WorldWideScience

Sample records for possibly release materials

  1. Training Materials for Release 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wake, Jo Dugstad; Hansen, Cecilie; Debus, Kolja

    This document, D7.4 – training materials for release 3, provides an overview of the training material for version 3 of the NEXT-TELL tools and methods. Previous documents submitted as part of work package 7, which is about teacher training, are D7.1 – Training Concept, D7.2 – Training Materials...... for Release 1 and D7.3 – Training Materials for Release 2. D7.4 builds on D7.1 and D7.2 and D7.3. D7.4 contains further development of previous work within WP7, essentially a revised theoretical approach to the teacher training, and expansion of the notion of tool training. The media in use have been expanded...

  2. Triphenylmethane, a possible moderator material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hügle, Th.; Mocko, M.; Hartl, M.A.; Daemen, L.L.; Muhrer, G.

    2014-01-01

    New challenges in neutron scattering result in an increased demand in novel moderator concepts. The most direct way to address the problem would be to change the moderator material itself. However the range of available neutron moderator materials is small. In this paper, we discuss triphenylmethane, a possible moderator material especially promising for cold neutron moderator applications. Our investigations include a parallel experimental and theoretical approach ranging from cross-section measurements and inelastic neutron spectroscopy to molecular modeling. -- Highlights: • Triphenylmethane as a potential moderator material is discussed. • Parallel theoretical and experimental approach. • Possibly very useful for cold neutrons

  3. Releasing growth factors from activated human platelets after chitosan stimulation: a possible bio-material for platelet-rich plasma preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, E-Chin; Chou, Tz-Chong; Gau, Ching-Hwa; Tu, Hsiao-Pei; Chen, Yen-Teen; Fu, Earl

    2006-10-01

    Thrombin is commonly used for activating the platelets and releasing the growth factors on the application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). We have previously reported that chitosan can enhance rabbit platelet aggregation. In this study, the effects of chitosan on the subsequent growth factors release after human platelets activation were examined to evaluate the possibility of chitosan being used as a substitute for thrombin during PRP preparation. Human platelet activation was determined by aggregation, adhesion and alpha-granule membrane glycoprotein expression. Platelet aggregation was measured by the turbidimetric method, the adhesion was directly examined on chitosan-coated glass plates under light microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the alpha-granule membrane glycoprotein was detected by fluorescent isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated anti-CD61 antibody through flow cytometry. The subsequent epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 release from platelets were assayed by ELISA after mixing with chitosan. The enhancing effects on the platelet adhesion and the aggregation from chitosan were observed. Under both microscopes, the adhesive platelets on the chitosan-coated plates were not only greater in number but also earlier in activation than those on the control plates. With flow cytometry, increased glycoprotein IIIa expression in platelets was detected after chitosan treatment. Greater concentrations of growth factors were measured from PRP after chitosan treatment than after the solvent treatment. Because of the observations of growth factors releasing from activated human platelets after chitosan stimulation, we suggest that chitosan may be an appropriate substitute for thrombin in PRP preparation.

  4. Release of powdered material from waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H.P.; Gruendler, D.; Peiffer, F.; Seehars, H.D.

    1990-01-01

    Possible incidents in the operational phase of the planned German repository KONRAD for radioactive waste with negligible heat production were investigated to assess the radiological consequences. For these investigations release fractions of the radioactive materials are required. This paper deals with the determination of the release of powdered material from waste packages under mechanical stress. These determinations were based on experiments. The experimental procedure and the process parameters chosen in accordance with the conditions in the planned repository will be described. The significance of the experimental results is discussed with respect to incidents in the planned repository. 8 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Nanostructured Diclofenac Sodium Releasing Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Harlin, A.; Seppälä, J.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Various techniques have been developed to produce second generation biomaterials for tissue repair. These include extrusion, molding, salt leaching, spinning etc, but success in regenerating tissues has been limited. It is important to develop porous material, yet with a fibrous structure for it to be biomimetic. To mimic biological tissues, the extra-cellular matrix usually contains fibers in nano scale. To produce nanostructures, self-assembly or electrospinning can be used. Adding a drug release function to such a material may advance applications further for use in controlled tissue repair. This turns the resulting device into a multifunctional porous, fibrous structure to support cells and drug releasing properties in order to control tissue reactions. A bioabsorbable poly(ɛ-caprolactone-co-D,L lactide) 95/5 (PCL) was made into diluted solution using a solvent, to which was added 2w-% of diclofenac sodium (DS). Nano-fibers were made by electrospinning onto substrate. Microstructure of the resulting nanomat was studied using SEM and drug release profiles with UV/VIS spectroscopy. Thickness of the electrospun nanomat was about 2 mm. SEM analysis showed that polymeric nano-fibers containing drug particles form a highly interconnected porous nano structure. Average diameter of the nano-fibers was 130 nm. There was a high burst peak in drug release, which decreased to low levels after one day. The used polymer has slow a degradation rate and though the nanomat was highly porous with a large surface area, drug release rate is slow. It is feasible to develop a nano-fibrous porous structure of bioabsorbable polymer, which is loaded with test drug. Drug release is targeted at improving the properties of biomaterial for use in controlled tissue repair and regeneration.

  6. Radionuclides release possibility analysis of MSR at various accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choong Wie; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    There are some accidents which go beyond our expectation such as Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster and amounts of radionuclides release to environment, so more effort and research are conducted to prevent it. MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) is one of GEN-IV reactor types, and its coolant and fuel are mixtures of molten salt. MSR has a schematic like figure 1 and it has different features with the solid fuel reactor, but most important and interesting feature of MSR is its many safety systems. For example, MSR has a large negative void coefficient. Even though power increases, the reactor slows down soon. Radionuclides release possibility of MSR was analyzed at various accident conditions including Chernobyl and Fukushima ones. The MSR was understood to prevent the severe accident by the negative reactivity coefficient and the absence of explosive material such as water at the Chernobyl disaster condition. It was expected to contain fuel salts in the reactor building and not to release radionuclides into environment even if the primary system could be ruptured or broken and fuel salts would be leaked at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster condition of earthquake and tsunami. The MSR, which would not lead to the severe accident and therefore prevents the fuel release to the environment at many expected scenarios, was thought to have priority in the aspect of accidents. A quantitative analysis and a further research are needed to evaluate the possibility of radionuclide release to the environment at the various accident conditions based on the simple comparison of the safety feature between MSR and solid fuel reactor.

  7. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1991-05-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1988 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1988 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized. 16 tabs

  8. Determination of fungal spore release from wet building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildesø, J.; Wurtz, H.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2003-01-01

    The release and transport of fungal spores from water-damaged building materials is a key factor for understanding the exposure to particles of fungal origin as a possible cause of adverse health effects associated to growth of fungi indoors. In this study, the release of spores from nine species...... of typical indoor fungi has been measured under controlled conditions. The fungi were cultivated for a period of 4-6 weeks on sterilized wet wallpapered gypsum boards at a relative humidity (RH) of approximately 97%. A specially designed small chamber (P-FLEC) was placed on the gypsum board. The release...

  9. Fluoride-releasing restorative materials and secondary caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, John; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Donly, Kevin; Flaitz, Catherine

    2003-03-01

    Secondary caries is responsible for 60 percent of all replacement restorations in the typical dental practice. Risk factors for secondary caries are similar to those for primary caries development. Unfortunately, it is not possible to accurately predict which patients are at risk for restoration failure. During the past several decades, fluoride-releasing dental materials have become a part of the dentist's armamentarium. Considerable fluoride is released during the setting reaction and for periods up to eight years following restoration placement. This released fluoride is readily taken up by the cavosurface tooth structure, as well as the enamel and root surfaces adjacent to the restoration. Resistance against caries along the cavosurface and the adjacent smooth surface has been shown in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Fluoride-releasing dental materials provide for improved resistance against primary and secondary caries in coronal and root surfaces. Plaque and salivary fluoride levels are elevated to a level that facilitates remineralization. In addition, the fluoride released to dental plaque adversely affects the growth of lactobacilli and mutans streptococci by interference with bacterial enzyme systems. Fluoride recharging of these dental materials is readily achieved with fluoridated toothpastes, fluoride mouthrinses, and other sources of topical fluoride. This allows fluoride-releasing dental materials to act as intraoral fluoride reservoirs. The improvement in the properties of dental materials with the ability to release fluoride has improved dramatically in the past decade, and it is anticipated that in the near future the vast majority of restorative procedures will employ fluoride-releasing dental materials as bonding agents, cavity liners, luting agents, adhesives for orthodontic brackets, and definitive restoratives.

  10. FERLENT - a controlled release fertilizer produced from a polymer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Mayra; Arces, Milagros; Cuesta, Ernesto; Corredera, Pilar; Sardina, Carmen; Rieumont, Jacques; Quintana, Patricia; Bartolo, Pascual; Guenther, Bluma

    2011-01-01

    The possibility to use release controlled fertilizers in the agriculture of the tropical countries is more important than in the agriculture of the countries of the template regions. In this context, this work purpose the development of a new Fertilizer of Controlled Release named FERLENT, which was obtained starting from a polymeric material, under controlled conditions which allowed to corroborate the adjustment of the synthesis parameters under the modulate of nutrients liberation. It was characterized by, Scanning Microscopy Electron (SEM), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). (author)

  11. Stochastic Modeling of Radioactive Material Releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrus, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pope, Chad [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Nonreactor nuclear facilities operated under the approval authority of the U.S. Department of Energy use unmitigated hazard evaluations to determine if potential radiological doses associated with design basis events challenge or exceed dose evaluation guidelines. Unmitigated design basis events that sufficiently challenge dose evaluation guidelines or exceed the guidelines for members of the public or workers, merit selection of safety structures, systems, or components or other controls to prevent or mitigate the hazard. Idaho State University, in collaboration with Idaho National Laboratory, has developed a portable and simple to use software application called SODA (Stochastic Objective Decision-Aide) that stochastically calculates the radiation dose associated with hypothetical radiological material release scenarios. Rather than producing a point estimate of the dose, SODA produces a dose distribution result to allow a deeper understanding of the dose potential. SODA allows users to select the distribution type and parameter values for all of the input variables used to perform the dose calculation. SODA then randomly samples each distribution input variable and calculates the overall resulting dose distribution. In cases where an input variable distribution is unknown, a traditional single point value can be used. SODA was developed using the MATLAB coding framework. The software application has a graphical user input. SODA can be installed on both Windows and Mac computers and does not require MATLAB to function. SODA provides improved risk understanding leading to better informed decision making associated with establishing nuclear facility material-at-risk limits and safety structure, system, or component selection. It is important to note that SODA does not replace or compete with codes such as MACCS or RSAC, rather it is viewed as an easy to use supplemental tool to help improve risk understanding and support better informed decisions. The work was

  12. Stochastic Modeling of Radioactive Material Releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrus, Jason; Pope, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Nonreactor nuclear facilities operated under the approval authority of the U.S. Department of Energy use unmitigated hazard evaluations to determine if potential radiological doses associated with design basis events challenge or exceed dose evaluation guidelines. Unmitigated design basis events that sufficiently challenge dose evaluation guidelines or exceed the guidelines for members of the public or workers, merit selection of safety structures, systems, or components or other controls to prevent or mitigate the hazard. Idaho State University, in collaboration with Idaho National Laboratory, has developed a portable and simple to use software application called SODA (Stochastic Objective Decision-Aide) that stochastically calculates the radiation dose associated with hypothetical radiological material release scenarios. Rather than producing a point estimate of the dose, SODA produces a dose distribution result to allow a deeper understanding of the dose potential. SODA allows users to select the distribution type and parameter values for all of the input variables used to perform the dose calculation. SODA then randomly samples each distribution input variable and calculates the overall resulting dose distribution. In cases where an input variable distribution is unknown, a traditional single point value can be used. SODA was developed using the MATLAB coding framework. The software application has a graphical user input. SODA can be installed on both Windows and Mac computers and does not require MATLAB to function. SODA provides improved risk understanding leading to better informed decision making associated with establishing nuclear facility material-at-risk limits and safety structure, system, or component selection. It is important to note that SODA does not replace or compete with codes such as MACCS or RSAC, rather it is viewed as an easy to use supplemental tool to help improve risk understanding and support better informed decisions. The work was

  13. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants (1976)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, T.R.

    1978-11-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1976 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1976 release data are compared with previous year releases in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized

  14. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, T.R.

    1978-11-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1977 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1977 release data are compared with previous years releases in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized

  15. Stimuli-Responsive Materials for Controlled Release Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2015-01-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. To address this outstanding problem, the design and fabrication of stimuli-responsive materials are pursued

  16. Photoactivation and photocontrolled release of bioactive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, D; Petrak, K

    1989-01-01

    Photoresponsive systems are widespread in nature, and life processes such as photosynthesis, vision, phototropism, and phototaxis are linked with structural changes of molecules caused by sunlight. Similar photochemical transformations can be employed to render synthetic agrochemicals and drugs active or to govern their bioavailability at the site of action. Related fundamental physical and chemical processes are discussed as part of the introductory paragraph. In agrochemical applications mainly three different ways have been reported as to how light can be utilized to optimize pesticidal effects in crop protection. The hypersensitization of certain pests to sunlight by chemical compounds represents an effective approach and exists also as a natural mechanism of defense. Photo-removable protective groups and various photoreactive structural moieties have successfully been applied for the rational design of light-activated propesticides. Finally, daylight can function as a triggering and governing factor in controlled-release systems based on photoresponsive polymers. Among the major advantages of light-regulated pesticides, the target-directed activation and the inherent detoxification predominate. In biomedical applications, light has also been used to activate compounds to time their action. Although radiation of various types (microwave, X-ray, and gamma radiation) has been used extensively for both treatment and diagnostics, the limited access of UV and visible light to most tissues of the body prevents its general use as the activating trigger. We review here three areas only: cutaneous photobiology-related applications; photoaffinity labeling; and porphyrins as therapeutic agents.

  17. Sulfur Release from Cement Raw Materials during Solid Fuel Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma; Larsen, Morten B.; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    During combustion of solid fuels in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns, local reducing conditions can occur and cause decomposition of sulfates from cement raw materials. Decomposition of sulfates is problematic because it increases the gas-phase SO2 concentration, which may cause...... deposit formation in the kiln system. SO2 release from cement raw materials during combustion of solid fuels has been studied experimentally in a high temperature rotary drum. The fuels were tire rubber, pine wood, petcoke, sewage sludge, and polypropylene. The SO2 release from the raw materials...

  18. Stimuli-Responsive Materials for Controlled Release Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2015-04-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. To address this outstanding problem, the design and fabrication of stimuli-responsive materials are pursued to guarantee the controlled release of cargo at a specific time and with an accurate amount. Upon applying different stimuli such as light, magnetic field, heat, pH change, enzymes or redox, functional materials change their physicochemical properties through physical transformation or chemical reactions, allowing the release of payload agents on demand. This dissertation studied three stimuli-responsive membrane systems for controlled release from films of macro sizes to microcapsules of nano sizes. The first membrane system is a polymeric composite film which can decrease and sustain diffusion upon light irradiation. The photo-response of membranes is based on the photoreaction of cinnamic derivatives. The second one is composite membrane which can improve diffusion upon heating. The thermo-response of membranes comes from the volume phase transition ability of hydrogels. The third one is microcapsule which can release encapsulated agents upon light irradiation. The photo-response of capsules results from the photoreaction of nitrobenzyl derivatives. The study on these membrane systems reveals that stimuli-responsive release can be achieved by utilizing different functional materials on either macro or micro level. Based on the abundant family of smart materials, designing and fabricating stimuli-responsive systems shall lead to various advanced release processes on demand for biomedical applications.

  19. Methodology for performing measurements to release material from radiological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, J.S.; Gardner, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the existing and proposed methodologies for performing measurements of contamination prior to releasing material for uncontrolled use at the Hanford Site. The technical basis for the proposed methodology, a modification to the existing contamination survey protocol, is also described. The modified methodology, which includes a large-area swipe followed by a statistical survey, can be used to survey material that is unlikely to be contaminated for release to controlled and uncontrolled areas. The material evaluation procedure that is used to determine the likelihood of contamination is also described

  20. Modeling release of chemicals from multilayer materials into food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xiu-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The migration of chemicals from materials into food is predictable by various mathematical models. In this article, a general mathematical model is developed to quantify the release of chemicals through multilayer packaging films based on Fick's diffusion. The model is solved numerically to elucidate the effects of different diffusivity values of different layers, distribution of chemical between two adjacent layers and between material and food, mass transfer at the interface of material and food on the migration process.

  1. Modelling of motorway tunnels scenario for utilization of conditionally released radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrncir, Tomas; Panik, Michal; Necas, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Considerable amount of solid radioactive waste with radioactivity slightly above the limits for unconditional release is generated during the decommissioning of the nuclear installations. Conditional release deals with precisely this type of materials with activity slightly above limits in order to save considerable financial resources, which would be otherwise spend on treatment, conditioning and disposal of these materials at appropriate repository. The basic principles of conditional release as well as possibilities of reusing of the conditionally released materials are described. One of these possibilities of the reusing was chosen and application proposal of conditional release of metal waste - steel reinforcement in the concrete, which could be used for construction of motorway tunnels, was created. The computer code Visiplan 4.0 3D ALARA planning tool software was used for the calculation of effective individual dose for personnel constructing the tunnel and for critical group related to scenario. Particular models for individual scenarios of conditional release have been developed within the scope of this software code. The aim of the paper is to determine a level of the radioactivity of conditional released materials to avoid over exceeding the value of annual individual effective dose 10μSv/year established by international recommendations. (author)

  2. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants: Annual report, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1987-08-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1984 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1984 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  3. Electrical conduction in solid materials physicochemical bases and possible applications

    CERN Document Server

    Suchet, J P

    2013-01-01

    Electrical Conduction in Solid Materials (Physicochemical Bases and Possible Applications) investigates the physicochemical bases and possible applications of electrical conduction in solid materials, with emphasis on conductors, semiconductors, and insulators. Topics range from the interatomic bonds of conductors to the effective atomic charge in conventional semiconductors and magnetic transitions in switching semiconductors. Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with a description of electrical conduction in conductors and semiconductors, metals and alloys, as well as interatomic bon

  4. Response to a radioactive materials release having a transboundary impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Compared with an accidental release of radioactive material which is confined to the accident State, a transboundary release has added dimensions which were not fully anticipated in publications dealing with response to accidents at nuclear facilities. The new aspects to the problem may be summarized as follows: (1) A transboundary release of radioactive material, as distinct from a release which affects only the accident State, has international repercussions in the following ways: Potentially at least, the difficulties associated with a transboundary release may be magnified in those States that have no nuclear facilities of their own and may, therefore, have foreseen no need for resources to assess and deal with radioactive contamination of their food supplies, their water and their environment appropriately. International trade, in food commodities particularly, may be severely affected. Issues of compensation may arise for which the dispute settlement mechanisms are weak or non-existent. (2) Many Member States are in such geographic locations that they could be affected by a transboundary release occurring in any of their surrounding neighbour States. Planning for and responding to such an event is necessarily more difficult than planning for an accidental release from a single, identified nuclear facility. (3) Deposits of radioactive material from a distant source are apt to be highly unpredictable. Depending on weather conditions, they may be localized in a random fashion or widespread. Because of the international dimension of the problem and its essentially unpredictable character it is recommended here that planning for such events should be carried at the national or federal government level rather than at provincial government level. 14 refs

  5. The release of lindane from contaminated building materials

    OpenAIRE

    Volchek, Konstantin; Thouin, Geneviève; Kuang, Wenxing; Li, Ken; Tezel, F. Handan; Brown, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    The release of the organochlorine pesticide lindane (γ-hexachlorocyclohexane) from several types of contaminated building materials was studied to assess inhalation hazard and decontamination requirements in response to accidental and/or intentional spills. The materials included glass, polypropylene carpet, latex-painted drywall, ceramic tiles, vinyl floor tiles, and gypsum ceiling tiles. For each surface concentration, an equilibrium concentration was determined in the vapour phase of the s...

  6. Developments in consequence modelling of accidental releases of hazardous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, H.

    2012-01-01

    The modelling of consequences of releases of hazardous materials in the Netherlands has mainly been based on the “Yellow Book”. Although there is no updated version of this official publication, new insights have been developed during the last decades. This article will give an overview of new

  7. Investigation of Appropriate Applications for Reuse of Conditionally Released Materials from Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniska, V.; Vasko, M.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    During the decommissioning (D and D) phase of nuclear facility life cycle a lot of original facility materials are generated as a primary decommissioning waste. One portion of these materials is unconditionally releasable, i.e. their radioactivity content is below the stipulated concentration limits for clearance thus they can be further recycled or dumped without any constraints as a conventional waste. Second portion of generated waste is waste with radioactivity content higher than limits for free release and it has to be handled and disposed of as the radioactive waste (RAW) within special RAW repositories. Disposal of RAW is quite expensive therefore it seems to be reasonable to reduce amount of waste destined for disposal and to identify RAW with radioactivity content slightly higher than stipulated concentration limits for unconditional release which could be released with some constraints for further recycling and reuse while stipulated safety requirements are observed, i.e. conditional release of RAW. The most perspective materials from decommissioning for such material reuse are steel and concrete. These materials can be reused within the long term robust constructions for applications with infrequent or only short time presence of personnel/public, minimum interaction of human with materials and controllable interaction of materials with environment. Ideal applications for deployment of such materials are steel reinforcement in pylons for highways, tunnel linings, industry prefabricates, big tanks or linings in nuclear applications, for concrete debris it can be filling material for road construction. Presented paper deals with preconditions for reuse of conditionally released materials. It maps legal pre-requisites in the Slovak Republic, appropriate material application scenarios, methodology of assessment of impact on human health and environment - external and internal exposure assessment, possible optimisation of scenarios and estimation of

  8. Experiments to quantify airborne release from packages with dispersible radioactive materials under accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, R.; Lange, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Koeln (Germany); Koch, W.; Nolte, O. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin (ITEM), Nikolai-Fuchs-Str.1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    For transport or handling accidents involving packages with radioactive materials and the assessment of potential radiological consequences, for the review of current requirements of the IAEA Transport Regulations, and for their possible further development reliable release data following mechanical impact are required. Within this context a research project was carried out which extends the basis for a well-founded examination of the contemporary system of requirements of 'Low Specific Activity' (LSA)-type materials and allows for its further development where appropriate. This project comprises a prior system-analytical examination and an experimental programme aiming at improving the general physical understanding of the release process as well as the quantity and the characteristics of airborne released material for non-fixed dispersible LSA-II material upon mechanical impact. Impaction experiments applying small, medium and real sized specimens of different dispersible materials revealed that the release behaviour of dispersible powders strongly depends upon material properties, e.g. particle size distribution and cohesion forces. The highest experimentally determined release fraction of respirable mass (AED < 10 {mu}m) amounted to about 2 % and was obtained for 2 kg of un-contained easily dispersible pulverized fly ash (PFA). For larger un-contained PFA specimen the release fraction decreases. However, packaging containing powdery material substantially reduces the airborne release fraction. The measured airborne release fractions for a 200 l drum with Type A certificate containing PFA were about a factor of 50 to 100 lower than for un-contained material. For a drop height of 9 m the airborne release fraction amounted to about 4 x 10{sup -5}. This value should be applicable for most of transport and handling accidents with mechanical impact. For a metal container of Type IP-2 or better which contains powder masses of 100 kg or more this release

  9. Assessment of consequences from airborne releases of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, P.E.; Blond, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    Over the past several years, the manner in which assessments have been made of the consequences of large airborne releases of radioactive material has not changed much conceptually. The models to describe the atmospheric dispersion of the radioactive material have generally been time-invariant, i.e., the meteorological conditions (thermal stability, wind speed, and precipitation) are invariant during release and the subsequent period of radiation exposure of the population to the airborne material. The frequency distribution of the meteorological conditions are determined by analyzing several years of weather data from the appropriate geographical location. In reality, weather is continuously changing over short time periods (hours) following the release. It is to be expected that the changing meteorological conditions would have important effects on the potential consequences of the release. A time-dependent atmospheric dispersion model was developed and implemented in the Reactor Safety Study. This paper provides a description of the model and the nature of the results generated. Emphasis is given to an explanation of how, and why, these results differ from those estimated with time-invariant models

  10. Possible chaoticity for the time series of the amount of nuclear information released by the newsmedia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, T.

    1995-01-01

    The amount of information concerning nuclear problems was time analysed which has been released by three types of the newsmedia in Japan, the press, television and magazines during the past 20 years. The time series of the logarithmic value of the amount released by some of the newsmedia was found to be possibly chaotic, or at least to be non-stochastic. Such a characteristic of time series can be interpreted as a result of the exertion of a certain sort of selection process in the interior of the newsmedia in deciding an event as news to be released. (author)

  11. Simulated atmospheric disperison of radioactive material released in an urban area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akins, R.E.; Church, H.W.; Tierney, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    A combination of Gaussian plume and particle-in-cell techniques is used to simulate the atmospheric transport and dispersion of a puff release of radioactive material. The release is caused by an accident that is assumed to occur during the shipment of the radioactive material through central New York City. The simulation provides estimates of volumetric and surface concentrations of the dispersed material that are used to predict radiation doses incurred by the City's population in the event of an accidental release. In the simulation, the release point is arbitrary and the material is assumed to be either a gas or fine particles. The Gaussian plume model follows cloud concentrations from the release time until times when transport over distances up to 500 m has been achieved. The released cloud may stabilize at street level or above the mean buildings height; at a street intersection or in the middle of the block. The possibility of the formation of multiple clouds, owing to circumstances of wind flow direction and street geometry, is allowed

  12. Risk assessment methodology for evaluating releases of radioactively contaminated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) activities are expected to be required in the near future in association with license termination of nuclear power facilities and cleanup efforts at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) weapons production facilities. In advance of these D ampersand D activities, it is becoming increasingly urgent that standards be established for the release of materials with residual radioactive contamination. The only standards for unrestricted release that currently exist address surface contamination. The methods used to justify those standards were developed some 20 yr ago and may not satisfy today's criteria. Furthermore, the basis of setting standards has moved away from the traditional open-quotes instrumentation-basedclose quotes concept toward a open-quotes risk-basedclose quotes approach. Therefore, as new release standards are developed, it will be necessary that risk assessment methodology consistent with modern concepts be incorporated into the process. This paper discusses recent developments in risk methodology and issues and concerns regarding the future development of standards for the release of radioactively contaminated materials

  13. The release of lindane from contaminated building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchek, Konstantin; Thouin, Geneviève; Kuang, Wenxing; Li, Ken; Tezel, F Handan; Brown, Carl E

    2014-10-01

    The release of the organochlorine pesticide lindane (γ-hexachlorocyclohexane) from several types of contaminated building materials was studied to assess inhalation hazard and decontamination requirements in response to accidental and/or intentional spills. The materials included glass, polypropylene carpet, latex-painted drywall, ceramic tiles, vinyl floor tiles, and gypsum ceiling tiles. For each surface concentration, an equilibrium concentration was determined in the vapour phase of the surrounding air. Vapor concentrations depended upon initial surface concentration, temperature, and type of building material. A time-weighted average (TWA) concentration in the air was used to quantify the health risk associated with the inhalation of lindane vapors. Transformation products of lindane, namely α-hexachlorocyclohexane and pentachlorocyclohexene, were detected in the vapour phase at both temperatures and for all of the test materials. Their formation was greater on glass and ceramic tiles, compared to other building materials. An empiric Sips isotherm model was employed to approximate experimental results and to estimate the release of lindane and its transformation products. This helped determine the extent of decontamination required to reduce the surface concentrations of lindane to the levels corresponding to vapor concentrations below TWA.

  14. Determination of Radiological, Material and Organizational Measures for Reuse of Conditionally Released Materials from Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondra, F.; Vasko, M.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    An important part of nuclear installation decommissioning is conditional release of materials. The mass of conditionally released materials can significantly influence radioactive waste management and capacity of radioactive waste repository. The influence on a total decommissioning cost is also not negligible. Several scenarios for reuse of conditionally released materials were developed within CONRELMAT project. Each scenario contains preparation phase, construction phase and operation phase. For each above mentioned phase is needed to determine radiological, material, organizational and other constraints for conditionally released materials reuse to not break exposure limits for staff and public. Constraints are determined on the basis of external and internal exposure calculations in created models for selected takes in particular scenarios phases. The paper presents a developed methodology for determination of part of above mentioned constraints concerning external exposure of staff or public. Values of staff external exposure are also presented in paper to ensure that staff or public exposure does not break the limits. The methodology comprises a proposal of following constraints: radionuclide limit concentration of conditionally released materials for specific scenarios and nuclide vectors, specific deployment of conditionally released materials eventually shielding materials, staff and public during the scenario's phases, organizational measures concerning time of staff's or public's stay in the vicinity of conditionally released materials for individual performed scenarios and nuclide vectors. The paper further describes VISIPLAN 3D ALARA calculation planning software tool used for calculation of staff's and public's external exposure for individual scenarios. Several other parallel papers proposed for HND2012 are presenting selected details of the project.(author).

  15. Temperature-regulated guest admission and release in microporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang (Kevin); Shang, Jin; Gu, Qinfen; Awati, Rohan V.; Jensen, Nathan; Grant, Andrew; Zhang, Xueying; Sholl, David S.; Liu, Jefferson Z.; Webley, Paul A.; May, Eric F.

    2017-06-01

    While it has long been known that some highly adsorbing microporous materials suddenly become inaccessible to guest molecules below certain temperatures, previous attempts to explain this phenomenon have failed. Here we show that this anomalous sorption behaviour is a temperature-regulated guest admission process, where the pore-keeping group's thermal fluctuations are influenced by interactions with guest molecules. A physical model is presented to explain the atomic-level chemistry and structure of these thermally regulated micropores, which is crucial to systematic engineering of new functional materials such as tunable molecular sieves, gated membranes and controlled-release nanocontainers. The model was validated experimentally with H2, N2, Ar and CH4 on three classes of microporous materials: trapdoor zeolites, supramolecular host calixarenes and metal-organic frameworks. We demonstrate how temperature can be exploited to achieve appreciable hydrogen and methane storage in such materials without sustained pressure. These findings also open new avenues for gas sensing and isotope separation.

  16. Ice-Release and Erosion Resistant Materials for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Brinn, Cameron; Cook, Alex; Pascual-Marquez, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    Icing conditions may cause wind turbine generators to partially lose productivity or to be completely shut down to avoid structural damage. At present, commercially available technologies to mitigate this problem consist of expensive, energy hungry heating elements, which costs roughly 70,000 euro per medium size turbine. Conventional passive ice protection coating systems heavily rely on delicate surface structures and expensive materials to create water repellent superhydrophobic / low surface energy surfaces, which have been proven to be ineffective against ice accumulation. The lack of performance among conventional ice protection materials stems from a flaw in the approach to the problem: failure to recognize that water in its liquid form (WATER) and water in its solid form (ICE) are two different things. Something that works for WATER does not automatically work for ICE. Another reason is that many superhydrophobic materials are often reliant upon often fragile micro-structured surfaces to achieve their intended effects. This paper discusses a fundamentally different approach to the creation of a robust, low cost, durable, and multifunctional materials for ice release and erosion resistance. This National Science Foundation sponsored ice-release coating technology holds promise for protecting wind turbine blades and towers, thus potentially increasing reliability for power generation under icing conditions. Because of the vulnerability of wind turbine blades to ice buildup and erosion damages, wind farm facilities stand to reap considerable benefits.

  17. Methodology of external exposure calculation for reuse of conditional released materials from decommissioning - 59138

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondra, Frantisek; Vasko, Marek; Necas, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The article presents methodology of external exposure calculation for reuse of conditional released materials from decommissioning using VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool. Production of rails has been used as an example application of proposed methodology within the CONRELMAT project. The article presents a methodology for determination of radiological, material, organizational and other conditions for conditionally released materials reuse to ensure that workers and public exposure does not breach the exposure limits during scenario's life cycle (preparation, construction and operation of scenario). The methodology comprises a proposal of following conditions in the view of workers and public exposure: - radionuclide limit concentration of conditionally released materials for specific scenarios and nuclide vectors, - specific deployment of conditionally released materials eventually shielding materials, workers and public during the scenario's life cycle, - organizational measures concerning time of workers or public stay in the vicinity on conditionally released materials for individual performed scenarios and nuclide vectors. The above mentioned steps of proposed methodology have been applied within the CONRELMAT project. Exposure evaluation of workers for rail production is introduced in the article as an example of this application. Exposure calculation using VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool was done within several models. The most exposed profession for scenario was identified. On the basis of this result, an increase of radionuclide concentration in conditional released material was proposed more than two times to 681 Bq/kg without no additional safety or organizational measures being applied. After application of proposed safety and organizational measures (additional shielding, geometry changes and limitation of work duration) it is possible to increase concentration of radionuclide in conditional released material more than ten times to 3092 Bq/kg. Storage

  18. Dedicated new descaling method to characterize corrosion and cation release of SG tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauzel, Maryline; Guillodo, Michael; Foucault, Marc; Engler, Nathalie; Chahma, Farah

    2012-09-01

    PWR steam generators (SGs), due to the huge wetted surface, are the main source of corrosion product release in the primary coolant circuit. Corrosion products may be transported throughout the whole circuit, activated in the core, and redeposited all over circuit surfaces, resulting in an increase of activity buildup. Understanding the phenomena leading to corrosion product release from SG tubing materials is of primary importance to minimize the global dose integrated by workers and to optimize the reactor shutdown duration and environment releases. Lab scale testing devices are a way to investigate cation release and propose mitigation measures. The descaling technique is based on the specific dissolution of the oxides making possible, by gravimetry, to directly evaluate the total quantity of corroded metal and the quantity of released elements. This technique allows for a statistical study as several SG coupons are exposed in one single test and is usually well-adapted to tubing materials having high or medium cation release behaviors, but has been proven too less accurate for the most recent manufactured SG tubes having low cation release rates. An optimized descaling technique has been developed to allow for the study of low-releasing SG tubing materials. Several steps of the process have been reconsidered. The electropolishing of the coupon is now performed after a careful determination of the thickness of the perturbed layer on the tube outer and/or inner surface to completely remove it so as to limit as much as possible the release of electro-polished faces which are not matter of the study. The number of coupons exposed in the autoclave has been reduced to avoid any saturation of the water primary chemistry, and two kinds of control coupons have been prepared instead of one in the former descaling method to take into account the uncertainties due to the descaling process as well as the CP possible redeposition on the coupons during exposure. Another

  19. Possibilities to improve the adaptation quality of calculated material substitutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geske, G.

    1981-04-01

    In calculating the composition of material substitutes by a system of simultaneous equations it is possible, by using a so called quality index, to find out of the set of solutions which generally exists that solution which possesses the best adaptation quality. Further improvement is often possible by describing coherent scattering and photoelectric interaction by an own material parameter for each effect. The exact formulation of these quantities as energy indepedent functions is, however, impossible. Using a set of attenuation coefficients at suitably chosen energies as coefficients for the system of equations the best substitutes are found. The solutions for the investigated example are identical with the original relative to its chemical composition. Such solutions may be of use in connection with neutrons, protons, heavy ions and negative pions. The components taken into consideration must, of course, permit such solutions. These facts are discussed in detail by two examples.

  20. A method for prevention of radioactive material release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Sato, Chikara; Kitamura, Masao.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a method for preventing an underwater radioactive material from being released in a simple and highly reliable manner, which can decrease an amount of radioactive materials discharged into open air from reactor water containing a large amount of radioactive materials such as a reactor core pool. Structure: Pure warm water higher in temperature than that of reactor water is poured from the top of a water surface of a water tank which stores reactor water containing radioactive materials such as radioactive iodine, and water is drawn through an outlet located downwardly of the pure warm water inlet to form a layer of pure warm water at the upper part of the water tank while preventing diffusion of the reactor water into the pure warm water by the difference in density between the reactor water and the pure warm water and downward movement of the pure warm water, thereby preventing contact of the reactor water with the atmosphere and diffusion of the radioactive material into the atmosphere. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Probability analysis of multiple-tank-car release incidents in railway hazardous materials transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiang; Saat, Mohd Rapik; Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    2014-01-01

    Railroads play a key role in the transportation of hazardous materials in North America. Rail transport differs from highway transport in several aspects, an important one being that rail transport involves trains in which many railcars carrying hazardous materials travel together. By contrast to truck accidents, it is possible that a train accident may involve multiple hazardous materials cars derailing and releasing contents with consequently greater potential impact on human health, property and the environment. In this paper, a probabilistic model is developed to estimate the probability distribution of the number of tank cars releasing contents in a train derailment. Principal operational characteristics considered include train length, derailment speed, accident cause, position of the first car derailed, number and placement of tank cars in a train and tank car safety design. The effect of train speed, tank car safety design and tank car positions in a train were evaluated regarding the number of cars that release their contents in a derailment. This research provides insights regarding the circumstances affecting multiple-tank-car release incidents and potential strategies to reduce their occurrences. The model can be incorporated into a larger risk management framework to enable better local, regional and national safety management of hazardous materials transportation by rail

  2. Probability analysis of multiple-tank-car release incidents in railway hazardous materials transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang, E-mail: liu94@illinois.edu; Saat, Mohd Rapik, E-mail: mohdsaat@illinois.edu; Barkan, Christopher P.L., E-mail: cbarkan@illinois.edu

    2014-07-15

    Railroads play a key role in the transportation of hazardous materials in North America. Rail transport differs from highway transport in several aspects, an important one being that rail transport involves trains in which many railcars carrying hazardous materials travel together. By contrast to truck accidents, it is possible that a train accident may involve multiple hazardous materials cars derailing and releasing contents with consequently greater potential impact on human health, property and the environment. In this paper, a probabilistic model is developed to estimate the probability distribution of the number of tank cars releasing contents in a train derailment. Principal operational characteristics considered include train length, derailment speed, accident cause, position of the first car derailed, number and placement of tank cars in a train and tank car safety design. The effect of train speed, tank car safety design and tank car positions in a train were evaluated regarding the number of cars that release their contents in a derailment. This research provides insights regarding the circumstances affecting multiple-tank-car release incidents and potential strategies to reduce their occurrences. The model can be incorporated into a larger risk management framework to enable better local, regional and national safety management of hazardous materials transportation by rail.

  3. Conditional release of materials from decommissioning process into the environment in the form of steel railway tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatransky, Peter; Necas, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    This work points to the possibilities of conditional release of materials from the process of decommissioning the nuclear unit from the operation. According to the valid legislation, materials which do not meet the condition of direct-unconditional release into the environment, should be modified and processed into the matrix designed for the final disposal in the storing place. However there exists a group of materials which activity is on the borderline of the limit of releasing into the environment and it is possible to release them conditionally. The matter of conditional release is that notable amount of materials, mainly metals, is usually contaminated only by radionuclids with relatively short time of half decay. These materials are suitable to use for a specific industrial purpose where the longtime fixation of shortly living radionuclids is expected in one place. This work deals with the conditional release of metals into the form of steel railway tracks. It describes the (working) groups of workers working with the steel railway tracks and defines in the numbers the critical group and its critical individual. For critical individual it dimensions the amounts of materials, which are possible to be released conditionally from one double-unit of the plant of the type VVER 440 V-230 which operation was ended on the regular basis. According to the calculations in the software VISIPLAN and OMEGA there is defined a number of released steel in such way that the internationally recommended rate of maximal effective dose for critical individual-10 μSv/year [IAEA, 2008. Managing low radioactivity material from the decommissioning of nuclear facility. Technical reports series no. 462] is not extended. In the final part there are compared the estimates of the costs of the decommissioning process with the application of conditional release and without it, which is directly reflected in the amount of saved costs and number of containers for surface disposal.

  4. Methodology for prediction and estimation of consequences of possible atmospheric releases of hazardous matter: "Kursk"? submarine study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklanov, A.; Mahura, A.; Sørensen, J. H.

    2003-03-01

    There are objects with some periods of higher than normal levels of risk of accidental atmospheric releases (nuclear, chemical, biological, etc.). Such accidents or events may occur due to natural hazards, human errors, terror acts, and during transportation of waste or various operations at high risk. A methodology for risk assessment is suggested and it includes two approaches: 1) probabilistic analysis of possible atmospheric transport patterns using long-term trajectory and dispersion modelling, and 2) forecast and evaluation of possible contamination and consequences for the environment and population using operational dispersion modelling. The first approach could be applied during the preparation stage, and the second - during the operation stage. The suggested methodology is applied on an example of the most important phases (lifting, transportation, and decommissioning) of the "Kursk" nuclear submarine operation. It is found that the temporal variability of several probabilistic indicators (fast transport probability fields, maximum reaching distance, maximum possible impact zone, and average integral concentration of 137Cs) showed that the fall of 2001 was the most appropriate time for the beginning of the operation. These indicators allowed to identify the hypothetically impacted geographical regions and territories. In cases of atmospheric transport toward the most populated areas, the forecasts of possible consequences during phases of the high and medium potential risk levels based on a unit hypothetical release are performed. The analysis showed that the possible deposition fractions of 1011 over the Kola Peninsula, and 10-12 - 10-13 for the remote areas of the Scandinavia and Northwest Russia could be observed. The suggested methodology may be used successfully for any potentially dangerous object involving risk of atmospheric release of hazardous materials of nuclear, chemical or biological nature.

  5. Methodology for prediction and estimation of consequences of possible atmospheric releases of hazardous matter: "Kursk" submarine study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklanov, A.; Mahura, A.; Sørensen, J. H.

    2003-06-01

    There are objects with some periods of higher than normal levels of risk of accidental atmospheric releases (nuclear, chemical, biological, etc.). Such accidents or events may occur due to natural hazards, human errors, terror acts, and during transportation of waste or various operations at high risk. A methodology for risk assessment is suggested and it includes two approaches: 1) probabilistic analysis of possible atmospheric transport patterns using long-term trajectory and dispersion modelling, and 2) forecast and evaluation of possible contamination and consequences for the environment and population using operational dispersion modelling. The first approach could be applied during the preparation stage, and the second - during the operation stage. The suggested methodology is applied on an example of the most important phases (lifting, transportation, and decommissioning) of the ``Kursk" nuclear submarine operation. It is found that the temporal variability of several probabilistic indicators (fast transport probability fields, maximum reaching distance, maximum possible impact zone, and average integral concentration of 137Cs) showed that the fall of 2001 was the most appropriate time for the beginning of the operation. These indicators allowed to identify the hypothetically impacted geographical regions and territories. In cases of atmospheric transport toward the most populated areas, the forecasts of possible consequences during phases of the high and medium potential risk levels based on a unit hypothetical release (e.g. 1 Bq) are performed. The analysis showed that the possible deposition fractions of 10-11 (Bq/m2) over the Kola Peninsula, and 10-12 - 10-13 (Bq/m2) for the remote areas of the Scandinavia and Northwest Russia could be observed. The suggested methodology may be used successfully for any potentially dangerous object involving risk of atmospheric release of hazardous materials of nuclear, chemical or biological nature.

  6. Methodology for prediction and estimation of consequences of possible atmospheric releases of hazardous matter: 'Kursk' submarine study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baklanov

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available There are objects with some periods of higher than normal levels of risk of accidental atmospheric releases (nuclear, chemical, biological, etc.. Such accidents or events may occur due to natural hazards, human errors, terror acts, and during transportation of waste or various operations at high risk. A methodology for risk assessment is suggested and it includes two approaches: 1 probabilistic analysis of possible atmospheric transport patterns using long-term trajectory and dispersion modelling, and 2 forecast and evaluation of possible contamination and consequences for the environment and population using operational dispersion modelling. The first approach could be applied during the preparation stage, and the second - during the operation stage. The suggested methodology is applied on an example of the most important phases (lifting, transportation, and decommissioning of the ``Kursk" nuclear submarine operation. It is found that the temporal variability of several probabilistic indicators (fast transport probability fields, maximum reaching distance, maximum possible impact zone, and average integral concentration of 137Cs showed that the fall of 2001 was the most appropriate time for the beginning of the operation. These indicators allowed to identify the hypothetically impacted geographical regions and territories. In cases of atmospheric transport toward the most populated areas, the forecasts of possible consequences during phases of the high and medium potential risk levels based on a unit hypothetical release (e.g. 1 Bq are performed. The analysis showed that the possible deposition fractions of 10-11 (Bq/m2 over the Kola Peninsula, and 10-12 - 10-13 (Bq/m2 for the remote areas of the Scandinavia and Northwest Russia could be observed. The suggested methodology may be used successfully for any potentially dangerous object involving risk of atmospheric release of hazardous materials of nuclear, chemical or biological nature.

  7. Martian gullies: possible formation mechanism by dry granular material..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedillo-Flores, Y.; Durand-Manterola, H. J.

    section Some of the geomorphological features in Mars are the gullies Some theories developed tried explain its origin either by liquid water liquid carbon dioxide or flows of dry granular material We made a comparative analysis of the Martian gullies with the terrestrial ones We propose that the mechanism of formation of the gullies is as follows In winter CO 2 snow mixed with sand falls in the terrain In spring the CO 2 snow sublimate and gaseous CO 2 make fluid the sand which flows like liquid eroding the terrain and forming the gullies By experimental work with dry granular material we simulated the development of the Martian gullies injecting air in the granular material section We present the characteristics of some terrestrial gullies forms at cold environment sited at Nevado de Toluca Volcano near Toluca City M e xico We compare them with Martian gullies choose from four different areas to target goal recognize or to distinguish to identify possible processes evolved in its formation Also we measured the lengths of those Martian gullies and the range was from 24 m to 1775 meters Finally we present results of our experimental work at laboratory with dry granular material

  8. Japanese tea leaves: a possible biological standard reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Keiichiro; Notsu, Kenji; Tsunoda, Kin-ichi; Kato, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Yuko.

    1978-01-01

    Japanese Tea Leaves, prepared by pulverizing with an agate ball mill and sieving with a Saran fiber sieve (50 mesh) were assessed as a possible biological standard reference material for elemental analysis. The metal content of the tea leaves was determined independently at two laboratories using atomic absorption and flame emission spectrometry. Neutron activation analysis was also performed to determine the content (21 elements) of Tea Leaves. For some elements the result from the various methods were compared. The characteristics of Tea Leaves are discussed and the elemental composition is compared to that of Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM, 1571). The most significant characteristic of Tea Leaves was the high manganese content. (auth.)

  9. Geochemistry Model Validation Report: Material Degradation and Release Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Stockman

    2001-09-28

    The purpose of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) is to validate the Material Degradation and Release (MDR) model that predicts degradation and release of radionuclides from a degrading waste package (WP) in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This AMR is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 17). The intended use of the MDR model is to estimate the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages (WPs) containing U. S . Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed with High Level Waste (HLW) glass, commercial SNF, and Immobilized Plutonium Ceramic (Pu-ceramic) codisposed with HLW glass. The model is intended to predict (1) the extent to which criticality control material, such as gadolinium (Gd), will remain in the WP after corrosion of the initial WP, (2) the extent to which fissile Pu and uranium (U) will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water, and (3) the chemical composition and amounts of minerals and other solids left in the WP. The results of the model are intended for use in criticality calculations. The scope of the model validation report is to (1) describe the MDR model, and (2) compare the modeling results with experimental studies. A test case based on a degrading Pu-ceramic WP is provided to help explain the model. This model does not directly feed the assessment of system performance. The output from this model is used by several other models, such as the configuration generator, criticality, and criticality consequence models, prior to the evaluation of system performance. This document has been prepared according to AP-3.10Q, ''Analyses and Models'' (Ref. 2), and prepared in accordance with the technical work plan (Ref. 17).

  10. Geochemistry Model Validation Report: Material Degradation and Release Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockman, H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) is to validate the Material Degradation and Release (MDR) model that predicts degradation and release of radionuclides from a degrading waste package (WP) in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This AMR is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 17). The intended use of the MDR model is to estimate the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages (WPs) containing U. S . Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed with High Level Waste (HLW) glass, commercial SNF, and Immobilized Plutonium Ceramic (Pu-ceramic) codisposed with HLW glass. The model is intended to predict (1) the extent to which criticality control material, such as gadolinium (Gd), will remain in the WP after corrosion of the initial WP, (2) the extent to which fissile Pu and uranium (U) will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water, and (3) the chemical composition and amounts of minerals and other solids left in the WP. The results of the model are intended for use in criticality calculations. The scope of the model validation report is to (1) describe the MDR model, and (2) compare the modeling results with experimental studies. A test case based on a degrading Pu-ceramic WP is provided to help explain the model. This model does not directly feed the assessment of system performance. The output from this model is used by several other models, such as the configuration generator, criticality, and criticality consequence models, prior to the evaluation of system performance. This document has been prepared according to AP-3.10Q, ''Analyses and Models'' (Ref. 2), and prepared in accordance with the technical work plan (Ref. 17)

  11. Tritium release from lithium titanate, a low-activation tritium breeding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopasz, J.P.; Miller, J.M.; Johnson, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    The goals for fusion power are to produce energy in as safe, economical, and environmentally benign a manner as possible. To ensure environmentally sound operation low-activation materials should be used where feasible. The ARIES Tokamak Reactor Study has based reactor designs on the concept of using low-activation materials throughout the fusion reactor. For the tritium breeding blanket, the choices for low activation tritium breeding materials are limited. Lithium titanate is an alternative low-activation ceramic material for use in the tritium breeding blanket. To date, very little work has been done on characterizing the tritium release for lithium titanate. We have thus performed laboratory studies of tritium release from irradiated lithium titanate. The results indicate that tritium is easily removed from lithium titanate at temperatures as low as 600 K. The method of titanate preparation was found to affect the tritium release, and the addition of 0.1% H 2 to the helium purge gas did not improve tritium recovery. ((orig.))

  12. Bulk-scaffolded hydrogen storage and releasing materials and methods for preparing and using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autrey, S Thomas [West Richland, WA; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J [Richland, WA; Gutowska, Anna [Richland, WA; Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; Li, Xiaohong S [Richland, WA; Shin, Yongsoon [Richland, WA

    2011-06-21

    Compositions are disclosed for storing and releasing hydrogen and methods for preparing and using same. These hydrogen storage and releasing materials exhibit fast release rates at low release temperatures without unwanted side reactions, thus preserving desired levels of purity and enabling applications in combustion and fuel cell applications.

  13. RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOZLOWSKI, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-23429, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (PDSA) and RPP-23479, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Facility. The main document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative accidents involving the release of dried radioactive waste materials from the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) and to the associated represented hazardous conditions. Appendices D through F provide the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative dried waste release accident and associated represented hazardous conditions for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Packaging Unit (WPU). The risk binning process uses an evaluation of the frequency and consequence of a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition to determine the need for safety structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls. A representative accident or a represented hazardous condition is assigned to a risk bin based on the potential radiological and toxicological consequences to the public and the collocated worker. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because credible hazardous conditions with the potential for significant facility worker consequences are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls regardless of their estimated frequency. The controls for protection of the facility workers are described in RPP-23429 and RPP-23479. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described below

  14. W-Cu gradient materials - processing, properties and application possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, M.; Kieback, B.

    2001-01-01

    The functionally graded material (FGM) of tungsten with its high thermal and mechanical resistance and copper with its very high thermal and electrical conductivity and ductility expands the application fields of this material in the direction of extreme demands such as plasma facing components in fusion reactors. The PM-production of W-Cu-gradients recommends itself because of the possibility to form the gradient by the mixing of powder components, but is also demanding because of the differences in their sintering behavior and thermal expansions. W-Gu-gradient samples of different concentration profiles have been formed in layers by powder stacking in a die and continuously by centrifugal powder forming. The consolidation routes were determined by the concentration areas of the gradients and encompass liquid phase sintering, pressure assisted solid phase sintering and the application of coated Tungsten powder and sintering additives. The microstructure and the concentration profiles of the samples have been investigated metaliographically and by EDX. The influence of processing and the gradient profile of the properties have been characterized by TRS and the investigation of residual thermal stresses by neutron diffraction. (author)

  15. Flare Energy Release: Internal Conflict, Contradiction with High Resolution Observations, Possible Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustilnik, L.

    2017-06-01

    spectrum of distribution of flares and micro-flares, and possibility of phase transition to flare energy release with huge increasing of energy release.

  16. The effect of release liner materials on adhesive contaminants, paper recycling and recycled paper properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Venditti; Richard Gilbert; Andy Zhang; Said Abubakr

    2000-01-01

    Release liner waste material is found in post-consumer waste streams and is also a significant component of the preconsumer waste stream generated in the manufacturing of adhesive products. To date, very little has been reported pertaining to the behavior of release liner in paper recycling. In this study, the effect of the release liner material on the behavior of...

  17. Tritium transport and release from lithium ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.; Kopasz, J.P.; Tam, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    In an operating fusion reactor,, the tritium breeding blanket will reach a condition in which the tritium release rate equals the production rate. The tritium release rate must be fast enough that the tritium inventory in the blanket does not become excessive. Slow tritium release will result in a large tritium inventory, which is unacceptable from both economic and safety viewpoints As a consequence, considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the tritium release mechanism from ceramic breeders and beryllium neutron multipliers through theoretical, laboratory, and in-reactor studies. This information is being applied to the development of models for predicting tritium release for various blanket operating conditions

  18. Review on fluoride-releasing restorative materials--fluoride release and uptake characteristics, antibacterial activity and influence on caries formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Annette; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Attin, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the fluoride release and recharge capabilities, and antibacterial properties, of fluoride-releasing dental restoratives, and discuss the current status concerning the prevention or inhibition of caries development and progression. Information from original scientific full papers or reviews listed in PubMed (search term: fluoride release AND (restorative OR glass-ionomer OR compomer OR polyacid-modified composite resin OR composite OR amalgam)), published from 1980 to 2004, was included in the review. Papers dealing with endodontic or orthodontic topics were not taken into consideration. Clinical studies concerning secondary caries development were only included when performed in split-mouth design with an observation period of at least three years. Fluoride-containing dental materials show clear differences in the fluoride release and uptake characteristics. Short- and long-term fluoride releases from restoratives are related to their matrices, setting mechanisms and fluoride content and depend on several environmental conditions. Fluoride-releasing materials may act as a fluoride reservoir and may increase the fluoride level in saliva, plaque and dental hard tissues. However, clinical studies exhibited conflicting data as to whether or not these materials significantly prevent or inhibit secondary caries and affect the growth of caries-associated bacteria compared to non-fluoridated restoratives. Fluoride release and uptake characteristics depend on the matrices, fillers and fluoride content as well as on the setting mechanisms and environmental conditions of the restoratives. Fluoride-releasing materials, predominantly glass-ionomers and compomers, did show cariostatic properties and may affect bacterial metabolism under simulated cariogenic conditions in vitro. However, it is not proven by prospective clinical studies whether the incidence of secondary caries can be significantly reduced by the fluoride release of

  19. Wind field forecast for accidental release of radiative materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Ling; Chen Jiayi; Cai Xuhui

    2003-01-01

    A meso-scale wind field forecast model was designed for emergency environmental assessment in case of accidental release of radiative materials from a nuclear power station. Actual practice of the model showed that it runs fast, has wind field prediction function, and the result given is accurate. With meteorological data collected from weather stations, and pre-treated by a wind field diagnostic model, the initial wind fields at different times were inputted as initial values and assimilation fields for the forecasting model. The model, in turn, worked out to forecast meso-scale wind field of 24 hours in a horizontal domain of 205 km x 205 km. And then, the diagnostic model was employed again with the forecasting data to obtain more detail information of disturbed wind field by local terrain in a smaller domain of 20.5 km x 20.5 km, of which the nuclear power station is at the center. Using observation data in January, April, July and October of 1996 over the area of Hangzhou Bay, wind fields in these 4 months were simulated by different assimilation time and number of the weather stations for a sensitive test. Results indicated that the method used here has increased accuracy of the forecasted wind fields. And incorporating diagnostic method with the wind field forecast model has greatly increased efficiency of the wind field forecast for the smaller domain. This model and scheme have been used in Environmental Consequence Assessment System of Nuclear Accident in Qinshan Area

  20. Analysis of explosion-induced releases of toxic materials at an environmental restoration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, S.G.; Moon, W.H. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Prior to 1988, a variety of materials were buried on the US DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. Records of the disposal operations are incomplete and toxic materials may have been placed adjacent to potential explosives. One of the safety concerns in conducting an environmental restoration project at the burial sites, is the possibility of an explosion which could release toxic materials to the atmosphere. A safety analysis examined the consequences of such releases by first postulating an upper bound for the strength of an explosive. A correlation, developed by Steindler and Seefeldt of Argonne National Laboratory, was then used to estimate the amount and particle-size distribution of the material that could become airborne from the explosion. The estimated amount of airborne material was the source term in an atmospheric dispersion model which was used to calculate infinite-time, concentration-time integrals and 5-minute, time- weighted average concentrations at locations down-wind from the explosion. The dispersion model includes particle deposition as a function of particle-size distribution class. The concentration-time integrals and average concentrations were compared to published guidelines to assess the consequences of an accidental explosion

  1. The Risoe model for calculating the consequences of the release of radioactive material to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    1980-07-01

    A brief description is given of the model used at Risoe for calculating the consequences of releases of radioactive material to the atmosphere. The model is based on the Gaussian plume model, and it provides possibilities for calculation of: doses to individuals, collective doses, contamination of the ground, probability distribution of doses, and the consequences of doses for give dose-risk relationships. The model is implemented as a computer program PLUCON2, written in ALGOL for the Burroughs B6700 computer at Risoe. A short description of PLUCON2 is given. (author)

  2. RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOZLOWSKI, D.S.

    2005-01-01

    The body of this document analyzes scenarios involving releases of dried tank waste from the DBVS dried waste transfer system and OGTS HEPA filters. Analyses of dried waste release scenarios from the CH-TRUM WPU are included as Appendix D

  3. Release of hydrogen isotopes from carbon based fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainonen-Ahlgren, E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the annealing behavior of hydrogen isotopes in carbon based materials. Also, the density of the material and structural changes after thermal treatment and ion irradiation are examined. The study of hydrogen diffusion in diamondlike carbon films revealed an activation energy of 2.0 eV, while the deuterium diffusion, due to better measuring sensitivity, is found to be concentration dependent with the effective diffusion coefficient becoming smaller with decreasing deuterium concentration. To explain the experimentally observed profiles, a model according to which atomic deuterium diffuses and deuterium in clusters is immobile is developed. The concentration of immobile D was assumed to be an analytical function of the total D concentration. To describe the annealing behavior of D incorporated in diamondlike carbon films during the deposition process, a model taking into account diffusion of free D and thermal detrapping and trapping of D was developed. The difference in the analysis explains the disagreement of activation energy (1.5 ± 0.2 eV) with the value of 2,9± 0.1 eV obtained for D implanted samples earlier. The same model was applied to describe the experimental profiles in Si doped diamondlike carbon films. Si affects the retention of D in diamondlike carbon films. The amount of D depends on Si content in the co-deposited but not implanted samples. Besides, Si incorporation into carbon coating decreases to some extent the graphitization of the films and leads to formation of a structure which is stable under thermal treatment and ion irradiation. Hydrogen migration in the hydrogen and methane co-deposited films was also studied. In samples produced in methane atmosphere and annealed at different temperatures, the hydrogen concentration level decreases in the bulk, with more pronounced release at the surface region. In the case of coatings deposited by a methane ion beam, the H level also decreases with increasing

  4. Possible lattice formation of new materials within a piezoelectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    plasma systems but still make possible self organized collective phenomena. .... It may be mentioned here that the present theory provides a quantitative possibility for ... imental verification of the results of our theoretical studies, we propose to ...

  5. Monitoring of the release of gaseous and aerosol-bound radioactive materials. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    KTA 1503 contains requirements on technical installations and supplementary organizational measures considered necessary in order to monitor the release of gaseous and aerosol-bound radioactive materials. It consists of part 1: Monitoring of the release of radioactive materials together with stack gas during normal operation; part 2: Monitoring of the release of radioactive materials together with stack gas in the event of incidents; part 3: Monitoring of radioactive materials not released together with stack gas. The concept on which this rule is based is to ensure that in the case of incidents during which the result of effluent monitoring remains meaningful, such monitoring can be reliably performed. (orig./HSCH) [de

  6. Assessment of radioactive material released from a fuel fabrication plant under accidental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This report evaluates the amounts of fissile material released both inside and outside a mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant (MOFFP) for light water reactors. The first section begins with a descriptive study of fissile material containment systems, and the methods available for quantifying accident occurrence probabilities. In addition to accidents common to all industrial facilities, other much rarer accidents were considered, such as aircraft crashes. The minimum occurrence probability limit for consideration in this study was set at 10 -6 per annum. The second part of this report attempts to assess the consequences of the accidents considered (i.e. with occurrence probabilities exceeding 10 -6 per annum) by determining maximum values for such accidents. Acts of sabotage and other accidents of this type are beyond the scope of this study and were not taken into consideration. The most serious potential accident would be a fire involving all of the glove boxes in the PuO 2 powder calcination and preparation cell, which could release 76.5 mg of PuO 2 powder into the atmosphere; the occurrence probability of such an accident, however, is slight (less than 10 -5 per annum). The second possibility, is a specially nuclear hazard that would release fission products into the atmosphere. The occurrence probability of such an accident is currently evaluated at 10 -3 per annum

  7. Cask for radioactive material and method for preventing release of neutrons from radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffney, M.F.; Shaffer, P.T.

    1981-01-01

    A cask for radioactive material, such as nuclear reactor fuel or spent nuclear reactor fuel, includes a plurality of associated walled internal compartments for containing such radioactive material, with neutron absorbing material present to absorb neutrons emitted by the radioactive material, and a plurality of thermally conductive members, such as longitudinal copper or aluminum castings, about the compartment and in thermal contact with the compartment walls and with other such thermally conductive members and having thermal contact surfaces between such members extending, preferably radially, from the compartment walls to external surfaces of the thermally conductive members, which surfaces are preferably in the form of a cylinder. The ends of the shipping cask also preferably include a neutron absorber and a conductive metal covering to dissipate heat released by decay of the radioactive material. A preferred neutron absorber utilized is boron carbide, preferably as plasma sprayed with metal powder or as particles in a matrix of phenolic polymer, and the compartment walls are preferably of stainless steel, copper or other corrosion resistant and heat conductive metal or alloy. The invention also relates to shipping casks, storage casks and other containers for radioactive materials in which a plurality of internal compartments for such material, e.g., nuclear reactor fuel rods, are joined together, preferably in modular construction with surrounding heat conductive metal members, and the modules are joined together to form a major part of a finished shipping cask, which is preferably of cylindrical shape. Also within the invention are methods of safely storing radioactive materials which emit neutrons, while dissipating the heat thereof, and of manufacturing the present shipping casks

  8. Soft computing analysis of the possible correlation between temporal and energy release patterns in seismic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantaras, Anthony; Katsifarakis, Emmanouil; Artzouxaltzis, Xristos; Makris, John; Vallianatos, Filippos; Varley, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary investigation of the possible correlation of temporal and energy release patterns of seismic activity involving the preparation processes of consecutive sizeable seismic events [1,2]. The background idea is that during periods of low-level seismic activity, stress processes in the crust accumulate energy at the seismogenic area whilst larger seismic events act as a decongesting mechanism releasing considerable energy [3,4]. A dynamic algorithm is being developed aiming to identify and cluster pre- and post- seismic events to the main earthquake following on research carried out by Zubkov [5] and Dobrovolsky [6,7]. This clustering technique along with energy release equations dependent on Richter's scale [8,9] allow for an estimate to be drawn regarding the amount of the energy being released by the seismic sequence. The above approach is being implemented as a monitoring tool to investigate the behaviour of the underlying energy management system by introducing this information to various neural [10,11] and soft computing models [1,12,13,14]. The incorporation of intelligent systems aims towards the detection and simulation of the possible relationship between energy release patterns and time-intervals among consecutive sizeable earthquakes [1,15]. Anticipated successful training of the imported intelligent systems may result in a real-time, on-line processing methodology [1,16] capable to dynamically approximate the time-interval between the latest and the next forthcoming sizeable seismic event by monitoring the energy release process in a specific seismogenic area. Indexing terms: pattern recognition, long-term earthquake precursors, neural networks, soft computing, earthquake occurrence intervals References [1] Konstantaras A., Vallianatos F., Varley M.R. and Makris J. P.: ‘Soft computing modelling of seismicity in the southern Hellenic arc', IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 5 (3), pp. 323-327, 2008 [2] Eneva M. and

  9. The possibility of giant dielectric materials for multilayer ceramic capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tatsuya; Endo, Makoto; Masuda, Kenichiro; Ishida, Keisuke

    2013-02-11

    There have been numerous reports on discovery of giant dielectric permittivity materials called internal barrier layer capacitor in the recent years. We took particular note of one of such materials, i.e., BaTiO 3 with SiO 2 coating. It shows expressions of giant electric permittivity when processed by spark plasma sintering. So we evaluated various electrical characteristics of this material to find out whether it is applicable to multilayer ceramic capacitors. Our evaluation revealed that the isolated surface structure is the sole cause of expressions of giant dielectric permittivity.

  10. Natural and technologic hazardous material releases during and after natural disasters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stacy; Balluz, Lina; Malilay, Josephine

    2004-04-25

    Natural disasters may be powerful and prominent mechanisms of direct and indirect hazardous material (hazmat) releases. Hazardous materials that are released as the result of a technologic malfunction precipitated by a natural event are referred to as natural-technologic or na-tech events. Na-tech events pose unique environmental and human hazards. Disaster-associated hazardous material releases are of concern, given increases in population density and accelerating industrial development in areas subject to natural disasters. These trends increase the probability of catastrophic future disasters and the potential for mass human exposure to hazardous materials released during disasters. This systematic review summarizes direct and indirect disaster-associated releases, as well as environmental contamination and adverse human health effects that have resulted from natural disaster-related hazmat incidents. Thorough examination of historic disaster-related hazmat releases can be used to identify future threats and improve mitigation and prevention efforts.

  11. Resolving Radiological Classification and Release Issues for Many DOE Solid Wastes and Salvageable Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    The cost effective radiological classification and disposal of solid materials with potential volume contamination, in accordance with applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, suffers from an inability to unambiguously distinguish among transuranic waste, low-level waste, and unconditional-release materials in a generic way allowing in-situ measurement and verification. Depending on a material''s classification, disposal costs can vary by a hundred-fold. With these large costs at risk, the issues involved in making defensible decisions are ripe for closer scrutiny. In many cases, key issues can be easily resolved by a combination of process information, some simple measurements, and calculational predictions from a computer model for radiation shielding. The proper classification and disposal of many solid wastes requires a measurement regime that is able to show compliance with a variety of institutional and regulatory contamination limits. Ultimate responsibility for this, of course, rests with radiological control or health physics organization of the individual site, but there are many measurements which can be performed by operations and generation organizations to simplify the process and virtually guarantee acceptance. Although this is not possible for all potential solid wastes, there are many that do lend themselves to such measures, particularly some of large volumes and realizable cost savings. Mostly what is needed for this to happen are a few guiding rules, measurement procedures, and cross checks for potential pitfalls. Several examples are presented here and discussed that demonstrate the possibilities, including one which was successfully applied to bulk contamination

  12. Petroleum and hazardous material releases from industrial facilities associated with Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Sengul, Hatice

    2010-04-01

    Hurricane Katrina struck an area dense with industry, causing numerous releases of petroleum and hazardous materials. This study integrates information from a number of sources to describe the frequency, causes, and effects of these releases in order to inform analysis of risk from future hurricanes. Over 200 onshore releases of hazardous chemicals, petroleum, or natural gas were reported. Storm surge was responsible for the majority of petroleum releases and failure of storage tanks was the most common mechanism of release. Of the smaller number of hazardous chemical releases reported, many were associated with flaring from plant startup, shutdown, or process upset. In areas impacted by storm surge, 10% of the facilities within the Risk Management Plan (RMP) and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) databases and 28% of SIC 1311 facilities experienced accidental releases. In areas subject only to hurricane strength winds, a lower fraction (1% of RMP and TRI and 10% of SIC 1311 facilities) experienced a release while 1% of all facility types reported a release in areas that experienced tropical storm strength winds. Of industrial facilities surveyed, more experienced indirect disruptions such as displacement of workers, loss of electricity and communication systems, and difficulty acquiring supplies and contractors for operations or reconstruction (55%), than experienced releases. To reduce the risk of hazardous material releases and speed the return to normal operations under these difficult conditions, greater attention should be devoted to risk-based facility design and improved prevention and response planning.

  13. Mission: Possible. Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, W.T.; Prather-Stroud, W.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management (CEHMM) was established in May 2004 as a nonprofit research organization. Its purpose is to develop a sustainable technical/scientific community located in Carlsbad, New Mexico, that interacts worldwide to find solutions to hazardous materials management issues. An important part of the mission is to achieve improved protection of worker safety, human health, and the environment. Carlsbad has a large technical community due to the presence of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and its many contractors and support organizations. These groups include the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, Washington Group International, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. These organizations form the basis of a unique knowledge community with strengths in many areas, such as geosciences, actinide chemistry, environmental monitoring, and waste transportation. CEHMM works cooperatively with these organizations and others to develop projects that will maintain this knowledge community beyond the projected closure date of WIPP. At present, there is an emphasis in bio-monitoring, air monitoring, hazardous materials educational programs, and endangered species remediation. CEHMM is also currently working with a group from the American Nuclear Society to help facilitate their conference scheduled for April 2006 in Carlsbad. CEHMM is growing rapidly and is looking forward to a diverse array of new projects. (authors)

  14. An assessment of the tritium inventory in, permeation through and releases from the NET plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    The tritium retention, permeation and release characteristics of D-T tokamaks are extremely important from both an environmental and a plasma physics point of view. Tokamak measurements have demonstrated that release of retained hydrogen isotopes by plasma-wall interactions play a dominant role in fuel recycling during a discharge. In addition, retained tritium in the plasma facing materials may contribute substantially to the on-site tritium inventory of D-T devices. Austenitic and martensitic steels are being considered as first wall materials. Tungsten and molybdenum will be possibly used as divertor armour materials for NET. By using a computer code, the tritium inventory in, permeation through and release from these materials have been calculated as functions of material thickness, temperature and impinging fluxes. It is shown that the tritium inventory in the first wall will be strongly affected by the temperature gradient in the materials. It is evident, that the tritium permeation as well as the tritium inventory can be reduced appropriately by controlling the temperatures at the plasma and cooling sides of the first wall. The results are discussed and the possible consequences are analysed. (author)

  15. Resolving Radiological Classification and Release Issues for Many DOE Solid Wastes and Salvageable Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1999-06-14

    The cost effective radiological classification and disposal of solid materials with potential volume contamination, in accordance with applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, suffers from an inability to unambiguously distinguish among transuranic waste, low-level waste, and unconditional-release materials. Depending on the classification, disposal costs can vary by a hundred-fold. But in many cases, the issues can be easily resolved by a combination of process information, some simple measurements, and calculational predictions from a computer model for radiation shielding.The proper classification and disposal of many solid wastes requires a measurement regime that is able to show compliance with a variety of institutional and regulatory contamination limits. Although this is not possible for all solid wastes, there are many that do lend themselves to such measures. Several examples are discussed which demonstrate the possibilities, including one which was successfully applied to bulk contamination.The only barriers to such broader uses are the slow-to-change institutional perceptions and procedures. For many issues and materials, the measurement tools are available; they need only be applied.

  16. Resolving Radiological Classification and Release Issues for Many DOE Solid Wastes and Salvageable Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    The cost effective radiological classification and disposal of solid materials with potential volume contamination, in accordance with applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, suffers from an inability to unambiguously distinguish among transuranic waste, low-level waste, and unconditional-release materials. Depending on the classification, disposal costs can vary by a hundred-fold. But in many cases, the issues can be easily resolved by a combination of process information, some simple measurements, and calculational predictions from a computer model for radiation shielding.The proper classification and disposal of many solid wastes requires a measurement regime that is able to show compliance with a variety of institutional and regulatory contamination limits. Although this is not possible for all solid wastes, there are many that do lend themselves to such measures. Several examples are discussed which demonstrate the possibilities, including one which was successfully applied to bulk contamination.The only barriers to such broader uses are the slow-to-change institutional perceptions and procedures. For many issues and materials, the measurement tools are available; they need only be applied

  17. In Vitro Inhibition of Enamel Demineralisation by Fluoride-releasing Restorative Materials and Dental Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    To determine the ability of 5 contemporary fluoride-releasing restoratives and 3 fluoride-releasing adhesives to inhibit enamel demineralisation surrounding restorations, and the associations between inhibition and the levels of fluoride released from these materials. Five fluoride-releasing restoratives (Fuji IX GP, Ketac N100, Dyract Extra, Beautifil II and Wave) and 3 fluoride-releasing adhesives (Stae, Prime & Bond NT and Fluoro Bond II) were investigated. Eight disks of each material were prepared. Fluoride release was measured daily using a fluoride-ion-selective electrode for 15 days. Twenty-four cavities for each group were restored with a restorative and an adhesive. Specimens were subjected to thermal stress and stored for 30 days in saline solution. After a 15-day pH-cycling regimen, two 150-μm-thick sections were derived from each specimen. Enamel lesion depth was measured at 0, 100, and 200 μm from each restoration's margin via polarised light microscopy. Of the restoratives investigated, Fuji IX GP released the most fluoride. The fluoride-releasing restoratives tested exhibited shallower enamel lesions than did the control group at all distances tested (p < 0.05). Fuji IX GP yielded significantly lower enamel lesion depth than did the other experimental materials. The depths of enamel lesions did not differ significantly when comparing restoratives applied with a fluoride-releasing adhesive with those applied with a non-fluoride-releasing adhesive. The fluoride-releasing materials tested reduced enamel demineralisation but to different extents, depending on their levels of fluoride release. Fluoride-releasing adhesives did not influence enamel lesion formation.

  18. Fluoxetine-induced inhibition of synaptosomal [3H]5-HT release: Possible Ca2+-channel inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauderman, K.A.; Gandhi, V.C.; Jones, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective 5-Ht uptake inhibitor, inhibited 15 mM K + -induced [ 3 H]5-HT release from rat spinal cord and cortical synaptosomes at concentrations > 0.5 uM. This effect reflected a property shared by another selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor paroxetine but not by less selective uptake inhibitors such as amitriptyline, desipramine, imipramine or nortriptyline. Inhibition of release by fluoxetine was inversely related to both the concentration of K + used to depolarize the synaptosomes and the concentration of external Ca 2+ . Experiments aimed at determining a mechanism of action revealed that fluoxetine did not inhibit voltage-independent release of [ 3 H]5-HT release induced by the Ca 2+ -ionophore A 23187 or Ca 2+ -independent release induced by fenfluramine. Moreover the 5-HT autoreceptor antagonist methiothepin did not reverse the inhibitory actions of fluoxetine on K + -induced release. Further studies examined the effects of fluoxetine on voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channels and Ca 2+ entry

  19. Influence of factors on release of antimicrobials from antimicrobial packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Mei; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Hu, Chang-Ying; Nerín, Cristina

    2018-05-03

    Antimicrobial packaging materials (films or coatings) (APMs) have aroused great interest among the scientists or the experts specialized in material science, food science, packaging engineering, biology and chemistry. APMs have been used to package the food, such as dairy products, poultry, meat (e.g., beef), salmon muscle, pastry dough, fresh pasta, bakery products, fruits, vegetables and beverages. Some materials have been already commercialized. The ability of APMs to extend the shelf-life of the food depends on the release rate of the antimicrobials (AMs) from the materials to the food. The optimum rate is defined as target release rate (TRR). To achieve TRR, the influencing factors of the release rate should be considered. Herein we reviewed for the first time these factors and their influence on the release. These factors mainly include the AMs, food (or food simulant), packaging materials, the interactions among them, the temperature and environmental relative humidity (RH).

  20. In-pile test of tritium release from tritium breeding materials (VOM-21H experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasawa, Toshimasa; Takeshita, Hidefumi; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi.

    1986-10-01

    Material development and blanket design of lithium-based ceramics such as lithium oxide, lithium aluminate, lithium silicate and lithium zirconate have been performed in Japan, United State of America and Europian Communities. Lithium oxide is a most attractive candidate for tritium breeding materials because of its high lithium density, high thermal conductivity and good tritium release performance. This work has been done to clarify the characteristics of tritium release and recovery from Li 2 O by means of in-situ tritium release measurement. The effects of temperature and sweep gas composition on the tritium release were investigated in this VOM-21H Experiment. Good measurement of tritium release was achieved but there were uncertainties in reproduciblity of data. The experimental results show that the role of surface adsorption/desorption makes a significant contribution to the tritium release and tritium inventory. Also, it is necessary to define the rate limiting process either diffusion or surface adsorption/desorption. (author)

  1. Functionalized mesoporous materials for adsorption and release of different drug molecules: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gang; Otuonye, Amy N.; Blair, Elizabeth A.; Denton, Kelley; Tao Zhimin; Asefa, Tewodros

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption capacity and release properties of mesoporous materials for drug molecules can be improved by functionalizing their surfaces with judiciously chosen organic groups. Functionalized ordered mesoporous materials containing various types of organic groups via a co-condensation synthetic method from 15% organosilane and by post-grafting organosilanes onto a pre-made mesoporous silica were synthesized. Comparative studies of their adsorption and release properties for various model drug molecules were then conducted. Functional groups including 3-aminopropyl, 3-mercaptopropyl, vinyl, and secondary amine groups were used to functionalize the mesoporous materials while rhodamine 6G and ibuprofen were utilized to investigate the materials' relative adsorption and release properties. The self-assembly of the mesoporous materials was carried out in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant, which produced MCM-41 type materials with pore diameters of ∼2.7-3.3 nm and moderate to high surface areas up to ∼1000 m 2 /g. The different functional groups introduced into the materials dictated their adsorption capacity and release properties. While mercaptopropyl and vinyl functionalized samples showed high adsorption capacity for rhodamine 6G, amine functionalized samples exhibited higher adsorption capacity for ibuprofen. While the diffusional release of ibuprofen was fitted on the Fickian diffusion model, the release of rhodamine 6G followed Super Case-II transport model. - Graphical abstract: The adsorption capacity and release properties of mesoporous materials for various drug molecules are tuned by functionalizing the surfaces of the materials with judiciously chosen organic groups. This work reports comparative studies of the adsorption and release properties of functionalized ordered mesoporous materials containing different hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups that are synthesized via a co-condensation and post-grafting methods for

  2. Materials modelling - a possible design tool for advanced nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffelner, W.; Samaras, M.; Bako, B.; Iglesias, R.

    2008-01-01

    The design of components for power plants is usually based on codes, standards and design rules or code cases. However, it is very difficult to get the necessary experimental data to prove these lifetime assessment procedures for long-term applications in environments where complex damage interactions (temperature, stress, environment, irradiation) can occur. The rules used are often very simple and do not have a basis which take physical damage into consideration. The linear life fraction rule for creep and fatigue interaction can be taken as a prominent example. Materials modelling based on a multi-scale approach in principle provides a tool to convert microstructural findings into mechanical response and therefore has the capability of providing a set of tools for the improvement of design life assessments. The strength of current multi-scale modelling efforts is the insight they offer as regards experimental phenomena. To obtain an understanding of these phenomena it is import to focus on issues which are important at the various time and length scales of the modelling code. In this presentation the multi-scale path will be demonstrated with a few recent examples which focus on VHTR applications. (authors)

  3. Is analysis of biological materials with nm spatial resolution possible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warley, Alice

    2006-01-01

    Cells are bounded by a membrane, the plasma membrane, subcompartments within cells are also delineated by membranes, these membranes contain transporters that regulate the flow of ions across them. Fluxes of ions across the membranes underlie many of the basic properties of living material such as excitability and movement. Breakdown of membrane function ultimately leads to cell death. EM microanalysis has been instrumental in gaining understanding of how changes in element distribution affect cell behaviour and cell survival. The main problem that biologists face in undertaking such studies is that of specimen preparation. Cells consist mainly of water that needs to be either removed or stabilised before analysis can take place. Cryotechniques, fixation by rapid freezing followed by sectioning at low temperatures and freeze-drying of the sections have proved to be a reliable method for the study of intracellular element concentrations. These techniques have been used to show that elements are confined in different compartments within cells and produced results to support a new theory on the mechanism by which neutrophils kill bacteria. They have also shown that disturbance of the ionic content of mitochondria is one of the first signs in the pathway to cell death

  4. Materials for Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms: Molecular Pharmaceutics and Controlled Release Drug Delivery Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. DeLuca

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled release delivery is available for many routes of administration and offers many advantages (as microparticles and nanoparticles over immediate release delivery. These advantages include reduced dosing frequency, better therapeutic control, fewer side effects, and, consequently, these dosage forms are well accepted by patients. Advances in polymer material science, particle engineering design, manufacture, and nanotechnology have led the way to the introduction of several marketed controlled release products and several more are in pre-clinical and clinical development.

  5. Biocompatibility evaluations and biomedical sensing applications of nitric oxide-releasing/generating polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiduo

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent signaling molecule secreted by healthy vascular endothelial cells (EC) that is capable of inhibiting the activation and adhesion of platelets, preventing inflammation and inducing vasodilation. Polymeric materials that mimic the EC through the continuous release or generation of NO are expected to exhibit enhanced biocompatibility in vivo. In this dissertation research, the biocompatibility of novel NO-releasing/generating materials has been evaluated via both in vitro and in vivo studies. A new in vitro platelet adhesion assay has been designed to quantify platelet adhesion on NO-releasing/generating polymer surfaces via their innate lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) content. Using this assay, it was discovered that continuous NO fluxes of up to 7.05 x10-10 mol cm-2 min-1 emitted from the polymer surfaces could reduce platelet adhesion by almost 80%. Such an in vitro biocompatibility assay can be employed as a preliminary screening method in the development of new NO-releasing/generating materials. In addition, the first in vivo biocompatibility evaluation of NO-generating polymers was conducted in a porcine artery model for intravascular oxygen sensing catheters. The Cu(I)-catalyzed decomposition of endogenous S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) generated NO in situ at the polymer/blood interface and offered enhanced biocompatibility to the NO-generating catheters along with more accurate analytical results for intra-arterial measurements of PO2 levels. NO-generating polymers can also be utilized to fabricate electrochemical RSNO sensors based on the amperometric detection of NO generated by the reaction of RSNOs with immobilized catalysts. Unlike conventional methodologies employed to measure labile RSNO, the advantage of the RSNO sensor method is that measurement in whole blood samples is possible and this minimizes sample processing artifacts in RSNO measurements. An electrochemical RSNO sensor with organoselenium crosslinked polyethylenimine (RSe

  6. Inclusion of cefalexin in SBA-15 mesoporus material and release property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou

    2012-01-01

    SBA-15 (Santa Barbara Amorphous-15) is a high ordered mesoporous material. It has the advantages of a non-toxic property, good hydrothermal stability and thermal stability, etc. Inside inner surface a lot of silanols exist. Pore diameter size is uniform and pore size distribution is narrow. This structural feature makes SBA-15 have a higher loading drug amount and be able to effectively extend the drug release cycle. In this paper, polyethylene glycol-block-polypropylene glycol-block-polyethylene glycol was used as template and tetraethyl orthosilicate was used as silica source to prepare SBA-15 by hydrothermal synthesis method. Cefalexin was included in SBA-15 and the included cefalexin drug content was 158.72 mg/g. The composite materials were characterized by using chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and low temperature nitrogen adsorption–desorption. The results showed that cefalexin had been successfully included in host SBA-15 pore channels. Rational analyses of the release processes of cefalexin drug from the pores of SBA-15 to the simulated body fluid, simulated gastric juice and simulated intestinal fluid were made and sustained-release effects of the drug in complex system were studied. The results showed that in simulated body fluid within 1–5 h cefalexin was fast released and the cumulative release reached 50.00% at 5 h. In 15–20 h, the sustained release speed of cefalexin drug in the composite material decreased and the sustained-release cumulative amount reached 99.87% at 20 h. The release of cefalexin was basically complete. In simulated gastric fluid, composite material sustained-release ended at 4 h, the cumulative sustained release ratio reaching 26.10%. In simulated gastric fluid, the sustained-release was complete at 7 h, the cumulative sustained release ratio reaching 32.46%. The composite material of SBA-15 and cefalexin

  7. New plant releases from the USDA-NRCS Aberdeen, Idaho, Plant Materials Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. St. John; P. Blaker

    2001-01-01

    The Plant Materials Center at Aberdeen, Idaho, is operated by the United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. The purpose of the Plant Materials Center is to evaluate and release plant materials for conservation use and to develop and transfer new technology for the establishment and management of plants. The Center serves portions...

  8. Development and evaluation of a biocide release system for prolonged antifungal activity in finishing materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eversdijk, J.; Erich, S.J.F.; Hermanns, S.P.M.; Adan, O.C.G.; Bolle, de M.; Meyer, de K.; Bylemans, D.; Bekker, M.; Cate, ten A.T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of modified nano-clay particles as a controlled release system for biocides from building materials. Different (model) biocides were incorporated in a biocide/nano-clay composite and subsequently the release of the biocides was monitored under different environmental

  9. Reuse of conditional released materials from decommissioning; a review of approaches and scenarios with long-term constructions - 59149

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniska, Vladimir; Pritrsky, Jozef; Ondra, Frantisek; Zachar, Matej; Necas, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Paper presents the overall scope and actual results of the project for evaluation of representative scenarios for reuse of conditionally released materials from decommissioning. Aim of the project is to evaluate the possibilities of reuse of conditionally released steels and concrete in technical constructions which guarantee the long-term preservation of design properties over periods of 50-100 years. Interaction of conditionally released materials with public is limited and predictable due to design and purpose of selected constructions and due to fact that in many scenarios these materials are embedded in non-radioactive materials such as bars in reinforced concrete. Worker's scenarios for preparation, operation and maintenance of these constructions are analysed in detail including the manufacturing of elements for these constructions. Project aims to evaluate the scenarios of reuse of conditionally released materials in a complex way in order to develop the data for designers of scenarios and to evaluate the volumes of conditionally released materials based on facility (to be decommissioned) inventory data. The long-term constructions considered are bridges, tunnels, roads, railway constructions, industrial buildings, power industry equipment and others. Evaluation covers following areas: - Analysis of activities for manufacturing of reinforcement bars, rolled steel sheets and other steel elements and analysis of activities for construction of evaluated scenarios in order to evaluate the external exposure of professionals performing these activities; - Analysis of external exposure of professionals involved in operation and maintenance of the long-term constructions; analysis of external exposure of public groups which are exposed to evaluated constructions; - Analysis of internal exposure of public groups from the radionuclides released from the evaluated scenarios based on models for migration of radionuclides from the long-term constructions to critical

  10. Possibilities for in-vitro testing of controlled-release parenterals.

    OpenAIRE

    Kožák, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to start with the development of a gel-based medium simulating intramuscular environment for in-vitro drug release testing as an alternative to currently used water-based media. A pork meat was selected as a model of the muscle tissue. At the first part of the study, diffusion rate was proposed as the most determining factor of drug release in gel-based medium. Consequently, the diffusion rate of sodium fluorescein in pork meat was compared with the diffusion r...

  11. Probabilistic Approach to Conditional Probability of Release of Hazardous Materials from Railroad Tank Cars during Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-13

    This paper describes a probabilistic approach to estimate the conditional probability of release of hazardous materials from railroad tank cars during train accidents. Monte Carlo methods are used in developing a probabilistic model to simulate head ...

  12. Environmentally Sustainable Construction Products and Materials – Assessment of release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlström, Margareta; Laine-Yliijoki, Jutta; Järnström, helena

    The construction sector consumes yearly about half of all natural resourcesextracted in Europe and their transformation into building products has huge energy demands. Therefore the focus of today’s environmental policy is on the building end-of-life scenarios and material efficiency. Here waste...... hardly any construction product is designed keeping recycling/reuse in mind, the “Design for theEnvironment” -concept is one of the key steps towards increased recycling and reuse and thereby towards minimal environmental impacts. This project has been carried out by VTT with cooperation with the Danish...

  13. Monitoring for radioactive materials releasing to environment in M310 reformatived nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Zhenyu; Yang Guangli; Xu Guang

    2012-01-01

    Airborne radioactive materials of nuclear power plant (NPP) releases to the environment from the stack of NPP. Radioactive liquid waste releases of the ocean, the fluvial and the lake through the liquid waste letdyke of NPP. Further more, a few radioactive waste may be taken out of the NPP by vehicle or personnel. For the purpose of strict management and control above-mentioned waste, we use detect equipment monitoring radioactive waste of NPP. Management and control for the releasing of radioactive material to the environment in M310 reformatived NPP is strict and safety. (authors)

  14. Methods for determining the release of radioactive material into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farges, L.; Daw, H.T.

    1976-01-01

    The current policy on the discharge of radioactive effluents calls for the containment of radioactive wastes in most instances. The resulting doses to individuals and populations have been shown by many surveys to be very small (UNSCEAR Report, 1972). Nevertheless, small amounts of radioactive releases are made to the environment during normal operation of nuclear facilities. Whenever discharge of radioactive effluents to the environment is permitted, careful consideration is made of all the relevant factors which might lead to exposure of man. However, with the expansion of nuclear power programmes, more sophistication is required in setting discharge limits to the environment, taking into consideration future sources as well as present sources. The IAEA's recommendations conform to the dose limitation system set out by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The system implies that the individual dose limits should never be exceeded. Furthermore, the ICRP guidelines require that doses be kept as low as reasonably possible, taking social and economic considerations into account. This second objective, usually called optimization, implies the use of differential cost-benefit analysis. At present, decisions are still made by other procedures, for example, by applying safety factors to release limits derived only from the dose limits. However, the ICRP system of dose limitation, including optimization, appears to be a more rational approach to the establishment of release limits. Thus, it is necessary to provide basic material on concepts which are intended for use and decision making by national authorities, and the Agency plans to publish a series of complementary documents on the application of these concepts to various specific cases. (author)

  15. WATER HYACINTH: A POSSIBLE ALTERNATIVE RATE RETARDING NATURAL POLYMER USED IN SUSTAINED RELEASE TABLET DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabera eKhatun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years natural polymers have been widely used, because of their effectiveness and availability over synthetic polymers. In this present investigation matrix tablets of Metformin hydrochloride were formulated using Water hyacinth powder and its rate retardant activity was studied. Tablets were prepared using wet granulation method with 8% starch as granulating agent and 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% and 30% of Water hyacinth powder to the drug. In preformulation study, angle of repose, Carr’s Index and Hausner ratio were calculated. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM studies were performed and no interactions were found between drug and excipients. Weight variation, friability, hardness, thickness, diameter, and in vitro release study were performed with the prepared matrix tablets. Dissolution studies were conducted using USP type II apparatus at a speed of 100 rpm at 37oC ± 0.5 temperature, for 8 hours. All the formulations comply with both BP and USP requirements, but among all the formulations F-1 (5% of Water hyacinth was the best fitted formula. The drug release patterns were explained in different kinetic models such as Zero order, First order, Higuchi, Hixson Crowell and Korsmeyer-Peppas equations. The current investigation implies that Water hyacinth has the potential to be used as a rate-retarding agent in sustained release drug formulations.

  16. Water hyacinth: a possible alternative rate retarding natural polymer used in sustained release tablet design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Sabera; Sutradhar, Kumar B

    2014-01-01

    In recent years natural polymers have been widely used because of their effectiveness and availability over synthetic polymers. In this present investigation matrix tablets of Metformin hydrochloride were formulated using Water hyacinth powder and its rate retardant activity was studied. Tablets were prepared using wet granulation method with 8% starch as granulating agent and 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% of Water hyacinth powder to the drug. In preformulation study, angle of repose, Carr's Index and Hausner ratio were calculated. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies were performed and no interactions were found between drug and excipients. Weight variation, friability, hardness, thickness, diameter, and in vitro release study were performed with the prepared matrix tablets. Dissolution studies were conducted using USP type II apparatus at a speed of 100 rpm at 37°C ± 0.5 temperature for 8 h. Though all the formulations comply with both BP and USP requirements, formulation F-1 (5% of Water hyacinth) was the best fitted formula. The drug release patterns were explained in different kinetic models such as Zero order, First order, Higuchi, Hixson Crowell, and Korsmeyer-Peppas equations. The current investigation implies that Water hyacinth has the potential to be used as a rate-retarding agent in sustained release drug formulations.

  17. Model for absorption and release of gaseous materials by forest canopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A model of the physical processes defining the absorption and release of materials by a forest canopy has been developed. The model deals with the turbulent transport of gaseous materials in the surface boundary layer near the canopy, the turbulent transport in the canopy atmosphere, the transport through the boundary layer near the leaf and soil surface, and the solution of the gaseous materials in intracellular fluids and subsequent diffusion into the leaf cells. The model is used to simulate the uptake of molecular tritium by the forest canopy and the subsequent release of tritiated water. Results of dynamic simulations of tritium uptake and release are compared with data collected at the time of a release of molecular tritium to the atmosphere

  18. Stability and in vitro release profile of enalapril maleate from different commercially available tablets: possible therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Dione Marçal; dos Santos, Leandro Dias; Lima, Eliana Martins

    2008-08-05

    Stability of enalapril maleate formulations can be affected when the product is exposed to higher temperature and humidity, with the formation of two main degradation products: enalaprilat and a diketopiperazine derivative. In this work, stability and drug release profiles of 20 mg enalapril maleate tablets (reference, generic and similar products) were evaluated. After 180 days of the accelerated stability testing, most products did not exhibit the specified amount of drug. Additionally, drug release profiles were markedly different from that of the reference product, mainly due to drug degradation. Changes in drug concentration and drug release profile of enalapril formulations are strong indicators of a compromised bioavailability, with possible interferences on the therapeutic response for this drug.

  19. Resolving Radiological Classification and Release Issues for Many DOE Solid Wastes and Salvageable Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1999-11-19

    The cost effective radiological classification and disposal of solid materials with potential volume contamination, in accordance with applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, suffers from an inability to unambiguously distinguish among transuranic waste, low-level waste, and unconditional-release materials in a generic way allowing in-situ measurement and verification. Depending on a material''s classification, disposal costs can vary by a hundred-fold. With these large costs at risk, the issues involved in making defensible decisions are ripe for closer scrutiny. In many cases, key issues can be easily resolved by a combination of process information, some simple measurements, and calculational predictions from a computer model for radiation shielding. The proper classification and disposal of many solid wastes requires a measurement regime that is able to show compliance with a variety of institutional and regulatory contamination limits. Ultimate responsibility for this, of course, rests with radiological control or health physics organization of the individual site, but there are many measurements which can be performed by operations and generation organizations to simplify the process and virtually guarantee acceptance. Although this is not possible for all potential solid wastes, there are many that do lend themselves to such measures, particularly some of large volumes and realizable cost savings. Mostly what is needed for this to happen are a few guiding rules, measurement procedures, and cross checks for potential pitfalls. Several examples are presented here and discussed that demonstrate the possibilities, including one which was successfully applied to bulk contamination.

  20. Evaluation of hydrophobic materials as matrices for controlled-release drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadir, Mohiuddin Abdul; Rahman, M Sharifur; Karim, M Ziaul; Akter, Sanjida; Awkat, M Talat Bin; Reza, Md Selim

    2003-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of different insoluble and erodable wax-lipid based materials and their content level on the release profile of drug from matrix systems. Matrix tablets of theophylline were prepared using carnauba wax, bees wax, stearic acid, cetyl alcohol, cetostearyl alcohol and glyceryl monostearate as rate-retarding agents by direct compression process. The release of theophylline from these hydrophobic matrices was studied over 8-hours in buffer media of pH 6.8. Statistically significant difference was found among the drug release profile from different matrices. The release kinetics was found to be governed by the type and content of hydrophobic materials in the matrix. At lower level of wax matrices (25%), a potential burst release was observed with all the materials being studied. Bees wax could not exert any sustaining action while an extensive burst release was found with carnauba wax at this hydrophobic load. Increasing the concentration of fat-wax materials significantly decreased the burst effect of drug from the matrix. At higher hydrophobic level (50% of the matrix), the rate and extent of drug release was significantly reduced due to increased tortuosity and reduced porosity of the matrix. Cetostearyl alcohol imparted the strongest retardation of drug release irrespective of fat-wax level. Numerical fits indicate that the Higuchi square root of time model was the most appropriate one for describing the release profile of theophylline from hydrophobic matrices. The release mechanism was also explored and explained with biexponential equation. Application of this model indicates that Fickian or case I kinetics is the predominant mechanism of drug release from these wax-lipid matrices. The mean dissolution time (MDT) was calculated for all the formulations and the highest MDT value was obtained with cetostearyl matrix. The greater sustaining activity of cetostearyl alcohol can be attributed to some level of

  1. The release of organic material from clay based buffer materials and its potential implications for radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Goulard, M.; Haveman, S.A.; Bachinski, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    In the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal concept used fuel would be placed in corrosion resistant containers which would be surrounded by clay-based buffer and backfill materials in an engineered vault excavated at 500 to 1000 m depth in crystalline rock formations in the Canadian shield. Organic substances could affect radionuclide mobility due to the effects of redox and complexation reactions that increase solubility and alter mobility. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the buffer and backfill materials, proposed for use in a disposal vault, contain organics that could be leached by groundwater in large enough quantities to affect radionuclide mobility within the disposal vault and surrounding geosphere complex. Buffer material, made from a mixture of 50 wt.% Avonlea sodium bentonite and 50 wt.% silica sand, was extracted with deionized water to determine the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), humic acid and fulvic acid. The effect of radiation and heat from the used fuel was simulated by treating samples of buffer before leaching to various amounts of heat (60 and 90 C) for periods of 2, 4 and 6 weeks, and to ionizing radiation with doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy. The results showed that groundwater would leach significant amounts of organics from buffer that complex with radionuclides such as the actinides, potentially affecting their solubility and transport within the disposal vault and possibly the surrounding geosphere. In addition, the leached organics would likely stimulate microbial growth by several orders of magnitude. Heating and radiation affect the amount and nature of leachable organics. (orig.)

  2. Characterization of new functionalized calcium carbonate-polycaprolactone composite material for application in geometry-constrained drug release formulation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner-Hattler, Leonie; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Huwyler, Jörg; Puchkov, Maxim

    2017-10-01

    A new mineral-polymer composite (FCC-PCL) performance was assessed to produce complex geometries to aid in development of controlled release tablet formulations. The mechanical characteristics of a developed material such as compactibility, compressibility and elastoplastic deformation were measured. The results and comparative analysis versus other common excipients suggest efficient formation of a complex, stable and impermeable geometries for constrained drug release modifications under compression. The performance of the proposed composite material has been tested by compacting it into a geometrically altered tablet (Tablet-In-Cup, TIC) and the drug release was compared to commercially available product. The TIC device exhibited a uniform surface, showed high physical stability, and showed absence of friability. FCC-PCL composite had good binding properties and good compactibility. It was possible to reveal an enhanced plasticity characteristic of a new material which was not present in the individual components. The presented FCC-PCL composite mixture has the potential to become a successful tool to formulate controlled-release dosage solid forms.

  3. In vitro release of doxycycline from bioabsorbable materials and acrylic strips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of marginal periodontitis may include use of local antibiotics. In the present in vitro study the bioabsorbable materials Surgicel, Tissell, and CollaCote and acrylic strips were examined for release of doxycycline into liquids and residual antibacterial activity of the materials. Pieces...

  4. Enantioselectively controlled release of chiral drug (metoprolol) using chiral mesoporous silica materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhen; Liu Xianbin; Ng, Siu-Choon; Chen Yuan; Yang Yanhui; Du Yu

    2010-01-01

    Chiral porous materials have attracted burgeoning attention on account of their potential applications in many areas, such as enantioseparation, chiral catalysis, chemical sensors and drug delivery. In this report, chiral mesoporous silica (CMS) materials with various pore sizes and structures were prepared using conventional achiral templates (other than chiral surfactant) and a chiral cobalt complex as co-template. The synthesized CMS materials were characterized by x-ray diffraction, nitrogen physisorption, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. These CMS materials, as carriers, were demonstrated to be able to control the enantioselective release of a representative chiral drug (metoprolol). The release kinetics, as modeled by the power law equation, suggested that the release profiles of metoprolol were remarkably dependent on the pore diameter and pore structure of CMS materials. More importantly, R- and S-enantiomers of metoprolol exhibited different release kinetics on CMS compared to the corresponding achiral mesoporous silica (ACMS), attributable to the existence of local chirality on the pore wall surface of CMS materials. The chirality of CMS materials on a molecular level was further substantiated by vibrational circular dichroism measurements.

  5. Enantioselectively controlled release of chiral drug (metoprolol) using chiral mesoporous silica materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Zhen; Liu Xianbin; Ng, Siu-Choon; Chen Yuan; Yang Yanhui [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637459 (Singapore); Du Yu, E-mail: du_yu@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: yhyang@ntu.edu.sg [College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2010-04-23

    Chiral porous materials have attracted burgeoning attention on account of their potential applications in many areas, such as enantioseparation, chiral catalysis, chemical sensors and drug delivery. In this report, chiral mesoporous silica (CMS) materials with various pore sizes and structures were prepared using conventional achiral templates (other than chiral surfactant) and a chiral cobalt complex as co-template. The synthesized CMS materials were characterized by x-ray diffraction, nitrogen physisorption, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. These CMS materials, as carriers, were demonstrated to be able to control the enantioselective release of a representative chiral drug (metoprolol). The release kinetics, as modeled by the power law equation, suggested that the release profiles of metoprolol were remarkably dependent on the pore diameter and pore structure of CMS materials. More importantly, R- and S-enantiomers of metoprolol exhibited different release kinetics on CMS compared to the corresponding achiral mesoporous silica (ACMS), attributable to the existence of local chirality on the pore wall surface of CMS materials. The chirality of CMS materials on a molecular level was further substantiated by vibrational circular dichroism measurements.

  6. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  7. Release of corrosion products from construction materials containing cobalt. Pt.2: Inconel X750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, I.

    1978-02-01

    This report describes experimental work aimed at determining the release rate for corrosion products from 18Cr8Ni steel and Inconel X750 in BWR environments. For test purposes these environments were simulated in a high pressure loop, where irradiated samples of the materials were exposed for 720 hours. The amounts of released products were determined using gamma spectrometric analysis. The results show that the release from Inconel X750 is higher than that from 18Cr8Ni steel. The release calculated from Co58 measurements is 7 times higher and from Co60 measurements it is 1.5 times higher. Both the filtered and the deposited fractions of the released corrosion products exhibit the same relative concentrations of Co58 and Co60. (author)

  8. Minutes of the workshop on off-site release criteria for contaminated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.P.N.

    1989-11-01

    A one and one-half-day workshop was held May 2-3, 1989, at the Pollard Auditorium in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, with the objective of formulating a strategy for developing reasonable and uniform criteria for releasing radioactively contaminated materials from the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This report contains the minutes of the workshop. At the conclusion of the workshop, a plan was formulated to facilitate the development of the above-mentioned off-site release criteria

  9. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report, 1982. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.

    1986-02-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1982 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1982 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized

  10. Controlled release of phenytoin for epilepsy treatment from titania and silica based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Tessy, E-mail: tessy3@prodigy.net.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco. Departamento de Microbiologia. Calzada del Hueso 1100, Col. Villa Quietud, Coyoacan, C.P. 04960, Mexico D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia ' MVS' . Laboratorio de Nanotecnologia. Av. Insurgentes Sur 3877, Col. La Fama, Tlalpan, 14269, Mexico, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Ortiz, Emma [Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia ' MVS' . Laboratorio de Nanotecnologia. Av. Insurgentes Sur 3877, Col. La Fama, Tlalpan, 14269, Mexico, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Meza, Doraliz [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Departamento de Quimica, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, A.P. 55-534, Mexico D.F., C.P. 09340 (Mexico); Basaldella, Elena [CIC-CINDECA - Universidad Nacional de La Plata - Calle 47 No 257 - La Plata (Argentina); Bokhimi, Xim; Magana, Carlos [Instituto de fisica, UNAM. Circuito de la Investigacion s/n. C.U. Mexico D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Sepulveda, Antonio; Rodriguez, Francisco; Ruiz, Javier [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Alicante. Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante, Espana Spain (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Template technique was used to obtain well ordered nanostructured materials: SBA-15 and titania tubes. {yields} Phenytoin (PH), a drug used in epilepsy treatment, was loaded in these materials to used como PH release. {yields} Loaded PH showed a good stability inside the used materials as observed by spectroscopy analysis. {yields} The load-release PH are faster in nanostructured TiO2 tubes than in mesoporous silica matrix. {yields} There is an inverse effect of the surface area of the structured materials on the amount of released PH. - Abstract: Template technique was used to obtain well ordered nanostructured materials: mesoporous silica and nanostructured titania tubes. This technique permits the synthesis of solids with controlled mesoporosity, where a large variety of molecules that have therapeutic activity can be hosted and further released to specific sites. In this work phenytoin (PH), a drug used in epilepsy treatment, was loaded in ordered mesoporous silica (SBA 15) and nanostructured titania tubes (TiO{sub 2}). The pure materials and those containing PH were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption at 77 K. In order to determine the loading capacity of the antiepileptic drug on these silica- and titania-based materials, the loading and release of PH was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy. Tubular structures were found for the titania samples, for which the X-ray diffractograms showed to be formed by anatase and rutile phases. On the other hand, an amorphous phase was found in the silica sample. A highly ordered hexagonal structure of 1D cylindrical channels was also observed for this material. Loaded PH showed a good stability inside the used materials as observed by spectroscopy analysis. The adsorption and desorption of PH are faster in nanostructured TiO{sub 2} tubes than in mesoporous silica

  11. Controlled release of phenytoin for epilepsy treatment from titania and silica based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Tessy; Ortiz, Emma; Meza, Doraliz; Basaldella, Elena; Bokhimi, Xim; Magana, Carlos; Sepulveda, Antonio; Rodriguez, Francisco; Ruiz, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Template technique was used to obtain well ordered nanostructured materials: SBA-15 and titania tubes. → Phenytoin (PH), a drug used in epilepsy treatment, was loaded in these materials to used como PH release. → Loaded PH showed a good stability inside the used materials as observed by spectroscopy analysis. → The load-release PH are faster in nanostructured TiO2 tubes than in mesoporous silica matrix. → There is an inverse effect of the surface area of the structured materials on the amount of released PH. - Abstract: Template technique was used to obtain well ordered nanostructured materials: mesoporous silica and nanostructured titania tubes. This technique permits the synthesis of solids with controlled mesoporosity, where a large variety of molecules that have therapeutic activity can be hosted and further released to specific sites. In this work phenytoin (PH), a drug used in epilepsy treatment, was loaded in ordered mesoporous silica (SBA 15) and nanostructured titania tubes (TiO 2 ). The pure materials and those containing PH were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and N 2 adsorption-desorption at 77 K. In order to determine the loading capacity of the antiepileptic drug on these silica- and titania-based materials, the loading and release of PH was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy. Tubular structures were found for the titania samples, for which the X-ray diffractograms showed to be formed by anatase and rutile phases. On the other hand, an amorphous phase was found in the silica sample. A highly ordered hexagonal structure of 1D cylindrical channels was also observed for this material. Loaded PH showed a good stability inside the used materials as observed by spectroscopy analysis. The adsorption and desorption of PH are faster in nanostructured TiO 2 tubes than in mesoporous silica matrix.

  12. Survey of radioactive effluent releases from byproduct material facilities. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    A survey of over 3,000 NRC byproduct material licensees was conducted in late 1980 to collect data on annual effluent releases of radioactivity. The survey was conducted through a questionnaire, which was sent to NRC licensees who handle radioactive material in unsealed form, i.e., research, medical, and industrial institutions. Principal findings from the survey analysis are as follows: More than 98% of the reported annual releases to air (484 to 490) yield calculated average concentrations at the boundary of the unrestricted area that were at 1% or less than the maximum permissible concentration (MPC) of Appendix B, Table II, Column 1 of 10 CFR 20. The largest reported annual release was estimated to yield a concentration that was approximately 12% of MPC, the 5 other releases ranged from 1 to 10% of MPC. All reported annual releases of liquid waste were within the limits specified by NRC with most facilities reporting annual releases of only a fraction of a curie. Based on the data provided by licensees and analyzed in this report, it appears that in general the environmental impacts from research, medical and industrial institutions and organizations licensed by the NRC to possess and use byproduct materials are minimal and correspond to a small fraction of that from natural background

  13. Comparison of the release of constituents from granular materials under batch and column testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Meza, Sarynna; Garrabrants, Andrew C; van der Sloot, Hans; Kosson, David S

    2008-01-01

    Column leaching testing can be considered a better basis for assessing field impact data than any other available batch test method and thus provides a fundamental basis from which to estimate constituent release under a variety of field conditions. However, column testing is time-intensive compared to the more simplified batch testing, and may not always be a viable option when making decisions for material reuse. Batch tests are used most frequently as a simple tool for compliance or quality control reasons. Therefore, it is important to compare the release that occurs under batch and column testing, and establish conservative interpretation protocols for extrapolation from batch data when column data are not available. Five different materials (concrete, construction debris, aluminum recycling residue, coal fly ash and bottom ash) were evaluated via batch and column testing, including different column flow regimes (continuously saturated and intermittent unsaturated flow). Constituent release data from batch and column tests were compared. Results showed no significant difference between the column flow regimes when constituent release data from batch and column tests were compared. In most cases batch and column testing agreed when presented in the form of cumulative release. For arsenic in carbonated materials, however, batch testing underestimates the column constituent release for most LS ratios and also on a cumulative basis. For cases when As is a constituent of concern, column testing may be required.

  14. Slow-release fertilizers and possibilities of their utilizing in nursery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Salaš

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Reserve, slow-release fertilizers (SRF enable to simplify the whole system of plant nutrition and fertilisation. Tabletted fertilizers of the Silvamix series represent a prospective product of Czech provenience. At our university, these fertilizers have been tested and used since the year 1991. Ornamental woody species grown in containers were investigated in two stages. Experiments with ornamental plants were established using one-year-old cuttings and seedlings of the following deciduous and evergreen woody species: Cotoneaster dammeri Skogholm, Berberis thunbergii, Potentilla fruticosa Snowflake, Ligustrum vulgare Atrovirens and Picea omorika. After planting into containers, fertilizers in the dose of 1 tablet (i.e. 10 g per litre of substrate were applied either to roots level or on the soil surface in the container. Silvamix in the dose of 5 g.l-1 was used as the tested fertilizer in the second stage. It was applied during the planting in the form of tablets and/or a powder. Control plants were fertilized in the course of growing season using a common agricultural fertilizer Cererit Z. The annual plants increments were measured. These experiments demonstrated a long-term optimum effect of this product on woody species and an equal quality and efficiency of its tabletted and powdered forms.

  15. Influence of plume rise on the consequences of radioactive material releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.J.; Wayland, J.R.; Ritchie, L.T.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of health consequences resulting from a postulated nuclear reactor accident can be strongly dependent on the buoyant rise of the plume of released radioactive material. The sensitivity of the consequences of a postulated accident to two different plume rise models has been investigated. The results of these investigations are the subject of this report. One of the models includes the effects of emission angle, momentum, and radioactive heating of the released material. The difference in the consequence estimates from the two models can exceed an order of magnitude under some conditions, but in general the results are similar

  16. Decreased absorption as a possible cause for the lower bioavailability of a sustained-release propranolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H; Ogata, H; Warabioka, R; Kashiwada, K; Ohira, M; Someya, K

    1990-03-01

    The influence of sustained absorption on the oral availability of propranolol (P) and the metabolic disposition of P were investigated by obtaining the partial metabolic clearances (CLm) following long-acting P (LA) dosing in comparison with the conventional propranolol tablet (CP). Ten healthy volunteers were given a single oral dose of an LA capsule (60 mg) and CP (20 mg x 3) using a crossover design. Blood and urine samples were collected over 24- and 48-h postdose periods, respectively. Concentrations of P, propranolol glucuronide (PG), 4-hydroxypropranolol (4P), 4-hydroxypropranolol glucuronide (4PG), 4-hydroxypropranolol sulfate (4PS), and naphthoxylactic acid (NLA) were determined by HPLC with fluorescence and UV detection. Significant differences were observed between LA and CP in the area under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUCs) for P, PG, and NLA and in the amounts excreted into urine (Ae) for all measured metabolites (i.e., PG, 4P, 4PG, 4PS, and NLA). The parallel decrease of the AUC for P and the excreted amounts of all measured metabolites following LA dosing resulted in partial metabolic clearances (CLm) and renal clearances (CL) for P and its metabolites that were similar to those observed for CP. Therefore, the hepatic metabolism of P would not be affected by the slower absorption at a single oral dose of 60 mg. These results indicate that the poor absorption of P from the gastrointestinal tract might be one of the factors causing the low bioavailability of P observed after administration of the sustained-release formulation.

  17. New Class of Hybrid Materials for Detection, Capture, and "On-Demand" Release of Carbon Monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Lupan, Alexandru; Ellingford, Christopher; Attia, Amr A A; Barry, Nicolas P E

    2018-04-25

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is both a substance hazardous to health and a side product of a number of industrial processes, such as methanol steam reforming and large-scale oxidation reactions. The separation of CO from nitrogen (N 2 ) in industrial processes is considered to be difficult because of the similarities of their electronic structures, sizes, and physicochemical properties (e.g., boiling points). Carbon monoxide is also a major poison in fuel cells because of its adsorption onto the active sites of the catalysts. It is therefore of the utmost economic importance to discover new materials that enable effective CO capture and release under mild conditions. However, methods to specifically absorb and easily release CO in the presence of contaminants, such as water, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, at ambient temperature are not available. Here, we report the simple and versatile fabrication of a new class of hybrid materials that allows capture and release of carbon monoxide under mild conditions. We found that carborane-containing metal complexes encapsulated in networks made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) react with CO, even when immersed in water, leading to dramatic color and infrared signature changes. Furthermore, we found that the CO can be easily released from the materials by simply dipping the networks into an organic solvent for less than 1 min, at ambient temperature and pressure, which not only offers a straightforward recycling method, but also a new method for the "on-demand" release of carbon monoxide. We illustrated the utilization of the on-demand release of CO from the networks by carrying out a carbonylation reaction on an electron-deficient metal complex that led to the formation of the CO-adduct, with concomitant recycling of the gel. We anticipate that our sponge-like materials and scalable methodology will open up new avenues for the storage, transport, and controlled release of CO, the silent killer and a major industrial poison.

  18. TEGDMA and UDMA monomers released from composite dental material polymerized with diode and halogen lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacławczyk, Agnieszka; Postek-Stefańska, Lidia; Pietraszewska, Daria; Birkner, Ewa; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Wysoczańska-Jankowicz, Iwona

    2018-03-20

    More than 35 substances released from composite fillings have been identified. Among these, basic monomers and the so-called co-monomers are most often reported. The substances released from polymer-based materials demonstrate allergenic, cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, embryotoxic, teratogenic, and estrogenic properties. The aim of this study was to measure the amounts of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) monomers released from composite dental fillings to citrate-phosphate buffer with the pH of 4, 6, 8 after 24 h and 6 months from the polymerization. Ten samples for each polymerization method had been made from the composite material (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, USA), which underwent polymerization using the following lamps: halogen lamp (Translux CL, Heraeus Kulzer, Hanau, Germany) (sample H) and diode lamp (Elipar Freelight 2, 3M ESPE), with soft start function (group DS) and without that function (group DWS). It has been demonstrated that the type of light-curing units has a significant impact on the amount of TEGDMA and UDMA released. The amount of UDMA and TEGDMA monomers released from composite fillings differed significantly depending on the source of polymerization applied, as well as the pH of the solution and sample storage time. Elution of the monomers from composite material polymerized using halogen lamp was significantly greater as compared to curing with diode lamps.

  19. Operational control of material release and discharges from nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, I. C.; Ranga, T.; Daroczi, L.; Deme, S.; Kerekes, A.

    2003-01-01

    The operational control of radioactive materials during atmospheric release and aquatic discharge from nuclear power plant is a licensing criterion for NPPs. Originally at the Paks NPP the release control was based on activity limits for four groups of elements. These groups were noble gases, long living radio-aerosols, radioiodine and radiostrontium for atmospheric release and specified activity limit for beta emitters, strontium and tritium for aquatic discharge into Danube. These groups were controlled with proper sampling and/or measuring instrumentation. The limit for atmospheric release was given as a 30-day moving average, for liquid discharges the annual limit was stipulated. The new release and discharge limitation system is based on the environmental dose limitation. The dose constraint for Paks NPP is 90 Sv/year of the critical group for all release pathways and the investigation dose limit is equal to 27 Sv/year. The regulation did not subdivide the dose limit for atmospheric and liquid components but for operational control subdivision of dose limits for atmospheric release and aquatic discharge and shorter time period (one day-one month) seems to be useful. The subdivision can be based on past release data and/or previous activity limits. To satisfy dose below the investigation dose limit there should be a proper operation control level for each separately measured component and pathway belonging to reasonable time interval significantly shorter than one year. The main task of the NPP staff is elaboration of reasonable control levels and reference time intervals for different radionuclide and element groups to be used in operational control. Operational control levels are based on measured daily or monthly release rates. In case of noble gases, aerosols and iodine the daily release rates have several sharp peaks per year. Operational control levels give opportunity to detect these peaks for internal investigation purposes. Investigation release limits

  20. Release of axonally transported material from an in vitro amphibian sciatic nerve preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The rapid axonal transport of a pulse of [35S]methionine-labelled material was used to study the release of transported material from amphibian nerve maintained in vitro. Following creation of a moving pulse of activity in a dorsal root ganglion-sciatic nerve preparation, the ganglion was removed and the nerve placed in a three-compartment tray, the section of nerve in the middle compartment containing no truncated branches (unbranched section). All three compartments were filled with a saline solution that in some studies contained nonradioactive methionine (1.0 mmol/L). Analysis of studies in which nonradioactive methionine was absent revealed that labelled material appeared in the bathing solution of the end compartments that contained truncated branches, but not in the solution of the middle (unbranched) compartment. The quantity of label released in the branched compartments was approximately 6% of that remaining in the corresponding section of nerve following an 18-20 h incubation period. However, when nonradioactive methionine was present, all compartments showed an additional activity in the bathing solution of approximately 10% of that remaining in the nerve. In another study in which a position-sensitive detector of ionizing radiation was used to monitor progress of the pulse, it was found that activity did not enter the bathing solution of a compartment prior to the pulse of activity. It is concluded that in the absence of methionine from the bathing solution, axonally transported material is released only from regions of nerve that contain severed axons; however, the presence of methionine allows transported material to be released from nerve containing intact axons. Ultrafiltration studies and thin-layer chromatography revealed the majority of material released to be of low-molecular weight (less than 30,000 daltons) and not free [35S]methionine

  1. Novel Hydrogel-Advanced Modified Clay Nanocomposites as Possible Vehicles for Drug Delivery and Controlled Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Ianchis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Present study refers to the synthesis of new advanced materials based on poly(methacrylic acid (PMAA with previously reported own advanced modified clays by edge covalent bonding. This will create the premises to obtain nanocomposite hydrogels with combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic behavior absolutely necessary for co-delivery of polar/nonpolar substances. For the synthesis, N,N’-methylenebisacrylamide was used as cross-linker and ammonium persulphate as initiator. As a consequence of the inclusion of clay into the polymer matrix and the intercalation of PMAA between the layers as well as the presence of hydrophobic interactions occurred between partners, the final hydrogel nanocomposites possessed greater swelling degrees, slower de-swelling process and enhanced mechanical properties depending on the clay type in comparison with pure hydrogel. In vitro MTS ([3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt] colorimetric assay showed that direct exposure with PMMA-clay-based constructs did not affect cell viability and proliferation in time (24 and 48 h on either normal or adenocarcinoma cell lines.

  2. Novel Hydrogel-Advanced Modified Clay Nanocomposites as Possible Vehicles for Drug Delivery and Controlled Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianchis, Raluca; Ninciuleanu, Claudia M; Gifu, Ioana C; Alexandrescu, Elvira; Somoghi, Raluca; Gabor, Augusta R; Preda, Silviu; Nistor, Cristina L; Nitu, Sabina; Petcu, Cristian; Icriverzi, Madalina; Florian, Paula E; Roseanu, Anca M

    2017-12-13

    Present study refers to the synthesis of new advanced materials based on poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) with previously reported own advanced modified clays by edge covalent bonding. This will create the premises to obtain nanocomposite hydrogels with combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic behavior absolutely necessary for co-delivery of polar/nonpolar substances. For the synthesis, N , N '-methylenebisacrylamide was used as cross-linker and ammonium persulphate as initiator. As a consequence of the inclusion of clay into the polymer matrix and the intercalation of PMAA between the layers as well as the presence of hydrophobic interactions occurred between partners, the final hydrogel nanocomposites possessed greater swelling degrees, slower de-swelling process and enhanced mechanical properties depending on the clay type in comparison with pure hydrogel. In vitro MTS ([3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2 H -tetrazolium, inner salt]) colorimetric assay showed that direct exposure with PMMA-clay-based constructs did not affect cell viability and proliferation in time (24 and 48 h) on either normal or adenocarcinoma cell lines.

  3. Release from control of inactive material from decommissioning the ASTRA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandl, A.; Hrnecek, E.; Steger, F.; Kurz, H.; Meyer, F.; Karacson, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf have been operating a 10 MW ASTRA research reactor from 1960 until 1999. After that date, a submission of the intention to decommission the reactor has been provided to the Competent Authorities. After completion of an Environmental Impact Study by the Competent Authorities and modification of the Permissions for Site Use, the reactor finally entered the decommissioning phase in 2003. Inactive materials from the decommissioning site are expected to be released from control. The procedure for such a release from control agreed upon between the Competent Authorities and ARC Seibersdorf involves a four-step measurement, verification, and certification process detailed in this paper. By September 2003, this four-step procedure has been completed for 16500 kg of steel re-enforced concrete and for 5500 kg of other materials; the release from control of 3000 kg of paraffin and 10000 kg of graphite from the thermal column are planned for the near future. (author)

  4. A biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability for bone tissue repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, J. Carlos [CICECO — Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Wacha, András [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar Tudósok körútja 2, Budapest 1117 (Hungary); Gomes, Pedro S. [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto (Portugal); Alves, Luís C. [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N.10, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Fernandes, M. Helena Vaz [CICECO — Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Salvado, Isabel M. Miranda, E-mail: isabelmsalvado@ua.pt [CICECO — Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Fernandes, M. Helena R. [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto (Portugal)

    2016-05-01

    The increasing interest in the effect of strontium in bone tissue repair has promoted the development of bioactive materials with strontium release capability. According to literature, hybrid materials based on the system PDMS–SiO{sub 2} have been considered a plausible alternative as they present a mechanical behavior similar to the one of the human bone. The main purpose of this study was to obtain a biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability. A hybrid material, in the system PDMS–SiO{sub 2}–CaO–SrO, was prepared with the incorporation of 0.05 mol of titanium per mol of SiO{sub 2}. Calcium and strontium were added using the respective acetates as sources, following a sol–gel technique previously developed by the present authors. The obtained samples were characterized by FT-IR, solid-state NMR, and SAXS, and surface roughness was analyzed by 3D optical profilometry. In vitro studies were performed by immersion of the samples in Kokubo's SBF for different periods of time, in order to determine the bioactive potential of these hybrids. Surfaces of the immersed samples were observed by SEM, EDS and PIXE, showing the formation of calcium phosphate precipitates. Supernatants were analyzed by ICP, revealing the capability of the material to simultaneously fix phosphorus ions and to release calcium and strontium, in a concentration range within the values reported as suitable for the induction of the bone tissue repair. The material demonstrated to be cytocompatible when tested with MG63 osteoblastic cells, exhibiting an inductive effect on cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity. - Highlights: • A hybrid PDMS–SiO{sub 2}–CaO–SrO material was prepared with the incorporation of Ti. • Sr was released in concentrations suitable for the induction of bone tissue repair. • The material demonstrated to be cytocompatible when tested with osteoblastic cells.

  5. International conference and workshop on modeling and mitigating the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    This conference was held September 26--29, 1995 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous materials. Attention is focused on air dispersion of vapors. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  6. Exploring the Nutrient Release Potential of Organic Materials as Integrated Soil Fertility Management Components Using SAFERNAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maro, G.P.; Mrema, J.P.; Msanya, B.M.; Janssen, B.H.; Teri, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the nutrient release potential of different organic materials and assess their role in integrated soil fertility management for coffee using the new coffee yield model SAFERNAC. It involved an incubation experiment conducted at TaCRI Lyamungu Screenhouse for

  7. Influence of stabilizer on the environment and their use as possible secondary raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelenova, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper author deals with the environmental impact of coal combustion in coal fired power plants and with influence of ash and stabilizer on the environment and their use as possible secondary raw material

  8. Reconcentration of radioactive material released to sanitary sewers in accordance with 10 CFR Part 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, C.C.; Hill, R.L.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.; Norton, M.V.; Aaberg, R.L.; Stetar, E.A.

    1994-12-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), in accordance with 10 CFR 20, and agreement states, in accordance with state regulations, regulates the discharge of radioactive materials into sanitary sewer systems. A one-year study was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the NRC to assess whether radioactive materials that are dischared to sanitary sewer systems undergo significant reconcentration within the wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) and to determine the physical and/or chemical processes that may result in radionuclide reconcentration within the WWTPs. The study objectives were addressed by collecting information and data on wastewater treatment, relevant geochemical processes, and individual radionuclide behavior in WWTPs from the open literature, NRC reports, EPA surveys, and interviews with NRC licensees and staff of WWTPs that may be impacted by these discharges. Radionuclide mass balance and removal efficiencies were calculated for WWTPs at Oak Ridge, TN; and Erwin, TN, but were not shown to be reliable since the licensee release data generally underestimated the mass of radionuclide that was ultimately found in the sludge. This disparity may be due, in part, to the fact that data available for use in this study were collected to address regulatory concerns and not to perform mass balance calculations. A limited modeling study showed some promise for predicting radionuclide behavior in WWTPS, however, the general applicability of using these empirical models remains uncertain. With the data and models currently available, it is not possible to quantitatively determine the physical and chemical processes that cause reconcentration or to calculate, a priori, reconcentration factors for specific WWTP unit processes or WWTPs in general

  9. Analyse of possibilities of increasing housing energy efficiency by application of phase-changing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučeljić-Vavan Sanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Refurbishment of existing building stock using energy-saving phase-changing smart materials and technologies, in addition to improved indoor climatic conditions, offer an opportunity for increasing housing energy efficiency and value. This fast developing technology becomes increasingly cost-effective with much shorter payback periods. However, it is undertaken only on a limited scale; because of lack of knowledge about their changeable properties and dynamism in that they behave in response to energy fields. Main characteristics, which make them different form others, are: immediacy transience, self-actuation, selectivity and directness. Phase change processes invariably involve the absorbing, storing or releasing of large amounts of energy in the form of latent heat. These processes are reversible and phase-changing materials can undergo an unlimited number of cycles without degradation. Since phase-changing materials can be designed to absorb or release energy at predictable temperatures, they have naturally been explored for use in architecture as a way of helping deal with the thermal environment in a building. Technologies based on sealing phase-changing materials into small pellets have achieved widespread use in connection with radiant floor heating systems, phase change wallboards, mortar or facade systems. Thermal characteristics of existing buildings can be improved on increasing their thermal-stored mass by implementation products of phase-changing smart materials. In addition to contributing to carbon reduction and energy security, using phase-changing materials in the building sector stimulates innovations.

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on fluoride release and antibacterial activity of resin dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Fabiola Galbiatti de; Fucio, Suzana Beatriz Portugal de; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenco; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on fluoride release and antibacterial activity of FluroShield (FS) and Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB). Four groups were formed: G1-FS + gamma; G2-FS without gamma; G3-CPB + gamma; G4-CPB without gamma. For fluoride release analysis, 12 disks of each material were prepared and covered with nail polish, except for one side (50.4 mm 2 area). G1 and G3 were sterilized with a 14.5 KGy dose at 27 deg C for 24 h, while G2 and G4 (controls) were not sterilized and were maintained under the same time and temperature conditions. Fluoride release measurements were made in duplicate (n=6) by an ion specific electrode. The antibacterial activity of the CPB and FS against Streptococcus mutans after gamma sterilization was evaluated by the agar-disc diffusion method. The diameter of the zones of microbial growth inhibition was recorded after 48 h. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=5%). Gamma sterilization decreased the fluoride release of FS by approximately 50%, while CPB was not affected. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) in the antibacterial effect of CPB between gamma and non-gamma sterilization groups. FS presented no antibacterial activity. Gamma irradiation decreased the fluoride release of FS, but did not affect the antibacterial activity of the studied materials. (author)

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation on fluoride release and antibacterial activity of resin dental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fabiola Galbiatti de; Fucio, Suzana Beatriz Portugal de; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenco [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Piracicaba Dental School. Dept. of Dental Materials; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Piracicaba Dental School. Dept. of Pedriatric Dentistry], e-mail: rmpuppin@fop.unicamp.br

    2009-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on fluoride release and antibacterial activity of FluroShield (FS) and Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB). Four groups were formed: G1-FS + gamma; G2-FS without gamma; G3-CPB + gamma; G4-CPB without gamma. For fluoride release analysis, 12 disks of each material were prepared and covered with nail polish, except for one side (50.4 mm{sup 2} area). G1 and G3 were sterilized with a 14.5 KGy dose at 27 deg C for 24 h, while G2 and G4 (controls) were not sterilized and were maintained under the same time and temperature conditions. Fluoride release measurements were made in duplicate (n=6) by an ion specific electrode. The antibacterial activity of the CPB and FS against Streptococcus mutans after gamma sterilization was evaluated by the agar-disc diffusion method. The diameter of the zones of microbial growth inhibition was recorded after 48 h. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=5%). Gamma sterilization decreased the fluoride release of FS by approximately 50%, while CPB was not affected. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) in the antibacterial effect of CPB between gamma and non-gamma sterilization groups. FS presented no antibacterial activity. Gamma irradiation decreased the fluoride release of FS, but did not affect the antibacterial activity of the studied materials. (author)

  12. The Case for Extant Life on Mars and Its Possible Detection by the Viking Labeled Release Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Gilbert V; Straat, Patricia Ann

    2016-10-01

    The 1976 Viking Labeled Release (LR) experiment was positive for extant microbial life on the surface of Mars. Experiments on both Viking landers, 4000 miles apart, yielded similar, repeatable, positive responses. While the authors eventually concluded that the experiment detected martian life, this was and remains a highly controversial conclusion. Many believe that the martian environment is inimical to life and the LR responses were nonbiological, attributed to an as-yet-unidentified oxidant (or oxidants) in the martian soil. Unfortunately, no further metabolic experiments have been conducted on Mars. Instead, follow-on missions have sought to define the martian environment, mostly searching for signs of water. These missions have collected considerable data regarding Mars as a habitat, both past and present. The purpose of this article is to consider recent findings about martian water, methane, and organics that impact the case for extant life on Mars. Further, the biological explanation of the LR and recent nonbiological hypotheses are evaluated. It is concluded that extant life is a strong possibility, that abiotic interpretations of the LR data are not conclusive, and that, even setting our conclusion aside, biology should still be considered as an explanation for the LR experiment. Because of possible contamination of Mars by terrestrial microbes after Viking, we note that the LR data are the only data we will ever have on biologically pristine martian samples. Key Words: Extant life on Mars-Viking Labeled Release experiment-Astrobiology-Extraterrestrial life-Mars. Astrobiology 16, 798-810.

  13. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members

  14. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Behling, U.H.; Behling, K.; Goldin, D. [Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members.

  15. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    This regulatory analysis was developed to respond to three petitions for rulemaking to amend 10 CFR parts 20 and 35 regarding release of patients administered radioactive material. The petitions requested revision of these regulations to remove the ambiguity that existed between the 1-millisievert (0.1-rem) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) public dose limit in Part 20, adopted in 1991, and the activity-based release limit in 10 CFR 35.75 that, in some instances, would permit release of individuals in excess of the current public dose limit. Three alternatives for resolution of the petitions were evaluated. Under Alternative 1, NRC would amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to match the annual public dose limit in Part 20 of 1 millisievert (0.1 rem) TEDE. Alternative 2 would maintain the status quo of using the activity-based release criteria currently found in 10 CFR 35.75. Under Alternative 3, the NRC would revise the release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) TEDE.

  16. Tritium release from advanced beryllium materials after loading by tritium/hydrogen gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, Rolf; Moeslang, Anton; Kurinskiy, Petr; Vladimirov, Pavel [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Dorn, Christopher [Materion Beryllium & Composites, 6070 Parkland Boulevard, Mayfield Heights, OH 44124-4191 (United States); Kupriyanov, Igor [Bochvar Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Rogova str., 5, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • A major tritium release peak for beryllium samples occurs at temperatures higher than 1250 K. • A beryllium grade with comparatively smaller grain size has a comparatively higher tritium release compared to the grade with larger grain size. • The pebbles of irregular shape with the grain size of 10–30 μm produced by the crushing method demonstrate the highest tritium release rate. - Abstract: Comparison of different beryllium samples on tritium release and retention properties after high-temperature loading by tritium/hydrogen gas mixture and following temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) tests has been performed. The I-220-H grade produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) having the smallest grain size, the pebbles of irregular shape with the smallest grain size (10–30 μm) produced by the crushing method (CM), and the pebbles with 1 mm diameter produced by the fluoride reduction method (FRM) having a highly developed inherent porosity show the highest release rate. Grain size and porosity are considered as key structural parameters for comparison and ranking of different beryllium materials on tritium release and retention properties.

  17. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    This regulatory analysis was developed to respond to three petitions for rulemaking to amend 10 CFR parts 20 and 35 regarding release of patients administered radioactive material. The petitions requested revision of these regulations to remove the ambiguity that existed between the 1-millisievert (0.1-rem) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) public dose limit in Part 20, adopted in 1991, and the activity-based release limit in 10 CFR 35.75 that, in some instances, would permit release of individuals in excess of the current public dose limit. Three alternatives for resolution of the petitions were evaluated. Under Alternative 1, NRC would amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to match the annual public dose limit in Part 20 of 1 millisievert (0.1 rem) TEDE. Alternative 2 would maintain the status quo of using the activity-based release criteria currently found in 10 CFR 35.75. Under Alternative 3, the NRC would revise the release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) TEDE

  18. New approaches to deriving limits of the release of radioactive material into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    1977-01-01

    During the last few years, new principles have been developed for the limitation of the release of radioactive material into the environment. It is no longer considered appropriate to base the limitation on limits for the concentrations of the various radionuclides in air and water effluents. Such limits would not prevent large amounts of radioactive material from reaching the environment should effluent rates be high. A common practice has been to identify critical radionuclides and critical pathways and to base the limitation on authorized dose limits for local ''critical groups''. If this were the only limitation, however, larger releases could be permitted after installing either higher stacks or equipment to retain the more short-lived radionuclides for decay before release. Continued release at such limits would then lead to considerably higher exposure at a distance than if no such installation had been made. Accordingly there would be no immediate control of overlapping exposures from several sources, nor would the system guarantee control of the future situation. The new principles described in this paper take the future into account by limiting the annual dose commitments rather than the annual doses. They also offer means of controlling the global situation by limiting not only doses in critical groups but also global collective doses. Their objective is not only to ensure that individual dose limits will always be respected but also to meet the requirement that ''all doses be kept as low as reasonably achievable''. The new approach is based on the most recent recommendations by the ICRP and has been described in a report by an IAEA panel (Procedures for establishing limits for the release of radioactive material into the environment). It has been applied in the development of new Swedish release regulations, which illustrate some of the problems which arise in the practical application

  19. New approaches to deriving limits of the release of radioactive material into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    1977-01-01

    During the last few years, new principles have been developed for the limitation of the release of radioactive material into the environment. It is no longer considered appropriate to base the limitation on limits for the concentrations of the various radionuclides in air and water effluents. Such limits would not prevent large amounts of radioactive material from reaching the environment should effluent rates be high. A common practice has been to identify critical radionuclides and critical pathways and to base the limitation on authorized dose limits for local ''critical groups''. If this were the only limitation, however, larger releases could be permitted after installing either higher stacks or equipment to retain the more shortlived radionuclides for decay before release. Continued release at such limits would then lead to considerably higher exposure at a distance than if no such installation had been made. Accordingly there would be no immediate control of overlapping exposures from several sources, nor would the system guarantee control of the future situation. The new principles described in this paper take the future into account by limiting the annual dose commitments rather than the annual doses. They also offer means of controlling the global situation by limiting not only doses in critical groups but also global collective doses. Their objective is not only to ensure that individual dose limits will always be respected but also to meet the requirement that ''all doses be kept as low as reasonably achievable''. The new approach is based on the most recent recommendations by the ICRP and has been described in a report by an IAEA panel (Procedures for Establishing Limits for the Release of Radioactive Material into the Environment). It has been applied in the development of new Swedish release regulations, which illustrate some of the problems which arise in the practical application. (author)

  20. Scenarios and methods that induce protruding or released CNTs after degradation of nanocomposite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Sabine; Cena, Lorenzo; Cox, Gerhard; Tomović, Zeljko; Peters, Thomas; Wohlleben, Wendel

    2013-04-01

    Nanocomposite materials may be considered as a low-risk application of nanotechnology, if the nanofillers remain embedded throughout the life-cycle of the products in which they are embedded. We hypothesize that release of free CNTs occurs by a combination of mechanical stress and chemical degradation of the polymer matrix. We experimentally address limiting cases: Mechanically released fragments may show tubular protrusions on their surface. Here we identify these protrusions unambiguously as naked CNTs by chemically resolved microscopy and a suitable preparation protocol. By size-selective quantification of fragments we establish as a lower limit that at least 95 % of the CNTs remain embedded. Contrary to classical fiber composite approaches, we link this phenomenon to matrix materials with only a few percent elongation at break, predicting which materials should still cover their CNT nanofillers after machining. Protruding networks of CNTs remain after photochemical degradation of the matrix, and we show that it takes the worst case combinations of weathering plus high-shear wear to release free CNTs in the order of mg/m 2 /year. Synergy of chemical degradation and mechanical energy input is identified as the priority scenario of CNT release, but its lab simulation by combined methods is still far from real-world validation.

  1. Preparation of thermo-sensitive slow releasing material and its application in low tar tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Zhong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To solve some sensory defects such as fragrance deficiency,strong dry sense,poor satisfaction in the development of ultra-low tar tobacco products,we prepared a new thermo sensitive slow releasing composite material with tobacco aroma.The characterization results showed that the as-prepared thermosensitive particles have better aroma enhancing and slow releasing effects.Also,the aroma components of the tip stick containing thermosensitive particles were detected and its sensory quality was evaluated.The results showed that composite tip stick could enhance the aroma and improve the sensory quality of the cigarettes.

  2. Ion release from magnesium materials in physiological solutions under different oxygen tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, Frank; Drücker, Heiko; Laipple, Daniel; Vogt, Carla; Stekker, Michael; Hort, Norbert; Willumeit, Regine

    2012-01-01

    Although magnesium as degradable biomaterial already showed clinical proof of concepts, the design of new alloys requires predictive in vitro methods, which are still lacking. Incubation under cell culture conditions to obtain "physiological" corrosion may be a solution. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of different solutions, addition of proteins and of oxygen availability on the corrosion of different magnesium materials (pure Mg, WE43, and E11) with different surface finishing. Oxygen content in solution, pH, osmolality and ion release were determined. Corrosion led to a reduction of oxygen in solution. The influence of oxygen on pH was enhanced by proteins, while osmolality was not influenced. Magnesium ion release was solution-dependent and enhanced in the initial phase by proteins with delayed release of alloying elements. The main corrosion product formed was magnesium carbonate. Therefore, cell culture conditions are proposed as first step toward physiological corrosion.

  3. A method of surface area measurement of fuel materials by fission gas release at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaimal, K.N.G.; Naik, M.C.; Paul, A.R.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    The present report deals with the development of a method for surface area measurement of nuclear fuel as well as fissile doped materials by fission gas release study at low temperature. The method is based on the evaluation of knock-out release rate of fission 133 Xe from irradiated fuel after sufficient cooling to decay the short lived activity. The report also describes the fabrication of an ampoule breaker unit for such study. Knock-out release rate of 133 Xe has been studied from UO 2 powders having varying surface area 'S' ranging from 270 cm 2 /gm to 4100 cm 2 /gm at two fissioning rates 10 12 f/cm 3 . sec. and 3.2x10 10 f/cm.sec. A relation between K and A has been established and discussed in this report. (author). 6 refs

  4. Impact of pore characteristics of silica materials on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numpilai, Thanapha [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Muenmee, Suthaporn [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Center for Advanced Studies in Nanotechnology and Its Applications in Chemical Food and Agricultural Industries, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Witoon, Thongthai, E-mail: fengttwi@ku.ac.th [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Center for Advanced Studies in Nanotechnology and Its Applications in Chemical Food and Agricultural Industries, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); NANOTEC-KU-Center of Excellence on Nanoscale Materials Design for Green Nanotechnology, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2016-02-01

    Impact of pore characteristics of porous silica supports on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen was investigated. The porous silica materials and ibuprofen-loaded porous silica materials were thoroughly characterized by N{sub 2}-sorption, thermal gravimetric and derivative weight analyses (TG-DTW), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) to determine the physical properties of materials, amount of ibuprofen adsorbed and position of ibuprofen. The detailed characterization reveals that the ibuprofen molecules adsorbed inside the mesopores. Increasing the mesopore size from 5 nm to 10 nm increased the ibuprofen loading from 0.74 to 0.85 mmol/g, respectively. Incorporation of macropore into the structure of porous silica materials enhanced the ibuprofen loading capacity of 11.8–20.3%. The ibuprofen-loaded bimodal meso-macroporous silica materials exhibited the highest dissolution of 92 wt.% within an hour. The ibuprofen particles deposited on the external surface of the porous silica materials showed a lower dissolution rate than the ibuprofen adsorbed inside the mesopores due to the formation of ibuprofen crystalline. - Highlights: • Impacts of pore characteristics of supports on adsorption and release of ibuprofen • Increasing mesopore size increased the ibuprofen loading and dissolution rate. • Macropores reduced the diffusion pathway of ibuprofen and dissolution medium.

  5. Impact of pore characteristics of silica materials on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numpilai, Thanapha; Muenmee, Suthaporn; Witoon, Thongthai

    2016-01-01

    Impact of pore characteristics of porous silica supports on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen was investigated. The porous silica materials and ibuprofen-loaded porous silica materials were thoroughly characterized by N 2 -sorption, thermal gravimetric and derivative weight analyses (TG-DTW), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) to determine the physical properties of materials, amount of ibuprofen adsorbed and position of ibuprofen. The detailed characterization reveals that the ibuprofen molecules adsorbed inside the mesopores. Increasing the mesopore size from 5 nm to 10 nm increased the ibuprofen loading from 0.74 to 0.85 mmol/g, respectively. Incorporation of macropore into the structure of porous silica materials enhanced the ibuprofen loading capacity of 11.8–20.3%. The ibuprofen-loaded bimodal meso-macroporous silica materials exhibited the highest dissolution of 92 wt.% within an hour. The ibuprofen particles deposited on the external surface of the porous silica materials showed a lower dissolution rate than the ibuprofen adsorbed inside the mesopores due to the formation of ibuprofen crystalline. - Highlights: • Impacts of pore characteristics of supports on adsorption and release of ibuprofen • Increasing mesopore size increased the ibuprofen loading and dissolution rate. • Macropores reduced the diffusion pathway of ibuprofen and dissolution medium.

  6. Release process for non-real property containing residual radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranek, N.L.; Chen, S.Y.; Kamboj, S.; Hensley, J.; Burns, D.; Fleming, R.; Warren, S.; Wallo, A.

    1997-01-01

    It is DOE's objective to operate its facilities and to conduct its activities so that radiation exposures to members of the public are maintained within acceptable limits and exposures to residual radioactive materials are controlled. To accomplish this, DOE has adopted Order DOE 5400.51 'Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment', and will be promulgating IO CR Part 834 to codify and clarify the requirements of DOE 5400.5. Under both DOE 5400.5 and 10 CR Part 834, radioactively contaminated DOE property is prohibited from release unless specific actions have been completed prior to the release. This paper outlines a ten-step process that, if followed, will assist DOE Operations and contractor personnel in ensuring that the required actions established by Order DOE 5400.5 and 10 CR Part 834 have been appropriately completed prior to the release for reuse or recycle of non-real property (e.g., office furniture, computers, hand tools, machinery, vehicles and scrap metal). Following the process will assist in ensuring that radiological doses to the public from the released materials will meet applicable regulatory standards and be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

  7. A controlled release of ibuprofen by systematically tailoring the morphology of mesoporous silica materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Fengyu; Zhu Guangshan; Lin Huiming; Zhang Weiwei; Sun Jinyu; Li Shougui; Qiu Shilun

    2006-01-01

    A series of mesoporous silica materials with similar pore sizes, different morphologies and variable pore geometries were prepared systematically. In order to control drug release, ibuprofen was employed as a model drug and the influence of morphology and pore geometry of mesoporous silica on drug release profiles was extensively studied. The mesoporous silica and drug-loaded samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, N 2 adsorption and desorption, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the drug-loading amount was directly correlated to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, pore geometry, and pore volume; while the drug release profiles could be controlled by tailoring the morphologies of mesoporous silica carriers. - Graphical abstract: The release of ibuprofen is controlled by tailoring the morphologies of mesoporous silica. The mesoporous silica and drug-loaded samples are characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, N 2 adsorption and desorption, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The drug-loading amount is directly correlated to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, pore geometry, and pore volume; while the drug release profiles can be controlled by tailoring the morphologies of mesoporous silica carriers

  8. Ability of possible DMS precursors to release DMS during wine aging and in the conditions of heat-alkaline treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segurel, Marie A; Razungles, Alain J; Riou, Christophe; Trigueiro, Mafalda G L; Baumes, Raymond L

    2005-04-06

    The origin of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) produced during wine aging was examined through different assays. The production of DMS during the model aging of a wine and the concomitant decrease of residual potential DMS (PDMS), as DMS released by heat-alkaline treatment in 0.5 M sodium hydroxide at 100 degrees C for 1 h, were demonstrated. Then, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), methionine sulfoxide (MSO), S-methylmethionine (SMM), and dimethylsulfonium propanoic acid (DMSPA), reported previously as possible DMS precursors, were investigated for their ability to be DMS precursors in wine in the conditions of this model aging and of the heat-alkaline treatment. The results showed that DMSO, MSO, and DMSPA could hardly be DMS precursors in the conditions used, whereas SMM appeared to be a good candidate. Finally, the use of [(2)H(6)]-DMSPA as an internal standard for PDMS determination was proposed, because it provided better reproducibility than [(2)H(6)]-DMS used as an external standard.

  9. Characterization and inventories of nuclear materials and wastes for possible future energy scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, E.D.

    1997-10-01

    Awareness of the total materials inventory and materials balance associated with differing methods for energy generation is part of present day concerns associated with disparate areas that include atmospheric emissions, resource utilization, health effects, and both current and long term hazards and risks. Nuclear energy, for a number of decades, has been the recipient of significant scrutiny concerning the materials and wastes it generates, particularly in the context of long term solutions to such issues. This paper examines the nuclear materials and waste generation for nuclear energy scenarios spanning the coming century. The paper also briefly addresses wastes (in the form of emissions) from other energy sources and examines requirements associated with backend energy system materials management. Possible future requirements pertaining to CO 2 management are found to place conditions upon waste management generally similar to those for nuclear waste. One example of material flows for the case of coal generation of electricity coupled with carbon sequestration is also given

  10. Principles for establishing limits for the release of radioactive materials into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The document provides a basic consideration of concepts and principles for use by national authorities in setting limits for planned releases of radioactive material. The following topics are discussed general concepts, assessment of dose to the critical group, assessment of collective dose commitments, application of optimization techniques to the determination of discharge limits, explanation and application of the concept of collective dose commitment, discharge limitations based on concentration indices

  11. Technical committee meeting on evaluation of radioactive materials release and sodium fires in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the Technical Committee Meeting was to review the activities of research on radioactive materials release and sodium fires in fast reactors in each of the participating countries. It covered: out-of-pile experiments and analysis codes on source term; in-pile experiments on source term; core disruptive accidents; sodium leak experience in liquid metal fast reactors; evaluation of sodium fire; and aerosol behaviour

  12. Technical committee meeting on evaluation of radioactive materials release and sodium fires in fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The objectives of the Technical Committee Meeting was to review the activities of research on radioactive materials release and sodium fires in fast reactors in each of the participating countries. It covered: out-of-pile experiments and analysis codes on source term; in-pile experiments on source term; core disruptive accidents; sodium leak experience in liquid metal fast reactors; evaluation of sodium fire; and aerosol behaviour.

  13. 14 CFR 1213.107 - Preventing unauthorized release of sensitive but unclassified (SBU) information/material to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .../material to the news media. (a) All NASA SBU information requires accountability and approval for release... sensitive but unclassified (SBU) information/material to the news media. 1213.107 Section 1213.107 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND...

  14. Determination of the long-term release of metal(loid)s from construction materials using DGTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmukat, A; Duester, L; Ecker, D; Heininger, P; Ternes, T A

    2013-09-15

    Long-term leaching experiments are crucial to estimate the potential release of dangerous substances from construction materials. The application of Diffuse Gradients in Thin film (DGT) in static-batch experiments was tested to study the long-term release of metal(loid)s from construction materials for hydraulic engineering, for half a year. Long-term release experiments are essential to improve calculations of the life-time release for this materials. DGTs in batch experiments were found to be a space and labour efficient application, which enabled (i) to study, in a non-invasive manner, the total release of nine metal(loid)s for half a year, (ii) to differentiate between release mechanisms and (iii) to study mechanisms which were contrary to the release or caused experimental artefacts in the batch experiments. For copper slag (test material) it was found that eight metal(loid)s were released over the whole time period of 184 d. Cu, Ni and Pb were found to be released, predominantly caused by (the) weathering of sulphide minerals. Only for Zn a surface depletion mechanism was identified. The results from the long-term batch experiments deliver new information on the release of metal(loid)s during the life cycle of construction materials with regard to river basin management objectives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The insoluble carbonaceous material of CM chondrites: A possible source of discrete organic compounds under hydrothermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuta, Hikaru; Williams, Lynda B.; Cody, George D.; Alexander, Conel M. O. D.; Pizzarello, Sandra

    2007-08-01

    We report on the molecular analyses of the water- and solvent-soluble organic compounds released from the insoluble organic material (IOM) of the Murray meteorite upon treatment with weight-equivalent amounts of water and under conditions of elevated temperature and pressure. A varied suite of compounds was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). C3-C17 alkyl dicarboxylic acids and N- and O-containing hydroaromatic and aromatic compounds were found in the water extracts. The solvent extracts contained N-, O-, and S-containing aromatic compounds, a large number of their isomers and homologs, and a series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of up to five rings, together with noncondensed aromatic species such as substituted benzenes, biphenyl, and terphenyls as well as their substituted homologs, and hydrated PAHs. Isotopic analyses showed that residue IOMs after hydrothermal treatment had lower deuterium and 15N content than the untreated material (ΔD = -833‰ and Δ15N = -24.1) but did not differ from it in 13C composition. The effect of the hydrothermolytic release was recorded in significant differences between the NMR spectra of untreated and residue IOM. A possible relation to common precursors for the dicarboxylic acids found in the IOM and bulk extracts is discussed.

  16. The Insoluble Carbonaceous Material of CM Chondrites as Possible Source of Discrete Organics During the Asteroidal Aqueous Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuta, H.; Williams, L.; Cody, G.; Pizzarello, S.

    2005-01-01

    The larger portion of the organic carbon in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) is present as a complex and heterogeneous macromolecular material that is insoluble in acids and most solvents (IOM). So far, it has been analyzed only as a whole by microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopy (IR, NMR, EPR), which have offered and overview of its chemical nature, bonding, and functional group composition. Chemical or pyrolytic decomposition has also been used in combination with GC-MS to identify individual compounds released by these processes. Their value in the recognition of the original IOM structure resides in the ability to properly interpret the decomposition pathways for any given process. We report here a preliminary study of IOM from the Murray meteorite that combines both the analytical approaches described above, under conditions that would realistically model the IOM hydrothermal exposure in the meteorite parent body. The aim is to document the possible release of water and solvent soluble organics, determine possible changes in NMR spectral features, and ascertain, by extension, the effect of this loss on the frame of the IOM residue. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  17. Aerosol material release rates from zircaloy-4 at temperatures from 2000 to 22000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulpuru, S.R.; Wren, D.J.; Rondeau, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    During some postulated severe accidents involving loss of coolant and loss of emergency coolant injection, the temperatures in a CANDU reactor fuel channel become high enough to cause failure and melting of the Zircaloy fuel cladding. At such high temperatures, vapors of fission products and structural (fuel and cladding) materials will be released into the coolant steam and hydrogen mixture. These vapors will condense as cooler conditions are encountered downstream. The vapors from structural materials are relatively involatile; therefore, they will condense readily into aerosol particles. These particles, in turn, will provide sites for the condensation of the more volatile fission products. The aerosol transport of fission products in the primary heat transport system (PHTS) will thus be influenced by the structural material release rates. As part of an ongoing program to develop predictive tools for aerosol and associated fission product transport through the PHTS, experiments have been conducted to measure the vapor mass release rates of the alloying elements from Zircaloy-4 at high temperatures. The paper presents the results and analysis of these experiments

  18. The possibilities of the microwave utilization of wastes on the example of materials containing the asbestos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pigiel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper introduce some of the results of the investigations in the utilization of the materials containing asbestos in the existingin Wroclaw University of Technology Institute’s of Technology of Machines and the Automation Foundry and Automation Group themicrowave reactor. In the reactor’s heating chamber there is possible to recycle from 3 up to 5 kg of the batch at once. The temperaturewith which is possible to receive in it is approx. 1400 oC. The time of it’s achievement (in dependence from utilized material can take outfrom 25 up to 40 minutes.

  19. Investigation of the possibilities for application of NORM into polymer materials

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of the proposed STSM project is to perform: • Comparison of fly ash characteristics (chemical composition, granulometry and density) from different origins: Slovenia and Macedonia. • Characterization of the polymer materials: thermoset and thermoplastic. • Estimate the possibilities for preparing of the composites based on fly ash as NORM material from different origins and polymers. The analyses of the inorganic fillers and organic polymer matrices will be made in or...

  20. High-Temperature Release of SO2 from Calcined Cement Raw Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma; Larsen, Morten B.; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    During combustion of alternative fuels in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns, local reducing conditions may occur and cause reductive decomposition of sulfates from calcined cement raw materials. Decomposition of sulfates is problematic because it increases the gas-phase SO2...... concentration, which may cause deposit formation in the kiln system. In this study, the release of sulfur from calcined cement raw materials under both oxidizing and reducing conditions is investigated. The investigations include thermodynamic equilibrium calculations in the temperature interval of 800–1500 °C...... and experiments in a tube furnace reactor in the temperature interval of 900–1100 °C. The investigated conditions resemble actual conditions in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns. It was found that the sulfates CaSO4, K2SO4, and Na2SO4 were all stable under oxidizing conditions but began to decompose...

  1. The possibility of using materials based on secondary gravel in civil construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galitskova Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By now, the wear and tear of housing stock is more than 50%. Each year the number of old and dilapidated housing is growing, but it is gradually replaced by modern buildings. However, wastes accumulated from dismantling of buildings and constructions, are underutilized and, usually are just stored at landfills, or used for temporary roads construction. The purpose of this research is to define construction wastes characteristics and to explore possibilities for recycling of wastes from construction materials production. The paper also analyzes housing stock condition and basic requirements to building materials used in construction; and demonstrates results building materials based on secondary gravel investigation. While working with materials based on waste requirements the authors conducted laboratory research. Thus, the paper presents the analysis of laboratory tests results that made it possible to draw conclusions about the possible use of building materials based on secondary gravel and about their conformity to specified requirements. The researchers also developed proposals and recommendations to improve the competitiveness of such materials.

  2. Controlled release of non-steroidal antiinflammatory and anticancer drugs from hybrid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravieri, Beatriz Bernardes; Molina, Eduardo Ferreira, E-mail: bia_ms_@hotmail.com [Universidade de Franca, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Chronic inflammation is a well known risk factor for the development of human cancer, and at least one third of all human cancers have been associated with inflammation. This can lead to cellular proliferation, a process which per se increases the risk of abnormal cell formation and ultimately the development of cancer. For treating clinical conditions such as inflammation and cancer, the most common methods (e.g., oral administration, injection) can cause unwanted side effects due to drug delivery to non-target sites and the introduction of high doses of the drug to reach the desired location. An alternative to these problems is the preparation of materials that can release drugs with different activities. Thinking about it, the aim of this study was to use a class of hybrid materials based on siloxane-polyether known as ureasil for controlled release of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (IBU) and naproxen (NAP), and anticancer, such as 5-fluorouracil (5- FU). These drugs have been incorporated in the matrix in different proportions and thereafter, were characterized by different techniques such as XRD, FTIR, DSC and SAXS. In addition, it has been evaluated the release kinetics of these species with different chemical structures. The results have shown that the drug molecules were homogeneously distributed in the xerogel hybrids, which contributed to the drug’s release profile fine-tuning. The chemical environment of the polyether chains was amended by incorporating the drugs. The analysis from XRD, FTIR, SAXS and DSC confirm the good solubility of the substances within hybrid matrix. This hybrid material based on polymers and inorganic compounds may have potential applications in human health. (author)

  3. Controlled release of non-steroidal antiinflammatory and anticancer drugs from hybrid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caravieri, Beatriz Bernardes; Molina, Eduardo Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Chronic inflammation is a well known risk factor for the development of human cancer, and at least one third of all human cancers have been associated with inflammation. This can lead to cellular proliferation, a process which per se increases the risk of abnormal cell formation and ultimately the development of cancer. For treating clinical conditions such as inflammation and cancer, the most common methods (e.g., oral administration, injection) can cause unwanted side effects due to drug delivery to non-target sites and the introduction of high doses of the drug to reach the desired location. An alternative to these problems is the preparation of materials that can release drugs with different activities. Thinking about it, the aim of this study was to use a class of hybrid materials based on siloxane-polyether known as ureasil for controlled release of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (IBU) and naproxen (NAP), and anticancer, such as 5-fluorouracil (5- FU). These drugs have been incorporated in the matrix in different proportions and thereafter, were characterized by different techniques such as XRD, FTIR, DSC and SAXS. In addition, it has been evaluated the release kinetics of these species with different chemical structures. The results have shown that the drug molecules were homogeneously distributed in the xerogel hybrids, which contributed to the drug’s release profile fine-tuning. The chemical environment of the polyether chains was amended by incorporating the drugs. The analysis from XRD, FTIR, SAXS and DSC confirm the good solubility of the substances within hybrid matrix. This hybrid material based on polymers and inorganic compounds may have potential applications in human health. (author)

  4. Sapropel as a Binder: Properties and Application Possibilities for Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuka, V.; Šinka, M.; Kļaviņš, M.; Stankeviča, K.; Korjakins, A.

    2015-11-01

    Recent development trends largely look for possibilities of a wider use of natural materials and local resources. In this perspective, the use of organic rich lake sediment - sapropel - as a binding material in line with other environmentally friendly filling materials can be considered as a challenge. Sapropel itself is a valuable resource with multiple areas of application, for example, medicine, veterinary, agriculture, livestock farming, balneology, cosmetic applications, construction, and its application options have been widely studied in the 20th century in the Baltic countries, Ukraine and Russia. Birch wood fibre and sanding dust, hemp shives, ‘Aerosil’ are used as a filler and three types of sapropel are used as a binder in making composites. After material preparation and curing, physical and mechanical properties - density, thermal conductivity, compressive and flexural strength, were determined and compared to the data in the literature, and the opportunities to use them in the ecological construction were considered. The obtained results give insight into possibilities to use sapropel as a raw material, which can be considered as prospective material for construction materials and design products.

  5. Commutability of possible external quality assessment materials for cardiac troponin measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunli Zhang

    Full Text Available The measurement of cardiac troponin is crucial in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. The performance of troponin measurement is most conveniently monitored by external quality assessment (EQA programs. The commutability of EQA samples is often unknown and the effectiveness of EQA programs is limited.Commutability of possible EQA materials was evaluated. Commercial control materials used in an EQA program, human serum pools prepared from patient samples, purified analyte preparations, swine sera from model animals and a set of patient samples were measured for cTnI with 4 assays including Abbott Architect, Beckman Access, Ortho Vitros and Siemens Centaur. The measurement results were logarithm-transformed, and the transformed data for patient samples were pairwise analyzed with Deming regression and 95% prediction intervals were calculated for each pair of assays. The commutability of the materials was evaluated by comparing the logarithmic results of the materials with the limits of the intervals. Matrix-related biases were estimated for noncommutable materials. The impact of matrix-related bias on EQA was analyzed and a possible correction for the bias was proposed.Human serum pools were commutable for all assays; purified analyte preparations were commutable for 2 of the 6 assay pairs; commercial control materials and swine sera were all noncommutable; swine sera showed no reactivity to Vitros assay. The matrix-related biases for noncommutable materials ranged from -83% to 944%. Matrix-related biases of the EQA materials caused major abnormal between-assay variations in the EQA program and correction of the biases normalized the variations.Commutability of materials has major impact on the effectiveness of EQA programs for cTnI measurement. Human serum pools prepared from patient samples are commutable and other materials are mostly noncommutable. EQA programs should include at least one human serum pool to allow proper interpretation of

  6. ENERGY RELEASE FROM IMPACTING PROMINENCE MATERIAL FOLLOWING THE 2011 JUNE 7 ERUPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, H. R.; Inglis, A. R.; Mays, M. L.; Ofman, L.; Thompson, B. J.; Young, C. A. [Solar Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    Solar filaments exhibit a range of eruptive-like dynamic activity, ranging from the full or partial eruption of the filament mass and surrounding magnetic structure as a coronal mass ejection to a fully confined or failed eruption. On 2011 June 7, a dramatic partial eruption of a filament was observed by multiple instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory. One of the interesting aspects of this event is the response of the solar atmosphere as non-escaping material falls inward under the influence of gravity. The impact sites show clear evidence of brightening in the observed extreme ultraviolet wavelengths due to energy release. Two plausible physical mechanisms for explaining the brightening are considered: heating of the plasma due to the kinetic energy of impacting material compressing the plasma, or reconnection between the magnetic field of low-lying loops and the field carried by the impacting material. By analyzing the emission of the brightenings in several SDO/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly wavelengths, and comparing the kinetic energy of the impacting material (7.6 × 10{sup 26}-5.8 × 10{sup 27} erg) to the radiative energy (≈1.9 × 10{sup 25}-2.5 × 10{sup 26} erg), we find the dominant mechanism of energy release involved in the observed brightening is plasma compression.

  7. Energy Release from Impacting Prominence Material Following the 2011 June 7 Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, H. R.; Inglis, A. R.; Mays, M. L.; Ofman, L.; Thompson, B. J.; Young, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Solar filaments exhibit a range of eruptive-like dynamic activity, ranging from the full or partial eruption of the filament mass and surrounding magnetic structure as a coronal mass ejection to a fully confined or failed eruption. On 2011 June 7, a dramatic partial eruption of a filament was observed by multiple instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory. One of the interesting aspects of this event is the response of the solar atmosphere as non-escaping material falls inward under the influence of gravity. The impact sites show clear evidence of brightening in the observed extreme ultraviolet wavelengths due to energy release. Two plausible physical mechanisms for explaining the brightening are considered: heating of the plasma due to the kinetic energy of impacting material compressing the plasma, or reconnection between the magnetic field of low-lying loops and the field carried by the impacting material. By analyzing the emission of the brightenings in several SDO/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly wavelengths, and comparing the kinetic energy of the impacting material (7.6 × 10(exp 26) - 5.8 × 10(exp 27) erg) to the radiative energy (approx. 1.9 × 10(exp 25) - 2.5 × 10(exp 26) erg), we find the dominant mechanism of energy release involved in the observed brightening is plasma compression.

  8. Regulatory Initiatives for Control and Release of Technologically Enhanced Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, P.V.

    1999-03-02

    Current drafts of proposed standards and suggested State regulations for control and release of technologically-enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive material (TENORM), and standards for release of volumetrically-contaminated material in the US are reviewed. These are compared to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Safety Series and the European Commission (EC) proposals. Past regulatory efforts with respect to TENORM in the US dealt primarily with oil-field related wastes. Currently, nine states (AK, GA, LA, MS, NM, OH, OR SC, TX) have specific regulations pertaining to TENORM, mostly based on uranium mill tailings cleanup criteria. The new US proposals are dose- or risk-based, as are the IAEA and EC recommendations, and are grounded in the linear no threshold hypothesis (LNT). TENORM wastes involve extremely large volumes, particularly scrap metal and mine wastes. Costs to control and dispose of these wastes can be considerable. The current debate over the validity of LNT at low doses and low dose rates is particularly germane to this discussion. Most standards setting organizations and regulatory agencies base their recommendations on the LNT. The US Environmental Protection Agency has released a draft Federal Guidance Report that recommends calculating health risks from low-level exposure to radionuclides based on the LNT. However, some scientific and professional organizations are openly questioning the validity of LNT and its basis for regulations, practices, and costs to society in general. It is not clear at this time how a non-linear regulatory scheme would be implemented.

  9. Regulatory Initiatives for Control and Release of Technologically Enhanced Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egidi, P.V.

    1999-01-01

    Current drafts of proposed standards and suggested State regulations for control and release of technologically-enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive material (TENORM), and standards for release of volumetrically-contaminated material in the US are reviewed. These are compared to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Safety Series and the European Commission (EC) proposals. Past regulatory efforts with respect to TENORM in the US dealt primarily with oil-field related wastes. Currently, nine states (AK, GA, LA, MS, NM, OH, OR SC, TX) have specific regulations pertaining to TENORM, mostly based on uranium mill tailings cleanup criteria. The new US proposals are dose- or risk-based, as are the IAEA and EC recommendations, and are grounded in the linear no threshold hypothesis (LNT). TENORM wastes involve extremely large volumes, particularly scrap metal and mine wastes. Costs to control and dispose of these wastes can be considerable. The current debate over the validity of LNT at low doses and low dose rates is particularly germane to this discussion. Most standards setting organizations and regulatory agencies base their recommendations on the LNT. The US Environmental Protection Agency has released a draft Federal Guidance Report that recommends calculating health risks from low-level exposure to radionuclides based on the LNT. However, some scientific and professional organizations are openly questioning the validity of LNT and its basis for regulations, practices, and costs to society in general. It is not clear at this time how a non-linear regulatory scheme would be implemented

  10. On the possibility of high-dispersed composite material obtaining in impulsive high-enthalpy flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinkov, I.V.; Brodyagin, A.G.; Ivanov, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic possibility for the formation of TiC-Mo composite dispersed material in 1200-2800 K temperature interval and effect of H/Cl, C/Ti relation on the composite material composition are demonstrated. Investigation into the plasmo-chemical process of producing high-dispersed composite material in the pulsed regime has pointed out to a possibility of the product chemical composition regulation by changing the energy, flow-rate parameters and by conditions of component introduction into the plasmochemical reactor. Molybdenum-carbide composition powders produced are characterized by the particle size of ∼ 10 nm and high Mo and TiC distribution steadyness which allows one to exclude the stage of a long-term component mixing under the composition production

  11. Tracking of Drug Release and Material Fate for Naturally Derived Omega-3 Fatty Acid Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Keith M; Artzi, Natalie; Beck, Moshe; Beckerman, Rita; Moodie, Geoff; Albergo, Theresa; Conroy, Suzanne; Dale, Alicia; Corbeil, Scott; Martakos, Paul; Edelman, Elazer R

    2016-03-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted on omega-3 fatty acid-derived biomaterials to determine their utility as an implantable material for adhesion prevention following soft tissue hernia repair and as a means to allow for the local delivery of antimicrobial or antibiofilm agents. Naturally derived biomaterials offer several advantages over synthetic materials in the field of medical device development. These advantages include enhanced biocompatibility, elimination of risks posed by the presence of toxic catalysts and chemical crosslinking agents, and derivation from renewable resources. Omega-3 fatty acids are readily available from fish and plant sources and can be used to create implantable biomaterials either as a stand-alone device or as a device coating that can be utilized in local drug delivery applications. In-depth characterization of material erosion degradation over time using non-destructive imaging and chemical characterization techniques provided mechanistic insight into material structure: function relationship. This in turn guided rational tailoring of the material based on varying fatty acid composition to control material residence time and hence drug release. These studies demonstrate the utility of omega-3 fatty acid derived biomaterials as an absorbable material for soft tissue hernia repair and drug delivery applications.

  12. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous effluents from nuclear-powered merchant ships (NMS-GEFF code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardile, F.P.; Bangart, R.L.; Collins, J.T.

    1978-06-01

    The Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organization IMCO) is currently preparing guidelines concerning the safety of nuclear-powered merchant ships. An important aspect of these guidelines is the determination of the releases of radioactive material in effluents from these ships and the control exercised by the ships over these releases. To provide a method for the determination of these releases, the NRC staff has developed a computerized model, the NMS-GEFF Code, which is described in the following chapters. The NMS-GEFF Code calculates releases of radioactive material in gaseous effluents for nuclear-powered merchant ships using pressurized water reactors

  13. NRC's rulemaking to require materials licensees to be financially responsible for cleanup of accidental releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    On June 7, 1985, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) in the Federal Register to address funding for cleanup of accidents and unexpected decontamination by certain materials licensees. The NRC asked for public comment to help them determine whether to amend its regulations to require certain materials and fuel cycle licensees to demonstrate that they possess adequate financial means to pay for cleanup of accidental releases of radioactive materials. If licensees lack adequate financial resources and funds are to available for prompt cleanup, the consequences could be potentially significant for the public, the licencee and the federal government. The purpose of this paper is to explain the purpose and scope of the Commission's proposed regulatory action, as well as describing several accidents that made the Commission consider this action. Additionally, the paper will address other regulatory precedents. Finally, the paper will conclude by generally characterizing the public comments and items of concern raised by commenters

  14. A Selection of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Materials Incorporating S-Nitrosothiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzke, Alec

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a diatomic radical that occurs as a crucial component of mammalian biochemistry. As a signaling molecule, NO participates in the regulation of vascular tone and maintains the natural antithrombotic function of the healthy endothelium. Furthermore, NO is produced by phagocytes as part of the immune response, and exhibits both antimicrobial and wound-healing effects. In combination, these beneficial properties have led to the use of exogenous NO as a multifunctional therapeutic agent. However, the comparatively short half-life of NO under physiological conditions often renders systemic administration infeasible. This limitation is addressed by the use of NO-releasing polymeric materials, which permit the localized delivery of NO directly at the intended site of action. Such polymers have been utilized in the development of antithrombotic or antibacterial materials for biointerfacial applications, including tissue engineering and the fabrication of medical devices. NO release from polymers has most frequently been achieved through the incorporation of functional groups that are susceptible to NO-forming chemical decomposition in response to appropriate environmental stimuli. While numerous synthetic sources of NO are known, the S-nitrosothiol (RSNO) functional group occurs naturally in the form of S-nitrosocysteine residues in both proteins and small molecule species such as S-nitrosoglutathione. RSNOs are synthesized directly from thiol precursors, and their NO-forming decay has generally been established to produce the corresponding disulfide as a relatively benign organic byproduct. For these reasons, RSNOs have been conscripted as practical NO donors within a physiological environment. This dissertation describes the synthesis and characterization of RSNO-based NO-releasing polymers derived from the polysaccharides chitin and chitosan, as well as the development of amino acid ester-based NO-releasing biodegradable poly

  15. Role of iron and aluminum coagulant metal residuals and lead release from drinking water pipe materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Alisha D; Nguyen, Caroline K; Edwards, Marc A; Stoddart, Amina; McIlwain, Brad; Gagnon, Graham A

    2015-01-01

    Bench-scale experiments investigated the role of iron and aluminum residuals in lead release in a low alkalinity and high (> 0.5) chloride-to-sulfate mass ratio (CSMR) in water. Lead leaching was examined for two lead-bearing plumbing materials, including harvested lead pipe and new lead: tin solder, after exposure to water with simulated aluminum sulfate, polyaluminum chloride and ferric sulfate coagulation treatments with 1-25-μM levels of iron or aluminum residuals in the water. The release of lead from systems with harvested lead pipe was highly correlated with levels of residual aluminum or iron present in samples (R(2) = 0.66-0.88), consistent with sorption of lead onto the aluminum and iron hydroxides during stagnation. The results indicate that aluminum and iron coagulant residuals, at levels complying with recommended guidelines, can sometimes play a significant role in lead mobilization from premise plumbing.

  16. Fluorine uptake into the human tooth from a thin layer of F-releasing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Nomachi, M.; Yasuda, K.; Iwami, Y.; Ebisu, S.; Komatsu, H.; Sakai, T.; Kamiya, T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) method (TIARA, Japan), we have studied fluorine (F) distribution in the human tooth under various conditions. Here, we report F uptake into the human tooth from a thin layer of F-releasing low viscous resin (FLVR). Crowns of human teeth were horizontally cut and the dentin of the cut surface was first covered with four kinds of FLVR (FL-Bond, Reactmer Bond, Xeno Bond, and Protect Liner F; thickness, 50-150 μm) according to the manufacturers' instructions. Non-F-releasing and F-releasing filling resins were also hardened, on the cut surfaces of crowns covered with four kinds of FLVR thin layers. The type of the non-F-releasing filling materials used was LITE FIL IIP: G1-A (FL-Bond and LITE FIL IIP), G2-A (Reactmer Bond and LITE FIL IIP), G3-A (Xeno Bond and LITE FIL IIP), and G4-A (Protect Liner F and LITE FIL IIP). The types of F-releasing filling materials used were G1-B (FL-Bond and Beautifil), G2-B (Reactmer Bond and Reactmer Paste), G3-B (Xeno Bond and Xeno CF Paste), and G4-B (Protect Liner F and Teethmate F-1). Treatment and measurements of specimens were the same as previously reported [H. Yamamoto, M. Nomahci, K. Yasuda, Y. Iwami, S. Ebisu, N. Yamamoto, T. Sakai, T. Kamiya, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 210 (2003) 388]. F uptake from specimens following one month of application was estimated from 2-D maps. F penetration was observed in all teeth of G1-A-G4-A groups. The maximum values of F concentration in each tooth and F penetration depth were larger for larger F concentrations in FLVR. FLVR was useful for the F uptake into the tooth, and the F distribution near the thin layer of FLVR depended on the materials used. Between G1-A and G1-B or G4-A and G4-B, the F uptake was significantly different. We were able to obtain fundamental data, which were useful for the analysis of F transportation relating to prevention of caries

  17. Fluorine uptake into the human tooth from a thin layer of F-releasing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H. [Department of Restorative Dentistry and Endodontology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: yhiroko@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nomachi, M. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); Yasuda, K. [Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center, Tsuruga, Fukui, 914-0192 (Japan); Iwami, Y. [Department of Restorative Dentistry and Endodontology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Ebisu, S. [Department of Restorative Dentistry and Endodontology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Komatsu, H. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8585 (Japan); Sakai, T. [Advanced Radiation Technology Center, JAERI, Takasaki, Gunma, 370-1292 (Japan); Kamiya, T. [Advanced Radiation Technology Center, JAERI, Takasaki, Gunma, 370-1292 (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    Using the proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) method (TIARA, Japan), we have studied fluorine (F) distribution in the human tooth under various conditions. Here, we report F uptake into the human tooth from a thin layer of F-releasing low viscous resin (FLVR). Crowns of human teeth were horizontally cut and the dentin of the cut surface was first covered with four kinds of FLVR (FL-Bond, Reactmer Bond, Xeno Bond, and Protect Liner F; thickness, 50-150 {mu}m) according to the manufacturers' instructions. Non-F-releasing and F-releasing filling resins were also hardened, on the cut surfaces of crowns covered with four kinds of FLVR thin layers. The type of the non-F-releasing filling materials used was LITE FIL IIP: G1-A (FL-Bond and LITE FIL IIP), G2-A (Reactmer Bond and LITE FIL IIP), G3-A (Xeno Bond and LITE FIL IIP), and G4-A (Protect Liner F and LITE FIL IIP). The types of F-releasing filling materials used were G1-B (FL-Bond and Beautifil), G2-B (Reactmer Bond and Reactmer Paste), G3-B (Xeno Bond and Xeno CF Paste), and G4-B (Protect Liner F and Teethmate F-1). Treatment and measurements of specimens were the same as previously reported [H. Yamamoto, M. Nomahci, K. Yasuda, Y. Iwami, S. Ebisu, N. Yamamoto, T. Sakai, T. Kamiya, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 210 (2003) 388]. F uptake from specimens following one month of application was estimated from 2-D maps. F penetration was observed in all teeth of G1-A-G4-A groups. The maximum values of F concentration in each tooth and F penetration depth were larger for larger F concentrations in FLVR. FLVR was useful for the F uptake into the tooth, and the F distribution near the thin layer of FLVR depended on the materials used. Between G1-A and G1-B or G4-A and G4-B, the F uptake was significantly different. We were able to obtain fundamental data, which were useful for the analysis of F transportation relating to prevention of caries.

  18. Impact of pore characteristics of silica materials on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numpilai, Thanapha; Muenmee, Suthaporn; Witoon, Thongthai

    2016-02-01

    Impact of pore characteristics of porous silica supports on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen was investigated. The porous silica materials and ibuprofen-loaded porous silica materials were thoroughly characterized by N2-sorption, thermal gravimetric and derivative weight analyses (TG-DTW), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) to determine the physical properties of materials, amount of ibuprofen adsorbed and position of ibuprofen. The detailed characterization reveals that the ibuprofen molecules adsorbed inside the mesopores. Increasing the mesopore size from 5nm to 10nm increased the ibuprofen loading from 0.74 to 0.85mmol/g, respectively. Incorporation of macropore into the structure of porous silica materials enhanced the ibuprofen loading capacity of 11.8-20.3%. The ibuprofen-loaded bimodal meso-macroporous silica materials exhibited the highest dissolution of 92wt.% within an hour. The ibuprofen particles deposited on the external surface of the porous silica materials showed a lower dissolution rate than the ibuprofen adsorbed inside the mesopores due to the formation of ibuprofen crystalline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Towards a Spiderman suit: large invisible cables and self-cleaning releasable superadhesive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugno, Nicola M

    2007-01-01

    Spiders can produce cobwebs with high strength to density ratio and surprisingly display self-cleaning, strong and releasable adhesion (like geckos). Nanointerlocking, capillary and van der Waals forces, all potential adhesive mechanisms, are thus discussed, demonstrating the key role played by hierarchy in the design of superhydrophobic, i.e. self-cleaning (dry or wet and enhanced by activating Fakir drops as in lotus leaves) and superadhesive materials. The reversibility of the strong attachment is quantified thanks to an improved nonlinear peeling model including friction, for which the solution in closed form is provided. Thus, mimicking nature, thanks to carbon-nanotube-based technology, we suggest the feasibility of large invisible cables, as well as of self-cleaning, superadhesive and releasable hierarchical smart materials. We found that a man can theoretically be supported by a transparent cable with cross-section of 1 cm 2 and feasibly, with spider material gloves and boots, could remain attached even to a ceiling: a preliminary step towards a Spiderman suit

  20. Towards a Spiderman suit: large invisible cables and self-cleaning releasable superadhesive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugno, Nicola M.

    2007-10-01

    Spiders can produce cobwebs with high strength to density ratio and surprisingly display self-cleaning, strong and releasable adhesion (like geckos). Nanointerlocking, capillary and van der Waals forces, all potential adhesive mechanisms, are thus discussed, demonstrating the key role played by hierarchy in the design of superhydrophobic, i.e. self-cleaning (dry or wet and enhanced by activating Fakir drops as in lotus leaves) and superadhesive materials. The reversibility of the strong attachment is quantified thanks to an improved nonlinear peeling model including friction, for which the solution in closed form is provided. Thus, mimicking nature, thanks to carbon-nanotube-based technology, we suggest the feasibility of large invisible cables, as well as of self-cleaning, superadhesive and releasable hierarchical smart materials. We found that a man can theoretically be supported by a transparent cable with cross-section of 1 cm2 and feasibly, with spider material gloves and boots, could remain attached even to a ceiling: a preliminary step towards a Spiderman suit.

  1. Towards a Spiderman suit: large invisible cables and self-cleaning releasable superadhesive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugno, Nicola M [Department of Structural Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Spiders can produce cobwebs with high strength to density ratio and surprisingly display self-cleaning, strong and releasable adhesion (like geckos). Nanointerlocking, capillary and van der Waals forces, all potential adhesive mechanisms, are thus discussed, demonstrating the key role played by hierarchy in the design of superhydrophobic, i.e. self-cleaning (dry or wet and enhanced by activating Fakir drops as in lotus leaves) and superadhesive materials. The reversibility of the strong attachment is quantified thanks to an improved nonlinear peeling model including friction, for which the solution in closed form is provided. Thus, mimicking nature, thanks to carbon-nanotube-based technology, we suggest the feasibility of large invisible cables, as well as of self-cleaning, superadhesive and releasable hierarchical smart materials. We found that a man can theoretically be supported by a transparent cable with cross-section of 1 cm{sup 2} and feasibly, with spider material gloves and boots, could remain attached even to a ceiling: a preliminary step towards a Spiderman suit.

  2. The Research and Application of Sustainable Long-release Carbon Material with Agricultural Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Z.

    2017-12-01

    (1) The element analysis shown that ten kinds of agricultural wastes containing a certain amount of C, N, H elements, the highest content of C element, and t value ranges from 36.02% 36.02%, and the variation of C, N, H elements content in difference materials was not significant. The TOC concentration of sugar cane was up to 38.66 mg·g-1, and quality ratio was 39‰, significantly lower than C elements content. The released TOC quality of the rest materials were 2.36 2.36 mg·g-1, and the order from high to low were the soybean straw, rice straw, corn straw, rice husk, poplar branches, wheat straw, reeds, corn cob and wood chips respectively. The long-term leaching experiment of selected Optimized agricultural waste showed that the TOC content in leaching solution rise rapidly to peak value and was stable afterwards, with the concentration of 4.59 19.46 mg·g-1. The TOC releasing amount order was same with the short-term leaching experiment. (2) The releasing of nitrate nitrogen in ten kinds of agricultural waste was low (corn straw was up to 0.12mg·g-1, and the rest were all below 0.04mg·g-1 without accumulation. Most of the ammonia nitrogen concentration in leachate was lower than 0.3mg·g-1. The kjeldahl nitrogen in the corn straw, soybean straw, rice straw, reed, rice husk, and sugar cane leachate (0.81 1.65mg·g-1) were higher than that of poplar branches, corn cob and wood chips (corn straw, rice husk and wheat straw leachate. Above all, it can be concluded that the sugar cane, corn straw, rice husk, wheat straw, corn cob, wood were ideal carbon source material in ten kinds of agricultural.

  3. New possibilities using additive manufacturing with materials that are difficult to process and with complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Anders; Hellsing, Maja S.; Rennie, Adrian R.

    2017-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) opens the possibility of creating new designs and manufacturing objects with new materials rapidly and economically. Particularly for use with polymers and polymer composites, simple printers can make high quality products, and these can be produced easily in offices, schools and in workshops and laboratories. This technology has opened a route for many to test ideas or to make custom devices. It is possible to easily manufacture complex geometries that would be difficult or even impossible to create with traditional methods. Naturally this technology has attracted attention in many fields that include the production of medical devices and prostheses, mechanical engineering as well as basic sciences. Materials that are highly problematic to machine can be used. We illustrate process developments with an account of the production of printer parts to cope with polymer fillers that are hard and abrasive; new nozzles with ruby inserts designed for such materials are durable and can be used to print boron carbide composites. As with other materials, complex parts can be printed using boron carbide composites with fine structures, such as screw threads and labels to identify materials. General ideas about design for this new era of manufacturing customised parts are presented.

  4. New possibilities using additive manufacturing with materials that are difficult to process and with complex structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Anders; Hellsing, Maja S; Rennie, Adrian R

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) opens the possibility of creating new designs and manufacturing objects with new materials rapidly and economically. Particularly for use with polymers and polymer composites, simple printers can make high quality products, and these can be produced easily in offices, schools and in workshops and laboratories. This technology has opened a route for many to test ideas or to make custom devices. It is possible to easily manufacture complex geometries that would be difficult or even impossible to create with traditional methods. Naturally this technology has attracted attention in many fields that include the production of medical devices and prostheses, mechanical engineering as well as basic sciences. Materials that are highly problematic to machine can be used. We illustrate process developments with an account of the production of printer parts to cope with polymer fillers that are hard and abrasive; new nozzles with ruby inserts designed for such materials are durable and can be used to print boron carbide composites. As with other materials, complex parts can be printed using boron carbide composites with fine structures, such as screw threads and labels to identify materials. General ideas about design for this new era of manufacturing customised parts are presented. (invited comment)

  5. Diffusivity database (DDB) system for major rocks and buffer materials (Released on 2007/specification)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochigi, Yoshikatsu; Shibata, Masahiro; Sato, Haruo; Kitamura, Akira

    2007-03-01

    The Diffusivity Database (DDB) System developed on early 2006 was upgraded to apply the data of effective diffusion coefficient of the nuclides in the rock matrix for the 'H12: Project to Establish the Scientific and Technical Basis for HLW Disposal in Japan', and the data in the buffer materials from literature survey was newly added. Some functions of data search and selection were reformed to improve the level of convenience. This DDB system (work on MS-Access TM ) is released to the public through Web server managed by JAEA. (author)

  6. Computer program for prediction of the deposition of material released from fixed and rotary wing aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    This is a user manual for the computer code ""AGDISP'' (AGricultural DISPersal) which has been developed to predict the deposition of material released from fixed and rotary wing aircraft in a single-pass, computationally efficient manner. The formulation of the code is novel in that the mean particle trajectory and the variance about the mean resulting from turbulent fluid fluctuations are simultaneously predicted. The code presently includes the capability of assessing the influence of neutral atmospheric conditions, inviscid wake vortices, particle evaporation, plant canopy and terrain on the deposition pattern.

  7. Transporting radioactive materials and possible radiological consequences from accidents as might be seen by medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses how medical personnel faced with treating victims of an accident involving radioactive material should be suspicious concerning possible radiological involvement. At the same time, they should be careful to obtain the necessary information in order to make a rational decision as to the likelihood of such involvement. Having made that decision, it is entirely possible then to approach the problem from a medical standpoint in such a way as to determine the extent of radiological involvement and to apply proper medical treatment consistent with that exposure

  8. Apparatus for dynamic measurement of gases released from materials heated under programmed temperature-time control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early, J.W.; Abernathey, R.M.

    1982-04-01

    This apparatus, a prototype of one being constructed for hotcell examination of irradiated nuclear materials, measures dynamic release rates and integrated volumes of individual gases from materials heated under controlled temperature-time programs. It consists of an inductively heated vacuum furnace connected to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A computerized control system with data acquisition provides scanning rates down to 1s and on-line tabular and graphic displays. Heating rates are up to 1300 0 C/min to a maximum temperature of 2000 0 C. The measurement range is about 10 -6 to 10 -2 torr-liter/s for H 2 , CH 4 , H 2 O, N 2 , and CO and 10 -8 to 10 -2 torr-liter/s for He, Kr, and Xe. Applications are described for measurements of Kr and Xe in mixed oxide fuel, various gases in UO 2 pellets, and He in 238 PuO 2 power and heat sources

  9. Radionuclide release from simulated waste material after biogeochemical leaching of uraniferous mineral samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Aimee Lynn; Caron, François; Spiers, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Biogeochemical mineral dissolution is a promising method for the released of metals in low-grade host mineralization that contain sulphidic minerals. The application of biogeochemical mineral dissolution to engineered leach heap piles in the Elliot Lake region may be considered as a promising passive technology for the economic recovery of low grade Uranium-bearing ores. In the current investigation, the decrease of radiological activity of uraniferous mineral material after biogeochemical mineral dissolution is quantified by gamma spectroscopy and compared to the results from digestion/ICP-MS analysis of the ore materials to determine if gamma spectroscopy is a simple, viable alternative quantification method for heavy nuclides. The potential release of Uranium (U) and Radium-226 ( 226 Ra) to the aqueous environment from samples that have been treated to represent various stages of leaching and passive closure processes are assessed. Dissolution of U from the solid phase has occurred during biogeochemical mineral dissolution in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, with gamma spectroscopy indicating an 84% decrease in Uranium-235 ( 235 U) content, a value in accordance with the data obtained by dissolution chemistry. Gamma spectroscopy data indicate that only 30% of the 226 Ra was removed during the biogeochemical mineral dissolution. Chemical inhibition and passivation treatments of waste materials following the biogeochemical mineral dissolution offer greater protection against residual U and 226 Ra leaching. Pacified samples resist the release of 226 Ra contained in the mineral phase and may offer more protection to the aqueous environment for the long term, compared to untreated or inhibited residues, and should be taken into account for future decommissioning. - Highlights: • Gamma counting showed an 84% decrease in 235 U after biogeochemical mineral leaching. • Chemical digestion/ICP-MS analysis also showed an 84% decrease in total U. • Over

  10. Possibility of using sources of vacuum ultraviolet irradiation to solve problems of space material science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhoutseva, E. T.; Yaremenko, E. I.

    1974-01-01

    An urgent problem in space materials science is simulating the interaction of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) of solar emission with solids in space conditions, that is, producing a light source with a distribution that approximates the distribution of solar energy. Information is presented on the distribution of the energy flux of VUV of solar radiation. Requirements that must be satisfied by the VUV source used for space materials science are formulated, and a critical evaluation is given of the possibilities of using existing sources for space materials science. From this evaluation it was established that none of the sources of VUV satisfies the specific requirements imposed on the simulator of solar radiation. A solution to the problem was found to be in the development of a new type of source based on exciting a supersonic gas jet flowing into vacuum with a sense electron beam. A description of this gas-jet source, along with its spectral and operation characteristics, is presented.

  11. Fluoride release and recharge behavior of a nano-filled resin-modified glass ionomer compared with that of other fluoride releasing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumita B; Oxman, Joe D; Falsafi, Afshin; Ton, Tiffany T

    2011-12-01

    To compare the long-term fluoride release kinetics of a novel nano-filled two-paste resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI), Ketac Nano (KN) with that of two powder-liquid resin-modified glass-ionomers, Fuji II LC (FLC) and Vitremer (VT) and one conventional glass-ionomer, Fuji IX (FIX). Fluoride release was measured in vitro using ion-selective electrodes. Kinetic analysis was done using regression analysis and compared with existing models for GIs and compomers. In a separate experiment the samples of KN and two conventional glass-ionomers, FIX and Ketac Molar (KM) were subjected to a treatment with external fluoride source (Oral-B Neutra-Foam) after 3 months of fluoride release and the recharge behavior studied for an additional 7-day period. The cumulative amount of fluoride released from KN, VT and FLC and the release profiles were statistically similar but greater than that for FIX at P coating of KN with its primer and of DY with its adhesive did not significantly alter the fluoride release behavior of the respective materials. The overall rate for KN was significantly higher than for the compomer DY. DY showed a linear rate of release vs. t and no burst effect as expected for compomers. The nanoionomer KN showed fluoride recharge behavior similar to the conventional glass ionomers FIX and KM. Thus, it was concluded that the new RMGI KN exhibits fluoride ion release behavior similar to typical conventional and RMGIs and that the primer does not impede the release of fluoride.

  12. Safeguarding of emergency core cooling in case of loss-of-coolant accidents with insulation material release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointner, W.; Broecker, A.

    2012-01-01

    The report on safeguarding of emergency core cooling in case of loss-of-coolant accidents with insulation material release covers the following issues: assessment of the relevant status for PWR, evaluation of the national and international (USA, Canada, France) status, actualization of recommendations, transferability from PWR to BWR. Generic studies on the core cooling capability in case of insulation material release in BWR-type reactors were evaluated.

  13. Porous alkali activated materials with slow alkali release dynamic. Role of composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.

    2018-01-01

    Alkali activated materials (AAM) based on calcined metakaolin or illite clay together with waste by-products, such as waste glass or aluminium scrap recycling waste, were tested as value-added materials for pH stabilization in biogas technology where decrease of pH should be avoided. Porous materials with ability to slowly leach alkalis in the water media thus providing continuous control of the pH level were obtained. XRD, FTIR, SEM and titration methods were used to characterize AAM and their leaching properties. It is clear that composition of the material has an important effect on the diffusion of alkali from structure. Namely, higher Si/Al and Na/Al molar ratios may increase pore solution transfer to the leachate. The leaching rate of alkalis from the structure of AAM is high for the first few days, decreasing over time. It was possible to calculate the buffer capacity from the mixture design of AAM. [es

  14. Cesium release from ceramic waste form materials in simulated canister corrosion product containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittorio, Luca; Drabarek, Elizabeth; Chronis, Harriet; Griffith, Christopher S

    2004-07-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that immobilization of Cs{sup +} and/or Sr{sup 2+} sorbed on hexagonal tungsten oxide bronze (HTB) adsorbent materials can be achieved by heating the materials in air at temperatures in the range 500 - 1300 deg C. Highly crystalline powdered HTB materials formed by heating at 800 deg C show leach characteristics comparable to Cs-containing hot-pressed hollandites in the pH range from 0 to 12. As a very harsh leaching test, and also to model in a basic manner, leaching in the presence of canister corrosion products in oxidising environments, leaching of the bronzoid phases has been undertaken in Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solutions of increasing concentration. This is done in comparison with Cs -hollandite materials in order to compare the leaching characteristics of these two materials under such conditions. Both the Cs-loaded bronze and hollandite materials leach severely in Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} losing virtually all of the immobilized Cs in a period of four days at 150 deg C. Total release of Cs and conversion of hollandite to titanium and iron titanium oxides begins to be observed at relatively low concentrations and is virtually complete after four days reaction in 0.5 mol/L Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. In the case of the bronze, all of the Cs is also extracted but the HTB structure is preserved. The reaction presumably involves an ion-exchange mechanism and iron oxide with a spinel structure is also observed at high Fe concentrations. (authors)

  15. Cesium release from ceramic waste form materials in simulated canister corrosion product containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittorio, Luca; Drabarek, Elizabeth; Chronis, Harriet; Griffith, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that immobilization of Cs + and/or Sr 2+ sorbed on hexagonal tungsten oxide bronze (HTB) adsorbent materials can be achieved by heating the materials in air at temperatures in the range 500 - 1300 deg C. Highly crystalline powdered HTB materials formed by heating at 800 deg C show leach characteristics comparable to Cs-containing hot-pressed hollandites in the pH range from 0 to 12. As a very harsh leaching test, and also to model in a basic manner, leaching in the presence of canister corrosion products in oxidising environments, leaching of the bronzoid phases has been undertaken in Fe(NO 3 ) 3 solutions of increasing concentration. This is done in comparison with Cs -hollandite materials in order to compare the leaching characteristics of these two materials under such conditions. Both the Cs-loaded bronze and hollandite materials leach severely in Fe(NO 3 ) 3 losing virtually all of the immobilized Cs in a period of four days at 150 deg C. Total release of Cs and conversion of hollandite to titanium and iron titanium oxides begins to be observed at relatively low concentrations and is virtually complete after four days reaction in 0.5 mol/L Fe(NO 3 ) 3 . In the case of the bronze, all of the Cs is also extracted but the HTB structure is preserved. The reaction presumably involves an ion-exchange mechanism and iron oxide with a spinel structure is also observed at high Fe concentrations. (authors)

  16. Characterisation, in vitro release study, and antibacterial activity of montmorillonite-gentamicin complex material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapacz-Kmita, A.; Bućko, M.M.; Stodolak-Zych, E.; Mikołajczyk, M.; Dudek, P.; nd Department of Surgery, Kopernika 21, 31-501 Krakow (Poland))" data-affiliation=" (Jagiellonian University, Medical College, 2nd Department of Surgery, Kopernika 21, 31-501 Krakow (Poland))" >Trybus, M.

    2017-01-01

    The present paper concerns the potential use of montmorillonite as a drug carrier and focusses on the intercalation of the studied clay with gentamicin (an aminoglycoside antibiotic) at various temperatures (20, 50 and 80 °C). The experiments were performed to identify the temperature required for the optimum intercalation of gentamicin into the interlayer of montmorillonite. The structural and microstructural properties of gentamicin and the potential for introducing it between smectite clay layers were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques, and SEM with EDS analysis. Additionally, the in vitro drug release behaviour of the montmorillonite-gentamicin complex and its antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria was investigated. Based on these studies, the impact of temperature on the intercalation of the drug between layers of smectite was evaluated. It was found that an intercalation temperature of 50 °C resulted in the highest shift in the position of principle peak d (001) as measured by XRD, suggesting, that the greatest amount of gentamicin had been introduced into the interlayer space of montmorillonite at this temperature. Subsequently, the montmorillonite-gentamicin complex material obtained at 50 °C revealed the greatest capacity for killing E. coli bacteria during an in vitro test. - Highlights: • A novel montmorillonite-gentamicin hybrid materials was prepared as potential drug carrier. • Optimal conditions for the intercalation of gentamicin into the interlayer space of montmorillonite were tested. • The MMT-G complex material obtained at 50 °C revealed the greatest capacity for killing E. coli during the inhibitory zone test. • Modulating drug delivery was monitored and confirmed in in vitro drug release study.

  17. Characterisation, in vitro release study, and antibacterial activity of montmorillonite-gentamicin complex material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapacz-Kmita, A., E-mail: kmita@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Bućko, M.M.; Stodolak-Zych, E. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Mikołajczyk, M. [The University Hospital in Krakow, Division of Microbiology, Kopernika 19, 31-501 Krakow (Poland); Dudek, P. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Robotics, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Trybus, M. [Jagiellonian University, Medical College, 2" n" d Department of Surgery, Kopernika 21, 31-501 Krakow (Poland)

    2017-01-01

    The present paper concerns the potential use of montmorillonite as a drug carrier and focusses on the intercalation of the studied clay with gentamicin (an aminoglycoside antibiotic) at various temperatures (20, 50 and 80 °C). The experiments were performed to identify the temperature required for the optimum intercalation of gentamicin into the interlayer of montmorillonite. The structural and microstructural properties of gentamicin and the potential for introducing it between smectite clay layers were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques, and SEM with EDS analysis. Additionally, the in vitro drug release behaviour of the montmorillonite-gentamicin complex and its antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria was investigated. Based on these studies, the impact of temperature on the intercalation of the drug between layers of smectite was evaluated. It was found that an intercalation temperature of 50 °C resulted in the highest shift in the position of principle peak d{sub (001)} as measured by XRD, suggesting, that the greatest amount of gentamicin had been introduced into the interlayer space of montmorillonite at this temperature. Subsequently, the montmorillonite-gentamicin complex material obtained at 50 °C revealed the greatest capacity for killing E. coli bacteria during an in vitro test. - Highlights: • A novel montmorillonite-gentamicin hybrid materials was prepared as potential drug carrier. • Optimal conditions for the intercalation of gentamicin into the interlayer space of montmorillonite were tested. • The MMT-G complex material obtained at 50 °C revealed the greatest capacity for killing E. coli during the inhibitory zone test. • Modulating drug delivery was monitored and confirmed in in vitro drug release study.

  18. Histamine and chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycan released by cultured human colonic mucosa: indication for possible presence of E mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliakim, R.; Gilead, L.; Ligumsky, M; Okon, E.; Rachmilewitz, D.; Razin, E.

    1986-01-01

    An association between the release of histamine and chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycan (PG) was demonstrates in human colonic mucosa (HCM). Colonic biopsy samples incorporated [ 35 S]sulfate into PG, which was partially released into the culture medium during the incubation period. Ascending thin-layer chromatography of the released 35 S-labeled PG after its digestion by chondroitin ABC lyase (chondroitinase, EC 4.2.2.4) followed by autoradiography yielded three products that migrated in the position of monosulfated disaccharides of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate and N-acetylgalactosoamine 6-sulfate and of an oversulfated disaccharide possessing N-acetylgalatosamine 4,6-disulfate. Cultured colonic mucosa released 23.6 +/- 3.7ng of histamine per mg of wet tissue without any special trigger. Comparison by linear regression analysis of the release of histamine and chondroitin [ 35 S]sulfate E PG revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.7. Histological examination of the colonic biopsies revealed the presence of many mast cells in various degrees of degranulation in the mucosa and submucosa. The above correlation, the observation that most of the mast cells showed various degrees of degranulation, and the lack of heparin synthesis as opposed to the synthesis and immunological release of chondroitin sulfate E strongly suggest that the E mast cell exists in the human colon

  19. [Fabrication of a new composite scaffold material for delivering rifampicin and its sustained drug release in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xue-Ming; Lin, Zhen; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Sang, Chao-Hui; Qu, Dong-Bin; Jiang, Jian-Ming

    2016-03-01

    To fabricate a new composite scaffold material as an implant for sustained delivery of rifampicin and evaluate its performance of sustained drug release and biocompatibility. The composite scaffold material was prepared by loading poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microspheres that encapsulated rifampicin in a biphasic calcium composite material with a negative surface charge. The in vitro drug release characteristics of the microspheres and the composite scaffold material were evaluated; the in vivo drug release profile of the composite scaffold material implanted in a rat muscle pouch was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography. The biochemical parameters of the serum and liver histopathologies of the rats receiving the transplantation were observed to assess the biocompatibility of the composite scaffold material. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading efficiency of microspheres were (56.05±5.33)% and (29.80±2.88)%, respectively. The cumulative drug release rate of the microspheres in vitro was (94.19±5.4)% at 28 days, as compared with the rate of (82.23±6.28)% of composite scaffold material. The drug-loaded composite scaffold material showed a good performance of in vivo drug release in rats, and the local drug concentration still reached 16.18±0.35 µg/g at 28 days after implantation. Implantation of the composite scaffold material resulted in transient and reversible liver injury, which was fully reparred at 28 days after the implantation. The composite scaffold material possesses a good sustained drug release capacity and a good biocompatibility, and can serve as an alternative approach to conventional antituberculous chemotherapy.

  20. High yield CTMP fibres as a possibility of the more efficient yield of wood raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klašnja Bojana A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The evident shortage of wood as a raw material has become a limiting factor in the pulp and paper industry which is the greatest consumer of wood in Europe. The situation in our country is similar. During the few past years, the production of poplar and willow pulpwood was 220.000 m3 per year, which is insufficient for the planned increase in the production of sulphate pulp (175.000 tons till 2005. This paper deals with the aspects of the more efficient yield of raw material, based on the significantly higher yield of CTMP fibres, as well as with the significance of the lower adverse effect on the environment. It also analyses the conditions of production and the quality of the obtained fibres, as a possible substitute for chemical pulp and secondary fibres in papers of different quality. The main reasons for the production and use of CTMP fibres in our country are reported.

  1. Challenges in materials science and possibilities in 3D and 4D characterization techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, N.; Juul Jensen, D.; Nielsen, S.F.; Poulsen, H.F.; Ralph, B.

    2010-01-01

    Present days see a global effort to develop new and advanced materials and as an integral part of this endeavor a range of new characterization techniques are becoming available, which have led to significant breakthroughs in materials science and engineering. Within this broad scientific field the symposium focus on metals and on 3D and 4D characterization techniques using x-rays, neutrons and electrons. These techniques now allow characterization on a finer and finer scale and open up for analysis of dynamic behavior by real time in-situ investigations. This means that techniques are now available by which key challenges in materials science can be addressed. The combination of techniques and challenges has been the guide for contributions to this year symposium and these proceedings shows the successful result. The collection of papers demonstrates the many new possibilities in 3D and 4D characterization techniques and also the applications of these techniques in the studies of important materials science and engineering themes, for example: evolution in structure and properties under thermal and mechanical loading and during annealing, phase transformations and fracture/damage. The proceedings contain the 14 key note and 34 contributed presentations of the symposium, covering the above key themes. (LN)

  2. Incident involving radioactive material at IAEA Safeguards Laboratory - No radioactivity released to environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Pressure build-up in a small sealed sample bottle in a storage safe resulted in plutonium contamination of a storage room at about 02:30 today at the IAEA's Safeguards Analytical Laboratory in Seibersdorf. All indications are that there was no release of radioactivity to the environment. Further monitoring around the laboratory will be undertaken. No one was working in the laboratory at the time. The Laboratory's safety system detected plutonium contamination in the storage room where the safe was located and in two other rooms - subsequently confirmed by a team of IAEA radiation protection experts. The Laboratory is equipped with multiple safety systems, including an air-filtering system to prevent the release of radioactivity to the environment. There will be restricted access to the affected rooms until they are decontaminated. A full investigation of the incident will be conducted. The IAEA has informed the Austrian regulatory authority. The IAEA's Laboratory in Seibersdorf is located within the complex of the Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf (ARC), about 35 km southeast of Vienna. The laboratory routinely analyses small samples of nuclear material (uranium or plutonium) as part of the IAEA's safeguards verification work. (IAEA)

  3. Pharmacokinetic modeling of 4,4'-methylenedianiline released from reused polyurethane dialyzer potting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Luu, H M; Hutter, J C

    2000-01-01

    4, 4'-Methylenedianiline (MDA) is a hydrolysis degradation product that can be released from polyurethanes commonly used in medical device applications. MDA is mutagenic and carcinogenic in animals. In humans, it is hepatotoxic, a known contact and respiratory allergen, and a suspected carcinogen. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to estimate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of MDA in patients exposed to MDA leached from the potting materials of hemodialyzers. A worst-case reuse situation and a single use case were investigated. The PBPK model included five tissue compartments: liver, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, slowly perfused tissues, and richly perfused tissues. Physiological and chemical parameters of a healthy individual used in the model were obtained from the literature. The model was calibrated using previously published kinetic studies of IV administered doses of (14) C-MDA to rats. The model was validated using independent data published for MDA-exposed workers. The PBPK results indicated that dialysis patients who are exposed to MDA released from dialyzers (new or reused) could accumulate low levels of MDA and metabolites (total MDA) over time. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Comparison of the Heat Release Rate from the Mass Loss Calorimeter to the Cone Calorimeter for Wood-based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura E. Hasburgh; Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing demand for material properties to be used as inputs in fi re behavior models designed to address building fire safety. This comparative study evaluates using the mass loss calorimeter as an alternative to the cone calorimeter for obtaining heat release rates of wood-based materials. For this study, a modified mass loss calorimeter utilized an...

  5. Status and possible prospects of an international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzani, F.

    1999-01-01

    Structural materials for future DT fusion power reactors will have to operate under intense neutron fields with energies up to 14 MeV and fluences in the order of 2 MW/m 2 per year. As environmental acceptability, safety considerations and economic viability will be ultimately the keys to the widespread introduction of fusion power, the development of radiation-resistant and low activation materials would contribute significantly to fusion development. For this purpose, testing of materials under irradiation conditions close to those expected in a fusion power station would require the availability, in an appropriate time framework, of an intense, high-energy neutron source. Recent advances in linear accelerator technology, in small specimens testing technology, and in the comprehension of damage phenomena, lead to the conclusion that an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source, with beam energy variability, would provide the most realistic option for a fusion materials testing facility. Under the auspices of the IEA, an international effort (EU, Japan, US, RF) to carry out the conceptual design activities (CDA) of an international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF), based on the D-Li concept, have been carried out successfully. A final conceptual design report was produced at the end of 1996. A phase of conceptual design evaluation (CDE), presently underway, is extending and further refining some of the conceptual design details of IFMIF. The results indicate that an IFMIF-class installation would be technically feasible and could meet its mission objectives. However, a suitable phase of Engineering Validation, to carry out some complementary R and D and prototyping, would still be needed to resolve a few key technical uncertainties before the possibility to proceed toward detailed design and construction could be explored. (orig.)

  6. Mexican natural zeolite, material for their possible use in the hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iturbe G, J. L.; Vazquez A, O.

    2009-01-01

    In this work a study is presented on the use of a Mexican natural zeolite as possible alternative to storage hydrogen. This zeolite material comes from the Sonora State (Mexico), to which is diminished the particle size by means of a mill treatment with a mechanical alloyed system during 5 hours. Later on, the zeolite in powder form was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. It was also exposed to heating in a micro-reactor at 350 C and at the same time making empty during 2 hours, to eliminate humidity and possible gases that were caught in their structure. Soon after, it was diminished the temperature at 10 C and it was contacted with hydrogen of ultra high purity to a pressure of 10 bars during 10 minutes. The hydrogen analysis caught in the zeolite was realized through gas chromatography. The results by means of the chromatograms indicate that the zeolite adsorbed and liberate to hydrogen under conditions completely different to that reported in the literature, being understood that under our experimental conditions to low pressure and temperature, the hydrogen is adsorbed in this material type. (Author)

  7. Dopamine mediated iron release from ferritin is enhanced at higher temperatures: Possible implications for fever-induced Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babincova, Melania; Babinec, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A new molecular mechanism is proposed to explain the pathogenesis of fever-induced Parkinson's disease. This proposal is based on dopamine and 6-hydroxydopamine-mediated free iron release from ferritin magnetic nanoparticles, which is enhanced at higher temperatures, and which may lead to substantial peroxidation and injury of lipid biomembranes of the substantia nigra in the brain

  8. Creep rupture behavior of polypropylene suture material and its applications as a time-release mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusy, R.P.; Whitley, J.Q.

    1983-01-01

    The controlled failure of polypropylene (PP) sutures is studied via creep rupture tests. From plots of log time (tB) vs. stress (sigma), linear relationships are generated over the failure times of 1-1000 h. Results show that as a function of stress, the time dependence varies with irradiation dose (15, 20, 25, and 50 Mrad), irradiation atmosphere (air and vacuum), suture diameter (7-0, 6-0, 5-0, and 4-0), and test temperature (26 and 37 degrees C). For a given stress, the time to failure is least for the greatest dose in the presence of air and at the highest temperature. When suture loops are wrapped around a small wire sheave, however, failure occurs in the largest suture as much as two decades sooner than the smallest suture studied. Within the limitations stated herein, they are independent of test method, loop diameter, aging, and humidity. Consequently, after irradiation in vacuum and postirradiation heat treatment, the processed material may be stored at room temperature for at least 1 month. Such materials are advocated when the time release of a dental or medical device is required, for example, in the self-activating cleft palate appliance

  9. Comparing Titanium Release from Ceramic Tiles using a waste material characterization test - Influence of Calcium and Organic Matter concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heggelund, Laura Roverskov; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are beneficial in the building industry to enhance or add certain features to commonly used materials. One example is the use of nano-titanium dioxide in the surface coating of ceramic tiles, to make the tiles surface self-cleaning. At the end of life stage, ceramic tiles might...... to assess if nano-titanium dioxide coated ceramic tiles are suitable for depositing in a landfill or not. Specifically, we used compliance batch test method, which is a simple test evaluating the release from a solid material to an aqueous media during 24 hrs. If nano-Ti particles are released from solid...... immediately after the 24 hrs. test using single particle ICPMS and Transmission Electron Microscopy imaging. The preliminary results suggest that nanoparticulate titanium is released from both tiles – with and without nano-titanium dioxide coating. The size distributions of the released particles are similar...

  10. Possibilities and Challenges of Scanning Hard X-ray Spectro-microscopy Techniques in Material Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Somogyi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scanning hard X-ray spectro-microscopic imaging opens unprecedented possibilities in the study of inhomogeneous samples at different length-scales. It gives insight into the spatial variation of the major and minor components, impurities and dopants of the sample, and their chemical and electronic states at micro- and nano-meter scales. Measuring, modelling and understanding novel properties of laterally confined structures are now attainable. The large penetration depth of hard X-rays (several keV to several 10 keV beam energy makes the study of layered and buried structures possible also in in situ and in operando conditions. The combination of different X-ray analytical techniques complementary to scanning spectro-microscopy, such as X-ray diffraction, X-ray excited optical luminescence, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS and nano-SIMS, provides access to optical characteristics and strain and stress distributions. Complex sample environments (temperature, pressure, controlled atmosphere/vacuum, chemical environment are also possible and were demonstrated, and allow as well the combination with other analysis techniques (Raman spectroscopy, infrared imaging, mechanical tensile devices, etc. on precisely the very same area of the sample. The use of the coherence properties of X-rays from synchrotron sources is triggering emerging experimental imaging approaches with nanometer lateral resolution. New fast analytical possibilities pave the way towards statistically significant studies at multi- length-scales and three dimensional tomographic investigations. This paper gives an overview of these techniques and their recent achievements in the field of material sciences.

  11. On possibility of high energy electron irradiation usage for material alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirskij, R.A.; Livshits, V.B.; Payuk, V.A.; Plotnikov, S.V.; Kuz'minykh, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    Review of papers concerning over 2.5 MeV fast electron beam (FEB) irradiation of metals and semiconductors is made. It makes possible to transform physical and mechanical properties ofsurface layers due to their alloyage with different elements or due to redistribution of alloy impurities at the essential depth. It is shown, that electron beam irradiation of materials results in the formation of essential temperature gradient in the sample near the surface and defect nonequilibrium concentration. Along with the increase of diffusion effective ratio the heterogeneous distribution of temperature and defects results in the formation of atom nucompensated fluxes within the sample, which result in element redistribution. Drift of one element through the layer of the second one occurs as a result. Gradient of temperature and defects, amfient temperature and correlation of migration activation energies of element atoms are considered as determining factors at anomalous mass transfer

  12. Possibilities of nondestructive determination of fluorine in coal and biological materials by IPAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randa, Zdenek; Mizera, Jiri; Chvatil, David

    2009-01-01

    The possibilities of nondestructive determination of fluorine in coal and biological materials by instrumental photon activation analysis (IPAA) were studied. The determination was based on counting the non-specific 511 keV annihilation gamma rays of 18 F, a pure positron emitter which is the product of the photonuclear reaction 19 F(γ, n) 18 F. The simultaneous formation of some additional positron emitters, particularly 45 Ti and 34m Cl, is an interfering factor. When using correction standards for Ti and Cl and optimization of the beam energy and irradiation-decay-counting times, fluorine could be determined by IPAA in selected coal and biological samples at the ten ppm level. The feasibility of additional optimization for further improvements of the proposed IPAA procedure are discussed

  13. Influence of the conditional release of the materials with very low level of radioactivity on the environment - 59132

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prvakova, Slavka; Mrskova, Adela; Pritrsky, Jozef

    2012-01-01

    Significant amount of solid materials (metals, non-metals, building structures) that could be contaminated or activated is produced during operation and especially decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Considerable fraction of these materials has level of radioactivity close to the radiological limits allowing its safe release into the environment thereby could be potentially recycled within the special constructions, as for example tunnels, roads or bridges. If the requirements of legislation on the radiological limits for handling such material and long-term safety of the constructions are met, contaminated material can be incorporated in the form of recycled concrete, remelted steel, etc. The paper presents implementation of the IAEA and EC recommendations into the form of detailed analytical approaches with the aim to develop integrated scenarios and to analyse long-term influence of the conditional release of the material with very low level of radioactivity on the environment. Further, an estimation of the key input parameters characteristic for the specific conditions of Slovak case in order to fulfil the radiological limits according to the Slovak legislation is included. Analysed integrated scenarios represent surface or underground civil construction with radionuclides released directly into the geosphere and transported by a groundwater flow to the biosphere. The migration of radionuclides is modelled in the near-surface conditions with the advection as a dominant transport mechanism. Computer code GoldSim is used to evaluate the long-term safety assessment of the conditionally released material on the environment. (authors)

  14. Suppressed histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells by ultraviolet B irradiation: decreased diacylglycerol formation as a possible mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danno, K.; Fujii, K.; Tachibana, T.; Toda, K.; Horio, T.

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation on mast cell functions. Purified mast cells obtained from rat peritoneal cavity were irradiated with UVB and subsequently exposed to a degranulator, compound 48/80, or the calcium ionophore A-23187. The amount of histamine released from mast cells measured by the enzyme isotopic assay was significantly decreased by UVB irradiation (100-400 mJ/cm2). Within this dose range, UVB alone was not cytotoxic to the cells because it did not induce histamine release. The suppression was observed when mast cells were subjected to degranulation without intervals after UVB irradiation, and even after 5 h postirradiation. The wavelength of 300 nm from a monochromatic light source showed the maximum effect. When mast cells prelabeled with [ 3 H]arachidonate were irradiated and challenged by compound 48/80, label accumulation in diacylglycerol produced by the phosphatidylinositol cycle was considerably decreased by UVB irradiation. From these results, we hypothesize that, within an adequate irradiation dose, UVB irradiation suppresses histamine release from mast cells, probably by causing noncytotoxic damage to the membrane phospholipid metabolism, which is tied to the degranulation mechanisms

  15. Possibility of material cost reduction toward development of low-cost second-generation superconducting wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Ataru; Horii, Shigeru; Doi, Toshiya

    2017-10-01

    Two approaches to reducing the material cost of second-generation superconducting wires are proposed in this paper: (1) instead of the electrical stabilizing layers of silver and copper presently used on the superconducting layer, a Nb-doped SrTiO3 conductive buffer layer and cube-textured Cu are proposed as an advanced architecture, and (2) the use of an electromagnetic (EM) steel tape as a metal substrate of coated conductors in a conventional architecture. In structures fabricated without using electrical stabilizing layers on the superconducting layer, the critical current density achieved at 77 K in a self-field was approximately 2.6 MA/cm2. On the other hand, in the case of using EM steel tapes, although the critical current density was far from practical at the current stage, the biaxial alignment of YBa2Cu3O y (YBCO) and buffer layers was realized without oxidation on the metal surface. In this study, the possibility of material cost reduction has been strongly indicated toward the development of low-cost second-generation superconducting wires in the near future.

  16. Assessment of the Possibility of Using Reclaimed Materials for Making Cores by the Blowing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dańko R.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The cumulative results of investigations of the possibility of using the reclaimed materials after the mechanical, thermal or mechanical-thermal reclamation for making cores by means of the blowing method in the alkaline CO2 technology, are presented in the paper. Three kinds of spent sands: with furfuryl resin, bentonite and alkaline phenolic resin, obtained from the foundry, were subjected to three kinds of reclamation: mechanical, thermal and combined mechanical-thermal, applying for this aim adequate experimental devices. The obtained reclaims were assessed with regard to the degree of the matrix liberation from the determined binding material. Reclaims of moulding sands with binders of the form of resin were assessed with regard to ignition loss values and pH reaction, while reclaims of moulding sands with bentonite with regard to the residual clay content and pH value. In all cases the results of the performed sieve analyses were estimated and the average characteristic diameter dl was determined. The reclaimed matrix was applied as a full substitute of the fresh high-silica sand in typical procedures of preparing core sands used for making shaped samples for bending strength investigations, Rgu.

  17. The Possibility of Phase Change Materials (PCM Usage to Increase Efficiency of the Photovoltaic Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klugmann-Radziemska Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is widely available, free and inexhaustible. Furthermore this source of energy is the most friendly to the environment. For direct conversion of solar energy into useful forms like of electricity and thermal energy, respectively photovoltaic cells and solar collectors are being used. Forecast indicate that the first one solution will soon have a significant part in meeting the global energy demand. Therefore it is highly important to increase their efficiency in the terms of providing better energy conversion conditions. It can be obtain by designing new devices or by modifications of existing ones. This article presents general issues of photovoltaic installations exposed to work in high temperatures and basic concepts about phase change materials (PCMs. The paper presents the possibility of PCM usage to receive heat from the photovoltaic module. Specially designed test stand, consisting of PV module covered with a layer of PCM has been build and tested. Current-voltage characteristics of the cell without PCM material and with a layer of PCM have been presented. Authors also describe the results of the electrical and thermal characteristic of a coupled PV-PCM system.

  18. In vivo release of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like material from the cervicotrigeminal area in the rat. Effects of electrical and noxious stimulations of the muzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, M; Collin, E; Bourgoin, S; Clot, A M; Hamon, M; Cesselin, F; Le Bars, D

    1992-10-01

    The continuous perfusion with an artificial cerebrospinal fluid of the cervicotrigeminal area of the spinal cord in halothane-anaesthetized rats allowed the collection of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like material with the same immunological and chromatographic characteristics as authentic rat alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide. The spinal release of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like material could be significantly increased by the local application of 60 mM K+ (approximately +100%), high-intensity percutaneous electrical stimulation (approximately +200%) and noxious heat (by immersion in water at 52 degrees C; approximately +150%) applied to the muzzle. By contrast, noxious mechanical (pinches) and chemical (subcutaneous formalin injection) stimulations and deep cooling (by immersion in water at 0 degrees C) of the muzzle did not alter the spinal release of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like material. In addition, low-intensity electrical stimulation, recruiting only the A alpha/beta primary afferent fibres, significantly reduced (approximately -30%) the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like material from the cervicotrigeminal area. These data suggest that among the various types of natural noxious stimuli, noxious heat may selectively excite calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing A delta and C primary afferent fibres projecting within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, and that activation of A alpha/beta fibres reduces spontaneous calcitonin gene-related peptide-like material release possibly through an inhibitory presynaptic control of calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing A delta/C fibres.

  19. Analytics of Radioactive Materials Released in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egarievwe, Stephen U. [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science Center, Alabama A and M University, Huntsville, AL (United States); Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Coble, Jamie B.; Miller, Laurence F. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan resulted in the release of radioactive materials into the atmosphere, the nearby sea, and the surrounding land. Following the accident, several meteorological models were used to predict the transport of the radioactive materials to other continents such as North America and Europe. Also of high importance is the dispersion of radioactive materials locally and within Japan. Based on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Convention on Early Notification of a nuclear accident, several radiological data sets were collected on the accident by the Japanese authorities. Among the radioactive materials monitored, are I-131 and Cs-137 which form the major contributions to the contamination of drinking water. The radiation dose in the atmosphere was also measured. It is impractical to measure contamination and radiation dose in every place of interest. Therefore, modeling helps to predict contamination and radiation dose. Some modeling studies that have been reported in the literature include the simulation of transport and deposition of I-131 and Cs-137 from the accident, Cs-137 deposition and contamination of Japanese soils, and preliminary estimates of I-131 and Cs-137 discharged from the plant into the atmosphere. In this paper, we present statistical analytics of I-131 and Cs-137 with the goal of predicting gamma dose from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. The data sets used in our study were collected from the IAEA Fukushima Monitoring Database. As part of this study, we investigated several regression models to find the best algorithm for modeling the gamma dose. The modeling techniques used in our study include linear regression, principal component regression (PCR), partial least square (PLS) regression, and ridge regression. Our preliminary results on the first set of data showed that the linear regression model with one variable was the best with a root mean square error of 0.0133 μSv/h, compared

  20. Analytics of Radioactive Materials Released in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Coble, Jamie B.; Miller, Laurence F.

    2015-01-01

    The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan resulted in the release of radioactive materials into the atmosphere, the nearby sea, and the surrounding land. Following the accident, several meteorological models were used to predict the transport of the radioactive materials to other continents such as North America and Europe. Also of high importance is the dispersion of radioactive materials locally and within Japan. Based on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Convention on Early Notification of a nuclear accident, several radiological data sets were collected on the accident by the Japanese authorities. Among the radioactive materials monitored, are I-131 and Cs-137 which form the major contributions to the contamination of drinking water. The radiation dose in the atmosphere was also measured. It is impractical to measure contamination and radiation dose in every place of interest. Therefore, modeling helps to predict contamination and radiation dose. Some modeling studies that have been reported in the literature include the simulation of transport and deposition of I-131 and Cs-137 from the accident, Cs-137 deposition and contamination of Japanese soils, and preliminary estimates of I-131 and Cs-137 discharged from the plant into the atmosphere. In this paper, we present statistical analytics of I-131 and Cs-137 with the goal of predicting gamma dose from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. The data sets used in our study were collected from the IAEA Fukushima Monitoring Database. As part of this study, we investigated several regression models to find the best algorithm for modeling the gamma dose. The modeling techniques used in our study include linear regression, principal component regression (PCR), partial least square (PLS) regression, and ridge regression. Our preliminary results on the first set of data showed that the linear regression model with one variable was the best with a root mean square error of 0.0133 μSv/h, compared

  1. Biomolecular characterization of exosomes released from cancer stem cells: Possible implications for biomarker and treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhruv; Gupta, Dwijendra; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K

    2015-02-20

    Cancer recognized as one of the leading irrepressible health issues is contributing to increasing mortality-rate day-by-day. The tumor microenvironment is an important field of cancer to understand the detection, treatment and prevention of cancer. Recently, cancer stem cell (CSC) research has shown promising results aiming towards cancer diagnostics and treatment. Here, we found that prostate and breast cancer stem cells secreted vesicles of endosomal origin, called exosomes showed strong connection between autophagy and exosomes released from CSCs. Exosomes may serve as vesicles to communicate with neoplastic cells (autocrine and paracrine manner) and normal cells (paracrine and endocrine manner) and thereby suppress immune systems and regulate neoplastic growth, and metastasis. They can also be used as biomarkers for various cancers. We detected tetraspanin proteins (CD9, CD63, CD81), Alix and tumor susceptibility gene-101 (TSG101) of exosomal markers from rotenone treated CSCs. We have also detected the induction of autophagy genes, Atg7 and conversion of autophagy marker (LC3-I to LC3-II), and tetraspanin proteins (CD9, CD63, CD81) in rotenone treated CSCs by western blotting. The mRNA expression of CD9, CD63, CD81 and TSG101 analyzed by qRT-PCR showed that the rotenone induced the expression of CD9, CD63, CD81 and TSG101 in CSCs. Electron microscopy of rotenone treated CSCs showed the mitochondrial damage of CSCs as confirmed by the release of exosomes from CSCs. The constituents of exosomes may be useful to understand the mechanism of exosomes formation, release and function, and also serve as a useful biomarker and provide novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment and prevention of cancer.

  2. Advances in Hybrid Polymer-Based Materials for Sustained Drug Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia N. M. Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of biomaterials composed of organic pristine components has been successfully described in several purposes, such as tissue engineering and drug delivery. Drug delivery systems (DDS have shown several advantages over traditional drug therapy, such as greater therapeutic efficacy, prolonged delivery profile, and reduced drug toxicity, as evidenced by in vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials. Despite that, there is no perfect delivery carrier, and issues such as undesirable viscosity and physicochemical stability or inability to efficiently encapsulate hydrophilic/hydrophobic molecules still persist, limiting DDS applications. To overcome that, biohybrid systems, originating from the synergistic assembly of polymers and other organic materials such as proteins and lipids, have recently been described, yielding molecularly planned biohybrid systems that are able to optimize structures to easily interact with the targets. This work revised the biohybrid DDS clarifying their advantages, limitations, and future perspectives in an attempt to contribute to further research of innovative and safe biohybrid polymer-based system as biomaterials for the sustained release of active molecules.

  3. Saturated fatty acid palmitate induces extracellular release of histone H3: A possible mechanistic basis for high-fat diet-induced inflammation and thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Chandan [Department of Systems Biology in Thromboregulation, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Ito, Takashi [Department of Systems Biology in Thromboregulation, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Kawahara, Ko-ichi [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, Osaka (Japan); Shrestha, Binita; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Hashiguchi, Teruto [Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Maruyama, Ikuro, E-mail: rinken@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Systems Biology in Thromboregulation, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •High-fat diet feeding and palmitate induces the release of nuclear protein histone H3. •ROS production and JNK signaling mediates the release of histone H3. •Extracellular histones induces proinflammatory and procoagulant response. -- Abstract: Chronic low-grade inflammation is a key contributor to high-fat diet (HFD)-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and atherosclerosis. The inflammation is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages, into obese adipose tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms by which a HFD induces low-grade inflammation are poorly understood. Here, we show that histone H3, a major protein component of chromatin, is released into the extracellular space when mice are fed a HFD or macrophages are stimulated with the saturated fatty acid palmitate. In a murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, palmitate activated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK signaling. Inhibitors of these pathways dampened palmitate-induced histone H3 release, suggesting that the extracellular release of histone H3 was mediated, in part, through ROS and JNK signaling. Extracellular histone activated endothelial cells toexpress the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and the procoagulant molecule tissue factor, which are known to contribute to inflammatory cell recruitment and thrombosis. These results suggest the possible contribution of extracellular histone to the pathogenesis of HFD-induced inflammation and thrombosis.

  4. The stability of CaS in circulating fluidized bed boiler residue and the possible release of H2S gas to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattisson, T.; Lyngfelt, A.

    1995-01-01

    During the combustion of coal, SO 2 is released to the atmosphere. Because of environmental concerns with acid rain, the capture of SO 2 is an important issue. In fluidized bed combustion SO 2 is captured in-situ by limestone or dolomite to form CaSO 4 . This product is stable and can be disposed of or reused as gypsum. In order to capture the sulphur as CaSO 4 oxidizing conditions are necessary. In a fluidized bed boiler (FBB) CaS may form in regions with reducing conditions, and FBB ashes sampled under irregular operating conditions may contain as much as 50 % of the captured sulphur as CaS. The stability of CaS in a landfill environment is thus very important. It is possible that the sulphide decomposes in the presence of moisture or runoff leachate with the subsequent release of H 2 S gas. This re-release of captured sulphur could have a substantial effect on the overall sulphur capture efficiency, with more sulphur released to the atmosphere than previously thought. In this study the stability of CaS in bed ashes from a 12 MW circulating FBB combusting coal has been investigated, with focus on the release of H 2 S gas. (orig.)

  5. Saturated fatty acid palmitate induces extracellular release of histone H3: A possible mechanistic basis for high-fat diet-induced inflammation and thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Chandan; Ito, Takashi; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Shrestha, Binita; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •High-fat diet feeding and palmitate induces the release of nuclear protein histone H3. •ROS production and JNK signaling mediates the release of histone H3. •Extracellular histones induces proinflammatory and procoagulant response. -- Abstract: Chronic low-grade inflammation is a key contributor to high-fat diet (HFD)-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and atherosclerosis. The inflammation is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages, into obese adipose tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms by which a HFD induces low-grade inflammation are poorly understood. Here, we show that histone H3, a major protein component of chromatin, is released into the extracellular space when mice are fed a HFD or macrophages are stimulated with the saturated fatty acid palmitate. In a murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, palmitate activated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK signaling. Inhibitors of these pathways dampened palmitate-induced histone H3 release, suggesting that the extracellular release of histone H3 was mediated, in part, through ROS and JNK signaling. Extracellular histone activated endothelial cells toexpress the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and the procoagulant molecule tissue factor, which are known to contribute to inflammatory cell recruitment and thrombosis. These results suggest the possible contribution of extracellular histone to the pathogenesis of HFD-induced inflammation and thrombosis

  6. A mobile dose prediction system based on artificial neural networks for NPP emergencies with radioactive material releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto; Gomes, Kelcio J.; Cunha, José Luiz, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    This work presents the approach of a mobile dose prediction system for NPP emergencies with nuclear material release. The objective is to provide extra support to field teams decisions when plant information systems are not available. However, predicting doses due to atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide generally requires execution of complex and computationally intensive physical models. In order to allow such predictions to be made by using limited computational resources such as mobile phones, it is proposed the use of artificial neural networks (ANN) previously trained (offline) with data generated by precise simulations using the NPP atmospheric dispersion system. Typical situations for each postulated accident and respective source terms, as well as a wide range of meteorological conditions have been considered. As a first step, several ANN architectures have been investigated in order to evaluate their ability for dose prediction in hypothetical scenarios in the vicinity of CNAAA Brazilian NPP, in Angra dos Reis, Brazil. As a result, good generalization and a correlation coefficient of 0.99 was achieved for a validation data set (untrained patterns). Then, selected ANNs have been coded in Java programming language to run as an Android application aimed to plot the spatial dose distribution into a map.In this paper, the general architecture of the proposed system is described; numerical results and comparisons between investigated ANN architectures are discussed; performance and limitations of running the Application into a commercial mobile phone are evaluated and possible improvements and future works are pointed. (author)

  7. Development of a mobile dose prediction system based on artificial neural networks for NPP emergencies with radioactive material releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto; Gomes, Kelcio J.; Cunha, José L.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the approach of a mobile dose prediction system for NPP emergencies with nuclear material release. The objective is to provide extra support to field teams decisions when plant information systems are not available. However, predicting doses due to atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide generally requires execution of complex and computationally intensive physical models. In order to allow such predictions to be made by using limited computational resources such as mobile phones, it is proposed the use of artificial neural networks (ANN) previously trained (offline) with data generated by precise simulations using the NPP atmospheric dispersion system. Typical situations for each postulated accident and respective source terms, as well as a wide range of meteorological conditions have been considered. As a first step, several ANN architectures have been investigated in order to evaluate their ability for dose prediction in hypothetical scenarios in the vicinity of CNAAA Brazilian NPP, in Angra dos Reis, Brazil. As a result, good generalization and a correlation coefficient of 0.99 was achieved for a validation data set (untrained patterns). Then, selected ANNs have been coded in Java programming language to run as an Android application aimed to plot the spatial dose distribution into a map. In this paper, the general architecture of the proposed system is described; numerical results and comparisons between investigated ANN architectures are discussed; performance and limitations of running the Application into a commercial mobile phone are evaluated and possible improvements and future works are pointed.

  8. A mobile dose prediction system based on artificial neural networks for NPP emergencies with radioactive material releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto; Gomes, Kelcio J.; Cunha, José Luiz

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the approach of a mobile dose prediction system for NPP emergencies with nuclear material release. The objective is to provide extra support to field teams decisions when plant information systems are not available. However, predicting doses due to atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide generally requires execution of complex and computationally intensive physical models. In order to allow such predictions to be made by using limited computational resources such as mobile phones, it is proposed the use of artificial neural networks (ANN) previously trained (offline) with data generated by precise simulations using the NPP atmospheric dispersion system. Typical situations for each postulated accident and respective source terms, as well as a wide range of meteorological conditions have been considered. As a first step, several ANN architectures have been investigated in order to evaluate their ability for dose prediction in hypothetical scenarios in the vicinity of CNAAA Brazilian NPP, in Angra dos Reis, Brazil. As a result, good generalization and a correlation coefficient of 0.99 was achieved for a validation data set (untrained patterns). Then, selected ANNs have been coded in Java programming language to run as an Android application aimed to plot the spatial dose distribution into a map.In this paper, the general architecture of the proposed system is described; numerical results and comparisons between investigated ANN architectures are discussed; performance and limitations of running the Application into a commercial mobile phone are evaluated and possible improvements and future works are pointed. (author)

  9. Evaluation of gum mastic (Pistacia lentiscus as a microencapsulating and matrix forming material for sustained drug release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh M. Morkhade

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a natural gum mastic was evaluated as a microencapsulating and matrix-forming material for sustained drug release. Mastic was characterized for its physicochemical properties. Microparticles were prepared by oil-in-oil solvent evaporation method. Matrix tablets were prepared by wet and melt granulation techniques. Diclofenac sodium (DFS and diltiazem hydrochloride (DLTZ were used as model drugs. Mastic produced discrete and spherical microspheres with DLTZ and microcapsules with DFS. Particle size and drug loading of microparticles was in the range of 22–62 µm and 50–87%, respectively. Increase in mastic: drug ratio increased microparticle size, improved drug loading and decreased the drug release rate. Microparticles with gum: drug ratio of 2:1 could sustain DLTZ release up to 12 h and released 57% DFS in 12 h. Mastic produced tablets with acceptable pharmacotechnical properties. A 30% w/w of mastic in tablet could sustain DLTZ release for 5 h from wet granulation, and DFS release for 8 h and 11 h from wet and melt granulation, respectively. Results revealed that a natural gum mastic can be used successfully to formulate matrix tablets and microparticles for sustained drug release.

  10. Accidental hazardous material releases with human impacts in the United States: exploration of geographical distribution and temporal trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Hatice; Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Chermak, Christina

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the circumstances and geographic and temporal distributions of hazardous material releases and resulting human impacts in the United States. Releases with fatalities, injuries, and evacuations were identified from reports to the National Response Center between 1990 and 2008, correcting for data quality issues identified in previous studies. From more than 550,000 reports, 861 deaths, 16,348 injuries and 741,427 evacuations were identified. Injuries from releases of chemicals at fixed facilities and natural gas from pipelines have decreased whereas evacuations from petroleum releases at fixed facilities have increased. Results confirm recent advances in chemical and pipeline safety and suggest directions for further improvement including targeted training and inspections and adoption of inherently safer design principles.

  11. Polymeric materials and formulation technologies for modified-release tablet development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, J; Igartua, M; Hernández, R M; Pedraz, J L

    2009-11-01

    Over the last years significant advances have been made in the area of drug delivery with the development of modified-release (MR) dosage forms. The present review is divided into two parts, one dealing with technologies for the design of modified-release drug delivery tablets and the other with the use of synthetic and natural polymers that are capable of controlling drug release.

  12. Flightless mutants in the melon fly and oriental fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) and their possible role in the sterile insect release method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCombs, S.D.; Saul, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    Two new mutants that affect adult wing morphology and render the flies incapable of flight.sbd.bubble wing (bw) in the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), and small wing (sw) in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).sbd.are described. Both mutants have variable expression and are caused by autosomal, recessive genes. We discuss the possible role of these alleles in constructing genetic sex sorting systems to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the sterile insect release method

  13. [Influence of the fluoride releasing dental materials on the bacterial flora of dental plaque].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płuciennik, Małgorzata; Sakowska, Danuta; Krzemiński, Zbigniew; Piatowska, Danuta

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of influence of silver-free, fluor releasing dental materials on dental plaque bacteria quantity. 17 patients were included into the study. 51 restorations were placed following manufacturers recommendations. Following materials were used: conventional glassionomer Ketac-Molar ESPE, resin modified glassionomer Fuji II LC GC and fluor containing composite Charisma Heraeus Kulzer Class V restorations were placed in following teeth of upper and lower jaw: canines, first bicuspids, second bicuspids. Sound enamel was a control. After 10 weeks the 72 hours old dental plaque was collected from surface of restorations and control using sterile probe. Total amount of 68 dental plaques were investigated. Each plaque was placed on scaled and sterile aluminum foil. The moist weight of dental plaque was scaled. Dental plaque was moved into 7 ml 0.85% NaCl solution reduced by cystein chlorine hydrogen and disintegrated by ultrasounds (power:100 Watt, wave amplitude: 5 micorm). The suspension of dental plaque was serially diluted from 10(-4) to 10(-5) in sterile 0,85% NaCl solution, and seeded with amount of 0.1 ml on appropriate base. In dental plaque trials the amount of cariogenic bacteria was calculated--Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Neisseria, and also total amount of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was measured. Microbiologic studies were performed in Institute of Microbiology, Medical University, Łódź. Statistical analysis of collected data was accomplished. In 72 hours old dental plaques collected from the surfaces of Ketac -Molar, Fuji II LC, Charisma after 10 weeks since being placed into the class V cavity, results show no statistically significant differences in the amount of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Veillonella spp., Neisseria spp, in total amount of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and in the quantity proportion of Streptococcus mutans versus Streptococcus spp. in comparison

  14. ARAC: a centralized computer-assisted emergency planning, response, and assessment system for atmospheric releases of toxic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.; Knox, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an emergency planning, response, and assessment service, developed by the US Departments of Energy and Defense, and focused, thus far, on atmospheric releases of nuclear material. For the past 14 years ARAC has responded to over 150 accidents, potential accidents, and major exercises. The most notable accident responses are the COSMOS 954 reentry, the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) accident and subsequent purge of 85 Kr from the containment vessel, the recent UF 6 accident at the Kerr-McGee Plant, Gore, Oklahoma, and the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union. Based on experience in the area of emergency response, developed during the past 14 years, this paper describes the cost effectiveness and other advantages of a centralized emergency planning, response, and assessment service for atmospheric releases of nuclear material

  15. ARAC: a centralized computer assisted emergency planning, response, and assessment system for atmospheric releases of toxic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.; Knox, J.B.

    1986-10-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an emergency planning, response, and assessment service, developed by the US Departments of Energy and Defense, and focused, thus far, on atmospheric releases of nuclear material. For the past 14 years ARAC has responded to over 150 accidents, potential accidents, and major exercises. The most notable accident responses are the COSMOS 954 reentry, the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) accident and subsequent purge of 85 Kr from the containment vessel, the recent UF 6 accident at the Kerr-McGee Plant, Gore, Oklahoma, and the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union. Based on experience in the area of emergency response, developed during the past 14 years, this paper describes the cost effectiveness and other advantages of a centralized emergency planning, response, and assessment service for atmospheric releases of nuclear material

  16. Robotic Transversus Abdominis Release (TAR: is it possible to offer minimally invasive surgery for abdominal wall complex defects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA VITÓRIA FRANÇA DO AMARAL

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We describe the preliminary national experience and the early results of the use of robotic surgery to perform the posterior separation of abdominal wall components by the Transversus Abdominis Release (TAR technique for the correction of complex defects of the abdominal wall. We performed the procedures between 04/2/2015 and 06/15/2015 and the follow-up time was up to six months, with a minimum of two months. The mean surgical time was five hours and 40 minutes. Two patients required laparoscopic re-intervention, since one developed hernia by peritoneal migration of the mesh and one had mesh extrusion. The procedure proved to be technically feasible, with a still long surgical time. Considering the potential advantages of robotic surgery and those related to TAR and the results obtained when these two techniques are associated, we conclude that they seem to be a good option for the correction of complex abdominal wall defects.

  17. A guide to TIRION 4 - a computer code for calculating the consequences of releasing radioactive material to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, L.S.

    1978-12-01

    TIRION 4 is the most recent program in a series designed to calculate the consequences of releasing radioactive material to the atmosphere. A brief description of the models used in the program and full details of the various control cards necessary to run TIRION 4 are given. (author)

  18. Delayed Release from Proactive Interference with Meaningful Material: How Much Do We Remember After Reading Brief Prose Passages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Gary B.; Robbins, Donald

    1977-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted, investigating the buildup of and the release from proactive interference, in which the stimulus materials were brief prose passages about specific topics. Each passage was followed by a multiple-choice test, and then a final test on all the passages read was given. Implications of the data for standardized tests…

  19. Residual monomer content determination in some acrylic denture base materials and possibilities of its reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Milena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Polymethyl methacrylate is used for producing a denture basis. It is a material made by the polymerization process of methyl methacrylate. Despite of the polymerization type, there is a certain amount of free methyl methacrylate (residual monomer incorporated in the denture, which can cause irritation of the oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of residual monomer in four different denture base acrylic resins by liquid chromatography and the possibility of its reduction. Methods. After the polymerization, a postpolymerization treatment was performed in three different ways: in boiling water for thirty minutes, with 500 W microwaves for three minutes and in steam bath at 22º C for one to thirty days. Results. The obtained results showed that the amount of residual monomer is significantly higher in cold polymerizing acrylates (9.1-11%. The amount of residual monomer after hot polymerization was in the tolerance range (0.59- 0.86%. Conclusion. The obtained results denote a low content of residual monomer in the samples which have undergone postpolymerization treatment. A lower percent of residual monomer is established in samples undergone a hot polymerization.

  20. Transient Structures and Possible Limits of Data Recording in Phase-Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianbo; Vanacore, Giovanni M; Yang, Zhe; Miao, Xiangshui; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2015-07-28

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) represent the leading candidates for universal data storage devices, which exploit the large difference in the physical properties of their transitional lattice structures. On a nanoscale, it is fundamental to determine their performance, which is ultimately controlled by the speed limit of transformation among the different structures involved. Here, we report observation with atomic-scale resolution of transient structures of nanofilms of crystalline germanium telluride, a prototypical PCM, using ultrafast electron crystallography. A nonthermal transformation from the initial rhombohedral phase to the cubic structure was found to occur in 12 ps. On a much longer time scale, hundreds of picoseconds, equilibrium heating of the nanofilm is reached, driving the system toward amorphization, provided that high excitation energy is invoked. These results elucidate the elementary steps defining the structural pathway in the transformation of crystalline-to-amorphous phase transitions and describe the essential atomic motions involved when driven by an ultrafast excitation. The establishment of the time scales of the different transient structures, as reported here, permits determination of the possible limit of performance, which is crucial for high-speed recording applications of PCMs.

  1. On one possibility for application of new thermoelectric materials based on Ag2Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, Venceslav; Parvanov, Svetlin; Vachkov, Valeri

    2011-01-01

    The thermoelectric characteristics of Ag 2 Te and Ag 1,84 Cd 0,08 Te (solid solution based on Ag 2 Te) are investigated and analyzed. The main thermoelectric characteristics of the solid solution: α=118 μV/K; σ = 2230 S/cm and = 2,45.10 -2 W/(cm.K) ensure coefficient of thermoelectric efficiency z = 1,27. 10-3 K -1 (at 300 ), which increases this of the Ag 2 Te. A composition for commutation material is developed, which connects the N- and the P-branches of a single thermo element (52 wt. % In + 48 wt. % Sn) with melting temperature of 390 K. The possibility for application of the Ag 1,84 Cd 0,08 Te solid solution as N-branch of a thermo element in combination with the solid solution Bi 0,5 Sb 1,5 Te 3 (P-branch) is investigated. The thermo element guarantees values of z from 0,71.10 -3 to 1,27.10 -3 K -1 in the temperature interval 250 - 350 . The maximum z value is registered at 300 K (z = 1,27.10 -3 K -1 ). Keywords: Silver telluride, Solid solutions, Thermoelectric properties, Thermo element

  2. User's guide for the KBERT 1.0 code: For the knowledge-based estimation of hazards of radioactive material releases from DOE nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browitt, D.S.; Washington, K.E.; Powers, D.A.

    1995-07-01

    The possibility of worker exposure to radioactive materials during accidents at nuclear facilities is a principal concern of the DOE. The KBERT software has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories under DOE support to address this issue by assisting in the estimation of risks posed by accidents at chemical and nuclear facilities. KBERT is an acronym for Knowledge-Based system for Estimating hazards of Radioactive material release Transients. The current prototype version of KBERT focuses on calculation of doses and consequences to in-facility workers due to accidental releases of radioactivity. This report gives detailed instructions on how a user who is familiar with the design, layout and potential hazards of a facility can use KBERT to assess the risks to workers in that facility. KBERT is a tool that allows a user to simulate possible accidents and observe the predicted consequences. Potential applications of KBERT include the evaluation of the efficacy of evacuation practices, worker shielding, personal protection equipment and the containment of hazardous materials

  3. Modulation of active pharmaceutical material release from a novel 'tablet in capsule system' containing an effervescent blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohel, Mukesh C; Sumitra G, Manhapra

    2002-02-19

    The objective of the present study was to obtain programmed drug delivery from hard gelatin capsules containing a hydrophilic plug (HPMC or guar gum). The significance of factors such as type of plug (powder or tablet), plug thickness and the formulation of fill material on the release pattern of diltiazem HCl, a model drug, was investigated. The body portion of the hard gelatin capsules was cross-linked by the combined effect of formaldehyde and heat treatment. A linear relationship was observed between weight of HPMC K15M and log % drug released at 4 h from the capsules containing the plug in powder form. In order to accelerate the drug release after a lag time of 4 h, addition of an effervescent blend, NaHCO(3) and citric acid, in the capsules was found to be essential. The plugs of HPMC in tablet form, with or without a water soluble adjuvant (NaCl or lactose) were used for obtaining immediate drug release after the lag time. Sodium chloride did not cause significant influence on drug release whereas lactose favourably affected the drug release. The capsules containing HPMC K15M tablet plug (200 mg) and 35 mg effervescent blend in body portion of the capsule met the selection criteria of less than 10% drug release in 4 h and immediate drug release thereafter. It is further shown that the drug release was also dependant on the type of swellable hydrophilic agent (HPMC or guar gum) and molecular weight of HPMC (K15M or 20 cPs). The results reveal that programmed drug delivery can be obtained from hard gelatin capsules by systemic formulation approach.

  4. 32 CFR 705.6 - Releasing public information material to the media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.6 Releasing public... and/or as approved by the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs). (i) Overall responsibility for release of information rests with the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs). The Chief...

  5. Possibilities of avoidance and control of bacterial plant diseases when using pathogen-tested (certified) or - treated planting material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, J.; Wenneker, M.

    2002-01-01

    Testing of planting material for freedom from phytopathogenic bacteria is an important, although not exclusive, method for control of bacterial diseases of plants. Ideally, pathogen-free or pathogen-/disease-resistant planting material is desirable, but this situation is not always possible on a

  6. Digital Materials - Evaluation of the Possibilities of using Selected Hyperelastic Models to Describe Constitutive Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mańkowski, J.; Lipnicki, J.

    2017-08-01

    The authors tried to identify the parameters of numerical models of digital materials, which are a kind of composite resulting from the manufacture of the product in 3D printers. With the arrangement of several heads of the printer, the new material can result from mixing of materials with radically different properties, during the process of producing single layer of the product. The new material has properties dependent on the base materials properties and their proportions. Digital materials tensile characteristics are often non-linear and qualify to be described by hyperelastic materials models. The identification was conducted based on the results of tensile tests models, its various degrees coefficients of the polynomials to various degrees coefficients of the polynomials. The Drucker's stability criterion was also examined. Fourteen different materials were analyzed.

  7. Digital Materials – Evaluation of the Possibilities of using Selected Hyperelastic Models to Describe Constitutive Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mańkowski J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors tried to identify the parameters of numerical models of digital materials, which are a kind of composite resulting from the manufacture of the product in 3D printers. With the arrangement of several heads of the printer, the new material can result from mixing of materials with radically different properties, during the process of producing single layer of the product. The new material has properties dependent on the base materials properties and their proportions. Digital materials tensile characteristics are often non-linear and qualify to be described by hyperelastic materials models. The identification was conducted based on the results of tensile tests models, its various degrees coefficients of the polynomials to various degrees coefficients of the polynomials. The Drucker’s stability criterion was also examined. Fourteen different materials were analyzed.

  8. Polymer Industrial Floors - The Possibility of Using Secondary Raw Materials from Solar Panels

    OpenAIRE

    J. Kosikova; B. Vacenovska; M. Vyhnankova

    2014-01-01

    The paper reports on the subject of recycling and further use of secondary raw materials obtained from solar panels, which is becoming a very up to date topic in recent years. Recycling these panels is very difficult and complex, and the use of resulting secondary raw materials is still not fully resolved. Within the research carried out at the Brno University of Technology, new polymer materials used for industrial floors are being developed. Secondary raw materials are ...

  9. Possibility of Localized Corrosion of PWR primary side materials in oxidative decontamination condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Jung, Jun Young; Won, Huijun; Kim, Seon Byeong; Choi, Wangkyu; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Primary circuit of a PWR (radionuclides uptake in the inner oxide layer and oxide/metal interface occurred inevitably. Therefore, it is necessary to remove the inner oxide layer as well as the outer oxide layer to achieve excellent decontamination effects. It is known that the outer oxide layers are typically composed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. On the other hand, the inner oxide layers are composed of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Ni{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x})(Cr{sub 1-y}Fe{sub y}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, and FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Because of chromium in the trivalent oxidation state which is difficult to dissolve, the oxide layer has an excellent protectiveness and is hard to decontaminate. For the dissolution of chromium-rich oxide, there have been developed an alkaline permanganate (AP) or nitric permanganate (NP). A disadvantage of the AP process is the generation of a large volume of secondary waste. On the other hand, NP process is highly incompatible to the corrosion of the structure materials. In this study as a part of developing decontamination process, we investigated the corrosion behavior of the structure materials such as Inconel-600 and type 304 stainless steel in NP and AP oxidative decontamination conditions for the safe use of an oxidative phase in PWR system decontamination. The corrosion behavior was analyzed through the potential-pH equilibrium for the system of Cr-H{sub 2}O / Mn-H{sub 2}O at 90 .deg. C and potentiodynamic polarization in a typical AP and NP solution were evaluated. The AP or NP treated specimen surface was observed using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for an evaluation of the localized corrosion. The possibility of localized corrosion of PWR primary side materials under oxidative decontamination condition was evaluated using a potentiodynamic polarization technique, observation of localized corrosion morphology, and consideration of potential-pH diagrams at 90 .deg. C. From the results of these tests, we

  10. Halite as a Methane Sequestration Host: A Possible Explanation for Periodic Methane Release on Mars, and a Surface-accessible Source of Ancient Martian Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M. D.; Steele, Andrew; Hynek, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the hypothesis that halite may play a role in methane sequestration on the martian surface. In terrestrial examples, halite deposits sequester large volumes of methane and chloromethane. Also, examples of chloromethane-bearing, approximately 4.5 Ga old halite from the Monahans meteorite show that this system is very stable unless the halite is damaged. On Mars, methane may be generated from carbonaceous material trapped in ancient halite deposits and sequestered. The methane may be released by damaging its halite host; either by aqueous alteration, aeolian abrasion, heating, or impact shock. Such a scenario may help to explain the appearance of short-lived releases of methane on the martian surface. The methane may be of either biogenic or abiogenic origin. If this scenario plays a significant role on Mars, then martian halite deposits may contain samples of organic compounds dating to the ancient desiccation of the planet, accessible at the surface for future sample return missions.

  11. Investigation of mine and industry dumps in Lower Saxony (FRG) in relation to a possible release of natural radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, J.; Klein, H.

    1985-09-01

    More than 230 dumps of mines and industries in the country of Lower Saxony (FRG) were recorded, radiometrically measured, evaluated and some of them sampled. Most of the mine dumps belonged to old and smaller residues of the lead/zinc and iron ore mining while the largest depositions contain tailings of modern ore benificiation or fly ash disposal. The highest doses, up to 2 mSv/a, were found on the dumps of the redmud and phosphate-gypsum deposits. These are followed by fly ash and slag dumps which show doses between 1 and 2 mSv/a. The lowest doses were found on the dumps of the hydrothermal Pb/Zn and iron ore deposits, while the slag piles of the iron ore processing showed higher thorium values. The uranium-, Ra-226- and Pb-210 analyses of the deposited materials confirmed the radiometric results. The analysis of seepage and gallery waters showed only a small number of values exceeding the derived drinking water concentrations. The examination of nearly all mineral deposition in Lower Saxony have clearly shown that primary radioecological impacts can be excluded, which might be not the case when the deposited material undergoes a recycling process. (orig.) [de

  12. Release of radioisotopes and activated materials from nuclear installations and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses the problems of release of items from facilities and installations where radiation-based activities have been carried out. Several situations are reviewed and their release problems are discussed in detail. Particular attention is devoted to the assessment of the activity of the items to be released. A correct assessment of the activity will help the decision about the final use of the items removed from the radiation-related facility, either re-use, entering the public market, recycling, disposal and storage under different procedures. Even the final destination of the building which hosted the facility needs to be decided on the basis of an accurate assessment of the residual activity. The assessment of the activity, besides being fundamental in guaranteeing a safe approach to the procedures related to the release may result in a substantial profit. This is the case of items whose level of activity is so low that they can be put on the public market, reused or recycled for final product subject to very stringent radiation safety requirements. It will be shown that detector techniques play a fundamental role in the release process. In particular, the low-level counting techniques are fundamental in establishing whether or not the unrestrained release is feasible or not

  13. Radioactive material releases in the nuclear fuel cycle - Recent experience and improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Allsop, P.J.; Anderson, R.W.; Boss, C.R.; Frost, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle involves a wide range of activities and technologies from the mining of uranium, to the production of electricity and radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications, to the reprocessing and recycling of used fuel, to decommissioning and waste disposal. Worker exposures and releases to the environment are carefully controlled in: (a) all stages of uranium mining, refining and fuel fabrication, where occupational exposures and releases have decreased while production has increased; (b) the operation of nuclear power plants, where occupational exposures and releases have decreased as reactor vendors evolve their products and reactor operators optimize their procedures; (c) fuel reprocessing facilities in the U.K. and France, where occupational exposures and releases have decreased while the amount of fuel processed has increased; and in (d) decommissioning nuclear facilities and waste management activities. The nuclear industry's recent record of achievement in controlling its releases and ensuring the radiological protection of its employees has been excellent. It is clear that releases and occupational exposures from modem nuclear facilities of all types contribute negligibly to the radiation environment to which all biota are exposed. But the general public seems not to appreciate the low environmental impact of nuclear activities. The future of nuclear power and of other applications of nuclear technology applications in medicine, in agriculture and in industry will depend on maintaining a high standard of performance so that the public and decision makers can be assured that the industry is safe. (author)

  14. Influence of PCL on the material properties of collagen based biocomposites and in vitro evaluation of drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanungo, Ivy; Fathima, Nishter Nishad; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2013-01-01

    Formulation of biodegradable collagen–poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) based biomaterials for the sustained release of insulin is the main objective of the present work. PCL has been employed to modulate the physico-chemical behavior of collagen to control the drug release. Designed formulations were employed to statistically optimize insulin release parameter profile at different collagen to PCL molar ratios. Circular dichroism, thermoporometry, FTIR, impedance and scanning electron microscopy techniques have been employed to investigate the effect of PCL on hydration dynamics of the collagen molecule, which in turn changes the dissolution parameters of the drug from the systems. Drug entrapment efficiency has been found to be maximum for collagen to PCL molar ratio of 1:2 (> 90%). In vitro dissolution test reveals that 99% of the drug was released from composite at collagen to PCL molar ratio of 1:3 and 1:4 within 2 h, which indicates that hydrophobicity of the matrix results in weak interaction between lipophilic drug and carrier materials. The least burst release was observed for collagen to PCL molar ratio at 1:2 as synergistic interactions between collagen and PCL was maximum at that particular polymer–polymer ratios. The drug release data indicates super case-II transport of drug (n > 1.0). - Graphical abstract: Collagen–poly-ε-caprolactone based biomaterials for the sustained release of insulin were formulated. Circular dichroism, thermoporometry, FTIR, impedance and scanning electron microscopy techniques have been employed to elucidate the effect of PCL on the structure of the collagen and in vitro drug release. The drug release data fitted to the kinetic model indicates super case-II transport due to the combination of diffusion and polymer relaxation/dissolution (n > 1.0). - Highlights: • Poly-ε-caprolactone influences physico-chemical behavior of collagen. • Poly-ε-caprolactone influences in vitro drug release mechanism from biocomposites.

  15. Chemical form of tritium released from solid breeder materials and the influences of it on a bred tritium recovery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukubo, Y.; Nishikawa, M.; Nishida, Y.; Kinjyo, T.; Tanifuji, Takaaki; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Enoeda, Mikio

    2004-01-01

    The ratio of HTO in total tritium was measured at release of the bred tritium to the purge gas with hydrogen using the thermal release after irradiation method, where neutron irradiation was performed at JRR-3 reactor in JAERI or KUR reactor in Kyoto University. It is experimentally confirmed in this study that not a small portion of bred tritium is released to the purge gas in the form of HTO form ceramic breeder materials even when hydrogen is added to the purge gas. The chemical composition is to be decided by the competitive reaction at the grain surface of a ceramic breeder material where desorption reaction, isotope exchange reaction 1, isotope exchange reaction 2 and water formation reaction are considered to take part. Observation in this study implies that it is necessary to have a bred tritium recovery system applicable for both HT and HTO form to recover whole bred tritium. The chemical composition also decides the amount of tritium transferable to the cooling water of the electricity generation system through the structural material in the blanket system. Permeation behavior of tritium through some structural materials at various conditions are also discussed. (author)

  16. Ciprofloxacin-intercalated Zinc Layered Hydroxides Hybrid Material: Synthesis and in Vitro Release Profiles of an Antibiotic Compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Zobir Hussein; Mohd Zobir Hussein; Stanslas, J.; Abdul Halim Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    The intriguing anion exchange properties of layered hydroxides salts, combined with its high layer charge density have provided strong motivations for the potential use of the inorganic layered host material in drug delivery applications. Ciprofloxacin (CFX), a wide spectrum antibiotic has been anion exchanged with nitrate of zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZHN), which belongs to the LHS family, resulted in the expansion of the basal spacing from 9.92 Amstrom of ZHN to 21.5 Angstrom of ZCFX, the obtained hybrid material. Other characterizations, such as Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FTIR), CHNS analysis and TGA/ DTG have further corroborated this finding. Electron microscopy study reveals the plate-like structure of the nano hybrid material. The in vitro release of CFX was performed in phosphate saline buffer at pH 7.4 and it behaves in a slow and sustained release profile over a period of 72 hours. This study suggests that ZHN, which demonstrates a controlled release behavior, could be a potential host material in the drug delivery applications. (author)

  17. Analog specificity of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the central nervous system: possible clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, E.F.; Engel, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    TRH has rapid-onset (30 sec), slow-offset (1-12 days) clinical benefit in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other motor neuron disorders. This benefit is probably receptor-mediated and may have at least 2 components. To obtain a better understanding of the various responses to TRH of the spinal lower motor neurons (LMNs) in patients, and possibly to help guide selection of additional therapeutic agents, the authors utilized rat CNS (spinal-cord and brain membranes) to analyze the ability of certain molecules to inhibit specific binding of [ 3 H]methyl TRH ([ 3 H]MeTRH) to the TRH receptor. They found: a) lack of high-affinity binding of the TRH-analog DN-1417 by spinal-cord and brain TRH receptor, despite its known strong TRH-like action physiologically on LMNs; b) lack of high-affinity binding of the TRH-product cyclo(His-Pro) by spinal cord and brain TRH receptor despite its having some strong TRH-like physiologic actions on the CNS; and c) lack of any identifiable high-affinity receptor for cyclo(His-Pro) in spinal cord and brain. From these data the authors hypothesize that the acute transmitter-like action of DN-1417, TRH, and possibly other TRH-analogs and products on LMNs is via a non-TRH receptor, such as an amine or amino acid neurotransmitter receptor, e.g. a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor. They further postulate that the CNS TRH-receptor may modulate a trophic-like influence of TRH on LMNs

  18. On the possibility of multiple utilization of Bowen's Kale for neutron activation analysis of biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinov, V.M.; Lazarova, M.S.; Mihajlov, M.I.; Apostolov, D.

    1977-01-01

    The results of investigations related to the multiple utilization of Bowen's Kale in developing neutron-activation methods for determining microelements in biological materials carried out in recent years are presented. Bowen's Kale might be used as: (1) experimental material in the development of a method and its verification, i.e. as a test for biological materials; (2) a material where experimental conditions might be optimized; (3) a material for investigating the accuracy, reproducibility and the limit of proof at experimental conditions already defined; (4) a monitor; (5) a multielement volume reference standard for a number of microelements during their simultaneous determination and (6) a standard for verifying the authenticity of the results obtained. In this manner, a reliable criterion for comparison of the potentialities, the accuracy, reproducibility, the limits of proof and the authenticity of the neutron-activation methods of determining microelements in biological materials is introduced. (author)

  19. Source term estimation and the isotopic ratio of radioactive material released from the WIPP repository in New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, P.

    2016-01-01

    lifted its lid to allow release of waste into the underground air. - Highlights: • February 14, 2014 radiation release from the Nation's only TRU waste repository is discussed. • Environmental monitoring results in the vicinity of the WIPP site are presented. • Source term estimation of the radioactive material released is assessed. • The isotopic ratio of the radioactive material release from the WIPP is discussed.

  20. Assessment of the Possibility of Applying Ceramic Materials in Common Rail Injection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Bor

    2018-03-01

    The second part concerns analysis conduct by means of the finite element method and a specialized simulation environment, based on comparing ceramic materials and bearing steel. This comparison was conducted by using a CAD strength model of a piston in a specific application, being a pump with CP3 design. Simulation results confirmed the beneficial qualities of ceramic materials – the level of material deformation is lower for ceramics in comparison to steel.

  1. Bone substitute material composition and morphology differentially modulate calcium and phosphate release through osteoclast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, A; Staubwasser, M; Dirk, C; Keilig, L; Bourauel, C; Götz, W; Jäger, A; Reichert, C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the material composition and cell-mediated remodelling of different calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes. Osteoclasts were cultivated on bone substitutes (Cerabone, Maxresorb, and NanoBone) for up to 5 days. Bafilomycin A1 addition served as the control. To determine cellular activity, the supernatant content of calcium and phosphate was measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Cells were visualized on the materials by scanning electron microscopy. Material composition and surface characteristics were assessed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Osteoclast-induced calcium and phosphate release was material-specific. Maxresorb exhibited the highest ion release to the medium (P = 0.034; calcium 40.25mg/l day 5, phosphate 102.08 mg/l day 5) and NanoBone the lowest (P = 0.021; calcium 8.43 mg/l day 5, phosphate 15.15 mg/l day 5); Cerabone was intermediate (P = 0.034; calcium 16.34 mg/l day 5, phosphate 30.6 mg/l day 5). All investigated materials showed unique resorption behaviours. The presented methodology provides a new perspective on the investigation of bone substitute biodegradation, maintaining the material-specific micro- and macrostructure. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  3. The cleanup of releases of radioactive materials from commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites: Whose jurisdiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartnett, C.

    1994-01-01

    There exists an overlap between the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act (open-quotes CERCLAclose quotes) and the Atomic Energy Act (open-quotes AEAclose quotes) regarding the cleanup of releases of radioactive materials from commercial low-level radioactive waste sites. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (open-quotes NRCclose quotes) and Agreement States have jurisdiction under the AEA, and the Environmental Protection Agency (open-quotes EPAclose quotes) has jurisdiction pursuant to CERCLA. This overlapping jurisdiction has the effect of imposing CERCLA liability on parties who have complied with AEA regulations. However, CERCLA was not intended to preempt existing legislation. This is evidenced by the federally permitted release exemption, which explicitly exempts releases from CERCLA liability pursuant to an AEA license. With little guidance as to the applicability of this exemption, it is uncertain whether CERCLA's liability is broad enough to supersede the Atomic Energy Act. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the overlapping jurisdiction for the cleanup of releases of radioactive materials from commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites with particular emphasis on the cleanup at the Maxey Flats, West Valley and Sheffield sites

  4. Thermophilic methanogenic Archaea in compost material: occurrence, persistence and possible mechanisms for their distribution to other environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thummes, Kathrin; Schäfer, Jenny; Kämpfer, Peter; Jäckel, Udo

    2007-12-01

    Since compost is widely used as soil amendment and the fact that during the processing of compost material high amounts of microorganisms are released into the air, we investigated whether compost may act as a carrier for thermophilic methanogens to temperate soils. All eight investigated compost materials showed a clear methane production potential between 0.01 and 0.98 micromol CH(4) g dw(-1)h(-1) at 50 degrees C. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and cloning analysis indicated the presence of Methanosarcina thermophila, Methanoculleus thermophilus, and Methanobacterium formicicum. Bioaerosols collected during the turning of a compost pile showed both a highly similar SSCP profile compared to the corresponding compost material and clear methane production during anoxic incubation in selective medium at 50 degrees C. Both observations indicated a considerable release of thermophilic methanogens into the air. To analyse the persistence of compost-borne thermophilic methanogens in temperate oxic soils, we therefore studied their potential activity in compost and compost/soil mixtures, which was brought to a meadow soil, as well as in an agricultural soil fertilised with compost. After 24h anoxic incubation at 50 degrees C, all samples containing compost showed a clear methanogenic activity, even 1 year after application. In combination with the in vitro observed resilience of the compost-borne methanogens against desiccation and UV radiation we assume that compost material acts as an effective carrier for the distribution of thermophilic methanogens by fertilisation and wind.

  5. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from boiling water reactors (BWR-GALE Code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangart, R.L.; Bell, L.G.; Boegli, J.S.; Burke, W.C.; Lee, J.Y.; Minns, J.L.; Stoddart, P.G.; Weller, R.A.; Collins, J.T.

    1978-12-01

    The calculational procedures described in the report reflect current NRC staff practice. The methods described will be used in the evaluation of applications for construction permits and operating licenses docketed after January 1, 1979, until this NUREG is revised as a result of additional staff review. The BWR-GALE (Boiling Water Reactor Gaseous and Liquid Effluents) Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the release of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents from boiling water reactors (BWRs). The calculations are based on data generated from operating reactors, field tests, laboratory tests, and plant-specific design considerations incorporated to reduce the quantity of radioactive materials that may be released to the environment

  6. A Self-Peeling Vat for Improved Release Capabilities During DLP Materials Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, David Bue; Zhang, Yang; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    2016-01-01

    for an eased release of the manufactured part from the vat by means of a flexible membrane system. A membrane of fluorinated ethylene polymer will through elastic deformation automatically peel off the part as the part is lifted during layer changes. Peeling has been qualified by means of a truncated inverted...... cone as test geometry. As the cross-sectional diameter of the cone increase throughout the build-job, the geometry will release from the glass based build platform at the point where the peeling force exceed the adhesion force between platform and part. At failure point the lateral surface area...... of the top and bottom of the truncated cone is used as a measure of the performance of the vat with respect to release-capability. This has been tested at increasing manufacturing rates. The new self-peeling vat outperformed industrial state-of-the-art vats by 814% percent....

  7. Possibilities for the Reuse of Steel from Decommissioning. Selected Scenarios in the Process of Proposal and Evaluation of Manufacturing Processes for Conditional Released Steel and their Application in General and Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezak, P.; Daniska, V.; Ondra, F.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    Conditional release of steels from NPP decommissioning enables controlled reuse of non-negligible volumes of steels. For proposal of scenarios for steel reuse, it is needed to identify and evaluate partial elementary activities of the whole process from conditional release of steels, manufacturing of various elements up to realisation of scenarios. For scenarios of reuse of conditionally released steel the products of steel, as steel reinforcements, rails, profiles and sheets for technical constructions such as bridges, tunnels, railways and other constructions which guarantee the long-term properties over the periods of 50-100 years are considered. The idea offers also the possibility for using this type of steel for particular technical constructions, directly usable in nuclear facilities. The paper presents the review of activities for manufacturing of various steel construction elements made from conditionally released steels and their use in general and also in the nuclear industry. As the starting material for manufacturing of steel elements ingots or just fragments of steel after dismantling in controlled area can be used. These input materials are re-melted in industrial facilities in order to achieve the required physical and chemical characteristics. Mostly used technique for manufacturing of the steel construction elements is rolling. As the products considered in scenarios for reuse of conditional released steels are bars for reinforcement concrete, rolled steel sheets and other rolled profiles. For use in the nuclear industry it offers the possibility for casting of thick-walled steel containers for long-term storage of high level radioactive components in integral storage and also assembly of stainless steel tanks for storing of liquid radioactive waste. Lists of elementary activities which are needed for manufacturing of selected steel elements are elaborated. These elementary activities are then the base for detailed safety evaluation of external

  8. Fiber-reinforced plastic composites. Possibilities and limitations of applications as machine-construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophey, Lothar

    1988-01-01

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite structural materials in engineering applications is discussed in a survey of currently available technology and future prospects. The ongoing rapid growth in the use of these materials is described, and the criteria to be applied in selecting base materials, lamination schemes, fasteners, and processing methods are examined in detail and illustrated with graphs, diagrams, flow charts, and drawings. A description of a sample application (comparing the properties of steel, CFRP, SiC-reinforced Al, CFRP/steel, and CFRP/Al automobile piston rods) is included.

  9. Impact of physicochemical properties of porous silica materials conjugated with dexamethasone via pH-responsive hydrazone bond on drug loading and release behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numpilai, Thanapha; Witoon, Thongthai; Chareonpanich, Metta; Limtrakul, Jumras

    2017-02-01

    The conjugation of dexamethasone (DEX) onto modified-porous silica materials via a pH-responsive hydrazone bond has been reported to be highly efficient method to specifically deliver the DEX to diseased sites. However, the influence of physicochemical properties of porous silica materials has not yet been fully understood. In this paper, the impact of pore sizes, particle sizes and silanol contents on surface functionalization, drug loading and release behavior of porous silica materials conjugated with dexamethasone via pH-responsive hydrazone bond was investigated. The grafting density was found to relate to the number of silanol groups on the surface of porous silica materials. The particle size and macropores of the porous silica materials played an vital role on the drug loading and release behavior. Although the porous silica materials with larger particle sizes possessed a lower grafting density, a larger amount of drug loading could be achieved. Moreover, the porous silica materials with larger particle sizes showed a slower release rate of DEX due to a longer distance for cleaved DEX diffusion out of pores. DEX release rate exhibited pH-dependent, sustained release. At pH 4.5, the amount of DEX release within 10 days could be controlled in the range of 12.74-36.41%, depending on the host material. Meanwhile, less than 1.5% of DEX was released from each of type of the porous silica materials at pH 7.4. The results of silica dissolution suggested that the degradation of silica matrix did not significantly affect the release rate of DEX. In addition, the kinetic modeling studies revealed that the DEX releases followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model with a release exponent (n) ranged from 0.3 to 0.47, indicating a diffusion-controlled release mechanism.

  10. Building materials as a source of a possible radiation exposure of the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pensko, J.; Burkart, W.

    1986-12-01

    Two main pathways of exposure contribute to the human radiation exposure indoors: external whole body irradiation from gamma-rays originating from the walls, and exposure of lung tissue by alpha-rays emitted by radon daughters present in the inhaled air. Natural radioactive elements present in building materials produce both kinds of radioactive exposure. Uranium, thorium and potassium are sources of gamma radiations. Materials containing radium can create an alpha-radiation hazard for the human respiratory system through the exhalation of radon from room surfaces. Measurements of the natural radioactivity of building materials made in several European countries are reviewed. A preliminary assessment of the radioactivity content of potentially hazardous materials on the Swiss market shows elevated levels in imported phosphogypsum and tuff. (author)

  11. On possibility of fabrication of monolith composite materials on niobium carbide base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploshkin, V.V.; Ul'yanina, I.Yu.; Filonenko, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt was made to fabricate the composite material on niobium carbide base possessing the elevated heat resistance, erosion and chemical resistance in special media, as well as capable of withstanding sufficient thermal shocks. Powder of niobium carbide of 10 μm fraction was used as base material, the powder of pure copper of 10...12 μm fraction - as binder. It was shown that samples of composite mateiral on niobium carbide base fabricated by the method of hydrostatic pressing possessed the minimal porosity as compared to samples fabricated by usual methods of powder metallurgy. The basic phases of composite material-copper and niobium carbide - distribute uniformly over sample cross-section and don't interact with each other under any conditions. The fabricated composite material possesses sufficient thermal shock resistance and isn't subjected to brittle fracture

  12. Release Mathematical Model of Active Agent from Packaging Material into Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuling Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active packaging is an innovative packaging technology by which active compounds are released from the package to enhance the quality and microbial safety for a wide range of foods. The problem of active ingredient release through the bilayer packaging food system is studied from a theoretical viewpoint. A release model is built to provide predictions of concentration and amount of active ingredient. The equations are built based on Fickian diffusion, and numerical solutions are obtained through finite difference. Different diffusion coefficients DP and DC of active ingredient in different packaging layers, partition coefficient kCP at the interface of outer layer and inner layer, partition coefficient kFC at the interface of inner layer and food, and mass transfer coefficient hm at the interface of inner layer and food are considered in the model. The effects of kCP, thicknesses of outer layer and inner layer, CP0, DP, DC, kFC, and hm on the release are discussed. Corresponding conclusions and analysis are given.

  13. Possibilities for specific utilization of material properties for an optimal part design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, T.; Gerlach, J.; Roettger, R.; Kuhn, P.

    2017-09-01

    High-strength, cold-formable steels offer great potential for meeting cost and safety requirements in the automotive industry. In view of strengths of up to 1200 MPa now attainable, certain aspects need to be analysed and evaluated in advance in the development process using these materials. In addition to early assessment of crash properties, it is also highly important to adapt the forming process to match the material potential. The steel making companies have widened their portfolios of cold-rolled dual-phase steels well beyond the conventional high-strength steels. There are added new grades which offer a customized selection of high energy absorption, deformation resistance or enhanced cold-forming properties. In this article the necessary components for material modelling for finite element simulation are discussed. Additionally the required tests for material model calibration are presented and the potentials of the thyssenkrupp Steel material data base are introduced. Besides classical tensile tests at different angles to rolling direction and the forming limit curve, the hydraulic bulge test is now available for a wide range of modern steel grades. Using the conventional DP-K®60/98 and the DP-K®700Y980T with higher yield strength the method for calibrating yield locus, hardening and formability is given. With reference to the examples of an A-pillar reinforcement and different crash tests the procedure is shown how the customer can evaluate an optimal steel grade for specific requirements. Although the investigated materials have different yield strengths, no large differences in the forming process between the two steel grades can be found. However some advantages of the high-yield grade can be detected in crash performance depending on the specific boundary and loading conditions.

  14. Theories of TL systems: Failures, successes, conflicts, trends: Insights into possible future materials and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, Y. S.; Belaish, Y.; Oster, L.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper some of the many theoretical models dealing with characteristics of TL materials are discussed. Special attention is given to some of the models dealing with the effects of ionisation density, that is Modified Track Structure Theory (MTST) and Micro-dosimetric Track Structure Theory (MTT) for the calculation of Heavy Charged Particle relative TL efficiencies, as well as solid-state models based on conduction band/valence band theory. Failures, successes, conflicts and trends are highlighted as well as a peek into future avenues of research for dosimetric TL materials. (authors)

  15. UV-screening chitosan nanocontainers: increasing the photostability of encapsulated materials and controlled release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anumansirikul, Nattaporm; Wittayasuporn, Mayura; Klinubol, Patcharawalai; Tachaprutinun, A; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason P

    2008-01-01

    Methyl ether terminated poly(ethylene glycol)-4-methoxycinnamoylphthaloylchitosan (PCPLC), a UV absorptive polymer, and methyl ether terminated poly(ethylene glycol)-phthaloylchitosan (PPLC) were synthesized, characterized and self-assembled into stable water-dispersible spherical nanoparticles. The encapsulation of a model compound, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC), was carried out to give particles with 67% (w/w) EHMC loading. The E to Z photoisomerization of EHMC encapsulated inside both particles was monitored and compared to non-encapsulated EHMC. Minimal E to Z photoisomerization was observed when EHMC was encapsulated in PCPLC particles prepared from a polymer with a maximum degree of 4-methoxycinnamoyl substitution. The results indicated that the grafted UVB absorptive chromophore, 4-methoxycinnamoyl moieties, situated at the shell of PCPLC nanoparticles acted as a UV-filtering barrier, protecting the encapsulated EHMC from the UVB radiation, thus minimizing its photoisomerization. In vitro experiments revealed the pH-dependent controlled release of EHMC from PCPLC and PPLC particles. Ex vivo experiments, using a Franz diffusion cell with baby mouse skin, indicated that neither PPLC nor PCPLC particles could penetrate the skin into the receptor medium after a 24 h topical application. When applied on the baby mouse skin, both EHMC-encapsulated PPLC and EHMC-encapsulated PCPLC showed comparable controlled releases of the EHMC. The released EHMC could transdermally penetrate the baby mouse skin

  16. UV-screening chitosan nanocontainers: increasing the photostability of encapsulated materials and controlled release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumansirikul, Nattaporm; Wittayasuporn, Mayura; Klinubol, Patcharawalai; Tachaprutinun, A.; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason P.

    2008-05-01

    Methyl ether terminated poly(ethylene glycol)-4-methoxycinnamoylphthaloylchitosan (PCPLC), a UV absorptive polymer, and methyl ether terminated poly(ethylene glycol)-phthaloylchitosan (PPLC) were synthesized, characterized and self-assembled into stable water-dispersible spherical nanoparticles. The encapsulation of a model compound, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC), was carried out to give particles with 67% (w/w) EHMC loading. The E to Z photoisomerization of EHMC encapsulated inside both particles was monitored and compared to non-encapsulated EHMC. Minimal E to Z photoisomerization was observed when EHMC was encapsulated in PCPLC particles prepared from a polymer with a maximum degree of 4-methoxycinnamoyl substitution. The results indicated that the grafted UVB absorptive chromophore, 4-methoxycinnamoyl moieties, situated at the shell of PCPLC nanoparticles acted as a UV-filtering barrier, protecting the encapsulated EHMC from the UVB radiation, thus minimizing its photoisomerization. In vitro experiments revealed the pH-dependent controlled release of EHMC from PCPLC and PPLC particles. Ex vivo experiments, using a Franz diffusion cell with baby mouse skin, indicated that neither PPLC nor PCPLC particles could penetrate the skin into the receptor medium after a 24 h topical application. When applied on the baby mouse skin, both EHMC-encapsulated PPLC and EHMC-encapsulated PCPLC showed comparable controlled releases of the EHMC. The released EHMC could transdermally penetrate the baby mouse skin.

  17. Plasma-arc reactor for production possibility of powdered nano-size materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadzhiyski, V; Mihovsky, M; Gavrilova, R

    2011-01-01

    Nano-size materials of various chemical compositions find increasing application in life nowadays due to some of their unique properties. Plasma technologies are widely used in the production of a range of powdered nano-size materials (metals, alloys, oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides, carbonitrides, etc.), that have relatively high melting temperatures. Until recently, the so-called RF-plasma generated in induction plasma torches was most frequently applied. The subject of this paper is the developments of a new type of plasma-arc reactor, operated with transferred arc system for production of disperse nano-size materials. The new characteristics of the PLASMALAB reactor are the method of feeding the charge, plasma arc control and anode design. The disperse charge is fed by a charge feeding system operating on gravity principle through a hollow cathode of an arc plasma torch situated along the axis of a water-cooled wall vertical tubular reactor. The powdered material is brought into the zone of a plasma space generated by the DC rotating transferred plasma arc. The arc is subjected to Auto-Electro-Magnetic Rotation (AEMR) by an inductor serially connected to the anode circuit. The anode is in the form of a water-cooled copper ring. It is mounted concentrically within the cylindrical reactor, with its lower part electrically insulated from it. The electric parameters of the arc in the reactor and the quantity of processed charge are maintained at a level permitting generation of a volumetric plasma discharge. This mode enables one to attain high mean mass temperature while the processed disperse material flows along the reactor axis through the plasma zone where the main physico-chemical processes take place. The product obtained leaves the reactor through the annular anode, from where it enters a cooling chamber for fixing the produced nano-structure. Experiments for AlN synthesis from aluminium power and nitrogen were carried out using the plasma reactor

  18. Materials interactions test methods to measure radionuclide release from waste forms under repository-relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickert, R.G.; Erikson, R.L.; Shade, J.W.

    1984-10-01

    At the request of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project, the Materials Characterization Center has collected and developed a set of procedures into a waste form compliance test method (MCC-14.4). The purpose of the test is to measure the steady-state concentrations of specified radionuclides in solutions contacting a waste form material. The test method uses a crushed waste form and basalt material suspended in a synthetic basalt groundwater and agitated for up to three months at 150 0 C under anoxic conditions. Elemental and radioisotopic analyses are made on filtered and unfiltered aliquots of the solution. Replicate experiments are performed and simultaneous tests are conducted with an approved test material (ATM) to help ensure precise and reliable data for the actual waste form material. Various features of the test method, equipment, and test conditions are reviewed. Experimental testing using actinide-doped borosilicate glasses are also discussed. 9 references, 2 tables

  19. Microscopic properties of lithium, sodium, and magnesium battery anode materials related to possible dendrite growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jäckle, Markus; Groß, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Lithium and magnesium exhibit rather different properties as battery anode materials with respect to the phenomenon of dendrite formation which can lead to short-circuits in batteries. Diffusion processes are the key to understanding structure forming processes on surfaces. Therefore, we have determined adsorption energies and barriers for the self-diffusion on Li and Mg using periodic density functional theory calculations and contrasted the results to Na which is also regarded as a promising electrode material in batteries. According to our calculations, magnesium exhibits a tendency towards the growth of smooth surfaces as it exhibits lower diffusion barriers than lithium and sodium, and as an hcp metal it favors higher-coordinated configurations in contrast to the bcc metals Li and Na. These characteristic differences are expected to contribute to the unequal tendencies of these metals with respect to dendrite growth

  20. Release of radioactive materials in simulation test of a postulated solvent fire in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, G.; Hashimoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on small- and large-scale fire tests performed to examine the adequacy of a safety evaluation method for a solvent fire in the extraction process of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The test objectives were to obtain information on the confinement of radioactive materials during a 30% tri-n-butyl phosphate-n-dodecane fire while air ventilation is operating in the cell. The rates of release of cesium, strontium, cerium, ruthenium, and uranium from a burning solvent were determined. The quantities of species released were obtained from the solvent burning rate, smoke generation rate, partition coefficients of species between solvent and water, and coefficients of species entrainment to atmosphere in cell

  1. Strontium-Doped Hematite as a Possible Humidity Sensing Material for Soil Water Content Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Tulliani, Jean-Marc; Baroni, Chiara; Zavattaro, Laura; Grignani, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the sensing behavior of Sr-doped hematite for soil water content measurement. The material was prepared by solid state reaction from commercial hematite and strontium carbonate heat treated at 900 °C. X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry were used for microstructural characterization of the synthesized powder. Sensors were then prepared by uniaxially pressing and by screen-printing, on an alumina substrate, the prep...

  2. The possibilities of searching for new materials based on isocationic analogs of ZnBVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirovskaya, I. A.; Mironova, E. V.; Kosarev, B. A.; Yureva, A. V.; Ekkert, R. V.

    2017-08-01

    Acid-base properties of chalcogenides - analogs of ZnBVI - were investigated in detail by modern techniques. The regularities of their composition-dependent changes were set, these regularities correlating with the dependencies "bulk physicochemical property - composition". The main reason for such correlations was found, facilitating the search for new materials of corresponding sensors. In this case, it was the sensors for basic gases impurities.

  3. Investigation of possibility of recovery nonferrous metals and producing building materials from copper-nickel smelterslag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlov A.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pelletized slag of copper-nickel smelter ("Pechenganikel" combine, "Kola MMC" JSC has been investigated as a potential technogenic deposit. It has been shown that nonferrous metals can be re-extracted from slag using flotation. The work presents the results of laboratory simulation of heap leaching of non-ferrous metals. Ceramic building materials from slag-based feed have been produced and their main properties have been studied

  4. High strain rate characterization of soft materials: past, present and possible futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siviour, Clive

    2015-06-01

    The high strain rate properties of low impedance materials have long been of interest to the community: the very first paper by Kolsky on his eponymous bars included data from man-made polymers and natural rubber. However, it has also long been recognized that characterizing soft or low impedance specimens under dynamic loading presents a number of challenges, mainly owing to the low sound speed in, and low stresses supported by, these materials. Over the past 20 years, significant progress has been made in high rate testing techniques, including better experimental design, more sensitive data acquisition and better understanding of specimen behavior. Further, a new generation of techniques, in which materials are characterized using travelling waves, rather than in a state of static equilibrium, promise to turn those properties that were previously a drawback into an advantage. This paper will give an overview of the history of high rate characterization, the current state of the art after an exciting couple of decades and some of the techniques currently being developed that have the potential to offer increased quality data in the future.

  5. Lithium-Catalyzed Carbon Aerogel and Its Possible Application in Energy Storage Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszewski, Mateusz; Szatkowska, Elżbieta; Koszorek, Andrzej

    2017-07-01

    A lithium-based catalyst for carbon aerogel compounds and carbon nanotubes synthesis was used. Lithium hydroxide-catalyzed and CNT-modified carbon aerogel was compared to traditionally synthesized sodium carbonate-catalyzed carbon aerogel, as well as to the same material modified with CNT to evaluate the real effect of lithium hydroxide addition. Enhancement in the specific surface area from 498 m2/g to 786 m2/g and significant change in pore size distribution were observed. Low temperature, supercritical drying in carbon dioxide was used to prepare an organic aerogel with subsequent pyrolysis in an inert gas flow to convert it into carbon aerogel. The as-obtained material was examined with respect to energy storage applications, i.e. symmetric hybrid supercapacitors. It was shown that lithium hydroxide was responsible for shorter gelation time, increased specific surface area, and a greater number of micropores within the structure. For both reference materials prepared using sodium carbonate, quite different data were recorded. It was presented that the proper choice of carbon matrix should combine both high specific surface area and appropriate pore size distribution. High surface area and a relatively large number of micropores were responsible for specific capacity loss.

  6. Dentin matrix gelatin (DMG) as a possible "universal" grafting material in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, T R; Westbury, L; Tillman, J

    1982-01-01

    The ideal of periodontal surgery is the total regeneration of the lost periodontal complex. A promising new osseous grafting material is Dental Matrix Gelation (DMG). DMG was prepared by a method similar to that of Conover and Urist (1979). This consisted of sequential extraction in 1:1 chloroform-methanol, 25 degrees C for 1 hour; 0.6 N HCl, 2 degrees C for 24 hours with constant agitation; 2 M CaCl2, 2 degrees C for 1 hour; 0.5 M EDTA pH 7.4, 2 degrees C for 1 hour; washed in distilled water 1 hour. Twelve rats were anesthetized, had heads shaved, midline flaps reflected, and 2 mm holes drilled through the right and left parietal bones. This type of osseous defect normally heals only by fibrous scarring and has been used to define osteoinductive materials. The DMG was cut into pieces about 1 mm square and placed into the right side defect while the left side remained open as a control. The animals were sacrificed on a schedule of two rats every 2 weeks until the 10th week when four rats were killed. The results showed complete osseous closure of the DMG site while the control healed by fibrous scarring. DMG seems to have strong osteoinductive power, and used allogenically has great potential as a commercially viable implant material.

  7. Thin film growing by the laser ablation technique: possibilities for growing of dosimetric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas R, E.M.; Melo M, M.; Enriquez Z, E.; Fernandez G, M.; Haro P, E.; Hernandez P, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    In this talk we will present the basics about the laser ablation technique and how it is used for thin film growing, either as a single film or a stack of thin films, as well as some methods to characterize in real time the film thickness. Finally, we will discuss the possibilities of using laser ablation for growing thin films with applications to dosimetry. (Author)

  8. Determination of Residual Monomers Released from Soft Lining Materials with the use of HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrodite Sofou

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to examine the post polymerized leachability of three non phthalic and four phthalic residual monomers, from twelve commercially available soft lining materials, using HPLC. Specimens of equal dimensions were constructed from each brand of material following a standardized procedure and were stored in three different conditions of storage i.e. distilled water, artificial saliva and a binary mixture of ethanol-water, with the resulting liquids providing samples for analysis in the HPLC apparatus. Three different experiments were performed for each brand of material and each condition of storage, in order to examine the parameters time and temperature. The results obtained from this study suggest that a wide spectrum of residues is diffusing out of the twelve examined soft lining materials. The non phthalic compounds were leaching at high concentrations while all the phthalates examined exhibited different degrees of elusion commensurate with the storage condition, brand of material and type of experiment. The main non phthalic component extracted from all the materials was methyl methacrylate, while the mainly extracted phthalic compound was different from each material. The level of elusion seems to be increasing dependent on time, medium of storage, and temperature as well.

  9. Determination of residual monomers released from soft lining materials with the use of HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofou, A.; Tsoupi, I.; Karayannia, M.

    2007-01-01

    A study was carried out to examine the post polymerized leachability of three non phthalic and four phthalic residual monomers, from twelve commercially available soft lining materials, using HPLC. Specimens of equal: dimensions were constructed from each brand of material following a standardized procedure and were stored in three different conditions of storage i.e. distilled water, artificial saliva and a binary mixture of ethanol-water with the resulting liquids providing samples for analysis in the HPLC apparatus. Three different experiments were performed for each brand of material and each condition of storage, in order to examine the parameters time and temperature. The results obtained from this study suggest that a wide spectrum of residues is diffusing out of the twelve examined soft lining materials. The non phthalic compounds were leaching at high concentrations while all the phthalates examined exhibited different degrees of elusion commensurate with the storage condition, brand of material and type of experiment. The main non phthalic component extracted from all the materials was methyl methacrylate, while the mainly extracted phthalic compound was different from each material. The level of elusion seems to be increasing dependent on time, medium of storage and temperature as well. (author)

  10. PAVAN: an atmospheric-dispersion program for evaluating design-basis accidental releases of radioactive materials from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bander, T.J.

    1982-11-01

    This report provides a user's guide for the NRC computer program, PAVAN, which is a program used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to estimate downwind ground-level air concentrations for potential accidental releases of radioactive material from nuclear facilities. Such an assessment is required by 10 CFR Part 100 and 10 CFR Part 50. The program implements the guidance provided in Regulatory Guide 1.145, Atmospheric Dispersion Models for Potential Accident Consequence Assessments at Nuclear Power Plants. Using joint frequency distributions of wind direction and wind speed by atmospheric stability, the program provides relative air concentration (X/Q) values as functions of direction for various time periods at the exclusion area boundary (EAB) and the outer boundary of the low population zone (LPZ). Calculations of X/Q values can be made for assumed ground-level releases (e.g., through building penetrations and vents) or elevated releases from free-standing stacks. Various options may be selected by the user. They can account for variation in the location of release points, additional plume dispersion due to building wakes, plume meander under low wind speed conditions, and adjustments to consider non-straight trajectories. It computes an effective plume height using the physical release height which can be reduced by inputted terrain features. It cannot handle multiple emission sources. A description of the main program and all subroutines is provided. Also included as appendices are a complete listing of the program and two test cases with the required data inputs and the resulting program outputs

  11. Report: EPA Provided Quality and Timely Information on Hurricane Katrina Hazardous Material Releases and Debris Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #2006-P-00023, May 2, 2006. After Hurricane Katrina, EPA was the agency with lead responsibility to prevent, minimize, or mitigate threats to public health and the environment caused by hazardous materials and oil spills in inland zones.

  12. Optically-controlled long-term storage and release of thermal energy in phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Grace G D; Li, Huashan; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2017-11-13

    Thermal energy storage offers enormous potential for a wide range of energy technologies. Phase-change materials offer state-of-the-art thermal storage due to high latent heat. However, spontaneous heat loss from thermally charged phase-change materials to cooler surroundings occurs due to the absence of a significant energy barrier for the liquid-solid transition. This prevents control over the thermal storage, and developing effective methods to address this problem has remained an elusive goal. Herein, we report a combination of photo-switching dopants and organic phase-change materials as a way to introduce an activation energy barrier for phase-change materials solidification and to conserve thermal energy in the materials, allowing them to be triggered optically to release their stored latent heat. This approach enables the retention of thermal energy (about 200 J g -1 ) in the materials for at least 10 h at temperatures lower than the original crystallization point, unlocking opportunities for portable thermal energy storage systems.

  13. Possible checking of technical parameters in nondestructive materials and products testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesl, J.

    1987-01-01

    The requirements are summed up for partial technical parameters of instruments and facilities for nondestructive testing by ultrasound, radiography, by magnetic, capillary and electric induction methods. The requirements and procedures for testing instrument performance are presented for the individual methods as listed in domestic and foreign standards, specifications and promotional literature. The parameters to be tested and the methods of testing, including the testing and calibration instruments are shown in tables. The Czechoslovak standards are listed currently valid for nondestructive materials testing. (M.D.)

  14. Controlled adsorption and release onto calcium phosphates materials and drug delivery applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barroug A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptive properties of synthetic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral were examined with respect to cisplatin and risedronate, two biological active drugs; the uptake and release experiments were carried out under various conditions in order to understand the basic mechanism of interaction. The effect of temperature and solution composition were highlighted and discussed. The adsorption results obtained for the therapeutic agents demonstrated that, depending on the conditions investigated (nature of the sorbent, concentration range, ionic composition, temperature…, the shape of the isotherms is of Freundlich or Langmuir type. The adsorption is described as an ion-exchange process in dilute solutions, while the interaction appears to be reactive for concentrated solutions (dissolution of mineral ions from the apatite substrate and formation of soluble calcium complex and/or precipitation of calcium salts involving sorbate molecules. The information gained on the surface reactivity of calcium phosphate were exploited to associate an antibiotic to calcium phosphate cements for drug delivery applications. The specimens were obtained by combination of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate powders upon mixing with water. The physicochemical properties of the paste were altered by the drug loading method (in the liquid or solid phase. Thus, a dose-dependent effect was noticed for the paste setting time, hardening and the release process.

  15. AEROS: a real-time emergency response system for atmospheric releases of toxic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasstrom, J.S.; Greenly, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a sophisticated computer-based real-time emergency response system for radiotoxic releases into the atmosphere. The ARAC Emergency Response Operating System (AEROS) has a centralized computer facility linked to remote site computers, meteorological towers, and meteorological data sources. The system supports certain fixed sites, but has the ability to respond to accidents at arbitrary locations. Product quality and response time are optimized by using complex three-dimensional dispersion models; extensive on-line data bases; automated data processing; and an efficient user interface, employing graphical computer displays and computer-displayed forms. Upon notification, the system automatically initiates a response to an emergency and proceeds through preliminary calculations, automatically processing accident information, meteorological data, and model parameters. The model calculations incorporate mass-consistent three-dimensional wind fields, terrain effects, and particle-in-cell diffusion. Model products are color images of dose or deposition contours overlaid on a base map

  16. Possibility of using waste tire rubber and fly ash with Portland cement as construction materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Arin; Degirmenci, Nurhayat

    2009-05-01

    The growing amount of waste rubber produced from used tires has resulted in an environmental problem. Recycling waste tires has been widely studied for the last 20 years in applications such as asphalt pavement, waterproofing systems and membrane liners. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash and rubber waste with Portland cement as a composite material for masonry applications. Class C fly ash and waste automobile tires in three different sizes were used with Portland cement. Compressive and flexural strength, dry unit weight and water absorption tests were performed on the composite specimens containing waste tire rubber. The compressive strength decreased by increasing the rubber content while increased by increasing the fly ash content for all curing periods. This trend is slightly influenced by particle size. For flexural strength, the specimens with waste tire rubber showed higher values than the control mix probably due to the effect of rubber fibers. The dry unit weight of all specimens decreased with increasing rubber content, which can be explained by the low specific gravity of rubber particles. Water absorption decreased slightly with the increase in rubber particles size. These composite materials containing 10% Portland cement, 70% and 60% fly ash and 20% and 30% tire rubber particles have sufficient strength for masonry applications.

  17. Dissolution stability studies of suspensions of prolonged-release diclofenac microcapsules prepared by the Wurster process: I. Eudragit-based formulation and possible drug-excipient interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyeye, M C; Mwangi, E; Katondo, B; Jain, A; Ichikawa, H; Fukumori, Y

    2005-06-01

    The aim was to evaluate possible interaction in solid and liquid state of the drug with formulation excipients consequent to very fast drug release of diclofenac-Eudragit prolonged release microcapsules. The microcapsules were prepared by drug layering on calcium carbonate cores and coated with Eudragit RS 30D and L30D-55 as previously reported. Suspension of the microcapsules was prepared using microcrystalline cellulose/sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (Avicel CL-611) as medium. In vitro dissolution testing of the suspension was done, and, based on the dissolution results, possible interaction between diclofenac and Eudragit and Avicel in the medium was studied. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses were performed using 1:1 binary, 1:1:1 ternary mixtures and a ratio equivalent to that in the formulation. The mixtures were prepared by mixing the dispersions--Eudragit RS 30D or L30D-55 with the drug or other components, followed by drying at 60 degrees C for 48 h. Dry mixing was done using the powder equivalents of the polymers, Eudragit RS PO and L100-55, Avicel and calcium carbonate. In vitro dissolution of the suspended microcapsules showed a very fast release after 48 h (T50 = microcapsules (T50 = 6 h). DSC curves of the formulation components or microcapsules did not show the characteristic endothermic peak of diclofenac at 287 degrees C. Powder X-ray diffraction of the binary or ternary mixtures of diclofenac and Eudragit polymers indicated reduction, shift or modification of the crystalline peaks of the drug or excipients at 2theta of 12 degrees and 18 degrees , suggestive of interaction. Some changes in drug peak characteristics at 18 degrees and 23 degrees were observed for Avicel/drug mixture, though not significant. The DSC curves of the binary mixture of diclofenac co-dried with liquid forms of Eudragit (i.e. RS 30D or L30D-55) revealed greater interaction compared to the curves of drug and powdered forms of

  18. Malicious release of radioactive materials in urban area. Exposure of the public and emergency staff, protective measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Wolfgang; Lange, Florentin

    2016-01-01

    The preparedness for hypothetical radiological scenarios is part of the tasks for governmental authorities, safety and emergency organizations and the staff in case of the incident. The EURATOM guideline for radiation protection has to be implemented into national laws. According to the guidelines it is required that emergency planning has to be prepared for hypothetical radiological scenarios including terroristic or other maliciously motivated attacks using radioactive materials. The study includes assumptions on the released respirable radioactivity, restriction of the hazardous area, wind induced re-suspension of radioactive dusts and inhalation exposure, and mitigation measures.

  19. Strontium-Doped Hematite as a Possible Humidity Sensing Material for Soil Water Content Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Grignani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the sensing behavior of Sr-doped hematite for soil water content measurement. The material was prepared by solid state reaction from commercial hematite and strontium carbonate heat treated at 900 °C. X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry were used for microstructural characterization of the synthesized powder. Sensors were then prepared by uniaxially pressing and by screen-printing, on an alumina substrate, the prepared powder and subsequent firing in the 800–1,000 °C range. These sensors were first tested in a laboratory apparatus under humid air and then in an homogenized soil and finally in field. The results evidenced that the screen printed film was able to give a response for a soil matric potential from about 570 kPa, that is to say well below the wilting point in the used soil.

  20. Strontium-doped hematite as a possible humidity sensing material for soil water content determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulliani, Jean-Marc; Baroni, Chiara; Zavattaro, Laura; Grignani, Carlo

    2013-09-10

    The aim of this work is to study the sensing behavior of Sr-doped hematite for soil water content measurement. The material was prepared by solid state reaction from commercial hematite and strontium carbonate heat treated at 900 °C. X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry were used for microstructural characterization of the synthesized powder. Sensors were then prepared by uniaxially pressing and by screen-printing, on an alumina substrate, the prepared powder and subsequent firing in the 800-1,000 °C range. These sensors were first tested in a laboratory apparatus under humid air and then in an homogenized soil and finally in field. The results evidenced that the screen printed film was able to give a response for a soil matric potential from about 570 kPa, that is to say well below the wilting point in the used soil.

  1. Photonic band gap materials in butterfly scales: A possible source of 'blueprints'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertesz, K.; Molnar, G.; Vertesy, Z.; Koos, A.A.; Horvath, Z.E.; Mark, G.I.; Tapaszto, L.; Balint, Zs.; Tamaska, I.; Deparis, O.; Vigneron, J.P.; Biro, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    The color generating nanoarchitectures in the cover scales of the blue (dorsal)-green (ventral) wing surfaces of the butterfly Albulina metallica were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. A layered, quasiordered structure was revealed in both the dorsal and ventral scales, with different order parameters, associated with their different colors. A successful attempt was made to reproduce the biological structure in the form of a quasiordered composite (SiO/(In and SiO)) multilayer structure using standard thin film deposition techniques. The position of the reflectance maxima of this artificial structure could be tailored by controlling the size of the In inclusions through oxidation. Our results show that photonic band gap materials of biologic origin may constitute valuable blueprints for artificial structures

  2. Energy production from waste with regard to the possibilities of high-grade insulating granulates for building material through the distension method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, P

    1981-01-01

    A study is made of the extent to which energy contained in residual materials can be released and be used for making concretes, based on waste products from industry, domestic and communal refuse as well as filings from the coal mining industry, flotation and screening plants, and coal-pit power plants. Also examined is the organic composition of the residue for residual energy release. The studies indicate that significant energy savings can be obtained by the release of residual energy of original raw material in the making of concretes. 14 figures, 6 tables.

  3. The role of clearance in Germany - release of materials, buildings and sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfeldt, S.

    2005-01-01

    Clearance in Germany is far advanced. A complex regulatory framework exists in the Radiation Protection Ordinance (RPO/Strahlenschutzverordnung, StrlSchV) since 2001 which has replaced previous recommendations on clearance issued by the German Radiation Protection Commission (Strahlenschutzkommission, SSK). A number of options exist both for unconditional clearance (e.g. of all kinds of materials with no restrictions on the destination or future use) and for clearance for a specific purpose (e.g. recycling of metal scrap). For each clearance option there is a set of nuclide specific clearance levels which have been derived on the basis of the 10 Sv/a individual dose criterion using complex radiological models which are tailored to the respective material cycles (metal scrap, buildings, building rubble, waste for disposal, sites). The clearance levels have been thoroughly reviewed by the SSK. An extensive comparison to sets of clearance levels used in other countries or issued as guidance by international bodies revealed that the correspondence between values is between good and acceptable taking into account country-specific approaches and special assumptions which would not necessarily pertain to German situations. Clearance is a major factor in the material management, especially of nuclear installations undergoing decommissioning. The variety of clearance options leaves the operator of a nuclear installation sufficient flexibility for optimisation of the material management. Clearance is of particular importance in a country like Germany where the estimated costs for a future repository are very high and the interim storage facilities for radioactive material are limited and costly. While the licensee is responsible for his material management, the issuance of a clearance permit is done by the regulatory body upon application. The regulators may choose to use the clearance levels and regulations as stipulated by the RPO, or to impose site-specific regulations on

  4. Possibility of using waste tire composites reinforced with rice straw as construction materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han-Seung; Kim, Dae-Jun; Lee, Young-Kyu; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Jeon, Jin-Yong; Kang, Chun-Won

    2004-10-01

    Agricultural lignocellulosic fiber (rice straw)-waste tire particle composite boards were manufactured for use as insulation boards in construction, using the same method as that used in the wood-based panel industry. The manufacturing parameters were: a specific gravity of 0.8 and a rice straw content (10/90, 20/80 and 30/70 by wt.% of rice straw/waste tire particle). A commercial polyurethane adhesive for rubber was used as the composite binder. The water proof, water absorption and thickness swelling properties of the composite boards were better than those of wood particleboard. Furthermore, the flexibility and flexural properties of the composite boards were superior to those of other wood-based panel products. The composite boards also demonstrated good acoustical insulation, electrical insulation, anti-caustic and anti-rot properties. These boards can be used to prevent impact damage, are easily modifiable and are inexpensive. They are able to be used as a substitute for insulation boards and other flexural materials in construction.

  5. Assessing the sustainability of Brazilian oleaginous crops - possible raw material to produce biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fabio; Ortega, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to make an emergy assessment of oleaginous crops cultivated in Brazil, available to produce biodiesel, in order to determine which crop is the most sustainable. This study evaluates conventional agro-chemical farms that produce rapeseed (canola), oil palm, soybean, sunflower and cotton. Rapeseed (canola) crop uses 40.41% of renewable energy and it is the most sustainable conventional oil crop; on the other hand, it is not widely produced in Brazil, probably due to climate restrictions or low market demand. The oil palm emergy indicators are contradictory: its emergy exchange ratio (EER) value is the lower, showing the possibility of fair exchange, and the low transformity value indicates high efficiency; however, it also has low renewability (28.31%), indicating a high dependency on agro-chemicals (basically fertilizers). Oil palm is a potential energy source due to its high agricultural productivity, but appropriate management is necessary to increase its sustainability and reduce the use of non-renewable resources.

  6. Assessing the sustainability of Brazilian oleaginous crops - possible raw material to produce biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Fabio, E-mail: fabiotak@fea.unicamp.b [FEA - College of Food Engineering - Unicamp, CP 6121, CEP 13083-862 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ortega, Enrique, E-mail: fabiotak@gmail.co [FEA - College of Food Engineering - Unicamp, CP 6121, CEP 13083-862 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2010-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to make an emergy assessment of oleaginous crops cultivated in Brazil, available to produce biodiesel, in order to determine which crop is the most sustainable. This study evaluates conventional agro-chemical farms that produce rapeseed (canola), oil palm, soybean, sunflower and cotton. Rapeseed (canola) crop uses 40.41% of renewable energy and it is the most sustainable conventional oil crop; on the other hand, it is not widely produced in Brazil, probably due to climate restrictions or low market demand. The oil palm emergy indicators are contradictory: its emergy exchange ratio (EER) value is the lower, showing the possibility of fair exchange, and the low transformity value indicates high efficiency; however, it also has low renewability (28.31%), indicating a high dependency on agro-chemicals (basically fertilizers). Oil palm is a potential energy source due to its high agricultural productivity, but appropriate management is necessary to increase its sustainability and reduce the use of non-renewable resources.

  7. A route to possible civil engineering materials: the case of high-pressure phases of lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouibes, A; Zaoui, A

    2015-07-23

    Lime system has a chemical composition CaO, which is known as thermodynamically stable. The purpose here is to explore further possible phases under pressure, by means of variable-composition ab initio evolutionary algorithm. The present investigation shows surprisingly new stable compounds of lime. At ambient pressure we predict, in addition to CaO, CaO2 as new thermodynamically stable compound. The latter goes through two phases transition from C2/c space group structure to Pna21 at 1.5 GPa, and Pna21 space group structure to I4/mcm at 23.4 GPa. Under increasing pressure, further compounds such as CaO3 become the most stable and stabilize in P-421m space group structure above 65 GPa. For the necessary knowledge of the new predicted compounds, we have computed their mechanical and electronic properties in order to show and to explain the main reasons leading to the structural changes.

  8. Evaluating the Effect of Nuclear Power Plant Buildings on the Atmospheric Dispersion Behavior of Released Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassar, N.N.; Tawfik, F.S.; Agamy, S.A.; Nagla, T.F.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important principles in air pollution is to minimize the release of pollutants to the atmosphere, deposition on the ground and promote sufficient dilution of released pollutants within the atmosphere. Building down wash describes the effect that wind flowing over or around buildings create a cavity of reticulating winds in the are a near the buildings. These cavities cause increased vertical dispersion of plumes emitted from stacks on or near the buildings . Often it leads to elevated concentrations downwind of affected stacks. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of the building down wash phenomena on the atmospheric dispersion behavior of released radioactive materials from NPP. In this study, a hypothetical scenario is presented involving a point source with varying stack parameters and rectangular shaped buildings (Mille stone Nuclear Power Plant) using meteorological parameters of a chosen day. The concentrations of assumed released radionuclides, taking into consideration the building down wash effect and without are calculated using the AERMOD Model taking into consideration the effect of the type of atmospheric stability class. Also the analysis includes the model predictions for the highest 1-hour cavity concentration. The results show that the size of the cavity zone is not affected by the type of stability class, but is affected by the stack location and buildings shape. On other hand, the distance at which the plume touches the ground is affected by the type of stability class, the stack location and buildings shape. So, strategies for locating buildings need to be considered to maximize dispersion when planning for constructing several reactors and accessory buildings at a nuclear site

  9. Sorption/Desorption Behavior and Mechanism of NH4(+) by Biochar as a Nitrogen Fertilizer Sustained-Release Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yanxue; Qi, Hejinyan; Liu, Yujia; He, Xiaowei

    2016-06-22

    Biochar, the pyrolysis product of biomass material with limited oxygen, has the potential to increase crop production and sustained-release fertilizer, but the understanding of the reason for improving soil fertility is insufficient, especially the behavior and mechanism of ammonium sulfate. In this study, the sorption/desorption effect of NH4(+) by biochar deriving from common agricultural wastes under different preparation temperatures from 200 to 500 °C was studied and its mechanism was discussed. The results showed that biochar displayed excellent retention ability in holding NH4(+) above 90% after 21 days under 200 °C preparation temperature, and it can be deduced that the oxygen functional groups, such as carboxyl and keto group, played the primary role in adsorbing NH4(+) due to hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction. The sorption/desorption effect and mechanism were studied for providing an optional way to dispose of agricultural residues into biochar as a nitrogen fertilizer sustained-release material under suitable preparation temperature.

  10. The behaviour of ceramic breeder materials with respect to tritium release and pellet/pebble mechanical integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwast, H.; Conrad, R.; May, R.; Casadio, S.; Roux, N.; Werle, H.

    1994-09-01

    In situ tritium release experiments from several candidate fusion blanket ceramic breeder materials have been performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten over the last few years. The sixth experiment, EXOTIC-6, contained pellets of LiAlO 2, Li 2XrO 3, Li 6Xr 2O 7 and Li 8ZrO 6 and pebbles of Li 4SiO 4 and Li 2ZrO 3 which were irradiated up to a lithium burnup of 3%. A large number of temperature transients and purge gas composition changes were performed. From the temperature transients tritium residence times have been determined. Some preliminary results were presented at the 17th Symposium on Fusion Technology (SOFT) held in Rome in 1992. In the present paper results of a further analysis of the residence times are presented together with some postirradiation examination results. The LiAlO 2 pellets showed a better mechanical stability than the Li-zirconates pellets. The pebbels remained intact. The tritium residence times determined from the tritium inventories were in good agreement with those previously determined from temperature transients. The tritium release characteristics of the materials investigated remain substantially unchanged up to the maximum lithium burnup achieved in this experiment.

  11. Plasmid DNA is released from nanosized acicular material surface by low molecular weight oligonucleotides: exogenous plasmid acquisition mechanism for penetration intermediates based on the Yoshida effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, N; Ide, K

    2008-10-01

    When a colloidal solution consisting of nanosized acicular material and bacterial cells is stimulated with sliding friction at the interface between the hydrogel and interface-forming material where the frictional coefficient increases rapidly, the nanosized acicular material accompanying the bacterial cells forms a penetration intermediate. This effect is known as the Yoshida effect in honor of its discoverer. Through the Yoshida effect, a novel property in which penetration intermediates incorporate exogenous plasmid DNA has been identified. This report proposes a possible mechanism for exogenous plasmid acquisition by penetration intermediates in the Yoshida effect. Escherichia coli cells, pUC18, and chrysotile were used as recipient cells, plasmid DNA, and nanosized acicular material, respectively. Even when repeatedly washing the mixture consisting of pUC18 and chrysotile, transformation efficiency by pUC18 was stable. Accordingly, pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile was introduced into recipient E. coli cells. At saturation, the amount of pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile was 0.8-1.2 microg/mg. To investigate whether pUC18 adsorbed on chrysotile is replicated by polymerase, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out with the chrysotile. Amplification of the beta-lactamase gene coded in pUC18, which was adsorbed onto chrysotile, was strongly inhibited. This suggests that DNA adsorbed onto chrysotile is not replicated in vivo. When we searched for substances to release pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile, we found that a 300-bp single- or double-stranded segment of DNA releases pUC18 from chrysotile. Competitive adsorption onto chrysotile between double-stranded DNA and pUC18 was then examined through the Yoshida effect. The 310- and 603-bp double-stranded nucleotides caused 50% competitive inhibition at the same molar ratio with pUC18. Hence, the adsorbed region of pUC18 is about 300 bp in length. As the culture period for recipient cells increases, transformation

  12. Liberação de flúor de materiais restauradores Fluoride releasing of restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Silva de CARVALHO

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Atualmente no mercado odontológico existem diversos tipos de materiais restauradores que liberam flúor com o objetivo de diminuir ou eliminar as cáries recorrentes. Considerando-se a diferença de composição desses materiais, foi avaliada sua capacidade de liberação de flúor. Foram avaliados os materiais restauradores: Chelon-fil (ESPE, Vitremer (3M, Variglass (Dentsply, Dyract (Dentsply e Tetric (Vivadent. Confeccionaram-se seis amostras cilíndricas (área = 1,65 cm2 de cada material, as quais foram imersas individualmente em 2,0 ml de água deionizada, que foi trocada diariamente durante 15 dias. A liberação de flúor foi determinada após adição de volume igual de tampão TISAB II às soluções. Para a análise da concentração de flúor foi utilizado um eletrodo específico para flúor Orion 96-09, acoplado a um analisador de íons Orion EA-940. Todos os materiais seguiram o mesmo padrão de liberação de flúor. As maiores médias de flúor liberado dentro de cada material foram encontradas no 1º dia, decrescendo bruscamente no 2º e 3º dias, e a quantidade de flúor liberado apresentou um decréscimo com o passar dos dias até atingir um nível quase constante. A liberação média de flúor durante o período de avaliação (média e desvio padrão em µg F/cm2 foi: CHE = 7,62 ± 0,76A, VIT = 5,91 ± 0,79B, VAR = 2,72 ± 0,25C, DYR = 1,50 ± 0,17 D, TET = 0,136 ± 0,016 E. Médias seguidas por letras distintas diferem entre si ao nível de significância de 5% (Tukey. Os resultados mostraram que a composição dos materiais restauradores influencia de maneira significativa sua liberação de flúor.Nowadays there are several types of restorative materials with fluoride release properties. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the fluoride release from the following restorative materials, considering their different compositions. The materials used were: Chelon Fil-ESPE (CHE, Vitremer-3M (VIT, Variglass

  13. Release and Movement of Radionuclides in Soils Contaminated with Fallout Materials from an Underground Thermonuclear Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-07-06

    Studies The degree of dissolution of the fallout material in H2 0, HCl, DTPA, CDTA, and EDDHA solutions was investigated by the suspension method...days was: EDDHA >DTPA>CDTA>H 2 0. while after 65 days the order of effect was: CDTA> EDDHA >DTPA>H 20. Portions of gamma ray spectra of the 106 day...the same amounts of radionuclides as did H120. The most abundant radio- nuclide was radiotungsten for H120, DTPA, CDTA, and EDDHA supernatant liquids

  14. Maximum permissible dietary contamination after the accidental release of radioactive materials from a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochin, E E; Rock Carling, Ernest; Court Brown, W M [Medical Research Council, Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations, London (United Kingdom); and others

    1960-12-01

    After the accident to No. 1 pile at Windscale on October 10, 1957 (Atomic Energy Office, 1957), the Atomic Energy Authority asked the Medical Research Council for advice on the maximum intake of certain radioactive isotopes that should be regarded as permissible, under emergency conditions, for members of the general population living in, or deriving food from, an area contaminated owing to an accident to a reactor. The Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations, together with its Subcommittees on Internal and External Radiations, has considered this problem, and concludes that the intake of radioactive materials by ingestion of contaminated food would generally be the limiting source of hazard after any such accident. Intake by inhalation, or radiation from the exterior, would become of importance only in rather special circumstances. In the following report, therefore, the Committee proposes maximum permissible levels of dietary contamination for the relevant isotopes in the emergency conditions envisaged. In proposing these levels, the Protection Committee has used the fullest information available on the radiation doses that would be delivered to different body tissues and at different ages by the isotopes concerned, and on the ways in which these materials would enter the body.

  15. Maximum permissible dietary contamination after the accidental release of radioactive materials from a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochin, E.E.; Rock Carling, Ernest; Court Brown, W.M.

    1960-01-01

    After the accident to No. 1 pile at Windscale on October 10, 1957 (Atomic Energy Office, 1957), the Atomic Energy Authority asked the Medical Research Council for advice on the maximum intake of certain radioactive isotopes that should be regarded as permissible, under emergency conditions, for members of the general population living in, or deriving food from, an area contaminated owing to an accident to a reactor. The Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations, together with its Subcommittees on Internal and External Radiations, has considered this problem, and concludes that the intake of radioactive materials by ingestion of contaminated food would generally be the limiting source of hazard after any such accident. Intake by inhalation, or radiation from the exterior, would become of importance only in rather special circumstances. In the following report, therefore, the Committee proposes maximum permissible levels of dietary contamination for the relevant isotopes in the emergency conditions envisaged. In proposing these levels, the Protection Committee has used the fullest information available on the radiation doses that would be delivered to different body tissues and at different ages by the isotopes concerned, and on the ways in which these materials would enter the body

  16. Effects of temperature, ultraviolet radiation and pectin methyl esterase on aerobic methane release from plant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, D; Mikkelsen, T N; Obro, J; Willats, W G T; Ambus, P

    2009-11-01

    This study examines the effects of different irradiance types on aerobic methane (CH(4)) efflux rates from terrestrial plant material. Furthermore, the role of the enzyme pectin methyl esterase (PME) on CH(4) efflux potential was also examined. Different types of plant tissue and purified pectin were incubated in glass vials with different combinations of irradiation and/or temperature. Purified dry pectin was incubated in solution, and with or without PME. Before and after incubation, the concentration of CH(4) was measured with a gas chromatograph. Rates of CH(4) emission were found to depend exponentially on temperature and linearly on UV-B irradiance. UV-B had a greater stimulating effect than UV-A, while visible light had no effect on emission rates. PME was found to substantially reduce the potential for aerobic CH(4) emissions upon demethylation of pectin.

  17. Determination of phthalates released from paper packaging materials by solid-phase extraction-high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Yang, Bofeng; Tang, Zhixu; Luo, Xin; Wang, Fengmei; Xu, Hui; Cai, Xue

    2014-01-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 10 phthalic acid esters (dimethyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate, dipropyl phthalate, benzylbutyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate, dicyclohexyl phthalate, diamyl phthalate, di-n-hexyl phthalate, di-n-octyl phthalate and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) released from food paper packaging materials. The use of distilled water, 3% acetic acid (w/v), 10% ethanol (v/v) and 95% ethanol (v/v) instead of the different types of food simulated the migration of 10 phthalic acid esters from food paper packaging materials; the phthalic acid esters in four food simulants were enriched and purified by a C18 SPE column and nitrogen blowing, and quantified by HPLC with a diode array detector. The chromatographic conditions and extraction conditions were optimized and all 10 of the phthalate acid esters had a maximum absorbance at 224 nm. The method showed limitations of detection in the range of 6.0-23.8 ng/mL the correlation coefficients were greater than 0.9999 in all cases, recovery values ranged between 71.27 and 106.97% at spiking levels of 30, 60 and 90 ng/mL and relative standard deviation values ranged from 0.86 to 8.00%. The method was considered to be simple, fast and reliable for a study on the migration of these 10 phthalic acid esters from food paper packaging materials into food.

  18. Titanium carbide-carbon porous nanocomposite materials for radioactive ion beam production: processing, sintering and isotope release properties

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081922; Stora, Thierry

    2017-01-26

    The Isotope Separator OnLine (ISOL) technique is used at the ISOLDE - Isotope Separator OnLine DEvice facility at CERN, to produce radioactive ion beams for physics research. At CERN protons are accelerated to 1.4 GeV and made to collide with one of two targets located at ISOLDE facility. When the protons collide with the target material, nuclear reactions produce isotopes which are thermalized in the bulk of the target material grains. During irradiation the target is kept at high temperatures (up to 2300 °C) to promote diffusion and effusion of the produced isotopes into an ion source, to produce a radioactive ion beam. Ti-foils targets are currently used at ISOLDE to deliver beams of K, Ca and Sc, however they are operated at temperatures close to their melting point which brings target degradation, through sintering and/or melting which reduces the beam intensities over time. For the past 10 years, nanostructured target materials have been developed and have shown improved release rates of the produced i...

  19. Radiological aspects of storage and release of waste materials by the phosphate industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggink, G.J.

    1995-03-01

    The production of phosphate fertilizers from phosphate rock following the wet process leads to the generation of phosphogypsum containing large amounts of natural radionuclides. The removal of radionuclides from the gypsum occurs only on a limited scale. The majority is stockpiled on land or discharged into the surface water. Europe produced in 1991 in total over 4 Mton of P 2 O 5 , with an estimated 19 Mton of L phosphogypsum. Since 1987 the total European production of phosphate fertilizers decreased. For nine European countries detailed information on phosphogypsum production is obtained: Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and Great Britain. In 1991 they generated together an estimated 11,8 Mton of phosphogypsum, which is about 63% of the total European production. 27% is discharged into rivers and seas (3.2 Mton) and 68% is stockpiled on land in special dumpsites (8 Mton). In Belgium the remaining 5% (0.6 Mton) is processed with the aid of a special installation into products suitable to be used in building materials, for road construction etc. 4 figs., 3 tabs., 3 appendices, 18 refs

  20. Uranium pollution in an estuary affected by pyrite acid mine drainage and releases of naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Manjon, G.; Hurtado, S.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Huelva estuary is affected by former phosphogypsum releases and pyrite acid mine drainage. → Time evolution of uranium concentration is analyzed after halting of NORM releases. → Two new contamination sources are preventing the complete uranium cleaning: (1) The leaching of phosphogypsum stacks located close to Tinto River. (2) Pyrite acid mine drainage. → High uranium concentrations are dissolved in water and precipitate subsequently. - Abstract: After the termination of phosphogypsum discharges to the Huelva estuary (SW Spain), a unique opportunity was presented to study the response of a contaminated environmental compartment after the cessation of its main source of pollution. The evolution over time of uranium concentrations in the estuary is presented to supply new insights into the decontamination of a scenario affected by Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) discharges. The cleaning of uranium isotopes from the area has not taken place as rapidly as expected due to leaching from phosphogypsum stacks. An in-depth study using various techniques of analysis, including 234 U/ 238 U and 230 Th/ 232 Th ratios and the decreasing rates of the uranium concentration, enabled a second source of uranium contamination to be discovered. Increased uranium levels due to acid mine drainage from pyrite mines located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain) prevent complete uranium decontamination and, therefore, result in levels nearly twice those of natural background levels.

  1. Comparison of the MARC and CRAC2 programs for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Hemming, C R; Charles, D; Ostmeyer, R M

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a comparison of the MARC (Methodology for Assessing Radiological Consequences) and CRAC2 (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences, version 2) computer programs for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material. A qualitative comparison has been made of the features of the constituent sub-models of the two codes, and potentially the most important differences identified. The influence of these differences has been investigated quantitatively by comparison of the predictions of the two codes in a wide variety of circumstances. Both intermediate quantities and endpoints used as a measure of risk have been compared in order to separate the variables more clearly. The results indicate that, in general, the predictions of MARC and CRAC2 are in good agreement.

  2. A cost/benefit analysis of methods for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, R.E.; Dahlman, R.C.; Davis, W. Jr.; Finney, B.C.; Groenier, W.S.; Hill, G.S.; Kibbey, A.H.; Kitts, F.G.; Lindauer, R.B.; Moore, R.E.; Pechin, W.H.; Roddy, J.W.; Ryon, A.D.; Seagren, R.D.; Sears, M.B.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    Cost/benefit surveys were made to determine the cost (in dollars) and effectiveness of radwaste treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from model fuel cycle facilities, and to determine the benefits in terms of reduction in radiological dose commitment to individuals and populations in the surrounding areas. The studies include milling of uranium ores, conversion of virgin uranium and recycle uranium to UF 6 , fabrication of light-water reactor (LWR) fuels containing enriched uranium or enriched uranium and plutonium, fabrication of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuels containing 233 U and thorium, and reprocessing of LWR and HTGR fuels. Conceptual flowsheets were prepared for each model facility illustrating the treatment methods for gaseous and liquid effluents. The ''base'' case represents the lowest treatment cost, current treatment technology, and highest radiological dose. In succeeding cases, increasingly efficient radwaste treatment equipment is added to the ''base'' plant to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released. The technology ranges from that currently available to that which may be developed over the next 30 years. The status of development for these technologies is discussed. The dose estimates are for maximum individual total body and organ doses at the plant boundary and for population total-body and organ doses out to 89 km. Comparisons of the doses vs annual costs in dollars are presented. In summary, they indicate that (1) the annual doses can be reduced to very low fractions of the natural background dose by the successful development and application of the radwaste treatment methods; and (2) excluding mills, the capital costs for the treatment methods vary from 0.02 to 8% of the capital cost of the base plants and the total annual operating costs (fixed charges plus operating costs) vary from 0.009 to 7.0% of the capital costs for the plant

  3. Redox buffered hydrofluoric acid etchant for the reduction of galvanic attack during release etching of MEMS devices having noble material films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-10-06

    Etchant solutions comprising a redox buffer can be used during the release etch step to reduce damage to the structural layers of a MEMS device that has noble material films. A preferred redox buffer comprises a soluble thiophosphoric acid, ester, or salt that maintains the electrochemical potential of the etchant solution at a level that prevents oxidation of the structural material. Therefore, the redox buffer preferentially oxidizes in place of the structural material. The sacrificial redox buffer thereby protects the exposed structural layers while permitting the dissolution of sacrificial oxide layers during the release etch.

  4. Compensation for nitrogen and phosphorous release from Baltic mariculture by Nodularia spumigena harvet during summer blooms - a possible path towards sustainable aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    An alternative technology for removal of nutrients released from mariculture ishere suggested. Harvest of cyanobacteria Nodularia spumigena during summerblooms may compensate for release of N and P from mariculture or other sources.Not only content of N in the cyanobacteria but also prevention of N...

  5. An In-Vitro Study on the Release of Fluoride from Two Restorative Materials and Their Rechargeability after Exposure to Daily 1000 ppm Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kowsari

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Since the fluoride releases from materials with the property of releasing fluoride are decreasing gradually, it seems that probably the material rechargeability is more important than their long-term fluoride release.Purpose: the objective of this study was to asses the fluoride release and rechargeability of 2 types of fluoride releasing restorative materials, a resin modified glass ionomer(Vitremer and a compomer (Compoglass F, after exposure to daily NaF solutionscontaining 1000 ppm F, for 1 minute.Materials and Methods: Twelve discs ( 8 mm ×2 mm of each of the materials were fabricated, and divided into 2 groups (test and control. All discs were stored in 4 mL artificial saliva at 37°C. In group 1 (N=6, the specimens were immersed in artificialsaliva which was changed daily for 25 days. In group 2 (N=6, in addition to receiving the same treatment as group 1, the specimens were immersed in NaF solution (1000ppm F, ph=6.9 for 1 minute before daily saliva change. A potentiometer was used to determine the amount of fluoride released on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25, after the daily saliva change, in all study groups. Data were analyzed by the t-student test after confirmation of the equality of variances by Leven’s test.Results: Both materials continued releasing fluoride throughout the whole study period. For each material, the release was highest on day one. During the first 3 days,glass ionomer released significantly higher amounts of fluoride as compared to compomer (p0.05. After exposure to NaF solution, none of the materials showed statistically significant rechargeability (p>0.05 and the amount of fluoride-releasecontinued to drop during the study period in similar patterns for both the test and the control groups.Conclusion: It may be concluded that rechargeability of glass ionomer and compomer,using daily neutral fluoride mouth rinses and toothpastes does not occur in reliable amounts.

  6. Contribution of the different erosion processes to material release from the vessel walls of fusion devices during plasma operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, R.

    2002-01-01

    In high temperature plasma experiments several processes contribute to erosion and loss of material from the vessel walls. This material may enter the plasma edge and the central plasma where it acts as impurities. It will finally be re-deposited at other wall areas. These erosion processes are: evaporation due to heating of wall areas. At very high power deposition evaporation may become very large, which has been named ''blooming''. Large evaporation and melting at some areas of the vessel wall surface may occur during heat pulses, as observed in plasma devices during plasma disruptions. At tips on the vessel walls and/or hot spots on the plasma exposed solid surfaces electrical arcs between the plasma and the vessel wall may ignite. They cause the release of ions, atoms and small metal droplets, or of carbon dust particles. Finally, atoms from the vessel walls are removed by physical and chemical sputtering caused by the bombardment of the vessel walls with ions as well as energetic neutral hydrogen atoms from the boundary plasma. All these processes have been, and are, observed in today's plasma experiments. Evaporation can in principle be controlled by very effective cooling of the wall tiles, arcing is reduced by very stable plasma operation, and sputtering by ions can be reduced by operating with a cold plasma in front of the vessel walls. However, sputtering by energetic neutrals, which impinge on all areas of the vessel walls, is likely to be the most critical process because ions lost from the plasma recycle as neutrals or have to be refuelled by neutrals leading to the charge exchange processes in the plasma. In order to quantify the wall erosion, ''materials factors'' (MF) have been introduced in the following for the different erosion processes. (orig.)

  7. Effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts and preliminary exploration of possible molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts and the possible molecular mechanisms. Methods: Fibroblast cell lines L929 were cultured, extracting solution of diatomite ceramic, casting ceramic, heat-pressed ceramic, infiltrated ceramic and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain was prepared and used to process L929 cells, and then cell apoptosis, percentages of cell cycle as well as expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 were detected. Results: Cell apoptosis indexes, number of early apoptosis, number of aponecrosis, percentages of G1 phase, S phase and G2 phase cells as well as expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 of diatomite ceramic group, casting ceramic group, heat-pressed ceramic group and infiltrated ceramic group had no differences from those of control group; cell apoptosis indexes, number of early apoptosis, number of aponecrosis, percentages of G2 phase cells as well as expression levels of Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 of diatomite ceramic group, casting ceramic group, heat-pressed ceramic group and infiltrated ceramic group were lower than those of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain group, and percentages of G1 phase and S phase cells as well as expression levels of Bcl-2 were significantly higher than those of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain group. Conclusion: The effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts has no differences and is weaker than that of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain crown, and biocompatibility of diatomite ceramic is equivalent to that of casting ceramic, heat-pressed ceramic, infiltrated ceramic and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain; mechanisms of different materials of all-ceramic crowns to regulate cell viability include Bcl-2/Bax pathway and Caspase pathway.

  8. Surface PEGylation of mesoporous silica materials via surface-initiated chain transfer free radical polymerization: Characterization and controlled drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Long; Liu, Meiying; Mao, Liucheng; Huang, Qiang; Huang, Hongye; Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Wen, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-12-01

    As a new type of mesoporous silica materials with large pore diameter (pore size between 2 and 50nm) and high specific surface areas, SBA-15 has been widely explored for different applications especially in the biomedical fields. The surface modification of SBA-15 with functional polymers has demonstrated to be an effective way for improving its properties and performance. In this work, we reported the preparation of PEGylated SBA-15 polymer composites through surface-initiated chain transfer free radical polymerization for the first time. The thiol group was first introduced on SBA-15 via co-condensation with γ-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS), that were utilized to initiate the chain transfer free radical polymerization using poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) and itaconic acid (IA) as the monomers. The successful modification of SBA-15 with poly(PEGMA-co-IA) copolymers was evidenced by a series of characterization techniques, including 1 H NMR, FT-IR, TGA and XPS. The final SBA-15-SH- poly(PEGMA-co-IA) composites display well water dispersity and high loading capability towards cisplatin (CDDP) owing to the introduction of hydrophilic PEGMA and carboxyl groups. Furthermore, the CDDP could be released from SBA-15-SH-poly(PEGMA-co-IA)-CDDP complexes in a pH dependent behavior, suggesting the potential controlled drug delivery of SBA-15-SH-poly(PEGMA-co-IA). More importantly, the strategy should be also useful for fabrication of many other functional materials for biomedical applications owing to the advantages of SBA-15 and well monomer adoptability of chain transfer free radical polymerization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. NSR&D Program Fiscal Year 2015 Funded Research Stochastic Modeling of Radioactive Material Releases Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrus, Jason P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pope, Chad [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Toston, Mary [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Maas, Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Nonreactor nuclear facilities operating under the approval authority of the U.S. Department of Energy use unmitigated hazard evaluations to determine if potential radiological doses associated with design basis events challenge or exceed dose evaluation guidelines. Unmitigated design basis events that sufficiently challenge dose evaluation guidelines or exceed the guidelines for members of the public or workers, merit selection of safety structures, systems, or components or other controls to prevent or mitigate the hazard. Idaho State University, in collaboration with Idaho National Laboratory, has developed a portable and simple to use software application called SODA (Stochastic Objective Decision-Aide) that stochastically calculates the radiation dose distribution associated with hypothetical radiological material release scenarios. Rather than producing a point estimate of the dose, SODA produces a dose distribution result to allow a deeper understanding of the dose potential. SODA allows users to select the distribution type and parameter values for all of the input variables used to perform the dose calculation. Users can also specify custom distributions through a user defined distribution option. SODA then randomly samples each distribution input variable and calculates the overall resulting dose distribution. In cases where an input variable distribution is unknown, a traditional single point value can be used. SODA, developed using the MATLAB coding framework, has a graphical user interface and can be installed on both Windows and Mac computers. SODA is a standalone software application and does not require MATLAB to function. SODA provides improved risk understanding leading to better informed decision making associated with establishing nuclear facility material-at-risk limits and safety structure, system, or component selection. It is important to note that SODA does not replace or compete with codes such as MACCS or RSAC; rather it is viewed as an

  10. An application of cost-effectiveness analysis to restrict the damage caused by an accidental release of radioactive material to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frittelli, L.; Tamburrano, A.

    1980-01-01

    When an accidental release of radioactive material occurs health effects in the exposed population can be mitigated by remedial actions applied to individuals or their environment. A cost-effectiveness analysis is performed by comparing the cost of remedial action with the monetary value of the collective dose avoided. (H.K.)

  11. A guide to the use of TIRION. A computer programme for the calculation of the consequences of releasing radioactive material to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, G.D.

    1976-11-01

    A brief description is given of the contents of TIRION, which is a computer program that has been written for use in calculations of the consequences of releasing radioactive material to the atmosphere. This is followed by a section devoted to an account of the control and data cards that make up the input to TIRION. (author)

  12. Use of new raw materials and industrial wastes to improve the possibilities of using ceramic materials from Bailén (Jaén, southern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galán-Arboledas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Raw materials used by the ceramic industry in Jaén (southern Spain consist of mixtures of carbonated clays from the Guadalquivir Basin and red clays from the Iberian Massif. The mixtures formulation usually obeys empirical experience developed by this industry for many generations. This work evaluates different possibilities of using these raw materials to manufacture new ceramic products on the basis of clay physical-chemical properties and analyzes limitations to produce high added value products. As an alternative to overcome these limitations, the mixture of these clays with raw materials from near regions (pyrophyllite clay and with different industrial wastes is proposed. These wastes are screen glass from monitors and oil impregnated diatomaceous earth. The study of the technological properties shows that the new mixtures are suitable for the processing of ceramic products in which structural and thermal insulating properties are improved or kept.La materia prima empleada por la industria cerámica de Jaén consiste en mezclas de margas de la Depresión del Guadalquivir con arcillas rojas del Macizo Ibérico. La formulación de estas mezclas responde generalmente a la experiencia empírica desarrollada por esta industria durante generaciones. El presente trabajo evalúa las posibilidades de utilización de estas materias primas para fabricar nuevos productos cerámicos de construcción basándose en sus propiedades físico-químicas y analiza las limitaciones que presentan para la fabricación de productos de mayor valor añadido. Como alternativa para superar estas limitaciones se propone la mezcla con arcillas pirofilíticas de áreas geográficamente cercanas y con diferentes residuos industriales. Estos residuos son vidrio de pantalla descontaminado y tierras diatomeas impregnadas con aceites vegetales. El estudio de caracterización tecnológica muestra que las nuevas mezclas permiten el procesamiento de piezas cerámicas y que en

  13. Possibilities of High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry in the Determination of Trace Elements in Environmental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaya Velitchkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new quantitative data for the spectral interferences obtained by high resolution 40.68 MHz radial viewing inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (HR-ICP-OES in the determination of Zn, Cd, Sb, Cu, Mn, Pb, Sn, Cr, U, and Ba in environmental materials in the presence of a complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Ti. The -concept for quantification of spectral interferences was used. The optimum line selection for trace analysis of a variety of multicomponent matrices requires the choice of prominent lines, which are free or negligibly influenced by line interference problems. The versatility of -concept as basic methodology was experimentally demonstrated in the determination of trace of elements in soil and drinking water. The detection limits are lower in comparison with corresponding threshold concentration levels for soil and drinking water in accordance with environmental regulations. This paper shows the possibilities of present day ICP-OES equipment in the direct determination of trace elements (without preconcentration of impurities in environmental samples.

  14. Temporary shelter-in-place as protection against a release of airborne hazardous material : report of a literature search.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yantosik, G. D.; Lerner, K.; Maloney, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    ''Temporary shelter-in place'' is the combination of prompt shelter-in-place (SIP) to minimize initial exposure to airborne hazardous material, followed by timely action to terminate this protection to minimize exposure to hazardous vapor accumulations in the shelter once the air outside becomes less hazardous than the air inside the shelter. Temporary SIP, if properly executed, is considered to be an effective way to protect populations from hazardous chemical vapors, especially from high concentrations for short periods. This is supported by laboratory and field experiments. The need for timely termination of temporary SIP as protection from infiltrated vapors is an integral component of a temporary SIP strategy. It was from this premise that Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) was asked to develop methodologies for deciding when and how to terminate SIP. These methodologies, in turn, could be the basis for site-specific operational guidelines (e.g., decision matrix, decision-tree, or algorithm) for terminating SIP on each of the eight Army chemical stockpile storage sites, and in the off-post communities surrounding them. This project consists of two tasks. Task 1 was to collect and analyze existing literature that might be relevant to the termination of temporary SIP. This report is the product of Task 1. Task 2, which will begin on 2 February 2001, will use the results of the literature search as the baseline to investigate the concepts associated with temporary SIP, and to develop methodologies for termination of temporary SIP that can be incorporated in site-specific operational guidelines. It is understood that these methods will be consistent with Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) policy that ''the most important objective of the emergency preparedness and implementation process is the avoidance of fatalities to the maximum extent practicable, should an accidental release of chemical agent occur.'' It is also anticipated that these

  15. Importance and possibilities of secondary cycles (recycling), substitution and innovation in mineral raw and primary material supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Part 1-4 of the series ''The basis of raw materials supply'' is intended to bring about a better understanding of the ''Concept for the supply of Austria with mineral raw- and primary materials''. Part 3 deals with recovery of raw material from old- and waste material as an important contribution to an extension of the supply's basis and to an improvement of raw material utilization.

  16. Activation of the Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells following histamine release: a possible role in cell recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, T; Ferjan, I; Johansen, Torben

    1993-01-01

    1. The activity of the Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells was measured at various time intervals after induction of cellular histamine release by compound 48/80 or by the antigen-antibody reaction. The Na+/K(+)-pump activity was assessed as the ouabain-sensitive potassium uptake....... On the basis of the present results, we suggest a role for the Na+/K(+)-pump in the recovery process of the mast cell following histamine release....... of the cells using 86Rb+ as a tracer for potassium (K+(86Rb+)-uptake). 2. Stimulation of the cells with compound 48/80 induced a time and concentration dependent increase of the Na+/K(+)-pump activity. The pump activity was maximal 2 min after stimulation of the cells. Then, the activity gradually decreased...

  17. Heat release, time required, and cleaning ability of MTwo R and ProTaper universal retreatment systems in the removal of filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Fidelis, Natasha Siqueira; Assumpção, Tatiana Santos; Bernardineli, Norberti; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; Bramante, Alexandre Silva; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes

    2010-11-01

    This ex vivo study evaluated the heat release, time required, and cleaning efficacy of MTwo (VDW, Munich, Germany) and ProTaper Universal Retreatment systems (Dentsply/Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and hand instrumentation in the removal of filling material. Sixty single-rooted human teeth with a single straight canal were obturated with gutta-percha and zinc oxide and eugenol-based cement and randomly allocated to 3 groups (n = 20). After 30-day storage at 37 °C and 100% humidity, the root fillings were removed using ProTaper UR, MTwo R, or hand files. Heat release, time required, and cleaning efficacy data were analyzed statistically (analysis of variance and the Tukey test, α = 0.05). None of the techniques removed the root fillings completely. Filling material removal with ProTaper UR was faster but caused more heat release. Mtwo R produced less heat release than the other techniques but was the least efficient in removing gutta-percha/sealer. ProTaper UR and MTwo R caused the greatest and lowest temperature increase on root surface, respectively; regardless of the type of instrument, more heat was released in the cervical third. Pro Taper UR needed less time to remove fillings than MTwo R. All techniques left filling debris in the root canals. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative Evaluation of Fluoride Releasing Ability of Various Restorative Materials after the Application of Surface Coating Agents – An In-vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, GVS; Sai-Sankar, AJ; Sridhar, M; Pranitha, Kakarla; Sai-Krishna, VS

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluoride plays a key role in prevention of dental caries and is also an essential element for oral health promotion both in children and adults. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface coating (petroleum jelly, G-Coat Plus) on the fluoride releasing property of conventional Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) and Zirconomer. Materials and Methods A total of 30 disk shaped brass mold specimens (6±0.1mm in diameter and 2±0.1mm thickness) for each test group were fabricated with conventional GIC (Group A) and Zirconomer (Group B). These test groups were further divided into three subgroups of 10 each. The unprotected specimens act as control (Group A1 and B1), G-Coat Plus specimens as (Group A2 and B2) and for the remaining specimens petroleum jelly was applied (Group A3 and B3). Fluoride ion concentration was measured with a combination of fluoride ion specific electrode and ion analyzer for every 24 hours for 15 days. The data was statistically analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Results The Group B released significantly more fluoride than Group A. Among all the subgroups the greatest amount of fluoride was released from Group B1, in the first 24 hours followed by A1 and B2. The least was observed on 15th day with Group B3 and A3. Conclusion Both the tested materials (GIC and Zirconomer) used in the study exhibited fluoride release whether protected or unprotected with surface coating. Though there was a difference between the groups, the pattern of fluoride release was similar and continuous throughout the study period i.e., first the initial burst followed by sustained release. The results revealed Zirconomer released more fluoride and is comparable to conventional GIC. PMID:28209001

  19. Effect of Drug Loading Method and Drug Physicochemical Properties on the Material and Drug Release Properties of Poly (Ethylene Oxide Hydrogels for Transdermal Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Shet Hui Wong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Novel poly (ethylene oxide (PEO hydrogel films were synthesized via UV cross-linking with pentaerythritol tetra-acrylate (PETRA as cross-linking agent. The purpose of this work was to develop a novel hydrogel film suitable for passive transdermal drug delivery via skin application. Hydrogels were loaded with model drugs (lidocaine hydrochloride (LID, diclofenac sodium (DIC and ibuprofen (IBU via post-loading and in situ loading methods. The effect of loading method and drug physicochemical properties on the material and drug release properties of medicated film samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, swelling studies, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, tensile testing, rheometry, and drug release studies. In situ loaded films showed better drug entrapment within the hydrogel network and also better polymer crystallinity. High drug release was observed from all studied formulations. In situ loaded LID had a plasticizing effect on PEO hydrogel, and films showed excellent mechanical properties and prolonged drug release. The drug release mechanism for the majority of medicated PEO hydrogel formulations was determined as both drug diffusion and polymer chain relaxation, which is highly desirable for controlled release formulations.

  20. Influence of environmental parameters and of their interactions on the release of metal(loid)s from a construction material in hydraulic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmukat, A; Duester, L; Goryunova, E; Ecker, D; Heininger, P; Ternes, T A

    2016-03-05

    Besides the leaching behaviour of a construction material under standardised test-specific conditions with laboratory water, for some construction materials it is advisable to test their environmental behaviour also under close to end use conditions. The envisaged end use combined with the product characteristics (e.g. mineral phases) is decisive for the choice of environmental factors that may change the release of substance that potentially cause adverse environmental effects (e.g. fertilisation or ecotoxicity). At the moment an experimental link is missing between mono-factorial standardised test systems and non standardised complex incubation experiments such as mesocosms which are closer to environmental conditions. Multi-factorial batch experiments may have the potential to close the gap. To verify this, batch experiments with copper slag were performed which is used as armour stones in hydraulic engineering. Design of experiments (DoE) was applied to evaluate the impact of pH, ionic strength, temperature and sediment content on the release of As, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn. The study shows that release and sediment-eluent partitioning of metal(loid)s are impacted by interactions between the studied factors. Under the prevalent test conditions sediment acts as a sink enhancing most strongly the release of elements from the material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory response to the December 13, 1991, Congressional inquiry on offsite release of hazardous and solid waste containing radioactive materials from Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, C.; Garcia, K.M.; McMurtrey, C.D.; Williams, K.L.; Jordan, P.J.

    1992-05-01

    This report is a response to the December 13, 1991, Congressional inquiry that requested information on all hazardous and solid waste containing radioactive materials sent from Department of Energy facilities to offsite facilities for treatment or disposal since January 1, 1981. This response is for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Other Department of Energy laboratories are preparing responses for their respective operations. The request includes ten questions, which the report divides into three parts, each responding to a related group of questions. Part 1 answers Questions 5, 6, and 7, which call for a description of Department of Energy and contractor documentation governing the release of waste containing radioactive materials to offsite facilities. ''Offsite'' is defined as non-Department of Energy and non-Department of Defense facilities, such as commercial facilities. Also requested is a description of the review process for relevant release criteria and a list of afl Department of Energy and contractor documents concerning release criteria as of January 1, 1981. Part 2 answers Questions 4, 8, and 9, which call for information about actual releases of waste containing radioactive materials to offsite facilities from 1981 to the present, including radiation levels and pertinent documentation. Part 3 answers Question 10, which requests a description of the process for selecting offsite facilities for treatment or disposal of waste from Department of Energy facilities. In accordance with instructions from the Department of Energy, the report does not address Questions 1, 2, and 3

  2. Analysis of the possibility for obtaining oil from the spend coffee grounds as potential raw material for biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iličković Zoran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the possibility of obtaining oil from spent coffee grounds, which are left behind after the coffee is prepared, as the potential feedstock for biodiesel production. The effect of process parameters, such as are the type of solvent, the ratio of spent coffee grounds/solvent and the extraction time on oil yielded from coffee grounds was examined. The oil was obtained by maceration and extraction in the Soxhlet apparatus. The obtain results show that the spent coffee grounds could be used as an alternative raw material for biodiesel production, because it contains a significant amount of oil that can be extracted. The oil yield depends on the extraction (maceration process parameters. The maximum oil yield obtained by the Soxhlet extraction with the n-hexane for the period of 5 h was 11.85% (the weight percentage of oil on dry mater, whereas with petroleum ether the oil yield was slightly lower and amounted to 10.44%. The yield of the oil extracted by maceration increases with the decrease of spent coffee grounds/solvent ratio from 1/3 to 1/7 g/cm3, and other parameters being constant. The oil yield increases with the duration of the maceration. Greater oil yield, ranging from 3 to 8.5%, can be obtained with n-hexane compared to the extraction with petroleum ether. Furthermore, n-hexane is less volatile and flammable, compared to petroleum ether, so it is more convenient to use.

  3. Influence of CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials on cell viability, migration ability and adenylate kinase release of human gingival fibroblasts and oral keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Grassmann, L; Weyhrauch, M; Brüllmann, D D; Ziebart, T; Scheller, H; Lehmann, K M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of four CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials on cell viability, migration ability and adenylate kinase (ADK) release of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and oral keratinocytes (HOK). HGF and HOK were cultured on disc-shaped CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials (e.max CAD LT, e.max CAD HT, Empress CAD and Mark II) and on discs made of tissue culture polystyrene surface (TCPS) serving as control. Cell viability was analyzed by using an MTT assay, and migration ability was investigated by a scratch assay. A ToxiLight assay has been performed to analyze the effect of all-ceramic materials on ADK release and cell apoptosis. At MTT assay for HGF, no significant decrease of cell viability could be detected at all points of measurement (p each > 0.05), while HOK demonstrated a significant decrease in cell viability especially on Empress CAD and Mark II at each point of measurement (p each materials at all points of measurement (between -36 % and -71 %; p each ceramic materials could be investigated. This study disclosed significant differences in cell viability and migration ability of HGF and HOK on CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials. CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials can influence oral cell lines responsible for soft tissue creation which may affect the esthetic outcome.

  4. Apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-1) deposition in, and release from, the enterocyte brush border: a possible role in transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte; Frenzel, Franz

    2012-03-01

    Transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) has been proposed to represent a non-hepatobiliary route of cholesterol secretion directly "from blood to gut" and to play a physiologically significant role in excretion of neutral sterols, but so far little is known about the proteins involved in the process. We have previously observed that apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-1) synthesized by enterocytes of the small intestine is mainly secreted apically into the gut lumen during fasting where its assembly into chylomicrons and basolateral discharge is at a minimal level. In the present work we showed, both by immunomicroscopy and subcellular fractionation, that a fraction of the apically secreted apoA-1 in porcine small intestine was not released from the cell surface but instead deposited in the brush border. Cholesterol was detected in immunoisolated microvillar apoA-1, and it was partially associated with detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), indicative of localization in lipid raft microdomains. The apolipoprotein was not readily released from microvillar vesicles by high salt or by incubation with phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C or trypsin, indicating a relatively firm attachment to the membrane bilayer. However, whole bile or taurocholate efficiently released apoA-1 at low concentrations that did not solubilize the transmembrane microvillar protein aminopeptidase N. Based on these findings and the well known role played by apoA-1 in extrahepatic cellular cholesterol removal and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), we propose that brush border-deposited apoA-1 in the small intestine acts in TICE by mediating cholesterol efflux into the gut lumen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Waste Material of Propolis as a Film Forming Agent Intended to Modify the Metronidazole Release: Preparation and Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Toledo, Lucas de Alcântara Sica; Rosseto, Hélen Cássia; Ravani, Laura; Cortesi, Rita; Bruschi, Marcos Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is an antimicrobial agent utilized for the treatment of protozoa and anaerobic bacteria infections. Many times, it is necessary to modify the metronidazole release, and the development of modified release systems may be suggested. In this study, we are able to investigate the use of the residue normally thrown out from the preparation of propolis extracts (BP) as strategy to modify the metronidazole release. We prepared films containing polymeric adjuvant (gelatin or ethylcellulose) and metronidazole, by solvent casting method. Density, mechanical properties, water vapor permeability (WVP), moisture uptake capacity (MUC), thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and in vitro metronidazole release were investigated. Thickness and density of the preparations indicated that the compounds were homogeneously dispersed throughout. Mechanical properties were influenced by film composition. Films containing gelatin showed higher resistance to stress while those containing ethylcellulose presented greater flexibility. The greater the adjuvant concentrations lower the resistance to rupture and the elasticity, but higher MUC and WVP of formulations. FT-IR tests suggested interactions between BP and the adjuvants. Films were capable to protect the metronidazole and changed its release profile. BP films are of great practical importance constituting a novel strategy to modify the metronidazole release.

  6. Transformation of the released asbestos, carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes from composite materials and the changes of their potential health impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Setyan, Ari

    2017-02-20

    Composite materials with fibrous reinforcement often provide superior mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties than the matrix. Asbestos, carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely used in composites with profound impacts not only on technology and economy but also on human health and environment. A large number of studies have been dedicated to the release of fibrous particles from composites. Here we focus on the transformation of the fibrous fillers after their release, especially the change of the properties essential for the health impacts. Asbestos fibers exist in a large number of products and the end-of-the-life treatment of asbestos-containing materials poses potential risks. Thermal treatment can transform asbestos to non-hazardous phase which provides opportunities of safe disposal of asbestos-containing materials by incineration, but challenges still exist. Carbon fibers with diameters in the range of 5-10 μm are not considered to be respirable, however, during the release process from composites, the carbon fibers may be split along the fiber axis, generating smaller and respirable fibers. CNTs may be exposed on the surface of the composites or released as free standing fibers, which have lengths shorter than the original ones. CNTs have high thermal stability and may be exposed after thermal treatment of the composites and still keep their structural integrity. Due to the transformation of the fibrous fillers during the release process, their toxicity may be significantly different from the virgin fibers, which should be taken into account in the risk assessment of fiber-containing composites.

  7. Influence of environmental parameters and of their interactions on the release of metal(loid)s from a construction material in hydraulic engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmukat, A.; Duester, L.; Goryunova, E.; Ecker, D.; Heininger, P.; Ternes, T.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • DoE supported multi-factorial study on the metal(loid) release from copper slag. • Interactions of four parameters were studied and weighted. • An effective separation method between slag and sediment was established. • The metal(loid) partitioning between sediment, slag and eluent is described. • The knowledge on the potential environmental impact of copper slag is increased. - Abstract: Besides the leaching behaviour of a construction material under standardised test-specific conditions with laboratory water, for some construction materials it is advisable to test their environmental behaviour also under close to end use conditions. The envisaged end use combined with the product characteristics (e.g. mineral phases) is decisive for the choice of environmental factors that may change the release of substance that potentially cause adverse environmental effects (e.g. fertilisation or ecotoxicity). At the moment an experimental link is missing between mono-factorial standardised test systems and non standardised complex incubation experiments such as mesocosms which are closer to environmental conditions. Multi-factorial batch experiments may have the potential to close the gap. To verify this, batch experiments with copper slag were performed which is used as armour stones in hydraulic engineering. Design of experiments (DoE) was applied to evaluate the impact of pH, ionic strength, temperature and sediment content on the release of As, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn. The study shows that release and sediment-eluent partitioning of metal(loid)s are impacted by interactions between the studied factors. Under the prevalent test conditions sediment acts as a sink enhancing most strongly the release of elements from the material.

  8. Influence of environmental parameters and of their interactions on the release of metal(loid)s from a construction material in hydraulic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmukat, A., E-mail: schmukat@harzwasserwerke.de [Harzwasserwerke GmbH, Zur Granetalsperre 8, 38685 Langelsheim (Germany); Federal Institute of Hydrology, Department of Aquatic Chemistry, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany); Duester, L. [Federal Institute of Hydrology, Department of Aquatic Chemistry, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany); Goryunova, E. [Federal Institute of Hydrology, Department of Aquatic Chemistry, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany); KAPP-Chemie GmbH & Co. KG, Industriestr. 2-4, 56357 Miehlen (Germany); Ecker, D.; Heininger, P.; Ternes, T.A. [Federal Institute of Hydrology, Department of Aquatic Chemistry, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz (Germany)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • DoE supported multi-factorial study on the metal(loid) release from copper slag. • Interactions of four parameters were studied and weighted. • An effective separation method between slag and sediment was established. • The metal(loid) partitioning between sediment, slag and eluent is described. • The knowledge on the potential environmental impact of copper slag is increased. - Abstract: Besides the leaching behaviour of a construction material under standardised test-specific conditions with laboratory water, for some construction materials it is advisable to test their environmental behaviour also under close to end use conditions. The envisaged end use combined with the product characteristics (e.g. mineral phases) is decisive for the choice of environmental factors that may change the release of substance that potentially cause adverse environmental effects (e.g. fertilisation or ecotoxicity). At the moment an experimental link is missing between mono-factorial standardised test systems and non standardised complex incubation experiments such as mesocosms which are closer to environmental conditions. Multi-factorial batch experiments may have the potential to close the gap. To verify this, batch experiments with copper slag were performed which is used as armour stones in hydraulic engineering. Design of experiments (DoE) was applied to evaluate the impact of pH, ionic strength, temperature and sediment content on the release of As, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn. The study shows that release and sediment-eluent partitioning of metal(loid)s are impacted by interactions between the studied factors. Under the prevalent test conditions sediment acts as a sink enhancing most strongly the release of elements from the material.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Fluoride Releasing Ability of Various Restorative Materials after the Application of Surface Coating Agents - An In-vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Gvs; Sai-Sankar, A J; Pratap-Gowd, Mjs; Sridhar, M; Pranitha, Kakarla; Sai-Krishna, V S

    2016-12-01

    Fluoride plays a key role in prevention of dental caries and is also an essential element for oral health promotion both in children and adults. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface coating (petroleum jelly, G-Coat Plus) on the fluoride releasing property of conventional Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) and Zirconomer. A total of 30 disk shaped brass mold specimens (6±0.1mm in diameter and 2±0.1mm thickness) for each test group were fabricated with conventional GIC (Group A) and Zirconomer (Group B). These test groups were further divided into three subgroups of 10 each. The unprotected specimens act as control (Group A1 and B1), G-Coat Plus specimens as (Group A2 and B2) and for the remaining specimens petroleum jelly was applied (Group A3 and B3). Fluoride ion concentration was measured with a combination of fluoride ion specific electrode and ion analyzer for every 24 hours for 15 days. The data was statistically analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. The Group B released significantly more fluoride than Group A. Among all the subgroups the greatest amount of fluoride was released from Group B1, in the first 24 hours followed by A1 and B2. The least was observed on 15 th day with Group B3 and A3. Both the tested materials (GIC and Zirconomer) used in the study exhibited fluoride release whether protected or unprotected with surface coating. Though there was a difference between the groups, the pattern of fluoride release was similar and continuous throughout the study period i.e., first the initial burst followed by sustained release. The results revealed Zirconomer released more fluoride and is comparable to conventional GIC.

  10. The development of the American national standard, ''control of radioactive surface contamination on materials, equipment and facilities to be released for uncontrolled use''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, J.

    1980-01-01

    The American National Standard, Control of Radioactive Surface Contamination on Materials, Equipment and Facilities to be Released for Uncontrolled Use, was developed under the procedures of ANSI for ANSI Main Committee N13 (Radiation Protection) by a working group of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee. This standard provides criteria for the control of materials, equipment and facilities contaminated with radioactivity proposed to be released for uncontrolled use. Permissible contamination limits are specified as well as methods assessing the levels of contamination. This paper reviews the proceedings of the Subcommittee on Radioactive Surface Contamination, the comments received by reviewers of the standard, the resolution of the committee, and the bases for reaching the final limits, recommendations, and measurement procedures. (H.K.)

  11. Possibilities of using new technology materials in constructing the radioactive waste containers The paper will consider using the latest technologies in material science for building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itu, Razvan Bogdan

    2008-01-01

    The paper will consider using the latest technologies in materials science for building the radioactive waste containers. A new amorphous steel has been discovered by the scientists from the University of Virginia, a material three times stronger then conventional steel and non-magnetic. Scientists shown that this steel, DARVA - Glass 101, has superior anticorrosive proprieties. The paper will also consider using Para-Aramides in protecting the radioactive waste containers. Chemical and physical properties of these materials shown a great tensile strength and the inter-chain bonds make these materials extremely strong. (author)

  12. Development of three-dimensional trajectory model for detecting source region of the radioactive materials released into the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kyung Suk; Park, Ki Hyun; Min, Byung Il; Kim, Sora; Yang, Byung Mo [Nuclear Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is necessary to consider the overall countermeasure for analysis of nuclear activities according to the increase of the nuclear facilities like nuclear power and reprocessing plants in the neighboring countries including China, Taiwan, North Korea, Japan and South Korea. South Korea and comprehensive nuclear-test-ban treaty organization (CTBTO) are now operating the monitoring instruments to detect radionuclides released into the air. It is important to estimate the origin of radionuclides measured using the detection technology as well as the monitoring analysis in aspects of investigation and security of the nuclear activities in neighboring countries. A three-dimensional forward/backward trajectory model has been developed to estimate the origin of radionuclides for a covert nuclear activity. The developed trajectory model was composed of forward and backward modules to track the particle positions using finite difference method. A three-dimensional trajectory model was validated using the measured data at Chernobyl accident. The calculated results showed a good agreement by using the high concentration measurements and the locations where was near a release point. The three-dimensional trajectory model had some uncertainty according to the release time, release height and time interval of the trajectory at each release points. An atmospheric dispersion model called long-range accident dose assessment system (LADAS), based on the fields of regards (FOR) technique, was applied to reduce the uncertainties of the trajectory model and to improve the detective technology for estimating the radioisotopes emission area. The detective technology developed in this study can evaluate in release area and origin for covert nuclear activities based on measured radioisotopes at monitoring stations, and it might play critical tool to improve the ability of the nuclear safety field.

  13. 10 CFR 50.34a - Design objectives for equipment to control releases of radioactive material in effluents-nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Design objectives for equipment to control releases of... out in appendix I to this part provide numerical guidance on design objectives for light-water-cooled... unrestricted areas be kept as low as is reasonably achievable. These numerical guides for design objectives and...

  14. Luna 24 regolith breccias: A possible source of the fine size material of the Luna 24 regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, O. D.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    The regolith breccias from the Luna 24 core were analyzed. The Luna 24 regolith is a mixture of fine and coarse grain materials. The comparable analysis of the grain size distributions, the modal and chemical compositions of the breccias, and the regolith from the same levels show that the friable slightly litificated breccia with a friable fine grain matrix may be a source of fine grain material of the Luna 24 present day regolith.

  15. Study the Effect of Gamma Radiation on some Solid and Polymeric Materials and Its Possible Applications in Radiation Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shawadfy, E.R.

    2015-01-01

    Dyed solid materials (films and gels) and dyed solutions dosimeters have wide-spread applications in radiation processing for installation process qualification and routine dose control for both gamma rays and electron beam irradiation. These film dosimeters have been introduced for low- and high-dose monitoring. The introduction of new types of dosimeters is due to the effort of seeking for more reliable, more stable, simpler and cheaper systems as routine dosimeters and/or label dosimeters. The main objective of this work is to study the possibility of preparing dyed solid polymeric materials (dyed films- dyed gels) and dyed solutions, and study the dosimetric studies for the prepared materials. The results obtained in this work can be summarized in the following: Section (1): Deals with the investigation of prepared three dosimetry systems based on Toludine Blue O (TBO) dye, to make them readily usable in high and low-radiation dosimetry applications (e.g. sterilization of medical products, sterilization of pharmaceutical products and polymer modification). This section is divided into three parts: Part I: This part includes the preparation and development of polymeric films for high-dose dosimetry applications, these films are based on poly (vinyl alcohol) dyed with TBO. These flexible plastic film dosimeters are bleached when exposed to gamma-ray photons (i.e. from blue to colorless) at λmax=633 nm. The radiation chemical yield (G-Value) for different concentrations of the dye as well as the dye with additive substances (chloral hydrate) was calculated. It was found that these films are highly stable for long time before and after irradiation under different storage conditions. The response of these films is not affected by humidity change in the range of relative humidity (0-56%). PVA films dyed with TBO are suitable in the dose range from 1-150 kGy. These properties suggest them to be useful for routine and dose mapping in sterilization range of radiation

  16. Preparation and characterization of novel functionalized prochloraz microcapsules using silica-alginate-elements as controlled release carrier materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenbing; He, Shun; Liu, Yao; Geng, Qianqian; Ding, Guanglong; Guo, Mingcheng; Deng, Yufang; Zhu, Juanli; Li, Jianqiang; Cao, Yongsong

    2014-07-23

    Controlled release formulation of pesticides is an effective approach to achieve the desirable purpose of increasing the utilization of pesticides and reducing the environmental residuals. In this work, a novel functionalized microcapsule using silica cross-linked with alginate, and some beneficial elements to crops, was prepared. The microcapsules were structurally characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that the microcapsules had a high loading efficiency of prochloraz (about 30% w/w) and could effectively protect prochloraz against degradation under UV irradiation and alkaline conditions, showed sustainable release for at least 60 days, and also likely increased disease resistance due to the element on the surface. Given the advantages of the microcapsules, this delivery system may be extended to other photosensitive or pH-sensitive pesticides in the future.

  17. Shear bond strengths of tooth coating materials including the experimental materials contained various amounts of multi-ion releasing fillers and their effects for preventing dentin demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Shoko; Suzuki, Masaya; Kazama-Koide, Miku; Shinkai, Koichi

    2017-10-01

    We examined shear bond strengths (SBSs) of various tooth-coating-materials including the experimental materials to dentin and demineralization resistance of a fractured adhesive surface after the SBS testing. Three resin-type tooth-coating-materials (BC, PRG Barrier Coat; HC, Hybrid Coat II; and SF, Shield force plus) and two glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials (CV, Clinpro XT Varnish; and FJ, Fuji VII) were selected. The experimental PRG Barrier Coat containing 0, 17, and 33 wt% S-PRG filler (BC0, BC17, and BC33, respectively) were developed. Each tooth-coating-material was applied to flattened dentin surfaces of extracted human teeth for SBS testing. After storing in water for 32 days with 4000 thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to the SBS test. Specimens after SBS testing were subjected to a pH cycling test, and then, demineralization depths were measured using a polarized-light microscope. ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test were used for statistical analysis. The SBS value of FJ and CV was significantly lower than those of other materials except for BC (p coating-materials demonstrated significantly higher SBS for dentin than the glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials; however, they were inferior to the glass ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials in regards to the acid resistance of the fractured adhesion surface.

  18. Evaluation of source term parameters for spent fuel disposal in foreign countries. (1) Instant release fraction from spent fuel matrices and composition materials for fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Masanobu; Chikazawa, Takahiro; Kitamura, Akira; Tachi, Yukio; Akahori, Kuniaki

    2016-01-01

    Although spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed after reprocessing and vitrification of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), feasibility study on direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SF) has been started as one of the alternative disposal options to flexibly apply change of future energy situation in Japan. Radionuclide inventories and their release behavior after breaching spent fuel container should be assessed to confirm safety of the SF disposal. Especially, instant release fractions (IRFs), which are fractions of radionuclide released relatively faster than those released with congruent dissolution with SF and construction materials after breaching spent fuel container, may have an impact on safety assessment of the direct disposal of SF. However, detailed studies on evaluation / estimation of IRF have not been performed in Japan. Therefore, we investigated some foreign safety assessment reports on direct disposal of SF by focusing on IRF for the safety assessment of Japanese SF disposal system. As a result of comparison between the safety assessment reports in foreign countries, although some fundamental data have been referred to the reports in common, the final source term dataset was seen differences between countries in the result of taking into account the national circumstances (reactor types and burnups, etc.). We also found the difference of assignment of uncertainties among the investigated reports; a report selected pessimistic values and another report selected mean values and their deviations. It is expected that these findings are useful as fundamental information for the safety assessment of Japanese SF disposal system. (author)

  19. Radiological protection principles concerning the safeguard, use or release of contaminated materials, buildings, areas or dumps from uranium mining. Recommendations of the Commission on Radiological Protection with explanations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Neumann, M.

    1992-01-01

    The volume presents the full texts of the SSK Recommendations addressing the aspects and problems involved, and which can be separately retrieved from the database: 1) Radiological protection principles concerning the release of scrap from the shut-down of uranium mining plants; 2) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for industrial use of areas contaminated from uranium mining; 3) Radiological protection principles concerning the use for forest and agricultural purposes and as public gardens (parks) and residential areas of areas contaminated from uranium mining; 4) Radiological protection principles concerning the safeguard and use of mine dumps; 5) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for further commercial or industrial use of buildings used for commercial or industrial purposes and the disposal of building debris from uranium mining and milling; 6) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for general use of reusable equipment and installations from uranium mining. The following appendices round up the material: 1) Radiation exposure from mining in Saxony and Thuringia and its evaluation (Summary of the results of consultations during the 1990 closed meeting); 2) Radiological protection principles for the limitation of the radiation exposure of the public to radon and its daughters; 3) Epidemiological studies on the health state of the inhabitants of the mining region and the miners in Saxony and Thuringia. (orig.) [de

  20. Irradiaiton facilities for testing solid and liquid blanket breeder materials with in-situ tritium release measurements in the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, R.; Debarberis, L.

    1991-01-01

    Lithium-based tritium breeder materials for solid and liquid fusion reactor blanket concepts are being tested in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) Petten with in-situ tritium release measurements since 1985, within the European Fusion Technology Programme and the BEATRIX-I programme. Ceramic breeder materials are being tested in the EXOTIC and COMPLIMENT experimental programmes and the liquid breeder material, Pb-17Li, is being tested in the LIBRETTO experimental programme. The in-pile experiments are performed with irradiation facilities developed by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) Petten. The irradiation vehicles are multi-channel rigs. The sample holders consist of independent, fully instrumented and triple contained capsules. The out-of-pile experimental equipment consist of twelve independent circuits for on-line tritium release and tritium permeation measurements and eight independent circuits for temperature control. The experimental achievements obtained so far contribute to the selection of candidate tritium breeder materials for blanket concepts of near future machines like NET, ITER and DEMO. (orig.)

  1. Effects of Surface and Subsurface Bed Material Composition on Gravel Transport and Flow Competence Relations—Possibilities for Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunte, K.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.; Cenderelli, D. A.; Gaeuman, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Bedload transport and flow competence relations are difficult to predict in coarse-bedded steep streams where widely differing sediment supply, bed stability, and complex flow hydraulics greatly affect amounts and sizes of transported gravel particles. This study explains how properties of bed material surface and subsurface size distributions are directly related to gravel transport and may be used for prediction of gravel transport and flow competence relations. Gravel transport, flow competence, and bed material size were measured in step-pool and plane-bed streams. Power functions were fitted to gravel transport QB=aQb and flow competence Dmax=cQd relations; Q is water discharge. Frequency distributions of surface FDsurf and subsurface FDsub bed material were likewise described by power functions FDsurf=hD j and FDsub=kDm fitted over six 0.5-phi size classes within 4 to 22.4 mm. Those gravel sizes are typically mobile even in moderate floods. Study results show that steeper subsurface bed material size distributions lead to steeper gravel transport and flow competence relations, whereas larger amounts of sediment contained in those 6 size bedmaterial classes (larger h and k) flatten the relations. Similarly, steeper surface size distributions decrease the coefficients of the gravel transport and flow competence relations, whereas larger amounts of sediment within the six bed material classes increase the intercepts of gravel transport and flow competence relations. Those relations are likely causative in streams where bedload stems almost entirely from the channel bed as opposed to direct (unworked) contributions from hillslopes and tributaries. The exponent of the subsurface bed material distribution m predicted the gravel transport exponent b with r2 near 0.7 and flow competence exponent d with r2 near 0.5. The intercept of bed surface distributions h increased the intercept a of gravel transport and c of the flow competence relations with r2 near 0.6.

  2. Possibilities of structure stabilisation in saliniferous formations using salt grit as a filling material; Moeglichkeiten der Gefuegestabilisierung von Salzgrusversatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Sebastian; Gruner, Matthias; Mischo, Helmut [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Bergbau und Spezialtiefbau

    2014-09-15

    The final disposal of high-active wastes in deep geological formations is an issue of great national and international import. On account of its good thermal conductivity and creep capability much research is currently focussed on sand as a host rock material. After the emplacement of wastes in abandoned mining cavities these must be sealed up to prevent fluids from coming into contact with the wastes. This must be done using materials that are either native or similar to the materials of the host formation. A particularly suitable material in the case of saliniferous formations is salt grit. Up to this point investigations have primarily been focused on preparing a suitable salt grit material and the rheological properties of the binding agent. This article presents and interprets the results of preliminary experiments on the miscibility of salt grit and binding agent suspensions. The MgO and CaSO{sub 4}-based binding agent systems analysed proved to be suitable. Among the MgO binding agents a composition of 3:1:8 was found to be more suitable than one of 5:1:8 on account of its lower initial viscosity. This reduces the amount of mixing required for wetting the material across all grain sizes, improving the chances of success. In the case of the two semihydrates of CaSO{sub 4} both the α and the β semihydrate proved suitable. This is due to a low fluid content which still also allows for a sufficiently low viscosity of the binding agent suspensions.

  3. To the question(point):The possibilities of material dept modification by Low-energy atom and ion flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaev, D.V.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the author tried to explain originally and untraditionally the processes that come out as a result of deposition and atom implantation into solid.The author tried to attract young researchers (scientists) attention to the possibilities of stimulation of these processes by electromagnet perturbation in wide frequency range

  4. Guidelines for calculating radiation doses to the public from a release of airborne radioactive material under hypothetical accident conditions in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This standard provides guidelines and a methodology for calculating effective doses and thyroid doses to people (either individually or collectively) in the path of airborne radioactive material released from a nuclear facility following a hypothetical accident. The radionuclides considered are those associated with substances having the greatest potential for becoming airborne in reactor accidents: tritium (HTO), noble gases and their daughters, radioiodines, and certain radioactive particulates (Cs, Ru, Sr, Te). The standard focuses on the calculation of radiation doses for external exposures from radioactive material in the cloud; internal exposures for inhalation of radioactive material in the cloud and skin penetration of tritium; and external exposures from radionuclides deposited on the ground. It uses as modified Gaussian plume model to evaluate the time-integrated concentration downwind. (52 refs., 12 tabs., 21 figs.)

  5. Investigation of a representative number of mine dumps in Baden-Wuerttemberg in relation to a possible release of radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, J.; Klein, H.

    1983-07-01

    More than 130 mine dumps of abandoned and working mines in Baden-Wuerttemberg were recorded, radiometricly measured, evaluated and some of them sampled. The representative selection of the mining activities resulted in the fact, that most of the dumps belonged to old and smaller residues of the lead/zinc and iron ore mining. In addition all existing mine dumps from the uranium exploration in Baden-Wuerttemberg and Bavaria were investigated. The highest doses, up to 10 rem/a, were found on the piles of the uranium exploration. These actually supervised and licensed depositions are followed by the old uncontrolled mine dumps of the Wittichen mining area with doses up to 2 rem/a. The numerous porphyry and granite quarries show doses between 0,1 and 0,2 rem/a. The lowest doses were found on the dumps of the hydrothermal Pb/Zn and iron ore deposits, while the slag piles of the ooelitic iron ore processing showed high Thorium anomalies. The Ra-226 and Pb-210 analyses of the deposited materials confirmed the radiometric results. The analysis of seepage and gallery waters showed only a small number of values exceeding the derived drinking water concentrations. (orig.) [de

  6. Non-Linear Optical Phenomena in Detecting Materials as a Possibility for Fast Timing in Detectors of Ionizing Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Korjik, M. V.; Buganov, O.; Fedorov, A. A.; Emelianchik, I.; Griesmayer, E.; Mechinsky, V.; Nargelas, S.; Sidletskiy, O.; Tamulaitis, G.; Tikhomirov, S. N.; Vaitkevicius, A.

    2016-01-01

    The time resolution of the detectors currently in use is limited by 50-70 ps due to the spontaneous processes involved in the development of the response signal, which forms after the relaxation of carriers generated during the interaction. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of exploiting sub-picosecond phenomena occurring after the interaction of scintillator material with ionizing radiation by probing the material with ultra-short laser pulses. One of the phenomena is the elastic polarization due to the local lattice distortion caused by the displacement of electrons and holes generated by ionization. The key feature of the elastic polarization is its short response time, which makes it prospective for using as an optically detectable time mark. The nonlinear optical absorption of femtosecond light pulses of appropriate wavelength is demonstrated to be a prospective tool to form the mark. This study was aimed at searching for inorganic crystalline media combining scintillation properties and non-...

  7. Assesment of (Mn,Co)3O4 powders for possible coating material for SOFC/SOEC interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymczewska, D.; Molin, Sebastian; Venkatachalam, Vinothini

    2015-01-01

    In this work (Mn,Co)3O4 spinel powders with different Mn:Co ratio (1:1 and 1:2) and from different commercial suppliers are evaluated for possible powder for production of interconnect coatings. Sinterability of the powders is evaluated on pressed pellets sintered in oxidizing and in reducing/oxidizing...... that with appropriate powder it is possible to produce adherent protective coating with a well-controlled thickness....... atmospheres. For selected powder, coatings are then prepared by the electrophoretic deposition method on Crofer 22 APU stainless steel coupons. Effects of dispersant/iodine content and deposition voltage and times are evaluated. Thickness as a function of deposition parameters is described. Results show...

  8. Assesment of (Mn,Co)33O4 powders for possible coating material for SOFC/SOEC interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymczewska, D.; Jasinski, P.; Molin, S.; Venkatachalam, V.; Chen, M.; Hendriksen, P.V.

    2016-01-01

    In this work (Mn,Co) 3 O 4 spinel powders with different Mn:Co ratio (1:1 and 1:2) and from different commercial suppliers are evaluated for possible powder for production of interconnect coatings. Sinterability of the powders is evaluated on pressed pellets sintered in oxidizing and in reducing/oxidizing atmospheres. For selected powder, coatings are then prepared by the electrophoretic deposition method on Crofer 22 APU stainless steel coupons. Effects of dispersant/iodine content and deposition voltage and times are evaluated. Thickness as a function of deposition parameters is described. Results show that with appropriate powder it is possible to produce adherent protective coating with a well-controlled thickness

  9. Applications of synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence technique in materials science-possibilities at INDUS-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Manoj K.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy has seen remarkable progress over the last few decades. Numerous applications in basic and applied sciences demonstrate its importance. Various advantages of XRF technique have motivated us to construct a microfocus XRF beamline (BL-16) on Indus-2 national synchrotron radiation facility. The BL-16 beamline offers a wide range of usages - both from research laboratories and industries; and for researchers working in diverse fields. Apart from the fields of pure sciences like physics and chemistry, the beamline provides an attractive platform to exercise material science applications, interdisciplinary applied sciences like medical, forensic and environmental studies etc. In addition to micro-XRF characterization, BL-16 beamline allows a user to perform studies using other advanced synchrotron based experimental methodologies, viz; grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXRF) analysis, chemical speciation, near-edge absorption spectroscopy and X-ray reflectivity studies of thin layered materials etc. The combined XRR-GIXRF analysis feature of the BL-16 beamline offers a novel capability to perform GIXRF assisted depth resolved X-ray studies to investigate chemical state and electronic structure of the thin nano-structured materials. The design aspects and various salient features of the BL-16 beamline X-ray reflectometer will be presented along with the measured performance. (author)

  10. Study of the composition and gas-phase release characteristics of salt material extracted from MSW ash particles using STA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvelakis, Stelios; Frandsen, Flemming; Koukios, E.G.

    2007-01-01

    material extracted from MSW ash particles using a six-stage leaching process is studied using simultaneous thermal analysis (STA). The produced results provide useful information regarding the composition of the salt material and its melting behavior that is considered to play an important role...... to deposition and corrosion problems at MSW incinerators. The results may be used to model the deposition process and to the better understanding of the corrosion process during MSW incineration....

  11. Optically-controlled long-term storage and release of thermal energy in phase-change materials

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Grace G. D.; Li, Huashan; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal energy storage offers enormous potential for a wide range of energy technologies. Phase-change materials offer state-of-the-art thermal storage due to high latent heat. However, spontaneous heat loss from thermally charged phase-change materials to cooler surroundings occurs due to the absence of a significant energy barrier for the liquid–solid transition. This prevents control over the thermal storage, and developing effective methods to address this problem has remained an elusive ...

  12. Development of Nano-Particles Within Polymeric Materials Prepared by Gamma Radiation and their Possible Practical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegazy, E. S.A.; Ali, A. E.; AbdEl-Rehim, H.; Mohammady, M.; Abdel Aal, A. S. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-07-01

    Nanoparticles can be used in biomedical applications, where they facilitate laboratory diagnostics, or in medical drug targeting nanoparticles based on a core consisting of iron oxides that can be targeted through external magnets. Polyvinyl alcohol/Polyacrylic acid nanoparticles were prepared using gamma rays. The prepared PVA/AAc nano copolymers were treated with Fe{sup 2+}/ Fe{sup 3+} solution followed by ammonia solution to obtain PVA/AAc-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle ferrogel. Characterization of the PVA/AAc-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle ferrogel was carried out using XRD, TGA, DSc , TEM and AFM. The use of magnetic field sensitive nano-ferrogels as a drug carrier was investigated. It was found that the release of drug in absence of the effect of magnetic field is mostly slow than that under the influence of magnetic field. On the other hand, development of nanoparticles within radiation grafted polymeric surfaces using electroless plating technique was investigated. Surface modification of polypropylene films (PP) was carried out via radiation induced graft copolymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine (4VP) and acrylamide (AAm) to enhance the adhesion ability of the PP surface for electroless deposition of copper. The produced grafted films were characterized by studying their FTIR and thermal stability. The prepared grafted films were copper-plated by electroless deposition using the Pd as a catalyst to initiate the redox reaction. The influences of catalytic activation method parameters on the plating rate have been studied. The electrical characteristics of the copper plated films in comparison with grafted films were studied. The results showed the high adhesion of the deposited copper film to the grafted PP film as well as high electrical conductivity. (author)

  13. Influence of oxygen and long term storage on the profile of volatile compounds released from polymeric multilayer food contact materials sterilized by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salafranca, Jesús, E-mail: fjsl@unizar.es [Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A), EINA, Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Zaragoza, María de Luna 3 (Torres Quevedo Bldg.), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Clemente, Isabel, E-mail: isabelclemente1984@gmail.com [Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A), EINA, Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Zaragoza, María de Luna 3 (Torres Quevedo Bldg.), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Isella, Francesca, E-mail: Francesca.Isella@goglio.it [Goglio S.p.A. Packaging Division, Via dell' Industria 7, 21020 Daverio (Italy); Nerín, Cristina, E-mail: cnerin@unizar.es [Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A), EINA, Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Zaragoza, María de Luna 3 (Torres Quevedo Bldg.), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Bosetti, Osvaldo, E-mail: Osvaldo.Bosetti@goglio.it [Goglio S.p.A. Packaging Division, Via dell' Industria 7, 21020 Daverio (Italy)

    2015-06-09

    Highlights: • 13 different food-use multilayers unirradiated and gamma-irradiated were studied. • 60–80 compounds/sample were identified by SPME–GC–MS even after 8-month storage. • Volatile profile of air- and N{sub 2}-filled bags greatly differed after irradiation. • Principal component analysis classified the samples into 4 groups. • Migration from irradiated materials to vapor phase was much lower than EU limits. - Abstract: The profile of volatile compounds released from 13 different multilayer polymeric materials for food use, before and after their exposure to gamma radiation, has been assessed by solid-phase microextraction–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Thermosealed bags of different materials were filled with either air or nitrogen to evaluate the oxygen influence. One-third of the samples were analyzed without irradiation, whereas the rest were irradiated at 15 and 25 kGy. Half of the samples were processed just after preparation and the other half was stored for 8 months at room temperature prior to analysis. Very significant differences between unirradiated and irradiated bags were found. About 60–80 compounds were released and identified per sample. A huge peak of 1,3-ditertbutylbenzene was present in most of the irradiated samples. An outstanding reproducibility in all the variables evaluated (chromatograms, oxygen percentage, volume of bags) was noticed. Independently of filling gas, the results of unirradiated materials were almost identical. In contrast, the chromatographic profile and the odor of irradiated bags filled with nitrogen were completely different to those filled with air. Principal component analysis was performed and 86.9% of the accumulated variance was explained with the first two components. The migration of compounds from irradiated materials to the vapor phase was much lower than the limits established in the Commission Regulation (EU) No 10/2011.

  14. Guidelines for calculating radiation doses to the public from a release of airborne radioactive material under hypothetical accident conditions in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This Standard provides guidelines and a methodology for calculating effective doses and thyroid doses to people (either individually or collectively) in the path of airborne radioactive material released from a nuclear facility following a hypothetical accident. The specific radionuclides considered in the Standard are those associated with substances having the greatest potential for becoming airborne in reactor accidents (eg, tritium (HTO), noble gases and their daughters (Kr-Rb, Xe-Cs), and radioiodines (I)); and certain radioactive particulates (eg, Cs, Ru, Sr, Te) that may become airborne under exceptional circumstances

  15. User's guide to MARINRAD: model for assessing the consequences of release of radioactive material into the oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koplik, C.M.; Kaplan, M.F.; Nalbandian, J.Y.; Simonson, J.H.; Clark, P.G.

    1984-05-01

    Marine Radionuclide Transport and Dose (MARINRAD) is a system of the computer programs designed to evaluate the consequences from release of radioactive waste into the ocean. The FORTRAN program MARRAD, which is part of the MARINRAD software, computes nuclide concentration caused by ocean transport and generates food chain concentration factors. The FORTRAN program MAROUT, which is also part of MARINRAD, evaluates a pathways-to-man dose model, generates print reports, and produces graphic plots. MARINRAD's top-down modular design provides flexible software that can be easily modified for a user's specific problem. MARINRAD was developed under contract with the Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 18 references, 23 figures, 42 tables

  16. Real-time computing of the environmental consequences of an atmospheric accidental release of radioactive material: user's point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeri, G.; Caracciolo, R.; Dickerson, M.

    1985-07-01

    All calculations of the consequences of an atmospheric release must start with atmospheric dispersion calculations. Time factors make external and inhalation dose estimates of immediate concern closely followed by ground contamination of land, pastures and onch agricultural crops. In general, the difficulties in modeling the source term and atmospheric transport and diffusion account for most of the error in calculating the dose to man. Thus, sophisticated treatment of the dose part of the calculating is not usually justified, though the relative distribution of dose in individual organs may be needed for correct decision marking. This paper emphasizes the atmospheric transport and diffusion part of the dose estimate and relates how this calculation can be used to estimate dose. 12 refs

  17. Criteria for selection of target materials and design of high-efficiency-release targets for radioactive ion beam generation

    CERN Document Server

    Alton, G D; Liu, Y

    1999-01-01

    In this report, we define criteria for choosing target materials and for designing, mechanically stable, short-diffusion-length, highly permeable targets for generation of high-intensity radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for use at nuclear physics and astrophysics research facilities based on the ISOL principle. In addition, lists of refractory target materials are provided and examples are given of a number of successful targets, based on these criteria, that have been fabricated and tested for use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF).

  18. Derived emergency reference levels for the introduction of countermeasures in the early to intermediate phases of emergencies involving the release of radioactive materials to atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsley, G.S.; Crick, M.J.; Simmonds, J.R.; Haywood, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    Derived Emergency Reference Levels (DERLs) are practical quantities intended for use in the aftermath of an accident involving the release of radioactive materials to atmosphere and for use in preparing emergency plans for the protection of the public. The results of environmental measurements may be compared with them as a means of assessing the seriousness of the release and in order to form judgements on the need to institute protective countermeasures. DERLs are the practical expression of Emergency Reference Levels, the radiological criteria for planning the introduction of emergency countermeasures. DERLs have been evaluated for a range of radionuclides which could be released in the event of an accident and for a number of different exposure pathways that are relevant in the initial phase of an accident. These pathways are: inhalation of activity both in the plume and resuspended from the ground; skin irradiation by β-emitting noble gases in the cloud; doses from β-emitters deposited on the skin; and external γ irradiation from ground deposits. (author)

  19. In situ depot comprising phase-change materials that can sustainably release a gasotransmitter H2S to treat diabetic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Chih; Huang, Chieh-Cheng; Lin, Shu-Jyuan; Li, Meng-Ju; Chang, Yen; Lin, Yu-Jung; Wan, Wei-Lin; Shih, Po-Chien; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2017-11-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are prone to develop refractory wounds. They exhibit reduced synthesis and levels of circulating hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which is an ephemeral gaseous molecule. Physiologically, H 2 S is an endogenous gasotransmitter with multiple biological functions. An emulsion method is utilized to prepare a microparticle system that comprises phase-change materials with a nearly constant temperature of phase transitions to encapsulate sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a highly water-labile H 2 S donor. An emulsion technique that can minimize the loss of water-labile active compounds during emulsification must be developed. The as-prepared microparticles (NaHS@MPs) provide an in situ depot for the sustained release of exogenous H 2 S under physiological conditions. The sustained release of H 2 S promotes several cell behaviors, including epidermal/endothelial cell proliferation and migration, as well as angiogenesis, by extending the activation of cellular ERK1/2 and p38, accelerating the healing of full-thickness wounds in diabetic mice. These experimental results reveal the strong potential of NaHS@MPs for the sustained release of H 2 S for the treatment of diabetic wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacterial spores as possible contaminants of biomedical materials and devices. [Bacillus anthracis, clostridium botulinum, C. perfringens, C. tetani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecz, N; Kang, T

    1973-01-01

    Destruction of spores on biomedical devices in drugs, and biologicals is essential for prevention of infection of patients with pathogenic sporeformers. Of particular concern are Clostridium tetani, C. perfringens, C. botulinum, Bacillus anthracis and other sporeforming pathogens. Spores are ubiquitous in nature and contamination of biomedical devices varies depending on manufacturing process, handling, raw materials and other variables. In the last 20 years the number of cases per year of specific notifiable diseases in the United States was as follows: tetanus, 120 to 500 cases, botulism, 7 to 47 cases, and anthrax, 2 to 10 cases. Gas gangrene is caused by a mixed flora consisting predominantly of sporeformers. C botulinum, which usually acts as saprophytic agent of food poisoning, may also initiate pathogenic processes; there are nine cases on record in the United States of botulism wound infections almost half of which ended in death. The spores of these organisms are distinguished by high radiation resistance and their erradication often requires severe radiation treatments. Representative bacterial spores in various suspending media show D/sub 10/ values (dose necessary to destroy 90 percent of a given population) ranging from approximately 0.1 to 0.4 Mrad. Some viruses show D/sub 10/ values up to greater than 1 Mrad. The D/sub 10/-values of spores vary depending on physical, chemical and biological factors. This variability is important in evaluation and selection of biological indicator organisms. Radiation sterilization of biomedical devices and biomedical materials must provide safety from infectious microorganisms including radiation resistant spores and viruses.

  1. International Commission on Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament - A possible international regime to cover radiological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, Benjamin

    2009-10-01

    Even if a 'dirty bomb' has never been used to date, the perception of the existence of a threat is shared by many. Four main types of radiological and nuclear terrorist attacks can be outlined: - acquisition and use of a nuclear weapon, - attacks and acts of sabotage against a nuclear reactor or another nuclear facility, - acquisition of fissile material for the elaboration of an Improvised Nuclear Device, - terrorist use of radiological materials for the elaboration of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD). This paper seeks to evaluate the probability for a terrorist group to acquire and make use of radiological materials in the objective of detonating a RDD, and the current international framework put into place to address such a threat. Is an international regime to cover radiological materials already in place? How comprehensive / integrated is it? Does a new and/or separate system need to be set up? Before 9/11, two events in particular served to illustrate the threat of a radiological or nuclear terrorist attack: Moscow in 1996, Argun in 1998. Since the 9/11 attacks, a few other radiological events have occurred, which could suggest that the threat is becoming more pressing. It must be noted that the use of a dirty bomb by a terrorist group would most probably be aimed at the contamination of a given geographical area, rather than mass destruction and killing. Indeed, the lethal impact of such weapons remains limited. For this reason, dirty bombs are considered by analysts as weapons of mass disruption rather than weapons of mass destruction. Impacts would be more important in the psychological or economic realms: - targeting highly populated environments, such as cities, would most probably not result in a high death toll; - compared with impacts on health, psychological impacts of such an attack would be much more serious, both within and outside the targeted population; - economic damage is probably the greatest threat posed by such attacks, particularly

  2. Controlled Release of Plectasin NZ2114 from a Hybrid Silicone-Hydrogel Material for Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Kasper; Grønnemose, Rasmus Birkholm; Alm, Martin

    2017-01-01

    this system with plectasin derivate NZ2114 in an attempt to design an S. aureus biofilm-resistant catheter. The material demonstrated promising antibiofilm properties, including properties against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, thus suggesting a novel application of this antimicrobial peptide....

  3. Hydrogen trapping in and release from tungsten: modeling and comparison with graphite with regard to its use as fusion reactor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, P.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Plank, H.; Alimov, V.Kh.

    1997-01-01

    Trapping and release of deuterium implanted in tungsten is investigated by modeling the results of reemission, thermal and isothermal desorption experiments. Rate coefficients and activation energies for diffusion, trapping and detrapping are derived. Hydrogen atoms are able to diffuse deep into tungsten, establishing a solute amount of the same order of magnitude as the trapped one. This 'diffusion zone' exceeds the implantation zone by more than two orders of magnitude, even at room temperature. The solute amount of hydrogen in tungsten depends only slightly on the incident ion energy, but scales with implantation fluence. This high amount of solute hydrogen is the main difference of tungsten compared to graphite where nearly all hydrogen is trapped in the implantation zone, the solute amount being orders of magnitude lower. The resulting unlimited accumulation of hydrogen in tungsten deep in the material down to the backward surface disadvantages tungsten as fusion reactor material with regard to hydrogen recycling properties. (orig.)

  4. Release kinetics and mechanisms of trace heavy metals from cement based material; Cinetiques et mecanismes de relargage des metaux lourds presents en traces dans les matrices cimentaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudilou, E.

    2002-12-15

    Chemical species contained in a solid matrix may be transferred to the environment through water leaching. Previous studies of trace metals released from building materials (particularly cement-based ones) highlight an important analytical difficulty. The aim of this study is to determine the kinetics and the mechanisms involved in the release of trace heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) from industrial cement pastes (usually ranging from 20 to 300 ppm). The development of a dynamic leaching system, named CTG-LEACHCRETE, (used at pH=5, 20 C) which permits the evaluation of the kinetics of trace heavy metals is presented in the first part. Also, innovative solid analysis techniques (ICP-MS-Laser Ablation, local and Grazing Incidence X-rays Diffraction (GIXD) technique) were used to characterise the cement-degraded layers formed during leaching experiments. These techniques enable to monitor the mineralogical evolution and the distribution of trace metals in these areas. The confrontation of these two approaches, kinetic and solid analysis, coupled with a thorough investigation of previously developed models, lead to proposals concerning the mechanisms of release of the trace heavy metals studied. In all the cement pastes studied (CPA-CEM I, CPJ-CEM II/A and CLC-CEM V/A), chromium is trapped in ettringite by substitution SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}(U)CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and its release is then controlled by the dissolution of this hydrate. The behaviour of copper, nickel and zinc in degraded areas and in leachates, are correlated to the silicon of the hydrated calcium silicate (CSH), which imply that they are localised there. Lead, was never detected in the leachates. But it is also correlated to the silicon in the degraded layers. (author)

  5. Public exposure from environmental release of radioactive material under normal operation of unit-1 Bushehr nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Parsouzi, Z.; Amrollahi, R.; Khamooshy, C.; Ghasemi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The unit-1 Bushehr nuclear power plant is a VVER type reactor with 1000 MWe power. ► Doses of public critical groups living around the plant were assessed under normal reactor operation conditions. ► PC-CREAM 98 computer code developed by the HPA was applied to assess the public doses. ► Doses are comparable with those in the FSAR, in the ER and doses monitored. ► The doses assessed are lower than the dose constraint of 0.1 mSv/y associated with the plant. - Abstract: The Unit-1 Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP-1), constructed at the Hallileh site near Bushehr located at the coast of the Persian Gulf, Iran, is a VVER type reactor with 1000 MWe power. According to standard practices, under normal operation conditions of the plant, radiological assessment of atmospheric and aquatic releases to the environment and assessment of public exposures are considered essential. In order to assess the individual and collective doses of the critical groups of population who receive the highest dose from radioactive discharges into the environment (atmosphere and aquatic) under normal operation conditions, this study was conducted. To assess the doses, the PC-CREAM 98 computer code developed by the Radiation Protection Division of the Health Protection Agency (HPA; formerly called NRPB) was applied. It uses a standard Gaussian plume dispersion model and comprises a suite of models and data for estimation of the radiological impact assessments of routine and continuous discharges from an NPP. The input data include a stack height of 100 m annual radionuclides release of gaseous effluents from the stack and liquid effluents that are released from heat removal system, meteorological data from the Bushehr local meteorological station, and the data for agricultural products. To assess doses from marine discharges, consumption of sea fish, crustacean and mollusca were considered. According to calculation by PC-CREAM 98 computer code, the highest individual

  6. Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

  7. Fish scale collagen sponge incorporated with Macrotyloma uniflorum plant extract as a possible wound/burn dressing material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, Thangavelu; Prabu, P; Ghosh, Kausik; Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara

    2014-01-01

    Application of plant extracts for the burn/wound treatment is followed over the decades as a common practice and it is an important aspect in clinical management. In this study porous collagen sponges (CS) were prepared using fish scales and were incorporated with mupirocin (CSM) and extracts of Macrotyloma uniflorum (CSPE) separately to impart antimicrobial activity to the sponges. The results showed that the addition of plant extract increased the tensile strength of CSPE and stability against collagenase enzyme. FTIR studies have shown the incorporation of plant extract in CSPE, SEM studies have revealed the porous nature of the sponges and XRD patterns have shown the retention of collagen triple helical structure even after the addition of plant extract. CSPE and CSM have exhibited antimicrobial properties. The sponges prepared were analysed for their in vitro biocompatibility studies using fibroblasts and keratinocyte cell lines and the results have shown their biocompatible nature. Based on the results obtained, CS, CSM and CSPE may be tried as a burn/wound dressing materials, initially, in small animals in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Physicochemical properties of aerosol released in the case of a fire involving materials used in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouf, F.-X., E-mail: francois-xavier.ouf@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA, PSN-RES/SCA/LECEV, Gif-Sur-Yvette 91192 (France); Mocho, V.-M.; Pontreau, S.; Wang, Z. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA, PSN-RES/SCA/LECEV, Gif-Sur-Yvette 91192 (France); Ferry, D. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS UMR 7325, CINaM, 13009 Marseille (France); Yon, J. [CORIA-UMR 6614-Normandie Université, CNRS-Université et Insa de Rouen, Campus Universitaire du Madrillet, 76800 Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray (France)

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We characterize the aerosol emitted during thermal degradation of common materials. • Oxygen concentration on aerosol properties has been investigated. • Influence of oxygen concentration is limited to the organic carbon fraction. • The organic carbon fraction is correlated to the C:H ratio. • For pure materials, monomer diameter is correlated to the emission factor. - Abstract: For industrial concerns, and more especially for nuclear applications, the characterization of soot is essential for predicting the behaviour of containment barriers in fire conditions. This study deals with the characterization (emission factor, composition, size, morphology, microstructure) of particles produced during thermal degradation of materials found in nuclear facilities (electrical cables, polymers, oil and solvents). Small-scale experiments have been conducted for oxygen concentrations [O{sub 2}] ranging from 15% to 21% in order to imitate the oxygen depletion encountered during a confined fire. Particles denote distinct shapes, from aggregates composed of monomers with diameters ranging from 31.2 nm to 52.8 nm, to compact nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 15 nm to 400 nm, and their composition strongly depends on fuel type. Despite the organic to total carbon ratio (OC/TC), their properties are poorly influenced by the decrease in [O{sub 2}]. Finally, two empirical correlations are proposed for predicting the OC/TC ratio and the monomer diameter, respectively, as a function of the fuel's carbon to hydrogen ratio and the emission factor.

  9. DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES OF 3D-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY WITH INTRALESIONAL APPLICATION OF CONTRAST MATERIAL IN A CASE OF VERY LARGE RADICULAR MAXILLARY CYST - A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Gavazova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diagnosis of odontogenic cysts despite their benign nature is a critical and challenging problem. Aim: The aim of this article is to demonstrate a different diagnostic approach in case of very large odontogenic cyst. Materials and Methods: This study was executed on one male patient aged of 38 using 3D computed tomography and contrast material inside the lesion. Differential diagnosis made by the residents was compared to the histopathological examination as the gold standard for identifying the nature of the cysts. Results: This diagnostic approach using 3D computed tomography combined with contrast material injected inside the lesion shows the real borders of the cyst of the maxilla and helps oral surgeon in planning the volume of the surgical intervention. Conclusion: Precise diagnose ensure the possibility of doing the optimal surgical intervention- a precondition for best wound healing.

  10. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  11. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  12. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nageshwar [Magnetic and Superconducting Materials Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, M.P. (India); Deo, M.N. [High Pressure & Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Roy, S.B. [Magnetic and Superconducting Materials Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, M.P. (India)

    2016-09-11

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  13. Determination of potential radiation exposure via terrestrial food chains by the release of radioactive material from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handge, P.; Meurin, G.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation exposure level caused by consumption of vegetable and animal products in the environment of nuclear power plants is determined to a large extent by the release of 90 Sr, 134 Cs, and 137 Cs. For long-lived nuclides, especially 90 Sr, transfer from the soil into vegetation makes the essential contribution to plant contamination after several years of power plant operation. The relevant transfer coefficients for the different plant species vary, depending on the soil properties, between 0.02 and 6.0 [pCi/kg fresh weigth of vegetation : pCi/kg dry weight of soil] for Sr and between 1.10 -3 and 0.2 [pCi/kg fresh weight of vegetation : pCi/kg dry weight of soil] for Cs. The sensitivity analysis shows that already a variation of the transfer coefficients for Sr from 0.5 up to 2.5 [pCi/kg fresh weight of vegetation : pCi/kg dry weight of soil] and for Cs from 3.10 -2 up to 2.10 -1 cause variations in the level of radiation exposure for individual exposure pathways by factors fo 2 to 4. Correspondingly higher values are to be expected by still larger transfer of Sr and Cs from the ground to vegetation. For transfer coefficients >- 2.5 [pCi/kg fresh weight of vegetation : pCi/kg dry weight of soil], however, removal of radioactive substances from the ground by the plants must not remain without consideration any longer. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Comparison of phosphorus (P) removal properties of materials proposed for the control of sediment P release in UK lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Bryan M; Meis, Sebastian; Anderson, Amy; Kellou, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Of growing interest in the control of sediment phosphorus (P) release in lakes is the use of solid phase P-sorbing products (PSPs) including industrial by-products and naturally occurring or modified mineral complexes. However, there is a need to report on novel PSPs proposed by suppliers for use in lake remediation projects at the national scale. We comparatively assessed the elemental composition and P sorption properties of six industrial waste-products (waste-products from treatment of abandoned mine waters - 'red ochre' and 'black ochre'; waste products from building practices: 'gypsum', 'sander dust', 'mag dust' and 'vermiculite') and one commercially available modified lanthanum (La) bentonite product (Phoslock®), all of which have been proposed for use in remediation projects in UK lakes. P sorption was well described (r(2)>0.70) by Langmuir isotherms for all products with the exception of 'gypsum' for which no significant P sorption was reported. P sorption capacities ranged from 4 mgPg(-1) dry weight (d.w.) PSP ('black ochre') to 63 mgg(-1) d.w. ('sander dust'), with products composed mainly of calcium oxide (CaO) and silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) (i.e. 'vermiculite', 'mag dust' and 'sander dust' PSPs) having significantly higher sorption capacities than all other PSPs. Estimates of the equilibrium P concentration (EPC(0)) from Langmuir isotherms indicated that all PSPs, with the exception of 'gypsum', were capable of reducing soluble reactive P (SRP) concentrations to <5.1 μgL(-1). Further research and development required to underpin regulatory policy decisions regarding the use of PSPs is discussed. Dose estimates for each PSP required to treat a eutrophic shallow loch (40.6 ha) with persistent internal loading issues are reported. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Preparation and physical characterization of calcium sulfate cement/silica-based mesoporous material composites for controlled release of BMP-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan H

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Honglue Tan,1 Shengbing Yang,2 Pengyi Dai,1 Wuyin Li,1 Bing Yue2 1Luoyang Orthopedics and Traumatology Institution, Luoyang Orthopedic-Traumatological Hospital, Luoyang, 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implants, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: As a commonly used implant material, calcium sulfate cement (CSC, has some shortcomings, including low compressive strength, weak osteoinduction capability, and rapid degradation. In this study, silica-based mesoporous materials such as SBA-15 were synthesized and combined with CSC to prepare CSC/SBA-15 composites. The properties of SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms. SBA-15 was blended into CSC at 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt%, referred to as CSC, CSC-5S (5% mass ratio, CSC-10S (10% mass ratio, and CSC-20S (20% mass ratio, respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and compression tests were used to determine the structure and mechanical properties of the composites, respectively. The formation of hydroxyapatite on composite surfaces was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction after soaking in simulated body fluid. BMP-2 was loaded into the composites by vacuum freeze-drying, and its release characteristics were detected by Bradford protein assay. The in vitro degradation of the CSC/SBA-15 composite was investigated by measuring weight loss. The results showed that the orderly, nanostructured, mesoporous SBA-15 possessed regular pore size and structure. The compressive strength of CSC/SBA-15 increased with the increase in SBA-15 mass ratio, and CSC-20S demonstrated the maximum strength. Compared to CSC, hydroxyapatite that formed on the surfaces of CSC/SBA-15 was uniform and compact. The degradation rate of CSC/SBA-15 decreased with increasing

  16. The choice of individual dose criterion at which to restrict agricultural produce following an unplanned release of radioactive material to atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionian, J.; Simmonds, J.R.

    1985-06-01

    In the event of an accidental release of radioactive material to atmosphere, the introduction of emergency countermeasures will be based on the need to limit the risk to individuals. However, it has been suggested that a form of cost-benefit analysis may be used as an input to decisions on the withdrawal of countermeasures, although it is recognised that these decisions may be influenced by factors other than those directly related to radiological protection. In this study, a method based on cost-benefit analysis is illustrated for assessing the optimum level of individual dose at which restrictions on agricultural production may be considered. This requires monetary values to be assigned to both the lost food production and to the health detriment, expressed as the collective effective dose equivalent commitment. It has been assumed in this analysis that food-supply restrictions are both introduced and withdrawn at the same projected level of annual individual dose. The effect on the optimum dose level of the following parameters is examined: the type of produce restricted; the size of the release; the site and direction of the release; the weather conditions; and the cost assigned to unit collective dose. It is shown that the optimum dose criterion, based on the effective dose equivalent received by an individual from a years intake of food, varies over practically the whole range of individual dose considered, i.e., 0.1 to 50 mSv. However, it is concluded that 5 mSv would represent the optimum dose criterion in a substantial number of cases. (author)

  17. Stowing of radioactive packages, materials or objects for their transport. Guide nr 27, Release of 30 August 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    A good package stowing is part of an in-depth defence approach to ensure the safety of transport operations in the case of radioactive materials. This guide thus presents a set of recommendations to ensure this safety, recalls regulatory requirements, and presents recommendations made by the ASN for specific stowing training. This document concerns all kinds of transports (road, rail, river, sea, and air). After having indicated the different regulatory references, standards and recommendations, it proposes an overview of the applicable regulatory framework and technical requirements for stowing in France and in the EU in the case of road transport, of rail transport and of sea transport, and in France and in the world for the case of air transport. The next part details regulatory requirements and recommendations made by the ASN for the stowing of radioactive loads: commitment of the company's management, specific training for concerned personnel, definition of packing and stowing plans or of specific instructions, selection of the stowing system, adequacy of the used stowing equipment, documentation to achieve a good stowing, stowing quality control. Then, recommendations are made for the undertaking of a specific training on radioactive load stowing: training modalities, training content, training objectives (for designers, operators and controllers)

  18. Efficient Construction of Energetic Materials via Nonmetallic Catalytic Carbon-Carbon Cleavage/Oxime-Release-Coupling Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; He, Chunlin; Yin, Ping; Imler, Gregory H; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2018-03-14

    The exploitation of C-C activation to facilitate chemical reactions is well-known in organic chemistry. Traditional strategies in homogeneous media rely upon catalyst-activated or metal-mediated C-C bonds leading to the design of new processes for applications in organic chemistry. However, activation of a C-C bond, compared with C-H bond activation, is a more challenging process and an underdeveloped area because thermodynamics does not favor insertion into a C-C bond in solution. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage through loss of an oxime moiety has not been reported. In this paper, a new observation of self-coupling via C-C bond cleavage with concomitant loss of oxime in the absence of metals (either metal-complex mediation or catalysis) results in dihydroxylammonium 5,5-bistetrazole-1,10-diolate (TKX-50) as well as N, N'-([3,3'-bi(1,2,4-oxadiazole)]-5,5'-diyl)dinitramine, a potential candidate for a new generation of energetic materials.

  19. Study of deuterium retention in/release from ITER-relevant Be-containing mixed material layers implanted at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, K., E-mail: kazuyoshi.sugiyama@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Porosnicu, C. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, EURATOM-MEdC Association, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Jacob, W.; Roth, J.; Dürbeck, Th. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Jepu, I.; Lungu, C.P. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, EURATOM-MEdC Association, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-07-15

    D implantation into Be-containing mixed material layers: Be, Be–W (W: ∼6 at.%) and Be–C (C: ∼50 at.%), was performed at elevated temperatures. The temperature dependence of D retention varied depending on the admixed element. D retention in Be and Be–W layers decreases with increasing implantation temperature, while the Be–C layers maintained rather high D retention in the present investigated temperature range (up to 623 K). D desorption behaviour from Be–C suggests the contribution of C–D bonds to D retention. W admixture into Be can significantly suppress D retention in Be. Long-term isothermal annealing at 513 and 623 K for D removal was also performed to simulate the ITER-wall-baking scenario. Even extended annealing at temperatures comparable to or lower than the implantation temperature does not lead to a significant release of retained D.

  20. System for Capturing/Storage/Retrieval/Sharing of Toxicological Information Required for Rapid Assessment of Risks Posed By Release of CBRN Materials in the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M. L.; Ritondo, M.; Earp Singer, L.; Rogers, J. V.; Price, J. A.; Fleming, E. J.; Chappie, D.; McGonigle, D.; Nichols, T. L.; Sonich-Mullin, C.

    2007-01-01

    The Threat and Consequence Assessment Division (TCAD) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) is developing methodology for performing rapid risk assessments needed for incident management, cleanup, and mitigation of hazards in the aftermath of a terrorist event. TCAD, working with the Department of Defense's Chemical and Biological Defense Information Analysis Center (CBIAC, operated by Battelle) has developed SERRA - Support for Environmental Rapid Risk Assessment. This paper describes the methodology utilized to formulate SERRA, presents current contents of the SERRA database (information derived from assessments of over 3,000 publications selected from 10,000 citations), and describes SERRA implementation. The paper also discusses how an Internet-accessible version of the SERRA database could be utilized by a country or countries to prepare for and respond to the intentional release of chemical, biological or radiological materials.(author)

  1. Sorption-desorption processes of radioisotopes with solid materials from liquid releases and atmosphere deposits. The distribution coefficient (Ksub(d)), its uses, limitations, and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, Arsene

    1979-03-01

    The various sorption-desorption processes of radionuclides with environmental materials are presented. The parameters governing the distribution coefficient are reviewed in the light of various examples. The factors affecting equilibria between the different phases are: reaction time, concentration of the solid phase, water quality, salinity, competition between ions, concentration of radioisotopes or stable isotopes, pH of the mobile phase, particle diameter, chemical form of the radioisotopes, nature of the solid phase, temperature. The effects of the biological parameters on the distribution coefficient are discussed. Biological processes affect the main chemical transformations: mineralization, insolubilization, oxidation-reduction, complexation, ... The importance of these processes is demonstrated by a number of examples in various media. Finally, the practical use of Ksub(d) in the assessment of the environmental impact of radioactive releases is developed, with special emphasis on the limits of its use in siting studies and its essential interest in specifying pathways and capacity of a river system [fr

  2. Development of mats composed by TiO{sub 2} and carbon dual electrospun nanofibers: A possible anode material in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Gomez, Nora A.; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Av. Universidad S/N Cd. Universitaria San Nicolás de los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 México (Mexico); Garcia-Gutierrez, Domingo I. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Av. Universidad S/N Cd. Universitaria San Nicolás de los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 México (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Centro de Innovación, Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería y Tecnología, PIIT, Av. Universidad S/N Cd. Universitaria San Nicolás de los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 México (Mexico); Mosqueda, Hugo A. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Av. Universidad S/N Cd. Universitaria San Nicolás de los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 México (Mexico); and others

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Dual nanofiber of TiO{sub 2}–C/C showed excellent electrical performance. • TiO{sub 2}–C/C dual nanofiber can host a dense biofilm of electroactivated Escherichia coli. • Dual nanofibers can be applied as anode to obtain electricity in microbial fuel cells. - Abstract: A new material based on TiO{sub 2(rutile)}–C{sub (semi-graphitic)}/C{sub (semi-graphitic)} dual nanofiber mats is presented, whose composition and synthesis methodology are fundamental factors for the development of exoelectrogenic biofilms on its surface. Therefore, this material shows the required characteristics for possible applications in the bioconversion process of an organic substrate to electricity in a microbial fuel cell. Chronoamperometry, cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and electrical conductivity analyses showed excellent electrical performance of the material for the application intended; a resistance as low as 3.149 Ω was able to be measured on this material. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies confirmed the morphology sought on the material for the application intended, dual nanofibres TiO{sub 2(rutile)}–C{sub (semi-graphitic)}/C{sub (semi-graphitic)} with a side by side configuration. The difference in composition of the fibers forming the dual nanofibers was clearly observed and confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), and their crystal structure was evident in the results obtained from selected area electron diffraction (SAED) studies. This nanostructured material presented a high surface area and is biocompatible, given that it can host a dense biofilm of electroactivated Escherichia coli. In this study, the maximum current density obtained in a half microbial fuel cell was 8 A/m{sup 2} (0.8 mA/cm{sup 2})

  3. Possibilities of new materials surface sensibility express determination based on ZnSe-CdS system by pH isoelectric state measurements of the surface state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirovskaya, I. A.; Mironova, E. V.; Ushakov, O. V.; Nor, P. E.; Yureva, A. V.; Matyash, Yu I.

    2018-01-01

    A method for determining the hydrogen index of the surfaces isoelectric state (pHiso) at various gases pressures -possible components of the surrounding and technological media has been developed. With its use, changes in pH of binary and more complex semiconductors-components of the new system-ZnSe-CdS under the influence of nitrogen dioxide-have been found. The limiting sensitivity of surfaces - minimum PNO2, causing a change in pH has been estimated. The most active components of ZnSe-CdS system, recommended as materials for measuring cells of NO2, have been revealed. The relationship between the changing patterns with the composition of surface (acid-base) and bulk (in particular, theoretical calculated crystal density) properties has been established, allowing to find the most effective materials for sensor technology and for semiconductor analysis.

  4. Materials in Sweden for future production of fuel pellets. A review of possible materials in short- and medium long-term; Raavaror foer framtida tillverkning av braenslepellets i Sverige. En kartlaeggning av taenkbara alternativa raavaror paa kort och medellaang sikt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Lars [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    The use of fuel pellets, mainly produced from sawdust and shavings from the Swedish sawmill industry, has increased during the 1990s among small-scale users such as private houses as well as large-scale users such as thermal power stations. During the last years this increase has continued for small-scale use. Due to a significant increase of the pellet prices the last couple of years the increase for the large-scale users seems to have stopped. It is reasonable to believe that these higher prices depend mostly on lack of raw materials for the fuel pellet production. The greater part of sawdust from Swedish saw mills is used in the pellet industry, the board industry or as an internal fuel. It is reasonable to assume a small increase of present raw material available for pellet production without a further decrease in the use for the board industry. Another sawmill by-product, dry chips, may increase in importance as a fuel pellet raw material and give a small contribution while the green chips should be for use in the pulp industry only. If the use of fuel pellets should increase there is a need for new raw materials. In the short-term, thinning material and cull tree could be alternatives that could give pellets with similar characteristics as present fuel pellets. For large-scale consumers with greater ability to handle problems concerning ash, such as sintering and fouling, as well as particle and gaseous emissions a further choice of raw materials could be possible, such as bark, peat and logging residues. In the longer term energy crops could be used as well as lignin, derived from energy effective pulp industry and from possible large-scale production of ethanol from woody biomass. Nearly all of the different raw materials studied in this review have higher amounts of substances not desirable in combustion such as potassium, chlorine and nitrogen. However, pelletizing gives an unique opportunity to mix different raw materials and possible additives in order

  5. Increased Release of Mercury from Dental Amalgam Fillings due to Maternal Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields as a Possible Mechanism for the High Rates of Autism in the Offspring: Introducing a Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi Gh.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization (WHO, factors such as growing electricity demand, ever-advancing technologies and changes in social behaviour have led to steadily increasing exposure to man-made electromagnetic fields. Dental amalgam fillings are among the major sources of exposure to elemental mercury vapour in the general population. Although it was previously believed that low levels are mercury (i.g. release of mercury from dental amalgam is not hazardous, now numerous data indicate that even very low doses of mercury cause toxicity. There are some evidence indicating that perinatal exposure to mercury is significantly associated with an increased risk of developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Furthermore, mercury can decrease the levels of neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, noreprenephrine, and acetylcholine in the brain and cause neurological problems. On the other hand, a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels is found in some studies. We have previously shown that exposure to MRI or microwave radiation emitted by common mobile phones can lead to increased release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings. Moreover, when we investigated the effects of MRI machines with stronger magnetic fields, our previous findings were confirmed. As a strong association between exposure to electromagnetic fields and mercury level has been found in our previous studies, our findings can lead us to this conclusion that maternal exposure to electromagnetic fields in mothers with dental amalgam fillings may cause elevated levels of mercury and trigger the increase in autism rates. Further studies are needed to have a better understanding of the possible role of the increased mercury level after exposure to electromagnetic fields and the rate of autism spectrum disorders in the offspring.

  6. The development of the American National Standard 'control of radioactive surface contamination on materials equipment and facilities to be released for uncontrolled use'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, J.

    1980-01-01

    A new standard submitted by the Health Physics Society Standards Committee to the American National Standards Institute concerning radioactive surface contamination of materials and equipment is discussed. The chronological events in the development of this standard are given. The standard provides criteria for the release for uncontrolled use of materials, equipment and facilities contaminated or potentially contaminated with radioactivity. Permissible contamination limits are specified for: 1) long lived alpha emitters except natural uranium and thorium, 2) more hazardous beta-gamma emitters, 3) less hazardous beta-gamma emitters and 4) natural uranium and thorium. A contamination reference level of 1000 dpm/100 cm 2 for 90 Sr was set as the basis for assigning limits to radionuclides presenting an ingestion hazard and other radionuclides were grouped based on the values of their maximum permissible concentration (MPC) in water relative to 90 Sr. The contamination limit for 239 Pu was chosen as the basis for assigning limits based on MPC in air to radionuclides presenting an inhalation hazard; a value of 100 dpm/100 cm 2 was adopted in the standard. An upper limit of 5000 dpm/100 cm 2 for surface contamination was selected for the standard. (UK)

  7. Comfort and Functional Properties of Far-Infrared/Anion-Releasing Warp-Knitted Elastic Composite Fabrics Using Bamboo Charcoal, Copper, and Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Elastic warp-knitted composite fabrics with far-infrared emissivity and an anion-releasing property were prepared using bamboo charcoal (BC, copper (Cu, and phase-change material (PCM. The functional composite fabric, which was composed of self-made complex yarns with various twisting degrees and material composition, were created using a rotor twister and ring-spinning technique. The fabric structure was diversified by the feeding modes of weft yarn into a crochet-knitting machine. The twist number of complex yarns was optimized by tensile tenacity, twist contraction, and hairiness, and analysis showed that twisting at 12 twists per inch produced the highest tensile tenacity and appropriate twist contraction and hairiness. Comfort evaluation showed that the elastic composite fabrics with BC weft yarns exhibited higher water–vapor transmission rate and air permeability, reaching 876 g/m2∙ day and 73.2 cm3/s/cm2, respectively. Three structures of composite fabric with various weft yarns had >0.85 ε far-infrared emissivity and 350–420 counts/cm3 anion amount. The prepared elastic warp-knitted fabrics can provide a comfortable, dry, and breathable environment to the wearer and can thus be applied as health-care textiles in the future.

  8. Chitosan/alginate based multilayers to control drug release fromophthalmic lens

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Diana; Pinto, Luís F. V.; Bozukova, Dimitriya; Santos, Luís F.; Serro, Ana Paula; Saramago, Benilde

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the possibility of using layer-by-layer deposition, based in natural polymers (chitosan and alginate), to control the release of different ophthalmic drugs from three types of lens materials: a silicone-based hydrogel recently proposed by our group as drug releasing soft contact lens (SCL) material and two commercially available materials: CI26Y for intraocular lens (IOLs) and Definitive 50 for SCLs. The optimised coating, consisting in one double layer of (algin...

  9. Antimicrobial beeswax coated polylactide films with silver control release capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Abad, Antonio; Lagarón, Jose Maria; Ocio, María Jose

    2014-03-17

    Although the application of silver based antimicrobial systems is a widespread technology, its implementation in areas such as food packaging is still challenging. The present paper describes the fabrication of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) coated with beeswax with controlled release properties for sustained antimicrobial performance. Release of silver ions from the polymers was monitored voltammetrically under various conditions (surface contact, immersion in various liquid media and at different pH values) throughout at least 7days. A higher release was noted with decreasing pH while surface release was much slower than the release when immersed in liquid medium. While uncoated films demonstrated a high burst release which in some instances implied surpassing some current migration restrictions (food), the addition of a beeswax layer allowed a sustained release of the antimicrobial compound. Increasing the thickness of the beeswax layer resulted in an increase in the water barrier properties of the films while reducing the relatively constant values of sustained release. Antimicrobial performance was correlated with the release of silver ions, indicating threshold concentrations for biocide action of films displayed a strong bactericidal effect against Salmonella enterica. The application of this functional barrier thus offers the possibility of tuning the release profiles of the films to suit a specific application and puts forth the possible suitability of these materials for food packaging or other migration sensitive applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental evaluation of the neutrons flux of a irradiator with AmBe sources and its possibility of use in materials analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Ruy Barros de

    2003-01-01

    This work had as a target to determine the irradiator thermal and over cadmium (epithermal and fast) neutrons flux , of the Nuclear Experimental Laboratory of the Nuclear Energy Center (CNEN) - IPEN, and the possibility of its use for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) by the absolute method. The neutrons flux quantification was performed indirectly by the gold naked and cadmium-covered foils activation technique. The neutrons flux was determined for two situations: with polyethylene block 5.0 cm thick and without the polyethylene block. The quantification of the elements present in the irradiated samples was obtained after the experimental determination of the incident neutrons flux in the irradiation position of the sample. Flux values along the irradiator axis were determined. Some materials were analyzed, presenting good agreement with reference values. (author)

  11. Materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The choice of individual dose criterion at which to restrict agricultural produce following an unplanned release of radioactive material to atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Dionian, J

    1985-01-01

    In the event of an accidental release of radioactive material to atmosphere, the introduction of emergency countermeasures will be based on the need to limit the risk to individuals. However, it has been suggested that a form of cost-benefit analysis may be used as an input to decisions on the withdrawal of countermeasures, although it is recognised that these decisions may be influenced by factors other than those directly related to radiological protection. In this study, a method based on cost-benefit analysis is illustrated for assessing the optimum level of individual dose at which restrictions on agricultural production may be considered. This requires monetary values to be assigned to both the lost food production and to the health detriment, expressed as the collective effective dose equivalent commitment. It has been assumed in this analysis that food-supply restrictions are both introduced and withdrawn at the same projected level of annual individual dose. The effect on the optimum dose level of th...

  13. Environmental consequences of postulate plutonium releases from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), Santa Susana, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1982-02-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), in the Santa Susana site, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquake, and the 150-mph and 170-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 μCi/m 2 . The deposition values following the 110-mph and the 130-mph tornadoes are below the EPA proposed guideline

  14. Modeling the Effects of Reservoir Releases on the Bed Material Sediment Flux of the Colorado River in western Colorado and eastern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitlick, J.; Bizzi, S.; Schmitt, R. J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Warm-water reaches of the upper Colorado River have historically provided important habitat for four endangered fishes. Over time these habitats have been altered or lost due to reductions in peak flows and sediment loads caused by reservoir operations. In an effort to reverse these trends, controlled reservoir releases are now used to enhance sediment transport and restore channel complexity. In this presentation, we discuss the development of a sediment routing model designed to assess how changes in water and sediment supply can affect the mass balance of sediment. The model is formulated for ten reaches of the Colorado River spanning 250 km where values of bankfull discharge, width, and reach-average slope have been measured. Bed surface grain size distributions (GSDs) have also been measured throughout the study area; these distributions are used as a test of the model, not as input, except as an upstream boundary condition. In modeling fluxes and GSDs, we assume that the bed load transport capacity is determined by local hydraulic conditions and bed surface grain sizes. Estimates of the bankfull bed load transport capacity in each reach are computed for 14 size fractions of the surface bed material, and the fractional transport rates are summed to get the total transport capacity. In the adjacent reach, fluxes of each size fraction from upstream are used to determine the mean grain size, and the fractional transport capacity of that reach. Calculations proceed downstream and illustrate how linked changes in discharge, shear stress and mean grain size affect (1) the total bed load transport capacity, and (2) the size distribution of the bed surface sediment. The results show that model-derived GSDs match measured GSDs very closely, except for two reaches in the lower part of the study area where slope is affected by uplift associated with salt diapirs; here the model significantly overestimates the transport capacity in relation to the supply. Except for these

  15. Determination of accident related release data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, W.; Nolte, O.; Lange, F.; Martens, R.

    2004-01-01

    For accident safety analyses, for the assessment of potential radiological consequences, for the review of current requirements of the Transport Regulations and for their possible further development as well as for the demonstration that radioactive materials such as LDM candidate material fulfil the regulatory requirements reliable release data following mechanical impact are required. This is definitely one of the demanding issues in the field of transport safety of radioactive materials. In this context special attention has to be paid to radioactive wastes immobilised in brittle materials, e.g. cement/concrete, glass, ceramics or other brittle materials such as fresh and spent fuel. In this presentation we report on a long-term experimental program aiming at improving the general physical understanding of the release process as well as the quantity and the quality of release data. By combining laboratory experiments using small scale test specimens with a few key scaling experiments with large scale test objects significant progress was achieved to meet this objective. The laboratory equipment enables the in-situ determination of the amount and aerodynamic size distribution of the airborne particles generated upon impact of the test specimen on a hard target. Impact energies cover the range experienced in transport accidents including aircraft accidents. The well defined experimental boundary conditions and the good reproducibility of the experimental procedure allowed for systematic studies to exactly measure the amount and aerodynamic size distribution of the airborne release and to quantify its dependence on relevant parameters such as energy input, material properties, and specimen geometry. The experimental program was performed within the scope of various national and international (e.g. EU-funded) projects. The small scale experiments with brittle materials revealed a pronounced universality of the airborne release in view of the material properties and

  16. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Odom, Susan A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Sottos, Nancy R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; White, Scott R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Moore, Jeffrey S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  17. Geologic investigation of the Virgin River Valley salt deposits, Clark County, southeastern Nevada, to investigate their suitability for possible storage of radioactive waste material as of September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The results from a geologic investigation of the Virgin River Valley salt deposits, Clark County, southeastern Nevada, to examine their suitability for further study and consideration in connection with the possible storage of radioactive waste material are given. The results indicate that (1) approximately one-half of the salt body underlies the Overton Arm of Lake Mead and that the dry land portion of the salt body that has a thickness of 1,000 feet or more covers an area of about four and one-half square miles; (2) current tectonic activity in the area of the salt deposits is believed to be confined to seismic events associated with crustal adjustments following the filling of Lake Mead; (3) detailed information on the hydrology of the salt deposit area is not available at present but it is reported that a groundwater study by the U.S. Geological Survey is now in progress; (4) there is no evidence of exploitable minerals in the salt deposit area other than evaporites such as salt, gypsum, and possibly sand and gravel; (5) the salt deposit area is located inside the Lake Mead Recreation Area, outlined on the accompanying Location Plat, and several Federal, State, and Local agencies share regulatory responsibilities for the activities in the area; (6) other salt deposit areas of Arizona and Nevada, such as the Detrital Valley, Red Lake Dome, Luke Dome, and Mormon Mesa area, and several playa lake areas of central Nevada may merit further study; and (7) additional information, as outlined, is needed to more thoroughly evaluate the salt deposits of the Virgin River Valley and other areas referred to above

  18. Materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available . It is generally included as part of a structurally insulated panel (SIP) where the foam is sandwiched between external skins of steel, wood or cement. Cement composites Cement bonded composites are an important class of building materials. These products... for their stone buildings, including the Egyptians, Aztecs and Inca’s. As stone is a very dense material it requires intensive heating to become warm. Rocks were generally stacked dry but mud, and later cement, can be used as a mortar to hold the rocks...

  19. Sellafield (release of radioactivity)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J; Goodlad, A; Morris, M

    1986-02-06

    A government statement is reported, about the release of plutonium nitrate at the Sellafield site of British Nuclear Fuels plc on 5 February 1986. Matters raised included: details of accident; personnel monitoring; whether radioactive material was released from the site; need for public acceptance of BNFL activities; whether plant should be closed; need to reduce level of radioactive effluent; number of incidents at the plant.

  20. Principles for limiting releases of radioactive effluents into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is concerned with the subject of limiting releases of radioactive effluents during normal, controlled operation of nuclear installations. It does not deal with releases from accidents where it is only possible to limit exposures by intervention. In 1978 the IAEA published guidance on the concepts and principles for use by the competent authorities in setting limits for planned releases of radioactive material into the environment (Safety Series No. 45). This publication is a complete revision of Safety Series No. 45 and its Annex

  1. Role of pH Changes on Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Release and on the Fibrin Architecture of Platelet-rich Fibrin When Layered with Biodentine, Glass Ionomer Cement, and Intermediate Restorative Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaguri, Harish; Suresh, Nandini; Surendran, Smitha; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Chitra, Selvarajan

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of pH that is due to setting reaction of Biodentine, glass ionomer cement (GIC), and intermediate restorative material (IRM) on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) release and on the fibrin architecture of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF). PRF was obtained from 8 volunteers and layered over the freshly prepared GIC, IRM, and Biodentine mixtures. TGF-β1 release was estimated by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and fibrin structure of PRF was analyzed by using scanning electron microscope at 1 and 5 hours. Biodentine, GIC, and IRM increased the TGF-β1 release in comparison with that of control group (PRF alone) at both 1 and 5 hours. Biodentine released significantly more TGF-β1 than GIC and IRM at 1 hour. At 5 hours both GIC and Biodentine released significantly more TGF-β1 than IRM. The fibrin architecture of the Biodentine group was similar to that of control group at both 1 and 5 hours. In GIC and IRM groups the fibrillar structure of fibrin was collapsed, ill-defined, and cloudy with very thick fibers and irregularly reduced porosities. Biodentine induces larger amount of TGF-β1 release and also maintains the integrity of fibrin structure when compared with GIC and IRM when layered over PRF. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimated airborne release of plutonium from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility in the Santa Susana site, California, as a result of postulated damage from severe wind and earthquake hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, J.; Ayer, J.E.

    1981-09-01

    The potential mass of airborne releases of plutonium (source term) that could result from wind and seismic damage is estimated for the Atomics International Company's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF) at the Santa Susana site in California. The postulated source terms will be useful as the basis for estimating the potential dose to the maximum exposed individual by inhalation and to the total population living within a prescribed radius of the site. The respirable fraction of airborne particles is thus the principal concern. The estimated source terms are based on the damage ratio, and the potential airborne releases if all enclosures suffer particular levels of damage. In an attempt to provide a realistic range of potential source terms that include most of the normal processing conditions, a best estimate bounded by upper and lower limits is provided. The range of source terms is calculated by combining a high best estimate and a low damage ratio, based on a fraction of enclosures suffering crush or perforation, with the airborne release from enclosures based upon an upper limit, average, and lower limit inventory of dispersible materials at risk. Two throughput levels are considered. The factors used to evaluate the fractional airborne release of materials and the exchange rates between enclosed and exterior atmospheres are discussed. The postulated damage and source terms are discussed for wind and earthquake hazard scenarios in order of their increasing severity

  3. Assessment of nanoparticle release and associated health effect of polymer-silicon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, H; Irfan, A; Sachse, S; Njuguna, J

    2012-01-01

    Little information is currently available on possible release of nanomaterials or/and nanoparticles (NP) from conventional and novel products and associated health effect. This study aimed to assess the possible release of NP during the application stage of conventional and nanoproducts. NP release was monitored during physical processing of polymer-silicon composites, and the toxicity of both the released NP and the raw silica nanomaterials that were used as fillers in the nanocomposites was assessed in vitro using human lung epithelial A549 cells. This study suggests that 1) NP can be released from the conventional and novel polymer-silicon composites under certain application scenario; 2) the level of NP release from polymer composites could be altered by different reinforcement materials; e.g. nanostructured MMT could reduce the release while SiO2 NP could increase the release; 3) working with polymer composites under certain conditions could risk inhalation of high level of polymer NP; 4) raw nanomaterials appeared to be toxic in the chosen in vitro system. Further study of the effect of novel filler materials on NP release from final polymer products and the effect of released NP on environment and human health will inform design of safe materials and minimization of negative impact on the environment and human health.

  4. Spread of harmful radioactive materials into running water - Possible consequences on emergency protection measures: Results of the four work packages; Radiologische Schadstoffausbreitung in Fliessgewässer- Mögliche Auswirkungen auf den Notfallschutz: Ergebnisse der vier Arbeitspakete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-07-15

    When an extreme event in a Swiss nuclear power plant occurs, the release of radioactive materials could contaminate the drinking water supply through ground water, the river Aare or the river Rhine. To avoid such an accident, protection measures have to be taken in time, in order to stop drinking water treatment facilities downstream from the source of radioactivity release. The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) reviewed the current situation as far as their efficiency for emergency protection of drinking water supplies is concerned. Current legal requirements and measures provide protection for the population and the environment against an uncontrolled release of radioactive materials into ground water and flowing waters. However, some points have to be checked more deeply. The present report describes the results of this analysis. The release of radioactive material into ground water or flowing waters could occur as a result of earthquakes or flooding. Even for accidents exceeding design considerations with core meltdown, large contaminations of ground and flowing water are not to be expected thanks to the stability of the reactor buildings. Because of the varying ground water situations and the stability of the reactor buildings at Swiss nuclear power plants, a situation similar to the one that occurred during the Fukushima accident, where ground water continually entered into the reactor containment causing large contamination of the water, cannot take place. The examination of communication paths showed that the paths are established between the nuclear power plants, the participating federal offices and the cantons. The criteria for the setting off of alarms and immediate measures to be taken in cases where radioactive materials in the Aare or the Rhine are recorded were examined. Downstream of the nuclear power plants, five new sodium-iodide detectors were installed in order to continuously monitor the dose rate and the activity of gamma

  5. Contaminative Influence of Beef Due to the Inhalation of Air and the Ingestion of Soil of Livestock from an Acute Release of Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Jeong, Hyo Jeon; Han, Moon Hee

    2004-01-01

    The contaminative influence of beef due to the inhalation of air and the ingestion of soil of livestock, both of which are dealt with as minor contaminative pathways in most radioecological models but may not be neglected, was comprehensively investigated with the improvement of the Korean food chain model DYNACON. As the results, it was found that both pathways can not be neglected at all in the contamination of beef in the case of an accidental release during the non-grazing period of livestock. The ingestion of soil was more influential in the contamination of beef than the inhalation of air over most time following an release. If precipitation is encountered during an accidental release, contaminative influence due to the ingestion of soil was far greater compared with the cases of no precipitation. This fact was more distinct for a long-lived radionuclide 137 Cs than a short-lived radionuclide '1 31 I (elemental iodine). Compared with the results for milk performed prior to this study, the contaminative pathways due to the inhalation of air and the ingestion of soil were more important in beef because of longer biological half-lives. On the other hand, in the case of an accidental release during the grazing period of livestock, radioactive contamination due to the ingestion of pasture was dominant irrespective of the existence of precipitation during an accidental release. It means that contaminative influence due to the inhalation of air and the ingestion of soil is negligible, like the cases of milk.

  6. Contaminative influence of beef due to the inhalation of air and the ingestion of soil of cattle in an accidental release of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W. T.; Kim, E. H.; Seo, K. S.; Jung, H. J.; Lee, S. M.; Hang, M. H.

    2004-01-01

    The contaminative influence of beef due to the inhalation of air and the ingestion of soil of cattle, both of which are dealt with as minor contaminative pathways in most radioecological models but may not be neglected, was comprehensively investigated with the improvement of the Korean dynamic food chain model DYNACON. As the results, it was found that both pathways can not be neglected at all in the contamination of beef in the case of an accidental release during the non-grazing period of cattle. The ingestion of soil was more influential in the contamination of beef than the inhalation of air over most time following an release. If precipitation is encountered during an accidental release, contaminative influence due to the ingestion of soil was far greater compared with the cases of no precipitation. This fact was more distinct for a long-lived radionuclide 137 Cs than a short-lived radionuclide 131 I (elemental iodine). Compared with the results for milk performed prior to this study, the contaminative pathways due to the inhalation of air and the ingestion of soil were more important in beef because of longer biological half-lives. In the meantime, in the case of an accidental release during the grazing period of cattle, radioactive contamination due to the ingestion of pasture was dominant irrespective of the existence of precipitation during an accidental release. It means that contaminative influence due to the inhalation of air and the ingestion of soil is negligible like the cases of milk

  7. Controlled-release tablet formulation of isoniazid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, N K; Kulkarni, K; Talwar, N

    1992-04-01

    Guar (GG) and Karaya gums (KG) alone and in combination with hydroxy-propylmethylcellulose (HPMC) were evaluated as release retarding materials to formulate a controlled-release tablet dosage form of isoniazid (1). In vitro release of 1 from tablets followed non-Fickian release profile with rapid initial release. Urinary excretion studies in normal subjects showed steady-state levels of 1 for 13 h. In vitro and in vivo data correlated (r = 0.9794). The studies suggested the potentiality of GG and KG as release retarding materials in formulating controlled-release tablet dosage forms of 1.

  8. Development of a novel resin-based dental material with dual biocidal modes and sustained release of Ag+ ions based on photocurable core-shell AgBr/cationic polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weiwei; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xi; Chen, Yinyan; Li, Qiang; Xing, Xiaodong; Xiao, Yuhong; Peng, Xuefeng; Ye, Zhiwen

    2017-07-01

    Research on the incorporation of cutting-edge nano-antibacterial agent for designing dental materials with potent and long-lasting antibacterial property is demanding and provoking work. In this study, a novel resin-based dental material containing photocurable core-shell AgBr/cationic polymer nanocomposite (AgBr/BHPVP) was designed and developed. The shell of polymerizable cationic polymer not only provided non-releasing antibacterial capability for dental resins, but also had the potential to polymerize with other methacrylate monomers and prevented nanoparticles from aggregating in the resin matrix. As a result, incorporation of AgBr/BHPVP nanocomposites did not adversely affect the flexural strength and modulus but greatly increased the Vicker's hardness of resin disks. By continuing to release Ag + ions without the impact of anaerobic environment, resins containing AgBr/BHPVP nanoparticles are particularly suitable to combat anaerobic cariogenic bacteria. By reason of the combined bactericidal effect of the contact-killing cationic polymers and the releasing-killing Ag + ions, AgBr/BHPVP-containing resin disks had potent bactericidal activity against S. mutans. The long-lasting antibacterial activity was also achieved through the sustained release of Ag + ions due to the core-shell structure of the nanocomposites. The results of macrophage cytotoxicity showed that the cell viability of dental resins loading less than 1.0 wt% AgBr/BHPVP was close to that of neat resins. The AgBr/BHPVP-containing dental resin with dual bactericidal capability and long term antimicrobial effect is a promising material aimed at preventing second caries and prolonging the longevity of resin composite restorations.

  9. Microparticles obtained by complex coacervation: influence of the type of reticulation and the drying process on the release of the core material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Dutra Alvim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Microparticles obtained by complex coacervation were crosslinked with glutaraldehyde or with transglutaminase and dried using freeze drying or spray drying. Moist samples presented Encapsulation Efficiency (%EE higher than 96%. The mean diameters ranged from 43.7 ± 3.4 to 96.4 ± 10.3 µm for moist samples, from 38.1 ± 5.36 to 65.2 ± 16.1 µm for dried samples, and from 62.5 ± 7.5 to 106.9 ± 26.1 µm for rehydrated microparticles. The integrity of the particles without crosslinking was maintained when freeze drying was used. After spray drying, only crosslinked samples were able to maintain the wall integrity. Microparticles had a round shape and in the case of dried samples rugged walls apparently without cracks were observed. Core distribution inside the particles was multinuclear and homogeneous and core release was evaluated using anhydrous ethanol. Moist particles crosslinked with glutaraldehyde at the concentration of 1.0 mM.g-1 protein (ptn, were more efficient with respect to the core retention compared to 0.1 mM.g-1 ptn or those crosslinked with transglutaminase (10 U.g-1 ptn. The drying processes had a strong influence on the core release profile reducing the amount released to all dry samples

  10. Investigation of possible delocalization of long-lived radionuclides from phosphate materials used for radioactive waste fixation into water of granite formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylova, N.V.; Salamatina, R.N.; Shavruk, V.V.; Yuzvikova, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Study results of chemical stability of phosphate glass materials containing high-level waste imitators by their contact with imitators of strata waters of gratine formations within the interval 20-150 deg C, are presented. It is shown that above 100 deg C strontium, cesium and sodium discharge from vitrified high-level wastes is complicated because of deposition of difficulty soluble compounds of contact waters and leaching (solution) products of glass matrix on the surface of vitrified wastes. Layer thickness and element discharge into the water are determined by qualitative and quantative composition of the strata water, temperature interaction of materials with water and chemical stability of materials at the given temperature

  11. POSSIBILITY OF NATURAL RAW MATERIALS USE IN THE FORMULATION OF ADJUVANT THERAPY OF TUBERCULOSIS: EXPERIENCE OF FOLK MEDICINE, MODERN STATE OF STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The signs of growth in the prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, low effectiveness of therapy indicate the urgent need to solve problems aimed at the improvement of the effectiveness of treatment: the reduction of toxicity and side effects of anti-tuberculosis drugs, the provision of good tolerability and continuity of chemotherapy; the removal of symptoms of intoxication associated with the action of the pathogen on the body, the improvement of the quality of life of patients during therapy and remission.The aim of the investigation is to study the data of folk medicine, scientific research data concerning the use of raw materials of natural (vegetable, animal and mineral origin in the adjuvant therapy of tuberculosis.Materials and methods. The study was carried out using information retrieval and library databases (PubMed, eLIBRARY, Cyberleninka, technical information of manufacturers of dietary supplements to food, as well as site materials dedicated to the use of vegetable, animal and mineral raw materials in folk medicine.Results and discussion. The adjuvant therapy of tuberculosis includes remedies of natural origin: vegetable, animal and mineral ones. According to the research data, the use of phytotherapy is aimed at enhancing diuresis, which ensures the elimination of toxic substances and their metabolites, as well as the decrease of the overall level of toxins; the strengthening of the body’s antioxidant defense, and liver specificity, the compensation for the increased consumption of vitamins, amino acids and microelements by the liver, which actively metabolizes xenobiotics, as well as the increase of the body’s overall resistance. A long-term benefit of using natural mineral raw materials in adjuvant therapy of tuberculosis is also observed.Conclusion. Thus, adjuvant therapy of tuberculosis includes the use of raw materials of natural (vegetable, animal and mineral origin, the effectiveness of which is confirmed by

  12. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  13. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  14. Possibilities for power reactor structural material and fuel testing in reactor RA; Mogucnosti reaktora RA za testiranje konstrukcionih materijala i goriva energetskih reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinc, R; Lazarevic, Dj; Stefanovic, D; Cupac, S; Pesic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1978-05-15

    Nuclear reactor RA at Vinca has been designed as a high flux general purpose research reactor. Among other it was intended to play a role of material testing reactor. A scope of activities of Material Laboratory and Reactor RA Department of Boris Kidric Institute is presented in this report. Reactor RA capacity for reactor structural material and fuel irradiation is also described. The increase of RA reactor irradiation capacity is based on the improvement of VISA type fuel channel for fast neutron irradiations, as well as on the general neutron flux increase, due to introduction of highly enriched uranium fuel into reactor core and the advanced in-core fuel management. The irradiation capacities described allow for the reactor material and fuel testing to the considerable extent. Istrazivacki reaktor RA u Vinci je projektovan kao visokofluksni istrazivacki reaktor opste namene. Pored ostalog, on je namenjen i za testiranje reaktorskih konstrukcionih materijala i goriva. U radu je dat pregled aktivnosti Laboratorije za materijale IBK i reaktora RA na tom podrucju, kao i opis povecanih mogucnosti reaktora RA za ozracivanje reaktorskih materijala i goriva u cilju njihovog testiranja. Povecanje mogucnosti reaktora RA zasniva se na usavrsavanju specijalnog gorivnog kanala tipa VISA (za ozracivanje materijala brzim neutronima), kao i na opstem povecanju neutronskog fluksa na osnovu uvodjenja i nacina koriscenja visokoobogacenog uranskog goriva u reaktoru RA. Opisane mogucnosti reaktora RA dozvoljavaju u znatnoj meri ispitivanje konstrukcionih materijala i goriva energetskih reaktora.

  15. Environmental standard review plan for ES Section 7.1.1. Environmental impacts of postulated accidents involving releases of radioactive materials to groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    Environmental Standard Review Plan (ESRP) 7.1.1 provides guidance to the staff for preparation of environmental assessments of ''Radiological Impacts - Releases to Groundwater,'' an input to the staff's environmental statement which addresses the groundwater pathway consequences from postulated reactor core-melt accidents. The ESRP lists the type of information which should be collected, references that may be useful, and provides a procedure for uniform staff review of applicant analyses. The ESRP is applicable to both Construction Permit and Operating License Stage reviews

  16. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1975-01-01

    The chief purpose of ARAC data acquisition program is to provide site officials, who are responsible for ensuring maximum health protection for the endangered site personnel and public, with estimates of the effects of atmospheric releases of hazardous material as rapidly and accurately as possible. ARAC is in the initial stages of being implemented and is therefore susceptible to changes before it reaches its final form. However the concept of ARAC is fully developed and was successfully demonstrated during a feasibility study conducted in June 1974, as a joint effort between the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). Additional tests between SRL and LLL are scheduled for December 1975. While the immediate goal is the application of ARAC to assist a limited number of ERDA sites, the system is designed with sufficient flexibility to permit expanding the service to a large number of sites. Success in ARAC application should provide nuclear facilities with a means to handle better the urgent questions concerning the potential accidental hazards from atmospheric releases in addition to providing the sites with a capability to assess the effort of their normal operations

  17. The radiological situation at the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa. Technical report. V. 6. Doses due to radioactive materials present in the environment or released from the atolls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    International Advisory Committee, Task Group A

    1998-08-01

    In the previous volumes of this Report the concentrations of residual radioactivity in the environment of Mururoa and Fangataufa atolls have been described, and assessment made of the releases to the environment in the future. The further step in radiological assessment is the derivation of radiation doses that arise to actually or potentially exposed populations, from these concentrations and releases. These doses are estimated in this report. The existence of a hypothetical population resident on Mururoa is postulated as the group which would be most exposed. Doses to this group are estimated together with doses to maximally exposed residents on nearby South Pacific islands, and further afield. An assessment of the potential environmental impact of the residual contaminant radionuclides from the nuclear weapons testing at Mururoa and Fangataufa requires estimates of the incremental dose rates to a variety of marine organisms inhabiting a number of different ecological niches. These estimated dose rates provide the only secure basis for an assessment of the potential radiation effects in the organisms. The approach adopted for this assessment is that employed in a number of recent studies and adapts the dosimetry models for the particular organisms of interest in the atoll environment Refs, figs, tabs. In six volumes

  18. The radiological situation at the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa. Technical report. V. 6. Doses due to radioactive materials present in the environment or released from the atolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    In the previous volumes of this Report the concentrations of residual radioactivity in the environment of Mururoa and Fangataufa atolls have been described, and assessment made of the releases to the environment in the future. The further step in radiological assessment is the derivation of radiation doses that arise to actually or potentially exposed populations, from these concentrations and releases. These doses are estimated in this report. The existence of a hypothetical population resident on Mururoa is postulated as the group which would be most exposed. Doses to this group are estimated together with doses to maximally exposed residents on nearby South Pacific islands, and further afield. An assessment of the potential environmental impact of the residual contaminant radionuclides from the nuclear weapons testing at Mururoa and Fangataufa requires estimates of the incremental dose rates to a variety of marine organisms inhabiting a number of different ecological niches. These estimated dose rates provide the only secure basis for an assessment of the potential radiation effects in the organisms. The approach adopted for this assessment is that employed in a number of recent studies and adapts the dosimetry models for the particular organisms of interest in the atoll environment

  19. Design of composite microparticle systems based on pectin and waste material of propolis for modified l-alanyl-l-glutamine release and with immunostimulant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa Nova, Mônica; Ratti, Bianca A; Herculano, Leandro S; Bittencourt, Paulo R S; Novello, Cláudio R; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa; Lautenschlager, Sueli de Oliveira Silva; Bruschi, Marcos Luciano

    2017-12-12

    Catabolic conditions like acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, cancer, and burn can cause immunosuppression. Amino acids such as alanine and glutamine are essential for the activity of the immune system. Propolis is immunostimulant and the waste of propolis extraction has been reused with technological and therapeutic purposes. Therefore, this study describes the association of propolis byproduct extract (BPE) with pectin to prepare spray-dried microparticles containing the dipeptide l-alanyl-l-glutamine as stimulant systems of neutrophils. The use of a factorial design allowed selecting the best formulation, which was characterized by morphology, size, and entrapment efficiency analyses. In addition, the systems were characterized by thermal and X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, in vitro drug release, and in vitro cytotoxicity and stimulation test of neutrophils. Small well-structured microparticles with good entrapment efficiency values were achieved. Thermal stability of formulation was observed, and it was proved that pectin, BPE and l-alanyl-l-glutamine were dispersed throughout the matrix. The drug was released from the microparticles during 24 h governed by swelling and diffusion. The drug-loaded formulations showed a significant stimulating effect on neutrophils. These structures could increase the activity of immune cells, and other in vitro and in vivo studies should be performed in the future.

  20. Analysis of release and transport of aerial radioactive materials in accident of evaporation to dryness caused by boiling of reprocessed high-level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Jun; Abe, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    An accident of evaporation to dryness caused by boiling of high-level liquid waste (HLLW) is postulated as one of the severe accidents caused by the loss of cooling function at a fuel reprocessing plant. In this case, some amount of fission products (FPs) will be transferred to the vapor phase in the tank, and could be released to the environment. Therefore, the quantitative estimation of the transport and release behavior of FPs is one of the key issues in the assessment of the accident consequence. To resolve this issue, a systematic analysis method with computer codes has been developed on the basis of the phenomenological behavior in the accident of evaporation to dryness caused by boiling of HLLW. A simulation study demonstrated that the behavior of liquid waste temperature and the entrainment of mists were in good agreement with the experimental results during the early boiling stage, and that some issues to be resolved were pointed out for the estimation of the amount of transferred Ru to the vapor phase at the late boiling stage. (author)

  1. ATP Release Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyuki Taruno

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP has been well established as an important extracellular ligand of autocrine signaling, intercellular communication, and neurotransmission with numerous physiological and pathophysiological roles. In addition to the classical exocytosis, non-vesicular mechanisms of cellular ATP release have been demonstrated in many cell types. Although large and negatively charged ATP molecules cannot diffuse across the lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane, conductive ATP release from the cytosol into the extracellular space is possible through ATP-permeable channels. Such channels must possess two minimum qualifications for ATP permeation: anion permeability and a large ion-conducting pore. Currently, five groups of channels are acknowledged as ATP-release channels: connexin hemichannels, pannexin 1, calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs, also known as volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR anion channels, and maxi-anion channels (MACs. Recently, major breakthroughs have been made in the field by molecular identification of CALHM1 as the action potential-dependent ATP-release channel in taste bud cells, LRRC8s as components of VRACs, and SLCO2A1 as a core subunit of MACs. Here, the function and physiological roles of these five groups of ATP-release channels are summarized, along with a discussion on the future implications of understanding these channels.

  2. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  3. EIA new releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration. It contains news releases on items of interest to the petroleum, coal, nuclear, electric and alternate fuels industries ranging from economic outlooks to environmental concerns. There is also a listing of reports by industry and an energy education resource listing containing sources for free or low-cost energy-related educational materials for educators and primary and secondary students

  4. Malicious release of radioactive materials in urban area. Exposure of the public and emergency staff, protective measures; Boeswillige Freisetzung radioaktiver Stoffe in urbanen Bereichen. Exposition von Bevoelkerung und Einsatzpersonal, Schutzmassnahmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Wolfgang [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin ITEM, Hannover (Germany). Bereich Aerosolforschung und Analytische Chemie; Lange, Florentin

    2016-07-01

    The preparedness for hypothetical radiological scenarios is part of the tasks for governmental authorities, safety and emergency organizations and the staff in case of the incident. The EURATOM guideline for radiation protection has to be implemented into national laws. According to the guidelines it is required that emergency planning has to be prepared for hypothetical radiological scenarios including terroristic or other maliciously motivated attacks using radioactive materials. The study includes assumptions on the released respirable radioactivity, restriction of the hazardous area, wind induced re-suspension of radioactive dusts and inhalation exposure, and mitigation measures.

  5. Experiments with radioactive materials at schools. Didactically important and possible without risk; Experimente mit radioaktiven Stoffen an Schulen. Didaktisch wichtig und gefahrlos moeglich.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlbruch, Jan-Willem [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiooekologie und Strahlenschutz

    2017-04-01

    The basis for the understanding of radioactivity and radioprotection is formed in the secondary school. Therefore, the German-Swiss Radiation Protection Association has been trying to support the appropriate teaching of relevant topics in school for a long time. Unfortunately experiments with radioactive materials are hampered in Germany by complex and confusing legislation. In this contribution the framework is described which is given by the German legislation for the use of radioactive sources in secondary schools. Additionally, proposals for different simple experiments with radioactivity are presented, alternative methods like e.g. virtual experiments are introduced and a recommendation for a simplified regulatory framework is made.

  6. Possibilities and prospects of investigation of irradiated structural and fuel materials using scanning electron microscope PHILLIPS XL 30 ESEM-TMP installed in the hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovanov, V. N.; Novoselov, A.E.; Kuzmin, S.V.; Yakovlev, V. V.

    2005-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope Philips XL 30 ESEM - TMP with X-ray microanalysis system INCA has been installed at SSC RF RIAR. The microscope is placed in the hot cell. Monitoring and control system is installed in the operator's room. Irradiated specimens are supplied to the hot cell through the transport terminal and installed into the microscope by manipulators. Direct contact of the personnel with radioactive materials is impossible. In addition it is developed the system of remote placement of the irradiated specimens into the specimen chamber of microscope. The system includes a stage with three seats, holders for different types of specimens and equipment for their remote loading in the holders. (Author)

  7. Standardization, Calibration, and Evaluation of Tantalum-Nano rGO-SnO2 Composite as a Possible Candidate Material in Humidity Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, Subbiah; Lee, Han-Seung; Kwon, Seung-Jun; Natarajan, Rethinam; Saraswathy, Velu

    2016-01-01

    The present study focuses the development and the evaluation of humidity sensors based on reduced graphene oxide—tin oxide (rGO-SnO2) nanocomposites, synthesized by a simple redox reaction between GO and SnCl2. The physico-chemical characteristics of the nanocomposites were analyzed by XRD, TEM, FTIR, and Raman spectroscopy. The formation of SnO2 crystal phase was observed through XRD. The SnO2 crystal phase anchoring to the graphene sheet was confirmed through TEM images. For the preparation of the sensors, tantalum substrates were coated with the sensing material. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was studied by varying the relative humidity (RH) from 11% to 95% over a period of 30 days. The dependence of the impedance and of the capacitance with RH of the sensor was measured with varying frequency ranging from 1 kHz to 100 Hz. The long-term stability of the sensor was measured at 95% RH over a period of 30 days. The results proved that rGO-SnO2 nanocomposites are an ideal conducting material for humidity sensors due to their high sensitivity, rapid response and recovery times, as well as their good long-term stability. PMID:27941598

  8. Standardization, Calibration, and Evaluation of Tantalum-Nano rGO-SnO2 Composite as a Possible Candidate Material in Humidity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbiah Karthick

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses the development and the evaluation of humidity sensors based on reduced graphene oxide—tin oxide (rGO-SnO2 nanocomposites, synthesized by a simple redox reaction between GO and SnCl2. The physico-chemical characteristics of the nanocomposites were analyzed by XRD, TEM, FTIR, and Raman spectroscopy. The formation of SnO2 crystal phase was observed through XRD. The SnO2 crystal phase anchoring to the graphene sheet was confirmed through TEM images. For the preparation of the sensors, tantalum substrates were coated with the sensing material. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was studied by varying the relative humidity (RH from 11% to 95% over a period of 30 days. The dependence of the impedance and of the capacitance with RH of the sensor was measured with varying frequency ranging from 1 kHz to 100 Hz. The long-term stability of the sensor was measured at 95% RH over a period of 30 days. The results proved that rGO-SnO2 nanocomposites are an ideal conducting material for humidity sensors due to their high sensitivity, rapid response and recovery times, as well as their good long-term stability.

  9. Meticulous Overview on the Controlled Release Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siafu Ibahati Sempeho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the high demand for fertilizer formulations that will exhaust the possibilities of nutrient use efficiency (NUE, regulate fertilizer consumption, and lessen agrophysicochemical properties and environmental adverse effects instigated by conventional nutrient supply to crops, this review recapitulates controlled release fertilizers (CRFs as a cutting-edge and safe way to supply crops’ nutrients over the conventional ways. Essentially, CRFs entail fertilizer particles intercalated within excipients aiming at reducing the frequency of fertilizer application thereby abating potential adverse effects linked with conventional fertilizer use. Application of nanotechnology and materials engineering in agriculture particularly in the design of CRFs, the distinctions and classification of CRFs, and the economical, agronomical, and environmental aspects of CRFs has been revised putting into account the development and synthesis of CRFs, laboratory CRFs syntheses and testing, and both linear and sigmoid release features of CRF formulations. Methodical account on the mechanism of nutrient release centring on the empirical and mechanistic approaches of predicting nutrient release is given in view of selected mathematical models. Compositions and laboratory preparations of CRFs basing on in situ and graft polymerization are provided alongside the physical methods used in CRFs encapsulation, with an emphasis on the natural polymers, modified clays, and superabsorbent nanocomposite excipients.

  10. Electro-catalytic activity of multiwall carbon nanotube-metal (Pt or Pd) nanohybrid materials synthesized using microwave-induced reactions and their possible use in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Lakshman Kumar; Ntim, Susana Addo; Sae-Khow, Ornthida; Janardhana, Chelli; Lakshminarayanan, V; Mitra, Somenath

    2012-11-30

    Microwave induced reactions for immobilizing platinum and palladium nanoparticles on multiwall carbon nanotubes are presented. The resulting hybrid materials were used as catalysts for direct methanol, ethanol and formic acid oxidation in acidic as well as alkaline media. The electrodes are formed by simply mixing the hybrids with graphite paste, thus using a relatively small quantity of the precious metal. We report Tafel slopes and apparent activation energies at different potentials and temperatures. Ethanol electro-oxidation with the palladium hybrid showed an activation energy of 7.64 kJmol(-1) which is lower than those observed for other systems. This system is economically attractive because Pd is significantly less expensive than Pt and ethanol is fast evolving as a commercial biofuel.

  11. Proximal alveolar bone loss in a longitudinal radiographic investigation. III. Some predictors with a possible influence on the progress in an unselected material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolin, A.; Lavstedt, S.; Henrikson, C.O.; Frithiof, L.

    1986-01-01

    The difference in proximal alveolar bone height between 1970 and 1980, the /sup A/BD index/sup ,/ has been measured longitudinally in radiographs from an unselected material. The group constitutes 406 individuals born in 1904 - 1952 in the county of Stockholm. 13 of 18 predictors determined in 1970 were significantly related to the ABD index in the simple correlation analyses. The predictor /sup t/he alveolar bone loss 1970/sup /(ABL index 1970) had the strongest correlation to the ABD index. In the stepwise multiple regression analysis the predictor ABL index 1970 and three other predictors reached significant levels. These were age, number of lost teeth and Russell's Periodontal Index. 21 refs.

  12. Characterization of the axial plasma shock in a table top plasma focus after the pinch and its possible application to testing materials for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo, E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile); Inestrosa-Izurieta, María José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Veloso, Felipe [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Gutiérrez, Gonzalo [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vergara, Julio [Facultad de Ingeniería, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Bruzzone, Horacio [CONICET and Universidad de Mar del Plata, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Castillo, Fermín [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); and others

    2014-12-15

    The characterization of plasma bursts produced after the pinch phase in a plasma focus of hundreds of joules, using pulsed optical refractive techniques, is presented. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm and 8 ns FWHM pulse duration was used to obtain Schlieren images at different times of the plasma dynamics. The energy, interaction time with a target, and power flux of the plasma burst were assessed, providing useful information for the application of plasma focus devices for studying the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material targets. In particular, it was found that damage factors on targets of the order of 10{sup 4} (W/cm{sup 2})s{sup 1/2} can be obtained with a small plasma focus operating at hundred joules.

  13. ESR response of powder samples of clear fused quartz material to high doses of 10 MeV electrons: possible applications for industrial radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliabadi, R.; Amraei, R.; Ranjbar, A.H.; Rafieian, Sh.; Nasirimoghadam, S.

    2010-01-01

    Powder samples of clear fused quartz were irradiated by 10 MeV electrons at doses between 6-15 kGy and 25-37 kGy and analyzed with electron spin resonance. The reproducibility of the material dose response curve was studied, in which the irradiated samples were annealed and reused for further investigations. Results indicate a good linearity between the absorbed dose and the ESR intensity of the signals. They also showed that in the reuse processes, the electron spin resonance signal intensity, in both dose ranges was decreased. The thermal fading represented a relative sharp decay at room temperature through 15 days, after which the decay-rate was negligible for a measurement period of 60 days.

  14. Electro-catalytic activity of multiwall carbon nanotube-metal (Pt or Pd) nanohybrid materials synthesized using microwave-induced reactions and their possible use in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Lakshman Kumar; Ntim, Susana Addo; Sae-Khow, Ornthida; Janardhana, Chelli; Lakshminarayanan, V.; Mitra, Somenath

    2012-01-01

    Microwave induced reactions for immobilizing platinum and palladium nanoparticles on multiwall carbon nanotubes are presented. The resulting hybrid materials were used as catalysts for direct methanol, ethanol and formic acid oxidation in acidic as well as alkaline media. The electrodes are formed by simply mixing the hybrids with graphite paste, thus using a relatively small quantity of the precious metal. We report Tafel slopes and apparent activation energies at different potentials and temperatures. Ethanol electro-oxidation with the palladium hybrid showed an activation energy of 7.64 kJmol−1 which is lower than those observed for other systems. This system is economically attractive because Pd is significantly less expensive than Pt and ethanol is fast evolving as a commercial biofuel. PMID:23118490

  15. Characterization of the axial plasma shock in a table top plasma focus after the pinch and its possible application to testing materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" >Soto, Leopoldo; 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" >Pavez, Cristian; 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile))" >Moreno, José; 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile))" data-affiliation=" (Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P4, Santiago-Talca (Chile))" >Inestrosa-Izurieta, María José; Veloso, Felipe; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo; Vergara, Julio; Clausse, Alejandro; Bruzzone, Horacio; Castillo, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of plasma bursts produced after the pinch phase in a plasma focus of hundreds of joules, using pulsed optical refractive techniques, is presented. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm and 8 ns FWHM pulse duration was used to obtain Schlieren images at different times of the plasma dynamics. The energy, interaction time with a target, and power flux of the plasma burst were assessed, providing useful information for the application of plasma focus devices for studying the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material targets. In particular, it was found that damage factors on targets of the order of 10 4 (W/cm 2 )s 1/2 can be obtained with a small plasma focus operating at hundred joules

  16. Li3-xNaxV2(PO4)3 (0≤x≤3): Possible anode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Pengfei; Shao, Lianyi; Qian, Shangshu; Yi, Ting-Feng; Yu, Haoxiang; Yan, Lei; Li, Peng; Lin, Xiaoting; Shui, Miao; Shu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Li 3-x Na x V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) series are firstly evaluated as anode materials. • Li 3-x Na x V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 anodes show lithium storage activity in 1.0–3.0 V. • The lithium storage capability of different Li 3-x Na x V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 is compared. • Structural reversibility of Li 3-x Na x V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 is studied by in-situ XRD. - Abstract: In this paper, a series of Li 3-x Na x V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) are prepared by a solid state reaction and systematically evaluated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Structural analysis shows that the phase structure of Li 3-x Na x V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 changes along with the evolution of Na content. Charge-discharge tests exhibit that Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 shows the highest initial charge specific capacity as high as 88.3 mAh g −1 among all the seven samples, and the reversible capacity is kept at 68.3 mAh g −1 after 45 cycles, corresponding to 77.3% of the initial charge capacity. With increasing of Na content in Li 3-x Na x V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 , the as-obtained sample show poorer lithium storage capability than Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 . As a result, Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 shows the inferior cycling performance than other Li 3-x Na x V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 . It can only deliver a reversible capacity of 20.9 mAh g −1 after 45 cycles, corresponding to 45.9% of the initial charge capacity. In-situ X-ray diffraction observations demonstrate that the poor electrochemical property of Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 anode is due to the irreversible structural evolution during charge-discharge process. Therefore, reducing the Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 phase in as-obtained sample is a feasible route to improve the lithium storage capability of Li 3-x Na x V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 .

  17. Release of radioactive materials from nuclear power plants. Report No. 2. Dispersion mechanisms, transport paths, and concentration factors for radionuclides in the cooling water recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rygg, B.

    The discharge of radioactive materials in the cooling water from a nuclear power plant may involve consequences for the interests involved in the recipient and its organisms. Of special interest is the transport of radionuclides in water, sediments, and organisms to man. The most important elements are H, Na, P, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, Sr, Mo, Ru, I, Cs, and Ce. Metals with high affinity for organic material will be sorbed to sediments rich in organic material, while other elements will be enriched in algaes and arrive in the sediment through decay or excrement. Elements in particulate form will normally precipitate. Ions will generally not be enriched in sediments. Marine organisms may take up nuclides directly from the water and from food. The concentration factor is dependent on the chemical properties of the element and the physiology of the organism. The occurrence of elements in water and organisms in the Oslofjord district is poorly known and tables have therefore been derived from literature data to indicate the concentration factors to be expected

  18. Release-ability of nano fillers from different nanomaterials (toward the acceptability of nanoproduct)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golanski, L.; Guiot, A.; Pras, M.; Malarde, M.; Tardif, F.

    2012-01-01

    It is of great interest to set up a reproducible and sensitive method able to qualify nanomaterials before their market introduction in terms of their constitutive nanoparticle release-ability in usage. Abrasion was performed on polycarbonate, epoxy, and PA11 polymers containing carbone nanotubes (CNT) up to 4 %wt. Using Taber linear standard tool and standard abrasion conditions no release from polymer coatings containing CNT was measured. In this study, new practical tools inducing non-standardized stresses able to compete with van der Waals forces were developed and tested on model polymers, showing controlled CNT dispersion. These stresses are still realistic, corresponding to scratching, instantaneous mechanical shocks, and abrasion of the surface. They offer an efficient way to quantify if release is possible from nanomaterials under different mechanical stresses and therefore give an idea about the mechanisms that favors it. Release under mechanical shocks and hard abrasion was obtained using these tools but only when nanomaterials present a bad dispersion of CNT within the epoxy matrix. Under the same conditions no release was obtained from the same material presenting a good dispersion. The CNT used in this study showed an external diameter Dext = 12 nm, an internal diameter Din = 5 nm, and a mean length of 1 μm. Release from paints under hard abrasion using a standard rotative Taber tool was obtained from a intentionaly non-optimized paint containing SiO 2 nanoparticles up to 35 %wt. The primary diameter of the SiO 2 was estimated to be around 12 nm. A metallic rake was efficient to remove nanoparticles from a non-woven fabric nanomaterial.

  19. Possibility of using BeMgZnSe as a new cladding material for ZnSe-based blue laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. C.; Choi, J. H.; Yoo, K. H.; Kim, T. W.; Yao, T.

    1999-01-01

    We calculated the gain and the radiative recombination current density of ZnSe/Be x Mg y Zn 1-x-y Se/Be x Mg y Zn 1-x - y Se separate confinement heterostructure (SCH) laser diodes and compared the results with those for the more popular ZnSe/Zn 1-x Mg x S y Se 1-y /Zn 1-x Mg x S y Se 1-y system. For five different values of the cladding-layer energy gap (E g,c ), we sought the optimum SCH structure that had a minimum threshold current density for both quaternaries, and we compared the corresponding current densities. For the same E g,c , ZnMgSSe was found to have a smaller threshold current density. The threshold current density decreased rapidly with increasing. E g,c in both materials. Therefore, if the available energy gap of the BeMgZnSe cladding is larger than that of ZnMGZnSSe, BeMgZnSe may be the better choice

  20. Reduced Antivation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Eurofer 97 as Possible Structural Material for Fusion Devices. Metallurgical Characterization on As-Received Condition and after Simulated Services Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A. M.; Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2004-07-01

    Metallurgical Characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97, on as-received condition and after thermal ageing treatment in the temperature range from 400 degree centigree to 600 degree centigree for periods up to 10.000 h, was carried out. The microstructure of the steel remained stable (tempered martensite with M{sub 2}3 C{sub 6} and MX precipitates) after the thermal ageing treatments studied in this work. In general, this stability was also observed in the mechanical properties. The Eurofer'97 steel exhibited similar values of hardness, ultimate tensile stress, 0,2% proof stress, USE and T{sub 0}3 regardless of the investigated material condition. However, ageing at 600 degree centigree for 10.000 ha caused a slight increase in the DBTT, of approximately 23. In terms of creep properties, the steel shows in general adequate creep rupture strength levels for short rupture times. However, the results obtained up to now for long time creep rupture tests at 500 degree centigree suggests a change in the deformation mechanisms. (Author) 62 refs.

  1. Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Eurofer 97 as Possible Structural Material for Fusion Devices. Metallurgical Characterization on As-Received Condition and after Simulated Services Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A. M.; Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2004-01-01

    Metallurgical Characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97, on as-received condition and after thermal ageing treatment in the temperature range from 400 degree centigree to 600 degree centigree for periods up to 10.000 h, was carried out. The microstructure of the steel remained stable (tempered martensite with M 2 3 C 6 and MX precipitates) after the thermal ageing treatments studied in this work. In general, this stability was also observed in the mechanical properties. The Eurofer'97 steel exhibited similar values of hardness, ultimate tensile stress, 0,2% proof stress, USE and T 0 3 regardless of the investigated material condition. However, ageing at 600 degree centigree for 10.000 ha caused a slight increase in the DBTT, of approximately 23 . In terms of creep properties, the steel shows in general adequate creep rupture strength levels for short rupture times. However, the results obtained up to now for long time creep rupture tests at 500 degree centigree suggests a change in the deformation mechanisms. (Author) 62 refs

  2. Dynamic fuel retention in tokamak wall materials: An in situ laboratory study of deuterium release from polycrystalline tungsten at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisson, R., E-mail: regis.bisson@univ-amu.fr [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Markelj, S. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mourey, O.; Ghiorghiu, F. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Achkasov, K. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Layet, J.-M.; Roubin, P.; Cartry, G. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Grisolia, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Angot, T. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France)

    2015-12-15

    Retention of deuterium ion implanted in polycrystalline tungsten samples is studied in situ in an ultra-high vacuum apparatus equipped with a low-flux ion source and a high sensitivity thermo-desorption setup. Retention as a function of ion fluence was measured in the 10{sup 17}–10{sup 21} D{sup +}·m{sup −2} range. By combining this new fluence range with the literature in situ experimental data, we evidence the existence of a retention ∝ fluence{sup 0.645±0.025} relationship which describes deuterium retention behavior on polycrystalline tungsten on 8 orders of magnitude of fluence. Evolution of deuterium retention as a function of the sample storage time in vacuum at room temperature was followed. A loss of 50% of the retained deuterium is observed when the storage time is increased from 2 h to 135 h. The role of the surface and of natural bulk defects on the deuterium retention/release in polycrystalline tungsten is discussed in light of the behavior of the single desorption peak obtained with Temperature Programmed Desorption.

  3. A European network of experts with direct responsibility for monitoring and dosimetry after a deliberate release of radioactive material or a deliberate radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, Tua; Muikku, Maarit; Pellow, Peter G.D.; Etherington, George; Hodgson, Alan; Youngman, Mike J.; Le Guen, Bernard; Berard, Philippe; Lopez, Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    In the event of an accidental or deliberate release of radionuclides to the environment, individual monitoring and dose assessment may be needed for large numbers of people. The consequences of such incidents are not limited by national boundaries. However, within the European Union (EU), there has not been any coordinated strategy for individual monitoring and dose assessment. CONRAD (CO-ordination Action for Radiation Dosimetry) is an EC 6 th Framework Programme Co-ordination Action sponsored by EURADOS (the European Radiation Dosimetry Group, http://www.eurados.org). The objective of Task 5.4 of Work Package 5 of the CONRAD project, coordinated by HPA (UK) and STUK (Finland), is the development of a network of people and organisations with responsibilities for emergency monitoring of emergency services personnel and members of the public. The network (named EUREMON) aims to promote sharing of information between countries on plans and arrangements for individual monitoring. It currently has 51 individual members from 22 EU countries, 8 non-EU countries and two international organisations. After it was established, the network was used in a survey of plans and arrangements for emergency personal monitoring in EU countries. Information is also being compiled on portable and transportable monitoring facilities and equipment in the EU. (author)

  4. Possible preparation of wood-plastic materials based on unsaturated polyester resins and methyl metacrylate, by radiation and chemical methods in combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesek, M.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation of wood-plastic combinations (WPC) using combined methods for curing intermediate products and final products is described. In the first step, impregnated wood was irradiated using doses of 1 to 10 kGy in the presence of chemical initiators of polymerization. Thereafter, curing of this partly cured impregnating mixture was accomplished in the wood at elevated temperatures with the aid of chemical initiators of polymerization. Impregnation mixtures based on unsaturated polyester resins and methyl methacrylate, and the wood species European Beech (Fagus silvatica) and Black Alder (Alnus glutinosa) were used. The results indicate that this method of preparing WPC allows substantially lower radiation doses to be used, i.e., doses in the range of 1 to 2.5 kGy. These doses gelatinate the impregnation mixture in the wood so that the subsequent curing by chemical polymerization initiators proceeds without the impregnation mixture flowing out of the wood, and without forming bosses and incrustations. Intermediate products and wood products needing no further finish may thus be prepared: in some cases regrinding or repolish is sufficient. The possibility of using impregnation mixtures based on various unsaturated polyester resins was investigated, and the influence on the curing process of temperature, polymerization initiator concentration, methyl methacrylate concentration, inhibitor concentration, and other factors affecting curing was evaluated. (author)

  5. 21 CFR 181.28 - Release agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Release agents. 181.28 Section 181.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Release agents. Substances classified as release agents, when migrating from food-packaging material shall...

  6. Influence of Citric Acid on the Metal Release of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazinanian, N.; Wallinder, I. Odnevall; Hedberg, Y. S. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Knowledge of how metal releases from the stainless steels used in food processing applications and cooking utensils is essential within the framework of human health risk assessment. A new European standard test protocol for testing metal release in food contact materials made from metals and alloys has recently been published by the Council of Europe. The major difference from earlier test protocols is the use of citric acid as the worst-case food simulant. The objectives of this study were to assess the effect of citric acid at acidic, neutral, and alkaline solution pH on the extent of metal release for stainless steel grades AISI 304 and 316, commonly used as food contact materials. Both grades released lower amounts of metals than the specific release limits when they were tested according to test guidelines. The released amounts of metals were assessed by means of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, and changes in the outermost surface composition were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that both the pH and the complexation capacity of the solutions affected the extent of metal release from stainless steel and are discussed from a mechanistic perspective. The outermost surface oxide was significantly enriched in chromium upon exposure to citric acid, indicating rapid passivation by the acid. This study elucidates the effect of several possible mechanisms, including complex ion- and ligand-induced metal release, that govern the process of metal release from stainless steel under passive conditions in solutions that contain citric acid.

  7. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1983-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years

  8. Border cell release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Plant border cells are specialised cells derived from the root cap with roles in the biomechanics of root growth and in forming a barrier against pathogens. The mechanism of highly localised cell separation which is essential for their release to the environment is little understood. Here I present...... in situ analysis of Brachypodium distachyon, a model organism for grasses which possess type II primary cell walls poor in pectin content. Results suggest similarity in spatial dynamics of pectic homogalacturonan during dicot and monocot border cell release. Integration of observations from different...... species leads to the hypothesis that this process most likely does not involve degradation of cell wall material but rather employs unique cell wall structural and compositional means enabling both the rigidity of the root cap as well as detachability of given cells on its surface....

  9. Data on the experiments of temperature-sensitive hydrogels for pH-sensitive drug release and the characterizations of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This article contains experimental data on the strain sweep, the calibration curve of drug (doxorubicin, DOX and the characterizations of materials. Data included are related to the research article “Injectable and body temperature sensitive hydrogels based on chitosan and hyaluronic acid for pH sensitive drug release” (Zhang et al., 2017 [1]. The strain sweep experiments were performed on a rotational rheometer. The calibration curves were obtained by analyzing the absorbance of DOX solutions on a UV–vis-NIR spectrometer. Molecular weight (Mw of the hyaluronic acid (HA and chitosan (CS were determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The deacetylation degree of CS was measured by acid base titration.

  10. Free release measurement of radioactive waste on the basis of the Bayes theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Langer, F.; Schultheis, R.

    2013-01-01

    The application of Bayesian theory in the evaluation of the free release measurements requires complex co-ordination between experiment and analysis. The algorithms are more complex compared to those used in the frequentist data analysis and partly to those of the Monte Carlo methods. The user can get an objective treatment of parameters of the measurement error and - as a result - a reliable indication of confidence intervals. For release measurement, the upper limit of the confidence interval must be compared with the limit given by the Radiation Protection Regulations (StrlSchV) to decide on a possible release of the material under test. (orig.)

  11. [The release of biologically active compounds from peat peloids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaskin, D V

    2011-01-01

    This work had the objective to study kinetics of the release of flavonoides from peat peloid compositions containing extracts of medicinal herbs in model systems.The key parameters of the process are defined. The rate of liberation of flavonoides is shown to depend on their initial concentration in the compositions being used. The influence of the flavonoide composition of the tested extracts and dimethylsulfoxide on the release of biologically active compounds contained in the starting material in the model environment is estimated. The possibility of the layer-by-layer deposition of the compositions and peat peloids in order to increase the efficacy of flavonoide release from the starting composition and to ensure more rational utilization of the extracts of medicinal plants is demonstrated.

  12. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  13. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M andO 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  14. Controlled antiseptic release by alginate polymer films and beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Ioannis; Rizzello, Loris; Bayer, Ilker S; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2013-01-30

    Biodegradable polymeric materials based on blending aqueous dispersions of natural polymer sodium alginate (NaAlg) and povidone iodine (PVPI) complex, which allow controlled antiseptic release, are presented. The developed materials are either free standing NaAlg films or Ca(2+)-cross-linked alginate beads, which properly combined with PVPI demonstrate antibacterial and antifungal activity, suitable for therapeutic applications, such as wound dressing. Glycerol was used as the plasticizing agent. Film morphology was studied by optical and atomic force microscopy. It was found that PVPI complex forms well dispersed circular micro-domains within the NaAlg matrix. The beads were fabricated by drop-wise immersion of NaAlg/PVPI/glycerol solutions into aqueous calcium chloride solutions to form calcium alginate beads encapsulating PVPI solution (CaAlg/PVPI). Controlled release of PVPI was possible when the composite films and beads were brought into direct contact with water or with moist media. Bactericidal and fungicidal properties of the