a cytoprotective agent in cells that express a neuronal cholinergic phenotype. This new appreciation for the role of cotinine in nicotine's actions, and as a pharmacological agent in its own right, particularly in aspects of cognitive function and for neuroprotection, ultimately may be applied towards the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders, and for various psychiatric syndromes.

  20. The potential roles of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-MET pathway inhibitors in cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh RA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rahul A Parikh,1 Peng Wang,2 Jan H Beumer,3 Edward Chu,1 Leonard J Appleman11Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Cancer Therapeutics Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Division of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Markey Cancer Center, Lexington, KY, USA; 3University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, Cancer Therapeutics Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: MET is located on chromosome 7q31 and is a proto-oncogene that encodes for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF receptor, a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK family. HGF, also known as scatter factor (SF, is the only known ligand for MET. MET is a master regulator of cell growth and division (mitogenesis, mobility (motogenesis, and differentiation (morphogenesis; it plays an important role in normal development and tissue regeneration. The HGF-MET axis is frequently dysregulated in cancer by MET gene amplification, translocation, and mutation, or by MET or HGF protein overexpression. MET dysregulation is associated with an increased propensity for metastatic disease and poor overall prognosis across multiple tumor types. Targeting the dysregulated HGF-MET pathway is an area of active research; a number of monoclonal antibodies to HGF and MET, as well as small molecule inhibitors of MET, are under development. This review summarizes the key biological features of the HGF-MET axis, its dysregulation in cancer, and the therapeutic agents targeting the HGF-MET axis, which are in development.Keywords: MET inhibitor, HGF inhibitor, cancer

  1. Role of the placenta in fetal programming: underlying mechanisms and potential interventional approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2007-07-01

    Adverse influences during fetal life alter the structure and function of distinct cells, organ systems or homoeostatic pathways, thereby 'programming' the individual for an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes in adult life. Fetal programming can be caused by a number of different perturbations in the maternal compartment, such as altered maternal nutrition and reduced utero-placental blood flow; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully established. Perturbations in the maternal environment must be transmitted across the placenta in order to affect the fetus. Here, we review recent insights into how the placenta responds to changes in the maternal environment and discuss possible mechanisms by which the placenta mediates fetal programming. In IUGR (intrauterine growth restriction) pregnancies, the increased placental vascular resistance subjects the fetal heart to increased work load, representing a possible direct link between altered placental structure and fetal programming of cardiovascular disease. A decreased activity of placental 11beta-HSD-2 (type 2 isoform of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) activity can increase fetal exposure to maternal cortisol, which programmes the fetus for later hypertension and metabolic disease. The placenta appears to function as a nutrient sensor regulating nutrient transport according to the ability of the maternal supply line to deliver nutrients. By directly regulating fetal nutrient supply and fetal growth, the placenta plays a central role in fetal programming. Furthermore, perturbations in the maternal compartment may affect the methylation status of placental genes and increase placental oxidative/nitrative stress, resulting in changes in placental function. Intervention strategies targeting the placenta in order to prevent or alleviate altered fetal growth and/or fetal programming include altering placental growth and nutrient transport by maternally administered IGFs (insulin

  2. The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power currently reduces CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD ampersand D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO 2 emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO 2 emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  3. A potential role for chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate in arm regeneration in Amphiura filiformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Rashmi; Namburi, Ramesh B; Dupont, Sam T; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Lindahl, Ulf; Spillmann, Dorothe

    2017-05-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS) from various vertebrate and invertebrate sources are known to be involved in diverse cellular mechanisms during repair and regenerative processes. Recently, we have identified CS/DS as the major GAG in the brittlestar Amphiura filiformis, with high proportions of di- and tri-O-sulfated disaccharide units. As this echinoderm is known for its exceptional regeneration capacity, we aimed to explore the role of these GAG chains during A. filiformis arm regeneration. Analysis of CS/DS chains during the regeneration process revealed an increase in the proportion of the tri-O-sulfated disaccharides. Conversely, treatment of A. filiformis with sodium chlorate, a potent inhibitor of sulfation reactions in GAG biosynthesis, resulted in a significant reduction in arm growth rates with total inhibition at concentrations higher than 5 mM. Differentiation was less impacted by sodium chlorate exposure or even slightly increased at 1-2 mM. Based on the structural changes observed during arm regeneration we identified chondroitin synthase, chondroitin-4-O-sulfotransferase 2 and dermatan-4-O-sulfotransferase as candidate genes and sought to correlate their expression with the expression of the A. filiformis orthologue of bone morphogenetic factors, AfBMP2/4. Quantitative amplification by real-time PCR indicated increased expression of chondroitin synthase and chondroitin-4-O-sulfotransferase 2, with a corresponding increase in AfBMP2/4 during regeneration relative to nonregenerating controls. Our findings suggest that proper sulfation of GAGs is important for A. filiformis arm regeneration and that these molecules may participate in mechanisms controlling cell proliferation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Role of Saudi universities in achieving the solar potential 2030 target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyahya, Sulaiman; Irfan, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, domestic consumption of fossil fuel is expected to grow from 3.4 MBOE (Million Barrels of Oil Equivalent) to 8.3 MBOE by 2028; peak power demand from 55 GW to 121 GW by 2030. About 61 GW of demand appears unmet by the output of planned projects. In response, KACARE (King Abdullah City for Atomic and Renewable Energy, the nation’s energy policy maker) has announced the target of installing 41 GW of solar capacity by 2030 (24 GW by 2020). Deployment of so much solar power requires a substantial, locally trained, technical workforce. A lower bound estimate of 8.9 persons/MW of Solar PV and 3.04 persons/MW of Solar Thermal can be taken for manufacturing, operations and maintenance. This conservative figure would mean employment for 218,650 workers by 2030. This would require the 24 local universities to graduate 14,577 technically qualified workers annually for the next 15 years (607 graduates per year per university). Even assuming a 50% import of technical manpower, the above estimate can be revised as 303 graduates per university per year. The need for so many technical workers makes it imperative for local universities to immediately ramp up their capacity to graduate technical workforce. - Highlights: •A review was made for manpower requirement of solar projects. •Manpower requirement was suggested for the Solar Target 2030 of 41 GW for Saudi Arabia. •Role of universities was elaborated in achieving tis manpower requirement.

  5. The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO sub 2 emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power currently reduces CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO{sub 2} emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO{sub 2} emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Potential pitfalls of steatopygia on bone imaging using Tc99m MDP and role of SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgazzar, H; Elsaid, M; Omar, A; Al-Maskery, IB

    2004-01-01

    Body habbitus influence the quality of bone scintigraphy. Steatopygia (steato: fat, pygia: buttocks) may affect the quality of bone scan since it may lead to diagnostic pitfalls. Objective: The objective of this prospective study is to evaluate the effects of steatopygia on the appearance of the lumbar spine on bone scan and the role of SPECT in overcoming fat attenuation artifact if present. Method: Bone scintigraphy, including whole body bone scan, spot views and SPECT of the lumber spine, using a dual head gamma camera, were performed on thirty adult obese patients (13 males, 17 females) with an average weight of 90 kg. referred to the department for routine bone scan. Each patient was injected intravenously with 0.25 mCi/kg (9.25 Mbq of Tc-99m MDP, and their weight and height of each patient were recorded. Whole body scan was performed using 256 X 1024 matrix size and 8 min/meter speed. SPECT was performed using 128 X 128 matrix size, 20 second-32 projections and elliptical orbit around the lumbar spine. Spot views were acquired using 256X256 matrix size for 1000 Kcounts. Results: Twenty patients (67%) (6 males, 14 females) showed steatopygia with attenuation at the lower lumber vertebrae. Diminished uptake in the lower lumbar spine and edge effect artifacts were noted on planar images mimicking abnormalities. SPECT, especially in the sagittal axis, resolved these artifacts. Conclusion: Steatopygia should be considered in the interpretation of bone scans of obese patients to avoid diagnostic pitfalls. Adding SPECT of the lumber spine to the planar imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy in obese patients by overcoming the steatopygia effect seen on whole body and spot planar images. (authors)

  7. Potential preventive role of lactic acid bacteria against aflatoxin M₁ immunotoxicity and genotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah-Abbès, Jalila; Abbès, Samir; Jebali, Rania; Haous, Zohra; Oueslati, Ridha

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) is a mycotoxin produced by numerous Aspergillus species in pre- or post-harvest cereals and milk. Exposure to AFM1 imparts potent economic losses in the livestock industry. Toxicologically, it also causes severe immune system problems. The aims of this study were to evaluate a new AFM1-binding/degrading microorganism for biologic detoxification, to examine its ability to degrade AFM1 in liquid medium, and to evaluate its potential for in vivo preventative effects against AFM1-induced immunotoxicity and genotoxicity in mice. Lactobacillus plantarum MON03 (LP) isolated from Tunisian artisanal butter was found to display significant binding ability to AFM1 in PBS (93%) within 24 h of incubation. Further, the LP was able to tolerate gastric acidity, bile salts, and adhere efficiently to Caco-3 cells in vitro. The in vivo study used Balb/c mice that received either vehicle (control), LP only (at 1 × 10(9)CFU/L, ∼1 mg/kg bw), AFM1 (100 mg/kg bw), or AFM1 + LP daily for 15 days (by gavage); two other groups received a single dose of colchicine (4 mg/kg) or mitomycin C (1 mg/kg) as positive controls for induction of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations, respectively. The results showed that, compared to in control mice, AFM1 treatment led to significantly decreased body weight gains, and caused cytotoxic/genotoxic effects as indicated by increases in frequencies of polychromatic erythrocytes, as well as those with micronucleation (PCEMN) and chromosomal aberrations, among bone marrow cells. The concurrent administration of LP with AFM1 strongly reduced the adverse effects of AFM1 on each parameter. Mice receiving AFM1 + LP co-treatment displayed no significant differences in the assayed parameters as compared to the control mice. By itself, the bacteria caused no adverse effects. Based on the data, it is concluded that the test bacteria could potentially be beneficial in the detoxification of AFM1-contaminated foods and feeds

  8. Potential role of some nutraceuticals in the regression of Alzheimer’s disease in an experimental animal model

    OpenAIRE

    AHMED, Hanna Hamdy; SHOUSHA, Wafaa Ghoneim; HUSSIEN, Rehab Mahmoud; FARRAG, Abdel Razik Hussein

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential role of some nutraceuticals, coenzyme Q10, vitamin B complex, and lecithin against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. Materials and methods: Ninety-six male and female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 2 main groups, namely female and male. Each group was divided into 6 subgroups. Group 1 served as control group. Group 2 was administered AlCl3 for 4 months. Groups 3, 4, 5, and 6 were adm...

  9. The role of potential vorticity anomalies in the Somali Jet on Indian Summer Monsoon Intraseasonal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, P.; Joshi, M.; Dimri, A. P.; Turner, A. G.

    2018-06-01

    The climate of the Indian subcontinent is dominated by rainfall arising from the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) during June to September. Intraseasonal variability during the monsoon is characterized by periods of heavy rainfall interspersed by drier periods, known as active and break events respectively. Understanding and predicting such events is of vital importance for forecasting human impacts such as water resources. The Somali Jet is a key regional feature of the monsoon circulation. In the present study, we find that the spatial structure of Somali Jet potential vorticity (PV) anomalies varies considerably during active and break periods. Analysis of these anomalies shows a mechanism whereby sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies propagate north/northwestwards through the Arabian Sea, caused by a positive feedback loop joining anomalies in SST, convection, modification of PV by diabatic heating and mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer, wind-stress curl, and ocean upwelling processes. The feedback mechanism is consistent with observed variability in the coupled ocean-atmosphere system on timescales of approximately 20 days. This research suggests that better understanding and prediction of monsoon intraseasonal variability in the South Asian monsoon may be gained by analysis of the day-to-day dynamical evolution of PV in the Somali Jet.

  10. The potential role of taxes and subsidies on food in the prevention of obesity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Zapata, Laura Inés; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Millstone, Erik; Clemente-Gómez, Vicente; Holdsworth, Michelle; Ortiz-Moncada, Rocio; Lobstein, Tim; Sarri, Katerina; De Marchi, Bruna; Horvath, Katalin Z

    2010-08-01

    Obesity implies costs not only for the individual but also for society. The authors explore the opinions of stakeholders on the potential of taxes or subsidies, as measures for tackling obesity in Europe. Structured interviews were conducted using Multicriteria Mapping, a computer-based, decision-support tool, with 189 interviewees drawn from 21 different stakeholder categories across nine members of the EU interviews, to appraise 20 predefined policy options aimed at reducing obesity, including 'taxing obesity-promoting foods' and 'subsidising healthy foods.' A four-step approach involved selecting options, defining criteria, scoring options quantitatively and weighting criteria to provide overall rankings of options. Interviews were recorded and transcribed to yield qualitative data. Compared with other policy options appraised, taxation and subsidies were not favourably received, mainly because they were considered difficult to implement. Overall, trade unions rated both options more favourably than all other stakeholder groups. As anticipated, both options received their lowest scores from representatives of the farming, food processing and advertising industries. Nutritional/obesity advisory experts and public sector caterers gave the most positive ratings to subsidies overall. Along with public health professionals, large commercial retailers were most in favour of taxation. Taxation and subsidies were poorly appraised compared with other policy measures, with stakeholders expressing reservations mainly focussed on the practicalities and cost of introducing such measures. Although applying taxes/subsidies could be useful to combat obesity, the study suggests that most stakeholders still need to be convinced of their viability and acceptability when compared with other measures.

  11. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 in Electroacupuncture Analgesia on Chronic Inflammatory Pain in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory pain may result from peripheral tissue injury or inflammation, increasing the release of protons, histamines, adenosine triphosphate, and several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 is known to be involved in acute to subacute neuropathic and inflammatory pain; however, its exact mechanisms in chronic inflammatory pain are not elucidated. Our results showed that EA significantly reduced chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in the chronic inflammatory pain model. Chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were also abolished in TRPV1−/− mice. TRPV1 increased in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG and spinal cord (SC at 3 weeks after CFA injection. The expression levels of downstream molecules such as pPKA, pPI3K, and pPKC increased, as did those of pERK, pp38, and pJNK. Transcription factors (pCREB and pNFκB and nociceptive ion channels (Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 were involved in this process. Inflammatory mediators such as GFAP, S100B, and RAGE were also involved. The expression levels of these molecules were reduced in EA and TRPV1−/− mice but not in the sham EA group. Our data provided evidence to support the clinical use of EA for treating chronic inflammatory pain.

  12. The Relationship between Childhood Trauma and Suicidal Ideation: Role of Maltreatment and Potential Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahk, Yong-Chun; Jang, Seon-Kyeong; Choi, Kee-Hong; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Childhood trauma is recognized as an important risk factor in suicidal ideation, however it is not fully understood how the different types of childhood maltreatment influence suicidal ideation nor what variables mediate the relationship between childhood trauma and suicidal ideation. This study examined the path from childhood trauma to suicidal ideation, including potential mediators. A sample of 211 healthy adults completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), Beck scale for Suicidal Ideation (BSI), Functional Social Support Questionnaire (FSSQ) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Path analysis was used to investigate the relationship among study variables. Of the several types of childhood maltreatment we considered, only childhood sexual abuse directly predicted suicidal ideation (β=0.215, p=0.001). Childhood physical abuse (β=0.049, 95% confidence interval: 0.011-0.109) and childhood emotional abuse (β=0.042, 95% confidence interval: 0.001-0.107) indirectly predicted suicidal ideation through their association with anxiety. Childhood neglect indirectly predicted suicidal ideation through association with perceived social support (β=0.085, 95% confidence interval: 0.041-0.154). Our results confirmed that childhood sexual abuse is a strong predictor of suicidal ideation. Perceived social support mediated the relationship between suicidal ideation and neglect. Anxiety fully mediated the relationship between suicidal ideation and both physical abuse and emotional abuse. Interventions to reduce suicidal ideation among survivors of childhood trauma should focus on anxiety symptoms and attempt to increase their social support.

  13. The role of cell progression in potentiation of radiation lethality by hyperthermia and by chemical means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djordjevic, B.; Lange, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    Aerobic stationary dense cultures of HeLa cells show very little potentiation of radiation lethality when irradiated cells are incubated with procaine HCl for two hours at 37 0 C, but if cells are diluted in fresh medium after irradiation and incubated for two hours with procaine, a high degree of radiopotentiation is obtained. This effect is not cell density dependent, since the addition of heavily irradiated cells to achieve comparable densities did not diminish lethality in the diluted culture. Procaine radiopotentiation at 37 0 C could be prevented by simultaneous administration with procaine of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Since cycloheximide inhibits cell cycle progression (with block points in G1 and G2) progression is strongly implicated in the phenomenon of radiopotentiation. Cell progression may be also involved in hyperthermic radiopotentiation: adding cycloheximide during heating of irradiated cells at 41 0 C for two hours increased survival. This effect of cycloheximide is even more pronounced in cells also treated with procaine during heating, thus diminishing the interaction of heat and procaine in radiopotentiation. Data pertaining to cell progression in synchronous cultures of HeLa cells under various treatment conditions are presented and discussed

  14. Metabolomics: A potential way to know the role of vitamin D on multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Córdoba, Diego; Luque de Castro, María D

    2017-03-20

    The literature about the influence of vitamin D on multiple sclerosis (MS) is very controversial, possibly as a result of the way through which the research on the subject has been conducted. The studies developed so far have been focused exclusively on gene expression: the effect of a given vitamin D metabolite on target receptors. The influence of the vitamin D status (either natural or after supplementation) on MS has been studied by measurement of the 25 monohydroxylated metabolite (also known as circulating form), despite the 1,25 dihydroxylated metabolite is considered the active form. In the light of the multiple metabolic pathways in which both forms of vitamin D (D 2 and D 3 ) are involved, monitoring of the metabolites is crucial to know the activity of the target enzymes as a function of both the state of the MS patient and the clinical treatment applied. The study of metabolomics aspects is here proposed to clarify the present controversy. In "omics" terms, our proposal is to take profit from up-stream information-thus is, from metabolomics to genomics-with a potential subsequent step to systems biology, if required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential Role of Curcumin Against Biofilm-Producing Organisms on the Skin: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Haas, Kelly N; Burney, Waqas; Andersen, Erich; Clark, Ashley K; Crawford, Robert; Sivamani, Raja K

    2017-12-01

    Turmeric root (Curcuma longa) is predominantly used as a spice, but has also long been known to possess antimicrobial, analgesic, antiinflammatory, and anticancer properties. One predominant group of active compounds in turmeric are curcuminoids, namely bright yellow-pigmented curcumin. While modern science has yet to fully investigate the therapeutic claims of turmeric and its derivatives, results have proven promising in decreasing pain and inflammation in arthritis, improving insulin sensitivity in diabetes, and even curing a variety of infections. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential for curcumin as an agent against microbial infections, with a special focus on the skin and in the development of bacterial biofilms. Curcumin has demonstrated bactericidal efficacy against a variety of infections when administered with antibiotics in several clinical studies, with consistent antimicrobial activity demonstrated in vitro, as well as in urinary tract infections, gingival infections, and chronic wound infections. Hypothesized mechanisms of action include curcumin's ability to perturb bacterial membranes, disturb protofillament assembly, and even impair bacterial virulence factors. Further investigation is needed to fully understand which organisms are most susceptible to the effects of curcumin and how curcumin can be implemented in dermatology to treat skin conditions such as chronic wounds and acne vulgaris. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The potential role of curcumin (diferuloylmethane in plasma cell dyscrasias/paraproteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Golombick

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Terry Golombick, Terry DiamondDepartment of Endocrinology, St George Hospital, Kogarah, AustraliaAbstract: Plasma cell dyscrasias, most commonly associated with paraproteinemia, are a diverse group of diseases. Monoclonal gammopathy of undefined significance (MGUS can precede multiple myeloma, a progressive neoplastic disease. MGUS occurs in association with a variety of other diseases and currently no treatment is recommended but rather “watchful waiting”. Given that the size of the M-protein is a risk factor for disease progression, early intervention with the aim of reducing the paraprotein load would provide an innovative therapeutic tool. Preliminary results from our pilot study show a drop of between 5% and 30% serum paraprotein in patients taking curcumin compared with patients on placebo. Curcumin is a diferuloylmethane present in extracts of the rhizome of the Curcuma longa plant. As a natural product, this has exciting potential in the treatment of plasma cell dyscrasias.Keywords: plasma cell dyscrasias, MGUS, myeloma, curcumin, paraproteinemia

  17. Role of riboswitches in gene regulation and their potential for algal biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ginnie T D T; Scaife, Mark A; Helliwell, Katherine E; Smith, Alison G

    2016-06-01

    Riboswitches are regulatory elements in messenger RNA to which specific ligands can bind directly in the absence of proteins. Ligand binding alters the mRNA secondary structure, thereby affecting expression of the encoded protein. Riboswitches are widespread in prokaryotes, with over 20 different effector ligands known, including amino acids, cofactors, and Mg(2+) ions, and gene expression is generally regulated by affecting translation or termination of transcription. In plants, fungi, and microalgae, riboswitches have been found, but only those that bind thiamine pyrophosphate. These eukaryotic riboswitches operate by causing alternative splicing of the transcript. Here, we review the current status of riboswitch research with specific emphasis on microalgae. We discuss new riboswitch discoveries and insights into the underlying mechanism of action, and how next generation sequencing technology provides the motivation and opportunity to improve our understanding of these rare but important regulatory elements. We also highlight the potential of microalgal riboswitches as a tool for synthetic biology and industrial biotechnology. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  18. Future World Energy Demand and Supply: China and India and the Potential Role of Fusion Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, John

    2005-01-01

    Massive increases in energy demand are projected for countries such as China and India over this century e.g., many 100s of megawatts of electricity (MWe) of additional electrical capacity by 2050, with more additions later, are being considered for each of them. All energy sources will be required to meet such a demand. Fortunately, while world energy demand will be increasing, the world is well endowed with a variety of energy resources. However, their distribution does not match the areas of demand and there are many environmental issues.Such geopolitical issues affect China and India and make it important for them to be able to deploy improved technologies. In this regard, South Korea is an interesting example of a country that has developed the capability to do advanced technologies - such as nuclear power plants. International collaborations in developing these technologies, such as the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER), may be important in all energy areas. Fusion energy is viewed as an interesting potential option in these three countries

  19. Potential Roles of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni in Abrogating Insulin Resistance and Diabetes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabilatul Hani Mohd-Radzman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a key factor in metabolic disorders like hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, which are promoted by obesity and may later lead to Type II diabetes mellitus. In recent years, researchers have identified links between insulin resistance and many noncommunicable illnesses other than diabetes. Hence, studying insulin resistance is of particular importance in unravelling the pathways employed by such diseases. In this review, mechanisms involving free fatty acids, adipocytokines such as TNFα and PPARγ and serine kinases like JNK and IKKβ, asserted to be responsible in the development of insulin resistance, will be discussed. Suggested mechanisms for actions in normal and disrupted states were also visualised in several manually constructed diagrams to capture an overall view of the insulin-signalling pathway and its related components. The underlying constituents of medicinal significance found in the Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni plant (among other plants that potentiate antihyperglycemic activities were explored in further depth. Understanding these factors and their mechanisms may be essential for comprehending the progression of insulin resistance towards the development of diabetes mellitus.

  20. Aligning Land Use with Land Potential: The Role of Integrated Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Liebig

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary agricultural land use is dominated by an emphasis on provisioning services by applying energy-intensive inputs through relatively uniform production systems across variable landscapes. This approach to agricultural land use is not sustainable. Achieving sustainable use of agricultural land should instead focus on the application of innovative management systems that provide multiple ecosystem services on lands with varying inherent qualities. Integrated agricultural systems (IAS represent an alternative approach to prevailing land use, whereby site-adapted enterprises are implemented to enhance synergistic resource transfer among enterprises and sustainable delivery of ecosystem services. Sustainable deployment of IAS on agricultural land involves placing the “right enterprise” at the “right intensity” at the “right time” on the “right location,” with the inherent attributes of location providing guidance for management decisions. There is an urgent need to design IAS that enhance delivery of ecosystem services while ensuring land potential thresholds are not exceeded.

  1. Evolving role of hadron irradiation: Potential and risks of hadrons heavier than protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Richard P.

    2007-01-01

    Proton irradiation has been developed to achieve the clinical benefit of improved 3D-dose distribution, with biological properties similar to X-rays. Neutron irradiation, though much less 3D-conformal than proton treatment, has been developed to take advantage of increased relative biologic effectiveness (RBE). Irradiation with hadrons heavier than protons (e.g. carbon and neon ions) exhibits the unique combination of improved 3D-dose distribution and increased RBE. The synchrotron technology is rapidly developing to improve the efficiency of delivering these heavier hadrons clinically, but important issues remain regarding optimization of dose and fractionation parameters in the treatment of various histopathologies located in different portions of the anatomy. Many laboratory animal and in vitro cellular studies, and some clinical studies, have been performed to enable better understanding of how to adjust dose-fractionation selection to improve the therapeutic ratio of tumor-cell kill to normal-tissue injury. This paper highlights the enhanced therapeutic potential and associated risks of treatment with these heavier hadrons

  2. The potential role of brain asymmetry in the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesluchowski, W; Dabrowska, A; Kedzior, K; Zagrajek, T

    1999-10-01

    The size asymmetry of cerebral hemispheres may predispose to head tilt and asymmetric blocking of the zygapophysial joints, potentially leading to the development of compensatory curvatures in the lower segments of the spine. To analyze the effects of spinal manipulation, maintained by an exercise program, on the progression of idiopathic adolescent scoliosis in 2 children aged 6 and 10. The scoliosis found was 16 and 60 degrees. For diagnosis and monitoring of therapy, we recorded qualitative parameters of shoulder asymmetry, axillary line asymmetry, and scapular angle position. Manual treatment consisted of the examinations of all sliding motion in zygapophysial joints and both sacroiliac joints and removing the limitations of the sliding motions according to the method of Karel Lewit. The treatment procedure consisted of 3 or 4 manipulations within 17 months and an exercise program. The manipulation effects were maintained by the exercise program. The exercises were done in 2 or 3 sessions weekly for a year. In both patients we observed that scoliosis decompensation was successfully stopped and the effects of the correction persisted for 10 years. Brain and head asymmetry may be only a transient state, predisposing to asymmetric blocking at the atlanto-occipital level. Removal of blocking may prevent curve progression in children who had adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The manipulative therapy may also have a promising effect on retarding curve progression when used in skeletally immature patient.

  3. Potential role of the Romanian research and industry on the small and medium reactors market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapeanu, S.N.; Bujor, A.; Comsa, O.

    1998-01-01

    The need of diversifying the energy sources, independence from foreign supplies and modernization of economy have constituted the major factors in implementation of nuclear energy in Romania. The choice of the heavy water reactor CANDU-600 was made on grounds of advanced safety features, proven efficient economic operation as well as on the technologic feasibility for manufacturing of components, equipment, instrumentation, heavy water and natural uranium fuel in Romania. Unlike turn-key acquisition approaches, the Romanian option provided an active national participation in construction the Cernavoda NPP. As consequence, important support was being given to development of the industries involved in the nuclear fuel cycle, manufacturing of equipment and nuclear materials, construction-montage, engineering, consulting, services, etc. This was done based on technology transfer, implementation of advanced design and execution standards, quality assurance procedures and modern nuclear safety requirements at international level. The efforts materialized in an important national participation in the construction of the Cernavoda NPP and all related programs are successful. Now, Romanian firms are also involved in supplying components, equipment and services to NPP's in other eastern and central Europeans countries. The paper presents the achievements of the Romanian economy in this field and the effort of the Romanian companies on the small and medium power reactors market. Lists with main R and D institutes, nuclear fuel cycle facilities as well as potential equipment suppliers are attached. (author)

  4. Potential role of the Romanian research and industry on the small and medium reactors market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapeanu, S N; Bujor, A [National Agency for Atomic Energy, Bucharest (Romania); Comsa, O [Center of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Projects, Bucharest (Romania)

    1998-02-01

    The need of diversifying the energy sources, independence from foreign supplies and modernization of economy have constituted the major factors in implementation of nuclear energy in Romania. The choice of the heavy water reactor CANDU-600 was made on grounds of advanced safety features, proven efficient economic operation as well as on the technologic feasibility for manufacturing of components, equipment, instrumentation, heavy water and natural uranium fuel in Romania. Unlike turn-key acquisition approaches, the Romanian option provided an active national participation in construction the Cernavoda NPP. As consequence, important support was being given to development of the industries involved in the nuclear fuel cycle, manufacturing of equipment and nuclear materials, construction-montage, engineering, consulting, services, etc. This was done based on technology transfer, implementation of advanced design and execution standards, quality assurance procedures and modern nuclear safety requirements at international level. The efforts materialized in an important national participation in the construction of the Cernavoda NPP and all related programs are successful. Now, Romanian firms are also involved in supplying components, equipment and services to NPP`s in other eastern and central Europeans countries. The paper presents the achievements of the Romanian economy in this field and the effort of the Romanian companies on the small and medium power reactors market. Lists with main R and D institutes, nuclear fuel cycle facilities as well as potential equipment suppliers are attached. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs.

  5. The potential role of meaning in life in the relationship between bullying victimization and suicidal ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kimberly L; Lovegrove, Peter J; Steger, Michael F; Chen, Peter Y; Cigularov, Konstantin P; Tomazic, Rocco G

    2014-02-01

    Adolescent bullying is a common problem in schools across America. The consequences of bullying are significant, and can include severe psychological trauma and suicide. A better understanding of the mechanisms that link bullying and suicidal ideation is needed in order to develop effective prevention and intervention initiatives. Meaning in life is a potential mechanism that has not been studied in this context. It was hypothesized that meaning in life could serve as both a mediator and a moderator of the relationship between bullying victimization and suicidal ideation. As a mediator, meaning in life is considered to explain why bullying victimization leads to suicidal ideation. As a moderator, meaning in life is considered to buffer the ill effect of bullying victimization on suicidal ideation. Data collected from an ethnically diverse sample of 2,936 (50% female), 6th-12th grade students from one urban school district in the Northeastern US were used to examine the hypotheses. The model for girls was consistent with mediation (i.e., meaning in life may explain how victimization leads to suicidal ideation). The model for boys was consistent with moderation (i.e., the ill effect of victimization on suicidal ideation was attenuated as meaning in life increased). Implications for prevention are discussed.

  6. The role of glomalin, a protein produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, in sequestering potentially toxic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Chavez, M.C.; Carrillo-Gonzalez, R.; Wright, S.F.; Nichols, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    Naturally occurring soil organic compounds stabilize potentially toxic elements (PTEs) such as Cu, Cd, Pb, and Mn. The hypothesis of this work was that an insoluble glycoprotein, glomalin, produced in copious amounts on hyphae of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) sequesters PTEs. Glomalin can be extracted from laboratory cultures of AMF and from soils. Three different experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 showed that glomalin extracted from two polluted soils contained 1.6-4.3 mg Cu, 0.02-0.08 mg Cd, and 0.62-1.12 mg Pb/g glomalin. Experiment 2 showed that glomalin from hyphae of an isolate of Gigaspora rosea sequestered up to 28 mg Cu/g in vitro. Experiment 3 tested in vivo differences in Cu sequestration by Cu-tolerant and non-tolerant isolates of Glomus mosseae colonizing sorghum. Plants were fed with nutrient solution containing 0.5, 10 or 20 μM of Cu. Although no differences between isolates were detected, mean values for the 20 μM Cu level were 1.6, 0.4, and 0.3 mg Cu/g for glomalin extracted from hyphae, from sand after removal of hyphae and from hyphae attached to roots, respectively. Glomalin should be considered for biostabilization leading to remediation of polluted soils. - Glomalin may be useful in remediation of toxic elements in soils

  7. The role of glomalin, a protein produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, in sequestering potentially toxic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Chavez, M.C.; Carrillo-Gonzalez, R.; Wright, S.F.; Nichols, K.A

    2004-08-01

    Naturally occurring soil organic compounds stabilize potentially toxic elements (PTEs) such as Cu, Cd, Pb, and Mn. The hypothesis of this work was that an insoluble glycoprotein, glomalin, produced in copious amounts on hyphae of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) sequesters PTEs. Glomalin can be extracted from laboratory cultures of AMF and from soils. Three different experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 showed that glomalin extracted from two polluted soils contained 1.6-4.3 mg Cu, 0.02-0.08 mg Cd, and 0.62-1.12 mg Pb/g glomalin. Experiment 2 showed that glomalin from hyphae of an isolate of Gigaspora rosea sequestered up to 28 mg Cu/g in vitro. Experiment 3 tested in vivo differences in Cu sequestration by Cu-tolerant and non-tolerant isolates of Glomus mosseae colonizing sorghum. Plants were fed with nutrient solution containing 0.5, 10 or 20 {mu}M of Cu. Although no differences between isolates were detected, mean values for the 20 {mu}M Cu level were 1.6, 0.4, and 0.3 mg Cu/g for glomalin extracted from hyphae, from sand after removal of hyphae and from hyphae attached to roots, respectively. Glomalin should be considered for biostabilization leading to remediation of polluted soils. - Glomalin may be useful in remediation of toxic elements in soils.

  8. The Potential Role of Probiotics in the Management of Childhood Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. William Critchfield

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI dysfunction has been reported in a substantial number of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Activation of the mucosal immune response and the presence of abnormal gut microbiota are repeatedly observed in these children. In children with ASD, the presence of GI dysfunction is often associated with increased irritability, tantrums, aggressive behaviour, and sleep disturbances. Moreover, modulating gut bacteria with short-term antibiotic treatment can lead to temporary improvement in behavioral symptoms in some individuals with ASD. Probiotics can influence microbiota composition and intestinal barrier function and alter mucosal immune responses. The administration of probiotic bacteria to address changes in the microbiota might, therefore, be a useful novel therapeutic tool with which to restore normal gut microbiota, reduce inflammation, restore epithelial barrier function, and potentially ameliorate behavioural symptoms associated with some children with ASD. In this review of the literature, support emerges for the clinical testing of probiotics in ASD, especially in the context of addressing GI symptoms.

  9. Potential Role of Carotenoids as Antioxidants in Human Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Fiedor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids constitute a ubiquitous group of isoprenoid pigments. They are very efficient physical quenchers of singlet oxygen and scavengers of other reactive oxygen species. Carotenoids can also act as chemical quenchers undergoing irreversible oxygenation. The molecular mechanisms underlying these reactions are still not fully understood, especially in the context of the anti- and pro-oxidant activity of carotenoids, which, although not synthesized by humans and animals, are also present in their blood and tissues, contributing to a number of biochemical processes. The antioxidant potential of carotenoids is of particular significance to human health, due to the fact that losing antioxidant-reactive oxygen species balance results in “oxidative stress”, a critical factor of the pathogenic processes of various chronic disorders. Data coming from epidemiological studies and clinical trials strongly support the observation that adequate carotenoid supplementation may significantly reduce the risk of several disorders mediated by reactive oxygen species. Here, we would like to highlight the beneficial (protective effects of dietary carotenoid intake in exemplary widespread modern civilization diseases, i.e., cancer, cardiovascular or photosensitivity disorders, in the context of carotenoids’ unique antioxidative properties.

  10. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R. J.

    2016-08-01

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions.

  11. Feline hypersomatotropism and acromegaly tumorigenesis: a potential role for the AIP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, C J; Niessen, S J; Catchpole, B; Fowkes, R C; Church, D B; Forcada, Y

    2017-04-01

    Acromegaly in humans is usually sporadic, however up to 20% of familial isolated pituitary adenomas are caused by germline sequence variants of the aryl-hydrocarbon-receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene. Feline acromegaly has similarities to human acromegalic families with AIP mutations. The aim of this study was to sequence the feline AIP gene, identify sequence variants and compare the AIP gene sequence between feline acromegalic and control cats, and in acromegalic siblings. The feline AIP gene was amplified through PCR using whole blood genomic DNA from 10 acromegalic and 10 control cats, and 3 sibling pairs affected by acromegaly. PCR products were sequenced and compared with the published predicted feline AIP gene. A single nonsynonymous SNP was identified in exon 1 (AIP:c.9T > G) of two acromegalic cats and none of the control cats, as well as both members of one sibling pair. The region of this SNP is considered essential for the interaction of the AIP protein with its receptor. This sequence variant has not previously been reported in humans. Two additional synonymous sequence variants were identified (AIP:c.481C > T and AIP:c.826C > T). This is the first molecular study to investigate a potential genetic cause of feline acromegaly and identified a nonsynonymous AIP single nucleotide polymorphism in 20% of the acromegalic cat population evaluated, as well as in one of the sibling pairs evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Waste Derived Sorbents and Their Potential Roles in Heavy Metal Remediation Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Y. W.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic waste materials that have the suitable inherent characteristics could be used as precursors for the synthesis of micro- and mesoporous materials, which present great potential to be re-utilized as sorbent materials for heavy metal remediation. Three inorganic waste materials were studied in the present work: water treatment residuals (WTRs from an integrated drinking water/wastewater treatment plant, and fly ash and bottom ash samples from a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI. These wastes were converted into three sorbent materials: ferrihydrite-like materials derived from drying of WTRs, hydroxyapatite-like material derived from ultrasound assisted synthesis of MSWI fly ash with phosphoric acid solution, and a zeolitic material derived from alkaline hydrothermal conversion of MSWI bottom ash. The performance of these materials, as well as their equivalent commercially available counterparts, was assessed for the adsorption of multiple heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, Zn from synthetic solutions, contaminated sediments and surface waters; and satisfactory results were obtained. In addition, it was observed that the combination of sorbents into sorbent mixtures enhanced the performance levels and, where applicable, stabilized inherently mobile contaminants from the waste derived sorbents.

  13. The potential role of earthworms in toxicity assessment of terrestrial hazardous waste sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goven, A.J.; Fitzpatrick, L.C. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Venables, B.J. [TRAC Labs., Inc., Denton, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Understanding the toxic potential and mechanisms of action of environmental xenobiotics is fundamental for assessing risk to public and environmental health. Current established protocols with earthworms focus primarily on defining the lethal effects of chemicals associated with soil contamination. Development of sublethal assays, until recently, has been largely ignored. Here the authors develop rationale for use of earthworms as a model organism for comprehensive assessment of risks to higher wildlife from contaminated soils and hazardous waste sites. They present a panel of lethal (LC/LD50`s) and sublethal measurement endpoint biomarkers, developed within the framework of the National Toxicology Program`s tiered immunotoxicity protocol for mice and according to published criteria for good measurement endpoints, that represent sensitive phylogenetically-conserved processes. Specifically the authors discuss immunosuppressive effects of terrestrial heavy metal and organic contamination on the innate, nonspecific and specific immune responses of earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, coelomocytes in terms of total and differential cell counts, lysozyme activity, nitroblue tetrazolium dye reduction, phagocytic activity and secretary rosette formation. Findings indicate that sensitive phylogenetically conserved immune responses present in invertebrates can be used to assess or predict risk to wildlife from contaminated soils.

  14. Potential Role of Carotenoids as Antioxidants in Human Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedor, Joanna; Burda, Květoslava

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids constitute a ubiquitous group of isoprenoid pigments. They are very efficient physical quenchers of singlet oxygen and scavengers of other reactive oxygen species. Carotenoids can also act as chemical quenchers undergoing irreversible oxygenation. The molecular mechanisms underlying these reactions are still not fully understood, especially in the context of the anti- and pro-oxidant activity of carotenoids, which, although not synthesized by humans and animals, are also present in their blood and tissues, contributing to a number of biochemical processes. The antioxidant potential of carotenoids is of particular significance to human health, due to the fact that losing antioxidant-reactive oxygen species balance results in “oxidative stress”, a critical factor of the pathogenic processes of various chronic disorders. Data coming from epidemiological studies and clinical trials strongly support the observation that adequate carotenoid supplementation may significantly reduce the risk of several disorders mediated by reactive oxygen species. Here, we would like to highlight the beneficial (protective) effects of dietary carotenoid intake in exemplary widespread modern civilization diseases, i.e., cancer, cardiovascular or photosensitivity disorders, in the context of carotenoids’ unique antioxidative properties. PMID:24473231

  15. The role of potential vorticity anomalies in the Somali Jet on Indian Summer Monsoon Intraseasonal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, P.; Joshi, M.; Dimri, A. P.; Turner, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    The climate of the Indian subcontinent is dominated by rainfall arising from the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) during June to September. Intraseasonal variability during the monsoon is characterized by periods of heavy rainfall interspersed by drier periods, known as active and break events respectively. Understanding and predicting such events is of vital importance for forecasting human impacts such as water resources. The Somali Jet is a key regional feature of the monsoon circulation. In the present study, we find that the spatial structure of Somali Jet potential vorticity (PV) anomalies varies considerably during active and break periods. Analysis of these anomalies shows a mechanism whereby sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies propagate north/northwestwards through the Arabian Sea, caused by a positive feedback loop joining anomalies in SST, convection, modification of PV by diabatic heating and mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer, wind-stress curl, and ocean upwelling processes. The feedback mechanism is consistent with observed variability in the coupled ocean-atmosphere system on timescales of approximately 20 days. This research suggests that better understanding and prediction of monsoon intraseasonal variability in the South Asian monsoon may be gained by analysis of the day-to-day dynamical evolution of PV in the Somali Jet.

  16. Recent Advances on the Role of Neurogenesis in the Adult Brain: Therapeutic Potential in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radad, Khaled; Moldzio, Rudolf; Al-Shraim, Mubarak; Kranner, Barbara; Krewenka, Christopher; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Generation of nascent functional neurons from neural stem cells in the adult brain has recently become largely accepted by the neuroscience community. In adult mammals including humans, the process of neurogenesis has been well documented in two brain regions; the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Some evidence has indicated neurogenesis in other regions of the adult mammalian brain such as the neocortex, cerebellum, striatum, amygdala and hypothalamus. These discoveries question a long standing dogma on nervous system regeneration and provide medical science with potential new strategies to harness the process of neurogenesis for treating neurological disabilities and neurodegenerative diseases. In this current review, we address the most recent advances on the role of neurogenesis in the adult brain and therapeutic potential in the two most common neurodegenerative disorders, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Potential role of pemetrexed in metastatic breast cancer patients pre-treated with anthracycline or taxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Yan Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This article reviews pharmacology, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, and safety in metastatic breast cancer patients, as well as the predictive biomarkers for outcome of treatment with pemetrexed-based regimens. Methods: PubMed, Embase, OVID, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched from the beginning of each database without any limitations to the date of publication. Search terms were ‘‘pemetrexed’’ or ‘‘LY231514’’ or “Alimta”, “metastatic breast cancer”, and “advanced breast cancer”. Results: There were 15 studies (n = 1002 meeting our criteria for evaluation. Eight single-agent trials (n = 551 and seven using combinations with other agents (n = 451 were identified that evaluated pemetrexed for use in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Response rates to pemetrexed as a single agent varied from 8% to 31%, and with combination therapy have been reported to be between 15.8% and 55.7%. With routine supplementation of patients with folic acid, dexamethasone, and vitamin B12, the toxicity profile of these patients was mild, including dose-limiting neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, as well as lower grades of reversible hepatotoxicity and gastrointestinal toxicity. Expression of thymidylate synthase (TS and other biomarkers are associated with the prognosis and sensitivity for pemetrexed in breast cancer. Conclusion: Pemetrexed has shown remarkable activity with acceptable toxicities for treatment of metastatic breast cancer patients. Translational research on pemetrexed in breast cancer identified biomarkers as well as additional genes important to its clinical activity and toxicity. Further research is needed to clarify the role of pemetrexed in breast cancer treatment in order to guide oncologists. Keywords: Metastatic breast cancer, Chemotherapy, Pemetrexed, Anthracycline, Taxane

  18. A potential role for endogenous proteins as sacrificial sunscreens and antioxidants in human tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Hibbert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR exposure of the skin is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Although both exogenous sunscreens and endogenous tissue components (including melanins and tryptophan-derived compounds reduce UVR penetration, the role of endogenous proteins in absorbing environmental UV wavelengths is poorly defined. Having previously demonstrated that proteins which are rich in UVR-absorbing amino acid residues are readily degraded by broadband UVB-radiation (containing UVA, UVB and UVC wavelengths here we hypothesised that UV chromophore (Cys, Trp and Tyr content can predict the susceptibility of structural proteins in skin and the eye to damage by physiologically relevant doses (up to 15.4 J/cm2 of solar UVR (95% UVA, 5% UVB. We show that: i purified suspensions of UV-chromophore-rich fibronectin dimers, fibrillin microfibrils and β- and γ-lens crystallins undergo solar simulated radiation (SSR-induced aggregation and/or decomposition and ii exposure to identical doses of SSR has minimal effect on the size or ultrastructure of UV chromophore-poor tropoelastin, collagen I, collagen VI microfibrils and α-crystallin. If UV chromophore content is a factor in determining protein stability in vivo, we would expect that the tissue distribution of Cys, Trp and Tyr-rich proteins would correlate with regional UVR exposure. From bioinformatic analysis of 244 key structural proteins we identified several biochemically distinct, yet UV chromophore-rich, protein families. The majority of these putative UV-absorbing proteins (including the late cornified envelope proteins, keratin associated proteins, elastic fibre-associated components and β- and γ-crystallins are localised and/or particularly abundant in tissues that are exposed to the highest doses of environmental UVR, specifically the stratum corneum, hair, papillary dermis and lens. We therefore propose that UV chromophore-rich proteins are localised in regions of high UVR

  19. A potential role for endogenous proteins as sacrificial sunscreens and antioxidants in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbert, Sarah A; Watson, Rachel E B; Gibbs, Neil K; Costello, Patrick; Baldock, Clair; Weiss, Anthony S; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Sherratt, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure of the skin is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Although both exogenous sunscreens and endogenous tissue components (including melanins and tryptophan-derived compounds) reduce UVR penetration, the role of endogenous proteins in absorbing environmental UV wavelengths is poorly defined. Having previously demonstrated that proteins which are rich in UVR-absorbing amino acid residues are readily degraded by broadband UVB-radiation (containing UVA, UVB and UVC wavelengths) here we hypothesised that UV chromophore (Cys, Trp and Tyr) content can predict the susceptibility of structural proteins in skin and the eye to damage by physiologically relevant doses (up to 15.4 J/cm(2)) of solar UVR (95% UVA, 5% UVB). We show that: i) purified suspensions of UV-chromophore-rich fibronectin dimers, fibrillin microfibrils and β- and γ-lens crystallins undergo solar simulated radiation (SSR)-induced aggregation and/or decomposition and ii) exposure to identical doses of SSR has minimal effect on the size or ultrastructure of UV chromophore-poor tropoelastin, collagen I, collagen VI microfibrils and α-crystallin. If UV chromophore content is a factor in determining protein stability in vivo, we would expect that the tissue distribution of Cys, Trp and Tyr-rich proteins would correlate with regional UVR exposure. From bioinformatic analysis of 244 key structural proteins we identified several biochemically distinct, yet UV chromophore-rich, protein families. The majority of these putative UV-absorbing proteins (including the late cornified envelope proteins, keratin associated proteins, elastic fibre-associated components and β- and γ-crystallins) are localised and/or particularly abundant in tissues that are exposed to the highest doses of environmental UVR, specifically the stratum corneum, hair, papillary dermis and lens. We therefore propose that UV chromophore-rich proteins are localised in regions of high UVR exposure

  20. Ecological Restoration of Coastal Sage Scrub and Its Potential Role in Habitat Conservation Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOWLER

    2000-07-01

    Extensive acreage loss of coastal sage scrub (CSS), isolation of surviving stands, and the federal listing of several animal species with obligate relationships to this plant community, particularly the threatened California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica), have led to attempts to create CSS to mitigate habitat lost to urban development and other causes. Many of these creations lie within habitat conservation plan (HCP) sites, and they could play a more prominent role by being repositories for plants taken from a single site having site-specific genetics. Among others, one technique that increases initial resemblance to natural stands uses digitized, to-scale photography, which has been ground-truthed to verify vascular plant associations, which appear as mosaics on a landscape. A combination of placing patches of salvaged, mature canopy plants within larger matrices of imprinted or container plant plots appears to significantly enhance immediate use by CSS obligate bird species, accelerate "spread" or expansion of CSS, and can also introduce many epiphytic taxa that otherwise would be slow or unable to occupy developing CSS creations. Reptile, amphibian, butterfly, and rodent diversity in a salvaged canopy restoration case study at the University of California, Irvine, showed CSS species foraging and inhabiting transplanted canopy patches. Using restoration techniques to expand existing CSS stands has more promise than creating isolated patches, and the creation of canopies resembling CSS mid-fire cycle stands is now common. Gnatcatchers and other birds use restorations for foraging and occasional nesting, and in some cases created stands along "biological corridors" appear to be useful to bird movement. Patches of transplanted sage scrub shrubs along habitat edges appear to break up linear edge effects. There are no data on which long-term survival, succession, or postfire behavior can be predicted for CSS restoration sites, and postfire community changes

  1. Potential role of multiple carbon fixation pathways during lipid accumulation in Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenzuela Jacob

    2012-06-01

    DIC levels. Based upon overall low gene expression levels for fatty acid synthesis, the results also suggest that the build-up of precursors to the acetyl-CoA carboxylases may play a more significant role in TAG synthesis rather than the actual enzyme levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylases per se. The presented insights into the types and timing of cellular responses to inorganic carbon will help maximize photoautotrophic carbon flow to lipid accumulation.

  2. Potential role of lycopene in targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 to combat hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan Alvi, Sahir; Ansari, Irfan A; Khan, Imran; Iqbal, Johar; Khan, M Salman

    2017-07-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK-9) is a serine protease of the proprotien convertase (PC) family that has profound effects on plasma low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, the major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), through its ability to mediate LDL receptor (LDL-R) protein degradation and reduced recycling to the surface of hepatocytes. Thus, the current study was premeditated not only to evaluate the role of lycopene in targeting the inhibition of PCSK-9 via modulation of genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in HFD rats but also to examine a correlation between HFD induced inflammatory cascades and subsequent regulation of PCSK-9 expression. Besides the effect of lycopene on hepatic PCSK-9 gene expression, PPI studies for PCSK-9-Lycopene complex and EGF-A of LDL-R were also performed via molecular informatics approach to assess the dual mode of action of lycopene in LDL-R recycling and increased removal of circulatory LDL-C. We for the first time deciphered that lycopene treatment significantly down-regulates the expression of hepatic PCSK-9 and HMGR, whereas, hepatic LDL-R expression was significantly up-regulated. Furthermore, lycopene ameliorated inflammation stimulated expression of PCSK-9 via suppressing the expression of inflammatory markers. The results from our molecular informatics studies confirmed that lycopene, while occupying the active site of PCSK-9 crystal structure, reduces the affinity of PCSK-9 to complex with EGF-A of LDL-R, whereas, atorvastatin makes PCSK-9-EGF-A complex formation more feasible than both of PCSK-9-EGF-A alone and Lycopene-PCSK-9-EGF-A complex. Based on above results, it can be concluded that lycopene exhibits potent hypolipidemic activities via molecular mechanisms that are either identical (HMGR inhibition) or distinct from that of statins (down-regulation of PCSK-9 mRNA synthesis). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that lycopene has this specific

  3. Knowledge-based treatment planning and its potential role in the transition between treatment planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Kathryn; Archer, Paul; Jackson, William; Sun, Yilun; Schipper, Matthew; Hamstra, Daniel; Matuszak, Martha

    2017-11-22

    Commissioning a new treatment planning system (TPS) involves many time-consuming tasks. We investigated the role that knowledge-based planning (KBP) can play in aiding a clinic's transition to a new TPS. Sixty clinically treated prostate/prostate bed intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were exported from an in-house TPS and were used to create a KBP model in a newly implemented commercial application. To determine the benefit that KBP may have in a TPS transition, the model was tested on 2 groups of patients. Group 1 consisted of the first 10 prostate/prostate bed patients treated in the commercial TPS after the transition from the in-house TPS. Group 2 consisted of 10 patients planned in the commercial TPS after 8 months of clinical use. The KBP-generated plan was compared with the clinically used plan in terms of plan quality (ability to meet planning objectives and overall dose metrics) and planning efficiency (time required to generate clinically acceptable plans). The KBP-generated plans provided a significantly improved target coverage (p = 0.01) compared with the clinically used plans for Group 1, but yielded plans of comparable target coverage to the clinically used plans for Group 2. For the organs at risk, the KBP-generated plans produced lower doses, on average, for every normal-tissue objective except for the maximum dose to 0.1 cc of rectum. The time needed for the KBP-generated plans ranged from 6 to 15 minutes compared to 30 to 150 and 15 to 60 minutes for manual planning in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. KBP is a promising tool to aid in the transition to a new TPS. Our study indicates that high-quality treatment plans could have been generated in the newly implemented TPS more efficiently compared with not using KBP. Even after 8 months of the clinical use, KBP still showed an increase in plan quality and planning efficiency compared with manual planning. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published

  4. Potential Role of In Vivo Confocal Microscopy for Imaging Corneal Nerves in Transthyretin Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Antoine; Cauquil, Cecile; Dupas, Benedicte; Labbé, Antoine; Baudouin, Christophe; Barreau, Emmanuel; Théaudin, Marie; Lacroix, Catherine; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Benmalek, Anouar; Labetoulle, Marc; Adams, David

    2016-09-01

    Small fiber neuropathy (SFN) is an important feature of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP). A practical and objective method for the clinical evaluation of SFN is needed to improve the management of this disease. In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) of the corneal nerves, a rapid noninvasive technique, may be used as a surrogate marker of SFN. To determine the correlation of SFN with IVCM in patients with TTR-FAP. A prospective, single-center, cross-sectional controlled study was conducted at the French National Reference Center for TTR-FAP from June 1, 2013, to June 30, 2014. Fifteen patients with TTR-FAP underwent a complete neurologic examination, including Neuropathy Impairment Score of the Lower Limbs, hand grip strength, and evaluation of vegetative dysfunction, as well as electrophysiologic studies (nerve conduction and electrochemical skin conductance) and intraepidermal nerve fiber density quantification. Patients and 15 controls (matched for age and sex) underwent ophthalmologic assessments, including corneal esthesiometry and IVCM. Correlation of corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL) with the severity of SFN. Of the 15 patients enrolled in the study, 6 were women (40%); mean (SD) age was 54.4 [13.7] years. The CNFL was shorter in the patients than in controls (13.08 vs 17.57 mm/mm2; difference of 4.49 [95% CI, 0.72 to 8.27]; P = .02). The patients' CNFL correlated with the severity of both autonomic neuropathy assessed by the Compound Autonomic Dysfunction Test (rs = 0.66 [95% CI, 0.22 to 0.87]; P = .008) or electrochemical skin conductance (rs = 0.80 [95% CI, 0.50 to 0.93]; P < .001) and sensorimotor neuropathy assessed using the Neuropathy Impairment Score of the Lower Limbs (rs = -0.58 [95% CI, -0.84 to -0.11]; P = .02). Patients with altered sensory nerve action potentials and intraepidermal nerve fiber density had a shorter CNFL (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). The CNFL could be measured in all

  5. Potential role of miR-9 and miR-223 in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuinness Eamonn

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression by binding to target mRNAs. miRNAs have not been comprehensively studied in recurrent ovarian cancer, yet an incurable disease. Results Using real-time RT-PCR, we obtained distinct miRNA expression profiles between primary and recurrent serous papillary ovarian adenocarcinomas (n = 6 in a subset of samples previously used in a transcriptome approach. Expression levels of top dysregulated miRNA genes, miR-223 and miR-9, were examined using TaqMan PCR in independent cohorts of fresh frozen (n = 18 and FFPE serous ovarian tumours (n = 22. Concordance was observed on TaqMan analysis for miR-223 and miR-9 between the training cohort and the independent test cohorts. Target prediction analysis for the above miRNA "recurrent metastatic signature" identified genes previously validated in our transcriptome study. Common biological pathways well characterised in ovarian cancer were shared by miR-9 and miR-223 lists of predicted target genes. We provide strong evidence that miR-9 acts as a putative tumour suppressor gene in recurrent ovarian cancer. Components of the miRNA processing machinery, such as Dicer and Drosha are not responsible for miRNA deregulation in recurrent ovarian cancer, as deluded by TaqMan and immunohistochemistry. Conclusion We propose a miRNA model for the molecular pathogenesis of recurrent ovarian cancer. Some of the differentially deregulated miRNAs identified correlate with our previous transcriptome findings. Based on integrated transcriptome and miRNA analysis, miR-9 and miR-223 can be of potential importance as biomarkers in recurrent ovarian cancer.

  6. Update on Vitamin E and Its Potential Role in Preventing or Treating Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Cosby A; McEvoy, Cindy T; Aschner, Judy L; Kirk, Ashudee; Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Cook-Mills, Joan M; Moore, Paul E; Walsh, William F; Hartert, Tina V

    2018-03-07

    Vitamin E is obtained only through the diet and has a number of important biological activities, including functioning as an antioxidant. Evidence that free radicals may contribute to pathological processes such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a disease of prematurity associated with increased lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress, led to trials of the antioxidant vitamin E (α-tocopherol) to prevent BPD with variable results. These trials were all conducted at supraphysiologic doses and 2 of these trials utilized a formulation containing a potentially harmful excipient. Since 1991, when the last of these trials was conducted, both neonatal management strategies for minimizing oxygen and ventilator-related lung injury and our understanding of vitamin E isoforms in respiratory health have advanced substantially. It is now known that there are differences between the effects of vitamin E isoforms α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol on the development of respiratory morbidity and inflammation. What is not known is whether improvements in physiologic concentrations of individual or combinations of vitamin E isoforms during pregnancy or following preterm birth might prevent or reduce BPD development. The answers to these questions require adequately powered studies targeting pregnant women at risk of preterm birth or their premature infants immediately following birth, especially in certain subgroups that are at increased risk of vitamin E deficiency (e.g., smokers). The objective of this review is to compile, update, and interpret what is known about vitamin E isoforms and BPD since these first studies were conducted, and suggest future research directions. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Neuromuscular fatigue during exercise: Methodological considerations, etiology and potential