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Sample records for position description student

  1. Employing Picture Description to Assess the Students' Descriptive Paragraph Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Ayu Mega Cahyani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Writing is considered as an important skill in learning process which is needed to be mastered by the students. However, in teaching learning process at schools or universities, the assessment of writing skill is not becoming the focus of learning process and the assessment is administered inappropriately. In this present study, the researcher undertook the study which dealt with assessing descriptive paragraph writing ability of the students through picture description by employing an ex post facto as the research design. The present study was intended to answer the research problem dealing with the extent of the students’ achievement of descriptive paragraph writing ability which is assessed through picture description. The samples under the study were 40 students determined by means of random sampling technique with lottery system. The data were collected through administering picture description as the research instrument. The obtained data were analyzed by using norm-reference measure of five standard values. The results of the data analysis showed that there were 67.50% samples of the study were successful in writing descriptive paragraph, while there were 32.50% samples were unsuccessful in writing descriptive paragraph which was assessed by administering picture description test

  2. College Students' Positivity toward Teen Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    Although teen pregnancy and parenthood are more visible in society than in the past, teen mothers are often stereotyped and stigmatized. The study examined positivity toward teen mothers among college students (N = 316) at a midwestern university. Although students responded positively to some items regarding teen mothers, other statements showed…

  3. Qualitative Description of College Students' Dinner Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Brita; Brown, Lora Beth

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discover how college students conduct dinner groups and perceptions of the benefits and difficulties of participation. Design: Qualitative study conducted with 7 focus groups. Setting and Participants: A university campus, with 36 students participating in dinner groups, defined as a group of 3 people or more cooking for one another…

  4. Improving Students' Reading Comprehension in Descriptive Text Through Anticipation Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Nasution, Maya Puspita

    2014-01-01

    This study concerrns with improving students' reading comprehension in descriptive text through anticipation guide.The objective was to investigate improvement of students' reading comprehension by applying anticipation guide. This research was conducted by using action research method. The subject of the study was grade VII students of SMP SWASTA TAMAN HARAPAN MEDAN totalling to 30 students. They were taught reading comprehension by anticipation guide. The instruments for collecting data wer...

  5. PEER INTERACTIONS AND POSITIVE STUDENT-LECTURER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper sets out to interrogate the role played by peer interactions in the teaching and learning of College Algebra in a classroom setting. It also explores the impact of positive student-lecturer relationship on teaching and learning of College Algebra at the university level and the general improvement of student ...

  6. Learning motivation and student achievement : description analysis and relationships both

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Riswanto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Education is very important for humans, through the education throughout the world will increasingly flourish. However, if faced with the activities within the learning process, not a few men (students who have less motivation in learning activities. This resulted in fewer maximal learning processes and in turn will affect student achievement. This study focuses to discuss matters relating to the motivation to learn and student achievement, with the aim of strengthening the importance of motivation in the learning process so that a clear relationship with student achievement. The method used is descriptive analysis and simple correlation to the 97 students taking the course introduction to Microeconomics and Indonesian. The conclusion from this research is the students have a good record if it has a well and motivated as well, and this study concludes their tie's difference between learning motivation and achievement of students on two different courses.

  7. Evaluation of School of health students' ethics position in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Emine; Dal, Nursel Alp; Üstün, Çağatay; Okursoy, Algın

    2017-03-01

    The advances in science and technology increasingly lead to the appearance of ethical issues and to the complexity of care. Therefore, it is important to define the ethics position of students studying in health departments so that high quality patient care can be achieved. The aim of this study was to examine the ethics position of the students at Shool of Health of an University in western Turkey. The study design was descriptive and cross-sectional. The study population included 540 first, second, third, and fourth year students from the Departments of Nursing, Midwifery, and Rescue and Disaster Management in the 2013-2014 academic year. Data were collected with a Personal Identification Form and The Ethics Position Questionnaire. Obtained data were analyzed with Chi-square test, Confirmatory Factor Analysis, and Nested Analysis of Variance. Ethical considerations: Before conducting the research, approval was obtained from Ege University Clinical Research Ethics Committee in İzmir and written informed consent was taken from all the participants. There was no significant difference in the mean scores for the Ethics Position Questionnaire between the students in terms of years and fields of study. Although the mean scores for the subscale idealism did not differ between fields of study, the mean scores significantly differed between years of study. However, the mean scores for the subscale relativism did not differ in terms of years and fields of study. Whether students are idealistic or relativistic in terms of ethical judgment will be effective in ethical decision-making skills during patient care. Therefore, we need to define the factors that influence students' ethics position in the future. It is suggested that the courses and practices that teach students to be aware of their ethics position to create an ethical outlook can be placed in the curriculum in health schools.

  8. Academic dishonesty among nursing students: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keçeci, Ayla; Bulduk, Serap; Oruç, Deniz; Çelik, Serpil

    2011-09-01

    This descriptive and cross-sectional study aims to evaluate academic dishonesty among university nursing students in Turkey. The study's sample included 196 students. Two instruments were used for gathering data. The first instrument, a questionnaire, which included some socio-demographic variables (age, class, gender, education, family structure, parents' attitude and educators' attitude) formed the first part. The second part included the Academic Dishonesty Tendency Scale developed by Eminoğlu and Nartgün. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Kruskall Wallis, One-way Anova, t- test and Mann-Whitney U test. It was found that academic dishonesty was at medium-level (2.60-3.39) in nursing students.

  9. Neuroscientists' classroom visits positively impact student attitudes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Fitzakerley

    Full Text Available The primary recommendation of the 2010 President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report on K-12 education was to inspire more students so that they are motivated to study science. Scientists' visits to classrooms are intended to inspire learners and increase their interest in science, but verifications of this impact are largely qualitative. Our primary goal was to evaluate the impact of a longstanding Brain Awareness classroom visit program focused on increasing learners understanding of their own brains. Educational psychologists have established that neuroscience training sessions can improve academic performance and shift attitudes of students from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. Our secondary goal was to determine whether short interactive Brain Awareness scientist-in-the-classroom sessions could similarly alter learners' perceptions of their own potential to learn. Teacher and student surveys were administered in 4(th-6(th grade classrooms throughout Minnesota either before or after one-hour Brain Awareness sessions that engaged students in activities related to brain function. Teachers rated the Brain Awareness program as very valuable and said that the visits stimulated students' interest in the brain and in science. Student surveys probed general attitudes towards science and their knowledge of neuroscience concepts (particularly the ability of the brain to change. Significant favorable improvements were found on 10 of 18 survey statements. Factor analyses of 4805 responses demonstrated that Brain Awareness presentations increased positive attitudes toward science and improved agreement with statements related to growth mindset. Overall effect sizes were small, consistent with the short length of the presentations. Thus, the impact of Brain Awareness presentations was positive and proportional to the efforts expended, demonstrating that short, scientist-in-the-classroom visits can make a positive contribution to

  10. Description of psychophysiological indexes of students of different sporting specializations

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    Barybina L.N.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Information of the psychophysiological testing of students of technical institute of higher of different sporting specializations is considered. In research took part 159 students of specialization football, sambo, volleyball, basketball, aerobics, boxing, heavy athletics. The psychophysiological testing is given by possibility to choose the proper sporting specialization students for the best realization of the personality qualities. Positive attitude of students is marked toward employments on physical education. The increase of self-appraisal and improvement of health of students is also marked.

  11. Description of spinal findings and determining the MR positive spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penkov, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is an umbrella term applied to a family of rheumatic diseases that have both features in common with, as well as being distinct from, other inflammatory arthritides, particularly rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recently, the ASAS working group established classification criteria to distinguish 2 broad categories of SpA: peripheral SpA and axSpA (Rudwaleit, 2011; Rudwaleit, 2010; Rudwaleit, 2009c). This division is based on the body part predominantly involved in the inflammatory process and those areas of the body that may respond similarly well to medication. Therefore, peripheral SpA includes diseases affecting mainly peripheral joints, such as reactive arthritis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), whereas axSpA comprises those diseases with mainly axial involvement (sacroiliac joints and spine), including ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and nonradiographic axSpA (nr-axSpA). Patients with AS have definitive evidence of structural changes in the sacroiliac joint (sacroiliitis) on x-ray, fulfilling the Modified New York classification criteria (mNY-positive) (van der linden, 1984), whereas in those with nr-axSpA structural changes on conventional radiographs do not meet the mNy criteria (mNY-negative) (Rudwaleit, 2005; Dougados, 1991). Axial SpA is a chronic inflammatory disease that impacts a substantial proportion of the population. Limited evidence exists regarding the exact prevalence of axSpA. In the US, however, recent data suggest that the prevalence is similar to that of RA (axSpA: 0.7% to 1.4%; RA: 0.5% to 1.0%) (Reveille; 2012; Myasoedova, 2010; Helmick, 2008). In patients with axSpA, the disease typically originates in the sacroiliac joints, then progresses to the spine. In the sacroiliac joints and the spine, active inflammation results in erosions, sclerosis, and fatty lesions. However, the most characteristic feature is new bone formation leading to ankylosis of the sacroiliac joints and syndesmophytes attached to the vertebral

  12. Stories from the field: students' descriptions of gender discrimination and sexual harassment during medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Florence M; Stratton, Terry D; Nora, Lois Margaret

    2006-07-01

    Previous studies have documented the prevalence of gender discrimination and sexual harassment during medical training, but very few have examined the behaviors that students perceive as discriminatory or harassing. The authors addressed this lack of information by examining graduating medical students' written descriptions of personal experiences with such behaviors during medical school. The authors reviewed the responses of graduating seniors at 12 U.S. medical schools to a questionnaire, administered in 2001-02, that asked them to provide written descriptions of their personal experiences with gender discrimination and sexual harassment. Seven response categories were created on the basis of recurring themes: educational inequalities; stereotypical comments; sexual overtures; offensive, embarrassing, or sexually explicit comments; inappropriate touching; sexist remarks; and not classifiable. The three authors examined the students' written accounts and placed each into one or more of the categories. Of the students' responses, 290 (36.6%) contained 313 written descriptions of personal experiences that the students perceived as either discriminatory or harassing. The most frequently reported experiences involved educational inequalities; experiences in this category were reported more frequently by men than by women. All other categories of experiences were reported more frequently by women. The results support earlier findings of the prevalence of gender discrimination and sexual harassment during undergraduate medical education. Perhaps formal antiharassment policies should provide examples of unacceptable behavior that are based on categories such as those revealed by this analysis. Perhaps, too, medical students' comments could be used to develop educational interventions for physicians in supervisory positions.

  13. Can Raters with Reduced Job Descriptive Information Provide Accurate Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) Ratings?

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    Friedman, Lee; Harvey, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    Job-naive raters provided with job descriptive information made Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) ratings which were validated against ratings of job analysts who were also job content experts. None of the reduced job descriptive information conditions enabled job-naive raters to obtain either acceptable levels of convergent validity with…

  14. Quantitative Description of Medical Student Interest in Neurology and Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Raddy L; Cuoco, Joshua A; Guercio, Erik; Levitan, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Given the well-documented shortage of physicians in primary care and several other specialties, quantitative understanding of residency application and matching data among osteopathic and allopathic medical students has implications for predicting trends in the physician workforce. To estimate medical student interest in neurology and psychiatry based on numbers of applicants and matches to neurology and psychiatry osteopathic and allopathic residency programs. Also, to gauge students' previous academic experience with brain and cognitive sciences. The number of available postgraduate year 1 positions, applicants, and matches from graduating years 2011 through 2015 were collected from the National Matching Services Inc and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine for osteopathic programs and the National Resident Matching Program and the Association of American Medical Colleges for allopathic programs. To determine and compare osteopathic and allopathic medical students' interest in neurology and psychiatry, the number of positions, applicants, and matches were analyzed considering the number of total osteopathic and allopathic graduates in the given year using 2-tailed χ2 analyses with Yates correction. In addition, osteopathic and allopathic medical schools' websites were reviewed to determine whether neurology and psychiatry rotations were required. Osteopathic medical students' reported undergraduate majors were also gathered. Compared with allopathic medical students, osteopathic medical students had significantly greater interest (as measured by applicants) in neurology (χ21=11.85, Pneurology and psychiatry residency programs. Approximately 6% of osteopathic vs nearly 85% of allopathic medical schools had required neurology rotations. Nearly 10% of osteopathic applicants and matriculants had undergraduate coursework in brain and cognitive sciences. Osteopathic medical students demonstrated greater interest than allopathic medical

  15. Constructing a Professional: Gendered Knowledge in the (Self-)Positioning of Skin and Spa Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredlöv, Eleonor

    2017-01-01

    This study outlines the self-positioning of skin and spa therapy students. More specifically, it focuses how they position themselves as professionals in terms of knowledge, and how gender is at play throughout this process. Drawing on a poststructural approach, inspired by Foucault and feminist theory, regularities of description and…

  16. Social Positioning, Participation, and Second Language Learning: Talkative Students in an Academic ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayi-Aydar, Hayriye

    2014-01-01

    Guided by positioning theory and poststructural views of second language learning, the two descriptive case studies presented in this article explored the links between social positioning and the language learning experiences of two talkative students in an academic ESL classroom. Focusing on the macro- and micro-level contexts of communication,…

  17. Feasibility and outcomes of paid undergraduate student nurse positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamroth, Lucia; Budgen, Claire; Lougheed, Mary

    2006-09-01

    An Undergraduate Nurse Employment Demonstration Project (UNDP) was implemented in four Health Service Areas in British Columbia with a concurrent evaluation study. This demonstration project comprised the development and implementation of a new position in the BC healthcare system. The position enabled third- and fourth-year nursing students to be employed at their level of education. The purposes of the evaluation were to explore the feasibility and outcomes of this type of paid undergraduate student nurse employment. The three-year project and evaluation included both implementation and outcome analysis. The implementation evaluation design was descriptive and prospective, involving multiple data sources. The outcome evaluation design was quasi-experimental, with intervention and comparison groups. Learning outcomes for undergraduate nurses were increased confidence, organizational ability, competency and ability to work with a team. Workplace outcomes were increased unit morale, help with workload and improved patient care. New graduates with undergraduate nurse experience reported less time required for orientation and transition than other graduates who did not have this experience, and workplace nurses viewed these new graduates as more job-ready than other new graduates. After 21 months, new graduates with undergraduate nurse experience were less likely to move to other employment than other new graduates. Results from the four Health Service Areas indicated that the paid undergraduate nurse position was feasible and that outcomes benefited students, new graduates and workplaces. The undergraduate nurse position is now being implemented throughout all Health Service Areas in British Columbia.By 2000, concerns in British Columbia about the nursing workforce, workplace and patient safety had escalated to the point where diverse stakeholder groups were prepared to work together in new ways to prepare nursing graduates to be more job-ready, to recruit and retain

  18. Social dominance, values and ideological positioning in college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zubieta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social Dominance Theory (Sidanius & Pratto, 1999 stress that systematic inter group discrimination is related to social ideologies that contribute to coordinate institutions and individuals behaviors. The acceptance of inequity legitimating ideologies is partially determined for individuals general desire of group based domination. This desire is captured by Social Orientation Domination construct -SDO. Pursuing the objective of exploring SDO levels and its relationship with variables such ideological positioning and values, a descriptive correlation study, with a non experimental design, was carried out based on a convenience sample composed by 254 college students from Buenos Aires city surroundings . Results show that SDO is positively associated with Power and Achievement values and negatively with Benevolence and Universalism. SDO is stronger in participants right side ideologically positioned. Participants show a low SDO, emphasize self- trascendence and openness to change values and tend to a left side ideological positioning. Age, participant’s quality of “students” and prevailed career orientation can be seen as factors conditioning a more hierarchies attenuating believes and behaviors. 

  19. 'It's complicated': Staff nurse perceptions of their influence on nursing students' learning. A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Sarah E; MacLeod, Martha L; Schiller, Catharine J

    2018-04-01

    During both teacher-led clinical practica and precepted practica, students interact with, and learn from, staff nurses who work on the clinical units. It is understood that learning in clinical practice is enhanced by positive interactions between staff nurses and nursing students. While much is known about preceptors' experiences of working with nursing students, there is little evidence to date about staff nurses' perspectives of their interactions with students in teacher-led practica. To understand teacher-led clinical practica from the perspective of staff nurses. A qualitative descriptive approach answers the question: How do staff nurses perceive their contributions to nursing students' learning during teacher-led practica? Nine staff Registered Nurses (RNs) working within a regional acute care hospital in western Canada were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Interview transcripts were analyzed using cross case analysis to discover themes and findings were checked by several experienced RNs. Analysis showed that nurses' interactions with nursing students are complicated. Nurses want to "train up" their future colleagues but feel a heavy burden of responsibility for students on the wards. This sense of burden for the staff nurses is influenced by several factors: the practice environment, the clinical instructor, the students themselves, and the nurses' understanding of their own contributions to student learning. Staff nurses remain willing to support student learning despite multiple factors that contribute to a sense of burden during teacher-led practica. Workplace environment, nursing program, and personal supports are needed to support their continuing engagement in student learning. Nurses need to know how important they are as role models, and the impact their casual interactions have on student nurses' socialization into the profession. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Descriptive Study of Electromagnetic Wave Distribution for Various Seating Positions: Using Digital Textbooks

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    Seomun, GyeongAe; Kim, YoungHwan; Lee, Jung-Ah; Jeong, KwangHoon; Park, Seon-A; Kim, Miran; Noh, Wonjung

    2014-01-01

    To better understand environmental electromagnetic wave exposure during the use of digital textbooks by elementary school students, we measured numeric values of the electromagnetic fields produced by tablet personal computers (TPCs). Specifically, we examined the distribution of the electromagnetic waves for various students' seating positions in…

  1. THE POSITION OF STUDENTS AND TEACHERS IN THE TEADHING OF CONFLICT AS A FACTOR IN COMMUNICATION

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    Perica Ivanek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this empirical paper we consider the problem of communication and interaction between students and teachers in the classroom, looking at it from the aspect of the position of students and teachers in everyday teaching practice. Namely, we wanted to examine the attitudes of students and teachers related to the position of students and teachers on the occurrence of misunderstandings and conflicts in the classroom. The sample on which the study was conducted was made of third grade secondary vocational schools and high schools and their teachers. Dependent variable is descriptive: the position of students and teachers as a factor of conflict in communication between students and teachers, divided in to two groups of indicators (first: indicators that help to prevent conflicts-objective subjective position of students, and other: indicators that initiate the sole objective position of students and subjective position of the teacher. Research results to some extent, we should give a clearer picture of which segments are different perceptions of students and teachers related to the position as a factor in any conflict and misunderstanding in communication between the direct participants in the teaching process.

  2. The globe system : An unambiguous description of shoulder positions in daily life movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Harlaar, J.; Veeger, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Positions of the shoulder joint are commonly described in terms of degrees of humeral elevation in the principal planes. This approach is inadequate for an accurate and unambiguous description of functional arm movements that are not confined to these planes. In this paper, a general unambiguous

  3. Descriptive study of electromagnetic wave distribution for various seating positions: using digital textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seomun, GyeongAe; Kim, YoungHwan; Lee, Jung-Ah; Jeong, KwangHoon; Park, Seon-A; Kim, Miran; Noh, Wonjung

    2014-04-01

    To better understand environmental electromagnetic wave exposure during the use of digital textbooks by elementary school students, we measured numeric values of the electromagnetic fields produced by tablet personal computers (TPCs). Specifically, we examined the distribution of the electromagnetic waves for various students' seating positions in an elementary school that uses digital textbooks. Electric and magnetic fields from TPCs were measured using the HI-3603 Visual Display Terminal/ Very Low Frequency (VDT/VLF) radiation measurement system. Electromagnetic field values from TPCs measured at a student's seat and at a teacher's computer were deemed not harmful to health. However, electromagnetic field values varied based on the distance between students, other electronic devices such as a desktop computers, and student posture while using a TPC. Based on these results, it is necessary to guide students to observe proper posture and to arrange seats at an appropriate distance in the classroom.

  4. Mental health nurses' views and experiences of working with undergraduate nursing students: A descriptive exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienert-Brown, Mel; Taylor, Peta; Withington, John; Lefebvre, Evelyn

    2018-05-01

    The core of pre-registration nursing education is the learning that takes place during the clinical placement. However, despite the fact that registered nurse preceptors are key players in supporting students during their placements there is a lack of literature examining the views of preceptors working with nursing students in mental health settings. To explore mental health nurses' views and experiences of working with undergraduate nursing students and determine what factors influence this experience. A descriptive exploratory study approach using an on-line questionnaire was adopted for this study. A specialist mental health service (SMHS) within one District Health Board in New Zealand. 89 registered nurses who had been involved in working with nursing students participated in this study. Data was collected using an online questionnaire. The majority of the respondents in this study reported that they felt confident and well supported in the work they did with nursing students and had a positive perception of this role. However, one significant negative factor identified was the extra stress and workload pressure they reported when working with students, when no allowance was made for this. Another key finding was that engaging in some form of education related to the preceptorship role was positively correlated with nurses knowing what was required of them, feeling confident, the extent to which they planned clinical education, and feeling that they were sufficiently appreciated. Ensuring nurses have access to education related to clinical teaching and learning increases their confidence in the work they do with nursing students and has also been shown to have a positive impact on how they view this role. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Relation of Student Social Position to Consumer Attitudes and Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litro, Robert Frank

    1970-01-01

    A study of Connecticut high school students from different social positions found differences in consumer attitudes and understandings of money management, credit, insurance, and savings and investments. (CH)

  6. Positive Aspects of International Student Transitions: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Lisa; Popadiuk, Natalee

    2011-01-01

    Despite the considerable growth of the international student population, positive aspects of their experience have received little attention. The current study combines a Critical Incident Technique methodology and a positive psychology lens to explore the cross-cultural transition of seven international students, focusing on facilitative factors,…

  7. Perfectionism in students and positive career planning attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Stoeber, Joachim; Mutinelli, Sofia; Corr, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    In today's uncertain job market, university students who show positive attitudes in their career planning have an advantage. Yet, we know little what personality characteristics are associated with individual differences in career planning attitudes. The present study examined 177 university students to investigate whether perfectionism (self-oriented, other-oriented, and socially prescribed) predicted students' positive career planning attitudes (career adaptability, career optimism, and per...

  8. Motivating students through positive learning experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Coto Chotto, Mayela; Jantzen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Based on the assumption that wellbeing, positive emotions and engagement influence motivation for learning, the aim of this paper is to provide insight into students’ emotional responses to and engagement in different learning designs. By comparing students’ reports on the experiential qualities...... of three different learning designs, their respective influence on students’ motivation for learning is discussed with the purpose of exploring the relationship between positive emotions, engagement and intrinsic motivation for learning. Our study thus aims at evaluating the motivational elements...

  9. Improving Students' Achievement in Writing Descriptive Text by Using Movie Posters

    OpenAIRE

    Saleha, Ayu -; -, Sumarsih -

    2014-01-01

    This study concerns on Improving Students' Achievement in Writing Descriptive Text by Using Movie Posters. The underlying objective of this study is to investigate whether teaching descriptive by using movie posters potentially improves students' skill. The research was conducted by using Classroom Action Research (CAR). The subject of the research was class X of SMA SWASTA UTAMA MEDAN. The number of the students was 28. The procedure of the research was administrated into two cycles which ea...

  10. Do different types of social identity moderate the association between perceived descriptive norms and drinking among college students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Dipali Venkataraman; Neighbors, Clayton

    2014-09-01

    Perceived descriptive norms are one of the strongest predictors of college drinking. Social Identity Theory posits that much of our identity is based on groups with which we affiliate. Prior research suggests that there is an association between perceived descriptive norms and drinking among those who identify more strongly with the normative referent group. However, no studies to date have examined how different facets of social identity affect the relationship between perceived descriptive norms and drinking. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the interaction between perceived descriptive norms and social identity on drinking varied as a function of different dimensions of social identity among college students. Participants were 1095 college students from a large, public, southern university who completed an online survey about drinking behaviors and related attitudes. Drinks per week was examined as a function of norms, the Importance, Commitment, Deference, and Superiority subscales of the Measure of Identification with Groups, as well as the two-way interactions between each dimension of social identity and norms. Results indicated that norms were associated with drinking, but that this relationship varied as a function of identity dimension. The association between norms and drinking was stronger among those who viewed the university's student body as part of their own identity and were more committed to their fellow students, but weaker among those who reported greater deference to student leaders. This research suggests the importance of examining multiple dimensions of social identity in considering social influences on drinking. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The Burned-Out College Student: A Descriptive Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Scott T.; Schmeck, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Developed a measure of burnout for college students and created a profile of burned-out students based on "level of functioning" variables. Students (N=120) completed a series of tests. Results showed burnout to be related to measures of memory, learning style, self-esteem, vocational self-concept, and sensation seeking. (BH)

  12. Descriptive normative beliefs and the self-regulation in alcohol use among Slovak university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutovská, Monika; Orosova, Olga; Kalina, Ondrej; Šebeňa, René

    2015-12-01

    This study aims (i) to understand how descriptive normative beliefs (DNB) about typical students' alcohol use and self-regulation (SRG) are related to alcohol use (AU) by exploring the indirect effect of SRG on AU through DNB and (ii) to explore gender differences and the differences between universities in DNB, SRG and AU. The cross-sectional data were collected online from 817 Slovak university students from four universities (75.22% females; Mage = 19.61; SD = 1.42), who filled in the AUDIT-C items, items measuring the DNB about typical students' AU and SRG. T-tests, one-way Anova and structural equation modelling were used for data analysis. Gender differences in AU and DNB were found with males having higher levels of both AU and DNB. The tested model of AU fits the data well. A significant association was found between DNB and (i) AU (positive) and (ii) SRG (negative). The analysis confirmed the existence of an indirect effect of SRG on AU through DNB. The study contributes to research concerning AU by the way in which DNB and SRG are linked to AU among Slovak university students. The research findings can also be used in developing prevention and intervention programs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A descriptive study of baccalaureate nursing students' responses to suicide prevention education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, Julie M; Gilje, Fredricka; Tesar, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Internationally, little is known regarding the amount of educational content on suicide in undergraduate nursing curriculum. The literature conducted found few published research studies on implementation of suicide prevention instruction in baccalaureate nursing curriculum, even though various international healthcare and nursing initiatives address suicide prevention. The aim was to describe senior baccalaureate students' responses to an evidence-based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program entitled Question-Persuade-Refer implemented in a required course. This is a multi-method descriptive study. Data were collected utilizing a pre-post-survey questionnaire administered to 150 students in four classes of a psychiatric nursing course over a two-year period. The quantitative data were statistically significant (p suicide'. Students responded very positively to the evidence based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program. The instruction addresses various national initiatives and strategies filling a void in nursing curriculum, as well as empowering students to engage in suicide prevention interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An Exploratory, Descriptive Study of the Attitudes of Instructors and Students toward the Use of Asynchronous Online Discussion at a Female University in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahrani, Hamed A.; Walker, David A.

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory, descriptive study examined instructor and female student attitudes toward asynchronous online discussion (AOD) in Saudi Arabia. Preliminary results, derived from an attitudinal-based survey, indicated that, in aggregate, instructors and students had positive attitudes toward using AOD at a female institution of higher education…

  15. Stress, positive psychology and the National Student Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to explore the predictive ability of sources of stress and a range of dispositional and coping behaviours on student satisfaction and motivation. Most research exploring sources of stress and coping in students construes stress as psychological distress, with little attempt to consider positive experiences of stress. A questionnaire was administered to 120 first-year UK psychology students. Questions were asked which measured sources of stress when rated as likely to contribute to...

  16. Effect of Positive Training on Positive Psychological States (Character Strengths of Female High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farnam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available psychological states of female students in second and third grades of high school. The research method was quasi-experimental with pre-test, post-test and follow-up. The sample consisted of forty students selected randomly in two groups (twenty students in each group. To collect data, Positive Psychological State Inventory (Rajaei, Khuy Nzhad and Nesaei was used. The experimental group received ninety minute positive training sessions (for two months and the control group did not receive treatment. The results of analysis  of covariance showed that positive training had positive effects on positive psychological states (trust in God, optimism, self-efficacy, duty, sense of control, targeted, hope, satisfaction with life, meaningful life, pleasant, sociability, self-esteem and self-worth, sense of peace, gratitude, and forgiveness among adolescents  both in the post  and follow-up tests

  17. Explaining how honors students position themselves when collaborating with regular students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, Judith; Kamans, Elanor; Tiesinga, Lammert; Wolfensberger, Marca

    2015-01-01

    Paper presentatie tijdens de EARLI Conference 2015, Limassol, Cypres, 28 augustus. In this line of research we take a social psychological approach to understanding how honors students position themselves when collaborating with regular students. More specifically, we explore whether stereotypes

  18. University Student and Lecturer Perceptions of Positive Emotions in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Anna Dluzewska; Fitness, Julie; Wood, Leigh Norma

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation exploring the experience and functionality of positive feelings and emotions in learning and teaching. The role of emotions in learning is receiving increasing attention; however, few studies have researched how university students and academics experience and perceive positive emotions. A prototype…

  19. Sexual Self-Descriptions and Gender Stereotypes in College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Fernández Liporace

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents partial results from a study carried out to analyze the way young college students self-describe their sexual behavior in relation with sex. Data show significant differences in certain adjectives, linked with traditional roles assigned to women and men in sexual relationships; an additional comparison with results about gender sterotypes reported by Williams & Best (1994 is made. A survey on sociodemographic data and a list of 70 adjectives that describe sexual behaviors were administered to a sample of 248 college students from Buenos Aires city and its suburban area.

  20. Medical students, early general practice placements and positive supervisor experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Margaret; Upham, Susan; King, David; Dick, Marie-Louise; van Driel, Mieke

    2018-03-01

    Introduction Community-based longitudinal clinical placements for medical students are becoming more common globally. The perspective of supervising clinicians about their experiences and processes involved in maximising these training experiences has received less attention than that of students. Aims This paper explores the general practitioner (GP) supervisor perspective of positive training experiences with medical students undertaking urban community-based, longitudinal clinical placements in the early years of medical training. Methods Year 2 medical students spent a half-day per week in general practice for either 13 or 26 weeks. Transcribed semi-structured interviews from a convenience sample of participating GPs were thematically analysed by two researchers, using a general inductive approach. Results Identified themes related to the attributes of participating persons and organisations: GPs, students, patients, practices and their supporting institution; GPs' perceptions of student development; and triggers enhancing the experience. A model was developed to reflect these themes. Conclusions Training experiences were enhanced for GPs supervising medical students in early longitudinal clinical placements by the synergy of motivated students and keen teachers with support from patients, practice staff and academic institutions. We developed an explanatory model to better understand the mechanism of positive experiences. Understanding the interaction of factors enhancing teaching satisfaction is important for clinical disciplines wishing to maintain sustainable, high quality teaching.

  1. Intervention for Positive Use of Leisure Time Among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnal, Careen; Qian, Xinyi; Hustad, John; Sims, Damon

    2013-01-01

    College student excessive alcohol use is a pressing public health concern, and many of the negative events associated with heavy drinking occur during leisure or free time. Positive use of leisure can lead to coping skills, stress reduction, and healthy development. Negative use of leisure, including heavy alcohol use, is associated with physical inactivity, stress, and short and long-term health concerns. We contend that using the classroom context to help college students understand why it is beneficial to engage in positive leisure pursuits and how that engagement will promote personal growth is of critical importance to healthy development. PMID:24198896

  2. Sexting by high school students: an exploratory and descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassberg, Donald S; McKinnon, Ryan K; Sustaíta, Michael A; Rullo, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a phenomenon known as sexting, defined here as the transfer of sexually explicit photos via cell phone, has received substantial attention in the U.S. national media. To determine the current and potential future impact of sexting, more information about the behavior and the attitudes and beliefs surrounding it must be gathered, particularly as it relates to sexting by minors. The present study was designed to provide preliminary information about this phenomenon. Participants were 606 high school students (representing 98 % of the available student body) recruited from a single private high school in the southwestern U.S. Nearly 20 % of all participants reported they had ever sent a sexually explicit image of themselves via cell phone while almost twice as many reported that they had ever received a sexually explicit picture via cell phone and, of these, over 25 % indicated that they had forwarded such a picture to others. Of those reporting having sent a sexually explicit cell phone picture, over a third did so despite believing that there could be serious legal and other consequences attached to the behavior. Given the potential legal and psychological risks associated with sexting, it is important for adolescents, parents, school administrators, and even legislators and law enforcement to understand this behavior.

  3. Leadership Is Positively Related to Athletic Training Students' Clinical Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Leadership development by health professionals positively affects patient outcomes. Objective: To 1) determine if there is any relationship between demonstrated leadership behaviors and clinical behaviors among entry-level AT students (ATS); 2) to explore if the level of leadership behavior changes between ATS level; and 3) to determine…

  4. The Virtual Workplace Ethnography: Positioning Student Writers as Knowledge Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Virtual Workplace Ethnography is a first-year composition assignment that positions students as knowledge makers by requiring them to apply a theoretical lens ("Working Knowledge") to a video representation of a workplace. The lens provides multiple terms for analysis of workplace behaviors in context, providing a scaffolding for…

  5. Intervention for Positive Use of Leisure Time among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnal, Careen; Qian, Xinyi; Hustad, John; Sims, Damon

    2013-01-01

    College student excessive alcohol use is a pressing public health concern, and many of the negative events associated with heavy drinking occur during leisure or free time. Positive use of leisure can lead to coping skills, stress reduction, and healthy development. Negative use of leisure, including heavy alcohol use, is associated with physical…

  6. Quality of sleep and selective attention in university students: descriptive cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Alicia Fontana; Waldina Raimondi; María Laura Rizzo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sleep quality not only refers to sleeping well at night, but also includes appropriate daytime functioning. Poor quality of sleep can affect a variety of attention processes. PURPOSE The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the relationship between the perceived quality of sleep and selective focus in a group of college students. METHODS A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in a group of 52 Argentinian college students of the Universidad Adven...

  7. Description of Stikes Yarsis students' motivation in facing the international nursing job opportunity

    OpenAIRE

    Wesiana Heris Santy

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of nursing higher education in Indonesia increases the number of nurse graduates in Indonesia. Unfortunately, it is not equivalent with the jobs provided for them as well as their low motivation to catch the opportunity to work abroad. Therefore, this research was purposed to describe the motivation of students of Stikes Yarsis in facing the international nursing job opportunity. The type of research was descriptive involving all students of the second and fourth class in th...

  8. TPS as an Effective Technique to Enhance the Students' Achievement on Writing Descriptive Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarsih, M. Pd.; Sanjaya, Dedi

    2013-01-01

    Students' achievement in writing descriptive text is very low, in this study Think Pair Share (TPS) is applied to solve the problem. Action research is conducted for the result. Additionally, qualitative and quantitative techniques are applied in this research. The subject of this research is grade VIII in Junior High School in Indonesia. From…

  9. Student Trust in Teachers and Student Perceptions of Safety: Positive Predictors of Student Identification with School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Kensler, Lisa; Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the effects of student trust in teacher and student perceptions of safety on identification with school. Data were collected from one large urban district in an eastern state. Participants included 5441 students in 3rd through 12th grades from 49 schools. Students responded to surveys that assessed student trust in teachers,…

  10. Using Realia to Teach Physically Disabled Students in Writing Descriptive Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorma Fitriana M. Zain

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This case study is focused on teaching descriptive texts by using realia. The writer took the 8th grade students of SMPLB Negeri Ungaran as the subjects of the study. The aim of this research is to know the implementation of teaching descriptive texts that cover parts, qualities, and characteristics of the objects. This study was carried out around four meetings. In each meeting, the researcher observed the situation of the class and the setudents’ activities in that classroom. The data collection method used in the research was observation, interview, and documentation. In implementating the research, the researcher found several problems and difficulties in teaching learning processes. One of them is that, the teaching physically disabled students are not easy. It has to be slowly because the students’ ability in writing the lesson is limited. The other problem comes from the teacher him/herself that never uses media or tools to teach physically disabled students. It is a matter of fact that teaching physically  disabled students needs media to make them easily understand the learning materials. One of the media that could be used is realia. From this research it is expected that the problems could be solved and a new paradigm in teaching descriptive texts for disabled students could be considered.

  11. Relationship of self-esteem and happiness from the positive psychology among intercultural nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Alberto Núñez Ramírez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are contradictions on the relationship between self-esteem and happiness: it exists for some researches, for others it does not, and even some argue that self-esteem affects happiness. These variables are elementary for the practice of Nursing; however, their study is small within intercultural environments. The objective of this research is to know the association between self-esteem and happiness among Intercultural Nursing students from the positive psychology.Method: A quantitative, descriptive, transversal and correlational, research with a non-experimental design was realized, with a sample of 55 students of Intercultural Nursing. Two questionnaires were applied: the scale of Rosenberg self-esteem and happiness of Lima scale.Results: High levels of self-esteem and happiness were obtained. Through correlation of Pearson and hierarchical regression we found that self-esteem is associated in negative and positive way with certain factors of happiness; the same thing happened in the level of influence.Conclusion: In positive psychology is possible to associate variables such as self-esteem and happiness as strengths. Much more in the case of Intercultural Nursing students which have the aim to contribute to the indigenous communities development, that require nurses with favorable levels of self-esteem and the perception of subjective well-being to counteract an historical legacy of backwardness. From positive psychology is possible that this educational model will contribute to the mutual enrichment and empowerment within the work of the Intercultural Nursing.

  12. Personal determinants of positive states and stress in psychology students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Kozhukhar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report study results of personality characteristics as predictors of positive states (active, optimistic, emotional, subjective comfort and stress experience in adults with one higher education and ongoing training in Psychology. The respondents were 107 people aged 23 to 52 years. Diagnostic methods we used were: "SMIL" (L. Sobchik, Optimism and Activity Scale (adapted by E. Vodopyanova, C. Izard Differential Emotions Scale (adapted by A. Leonova, Subjective Comfort Scale (adapted by A. Leonova, PSM-25 Scale by Lemyr-Tessier-Fillion. The regression analysis revealed that in subjects ongoing training in Psychology, basic predictor of positive emotions and stress experience is anxiety. Cluster analysis revealed three types of subjects by their positive states experiences, which differ primarily by the level of baseline anxiety and related personality characteristics. The group of risk comprised Psychology students with a tendency to depression and negative emotions and specific personality profile.

  13. Financial attitudes, knowledge, and habits of chiropractic students: A descriptive survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorence, Julie; Lawrence, Dana J.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Goertz, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our purpose was to describe the financial knowledge, habits and attitudes of chiropractic students. Methods: We designed a cross-sectional survey to measure basic financial knowledge, current financial habits, risk tolerance, and beliefs about future income among 250 students enrolled in business courses at one US chiropractic college. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Results: We received 57 questionnaires (23% response rate). Most respondents would accumulate over $125,000 in student loan debt by graduation. Financial knowledge was low (mean 77%). Most respondents (72%) scored as average financial risk takers. Chiropractic students reported recommended short-term habits such as having checking accounts (90%) and health insurance (63%) or paying monthly bills (88%) and credit cards (60%). Few saved money for unplanned expenses (39%) or long-term goals (26%), kept written budgets (32%), or had retirement accounts (19%). Conclusion: These chiropractic students demonstrated inadequate financial literacy and did not engage in many recommended financial habits. PMID:24587498

  14. Self-Concept in Student Learning and Motivation Truant : Descriptive-Correlational Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlina Harahap

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed describ the learning motivation and self-concept of students who truant. This study used a descriptive quantitative method. The research conducted by the students of SMAN 5 Padangsidimpuan in the period of 2015/2016 with the total of the population was 420 students. Amount of research sample was 36 students and had been chosen by using purposive sampling technique. An instrument employed in this study was a Likert-scaled questionnaire. Data were analyzed by using percentage technique and the relationship between the two variables was analyzed by using nonparametric statistic, that is Spearman’s Coefficient of Rank Correlation. Results of this research are just like the following: 1 participants’ level of achievement on self-concept of students who truant is about 69,8%, 2 participants’ level of achievement on learning motivation of students who truant is about 69,2%, and 3 correlation coefficient of self-concept and learning motivation of students who truant is about 0,581. Therefore, it can be concluded that students who truancy have very low self-concept and learning motivation, and there is a significant relationship between self-concept and learning motivation. The implication in guidance counseling services is to create a service program which can increase self-concept and be learning motivation of students who truant

  15. [Inclusion of patient safety into the Medical degree electives: Description of the experience and student perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladenheim, R; Macchiavello, D; Milberg, M

    One of the factors identified to reduce medical errors has been the organisational culture. Education is proposed as a tool for its modification, but this does not have a unique way of being achieved. This paper sought to describe a patient safety elective for medical students and to determine their perceptions on the subject. A descriptive study was performed in the Center of Medical Education and Clinical Investigations, in Argentina. Every student who participated in the elective was included, and there were no exclusion criteria. An online survey was conducted on all participants, and individual interviews were conducted on a convenience sample. The subject was chosen by 54 students out of a total of 274 students between 2011 and 2014. All (100%) of the students completed the course and passed the exam, and stated that they would recommend the elective. Most of the students (n=26) agreed that patient safety content should be mandatory, that its content was novel, and that the subject's structure seemed appropriate, with 21 saying that it was the first time they had been talked about these issues. From the individual interviews, students emphasised the novelty of the subject, and that their perception on patient safety issues had increased. The proposed elective had a good reception among students. The methodology planned for its teaching seemed appropriate. Inter-professional education in patient safety should be implemented to improve student competencies in the subject. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Neighbourhood as community: A qualitative descriptive study of nursing students' experiences of community health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko-Mould, Yolanda; Ferguson, Karen; Atthill, Stephanie

    2016-03-01

    Explore the use of a neighbourhood practice placement with nursing students to gain insight into how the experience influenced their learning and how the reconceptualization of community can be a model for students' professional development. The integration of community health nursing competencies in undergraduate nursing education is a critical element of student development. Neighbourhood placements have been found to support development of such competencies by exposing students to issues such as culture, social justice, partnership, and community development. A qualitative design was used with a sample of 48 Year 3 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a community health nursing practice course. Students submitted reflective reviews where they responded to questions and subsequently participated in focus groups. Meaning making of narrative data took place using the descriptive qualitative analysis approach. Students became more self-directed learners and developed team process skills. Some found it challenging to adapt to a role outside of the traditional acute care context. Nursing practice in a neighbourhood context requires students to be innovative and creative in problem-solving and relationship building. The placement also requires neighbourhood liaison persons who are adept at helping students bridge the theory-practice gap. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Attitudes toward teen mothers among nursing students and psychometric evaluation of Positivity Toward Teen Mothers scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Son Chae; Burke, Leanne; Sloan, Chris; Barnett, Shannon

    2013-09-01

    To prepare future nurses who can deliver high quality nursing care to teen mothers, a better understanding of the nursing students' perception of teen mothers is needed. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 228 nursing students to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Positivity Toward Teen Mothers (PTTM) scale, to explore nursing students' general empathy and attitudes toward teen mothers, and to investigate the predictors of nursing students' attitudes toward teen mothers. Principal component factor analysis with varimax rotation resulted in a 19-item PTTM-Revised scale with Non-judgmental and Supportive subscales. Cronbach's alphas for the subscales were 0.84 and 0.69, respectively, and 0.87 for the total scale. Simultaneous multiple regression models showed that general empathy and having a teen mother in the family or as an acquaintance were significant predictors of positive attitudes toward teen mothers, whereas age was a significant negative predictor. The PTTM-Revised scale is a promising instrument for assessing attitudes toward teen mothers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Critical thinking skills of undergraduate nursing students: description and demographic predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sharyn; Pitt, Victoria; Croce, Nic; Roche, Jan

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the critical thinking skills among undergraduate nursing students in Australia to obtain a profile and determine demographic predictors of critical thinking. There is universal agreement that being a critical thinker is an outcome requirement for many accreditation and registering nursing bodies. Most studies provide descriptive statistical information about critical thinking skills while some have studied the changes in critical thinking after an intervention. Limited research about factors that predict critical thinking skills is available. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using convenience sampling. Two hundred and sixty-nine students were recruited across three years of an undergraduate programme in 2009. Most students' age ranged from under 20 to 34 years (58%), 87% were female, 91% were Australian and 23% of first and second year students had nursing associated experience external to the university. Data about critical thinking skills were collected via the Health Science Reasoning Test (HSRT). Linear regression analysis investigated the predictors of nursing students' critical thinking skills. The students in third year had a profile of critical thinking skills comparable with HSRT norms. Year of study predicted higher critical thinking scores for all domains (p<0.001) except the subscale, analysis. Nationality predicted higher scores for total CT skill scores (p<0.001) and subscales, inductive (p=0.001) and deductive reasoning (p=0.001). Nursing associated experience predicted higher scores for the subscale, analysis (p<0.001). Age and gender were not predictive. However, these demographic predictors only accounted for a small variance obtained for the domains of CT skills. An understanding of factors that predict nursing students' CT skills is required. Despite this study finding a number of significant predictors of nursing students' CT skills, there are others yet to be understood. Future research is recommended

  19. Specialty satisfaction, positive psychological capital, and nursing professional values in nursing students: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Chung Hee; Park, Ju Young

    2017-10-01

    Ideally, college majors should be chosen to achieve self-realization and correspond to self-concept. However, some students select a major based on extrinsic factors, rather than aptitude or interests, because of a lack of employment opportunities. If they have negative college experiences with an unsatisfactory major, they might not engage fully in their occupation following graduation. This study aimed to identify factors affecting specialty satisfaction in preclinical practice nursing-college students. A cross-sectional descriptive survey. A nonprobability convenience sample of 312 nursing-college students at colleges in Deajeon City, South Korea. The survey questionnaire was distributed to those who agreed to participate. Freshmen and sophomore nursing students (n=312). Participants were 312 students at colleges in Deajeon City. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data, which were analyzed using SPSS/WIN. Positive psychological capital and nursing professional values were positively correlated with specialty satisfaction. Significant predictors for specialty satisfaction included hope and optimism (as components of positive psychological capital), the roles of nursing service and originality of nursing (as nursing professional values), and aptitude/interests and job value (as motives for selecting a major). The findings suggested that nursing students' specialty satisfaction was partially linked to positive psychological capital and professional values. Therefore, the promotion of positive factors should be useful in enhancing specialty satisfaction in preclinical-practice nursing-college students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rocking the boat - nursing students' stories of moral courage: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickhoff, Laurie; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Sinclair, Peter M

    2016-07-01

    This paper profiles a qualitative study that examined how undergraduate nursing students demonstrate moral courage when confronted with clinical situations that negatively impact the quality of patient care and/or patient experience and the factors that encouraged or inhibited their willingness to speak up when they identified poor practice. Clinical placements are an essential component of nursing programmes. However, placements are a reported source of stress for students, with many witnessing, or feeling compelled to participate in, poor practice. In these instances, nursing students require the moral courage to raise concerns in order to protect patient safety and dignity. This was a qualitative descriptive study. Nine nursing students and one nursing graduate from one semi-metropolitan university in Australia were interviewed and the data were thematically analysed. Four key themes emerged: (1) patient advocate identity, which had two sub-themes of knowing one's own moral code and previous life experiences; (2) consequences to the patient and to the participant; (3) the impact of key individuals; and (4) picking your battles. This study demonstrates the importance of undergraduate nursing students identifying as patient advocates, the multitude of consequences students face when questioning the practice of a registered nurse, and the influence supervising nurses and clinical facilitators have on a student's decisions to intervene to protect patient safety. Further research is required to examine the factors, both intrinsic and extrinsic, that influence nursing students' moral courage and their decisions to intervene when poor practice is witnessed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Students' Positioning in the Classroom: a Study of Teacher-Student Interactions in a Socioscientific Issue Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossér, Ulrika; Lindahl, Mats

    2017-07-01

    The integration of socioscientific issues (SSI) in science education calls for emphasizing dialogic classroom practices that include students' views together with multiple sources of knowledge and diverse perspectives on the issues. Such classroom practices aim to empower students to participate in decision-making on SSI. This can be accomplished by enhancing their independence as learners and positioning them as legitimate participants in societal discussions. However, this is a complex task for science teachers. In this study, we introduce positioning theory as a lens to analyse classroom discourse on SSI in order to enhance our knowledge of the manners by which teachers' interactions with students make available or promote different positions for the students, that is, different parts for the students to play as participants, when dealing with SSI in the classroom. Transcripts of interactions between one teacher and six student groups, recorded during two lessons, were analysed with respect to the positioning of the students as participants in the classroom, and in relation to the SSI under consideration. The results show that the teacher-student interactions made available contrasting student positions. The students were positioned by the teacher or positioned themselves as independent learners or as dependent on the teacher. Furthermore, the students were positioned as affected by the issue but as spectators to public negotiations of the issue. Knowledge about the manner in which teacher-student interactions can function to position students seems important for dialogic classroom practices and the promotion of student positions that sustain the pursuit of intended educational outcomes.

  2. Baccalaureate nursing students' perspectives on learning about caring in China: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Li, Jiping; Liang, Hongmin; Bai, Yangjuan; Song, Jianhua

    2014-03-04

    The need to provide humanistic care in the contemporary healthcare system is more imperative now and the importance of cultivating caring in nursing education is urgent. Caring as the primary work of nursing has been discussed extensively, such as the meaning of caring, and teaching and learning strategies to improve nursing students' caring ability. Yet attempts to understand students' perspectives on learning about caring and to know their learning needs are seldom presented. The aim of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the baccalaureate nursing students' perspectives on learning about caring in China. A qualitative descriptive study using focus group interviews were undertaken in two colleges in Yunnan Province, China from February 2010 to April 2010. Purposeful sampling of 20 baccalaureate nursing students were recruited. Content analysis of the transcribed data was adopted to identify the themes. Four categories with some sub-categories related to students' perspectives on learning about caring were identified from the data: 1) Learning caring by role model; 2) conducive learning environment as the incentive to the learning about caring; 3) lack of directive substantive way of learning as the hindrance to the learning about caring; 4) lack of cultural competency as the barrier to the learning about caring. Both caring and uncaring experiences can promote the learning about caring in a way of reflective practice. The formal, informal and hidden curricula play an important role in the learning about caring. Cultural awareness, sensitivity and humility are important in the process of learning to care in a multicultural area.

  3. Market Positioning of Public and Private Universities:Students Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Kahar ADAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper concentrates on universities strategies for admitting students and the rate at which private sector universities expand in today’s higher educational setups. This paper answers the following question: to what extend are the public universities different from the private universities? In an attempt to find the answers, the whole study is developedtowards students’ perception of the universities positioning in terms of what they are offering to the customers, through what they prompt people to apply for admission? Therefore, thispaper looks at the prevailing admission strategies and potential students’ entry requirements at both public and private universities to determine the theoretical systems that are used by these universities in competition for customers (students. A quantitative survey of students in both public and private universities in Ghana was undergone In all, a total number of 255 questionnaires were printed. Only 187 were answered and returned out of 200 distributed questionnaires to the public sector universities whereas 55 questionnaires were distributed to the private sector students and 51 were answered and returned. This research was based on sampling data collection methods. The findings show that there are three categories of universities such as Publicly/Fully Independent Chartered Universities, Privately Owned Universities and Personal/Sole Proprietorship University Colleges. All these affect students’ choices for admission application. The findings clearly indicate that both public and private universitiespurposes are related using Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation Coefficient formulae to that of the sole proprietorship colleges. Also, the admission requirement strategies differ between public and private universities.

  4. Learning by playing: A cross-sectional descriptive study of nursing students' experiences of learning clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Jaana-Maija; Multisilta, Jari; Niemi, Hannele; Katajisto, Jouko; Eriksson, Elina

    2016-10-01

    Clinical reasoning is viewed as a problem-solving activity; in games, players solve problems. To provide excellent patient care, nursing students must gain competence in clinical reasoning. Utilising gaming elements and virtual simulations may enhance learning of clinical reasoning. To investigate nursing students' experiences of learning clinical reasoning process by playing a 3D simulation game. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Thirteen gaming sessions at two universities of applied sciences in Finland. The prototype of the simulation game used in this study was single-player in format. The game mechanics were built around the clinical reasoning process. Nursing students from the surgical nursing course of autumn 2014 (N=166). Data were collected by means of an online questionnaire. In terms of the clinical reasoning process, students learned how to take action and collect information but were less successful in learning to establish goals for patient care or to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Learning of the different phases of clinical reasoning process was strongly positively correlated. The students described that they learned mainly to apply theoretical knowledge while playing. The results show that those who played digital games daily or occasionally felt that they learned clinical reasoning by playing the game more than those who did not play at all. Nursing students' experiences of learning the clinical reasoning process by playing a 3D simulation game showed that such games can be used successfully for learning. To ensure that students follow a systematic approach, the game mechanics need to be built around the clinical reasoning process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating best educational practices, student satisfaction, and self-confidence in simulation: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapko, Karen A; Ferranto, Mary Lou Gemma; Blasiman, Rachael; Shelestak, Debra

    2018-01-01

    The National League for Nursing (NLN) has endorsed simulation as a necessary teaching approach to prepare students for the demanding role of professional nursing. Questions arise about the suitability of simulation experiences to educate students. Empirical support for the effect of simulation on patient outcomes is sparse. Most studies on simulation report only anecdotal results rather than data obtained using evaluative tools. The aim of this study was to examine student perception of best educational practices in simulation and to evaluate their satisfaction and self-confidence in simulation. This study was a descriptive study designed to explore students' perceptions of the simulation experience over a two-year period. Using the Jeffries framework, a Simulation Day was designed consisting of serial patient simulations using high and medium fidelity simulators and live patient actors. The setting for the study was a regional campus of a large Midwestern Research 2 university. The convenience sample consisted of 199 participants and included sophomore, junior, and senior nursing students enrolled in the baccalaureate nursing program. The Simulation Days consisted of serial patient simulations using high and medium fidelity simulators and live patient actors. Participants rotated through four scenarios that corresponded to their level in the nursing program. Data was collected in two consecutive years. Participants completed both the Educational Practices Questionnaire (Student Version) and the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning Scale. Results provide strong support for using serial simulation as a learning tool. Students were satisfied with the experience, felt confident in their performance, and felt the simulations were based on sound educational practices and were important for learning. Serial simulations and having students experience simulations more than once in consecutive years is a valuable method of clinical instruction. When

  6. Nuclear power plant shift technical advisor. Recommendations for position description, qualifications, education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the position and identify specific areas of formal education, plant-specific training and experience necessary to assure an advanced level of analytical ability on shift. These recommendations will provide a level of technical ability that is essential to improved operational safety and are consistent with regulatory requirements. This position was developed in conjunction with representatives of utilities, equipment vendors and engineering educators, giving consideration to specific contributions the function must make to shift operations

  7. The experiences of last-year student midwives with High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Joeri; Beeckman, Katrien; Turcksin, Rivka; Van Winkel, Lies; Gucciardo, Léonardo; Laubach, Monika; Peersman, Wim; Swinnen, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Simulation training is a powerful and evidence-based teaching method in healthcare. It allows students to develop essential competences that are often difficult to achieve during internships. High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation exposes them to real-life scenarios in a safe environment. Although student midwives' experiences need to be considered to make the simulation training work, these have been overlooked so far. To explore the experiences of last-year student midwives with High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training. A qualitative descriptive study, using three focus group conversations with last-year student midwives (n=24). Audio tapes were transcribed and a thematic content analysis was performed. The entire data set was coded according to recurrent or common themes. To achieve investigator triangulation and confirm themes, discussions among the researchers was incorporated in the analysis. Students found High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training to be a positive learning method that increased both their competence and confidence. Their experiences varied over the different phases of the High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training. Although uncertainty, tension, confusion and disappointment were experienced throughout the simulation trajectory, they reported that this did not affect their learning and confidence-building. As High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training constitutes a helpful learning experience in midwifery education, it could have a positive influence on maternal and neonatal outcomes. In the long term, it could therefore enhance the midwifery profession in several ways. The present study is an important first step in opening up the debate about the pedagogical use of High-Fidelity Perinatal Simulation training within midwifery education. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. "What's Positive about Positive Rights?" Students' Everyday Understandings and the Challenges of Teaching Political Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Linda; Lundholm, Cecilia

    2018-01-01

    A review of research into teaching and learning in political science education concludes that this literature emphasizes student outcomes and "show and tell" descriptions of pedagogical interventions (Craig 2014). The present study instead aims to open the "black box" of conceptual learning in political science, illustrating…

  9. Choosing Wisely Canada Students and Trainees Advocating for Resource Stewardship (STARS) campaign: a descriptive evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Franco; Cheung, Daphne; Han, Angela; Born, Karen B; Alexander, Lisa; Levinson, Wendy; Wong, Brian M

    2017-12-19

    Resource stewardship is being increasingly recognized as an essential competency for physicians, but medical schools are just beginning to integrate this into education. We describe the evaluation of Choosing Wisely Canada's Students and Trainees Advocating for Resource Stewardship (STARS) campaign, a student-led campaign to advance resource stewardship education in medical schools across Canada. We evaluated the campaign 6 months after its launch, in November 2015. STARS students were administered a telephone survey eliciting a description of the initiatives that they had implemented or planned to implement at their schools to promote resource stewardship, and exploring their perceptions of facilitators of and barriers to successful implementation of their initiatives. We used a mixed-methods approach to analyze and summarize the data. Twenty-seven (82%) of the 33 eligible students representing all 17 medical schools responded. In 14 schools (82%), students led various local activities (e.g., interest groups, campaign weeks) to raise awareness about resource stewardship among medical students and faculty. Students contributed to curriculum change (both planned and implemented) at 10 schools (59%). Thematic analysis revealed key program characteristics that facilitated success (e.g., pan-Canadian student network, local faculty champion) as well as barriers to implementing change (e.g., complex processes to change curriculum, hierarchical nature of medical school). This student-led campaign, with support from local faculty and Choosing Wisely Canada staff, led to awareness-building activities and early curricula change at medical schools across Canada. Future plans will build on the initial momentum created by the STARS campaign to sustain and spread local initiatives. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  10. Supervisor descriptions of veterinary student performance in the clinical workplace: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, E J

    2017-06-10

    This qualitative study investigated the qualities of veterinary student performance that inform a supervisor's impression of their competency. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 15 supervisors from different veterinary subdisciplines, to elicit descriptions of excellent, weak and marginal students. Thematic analysis of transcriptions revealed 12 themes, of which engagement was frequently discussed and of stated importance, and trustworthiness was a differentiator of weak and marginal students from excellent students. Other themes were knowledge, application of knowledge, technical and animal handling skills, communication, social interaction, personal functioning, caring for animals, impact, prospects and the difficulty in judging competency. Patterns of association of themes were found, however themes were also used independently in unique combinations for most students described. The findings show the range of abilities, behaviours, attitudes and personal characteristics of students that are considered by supervisors and how these are weighted and balanced. The key contribution of engagement and trustworthiness to the overall impression aligns with research indicating their importance for success in clinical practice, as both contributors to competency and indicators of it. The findings may inform future design and investigation of workplace-based learning and in-training evaluation, as well as conceptions of veterinary competency. British Veterinary Association.

  11. Nursing students' understanding of critical thinking and appraisal and academic writing: a descriptive, qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borglin, Gunilla; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2012-11-01

    In Sweden, regulations from the National Agency for Higher Education advocate an education that equips students with independence as well as critical, problem-based thinking, i.e. academic literacy skills. However, some research findings indicate that students may leave higher education without mastering these skills effectively. As part of quality-assuring a nursing programme at a university college in south-east Sweden we explored the nursing student's view of crucial academic literacy skills, such as critical thinking and appraisal and academic writing, by conducting a descriptive, qualitative study. Informants were recruited through an advertisement posted on the university's e-learning tool. Eight focused interviews were conducted during autumn 2010. The transcribed interviews were analysed - inspired by content analysis - and two categories became apparent: constantly questioning and formality before substance. The latter revealed a gap between the student's perception of academic writing and that of the educators, thus implying that nursing students might not be equipped with the tools they need to develop within academia. We suggest that students could benefit in their academic endeavours from theoretical educational models that integrate several academic skills simultaneously and which could be incorporated into the development of syllabuses and curriculums. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Leadership, management and teamwork learning through an extra-curricular project for medical students: descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Maria Lucia da Silva Germano; Coelho, Izabel Cristina Meister; Paraizo, Mariana Martins; Paciornik, Ester Fogel

    2014-01-01

    Professionalism in medicine requires preparation for the globalized world. Our objective was to describe a project that introduces medical students to the community, hospital and laboratory activities, thereby allowing them to gain experience in people management, leadership and teamwork. Descriptive study of the process applied at a philanthropic medical school in Curitiba, Paraná. Inclusion of management and leadership practices as part of the medical degree program. The study groups consisted of fifteen students. After six months, any of the participants could be elected as a subcoordinator, with responsibility for managing tasks and representing the team in hospital departments and the community. The activities required increasing levels of responsibility. In medical schools, students' involvement in practical activities is often limited to observation. They are not required to take responsibilities or to interact with other students and stakeholders. However, they will become accountable, which thus has an adverse effect on all involved. The learning space described here aims to fill this gap by bringing students closer to the daily lives and experiences of healthcare professionals. Being a physician requires not only management and leadership, but also transferrable competencies, communication and critical thinking. These attributes can be acquired through experience of teamwork, under qualified supervision from teaching staff. Students are thus expected to develop skills to deal with and resolve conflicts, learn to share leadership, prepare others to help and replace them, adopt an approach based on mutual responsibility and discuss their performance.

  13. Nursing students' perspectives on clinical instructors' effective teaching strategies: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiee, Sina; Moridi, Glorokh; Khaledi, Shahnaz; Garibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    An important factor contributing to the quality of clinical education is instructors' teaching performance. The aim of this study was to identify clinical instructors' most effective teaching strategies from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. All third- and fourth-year bachelor's nursing and midwifery students studying at the Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences were recruited to the study by using the census method. The study instrument consisted of a demographic questionnaire and the self-report 30-item Clinical Instructors' Effective Teaching Strategies Inventory. The SPSS v.16.0 was used for data analysis. The most effective teaching strategies of clinical instructors from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives were respectively 'treating students, clients, and colleagues with respect' and 'being eager for guiding students and manage their problems'. Clinical instructors need to be eager for education and also be able to establish effective communication with students. Empowering clinical instructors in specialized and technical aspects of clinical education seems necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Description and operation of the LEDA beam-position/intensity measurement module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, C.R.; Stettler, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the specification, design and preliminary operation of the beam-position/intensity measurement module being built for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) and Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The module, based on the VXI footprint, is divided into three sections: first, the analog front-end which consists of logarithmic amplifiers, anti-alias filters, and digitizers; second, the digital-to-analog section for monitoring signals on the front panel; and third, the DSP, error correction, and VXI-interface section. Beam position is calculated based on the log-ratio transfer function. The module has four, 2-MHz, IF inputs suitable for two-axis position measurements. It has outputs in both digital and analog format for x- and y-position and beam intensity. Real-time error-correction is performed on the four input signals after they are digitized and before calculating the beam position to compensate for drift, offsets, gain non-linearities, and other systematic errors. This paper also describes how the on-line error-correction is implemented digitally and algorithmically

  15. Experiences of internationally educated nurses holding management positions in the United States: Descriptive phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lilian A

    2018-02-12

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of internationally educated nurses in management positions in United States health care organisations to understand the obstacles and support these individuals' experience when pursuing and working in managerial roles. Although internationally educated nurses are an integral part of the US health care industry, few work in managerial roles. Little is known about the experiences of internationally educated nurses who do obtain management positions. In this qualitative, phenomenological study, seven internationally educated nurses who were managers in Chicago, Illinois, responded to open-ended interview questions. Supervisors contributed to the participants' acceptance of management positions. The participants experienced challenges such as cultural differences, language, and communication. Despite these challenges, the participants had positive working relationships with staff and supervisors. Further, the participants had opportunities for education and professional growth. Internationally educated nurses benefit from participating in organisational committees. They face challenges related to work responsibilities, cultural differences and communication but can succeed in management roles through developing strategies to overcome the challenges and through receiving support from staff, colleagues and supervisors. More internationally educated nurses may obtain managerial positions if supervisors provide encouragement and support. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Students views of integrating web-based learning technology into the nursing curriculum - A descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Audrey; Timmins, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes students' experiences of a Web-based innovation at one university. This paper reports on the first phase of this development where two Web-based modules were developed. Using a survey approach (n=44) students' access to and use of computer technology were explored. Findings revealed that students' prior use of computers and Internet technologies was higher than previously reported, although use of databases was low. Skills in this area increased during the programme, with a significant rise in database, email, search engine and word processing use. Many specific computer skills were learned during the programme, with high numbers reporting ability to deal adequately with files and folders. Overall, the experience was a positive one for students. While a sense of student isolation was not reported, as many students kept in touch by phone and class attendance continued, some individual students did appear to isolate themselves. This teaching methodology has much to offer in the provision of convenient easy to access programmes that can be easily adapted to the individual lifestyle. However, student support mechanisms need careful consideration for students who are at risk of becoming isolated. Staff also need to supported in the provision of this methodology and face-to-face contact with teachers for some part of the programme is preferable.

  17. A description of QUALCOMM Automatic Satellite Position Reporting (QASPR(R)) for mobile communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, William G.

    1990-01-01

    Two satellite position reporting has been introduced into the OmniTRACS mobile satellite communication system. This system significantly improves position reporting reliability and accuracy while simplifying the terminal's hardware. The positioning technique uses the original OmniTRACS TDMA timing signal formats in the forward and return link directions plus an auxiliary, low power forward link signal through a second satellite to derive distance values. The distances are then converted into the mobile terminal's latitude and longitude in real time. A minor augmentation of the spread spectrum profile of the return link allowed the resolution of periodic ambiguities. The system also locates the two satellites in real time with fixed platforms in known locations using identical mobile terminal hardware. Initial accuracies of 1/4 mile have been realized uniformly throughout the USA using a satellite separation of 22 degrees and there are no dead zones, skywaves, or cycle slips as found in terrestrial systems like LORAN-C.

  18. IBFA description of high-spin positive-parity states in Rh isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata, G.; Cutoiu, D.; Constantinescu, G.; Ivascu, M.; Zamfir, N.V.

    1985-01-01

    Properties of the odd-mass Rh isotopes are investigated in the framework of the interacting boson-fermion approximation (IBFA) model in which the odd proton moves in the 1gsub(9/2) and 2dsub(5/2) orbitals. Lifetimes of some high-spin positive-parity states in 99 Rh obtained by the recoil-distance method with the 88 Sr( 14 N,3n) reaction are also reported. Calculated excitation energies and electromagnetic properties of the high-spin positive-parity states are compared with experiment and an acceptable agreement is obtained. (orig.)

  19. The Effect of Roundtable and Clustering Teaching Techniques and Students' Personal Traits on Students' Achievement in Descriptive Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaga, Megawati

    2017-01-01

    The Objectives of this paper as an experimental research was to investigate the effect of Roundtable and Clustering teaching techniques and students' personal traits on students' achievement in descriptive writing. The students in grade ix of SMP Negeri 2 Pancurbatu 2016/2017 school academic year were chose as the population of this research. The…

  20. Research methods in nursing students' Bachelor's theses in Sweden: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Linda; Silén, Marit

    2018-07-01

    During the nursing programme in Sweden, students complete an independent project that allows them to receive both a professional qualification as a nurse and a Bachelor's degree. This project gives students the opportunity to develop and apply skills such as critical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making, thus preparing them for their future work. However, only a few, small-scale studies have analysed the independent project to gain more insight into how nursing students carry out this task. The aim of the present study was to describe the methods, including ethical considerations and assessment of data quality, applied in nursing students' independent Bachelor's degree projects in a Swedish context. A descriptive study with a quantitative approach. A total of 490 independent projects were analysed using descriptive statistics. Literature reviews were the predominant project form. References were often used to support the analysis method. They were not, however, always relevant to the method. This was also true of ethical considerations. When a qualitative approach was used, and data collected through interviews, the participants were typically professionals. In qualitative projects involving analysis of biographies/autobiographies or blogs participants were either persons with a disease or next of kin of a person with a disease. Although most of the projects were literature reviews, it seemed unclear to the nursing students how the data should be analysed as well as what ethical issues should be raised in relation to the method. Consequently, further research and guidance are needed. In Sweden, independent projects are not considered research and are therefore not required to undergo ethics vetting. However, it is important that they be designed so as to avoid possible research ethics problems. Asking persons about their health, which occurred in some of the empirical projects, may therefore be considered questionable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All

  1. Postdoctoral pharmacy industry fellowships: a descriptive analysis of programs and postgraduate positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Stephanie; Gangadharan, Amy; Johnson, Hiliary; Schleck, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael; Alexander, James G

    2012-01-01

    Postdoctoral pharmacy industry fellowship programs and the employment of fellowship graduates are described. A list of postgraduate industry fellowships was gathered from the 2009 ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting. Data regarding program characteristics were collected using the Personnel Placement Service database and program-specific brochures. After data compilation, a standardized survey was sent in January 2010 via e-mail to the point of contact for all programs to confirm the accuracy of the program's characteristics. Only academically affiliated industry fellowship programs were analyzed. Retrospective data were collected regarding the first position of employment for all fellows who graduated from the program between 2005 and 2009 and the position of those same individuals at the time of survey completion. Surveys were sent to 64 postgraduate industry fellowship programs affiliated with a school of pharmacy, 56 (87.5%) of whom responded. The departmental breakdown for positions offered (n = 75) across all academically affiliated industry fellowship programs (including nonresponders) was as follows: medical affairs (38.7%, n = 29), clinical research (32.0%, n = 24), regulatory affairs (9.3%, n = 7), commercial (8.0%, n = 6), health economics and outcomes research (8.0%, n = 6), and pharmacovigilance (4.0%, n = 3). Data from fellows during years 1-5 after completion of the industry fellowship indicated that 90.5% of former fellows remained in the industry (n = 238). The postgraduate industry fellowship programs surveyed indicated that the majority of fellowship graduates continued to hold positions in industry after program completion. The majority of industry fellowships and subsequent job placements occurred in the areas of medical affairs, clinical research, and regulatory affairs.

  2. Bundle 13 position verification tool description and on-reactor use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onderwater, T G [Canadian General Electric Co. Ltd., Peterborough, ON (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    To address the Power Pulse problem, Bruce B uses Gap: a comprehensive monitoring program by the station to maintain the gap between the fuel string and the upstream shield plug. The gap must be maintained within a band. The gap must not be so large as to allow excessive reactivity increases or cause high impact forces during reverse flow events. It should also not be so small as to cause crushed fuel during rapid, differential reactor/fuel string cool downs. Rapid cool downs are infrequent. The Bundle 13 Position Verification Tool (BPV tool) role is to independently measure the position of the upstream bundle of the fuel string. The measurements are made on-reactor, on-power and will allow verification of the Gap Management system`s calculated fuel string position. This paper reviews the reasons for developing the BPV tool. Design issues relevant to safe operation in the fuelling machine, fuel channel and fuel handling equipment are also reviewed. Tests ensuring no adverse effects on channel pressure losses are described and actual on-reactor, on-power results are discussed. (author). 4 figs.

  3. Bundle 13 position verification tool description and on-reactor use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onderwater, T.G.

    1996-01-01

    To address the Power Pulse problem, Bruce B uses Gap: a comprehensive monitoring program by the station to maintain the gap between the fuel string and the upstream shield plug. The gap must be maintained within a band. The gap must not be so large as to allow excessive reactivity increases or cause high impact forces during reverse flow events. It should also not be so small as to cause crushed fuel during rapid, differential reactor/fuel string cool downs. Rapid cool downs are infrequent. The Bundle 13 Position Verification Tool (BPV tool) role is to independently measure the position of the upstream bundle of the fuel string. The measurements are made on-reactor, on-power and will allow verification of the Gap Management system's calculated fuel string position. This paper reviews the reasons for developing the BPV tool. Design issues relevant to safe operation in the fuelling machine, fuel channel and fuel handling equipment are also reviewed. Tests ensuring no adverse effects on channel pressure losses are described and actual on-reactor, on-power results are discussed. (author). 4 figs

  4. Baccalaureate Student Nurses' Study Habits Prior to Admission to Nursing Program: A Descriptive Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicilda-Reynaldo, Rhea Faye D; Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Bigley, Louise; Adams, Kathryn

    2017-06-01

    Faculty continue to observe students struggling as they adapt their study strategies to learn nursing core content. This study described the study habits of Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students prior to admission to the program. This study used a descriptive qualitative research design. A purposive sample of 19 BSN students (juniors [n=10] and seniors [n=9]) from a 4-year public Midwestern university were included in this study. Two focus group sessions, using a semi-structured interview guide, were conducted in the spring semester of 2013. The four themes which emerged from the analysis of data were: "I just got it," "I had a lot of time then," "I studied alone" mostly, and "…a little struggle with the sciences." The findings suggest the BSN students did not study much or employed poor study strategies during their years completing general education courses. Academic support is needed by students prior to admission to the nursing program so they can learn effective study skills and modify their study habits for easier adaptation to the rigors of nursing education. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. DESCRIPTIVE STUDY ON SAGITTAL LUMBAR SPINE CHANGES IN STUDENTS OF THE FEDERAL EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM OF FLORIANÓPOLIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group, Susane; Santos, Saray Giovana Dos; Moro, Antônio Renato Pereira

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of sagittal lumbar spine postural abnormalities and associated factors among students in the federal educational system in Florianópolis. 288 adolescents (156 males and 132 females), aged from 15 to 18 years, who were students in the federal educational system in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, were evaluated. To gather data, photogrammetry was used following a specific protocol for postural assessment, and a questionnaire was used to identify the prevalence and frequency of pain, and the activities that triggered the problem. In the data analysis, descriptive statistics, Student's t-test for independent samples, chi-square test and Poisson's regression were used, with the significance level set at p<0.05 for all the tests. The prevalence of low back pain was 49.3%, with weekly frequency in 43.1% of the sample. The prevalence of deviation was 53.8%, and 90.9% corresponded to rectification of lumbar curvature, and this affected males more frequently. A significant difference in lumbar angle was found between the sexes; higher prevalence ratios of postural deviations were found in the male group. The prevalences of low back pain and lumbar postural deviation were high, but the relationship between these variables did not present significance. The main causes of the lumbar pain were sports practice or vigorous activities and remaining in a seated position for extended periods of time.

  6. Projected Shell Model Description of Positive Parity Band of 130Pr Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suram; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Dhanvir; Sharma, Chetan; Bharti, Arun; Bhat, G. H.; Sheikh, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    Theoretical investigation of positive parity yrast band of odd-odd 130Pr nucleus is performed by applying the projected shell model. The present study is undertaken to investigate and verify the very recently observed side band in 130Pr theoretically in terms of quasi-particle (qp) configuration. From the analysis of band diagram, the yrast as well as side band are found to arise from two-qp configuration πh 11/2 ⊗ νh 11/2. The present calculations are viewed to have qualitatively reproduced the known experimental data for yrast states, transition energies, and B( M1) / B( E2) ratios of this nucleus. The recently observed positive parity side band is also reproduced by the present calculations. The energy states of the side band are predicted up to spin 25+, which is far above the known experimental spin of 18+ and this could serve as a motivational factor for future experiments. In addition, the reduced transition probability B( E2) for interband transitions has also been calculated for the first time in projected shell model, which would serve as an encouragement for other research groups in the future.

  7. [Ophthalmic manifestations of toxoplasmosis in a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient. Description of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermida Pérez, J A; Bermejo Hernandez, Á; Sobenes Gutierrez, R

    2014-03-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an infection of worldwide distribution caused by Toxoplasma gondii, and infects a large proportion of the world population. Only under certain circumstances of severe immunosuppression can the parasite reactivate and cause disease. The most common form of presentation of this pathology in patients with positive HIV is the brain abscess. One of the extra-cerebral forms is toxoplasmic chorioretinitis, which could lead to a chronic active form of a slowly progressive retinitis. Diagnosis is made by observing the eye fundus and confirmed by the scarring obtained after specific treatment. We report a case of a patient with diabetes and positive HIV, in whom a toxoplasmic scar injury was detected in the annual retinography follow-up. A conservative therapeutic approach was decided, with regular check-ups for possible detection of disease activation. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Death and caring for dying patients: exploring first-year nursing students' descriptive experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Kristina; Westin, Lars; Prahl, Charlotte; Osterlind, Jane; Strang, Susann; Bergh, Ingrid; Hammarlund, Kina

    2014-10-01

    To describe first-year nursing students' experiences of witnessing death and providing end-of-life care. This study is part of a larger longitudinal project. Interviews (n=17) were conducted with nursing students at the end of their first year of education. To analyse the interviews (lived-experience descriptions), a thematic analysis, 'a search for meaning' ( Van Manen, 1997 ) was applied. The results are presented within the framework of four separate themes: (1) The thought of death is more frightening than the actual experience, (2) Daring to approach the dying patient and offering something of oneself, (3) The experience of not sufficing in the face of death and (4) Being confronted with one's own feelings. Nursing students require continuous support and opportunity to reflect and discuss their experiences about caring for dying patients and confronting death throughout the entirety of their education. In addition, teachers and clinical supervisors need to give support using reflective practice to help students to develop confidence in their capacity for caring for dying patients.

  9. Nursing students' perceptions of a collaborative clinical placement model: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Riet, Pamela; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Courtney-Pratt, Helen

    2018-03-01

    Clinical placements are specifically designed to facilitate authentic learning opportunities and are an integral component of undergraduate nursing programs. However, as academics and clinicians frequently point out, clinical placements are fraught with problems that are long-standing and multidimensional in nature. Collaborative placement models, grounded in a tripartite relationship between students, university staff and clinical partners, and designed to foster students' sense of belonging, have recently been implemented to address many of the challenges associated with clinical placements. In this study a qualitative descriptive design was undertaken with the aim of exploring 14 third year third year nursing students' perceptions of a collaborative clinical placement model undertaken in an Australian university. Students participated in audio recorded focus groups following their final clinical placement. Thematic analysis of the interview data resulted in identification of six main themes: Convenience and Camaraderie, Familiarity and Confidence, Welcomed and Wanted, Belongingness and Support, Employment, and The Need for Broader Clinical Experiences. The clinical collaborative model fostered a sense of familiarity for many of the participants and this led to belongingness, acceptance, confidence and meaningful learning experiences. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Leadership, management and teamwork learning through an extra-curricular project for medical students: descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia da Silva Germano Jorge

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Professionalism in medicine requires preparation for the globalized world. Our objective was to describe a project that introduces medical students to the community, hospital and laboratory activities, thereby allowing them to gain experience in people management, leadership and teamwork.DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive study of the process applied at a philanthropic medical school in Curitiba, Paraná.METHOD: Inclusion of management and leadership practices as part of the medical degree program.RESULTS: The study groups consisted of fifteen students. After six months, any of the participants could be elected as a subcoordinator, with responsibility for managing tasks and representing the team in hospital departments and the community. The activities required increasing levels of responsibility. In medical schools, students' involvement in practical activities is often limited to observation. They are not required to take responsibilities or to interact with other students and stakeholders. However, they will become accountable, which thus has an adverse effect on all involved. The learning space described here aims to fill this gap by bringing students closer to the daily lives and experiences of healthcare professionals.CONCLUSION: Being a physician requires not only management and leadership, but also transferrable competencies, communication and critical thinking. These attributes can be acquired through experience of teamwork, under qualified supervision from teaching staff. Students are thus expected to develop skills to deal with and resolve conflicts, learn to share leadership, prepare others to help and replace them, adopt an approach based on mutual responsibility and discuss their performance.

  11. Aims and theoretical frameworks in nursing students' Bachelor's theses in Sweden: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silén, Marit; Johansson, Linda

    2016-02-01

    Nursing students' independent projects in Sweden not only provide an opportunity to receive a professional qualification as a nurse but also gain a Bachelor's degree in nursing. The aim of these projects is to demonstrate knowledge and understanding within the major field of the education. This study aimed to describe and analyze the topics as well as theoretical frameworks and concepts in nursing students' independent projects, which lead to a Bachelor's degree, in a Swedish context. A total of 491 independent projects, written by nursing students in Sweden, were included in the study. Topics together with theoretical frameworks and concepts in the projects were identified. Similar topics and theoretical frameworks and concepts, respectively, were grouped into subcategories, and similar subcategories were then merged into a main category. The number of entries in each category was counted for descriptive statistics in order to allow for the demonstration of magnitude. The most common topics concerned experiences and managing when having an illness, experiences of care and of being a caregiver, and healthcare staff's care and knowledge. The nursing theories/models that were most often used were Eriksson's Theory of Caritative Caring, Travelbee's Human-to-Human Relationship Model, and Orem's Self-care Theory. Among the non-nursing theories/models, perspectives and concepts lifeworld, ethical values and principles, existential concepts and quality of life/health-related quality of life, were most often used by these students. There may be some difficulty in finding a topic for the project that is relevant for both a professional qualification as a nurse, as well as for achieving the requirements of a Bachelor's degree in nursing. The study indicates that there is a need to widen the student's understanding of different nursing theories/perspectives/models/concepts during nursing education so that students are familiar with a broad range of these when conducting their

  12. DESCRIPTION OF THE NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF STUDENTS IN SD NEGERI 3 PELIATAN, SUBDISTRICT UBUD, GIANYAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Indah Hapsari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Elementary school student are the group of student that potentialy having problem with nutrition due to their eating patern and development status. The cases of malnutrition in Ubud is still highly noted even if Ubud is kown as well-developed subdistrict. The aimed of the study is to descript the nutritional status and other factors related to among the students of SD Negeri 3 Peliatan, Subdistrict Ubud, Gianyar. This study was done on August 19th 2011 until August 20th 2011 and the study design was a cross-sectional. Subjects were the grade 5th and 6th students with a total of 70 student, were chosen by quota sampling technique. Every subject was asked to administer questionnaire, to get the informaton on characteristic, eating pattern and breakfast habit. Antropometric measurements were done to gain the nutritional status of sampel. History of low birth weight was collected from the parents through administering self-administered questionnaires. The data was analysed descriptively. Result showed that subjects tend to have high malnutrition cases, in whom 25.7% were undernutrition and 24.3% were overnutrition 24.3%. Majority of subjects who have good nutritional status were those who admitted to have balanced eating pattern and breakfast habit. In addition, subjects with good nutrition status tended to have good academic scores and those with history of low birth weight seemed to have good and over nutritional status. As the students of SD Negeri 3 Peliatan seemed to have remarkable problem of malnutrition, it is suggested to inform their parents regarding the best eating pattern and to emphasize the importance of berakfast habit to achieve and maintain the good nutritional status for their children. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso

  13. Evaluating Educational Practices for Positively Affecting Student Perceptions of a Sales Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Shannon; Peltier, James W.; Pomirleanu, Nadia; Cross, James; Simon, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Despite demand for new graduates seeking a sales position, student reticence toward pursuing a sales career remains. While all students will not choose a sales career, diminishing the existence of sales-related misconceptions among the student population should establish sales as a viable career path for a larger number of students. We test six…

  14. MDEP Generic Common Position No DICWG-05. Common position on the treatment of hardware description language (HDL) programmed devices for use in nuclear safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Following other industries, the nuclear industry developed increasing interest in the use of programmable logic components that are implemented using hardware description language (HDL) such as such as FPGAs, CPLDs or ASICs. HDL programmed devices (HPD) has both characteristics of software and hardware. Therefore applications using HPDs has many similarities with the traditional software (in particular the design may be affected by errors) and characteristics of traditional electronic design (e.g. electronic-level timing and electrical issues). However, due to the unique nature of HPDs, there exist several differences between HPDs and traditional software. Some key differences include: - HPDs use parallel processing with dedicated hardware for each function instead of executing instructions sequentially as in the case of traditional software. - Safety critical software uses imperative languages which specify each instruction of the program whereas HPDs use declarative languages. - The target of software is a microprocessor, which guarantees properties such as memory consistency after each instruction. Such properties are not inherent in HPDs and thus the design process needs different steps to build and guarantee behavioural properties. - Translation of the HDL description to bit-streams in HPDs is much more involved than the translation of source code to binary in software compilation. In the HPD case, this process is not fully automatic, and therefore designer must guide the tools, which may result in undetectable errors. The Digital Instrumentation and Controls Working Group (DICWG) has agreed that a common position on this topic is warranted given the increase of use of Digital I and C in new reactor designs, its safety implications, and the need to develop a common understanding from the perspectives of regulatory authorities. This action follows the DICWG examination of the regulatory requirements of the participating members and of relevant industry

  15. Student-generated instructional videos facilitate learning through positive emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Pirhonen, Juhani; Rasi, Päivi

    2017-01-01

    The central focus of this study is a learning method in which university students produce instructional videos about the content matter as part of their learning process, combined with other learning assignments. The rationale for this is to promote a more multimodal pedagogy, and to provide students opportunities for a more learner-centred, motivating, active, engaging and productive role in their learning process. As such we designed a ‘video course’ where the students needed to produce an ...

  16. Intensive care nursing students' perceptions of simulation for learning confirming communication skills: A descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Marte-Marie Wallander; Gabrielsen, Anita Kristin; Falch, Anne Lise; Stubberud, Dag-Gunnar

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore intensive care nursing students experiences with confirming communication skills training in a simulation-based environment. The study has a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive design. The participants were students in a post-graduate program in intensive care nursing, that had attended a one day confirming communication course. Three focus group interviews lasting between 60 and 80min were conducted with 14 participants. The interviews were transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was performed, using Braun & Clark's seven steps. The analysis resulted in three main themes: "awareness", "ice-breaker" and "challenging learning environment". The participants felt that it was a challenge to see themselves on the video-recordings afterwards, however receiving feedback resulted in better self-confidence in mastering complex communication. The main finding of the study is that the students reported improved communication skills after the confirming communication course. However; it is uncertain how these skills can be transferred to clinical practice improving patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Quality of sleep and selective attention in university students: descriptive cross-sectional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Silvia Alicia; Raimondi, Waldina; Rizzo, María Laura

    2014-09-05

    Sleep quality not only refers to sleeping well at night, but also includes appropriate daytime functioning. Poor quality of sleep can affect a variety of attention processes. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the relationship between the perceived quality of sleep and selective focus in a group of college students. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in a group of 52 Argentinian college students of the Universidad Adventista del Plata. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Continuous Performance Test and the Trail Making Test were applied. The main results indicate that students sleep an average of 6.48 hours. Generally half of the population tested had a good quality of sleep. However, the dispersion seen in some components demonstrates the heterogeneity of the sample in these variables. It was observed that the evaluated attention processes yielded different levels of alteration in the total sample: major variability in the process of process and in the divided-attention processes were detected. A lower percentage of alteration was observed in the process of attention support. Poor quality of sleep has more impact in the sub processes with greater participation of corticocortical circuits (selective and divided attention) and greater involvement of the prefrontal cortex. Fewer difficulties were found in the attention-support processes that rely on subcortical regions and have less frontal involvement.

  18. Quality of sleep and selective attention in university students: descriptive cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Alicia Fontana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Sleep quality not only refers to sleeping well at night, but also includes appropriate daytime functioning. Poor quality of sleep can affect a variety of attention processes. PURPOSE The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the relationship between the perceived quality of sleep and selective focus in a group of college students. METHODS A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in a group of 52 Argentinian college students of the Universidad Adventista del Plata. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Continuous Performance Test and the Trail Making Test were applied. RESULTS The main results indicate that students sleep an average of 6.48 hours. Generally half of the population tested had a good quality of sleep. However, the dispersion seen in some components demonstrates the heterogeneity of the sample in these variables. It was observed that the evaluated attention processes yielded different levels of alteration in the total sample: major variability in the process of process and in the divided-attention processes were detected. A lower percentage of alteration was observed in the process of attention support. CONCLUSION Poor quality of sleep has more impact in the sub processes with greater participation of corticocortical circuits (selective and divided attention and greater involvement of the prefrontal cortex. Fewer difficulties were found in the attention-support processes that rely on subcortical regions and have less frontal involvement.

  19. The effects of positive cognitions on the relationship between alienation and resourcefulness in nursing students in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhet, Abir K; ElGuenidi, Mervat; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2011-01-01

    Alienation is a subjective state, a feeling of being a stranger, as if one were not one's normal self. It is also a sense of homelessness; a feeling of uneasiness or discomfort, which signifies the person's exclusion from social or cultural participation. Alienation can adversely affect healthy functioning of nursing students. Nursing students are the adolescents of today and the nurses of tomorrow who will deal with human behavior, and their psychological well-being will be important in managing their clients' conditions. Healthy nursing students are likely to become healthy nurses who can then model and promote healthy lifestyles for their patients. This study looked at whether the effects of alienation on adolescents' resourcefulness are influenced by positive cognitions. Zauszniewski's theory of resourcefulness, which is based on the conceptualization of two forms of resourcefulness: personal (self-help) and social (help-seeking) resourcefulness, served as the theoretical framework for the study. A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used to examine hypothesized relationships among the study variables in a convenience sample of 170 first-year nursing students aged 17 to 20 years. Results showed that positive cognitions had a moderating and a partial mediating effect on the relationship between alienation and resourcefulness. It is imperative for nurse educators to generate interventions to enhance positive cognitions among nursing students.

  20. Student-Generated Instructional Videos Facilitate Learning through Positive Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhonen, Juhani; Rasi, Päivi

    2017-01-01

    The central focus of this study is a learning method in which university students produce instructional videos about the content matter as part of their learning process, combined with other learning assignments. The rationale for this is to promote a more multimodal pedagogy, and to provide students opportunities for a more learner-centred,…

  1. High School Student Physics Research Experience Yields Positive Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a…

  2. Students' Communication and Positive Outcomes in College Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKandari, Nabila

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine students' communication in the college classroom through faculty-led methods of enhancing classroom participation. The students in this study perceived that faculty members work to engage them in various classroom activities and enhance their participation through discussions, debates, dialogue, group…

  3. Motivational Techniques: Positively Impacting Students from Middle School through College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, our children face a number of factors that influence their behavior. Children's peers, parents and even the media, especially television, heavily influence students. Because of these influences, it can be difficult to motivate students in the classroom to strive for and achieve success. The purpose of this article is to…

  4. Beginning and experienced secondary school teachers' self- and student schema in positive and problematic teacher-student relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, Luce|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357401530; van Tartwijk, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112629385; Pennings, Heleen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323242588; van der Want, Anna; Verloop, Nico; den Brok, Perry; Wubbels, Theo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070651361

    2016-01-01

    The quality of teacher-student relationships is important for teachers' well-being in schools. In this interview study we investigated which cognitions comprise secondary school teachers' self- and student schema in positive and problematic teacher-student relationships. Frequency analyses of these

  5. Influencing factors on hand hygiene behavior of nursing students based on theory of planned behavior: A descriptive survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sun Young; Kim, Kyung Mi

    2016-01-01

    Hand hygiene is the single most important measure to prevent transmission of infection, but the compliance rate of healthcare workers is relatively low. This study was conducted to identify the knowledge, beliefs, behavior, and affecting factors about hand hygiene among nursing students. A descriptive survey study. The study was carried out in two South Korean nursing schools. A total 208 nursing students participated in this study. Questionnaires were used to collect data. The percentage of correct answers in the survey section concerning hand hygiene knowledge was 68.1%. No significant difference in the knowledge, behavioral beliefs, normative beliefs, or control beliefs data was found related to general characteristics. Behavioral beliefs correlated with normative beliefs (r=.25, phand hygiene behavior (r=.17, p=.017), and control beliefs correlated with hand hygiene behavior (r=.18, p=.010). The results suggest that knowledge is not enough to change the beliefs related to hand hygiene; positive behavioral beliefs and strong control beliefs are also needed to increase hand hygiene compliance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Description of Stikes Yarsis students' motivation in facing the international nursing job opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesiana Heris Santy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 The proliferation of nursing higher education in Indonesia increases the number of nurse graduates in Indonesia. Unfortunately, it is not equivalent with the jobs provided for them as well as their low motivation to catch the opportunity to work abroad. Therefore, this research was purposed to describe the motivation of students of Stikes Yarsis in facing the international nursing job opportunity. The type of research was descriptive involving all students of the second and fourth class in the program of study S1 Nursing Stikes Yarsis as the population. The samples were taken from all population by applying the total sampling technique, totally 184 respondents. Moreover, the research variable was the motivation of students of Stikes Yarsis in facing the international nursing job opportunity. The result showed that half of the respondents, 92 students, had a low motivation in facing the international nursing job opportunity. Low motivation is one of the factors which influence the students not to catch the job opportunity abroad. Hence, Stikes Yarsis as the nursing education provider is expected to be able to increase their motivation by giving information, providing facilities which support the students in developing their ability in speaking foreign languages, as well as building networking with institutions outside this country so that the graduates will easily get a job abroad.  Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";}

  7. Uncovering nursing students' views of their relationship with educators in a university context: A descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y; Tong, Chien Wai; Henderson, Saras

    2017-02-01

    Power dynamics is a key element in the educator-student relationship, and can be influential to the learning outcomes of students. Power relations are inherent in the interaction between educators and students. The educator-student relationship is still an under-explored area of power dynamics. The aim of the study was to investigate nursing students' perceptions of the power dynamics in the educator-student relationship in a university learning context in order to offer educators some understanding of how such a relationship was perceived by students. A descriptive qualitative study using focus group inquiry. Through convenience sampling, a total of 56 students were recruited and eight focus group interviews were conducted. Thematic analysis was adopted to capture the meanings extracted from the student narratives. Four core themes of the educator-student relationship were identified. Referring to these themes, some implications were drawn, such as the significance of the educator-student relationship; an educator's power matters; and polarized views among the students on whether or not an educator should be a friend. The power dynamics varied depending on an educator's personality, communication skills, ability to effectively monitor large classes, and teaching style. More efforts are needed to investigate the preferred conceptions and types of educator-student relationships in order to evaluate the impact that these have on learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Just Rewards: Positive Discipline Can Teach Students Self-Respect and Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandler, Nina

    1996-01-01

    Describes a teacher's approach to classroom management through positive discipline, using positive reinforcements to teach children positive behaviors. Students who feel affirmed can begin to believe in themselves and begin to take responsibility and build successful relationships. Five steps to positive discipline are outlined. (SLD)

  9. Alignment of Hands-On STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-01-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in…

  10. Toward a Positive Explanation of Student Differences in Reading Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Curt M.; Palmer, Anna H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Education has much in common with professions that are using positive psychology and positive organizational scholarship to transform practice, yet the science behind peak human and group functioning has been slow to displace deficit-based framing of reform policies and improvement strategies in education. Purpose of the Study: This…

  11. Betwixt and Between: The Social Position and Stress Experiences of Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Rebecca K.; La Touche, Rachel; Oslawski-Lopez, Jamie; Powers, Alyssa; Simacek, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Graduate students occupy social positions within institutions of higher education that are rife with role strain and, relative to broader power relations within these institutions, are marginalized. In this study, we inquire how the social positions and concomitant roles of graduate students shape their mental health experiences, investigating…

  12. Enhancing Students' Self-Efficacy in Making Positive Career Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddan, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Field Project A is an elective course in the Bachelor of Exercise Science program at Griffith University and includes elements of both career development learning and work-integrated learning. This paper aims to determine the effects of the learning activities and assessment items developed for the course on students' self-efficacy in making…

  13. Field trips as an intervention to enhance pharmacy students' positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine whether students' experience of field trips influenced their perceptions regarding a management module as part of their training as future pharmacists. Methods. A mixed-method sequential exploratory research design was used. Data were gathered through written narratives and focus group interviews, ...

  14. Students' Positive and Negative Experiences in Hybrid and Online Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mansour, Bassou; Mupinga, Davison M.

    2007-01-01

    As higher education institutions struggle to meet the growing demand for education from non-traditional students, many are turning to hybrid and online courses. These courses, free up classroom space, allow faculty to reach a wider audience using technology; and are therefore cost effective. But, what learning experiences do these courses provide…

  15. Classroom Management and Students' Self-Esteem: Creating Positive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirdag, Seyithan

    2015-01-01

    Middle school students experience substantial changes in their emotion and cognition while they grow. They have mixed feelings, which may negatively affect their motivation, self-esteem, and academic success due to different classroom management strategies of their teachers. There is available research about motivation of middle school students…

  16. Athletes as Students: Ensuring Positive Cognitive and Affective Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayles, Joy Gaston; Hu, Shouping

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has become increasingly concerned about the educational experience of student athletes, beyond enforcement of eligibility rules and regulations. Perhaps this growing interest is in response to public criticism of the poor performance--and even misconduct--associated with the…

  17. Student Attitudes towards Enterprise Education in Poland: A Positive Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Paul; Jones, Amanda; Packham, Gary; Miller, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to appraise the delivery of an enterprise education course to a cohort of Polish students evaluating its impact in encouraging entrepreneurial activity. The Polish economy continues its expansion with adoption of free market economies post communism. To encourage this growth, entrepreneurial activity must be encouraged…

  18. A descriptive qualitative study of student learning in a psychosocial nursing class infused with art, literature, music, and film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Alice; Curtis, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Nursing educators have long valued and supported the integration of liberal arts in professional nursing programs. This descriptive qualitative study explores the meanings students derive from the integration of liberal arts content into a psychosocial nursing class. Questionnaires, class observation, and focus group interviews revealed five themes: an interesting hook, a deeper level of understanding, developing self-understanding, developing empathy and increasing cultural awareness. Researchers suggest that integrating liberal arts into nursing education enhances student learning.

  19. Informational Literacy and Information and Communication Technologies Use by Secondary Education Students in Spain: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Ma. José Rodríguez; Migueláñez, Susana Olmos; Molina, María Pinto; Abad, Fernando Martínez; Riaza, Blanca García

    2011-01-01

    Informational literacy and the use of technologies by Secondary Education students in Spain: A descriptive study. The development of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), together with their application to research carried out on educational areas, are factors which contribute to the promotion of a new educative model constructed on…

  20. The Moderating Role of Classroom Descriptive Norms in the Association of Student Behavior with Social Preference and Popularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boor-Klip, Henrike J.; Segers, Eliane; Hendrickx, Marloes M. H. G.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.

    2017-01-01

    This study addressed the moderating role of classroom descriptive norms for overt and relational aggression, social withdrawal, prosocial behavior, and academic reputation in the association of behavior with social preference and popularity in early adolescence. Participants were 1,492 fifth-grade students ([x-bar][subscript age] = 10.6 years,…

  1. Attitudes and Descriptive Norms of Alcohol-Related Problems as Predictors of Alcohol Use among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Meg E.; Usdan, Stuart L.; Higginbotham, John C.; Cremeens-Matthews, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to identify predictors of alcohol use based on personal values and several constructs from the Integrated Behavioral Model (i.e., attitudes, injunctive norms and descriptive norms) among undergraduate college students. Methods: A cross sectional study design was used with a convenience sample of college…

  2. Who is the competent physics student? A study of students' positions and social interaction in small-group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Karin

    2014-06-01

    This article describes a study which explored the social interaction and the reproduction and challenge of gendered discourses in small group discussions in physics. Data for the study consisted of video recordings of eight upper secondary school groups solving physics problems and 15 audiotaped individual interviews with participating students. The analysis was based on gender theory viewing gender both as a process and a discourse. Specifically discursive psychology analysis was used to examine how students position themselves and their peers within discourses of physics and gender. The results of the study reveal how images of physics and of "skilled physics student" were constructed in the context of the interviews. These discourses were reconstructed in the students' discussions and their social interactions within groups. Traditional gendered positions were reconstructed, for example with boys positioned as more competent in physics than girls. These positions were however also resisted and challenged.

  3. Teacher-Provided Positive Attending to Improve Student Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perle, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    A teacher serves many important roles within a classroom, including an educator and a manager of child behavior. Inattention, overactivity, and noncompliance have long been cited as some of the most common areas of reported difficulty for schools (Axelrod & Zank, 2012; Goldstein, 1995). The evidence-based practice of positive attending (i.e.,…

  4. Proposed learning strategies of medical students in a clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Richard P; Murphy, Deirdre J

    2016-01-01

    Medical students face many challenges when learning within clinical environments. How students plan to use their time and engage with learning opportunities is therefore critical, as it may be possible to highlight strategies that optimize the learning experience at an early stage in the rotation. The aim of the study was to describe the learning drivers and proposed learning strategies of medical students for a clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology. A descriptive study of personal learning plans completed by students at the start of their clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology was undertaken. Data relating to students' learning strategies were obtained from the personal learning plans completed by students. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were used. The desire to obtain a good examination result was the most significant reason why the rotation was important to students (n=67/71, 94%). Students struggled to create a specific and practical learning outcome relevant to their career interest. Target scores of students were significantly higher than their reported typical scores (Plearning resource during the rotation. Bedside tutorials were rated as likely to be the most useful learning activity and small group learning activities were rated as likely to be more useful than lectures. Most students intended to study the course material linked to their clinical program rather than the classroom-based tutorial program. The main learning driver for medical students was academic achievement, and the proposed learning strategy favored by medical students was linking their study plans to clinical activities. Medical educators should consider strategies that foster more intrinsic drivers of student learning and more student-oriented learning resources and activities.

  5. A Guide for Graduate Students Interested in Postdoctoral Positions in Biology Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikens, Melissa L.; Corwin, Lisa A.; Andrews, Tessa C.; Couch, Brian A.; Eddy, Sarah L.; McDonnell, Lisa; Trujillo, Gloriana

    2016-01-01

    Postdoctoral positions in biology education research (BER) are becoming increasingly common as the field grows. However, many life science graduate students are unaware of these positions or do not understand what these positions entail or the careers with which they align. In this essay, we use a backward-design approach to inform life science graduate students of postdoctoral opportunities in BER. Beginning with the end in mind, we first discuss the types of careers to which BER postdoctoral positions lead. We then discuss the different types of BER postdoctoral positions, drawing on our own experiences and those of faculty mentors. Finally, we discuss activities in which life science graduate students can engage that will help them gauge whether BER aligns with their research interests and develop skills to be competitive for BER postdoctoral positions. PMID:27856554

  6. Sexual and Reproductive Health Needs of HIV-Positive People in Tehran, Iran: A Mixed-Method Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saharnaz Nedjat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background People Living with HIV (PLHIV are highly stigmatized and consequently hard-to-access by researchers and importantly, public health outreach in Iran, possibly due to the existing socio-cultural situation in this country. The present study aimed to evaluate the sexual and reproductive health needs of PLHIV in Tehran, the capital of Iran. Methods As a mixed-method descriptive study, this project was conducted in 2012 in Tehran, Iran. In this study, we evaluated and discussed socio-demographic characteristics, family and social support, sexual behaviors, fertility desires and needs, PMTCT services, contraceptive methods, unintended pregnancy and safe abortion, and Pap smear tests among 400 participants referring to the behavioral disorders consulting centers. Results Of the sample 240 (60% were male and 160 (40% were female. About 50% of women and 40% of men were 25-34 years old. More than 60% of men and 96% of women were married, while more than 50% of the participants had HIV-positive spouses at the time of study. According to the results, fertility desire was observed among more than 30% of female and 40% of male participants. Results of the in-depth interviews indicate that the participants are not satisfied with most of the existing services offered to address their sexual and reproductive health needs. Conclusion Despite the availability of services, most of sexual and reproductive health needs of the PLHIV are overlooked by the health system in Iran. Paying attention to sexual and reproductive health needs of PLHIV in Iran not only protects their right to live long and healthy lives, but also may prevent the transmission of HIV from the patients to others within the community.

  7. Examination performances of German and international medical students in the preclinical studying-term--a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D; Resch, F; Duelli, R; Möltner, A; Huber, J; Karimian Jazi, K; Amr, A; Eckart, W; Herzog, W; Nikendei, C

    2014-01-01

    Medical students with a migration background face several specific problems during their studies. International surveys show first indications that this group of students performs worse in written, oral or practical exams. However, so far, nothing is known about the performance of international students in written pre-clinical tests as well as in pre-clinical State Examinations for German-speaking countries. A descriptive, retrospective analysis of the exam performances of medical students in the pre-clinical part of their studies was conducted at the Faculty of Medicine of Heidelberg in for the year 2012. Performance in written tests of the final exams in the second (N=276), third (N=292) and fourth semester (N=285) were compared between German students, students from EU countries and students from non-EU countries. Same comparison was drawn for the performance in the oral exam of the First State Examination in the period from 2009 - 2012 (N=1137). German students performed significantly better than students with a non-EU migration background both in all written exams and in the oral State Examination (all pstudents with an EU migration background was significantly better than that of students with a non-EU background in the written exam at the end of the third and fourth semester (pstudents completed the oral exam of the First State Examination significantly earlier than students with a non-EU migration background (students with a country of origin outside of the European Union has to be seen as a high-risk group among students with a migration background. For this group, there is an urgent need for early support to prepare for written and oral examinations.

  8. Examination performances of German and international medical students in the preclinical studying-term – A descriptive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D.; Resch, F.; Duelli, R.; Möltner, A.; Huber, J.; Karimian Jazi, K.; Amr, A.; Eckart, W.; Herzog, W.; Nikendei, C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students with a migration background face several specific problems during their studies. International surveys show first indications that this group of students performs worse in written, oral or practical exams. However, so far, nothing is known about the performance of international students in written pre-clinical tests as well as in pre-clinical State Examinations for German-speaking countries. Method: A descriptive, retrospective analysis of the exam performances of medical students in the pre-clinical part of their studies was conducted at the Faculty of Medicine of Heidelberg in for the year 2012. Performance in written tests of the final exams in the second (N=276), third (N=292) and fourth semester (N=285) were compared between German students, students from EU countries and students from non-EU countries. Same comparison was drawn for the performance in the oral exam of the First State Examination in the period from 2009 - 2012 (N=1137). Results: German students performed significantly better than students with a non-EU migration background both in all written exams and in the oral State Examination (all pstudents with an EU migration background was significantly better than that of students with a non-EU background in the written exam at the end of the third and fourth semester (pstudents completed the oral exam of the First State Examination significantly earlier than students with a non-EU migration background (students with a country of origin outside of the European Union has to be seen as a high-risk group among students with a migration background. For this group, there is an urgent need for early support to prepare for written and oral examinations. PMID:25228931

  9. Evaluation of life skills in students of Nursing: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kavga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Life skills are a set of human skills acquired via teaching or direct experience that areused to handle problems and questions commonly encountered in daily human life. The basic elementof a skill is the ability to create and materialise an effective sequence of choices, so as to achieve thedesirable effect. It is important that somebody allocates life skills in six broad sectors: sensitivity,experiencing emotions, realism thought, language and the internal logos, harmony in self-attributionand communication and finally, remuneration activity in finding a meaning in professionAim: The determination of nursing students’ opinions with regard to the existence of life skills and towhat degree they impact.Methodology: The answers of 144 students of two Nursing Departments in Greece (one from Athensand one from providences were evaluated using a questionnaire in order to determine their opinionsabout the non-existence or existence of life skills and if so what level of impact they had on. Thequestionnaire included 69 questions describing the following seven dimensions of life skills: emotion,thought, relations, study, professional settlement, leisure time, mental – bodily health. The answerswere given based on the 4 point Likert scale (no need for improvement, minimal need, small need,large need. For data process we used SPSS 14 (Statistical Package for Social Sciences for Windowsand more concretely, the Mann –Whitney U control and Pearson’ s cross-correlation parametriccoefficient.Results: The descriptive analysis of this questionnaire showed that the sample of students had aneffectual or a large need of improvement at a percentage of 42.9% in the emotional sector, 32.2% in thesector of thought, 31% in the sector of relations, 41.3% in the sector of study, 32.7% in the sector ofprofessional settlement, 30.7% in the sector of leisure time and 35.1% in the sector of health. Mann –Whitney U control showed statistically important

  10. The Effects of the First Step to Success Program on Teacher-Student Positive Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Christy

    2012-01-01

    Positive student-teacher interactions have been linked to academic and social-success of all students. The present study examined the effects of the First Steps to Success program in improving the teacher-student interaction of three Latino English Language Learners (ELL) participants identified as at risk for behavioral and academic problems. A single subject multiple baseline research design was employed for this study. Data showed a functional relationship between the behavioral interventi...

  11. Motivating Students through Positive Learning Experiences: A Comparison of Three Learning Designs for Computer Programming Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykke, Marianne; Coto, Mayela; Jantzen, Christian; Mora, Sonia; Vandel, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Based on the assumption that wellbeing, positive emotions and engagement influence motivation for learning, the aim of this paper is to provide insight into students' emotional responses to and engagement in different learning designs. By comparing students' reports on the experiential qualities of three different learning designs, their…

  12. Positive teacher–student relationships go beyond the classroom, problematic ones stay inside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. A. Claessens, Luce|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357401530; van Tartwijk, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112629385; C. van der Want, Anna; Pennings, Heleen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323242588; Verloop, Nico; J. den Brok, Perry; Wubbels, Theo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070651361

    2017-01-01

    The authors voice teachers' perceptions of their interpersonal experiences with students in both positive and problematic relationships. Interview data from 28 teachers were examined by coding utterances on teacher and student interactions. Results indicate that teachers defined the quality of the

  13. Developing Autonomous Learning in First Year University Students Using Perspectives from Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaskill, Ann; Denovan, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous learning is a commonly occurring learning outcome from university study, and it is argued that students require confidence in their own abilities to achieve this. Using approaches from positive psychology, this study aimed to develop confidence in first-year university students to facilitate autonomous learning. Psychological character…

  14. Positive Psychology and Familial Factors as Predictors of Latina/o Students' Psychological Grit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Javier C.; Lu, Ming-Tsan P.; Lenz, A. Stephen; Hinojosa, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Positive psychology is a useful framework to understand Latina/o students' experiences. In the current study, we examined how presence of meaning in life, search for meaning in life, hope, and family importance influenced 128 Latina/o college students' psychological grit. We used the Meaning in Life Questionnaire (MLQ), Subjective Happiness Scale,…

  15. Positive Social Support, Negative Social Exchanges, and Suicidal Behavior in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jameson K.; Barton, Alison L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Risk for suicide is often higher among college students, compared to same-age noncollegiate peers, and may be exacerbated by quality of social support and interactions. The authors examined the independent contributions of positive social support and negative social exchanges to suicide ideation and attempts in college students.…

  16. Instilling positive beliefs about disabilities: pilot testing a novel experiential learning activity for rehabilitation students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Arielle M; Pitonyak, Jennifer S; Nelson, Ian K; Matsuda, Patricia N; Kartin, Deborah; Molton, Ivan R

    2018-05-01

    To develop and test a novel impairment simulation activity to teach beginning rehabilitation students how people adapt to physical impairments. Masters of Occupational Therapy students (n = 14) and Doctor of Physical Therapy students (n = 18) completed the study during the first month of their program. Students were randomized to the experimental or control learning activity. Experimental students learned to perform simple tasks while simulating paraplegia and hemiplegia. Control students viewed videos of others completing tasks with these impairments. Before and after the learning activities, all students estimated average self-perceived health, life satisfaction, and depression ratings among people with paraplegia and hemiplegia. Experimental students increased their estimates of self-perceived health, and decreased their estimates of depression rates, among people with paraplegia and hemiplegia after the learning activity. The control activity had no effect on these estimates. Impairment simulation can be an effective way to teach rehabilitation students about the adaptations that people make to physical impairments. Positive impairment simulations should allow students to experience success in completing activities of daily living with impairments. Impairment simulation is complementary to other pedagogical methods, such as simulated clinical encounters using standardized patients. Implication of Rehabilitation It is important for rehabilitation students to learn how people live well with disabilities. Impairment simulations can improve students' assessments of quality of life with disabilities. To be beneficial, impairment simulations must include guided exposure to effective methods for completing daily tasks with disabilities.

  17. The impact of short term clinical placement in a developing country on nursing students: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvund, Ingeborg; Mordal, Elin

    2017-08-01

    Offering nursing students' international clinical placement during the educational program is one response to meet the need of cultural competence among nurses. This paper provides insight into the impact of clinical placement, in a developing country, on third year nursing students. In the study we investigated how short term international clinical placement impacted Norwegian nursing students' development of cultural competency. In this study we utilised a qualitative descriptive design and used individual interviews with eighteen Norwegian nursing students who had all participated in an international clinical placement. The data were analysed using the principles of systematic text condensation. In spite the international clinical placement only was four weeks, the findings suggested that real life experience culturally awakened the students and forced an ongoing process developing cultural competence. However, it is important to give students time to reflection. Although increased cultural awareness and a growing cultural competence was identified by the students undertaking international clinical placement, further research is required. It is important to investigate the best methods to support the students' reflection such that the experiences lead to learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploring the Concern about Food Allergies among Secondary School and University Students in Ontario, Canada: A Descriptive Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majowicz, Shannon E; Jung, James K H; Courtney, Sarah M; Harrington, Daniel W

    2017-01-01

    Our objective was to explore the perceived risk of food allergies among students in Ontario, Canada. We analyzed blinding questions ("I am concerned about food allergies"; "food allergies are currently a big threat to my health") from three existing food safety surveys, given to high school and university undergraduate students ( n = 3,451) circa February 2015, using descriptive analysis, and explored how concern related to demographics and self-reported cooking ability using linear regression. Overall, high school students were neutral in their concern, although Food and Nutrition students specifically were significantly less concerned ( p = 0.002) than high school students overall. University undergraduates were moderately unconcerned about food allergies. Concern was highest in younger students, decreasing between 13 and 18 years of age and plateauing between 19 and 23 years. Among students aged 13-18 years, concern was higher among those who worked or volunteered in a daycare and who had previously taken a food preparation course. Among students aged 19-23 years, concern was higher among females and those with less advanced cooking abilities. Concern was significantly correlated with perceiving food allergies as a personal threat. This study offers a first exploration of perceived risk of food allergies among this demographic and can guide future, more rigorous assessments.

  19. Does physics instruction foster university students' cognitive processes? : a descriptive study of teacher activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferguson - Hessler, M.G.M.; Jong, de T.

    1993-01-01

    This study aims at giving a systematic description of the cognitive activities involved in teaching physics. Such a description of instruction in physics requires a basis in two models, that is, the cognitive activities involved in learning physics and the knowledge base that is the foundation of

  20. Weaving Student Engagement into the Core Practices of Schools. A National Dropout Prevention Center/Network Position Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dary, Teri; Pickeral, Terry; Shumer, Rob; Williams, Anderson

    2016-01-01

    This position paper on student engagement is organized in response to major questions on how student engagement aligns with dropout prevention. Through a set of questions and responses, the "Weaving Student Engagement Into the Core Practices of Schools" position paper on student engagement : (1) defines the term "student…

  1. Choking under Pressure: When an Additional Positive Stereotype Affects Performance for Domain Identified Male Mathematics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Harriet E. S.; Crisp, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    This research aimed to establish if the presentation of two positive stereotypes would result in choking under pressure for identified male mathematics students. Seventy-five 16 year old men, who had just commenced their AS-level study, were either made aware of their gender group membership (single positive stereotype), their school group…

  2. The School Nurse's Role in Behavioral Health of Students. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Elizabeth; Bohnenkamp, Jill Haak; Freedland, Mary; Baker, Dian; Palmer, Karla

    2017-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that registered, professional school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) serve a vital role in promoting positive behavioral health outcomes in students through evidence-based programs and curricula in schools and communities. Behavioral health is as critical to…

  3. Schoolwide Positive Behavior Supports and Students with Significant Disabilities: Where Are We?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Jennifer A.; Enyart, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Although the number of schools implementing schoolwide positive behavior supports (SWPBS) has increased dramatically, the inclusion of students with severe disabilities in these efforts remains negligible. This article describes the evolution of positive behavior intervention and supports into the SWPBS approach used in many schools today,…

  4. Positive mental health and well-being among a third level student population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davoren, Martin P

    2013-01-01

    Much research on the health and well-being of third level students is focused on poor mental health leading to a dearth of information on positive mental health and well-being. Recently, the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Well-being scale (WEMWBS) was developed as a measurement of positive mental health and well-being. The aim of this research is to investigate the distribution and determinants of positive mental health and well-being in a large, broadly representative sample of third level students using WEMWBS.

  5. Competing discourses and the positioning of students in an adult basic education programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the learning processes of students enrolled in an adult basic education programme in the social and health care sector in Denmark. Theoretically the project draws on ‘positioning theory’, i.e. a poststructuralist approach. The issues being researched are how...... the students are positioned and position themselves in relation to the discourses mobilised in the programme. A qualitative inquiry, the empirical aspects consist of observations, interviews and studying documents. In addition to suggesting that competition exists between the opposing discourses mobilised...

  6. Technology of forming a positive attitude to physical training students of special medical group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhamediarov N.N.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Defined effective technology stages of forming a positive attitude towards physical education of students in special medical groups, stimulate motivation, epistemologically, informative, content-procedural, analytical and adjustment. For each stage technology offered special tools: lectures, seminars, analysis articles, mini conference on improving technique, racing games, mini-competitions, diagnostic interviews, questionnaires, analysis of log data on attendance. Selected criteria forming positive attitudes towards physical education: theoretical and practical, formed groups for research: experimental and control, analyzed results introduction of technology, efficiency of the proposed technology and means forming a positive attitude towards physical education students in special medical groups.

  7. The use of a game-based learning platform to engage nursing students: A descriptive, qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Cara; Tesar, Abigail J; Connor, Kelley; Martz, Kim

    2017-11-01

    Baccalaureate nursing programs require students to complete a research course, and faculty find it challenging to engage students. Educational gaming has recently gained attention as a technique to motivate students and enhance learning. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe undergraduate nursing students' reflections of their experiences with 3D Gamelab © , a game-based learning platform. A descriptive qualitative research design was used to elicit students' reflections of their experiences. Educational content such as handouts, videos, activities, and recommended resources for a required junior level nursing research course was organized into quests for use in 3D GameLab © . At the end of the semester, students were invited to give their feedback through a survey with open-ended questions. Thematic analysis resulted in the following components of the game-based learning experience: navigation, motivation, gaming concept, knowledge, technology, and target population. Although the overall response to 3D GameLab © in this course was negative, game-based learning does have the potential to engage students and enhance learning. To better understand how educational gaming could be used in nursing, further research should be conducted to determine the most motivating elements and the types of course content best delivered in this manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Description of Communication Breakdown Repair Strategies Produced by Nonverbal Students with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, Baris; Erbas, Dilek

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the communication repair behaviors used by nonverbal students with developmental disabilities in the interactions they were involved in with their teachers during free play activities. All children were students at centers serving student with developmental disabilities at Anadolu University in Turkey. Data were collected by…

  9. Personal health promotion at US medical schools: a quantitative study and qualitative description of deans' and students' perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elon Lisa K

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior literature has shown that physicians with healthy personal habits are more likely to encourage patients to adopt similar habits. However, despite the possibility that promoting medical student health might therefore efficiently improve patient outcomes, no one has studied whether such promotion happens in medical school. We therefore wished to describe both typical and outstanding personal health promotion environments experienced by students in U.S. medical schools. Methods We collected information through four different modalities: a literature review, written surveys of medical school deans and students, student and dean focus groups, and site visits at and interviews with medical schools with reportedly outstanding student health promotion programs. Results We found strong correlations between deans' and students' perceptions of their schools' health promotion environments, including consistent support of the idea of schools' encouraging healthy student behaviors, with less consistent follow-through by schools on this concept. Though students seemed to have thought little about the relationships between their own personal and clinical health promotion practices, deans felt strongly that faculty members should model healthy behaviors. Conclusions Deans' support of the relationship between physicians' personal and clinical health practices, and concern about their institutions' acting on this relationship augurs well for the role of student health promotion in the future of medical education. Deans seem to understand their students' health environment, and believe it could and should be improved; if this is acted on, it could create important positive changes in medical education and in disease prevention.

  10. A Qualitative Descriptive Case Study of the Requirements of the IT Industry for Entry-Level IT Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerherm, Todd Michael

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative descriptive case study explored the requirements of the IT industry for education, IT certification, and work experience for entry-level IT professionals. Research has shown a growing problem where IT graduates were not able to meet the requirements for entry-level IT jobs. IT enrollment has decreased considerably over the past…

  11. Deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in male HIV-positive patients: a descriptive cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich Christian; Shakar, Shakil A; Hitz, Mette Friberg

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to describe the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in a cohort of HIV-seropositive males. Blood samples were collected in November and December 2004 and analyzed in the hospital laboratory. The concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH...

  12. Students' awareness of science teachers' leadership, attitudes toward science, and positive thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying-Yan; Chen, Hsiang-Ting; Hong, Zuway-R.; Yore, Larry D.

    2016-09-01

    There appears to be a complex network of cognitive and affective factors that influence students' decisions to study science and motivate their choices to engage in science-oriented careers. This study explored 330 Taiwanese senior high school students' awareness of their science teacher's learning leadership and how it relates to the students' attitudes toward science and positive thinking. Initial results revealed that the optimism of positive thinking is highly and positively correlated with the future participation in science and learning science in school attitudes toward science and self-concept in science. Moreover, structural equation modelling (SEM) results indicated that the subscale of teachers' leadership with idealised influence was the most predictive of students' attitudes toward science (β = .37), and the leadership with laissez-faire was predictive of students' positive thinking (β = .21). In addition, the interview results were consistent with the quantitative findings. The correlation and SEM results indicate some of the associations and potential relationships amongst the motivational and affective factors studied and students' attitudes toward and intentions to study science, which will increase their likelihood of future involvement in science careers.

  13. Emotional stress-reactivity and positive affect among college students: the role of depression history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Ross E; Armeli, Stephen; Boynton, Marcella H; Tennen, Howard

    2014-02-01

    Multiple theories posit that people with a history of depression are at higher risk for a depressive episode than people who have never experienced depression, which may be partly due to differences in stress-reactivity. In addition, both the dynamic model of affect and the broaden-and-build theory suggest that stress and positive affect interact to predict negative affect, but this moderation has never been tested in the context of depression history. The current study used multilevel modeling to examine these issues among 1,549 college students with or without a history of depression. Students completed a 30-day online diary study in which they reported daily their perceived stress, positive affect, and negative affect (including depression, anxiety, and hostility). On days characterized by higher than usual stress, students with a history of depression reported greater decreases in positive affect and greater increases in depressed affect than students with no history. Furthermore, the relations between daily stress and both depressed and anxious affect were moderated by daily positive affect among students with remitted depression. These results indicate that students with a history of depression show greater stress-reactivity even when in remission, which may place them at greater risk for recurrence. These individuals may also benefit more from positive affect on higher stress days despite being less likely to experience positive affect on such days. The current findings have various implications both clinically and for research on stress, mood, and depression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. STUDENTS POSITIVE RESPONSE THROUGH THINK PAIR SHARE STRATEGY ON ENGLISH SPEAKING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iin Baroroh Ma’arif

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Harmonious communication has an important role in teaching and learning process, especially in encouraging the success of teaching and learning process in the classroom. This research was conducted to know the student's response to the implementation of Think Pair Share strategy in Speaking course. This strategy emphasizes how students are more active in communicating using English in the classroom. The purpose of this research is 1 how the implementation of Think Pair Share strategy in class; 2 how students respond to the Think Pair Share strategy in the classroom; The design of this study is descriptive-qualitative to answer these questions. In this study, researchers themselves are the main instrument. In collecting data, researchers used observation sheets, and field notes.

  15. Data Entry Skills in a Computer-based Spread Sheet Amongst Postgraduate Medical Students: A Simulation Based Descriptive Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amir Maroof; Shah, Dheeraj; Chatterjee, Pranab

    2014-07-01

    In India, research work in the form of a thesis is a mandatory requirement for the postgraduate (PG) medical students. Data entry in a computer-based spread sheet is one of the important basic skills for research, which has not yet been studied. This study was conducted to assess the data entry skills of the 2(nd) year PG medical students of a medical college of North India. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted among 111 second year PG students by using four simulated filled case record forms and a computer-based spread sheet in which data entry was to be carried out. On a scale of 0-10, only 17.1% of the students scored more than seven. The specific sub-skills that were found to be lacking in more than half of the respondents were as follows: Inappropriate coding (93.7%), long variable names (51.4%), coding not being done for all the variables (76.6%), missing values entered in a non-uniform manner (84.7%) and two variables entered in the same column in the case of blood pressure reading (80.2%). PG medical students were not found to be proficient in data entry skill and this can act as a barrier to do research. This being a first of its kind study in India, more research is needed to understand this issue and then include this yet neglected aspect in teaching research methodology to the medical students.

  16. Positive and Negative Perceptions of Bumiputra And Non-Bumiputra Students on Professional Qualification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd. Rashid Noor Asidah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bumiputra and non-Bumiputra students may come from various economic backgrounds and culture. This may influence their perception on their career choice of pursuing a professional accounting qualification. Thus, this study investigates the difference in positive and negative perceptions of Bumiputra and non-Bumiputra students on pursuing a professional qualification upon graduation. A questionnaire survey method was used to collect the data from final year accounting students from five public and three private universities in Malaysia. Means and independent sample t-tests results were analysed. Results indicated that there are only a few significant differences between Bumiputra and non-Bumiputra students on positive and negative perceptions on becoming professional accountants. As perception frames action, these findings would be useful to the Malaysian Institute of Accountants as well as professional bodies to attract both Bumiputra and non-Bumiputra graduates to become professional accountants.

  17. Formation of positive motivation as the basis of students will qualities’ perfection in physical culture practicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Dudnyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to theoretically substantiate and test experimentally pedagogic conditions of positive motivation’s formation as the basis for students will and physical qualities’ perfection in physical culture practicing. Material: 244 first year students participated in experiment. At the beginning and at the end of experiment levels of manifestation of students’ will and physical qualities were assessed. Results: we have proved successfulness of will training if this process is naturally coincides with formation of positive motivation and perfection of motor fitness. It was found that motivation for physical culture practicing result from different demands: demand in motion, demand in fulfillment of student’s duties and demand in competition functioning. Conclusions: we have offered the following pedagogic conditions: application of game and competition methods: setting of appropriate for students tasks of training; usage of sufficient sport equipment and apparatuses; forcing of students for independent physical culture practicing through system of encouragement.

  18. Factors associated with positive attitude towards blood donation among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazibara, Tatjana; Kovacevic, Nikolina; Maric, Gorica; Kurtagic, Ilma; Nurkovic, Selmina; Kisic-Tepavcevic, Darija; Pekmezovic, Tatjana

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess attitudes and practice of blood donation among medical students. Medical students were recruited at Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade, Serbia. Of 973 students, 38.4% of freshmen and 41.4% of final year students have donated blood (χ(2) = 0.918, p = 0.186). Blood donors had significantly more positive attitude towards some aspects of blood donation. Being female, residing in a city other than the capital and previous blood donation experience were independent predictors of positive attitude towards being a blood donor to an unknown person. Efforts are required to augment blood donor pool among future physicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Suppressor Effects of Positive and Negative Religious Coping on Academic Burnout Among Korean Middle School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hyunkyung; Chang, Eunbi; Jang, Yoojin; Lee, Ji Hae; Lee, Sang Min

    2016-02-01

    Statistical suppressor effects in prediction models can provide evidence of the interdependent relationship of independent variables. In this study, the suppressor effects of positive and negative religious coping on academic burnout were examined using longitudinal data. First, 388 middle school students reported their type of religion and use of positive and negative religious coping strategies. Four months later, they also reported their level of academic burnout. From structural equation modeling, significant suppressor effects were found among religious students. That is, the coefficients became larger when both positive and negative religious coping predicted academic burnout simultaneously, compared to when each religious coping predicted academic burnout alone. However, suppressor effects were not found among non-religious students.

  20. Socio-cultural differences in the self-descriptions of two groups of Azerbaijanian students learning in the Russian and Azerbaijani languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzherelievskaya M.A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dimension of individualism-collectivism is regarded as one of the most important cultural factors that influence a person’s self-consciousness, and help shape his/her sense of self as independent or interdependent. Moreover, studies support the conclusion that the salience of both tendencies may vary not only within a single national culture (depending on the place of residence, language environment, etc., but also on the level of the individual self (depending on the current situation. In our research we have assumed that the language environment (receiving education in one’s native or a foreign language acts as a socio-cultural factor affecting the self-concept of students of the same nationality–more specifically, the intensity of their individualistic and collectivistic characteristics. Objective: Finding socio-cultural differences in self-image between two groups of Azerbaijanian students (learning in Russian and Azerbaijanian, respectively. Design: The sample included one hundred students from Baku colleges and universities equally divided into two groups. Participants in the first group were studying in Azerbaijani while those in the second group were learning in Russian. We collected data in the form of open-ended self-descriptions. We examined these texts using contentanalysis procedures. Then we calculated correlations between certain defined characteristics for each group. Results: The self-descriptions produced by students learning in Azerbaijanian contained the following features: norm compliance as a significant factor in emotional wellbeing; self-criticism related to negative feelings and expectation of outside criticism; the prevalence of self-justification and bravado as basic forms of psychological defense, combined with the lack of self-enhancement; and focus on society and interpersonal relations affecting the respondents’ inner feelings. The second group’s (those learning in Russian self-descriptions

  1. Mass sports of students and cadets which server military contract in positions of officers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Bondar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: study of features of organization of mass sports of students and cadets which server military contract in positions of officers. Material and Methods: analysis of literary sources and documents, analysis of the systems, questioning (questionnaire, methods of the mathematical processing of data. In a questionnaire 97 respondents – 29 cadets of a 5 course and 68 students of 4 courses of military-legal faculty of the Yaroslav Mudryi National law university. Results: 69% cadets and only 35% students are engaged in the different types of motive activity in free time, here 48% cadets and 43% students elect the playing types of sport (football, volley-ball, basket-ball, 65,5% cadets and 48,5% students go in for sports for self-perfection and self-realization, here 45% cadets and 32% students plan necessarily to prolong to be engaged in the select type of sport upon termination of studies in higher educational establishment. Conclusions: the Study 4th Year Students And Students Of The 5th Year Of Military Faculty Of Law Has Shown That The Students Serious About Their Chosen Profession And Understand The Importance Of Physical Fitness In A Future Service, They Are Able To Objectively Assess The Level Of Their Physical Readiness And Are Ready For Further Self-Improvement

  2. Informal science participation positively affects the communication and pedagogical skills of university physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinko, Kathleen; Finkelstein, Noah

    2013-04-01

    Many undergraduate and graduate physics students choose to participate in an informal science program at the University of Colorado Boulder (Partnerships for Informal Science Education in the Community (PISEC)). They coach elementary and middle school students in inquiry-based physics activities during weekly, afterschool sessions. Observations from the afterschool sessions, field notes from the students, and pre/post surveys are collected. University students are also pre/post- videotaped explaining a textbook passage on a physics concept to an imagined audience for the Communications in Everyday Language assessment (CELA). We present findings from these data that indicate informal experiences improve the communication and pedagogical skills of the university student as well as positively influence their self-efficacy as scientific communicators and teachers.

  3. Time as a Measure: Elementary Students Positioning the Hands of an Analog Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Earnest

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Elementary students have difficulty with the topic of time. The present study investigated students’ actions to position hour and minute hands on an analog clock to indicate particular times of the day. Using one-on-one interviews with students in Grades 2 and 4 (n = 48, we analyzed whether students were more accurate for one hand indicator (hour or minute versus the other as well as their solution approaches as they positioned each hand. We first present a quantitative analysis of student performance to document whether hour and minute hands posed differential challenges for students as they positioned hands to indicate particular times. Results indicate the hour hand is significantly more challenging to position accurately than the minute hand. Students’ solutions reflected varied approaches, including consideration of the quantitative hour-minute multiplicative relationship, attention to part-whole relations, and matching numbers from the provided time to numerals on the clock. We discuss implications for theory and instruction, including the relationship of time to length measure learning trajectories and the current treatment of time in K-12 mathematics standards for the United States.

  4. Supporting Students with Severe Disabilities in Inclusive Schools: A Descriptive Account From Schools Implementing Inclusive Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Jennifer A.; Lyon, Kristin J.; Shogren, Karrie A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate practices that support the inclusion of students with severe disabilities in the learning and social activities of inclusive K-8 schools to inform inclusive school reform research and practice. Eighteen K-8 students with severe disabilities in six schools recognized for their implementation of…

  5. A Cooperative Training Program for Students with Severe Behavior Problems: Description and Comparative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reganick, Karol A.

    The Cooperative Training Program was implemented with 20 students having severe behavior problems, to augment a classroom employability curriculum. Educators and business managers at a local Perkins restaurant worked cooperatively to design a new curriculum and recruitment procedure to benefit both students and the business. A continuous and…

  6. A Descriptive Review of ADHD Coaching Research: Implications for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmann, Elizabeth; Tuttle, Lisa Joy; Saviet, Micah; Wright, Sarah D.

    2018-01-01

    Relative to their typically developing peers, college students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often have poorer adjustment to college, higher rates of class withdrawal and academic probation, and lower rates of retention. Supportive services for these students are still being researched and developed. ADHD…

  7. A Description of a Blind Student's Science Process Skills through Health Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, M. Sahin

    2013-01-01

    This study describes an approach for blind students thought health physics about how they could set a hypothesis and test it. The participant of the study used some health materials designed for high school blind student and tested her hypothesis with the data she gathered with those materials. It was asked that she should hypothesize which could…

  8. A Descriptive Analysis of the Relationship Between Academic Ability and Achievement of Middlesex Community College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Glenda E.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between the academic achievement and academic ability of students who did and those who did not request assistance in reading. Subjects used in the study were 416 entering students at Middlesex Community College in the fall of 1973. Responses on tests of reading ability,…

  9. Improving the Argumentative Writing of Students with Learning Disabilities: Descriptive and Normative Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Ralph P.; Andrews-Weckerly, Scott; Lewis, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Education seeks to cultivate dispositions and skills that promote effective participation in democratic institutions, including the capacity to produce thoughtful written arguments about controversial issues. Unfortunately, students' argumentative writing is generally neither effective nor persuasive, and this is especially so for students with…

  10. Effectiveness of a Simulated Hospital Day with Undergraduate Student Nurses: A Comparative Descriptive Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholeben, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, outside forces create blocks that affect the quality and quantity of clinical experiences for pre-licensure nursing students. These limitations create an environment in which entry-level nursing students enter the workforce without a solid foundation in nursing concepts or in exposure to situations that they might encounter. To counter…

  11. Negative Marking and the Student Physician–-A Descriptive Study of Nigerian Medical Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikenna Kingsley Ndu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background There is considerable debate about the two most commonly used scoring methods, namely, the formula scoring (popularly referred to as negative marking method in our environment and number right scoring methods. Although the negative marking scoring system attempts to discourage students from guessing in order to increase test reliability and validity, there is the view that it is an excessive and unfair penalty that also increases anxiety. Feedback from students is part of the education process; thus, this study assessed the perception of medical students about negative marking method for multiple choice question (MCQ examination formats and also the effect of gender and risk-taking behavior on scores obtained with this assessment method. Methods This was a prospective multicenter survey carried out among fifth year medical students in Enugu State University and the University of Nigeria. A structured questionnaire was administered to 175 medical students from the two schools, while a class test was administered to medical students from Enugu State University. Qualitative statistical methods including frequencies, percentages, and chi square were used to analyze categorical variables. Quantitative statistics using analysis of variance was used to analyze continuous variables. Results Inquiry into assessment format revealed that most of the respondents preferred MCQs (65.9%. One hundred and thirty students (74.3% had an unfavorable perception of negative marking. Thirty-nine students (22.3% agreed that negative marking reduces the tendency to guess and increases the validity of MCQs examination format in testing knowledge content of a subject compared to 108 (61.3% who disagreed with this assertion (χ 2 = 23.0, df = 1, P = 0.000. The median score of the students who were not graded with negative marking was significantly higher than the score of the students graded with negative marking ( P = 0.001. There was no statistically

  12. The Effectiveness of Positive Coping Program on Reduction of Addiction Potential in Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Nematollahi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to study the effectiveness of positive coping program on reduction of addiction potential in dormitory girl students. Method: The research method was semi experimental method namely: pre test-post test with witness group. In selection of sample, first addiction potential scale administered among 160 dormitory girl students, and 20 of them who were scored higher than cutoff score on addiction potential scale selected and divided to two experimental and witness groups. Experimental group received 10 sessions training which each session was 90 minutes. Positive coping program was based on three components of Bob Murray’s theory namely: social relationships, goal setting and spirituality. After finishing of training Post test were administered in both experimental and witness groups. Results: The results showed positive coping training was significantly reduced students’ addiction potential. Conclusion: The training of positive coping can be affect on reduction of girl students’ addiction potential.

  13. Religiousness and Alcohol Use in College Students: Examining Descriptive Drinking Norms as Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechting, Emily H.; Carlson, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Religiousness has consistently emerged in the literature as a protective factor for alcohol use. Relatively few studies have empirically explored possible mechanisms for this robust effect. The present study examines descriptive drinking norms as a potential mediator of the religiousness--alcohol consumption association. Consistent with the…

  14. Impact of Single-Case Pupil Descriptions on Student Teacher Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhm, Alexander; Schnöring, Annika; Hastall, Matthias R.

    2018-01-01

    Institutional and individual stigmatization are still major barriers for children with disabilities to access education. Teacher attitudes towards inclusive education play a crucial role in this regard, and are shaped by single-case descriptions from mass media or other sources. Building on exemplification theory and priming, two experiments with…

  15. A practical description and student perspective of the integration of radiology into lower limb musculoskeletal anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, S; O'Keeffe, G W; Mahony, N; Phelan, N; Barry, D S

    2017-05-01

    Anatomy educators are increasing their utilisation of radiology in anatomy education in line with growing requirements for undergraduate radiology competency and clinical need. We aimed to evaluate student perceptions of radiology and to outline the technical and academic considerations underlying the integration of radiology into musculoskeletal practical anatomy sessions. The formal integration of radiology into anatomy practical sessions took place over a 5-week period during the lower limb musculoskeletal component of the anatomy course taught to first-year medical students. During practical sessions, students were required to rotate between aligned audio-visual radiology presentations, osteology/anatomical models, and prosection/dissection learning stations. After completing the course, students were invited to complete a survey to establish their opinions on radiology as a mode of learning and their satisfaction with radiological integration in anatomical practical sessions. Most students were not familiar with radiology prior to attending our university. All our students agreed or strongly agreed that learning to read radiographs in anatomy is important and most agreed that radiology is a valid assessment tool. Sixty percent stated that radiology facilitated their understanding of anatomy. The majority believed that radiology was best suited to clinically relevant anatomy and X-rays were their preferred learning tool. The practical approach to integrating radiology into undergraduate musculoskeletal anatomy described here did not place strain on existing academic resources. Most students agreed that radiology should be increased in anatomy education and that learning to understand radiographs in anatomy was important for clinical practice.

  16. Reliability and validity of the Positive Mental Health Questionnaire in a sample of Spanish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Merino, J; Lluch-Canut, M T; Casas, I; Sanromà-Ortíz, M; Ferré-Grau, C; Sequeira, C; Falcó-Pegueroles, A; Soares, D; Puig-Llobet, M

    2017-03-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: In general, the current studies of positive mental health use questionnaires or parts thereof. However, while these questionnaires evaluate aspects of positive mental health, they fail to measure the construct itself. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The widespread use and the lack of specific questionnaires for evaluating the positive mental health construct justify the need to measure the robustness of the Positive Mental Health Questionnaire. Also six factors are proposed to measure positive mental health. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: The availability of a good questionnaire to measure positive mental health in university students is useful not only to promote mental health but also to strengthen the curricula of future professionals. Introduction Nursing has a relevant role in managing mental health. It is important to identify and thereafter to enhance positive aspects of mental health among university nursing students. Aim The aim of the present study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the Positive Mental Health Questionnaire (PMHQ) in terms of reliability and validity using confirmatory factor analysis in a sample of university students. Method A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 1091 students at 4 nursing schools in Catalonia, Spain. The reliability of the PMHQ was measured by means of Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and the test-retest stability was measured with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to determine the validity of the factorial structure. Results Cronbach's alpha coefficient was satisfactory (>0.70) for four of the six subscales or dimensions and ranged from 0.54 to 0.79. ICC analysis was satisfactory for the six subscales or dimensions. The hypothesis was confirmed in the analysis of the correlations between subclasses and the overall scale, with the strongest correlations being found between the majority of

  17. Description and predictors of positive and negative alcohol-related consequences in the first year of college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Nancy P; Clerkin, Elise M; Wood, Mark; Monti, Peter M; O'Leary Tevyaw, Tracy; Corriveau, Donald; Fingeret, Allan; Kahler, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the frequency of positive and negative alcohol-related consequences during the first year of college and to evaluate gender, race/ethnicity, time of year, alcohol use, and intoxication as predictors of consequences using frequent assessments. Participants (N = 1,053; 57.5% female) completed biweekly assessments of alcohol use and positive and negative alcohol-related consequences throughout the year. The majority of drinkers reported both positive and negative consequences. Having a good time and feeling less stressed were the most commonly reported positive consequences. Blackouts and getting physically sick were the most commonly endorsed negative consequences. At the weekly level, number of drinking days, drinks per drinking day, and estimated blood alcohol concentration (eBAC, reflecting intoxication) were significantly related to all consequences after controlling for demographics and time of year. Negative consequences had stronger associations with number of drinks and eBAC than positive consequences did. With each additional drink consumed on a drinking day, the incidence of negative consequences more than doubled (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 2.34, 95% CI [2.19, 2.50]), whereas the incidence of positive consequences increased by about half (IRR = 1.51, 95% CI [1.47, 1.56]). The consequence with the largest gender difference was regretted sex, with women reporting it more often. Few racial/ethnic differences were found in report of negative consequences. Greater positive and negative consequences were endorsed at the beginning of both academic semesters. As number of drinks and eBAC increase, the relative odds of a negative consequence are higher than that of a positive consequence. Alcohol interventions could promote greater awareness of the likelihood of specific consequences and could highlight that positive consequences are associated with lower levels of drinking.

  18. Factors influencing medical students' choice of emergency medicine as a career specialty-a descriptive study of Saudi medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaneen, Hadeel; Alhusain, Faisal; Alshahri, Khalid; Al Jerian, Nawfal

    2018-03-07

    Choosing a medical specialty is a poorly understood process. Although studies conducted around the world have attempted to identify the factors that affect medical students' choice of specialty, data is scarce on the factors that influence the choice of specialty of Saudi Arabian medical students, in particular those planning a career in emergency medicine (EM). In this study, we investigated whether Saudi medical students choosing EM are influenced by different factors to those choosing other specialties. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAUHS), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The questionnaire distributed among all undergraduate and postgraduate medical students of both sexes in the second and third phases (57% were males and 43% were females). A total of 436 students answered the questionnaire, a response rate of 53.4%. EM group was most influenced by hospital orientation and lifestyle and least influenced by social orientation and prestige provided by their specialty. Unlike controllable lifestyle (CL) group and primary care (PC) group, EM reported lesser influence of social orientation on their career choice. When compared with students primarily interested in the surgical subspecialties (SS), EM group were less likely to report prestige as an important influence. Moreover, students interested in SS reported a leaser influence of medical lifestyle in comparison to EM group. When compared with CL group, EM group reported more interest in medical lifestyle. We found that students primarily interested in EM had different values and career expectations to other specialty groups. The trends in specialty choice should be appraised to meet future needs.

  19. The Effects of a School-Wide Positive Behavior Intervention Support Program on the Intrinsic Motivation of Third Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amis, Sarah Anne

    2013-01-01

    This research project sought to determine the effects of a School-Wide Positive Behavior Intervention Support program (SWPBIS) on the intrinsic motivation of third grade students in regard to student achievement, student behavior, and teacher perception. Students of two intermediate schools served as the treatment group and control group, and were…

  20. Descriptions of spinal MRI lesions and definition of a positive MRI of the spine in axial spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Kay-Geert A; Baraliakos, Xenofon; van der Heijde, Désirée M F M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define characteristic MRI findings in the spine of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and provide a definition of a positive spinal MRI for inflammation and structural changes.......The aim of this study was to define characteristic MRI findings in the spine of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and provide a definition of a positive spinal MRI for inflammation and structural changes....

  1. Preparing medical students for obstetrics and gynecology milestone level one: a description of a pilot curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Morgan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME Milestones in the field of obstetrics and gynecology has arrived with Milestones Level One defined as the level expected of an incoming first-year resident. Purpose: We designed, implemented, and evaluated a 4-week elective for fourth-year medical school students, which utilized a multimodal approach to teaching and assessing the Milestones Level One competencies. Methods: The 78-hour curriculum utilized traditional didactic lectures, flipped classroom active learning sessions, a simulated paging curriculum, simulation training, embalmed cadaver anatomical dissections, and fresh-frozen cadaver operative procedures. We performed an assessment of student knowledge and surgical skills before and after completion of the course. Students also received feedback on their assessment and management of eight simulated paging scenarios. Students completed course content satisfaction surveys at the completion of each of the 4 weeks. Results: Students demonstrated improvement in knowledge and surgical skills at the completion of the course. Paging confidence trended toward improvement at the completion of the course. Student satisfaction was high for all of the course content, and the active learning components of the curriculum (flipped classroom, simulation, and anatomy sessions had higher scores than the traditional didactics in all six categories of our student satisfaction survey. Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrates a practical approach for preparing fourth-year medical students for the expectations of Milestones Level One in obstetrics and gynecology. This curriculum can serve as a framework as medical schools and specific specialties work to meet the first steps of the ACGME's Next Accreditation System.

  2. Principals Can and Should Make a Positive Difference for LGBTQ Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyland, Lori G.; Swensson, Jeff; Ellis, John G.; Coleman, Lauren L.; Boyland, Margaret I.

    2016-01-01

    School principals should lead for social change, particularly in support of vulnerable or marginalized students. An important social justice issue in which principals must provide strong leadership, but may not be adequately prepared in university training, is creating positive and inclusive school environments for lesbian, gay, transgender,…

  3. Psychiatric framing affects positive but not negative schizotypy scores in psychology and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Christine; Schofield, Kerry; Leonards, Ute; Wilson, Marc S; Grimshaw, Gina M

    2018-08-01

    When testing risk for psychosis, we regularly rely on self-report questionnaires. Yet, the more that people know about this condition, the more they might respond defensively, in particular with regard to the more salient positive symptom dimension. In two studies, we investigated whether framing provided by questionnaire instructions might modulate responses on self-reported positive and negative schizotypy. The O-LIFE (UK study) or SPQ (New Zealand study) questionnaire was framed in either a "psychiatric", "creativity", or "personality" (NZ only) context. We tested psychology students (without taught knowledge about psychosis) and medical students (with taught knowledge about psychosis; UK only). We observed framing effects in psychology students in both studies: positive schizotypy scores were lower after the psychiatric compared to the creativity instruction. However, schizotypy scores did not differ between the creativity and personality framing conditions, suggesting that the low scores with psychiatric framing reflect defensive responding. The same framing effect was also observed in medical students, despite their lower positive schizotypy scores overall. Negative schizotypy scores were not affected by framing in either study. These results highlight the need to reduce response biases when studying schizotypy, because these might blur schizotypy-behaviour relationships. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Students with Chronic Health Conditions: The Role of The School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Laurie G.; Mattern, Cheryl; Fleming, Laurie; Killingsworth, Suzie

    2017-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that to optimize student health, safety, and learning, a professional registered school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) be present all day, every day. The American Academy of Pediatrics' Council on School Health (2016) highlights the important role school nurses…

  5. Fostering Inclusion and Positive Physical Education Experiences for Overweight and Obese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukavina, Paul B.; Doolittle, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obese students are often socially and instructionally excluded from physical education and school physical activity opportunities. This article describes teaching strategies from a study of middle school physical education teachers who are committed to providing effective teaching and positive experiences for overweight and obese…

  6. The Relationship between Identity-Related Constructs and Positive Mental Health in Black College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushonga, Dawnsha R.

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional, exploratory study examined positive mental health (PMH) in 156 Black college students, ages 18-25, attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs). In addition, identity-related constructs such as spirituality, self-esteem, social support, life satisfaction, racial…

  7. Enhancing the Students' Positive Attitude in Learning Business English by Using Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustina, Lia

    2017-01-01

    Many research findings have stated that the use of technology in EFL classroom results invaluable achievements and develops positive attitudes. Technology may integrate sounds, pictures, motions, and colors that fi ure out a natural picture of real life. The aim of the study was to enhance the students' attitude toward learning English by using…

  8. Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity/Expression (Sexual Minority Students): School Nurse Practice. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that all students, regardless of their sexual orientation or the sexual orientation of their parents and family members, are entitled to a safe school environment and equal opportunities for a high level of academic achievement and school participation/involvement. Establishment of…

  9. Positive Psychology in Cross-Cultural Narratives: Mexican Students Discover Themselves While Learning Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxford, Rebecca L.; Cuéllar, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Using the principles of positive psychology and the tools of narrative research, this article focuses on the psychology of five language learners who crossed cultural and linguistic borders. All five were university students learning Chinese in Mexico, and two of them also studied Chinese in China. The grounded theory approach was used to analyze…

  10. Positive Psychology and Familial Factors as Predictors of Latina/o Students' Hope and College Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazos Vela, Javier; Lerma, Eunice; Lenz, A. Stephen; Hinojosa, Karina; Hernandez-Duque, Omar; Gonzalez, Stacey L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the contributions of positive psychology and familial factors as predictors of hope and academic performance among 166 Latina/o college students enrolled at a Hispanic Serving Institution of Higher Education. The results indicated that presence of meaning in life, search for meaning in life, daily spiritual experiences, and…

  11. Whole-School Positive Behaviour Support: Effects on Student Discipline Problems and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiselli, James K.; Putnam, Robert F.; Handler, Marcie W.; Feinberg, Adam B.

    2005-01-01

    Many students attending public schools exhibit discipline problems such as disruptive classroom behaviour, vandalism, bullying, and violence. Establishing effective discipline practices is critical to ensure academic success and to provide a safe learning environment. In this article, we describe the effects of whole-school positive behaviour…

  12. Students' Use of Extra-Curricular Activities for Positional Advantage in Competitive Job Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Nicolas; Bangerter, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    With the rise of mass higher education, competition between graduates in the labour market is increasing. Students are aware that their degree will not guarantee them a job and realise they should add value and distinction to their credentials to achieve a positional advantage. Participation in extra-curricular activities (ECAs) is one such…

  13. French Second-Language Teacher Candidates' Positions towards Allophone Students and Implications for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mady, Callie; Arnett, Katy; Muilenburg, Lin Y.

    2017-01-01

    In Canada, there is a rising population of K-12 students who speak neither French nor English at home, and who are sometimes expected to learn both of the country's official languages in school. Applying the lenses of critical theory and positioning theory, this study uses questionnaire and interview data to frame considerations to explore how…

  14. Pointing the profession in the right direction: positive ethical movements among dental students and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Brooke

    2008-01-01

    The American Student Dental Association has a substantial stake in the future of the dental profession. ASDA is taking a proactive role in addressing recently publicized cases of academic dishonesty and other ethical problems. Some of these initiatives and a sampling of the positive efforts in dental schools to build sound ethical climates are reviewed.

  15. Testing Theoretical Relationships: Factors Influencing Positive Health Practices (PHP) in Filipino College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Cynthia; Mahat, Ganga; Atkins, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine variables influencing the positive health practices (PHP) of Filipino college students to gain a better understanding of health practices in this ethnic/racial group. Cross-sectional study tested theoretical relationships postulated among (a) PHP, (b) social support (SS), (c) optimism, and (d) acculturation. Participants: A…

  16. A custom-made guide-wire positioning device for Hip Surface Replacement Arthroplasty: description and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clijmans Tim

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip surface replacement arthroplasty (SRA can be an alternative for total hip arthroplasty. The short and long-term outcome of hip surface replacement arthroplasty mainly relies on the optimal size and position of the femoral component. This can be defined before surgery with pre-operative templating. Reproducing the optimal, templated femoral implant position during surgery relies on guide wire positioning devices in combination with visual inspection and experience of the surgeon. Another method of transferring the templated position into surgery is by navigation or Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS. Though CAS is documented to increase accurate placement particularly in case of normal hip anatomy, it requires bulky equipment that is not readily available in each centre. Methods A custom made neck jig device is presented as well as the results of a pilot study. The device is produced based on data pre-operatively acquired with CT-scan. The position of the guide wire is chosen as the anatomical axis of the femoral neck. Adjustments to the design of the jig are made based on the orthopedic surgeon's recommendations for the drill direction. The SRA jig is designed as a slightly more-than-hemispherical cage to fit the anterior part of the femoral head. The cage is connected to an anterior neck support. Four knifes are attached on the central arch of the cage. A drill guide cylinder is attached to the cage, thus allowing guide wire positioning as pre-operatively planned. Custom made devices were tested in 5 patients scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. The orthopedic surgeons reported the practical aspects of the use of the neck-jig device. The retrieved femoral heads were analyzed to assess the achieved drill place in mm deviation from the predefined location and orientation compared to the predefined orientation. Results The orthopedic surgeons rated the passive stability, full contact with neck portion of the jig and knife

  17. The description of condyle position in disc displacement with reduction using Cone Beam Computed Tomography 3D radiographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Rahmayani

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the temporomandibular joint disorders that mostly occurs is disc displacement with reduction. Disc displacement that causes the displacement of condyle position can be evaluated by using radiograph. The Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT-3D is a radiograph equipment which is able to capture the condyle position from many directions. This research was aimed to see the condyle position in patients with disc displacement with reduction symptoms. This research was conducted to 11 patients with symptoms of disc displacement with reduction and 3 patients without symptoms of disc displacement with reduction as the counterpart. What was conducted to the sample was the radiographic imaging using CBCT-3D radiography, followed by measuring the joint space distance in the sagittal and coronal directions. The result of the research was analyzed using the T-test. Statistically, the result of the test showed a significant difference ( = 0.05 between patients with disc displacement with reduction symptoms and the patients without symptoms, in sagittal and coronal views. The conclusion led to the difference in condyle positions in patients with the disc displacement with reduction and patients without the symptoms which meant there was a condyle position displacement that caused the distance alteration in joint space in sagittal and coronal directions.

  18. Positive behavioral support planning in the inpatient treatment of severe disruptive behaviors: A description of service features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, Nakia M; Carr, Erika R; Hillbrand, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Positive behavior support (PBS) plans are increasingly used on inpatient units to assess and treat serious and dangerous behaviors displayed by patients with serious psychiatric impairment. A contemporary extension of traditional applied behavior analytic procedures, PBS plans integrate theories from several domains with perspectives on community psychology, positive psychology, and recovery-oriented care. Because there is little evidence to suggest that more invasive, punitive disciplinary strategies lead to long-term positive behavioral change (Parkes, 1996), PBS plans have emerged as an alternative to the use of seclusion and restraint or other forms of restrictive measures typically used on inpatient psychiatric units (Hammer et al., 2011). Moreover, PBS plans are a preferred method of intervention because more invasive interventions often cause more harm than good to all involved (Elliott et al., 2005). This article seeks to provide an integrated framework for the development of positive behavior support plans in inpatient psychiatric settings. In addition to explicating the philosophy and core elements of PBS plans, this work includes discussion of the didactic and pragmatic aspects of training clinical staff in inpatient mental health settings. A case vignette is included for illustration and to highlight the use of PBS plans as a mechanism for helping patients transition to less restrictive settings. This work will add to the scant literature examining the use of positive behavioral support plans in inpatient psychiatric settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. An analysis of motivation factors for students' pursuit of leadership positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer A; McLaughlin, Milena M; Gettig, Jacob P; Fajiculay, Jay R; Advincula, M Renee

    2015-02-17

    To identify factors that influence student involvement and leadership within organizations and to assess the impact of involvement in organizations on professional skill development. A printed survey was administered to fourth-year pharmacy students at one college of pharmacy (N=202). Most students (82%) indicated they were involved in at least one organization during pharmacy school and 58% reported holding a leadership position at some point. Factors with the largest impact on involvement in organizations were desire to present a well-rounded image to employers, ability to network, and interest in the activities sponsored by the organization. Involvement in professional organizations had a strong influence on their leadership, teamwork, confidence, and time-management skills. That presenting a well-rounded image to employers and having the ability to network with mentors and peers drove student involvement in professional organizations may be reflective of increasing competition for residencies and jobs.

  20. Open MR imaging of the unstable shoulder in the apprehension test position: description and evaluation of an alternative MR examination position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintzell, G.; Larsson, S.; Larsson, H.; Zyto, K.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an alternative MR assessment procedure for analysis of unstable shoulders. Twelve patients with unilateral recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation had both shoulders examined. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed with an open-MR system in the apprehension position with the shoulder in 90 of abduction and maximum tolerable external rotation. Contrast enhancement was achieved with intravenous gadolinium. Correlations were made to the findings at operation. In 10 of 12 unstable shoulders the inferior glenohumeral ligament labral complex (IGHLLC) was detached from the glenoid as seen on MR and later verified during surgery. In one shoulder MR was unable to show a capsulolabral detachment that was verified at surgery, whereas in one shoulder both MR and surgical assessment revealed no soft tissue detachment (accuracy 92 %). A Hill-Sachs lesion was visualized and verified in all unstable shoulders, whereas the stable controls revealed normal IGHLLC and no Hill-Sachs lesion. Open-MRI evaluation of the shoulder in the apprehension test position may become a useful tool for the evaluation of anterior shoulder instability. (orig.)

  1. [Perspective of nursing students on the communication and apologies to patients for adverse events: a descriptive study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Priscila; Trespaderne, Isabel; Díaz, Cristina; Bardallo, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    To describe the approach to the communication and blame of an adverse by nursing students. A descriptive study on disclosure and apologies for adverse events by nursing students in the academic years 2011-12 and 2012-13. The study included group discussion and drafting a written communication to the injured patient about adverse events during hospitalization. An ad hoc checklist was used and an analysis was performed on items related to the disclosure and apologies issues. A total of 126 nursing students were involved, and they created 21 written The facts about adverse events were reported in 81% of written communications, and 47.1% chose an abbreviated disclosure of the facts with no detailed explanation of adverse events. The facts were accurately reproduced in only 9.5% of written communications to the patients. One third (33.3%) apologized for the mistakes, and 47.6% required that the communication was signed by the Management. All (100%) of the nursing students chose not to report the health professionals who had participated during the events. There is a fear to acknowledge errors within health centers. It is recommended that tools are developed for these future nursing professionals to make an open and honest disclosure of adverse events, as well as the apologies for them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Positive mental health and well-being among a third level student population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P Davoren

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Much research on the health and well-being of third level students is focused on poor mental health leading to a dearth of information on positive mental health and well-being. Recently, the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Well-being scale (WEMWBS was developed as a measurement of positive mental health and well-being. The aim of this research is to investigate the distribution and determinants of positive mental health and well-being in a large, broadly representative sample of third level students using WEMWBS. METHODS: Undergraduate students from one large third level institution were sampled using probability proportional to size sampling. Questionnaires were distributed to students attending lectures in the randomly selected degrees. A total of 2,332 self-completed questionnaires were obtained, yielding a response rate of 51% based on students registered to relevant modules and 84% based on attendance. One-way ANOVAs and multivariate logistic regression were utilised to investigate factors associated with positive mental health and well-being. RESULTS: The sample was predominantly female (62.66%, in first year (46.9% and living in their parents' house (42.4% or in a rented house or flat (40.8%. In multivariate analysis adjusted for age and stratified by gender, no significant differences in WEMWBS score were observed by area of study, alcohol, smoking or drug use. WEMWBS scores were higher among male students with low levels of physical activity (p=0.04. Men and women reporting one or more sexual partners (p<0.001 were also more likely to report above average mental health and well-being. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to examine positive mental health and well-being scores in a third level student sample using WEMWBS. The findings suggest that students with a relatively adverse health and lifestyle profile have higher than average mental health and well-being. To confirm these results, this work needs to be replicated across

  3. Data entry skills in a computer-based spread sheet amongst postgraduate medical students: A simulation based descriptive assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Maroof Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, research work in the form of a thesis is a mandatory requirement for the postgraduate (PG medical students. Data entry in a computer-based spread sheet is one of the important basic skills for research, which has not yet been studied. This study was conducted to assess the data entry skills of the 2 nd year PG medical students of a medical college of North India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted among 111 second year PG students by using four simulated filled case record forms and a computer-based spread sheet in which data entry was to be carried out. Results: On a scale of 0-10, only 17.1% of the students scored more than seven. The specific sub-skills that were found to be lacking in more than half of the respondents were as follows: Inappropriate coding (93.7%, long variable names (51.4%, coding not being done for all the variables (76.6%, missing values entered in a non-uniform manner (84.7% and two variables entered in the same column in the case of blood pressure reading (80.2%. Conclusion: PG medical students were not found to be proficient in data entry skill and this can act as a barrier to do research. This being a first of its kind study in India, more research is needed to understand this issue and then include this yet neglected aspect in teaching research methodology to the medical students.

  4. Mathematical calculation skills required for drug administration in undergraduate nursing students to ensure patient safety: A descriptive study: Drug calculation skills in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnasco, Annamaria; Galaverna, Lucia; Aleo, Giuseppe; Grugnetti, Anna Maria; Rosa, Francesca; Sasso, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    In the literature we found many studies that confirmed our concerns about nursing students' poor maths skills that directly impact on their ability to correctly calculate drug dosages with very serious consequences for patient safety. The aim of our study was to explore where students had most difficulty and identify appropriate educational interventions to bridge their mathematical knowledge gaps. This was a quali-quantitative descriptive study that included a sample of 726 undergraduate nursing students. We identified exactly where students had most difficulty and identified appropriate educational interventions to bridge their mathematical knowledge gaps. We found that the undergraduate nursing students mainly had difficulty with basic maths principles. Specific learning interventions are needed to improve their basic maths skills and their dosage calculation skills. For this purpose, we identified safeMedicate and eDose (Authentic World Ltd.), only that they are only available in English. In the near future we hope to set up a partnership to work together on the Italian version of these tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. DOES POSITIONING HAVE A PLACE IN THE MINDS OF OUR STUDENTS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatu Cristian Ionut

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Positioning is one of the most powerful marketing concepts. At the beginning, the meaning of positioning was rather limited, focusing on the concept of reputation. Then it became ”the place a brand occupies in the mind of its target audience”. Under this meaning , many companies have implemented the concept of positioning as a part of their everyday marketing activities. Nowadays, positioning is being used as a tool for explaining how consumers relate to foreign countries. The concept of positioning is simply to important to be ignored, but does it have a place in our students minds? This paper aims to determine whether we have an evolution or an involution in this matter.

  6. Antecedents of positive self-disclosure online: an empirical study of US college students' Facebook usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the factors predicting positive self-disclosure on social networking sites (SNSs). There is a formidable body of empirical research relating to online self-disclosure, but very few studies have assessed the antecedents of positive self-disclosure. To address this literature gap, the current study tests the effects of self-esteem, life satisfaction, social anxiety, privacy concerns, public self-consciousness (SC), and perceived collectivism on positive self-disclosure on SNSs. Data were collected online via Qualtrics in April 2013. Respondents were undergraduate students from the University of Connecticut. Using ordinary least squares regression, the current study found that self-esteem and perceived collectivism increased positive self-disclosure, life satisfaction, and privacy concerns decreased positive self-disclosure, and the effects of social anxiety and public SC were not significant.

  7. The Study of the Use of Picture Descriptions in Enhancing Communication Skills among the 8th- Grade Students--Learners of English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavalle, Pamela I.; Briesmaster, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) encourage students to take a more active role in the oral activities in the classroom through different strategies. This study examines the use of picture descriptions as a strategy to develop and enhance communication skills among the eighth-grade students attending a private English school in…

  8. How to Promote a Technology Education Program: An Effective Campaign Will Increase Student Enrollment, Spread Goodwill, Reflect a Positive Image, and Grow Positive Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Mike

    2004-01-01

    The advertising, marketing, promotion, and positioning of technology education programs have become increasingly important. Yet the rewards of promoting a program will not only bring more students and resources to the classroom, it will also bring support on a larger scale, resulting in added resources to help all students become more successful.…

  9. Community College Pathways: A Descriptive Report of Summative Assessments and Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strother, Scott; Sowers, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Carnegie's Community College Pathways (CCP) offers two pathways, Statway® and Quantway®, that reduce the amount of time required to complete developmental mathematics and earn college-level mathematics credit. The Pathways aim to improve student success in mathematics while maintaining rigorous content, pedagogy, and learning outcomes. It is…

  10. A Descriptive Study of Students with Disabilities at Montana State University Billings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Thomas Francis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze how the characteristics of age, major and type of disabilities for students who received services through Disability Support Services at Montana State University-Billings have changed from 1999 to 2011. Furthermore, this analysis contrasted local trends for types of disabilities with national…

  11. Exploring the environment of clinical baccalaureate nursing students' education in Iran; A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefy, Alireza; Yazdannik, Ahmad reza; Mohammadi, Sepideh

    2015-12-01

    Today's students are the nurses of tomorrow. They need appropriate clinical learning opportunities in order to shape their professional identity, attitudes and values. Despite undeniable progresses of nursing education in Iran, the quality of the clinical education in Iran is not favorable. There is a need to explore the environment of clinical baccalaureate nursing students' education for developing, maintaining and enhancing the quality of clinical program. This is a qualitative study and was conducted based on content analysis multimethod design. Data were collected by individual interviews, focus groups and direct observations. 54 nursing students and 8 clinical educators from the four geographically diverse universities in the Iran composed the study sample. A purposive sampling was used. Five themes were emerged from data analysis including; ambiguity in the nursing care role, routine-based nursing care, uncritical and dependent thinking climate, incompetency of clinical educators and patient education as important component of nursing. The findings of this study describe a clearer understanding of the real environment of the clinical education in Iran. All of themes that emerged from the study play an important role in student learning and nursing education. It is crucial to pay more attention to reconsider care concept as an operational component of nursing, maximize meaningful learning opportunities, reevaluate clinical instructor as role models and prepare effective operational plan to combine theoretical and evidence based knowledge with clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A descriptive study of step alignment and foot positioning relative to the tee by professional rugby union goal-kickers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockcroft, John; Van Den Heever, Dawie

    2016-01-01

    This study describes foot positioning during the final two steps of the approach to the ball amongst professional rugby goal-kickers. A 3D optical motion capture system was used to test 15 goal-kickers performing 10 goal-kicks. The distance and direction of each step, as well as individual foot contact positions relative to the tee, were measured. The intra- and inter-subject variability was calculated as well as the correlation (Pearson) between the measurements and participant anthropometrics. Inter-subject variability for the final foot position was lowest (placed 0.03 ± 0.07 m behind and 0.33 ± 0.03 m lateral to the tee) and highest for the penultimate step distance (0.666 ± 0.149 m), performed at an angle of 36.1 ± 8.5° external to the final step. The final step length was 1.523 ± 0.124 m, executed at an external angle of 35.5 ± 7.4° to the target line. The intra-subject variability was very low; distances and angles for the 10 kicks varied per participant by 1.6-3.1 cm and 0.7-1.6°, respectively. The results show that even though the participants had variability in their run-up to the tee, final foot position next to the tee was very similar and consistent. Furthermore, the inter- and intra-subject variability could not be attributed to differences in anthropometry. These findings may be useful as normative reference data for coaching, although further work is required to understand the role of other factors such as approach speed and body alignment.

  13. Does physics instruction foster university students' cognitive processes?: A descriptive study of teacher activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson-Hessler, Monica G. M.; de Jong, Ton

    This study aims at giving a systematic description of the cognitive activities involved in teaching physics. Such a description of instruction in physics requires a basis in two models, that is, the cognitive activities involved in learning physics and the knowledge base that is the foundation of expertise in that subject. These models have been provided by earlier research. The model of instruction distinguishes three main categories of instruction process: presenting new information, integrating (i.e., bringing structure into) new knowledge, and connecting elements of new knowledge to prior knowledge. Each of the main categories has been divided into a number of specific instruction processes. Hereby any limited and specific cognitive teacher activity can be described along the two dimensions of process and type of knowledge. The model was validated by application to lectures and problem-solving classes of first year university courses. These were recorded and analyzed as to instruction process and type of knowledge. Results indicate that teachers are indeed involved in the various types of instruction processes defined. The importance of this study lies in the creation of a terminology that makes it possible to discuss instruction in an explicit and specific way.

  14. Perspectives on enhancing international practical training of students in health and social care study programs - A qualitative descriptive case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Hopia, Hanna; Sihvonen, Sanna; Diwan, Sadhna; Sen, Soma; Skela-Savič, Brigita

    2017-01-01

    Internationalization of practical training in health and social care study programs is an important aspect of higher education. However, field mentors' and classroom teachers' competence in guiding culturally diverse students varies widely in European countries, and the majority does not have enough training in guiding foreign students. This study aimed to examine which factors enhance the efficacy of international practical placement experiences in health and social care study programs. A qualitative descriptive case study design was used. The study was conducted at six higher education institutions-two in Finland and one in Croatia, Estonia, the Netherlands and Slovenia. A convenience sample of 14 mentors, 15 teachers and 14 students with international experiences from six higher education institutions which are part of the Bologna Process was recruited. The data were collected from six focus groups using a semi-structured questionnaire based on a literature review. Each higher education institution conducted one group interview that was tape-recorded, transcribed and analysed for themes. Participants made several recommendations for enhancing the practical placement experience of students, teachers, and mentors. Most recommendations dealt with practical supervision of students. Three major themes noted were: 'Attitudes towards internationalization of practical placements', 'Factors impacting the international placement experience', and 'Pedagogical methods used and structural support available for internationalization.' The study highlights the need for strengthening the multicultural knowledge and skills of mentors and teachers. The findings provide practical guidelines for improving the international placement experience across health and social care fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The association between stressful life events and depressive symptoms among Cypriot university students: a cross-sectional descriptive correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokratous, Sokratis; Merkouris, Anastasios; Middleton, Nicos; Karanikola, Maria

    2013-12-05

    Previous findings suggest that stressful life events have a causal relationship with depressive symptoms. However, to date little is known concerning the contribution of the number and severity of recent stressful life events on the prevalence of depressive symptoms among university students. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and its association with the number and the severity of self-reported stressful life events among university students in Cyprus. A descriptive correlational design with cross sectional comparison was used. The CES-D scale was applied for the assessment of depressive symptoms and the LESS instrument for stressful life events. Both scales were completed anonymously and voluntarily by 1.500 students (response rate 85%). The prevalence of mild to moderate depressive symptoms [CES-D score between 16 and 21] and of clinically significant depressive symptoms [CES-D score ≥ 22] were 18.8% and 25.3% respectively. There were statistically significant differences in clinically significant depressive symptoms by gender, with higher rates among women (x(2) = 8.53, df = 1, p = 0.003). Higher scores on the LESS scale were associated with more frequent reports of clinical depressive symptoms (x(2) = 70.63, df = 4, p life events and clinical depressive symptoms (x(2) = 40.06, df = 4, p stressful life events during the previous year (OR = 2.64 95% CI: 1.02, 6.83) and a severe degree of stress due to these events (total LESS score > 351, OR = 3.03 95% CI: 1.66, 5.39) were more likely to manifest clinical depressive symptoms. The high frequency of occurrence of depressive symptoms among Cypriot university students, as well as the strong association with stressful life events, highlights the need for psychological empowerment strategies towards students by institutional counseling services.

  16. DESCRIPTION AND DIFFERENCE OF SOCIAL CAPITAL IN AN INTERCULTURAL CONTEXT. THE CASE OF NURSING STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Alberto Núñez-Ramírez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to assess the social capital of intercultural nursing students. We made a quantitative, exploratory and transverse study with a non-experimental design. A sample was taken composed of 55 intercultural nursing students of the Intercultural University of the State of Tabasco at Oxolotán, during the months of November and December 2014. A questionnaire for measuring social capital for indigenous peoples was administered. We found high levels of social capital; however, there were not significant differences according the State of provenance and the pertinence to a native group using student’s t distribution. Also we noted the need for the mediator intervention of the University to employ social capital as a strategic element to promote community development and ensure an inclusive access to public health through empowered nursing professionals who are subject of action for common good.

  17. A Correlational and Descriptive Study of Student Writing in Three Aims of Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    than the old abondend house does now. As it stands it is the perfect target and meeting place for criminals and drug addicts . If the house were C... Whale and Robinson (1978) discovered that, in a free-writing situation, students most often chose to write transactional (referential and persuasive...discourse.27 (Perhaps in the transactional aim they used the narrative mode more than any other, as Pianko’s study suggested, but Whale and Robinson did

  18. Analitycal Descriptive Study of Students' Critical Mathematic Thinking Ability Through Graded Response Model (Grm)

    OpenAIRE

    nurul, didin; zahra anasha, zara

    2013-01-01

    Critical mathematic thinking ability is very important to solve daily problems. But in reality, junior high school students' critical mathematic thinking ability is still low. Ability measurement such as measurement of critical mathematic thinking ability cannot be measured through multiple choices test. In that case, an essay test in which graded scoring is used as scoring technique more suitable than multiple choices test. The result of the essay test will be analyzed to describe...

  19. Ti Foyer (Hearth) community-based nutrition activities informed by the positive deviance approach in Leogane, Haiti: a programmatic description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolles, Kathryn; Speraw, Catherine; Berggren, Gretchen; Lafontant, Jack Guy

    2002-12-01

    This paper details the steps to design and implement a positive deviance-informed, "Hearth" approach for the nutritional rehabilitation of malnourished children in the district of Leogane, Haiti. Groups of four to five children met daily for two weeks at the home of a local volunteer mother for nutritional and health messages and a well-balanced meal. Health messages and meal components were determined using information gathered from interviews with the mothers of positive deviant children in the community who are well nourished despite their family's limited economic resources. Hearth participants were then followed for six months in their own home by the program "monitrices," women hired from each village and intensively trained to supervise the Hearth program, periodically weigh the children to evaluate their progress, and liaise between the hospital and the community. Monitoring from the first cycle indicated that 100% of children in eight villages and 66% of children in the remaining five villages continued to gain weight as fast or faster than the international standard median six months after participating in a Hearth program. At the conclusion of this cycle, programmers interviewed participant and non-participant families and made six modifications to the model, including the addition of a microcredit option for participating mothers.

  20. Analysis of and reflection on bachelor thesis in nursing students: A descriptive study in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Judith; Gros, Silvia; Canet, Olga

    2018-06-11

    The bachelor thesis, a final year subject to obtain a nursing degree, presents an ideal opportunity for the development and assessment of professional competencies. Thus, it is necessary to specify that the structure of the bachelor thesis works as an element of review and reflection from both a pedagogical and professional perspective. To analyse the main elements of the bachelor thesis in the nursing degree 2015-16 in Spain. A transversal descriptive study was conducted using a quantitative documentary analysis via study guides or grade reports. The variables were the main academic elements of the bachelor thesis subject (credits, competencies, learning outcomes, contents, methodologies, training activities and assessment). A probabilistic sample of 66 institutions was studied using descriptive statistics with statistical measures of central tendency and measures of variability. The results showed a maximum range of 12 and a minimum of 6 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System. The definition and number of competencies to be developed varied and the learning outcomes were formulated in only 40.9% of the guides consulted. The most widely used teaching methodologies and training activities were academic supervision (87.9%) and autonomous work (80.3%). Regarding types of work, basic investigation (34.8%), care plans (33.3%) and literature review (30,3%) ranked highest. No specific descriptors could be linked to the contents. Finally, two main assessment tools were found: process and product. The rubric is presented as a main element of the assessment. The bachelor thesis is conceived as autonomous, personal and original academic work. But no homogeneity was observed in the key development elements such as competencies, teaching strategies, or type of bachelor thesis. Therefore, the findings from the analysis and the bibliographic review are presented as recommendations as regards the outcome, structure and/or teaching elements linked to the bachelor thesis

  1. Neck Circumference Positively Related with Central Obesity and Overweight in Turkish University Students: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkaya, İsmail; Tunçkale, Aydın

    2016-06-01

    According to the World Health Organization, central obesity is increasing alarmingly worldwide. Neck circumference is a relatively new method of differentiating between normal and abnormal fat distribution. The aim of this study is to determine the association between neck circumference and central obesity in young Turkish male and female university students. A community of university students based cross-sectional study was conducted on 319 males and 838 females and investigated the association between neck circumference and other anthropometric variables by gender. In male subjects, the neck circumference revealed a positive correlation with the body mass index (r=0.684, pobesity, is also applicable to university students. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2015.

  2. A descriptive study of high school Latino and Caucasian students' values about math, perceived math achievement and STEM career choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Flecha, Samuel

    ' career choice, future directions and recommendations are provided. In sum, positive experiences in STEM can favorably contribute to students' sense of competence and satisfaction.

  3. Relationship of self-esteem and happiness from the positive psychology among intercultural nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Alberto Núñez Ramírez; Gloria Esthela González Quirarte; Rosario del Carmén Realpozo Reyes

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There are contradictions on the relationship between self-esteem and happiness: it exists for some researches, for others it does not, and even some argue that self-esteem affects happiness. These variables are elementary for the practice of Nursing; however, their study is small within intercultural environments. The objective of this research is to know the association between self-esteem and happiness among Intercultural Nursing students from the positive psychology.Method: A...

  4. Student's Second-Language Grade May Depend on Classroom Listening Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtig, Anders; Sörqvist, Patrik; Ljung, Robert; Hygge, Staffan; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to explore whether listening positions (close or distant location from the sound source) in the classroom, and classroom reverberation, influence students' score on a test for second-language (L2) listening comprehension (i.e., comprehension of English in Swedish speaking participants). The listening comprehension test administered was part of a standardized national test of English used in the Swedish school system. A total of 125 high school pupils, 15 years old, participated. Listening position was manipulated within subjects, classroom reverberation between subjects. The results showed that L2 listening comprehension decreased as distance from the sound source increased. The effect of reverberation was qualified by the participants' baseline L2 proficiency. A shorter reverberation was beneficial to participants with high L2 proficiency, while the opposite pattern was found among the participants with low L2 proficiency. The results indicate that listening comprehension scores-and hence students' grade in English-may depend on students' classroom listening position.

  5. Instructors' Positive Emotions: Effects on Student Engagement and Critical Thinking in U.S. and Chinese Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Jibiao

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used the broaden-and-build theory and emotional response theory as the framework to examine the effects of instructors' positive emotions on student engagement and critical thinking in U.S. and Chinese classrooms, as well as the mediating role of students' positive emotions in their relationships. MANOVA results revealed no…

  6. Relational aggression, positive urgency and negative urgency: predicting alcohol use and consequences among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Elizabeth M; Napper, Lucy E; LaBrie, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Research on relational aggression (indirect and social means of inflicting harm) has previously focused on adolescent populations. The current study extends this research by exploring both the frequency of perpetrating and being the target of relational aggression as it relates to alcohol use outcomes in a college population. Further, this study examines whether positive urgency (e.g., acting impulsively in response to positive emotions) and negative urgency (e.g., acting impulsively in response to negative emotions) moderate the relationship between relational aggression and alcohol outcomes. In this study, 245 college students (65.7% female) completed an online survey. Results indicated greater frequency of perpetrating relational aggression, higher levels of positive urgency, or higher levels of negative urgency was associated with more negative consequences. Further, negative urgency moderated the relationship between frequency of perpetrating aggression and consequences such that aggression was more strongly associated with consequences for those high in urgency. Counter to the adolescent literature, the frequency of being the target of aggression was not associated with more alcohol use. These findings suggest that perpetrators of relational aggression may be at particular risk for negative alcohol-related consequences when they act impulsively in response to negative, but not positive, emotions. These students may benefit from interventions exploring alternative ways to cope with negative emotions.

  7. BILINGUALISM AMONG STUDENTS OF THE FACULTY OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, SALATIGA, INDONESIA: A DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Indrayanti Timotius

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although bilingualism is an interesting phenomenon these days, not many researchers explore bilingualism in Asia. Most research in a similar field, like that done by Yip and Matthews (2007, and Harding-Esch and Riley (2003, show that children become bilingual because their parents are from countries with different mother tongues. This is not necessarily true in Asian countries like Indonesia. In Indonesia, most of its citizens are bilingual, even though both parents are Indonesian. This happens because children are not only exposed to and taught one language from a young age. Many of them are exposed to at least two languages, which are Indonesian (the national language and lingua franca of Indonesia and their local language – which is different depending on which area of Indonesia they were born or grew up. In addition, it is highly possible that exposure to other languages, such as English, may add to their capability to speak more than just two languages and thus, they become multilingual. This phenomenon has piqued the interest of the writers to conduct a study on bilingualism in Indonesia. The aim of the study is to describe bilingualism/multilingualism among a group of students in Indonesia. The data is collected by distributing questionnaires to 240 participants who are students in the Faculty of Language and Literature (FLL, Satya Wacana Christian University, Salatiga. The study reveals that there are three languages mostly spoken or used by the participants. They are Indonesian, English, and a regional language (mostly Javanese. Also, most of the students‘ first language is Indonesian. As for the second language, it is quite varied, including regional languages and English.

  8. Does Birth Order and Academic Proficiency Influence Perfectionistic Self-presentation Among Undergraduate Engineering Students? A Descriptive Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Preeti Tabitha; Kumar, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Perfectionism is a multifaceted concept. It had both advantages and disadvantages. Perfectionistic traits have been associated with leadership and very intellectual people. The present study is an attempt to understand if engineering students possess perfectionistic orientation and whether it influences self-efficacy, social connectedness, and achievement motivation. The present study adopts a random sampling design to evaluate the presence of perfectionism as a personality trait among undergraduate engineering students ( N = 320). Standardized inventories such as Almost Perfect Scale-Revised were administered first to identify perfectionists and second to differentiate the adaptive from the maladaptive perfectionists. Scheduled interviews were conducted with students to obtain information regarding birth order and family functioning. Findings from the study reveal that there were a significant number of maladaptive perfectionists and that they experienced higher levels of personal and societal demands leading to a negative emotional well-being in comparison to the adaptive perfectionists. We also observed that first-born children were more likely to display a perfectionistic self-presentation and from scheduled interviews, we understood that paternal influences were stronger when it came to decision-making and display of conscientiousness. The study draws on important implications for helping students to understand perfectionism and to respond to demands of the family and societal subsystems in a positive and an adaptive manner.

  9. Does Birth Order and Academic Proficiency Influence Perfectionistic Self-presentation Among Undergraduate Engineering Students? A Descriptive Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Preeti Tabitha; Kumar, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perfectionism is a multifaceted concept. It had both advantages and disadvantages. Perfectionistic traits have been associated with leadership and very intellectual people. The present study is an attempt to understand if engineering students possess perfectionistic orientation and whether it influences self-efficacy, social connectedness, and achievement motivation. Materials and Methods: The present study adopts a random sampling design to evaluate the presence of perfectionism as a personality trait among undergraduate engineering students (N = 320). Standardized inventories such as Almost Perfect Scale-Revised were administered first to identify perfectionists and second to differentiate the adaptive from the maladaptive perfectionists. Scheduled interviews were conducted with students to obtain information regarding birth order and family functioning. Results: Findings from the study reveal that there were a significant number of maladaptive perfectionists and that they experienced higher levels of personal and societal demands leading to a negative emotional well-being in comparison to the adaptive perfectionists. We also observed that first-born children were more likely to display a perfectionistic self-presentation and from scheduled interviews, we understood that paternal influences were stronger when it came to decision-making and display of conscientiousness. Conclusion: The study draws on important implications for helping students to understand perfectionism and to respond to demands of the family and societal subsystems in a positive and an adaptive manner. PMID:27833225

  10. Managing HIV/hepatitis positive patients: present approach of dental health care workers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Nagesh; Baad, Rajendra; Nagpal, Deepak Kumar J; Prabhu, Prashant R; Surekha, L Chavan; Karande, Prasad

    2012-11-01

    People with HIV/HBsAg in India frequently encounter discrimination while seeking and receiving health care services. The knowledge and attitudes of health care workers (HCWs) influences the willingness and ability of people with HIV/HBsAg to access care, and the quality of the care they receive. The objective of this study was to asses HIV/HBsAg-related knowledge, attitudes and risk perception among students and dental HCWs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 250 students and 120 dental HCWs in the form of objective questionnaire. Information was gathered regarding demographic details (age, sex, duration of employment, job category); HIV/ HBsAg-related knowledge and attitudes; risk perception; and previous experience caring for HIV-positive patients. The HCWs in this study generally had a positive attitude to care for the people with HIV/HBsAg. However, this was tempered by substantial concerns about providing care, and the fear of occupational infection with HIV/HBsAg. A continuing dental education program was conducted to resolve all the queries found interfering to provide care to HIV/HBsAg patients. But even after the queries were resolved the care providing capability was not attained. These findings show that even with advanced knowledge and facilities the attitude of dental HCWs and students require more strategic training with regards to the ethics and moral stigma associated with the dreaded infectious diseases (HIV/HBsAg).

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Positive Youth Development Course for University Students in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With higher education, university graduates are important elements of the labor force in knowledge-based economies. With reference to the mental health and developmental problems in university students, there is a need to review university’s role in nurturing holistic development of students. Based on the positive youth development approach, it is argued that promoting intrapersonal competencies is an important strategy to facilitate holistic development of young people in Hong Kong. In The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, a course entitled Tomorrow’s Leader focusing on positive youth development constructs to promote student well-being will be offered on a compulsory basis starting from 2012/13 academic year under the new undergraduate curriculum structure. The proposed course was piloted in 2010/11 school year. Different evaluation strategies, including objective outcome evaluation, subjective outcome evaluation, process evaluation, and qualitative evaluation, are being carried out to evaluate the developed course. Preliminary evaluation findings based on the piloting experience in 2010/11 academic year are presented in this paper.

  12. Description of the case mix experienced by chiropractic students during a clinical internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Aaron A; Reinhart, Christine J; Injeyan, H Stephen; Tibbles, Anthony

    2017-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe the case mix experienced by chiropractic students during their clinical internship at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College. Secondary objectives were to characterize teaching clinic patient populations, assess the similarity to previously published data for practicing chiropractors, and describe the treatment plans being recommended by interns. A prospective, observational study was conducted using a convenience sample of 24 chiropractic interns. Data were collected by interns using a standardized form that was completed for each new patient and each new complaint examined during the 1-year internship. Standardized forms included data regarding patient demographics, complaint characteristics, and treatment recommendations. Data were included for 23 of 24 participating interns, who described 828 patients and a total of 948 unique complaint presentations. Overall, 60% of patients were female, 86% were 18 to 64 years old, and 23% were naive to chiropractic care. Of all presenting complaints, 93% were pain-based, 67% were chronic, 65% included spinal complaints, and 7% presented with red flags; individual interns' experiences were variable and are described. On average, treatment recommendations called for 9.4 visits and often included multimodal treatment approaches, most commonly soft-tissue therapies (91%), home-based active care (84%), and spine manipulation (70%). The findings of this study suggest that patients presenting to CMCC teaching clinics are similar to those reported previously to attend private chiropractic clinics. While all participating interns encountered multiple complex clinical cases, very few had experience with pediatric populations. This study adds to the few that detail the characteristics of patients attending chiropractic teaching clinics; to our knowledge it is the first to describe average case loads of chiropractic interns.

  13. Section 504 and student health problems: the pivotal position of the school nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A; Granthom, Margarita Fernan; Lovato, Leanna

    2012-12-01

    News reports illustrate controversies between parents and schools in response to student health problems. Today's school nurse is in a pivotal position for the avoidance and resolution of disputes not only by increasing awareness of student health conditions but also by having a working knowledge of legal developments under Section 504 and its sister statute-the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA amendments of 2008 have extended the standards for eligibility and expanded questions about school districts' obligations under Section 504 and the ADA. This article provides a comprehensive synthesis of recent case law and related legal developments under this pair of federal statutes, culminating in practical implications and professional recommendations for school nurses.

  14. Classroom processes and positive youth development: conceptualizing, measuring, and improving the capacity of interactions between teachers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianta, Robert C; Hamre, Bridget K

    2009-01-01

    The National Research Council's (NRC) statement and description of features of settings that have value for positive youth development have been of great importance in shifting discourse toward creating programs that capitalize on youth motivations toward competence and connections with others. This assets-based approach to promote development is consistent with the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) framework for measuring and improving the quality of teacher-student interactions in classroom settings. This chapter highlights the similarities between the CLASS and NRC systems and describes the CLASS as a tool for standardized measurement and improvement of classrooms and their effects on children. It argues that the next important steps to be taken in extending the CLASS and NRC frameworks involve reengineering assessments of teacher and classroom quality and professional development around observations of teachers' performance. This might include using observations in policies regarding teacher quality or a "highly effective teacher" that may emanate from the reauthorization of No Child Left Behind and moving away from a course or workshop mode of professional development to one that ties supports directly to teachers' practices in classroom settings.

  15. Effectiveness of a Positive Youth Development Program for Secondary 1 Students in Macau: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Luk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid change to society after the opening of the gaming licensure by the government and the potential attraction to youth caused by the casinos, a well-tested and comprehensive adolescent development program previously established in Hong Kong was adopted and modified to be used in Macau. It is expected to help our adolescents achieve positive growth and be better prepared for future challenges. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the modified positive youth development program for Secondary 1 Students in Macau. Specifically, two research questions will be asked: (1 How does the positive youth development program affect positive growth for youth in Macau?; and (2 Is youth growth related to different factors such as gender, age, family financial condition, and parents' marital status? A mixed research method with a quantitative approach using a pre- and post-test pre-experimental design, and a qualitative approach using a focus group for the participants is carried out. The study sample included 232 Secondary 1 Students in two schools. The objective outcome evaluation showed that, overall, 123 (53% of the participants had significant improvement on the total scores of the Chinese Positive Youth Development Scale (CPYDS and the two composite scores. However, there were some increases in the behavioral intention of alcohol drinking and participation in gambling activities. The “happiness of the family life” was found to have significant differences in the score of the CPYDS, which was shown to be the factor related to youth growth. The focus group interviews revealed that both positive and negative feedback was obtained from the discussion; however, the majority of the participants perceived benefits to themselves from the program. With reference to the principle of triangulation, the present study suggests that, based on both quantitative and qualitative evaluation findings, it should be concluded that there is

  16. Descriptive study of burnout, compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction in undergraduate nursing students at a tertiary education institution in KwaZulu-Natal

    OpenAIRE

    Christina T. Mathias; Dorien L. Wentzel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Studies have investigated burnout and compassion fatigue among nurses and effects in the nursing profession. However, there are limited investigations of burnout and compassion fatigue among undergraduate nursing students in South Africa, as nursing students may experience distressful situations during their nursing education course, which may have an impact during their training and in their profession as they graduate. Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to des...

  17. Negative Thinking versus Positive Thinking in a Singaporean Student Sample: Relationships with Psychological Well-Being and Psychological Maladjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Shyh Shin

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the relationships of positive thinking versus negative thinking with psychological well-being and psychological maladjustment. Three hundred and ninety-eight undergraduate students from Singapore participated in this study. First, positive thinking were positively correlated with indicators psychological well-being--life…

  18. Descriptive study of burnout, compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction in undergraduate nursing students at a tertiary education institution in KwaZulu-Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Christina T; Wentzel, Dorien L

    2017-09-22

    Studies have investigated burnout and compassion fatigue among nurses and effects in the nursing profession. However, there are limited investigations of burnout and compassion fatigue among undergraduate nursing students in South Africa, as nursing students may experience distressful situations during their nursing education course, which may have an impact during their training and in their profession as they graduate. The purpose of this descriptive study was to describe compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and burnout among undergraduate nursing students at a tertiary nursing institution. A quantitative descriptive study was conducted to describe compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and burnout among undergraduate nursing students at a tertiary nursing institution in KwaZulu-Natal. Convenience sampling was used. Sixty-seven undergraduate students (26 third-year and 41 fourth-year nursing students) took the self-test Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL). The study results indicate that undergraduate students experienced average levels of compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction. As shown in the study, some of the undergraduate students are experiencing compassion fatigue and burnout, associated with relieving suffering of others. Therefore, knowledge of compassion fatigue and burnout and the coping strategies should be part of nursing training.

  19. Profiling students using an institutional information portal:a descriptive study of the Bachelor of Arts degree students,University of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using data mining techniques, this study examines the Bachelor of Arts (General degree’s data available in the University of South Africa’s institutional information and analysis portal (IP maintained by the Department of Information and Strategic Analysis (DISA. The purpose of this was to draw a demographic profile of the students and demonstrate the potential use of an IP in monitoring and evaluating the performance of individual qualifications as far as registrations, cancellations and graduation rates are concerned. Data were analysed in order to determine the students’ age, gender, occupational, home language and geographic distributions and the relationships between the “incoming”, “re-entering”, “degree completed” and “graduation” headcounts. It was observed, among other findings, that the BA(G degree attracts students with diverse characteristics; there is a general continued decline in the number of students registering as well as completing the qualification; the number of students cancelling registrations in BA(G has continued to grow since 2005; and that there is a significant positive correlation between (a the “incoming” and “graduation” headcounts; (b “incoming” and “degree completed” headcounts; (c “degree completed” and “graduation” headcounts; and (d “graduation” and “total registration” headcounts. Other findings as well as conclusions and recommendations are offered.

  20. Effectiveness of a positive psychology intervention combined with cognitive behavioral therapy in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario-Josefa Marrero

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design and implement a positive intervention combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy to enhance subjective and psychological well-being and other positive functioning constructs in a convenience sample. Participants analysed were 48 university students (mean age 22.25, 25 assigned nonrandomized to intervention condition and 23 to no-treatment waiting-list control condition. All participants were assessed pre- and post-intervention to test the treatment program effectiveness. Repeated-measures ANCOVAs, controlling baseline differences between the two groups, indicated that the intervention group reported greater social support after the intervention period than the waiting-list control group. Within-group differences were found for happiness, selfacceptance, positive relations with others, optimism, and self-esteem in the intervention group; these differences did not appear in the waiting-list control group. These findings suggest the limited capacity of this intervention program for improving well-being through positive activities combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy. Future research should analyse what kind of activities could be more effective in promoting well-being depending on the characteristics of participants.

  1. The Role of Extension Nutrition Education in Student Achievement of Nutrition Standards in Grades K-3: A Descriptive Evaluation of a School-Based Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Mary E.; Schreiber, Debera

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the results of a descriptive evaluation of the impact of an in-school Extension nutrition education program in a small, very rural county. The evaluation focused on understanding the nature of the role the Extension educator plays in delivering nutrition education, the impact of the program on student learning and achievement…

  2. A Descriptive Qualitative Study Exploring Teacher and Parental Perceptions of African-American Middle School Male Students Related to Mathematics Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Crystal Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative descriptive case study explored the perceptions of parents and teachers of the academic achievement gap in mathematics between African-American middle school males and their White counterparts. Ten parents, both African-American and White, with students attending middle school in the Cherokee County School District and 5 teachers…

  3. Positive School Climate: What It Looks Like and How It Happens. Nurturing Positive School Climate for Student Learning and Professional Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tami Kopischke; Connolly, Faith; Pryseski, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    The term "school climate" has been around for more than a hundred years to explore the idea of school environmental or contextual factors that might have an impact on student learning and academic success. During the past three decades there has been growing research to support the importance of a positive school climate in promoting…

  4. Can Appreciative Inquiry Increase Positive Interactions, Student Self-Advocacy and Turn-Taking during IEP Meetings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozik, Peter L.

    2018-01-01

    This comparative research study in the context of action research documents the effects of Appreciative Inquiry (AI) on positive participant interactions, student turn-taking and self-advocacy interactions during IEP meetings that focused on student transition to post-secondary outcomes. AI was implemented as a written protocol for conducting IEP…

  5. Group Work in the MBA Classroom: Improving Pedagogical Practice and Maximizing Positive Outcomes with Part-Time MBA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Patricia D.

    2013-01-01

    This article forms part of an exploration into how graduate students experience group work. A single case, embedded study was completed in 2011, which reveals insight and understanding into the manner in which part-time MBA students experience group work assignments and how these experiences contribute to their perception of positive group work…

  6. Increasing Elementary School Students' Subjective Well-Being through a Classwide Positive Psychology Intervention: Results of a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suldo, Shannon M.; Hearon, Brittany V.; Bander, Bryan; McCullough, Mollie; Garofano, Jeffrey; Roth, Rachel A.; Tan, Sim Yin

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in school-based programs to promote students' subjective well-being (SWB). Students with greater SWB tend to have stronger relationships with their teachers and classmates, as well as behave in more positive ways. Drawing from theory and research pertinent to promoting children's SWB, we developed an 11-session classwide…

  7. Positive and Negative Affectivity as Mediator and Moderator of the Relationship between Optimism and Life Satisfaction in Turkish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapikiran, Necla Acun

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine the mediator and moderator role of positive and negative affectivity variables on the relationship between optimism and life satisfaction in university students. 397 university students, ranging in age from 18 to 27 (M = 20.98), attending different departments of the Faculty of Education, at Pamukkale…

  8. The Effects of Gratitude Journaling on Turkish First Year College Students' College Adjustment, Life Satisfaction and Positive Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Serife; Ergüner-Tekinalp, Bengü

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of gratitude journaling on first-year college students' adjustment, life satisfaction, and positive affect. Students who scored high (i.e., scores between 35 and 56) on the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen et al. in "Journal of Health and Social Behavior," 24, 385-396, 1983) and low (i.e., scores between 48…

  9. The Pedagogical Benefits of Enacting Positive Psychology Practices through a Student-Faculty Partnership Approach to Academic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Sather, Alison; Schlosser, Joel Alden; Sweeney, Abigail; Peterson, Laurel M.; Cassidy, Kimberly Wright; Colón García, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Academic development that supports the enactment of positive psychology practices through student-faculty pedagogical partnership can increase faculty confidence and capacity in their first year in a new institution. When student partners practice affirmation and encouragement of strengths-based growth, processes of faculty acclimation and…

  10. The Effect of Positive or Negative Frame on the Choices of Students in School Psychology and Educational Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagley, N. S.; Miller, Paul M.; Jones, Robert N.

    1999-01-01

    Doctoral students (N=109) in school psychology and educational administration responded to five decision problems whose outcomes were framed either positively as gains or negatively as losses. Frame and profession significantly affected the number of risky choices. Educational administration students made more risky choices than school psychology…

  11. NASN position statement: Sexual orientation and gender identity/expression (sexual minority students): school nurse practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Beverly; Kelts, Susan; Robarge, Deb; Davis, Catherine; Delger, Suzey; Compton, Linda

    2013-03-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that all students, regardless of their sexual orientation or the sexual orientation of their parents and family members, are entitled to a safe school environment and equal opportunities for a high level of academic achievement and school participation/involvement. Sexual minority persons are those who identify themselves as gay, lesbian, or bisexual (LGB) or are unsure of their sexual orientation, or those who have had sexual contact with persons of the same sex or both sexes (Kann et al., 2011). Sexual minority is thought to be a more inclusive and neutral term. For the purposes of this statement, the term sexual minority will be used in lieu of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning).

  12. Not all developmental assets are related to positive health outcomes in college students

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    Teoli Daniel A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this investigation was to model the relationships between developmental assets, life satisfaction, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL among a stratified, random sample (n = 765, 56% response rate of college students. Methods Structural equation modeling techniques were employed to test the relationships using Mplus v4.21; Model evaluations were based on 1 theoretical salience, 2 global fit indices (chi-square goodness of fit, comparative fit index: CFI and Tucker-Lewis Index: TLI, 3 microfit indices (parameter estimates, root mean squared error of approximation: RMSEA and residuals and 4 parsimony. Results The model fit the data well: χ2(n = 581, 515 = 1252.23, CFI = .94, TLI = .93 and RMSEA = .05. First, participants who reported increased Family Communication also reported higher levels of life satisfaction. Second, as participants reported having more Non-Parental Role Models, life satisfaction decreased and poor mental HRQOL days increased. Finally increased Future Aspirations was related to increased poor mental HRQOL days. Results were variant across gender. Conclusions Preliminary results suggest not all developmental assets are related to positive health outcomes among college students, particularly mental health outcomes. While the findings for Family Communication were expected, the findings for Non-Parental Role Models suggest interactions with potential role models in college settings may be naturally less supportive. Future Aspirations findings suggest college students may harbor a greater temporal urgency for the rigors of an increasingly competitive work world. In both cases, these assets appear associated with increased poor mental HRQOL days.

  13. ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN RELATION TO THEIR SOCIAL POSITION IN THE CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Poledňová

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was based on a theoretical presumption that social climate and relationships in the class can be in specific ways connected with students’ achievement motivation. Previous research in the area of student motivation was mostly based on self-reports and was therefore focused on explicit motives, i.e. personal goals which the respondents strived for. Self-report measures of motivation, however, can be affected by biases and misperceptions of one’s own self. Our study approached achievement motivation at its implicit, i.e. non-conscious level. It was conducted with students in five classes of a secondary school, N = 138, 107 female and 31 male, with an average age of 17 years. The respondents were administered a sociometric questionnaire and the projective Thematic Apperception Test (TAT in McClelland´s adaptation using Heckhausen´s content-analytical clue for the measurement of achievement motivation. The hypothesized relation between social position in class and achievement motivation was only partly supported. Affiliation was unrelated to achievement motivation, even when analyzed for both achievement motives separately. We found a slight negative relationship between influence in the class and achievement motivation, especially with the motive to achieve success. These results, partly diverging from theoretical presumptions, can be explained in terms of specific features of the sample as well as a general methodological disparity in previous research, especially a lack of differentiation between implicit and explicit motives in the interpretation of the findings.

  14. Community-Dwelling People Screened Positive for Dementia in Primary Care: A Comprehensive, Multivariate Descriptive Analysis Using Data from the DelpHi-Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyrian, Jochen René; Eichler, Tilly; Michalowsky, Bernhard; Wucherer, Diana; Reimann, Melanie; Hertel, Johannes; Richter, Steffen; Dreier, Adina; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2016-03-30

    Efficient help and care for people with dementia (PWD) is dependent on knowledge about PWD in primary care. This analysis comprehensively describes community-dwelling PWD in primary care with respect to various dementia care specific variables. The analyses are based on baseline data of the ongoing general practitioner-based, randomized, controlled intervention trial DelpHi-MV (Dementia: life- and person-centered help). 6,838 patients were screened for dementia in 136 GP practices; 17.1% were screened positive, 54.4% of those agreed to participate and data could be assessed in n = 516 subjects. We assessed age, sex, living situation, cognitive status, functional status, level of impairment, comorbidities, formal diagnosis of dementia, depression, neuropsychiatric symptoms, quality of life, utilization of medical support, and pharmacological therapy. Concerning clinical-, dementia-, and health-related variables, the sample under examination was on average mildly cognitively and functionally impaired (MMSE, m = 22.2; BADL, m = 3.7). A level of care was assigned in 38.0%. Depression was identified in 15.4% and other frequent comorbidities were high blood pressure (83.3%), coronary heart diseases (37.1%), cerebrovascular diseases (22.3%), among others. In 48.6%, neuropsychiatric symptoms were present in a clinically relevant severity. Pharmacological treatment with antidementia medication was received by 25.8% and antidepressant medication by 14.0%. Utilization of services was generally low. The comprehensive description of people screened positive for dementia in primary care reveals a complex and unique population of patients. They are considerably underdiagnosed and in their majority mildly to moderately affected. More in-depth analyses are needed to study relations, associations and interactions between different variables.

  15. Social support, acculturation, and optimism: understanding positive health practices in Asian American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Cynthia G; Mahat, Ganga

    2012-07-01

    This study developed and tested a theory to better understand positive health practices (PHP) among Asian Americans aged 18 to 21 years. It tested theoretical relationships postulated between PHP and (a) social support (SS), (b) optimism, and (c) acculturation, and between SS and optimism and acculturation. Optimism and acculturation were also tested as possible mediators in the relationship between SS and PHP. A correlational study design was used. A convenience sample of 163 Asian college students in an urban setting completed four questionnaires assessing SS, PHP, optimism, and acculturation and one demographic questionnaire. There were statistically significant positive relationships between SS and optimism with PHP, between acculturation and PHP, and between optimism and SS. Optimism mediated the relationship between SS and PHP, whereas acculturation did not. Findings extend knowledge regarding these relationships to a defined population of Asian Americans aged 18 to 21 years. Findings contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge base regarding health practices among Asian Americans. The theoretical and empirical findings of this study provide the direction for future research as well. Further studies need to be conducted to identify and test other mediators in order to better understand the relationship between these two variables.

  16. Perceived positive teacher-student relationship as a protective factor for Chinese left-behind children's emotional and behavioural adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Xiaowei; Chen, Li; Qu, Zhiyong

    2015-10-01

    Using cross-sectional data collected in rural communities of two provinces of China, this study examined the protective role of perceived positive teacher-student relationship for Chinese left-behind children. The participants included 1442 children with a mean age of 14.13 classified into two groups: a left-behind group (104 boys and 110 girls) and a comparison group (588 boys and 640 girls). Self-reported questionnaires concerning self-esteem, depression, problem behaviours and the teacher-student relationship were administered. Relative to the comparison group, after controlling for age, gender and family socioeconomic status, the left-behind group was disadvantaged in terms of self-esteem and depression but not in problem behaviours. As hypothesised, the results of regression analyses indicated that teacher-student relationship positively predicted self-esteem and negatively predicted depression and problem behaviours for both groups. Moreover, the association between teacher-student relationship and depression was stronger among the left-behind group, suggesting that left-behind children were more responsive to the positive effect of a desired teacher-student relationship. Taken together, the results of our study support the idea that perceived positive teacher-student relationship may serve as a protective factor for left-behind children. Practical implications and limitations of the present study are discussed. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  17. A Cross-sectional, Descriptive, Quality Improvement Project to Assess Undergraduate Nursing Students' Clinical Exposure to Patients With Wounds in an Introductory Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Keves-Foster, Mary Kathryn; Ashare, JoAnn; Zugcic, Mary; Albdour, Maha; Albdour, Dalia

    2016-04-01

    Because nurses frequently participate in decisions related to wound care, learning about wounds and their care during undergraduate education is critical. A cross-sectional, descriptive, quality improvement project was conducted in an introductory baccalaureate nursing course to identify: 1) the types of patients with wounds assigned to beginning students, 2) patient wound care procedures and dressings, and 3) student level of participation in wound care. Data were collected from the weekly notes recorded about students' (N = 49) patient care experiences in 3 acute care hospitals for 9 clinical days during 1 semester. Data were recorded on a paper-and-pencil form by instructors at the end of the clinical day and included type of wound, wound irrigation, dressing, technique of care, and student's participation. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the frequency and distribution of the wound characteristics and care assessed. Of the 284 patients assigned to students, 75 (26.4%) had a wound. The most common wound was a surgical incision (49, 65%) and was closed (36, 73.5%). Twenty-six (26) patients had a pressure ulcer, most commonly Stage II. The most common dressing was dry gauze (29). Damp gauze was used on 18 wounds. Wound irrigation was recorded for 24 wound protocols and performed with a bulb syringe or by pouring the solution from a container. Generally, nonsterile wound care was performed. Twenty-five (25) students performed wound care with the instructor, 16 watched the care performed by another clinician, and 10 participated with another nurse in the wound care. For 22 patients, the wound care was neither observed nor performed because either it was not time for the dressing to be changed or it was only to be changed by a medical team. From these data, it was concluded beginning nursing students had some, but limited, clinical experience with patients with wounds. Students' wound care experiences need further examination, especially across multiple

  18. Position Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Position Information Data Asset provides the ability to search for active SSA position descriptions using various search criteria. An individual may search by PD...

  19. Exploring fertility decisions among pregnant HIV-positive women on antiretroviral therapy at a health centre in Balaka, Malawi: A descriptive qualitative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biseck, T; Kumwenda, S; Kalulu, K; Chidziwisano, K; Kalumbi, L

    2015-12-01

    The proportions of women of reproductive age living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vary between different regions of the world, with significantly higher proportions in sub-Saharan Africa. Family planning is one of the major issues that couples and families affected with HIV must confront. We aimed to assess the cultural and social factors associated with childbearing and family planning knowledge, decision-making, and practices among HIV-positive pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at a health centre in Balaka, Malawi. This was a qualitative descriptive study carried out at Kalembo Health Centre in Balaka. A purposive sampling technique was used to select pregnant women enroled in the antiretroviral therapy (ART) programme. A sample size of thirty-five women was decided upon after data saturation. Qualitative inquiry was used during data collection. Data were analysed using systematic text condensation, while numbers and percentages were generated using Microsoft Excel. Out of 35 participants, 20 were aged between 25 and 34 years, and 18 had been married at least three times. All 35 women wished to have their own biological child. Factors, reported by participants, that promote childbearing included: the desire to please their husbands, fear of losing their husbands to others if they did not bear children, the knowledge that ART would help prevent their children from acquiring the virus, the desire to prove to others that they can also bear children, and a lack of family planning leading to unplanned pregnancies. The factors that lead to pregnancies among women on ART in Balaka ranged from assured safety of the child from HIV, lack of contraception, to other factors related to their partners. The authors recognize and support the freedom for women to become pregnant and bear children, and, in the context of HIV infection, fertility and reproductive services should include a comprehensive approach towards addressing issues of HIV and AIDS and

  20. Decision of pedagogical tasks as mean of forming of pedagogical position of students of higher education physical establishments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanchenko N.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article one of terms of forming of pedagogical position for the students of higher education physical establishments - decision of educational-pedagogical situations (EPS is examined. Monitoring of progress from pedagogical disciplines confronted with the results of experiment on determination of levels of decision of EPS by students is conducted. It is set that the traditional model of studies provides the high level of capture students theoretical knowledge, but does not influence on forming of them pedagogical position. Most students were shown by the medium-and-low levels of formed of abilities to decide EPS. It is set that the traditional model of teaching provides the high level of capture students theoretical knowledge's, but substantially does not influence on forming of their pedagogical position. Basic difficulties are certain at a decision the students of EPS, which allow to define the basic going near development of methodical accompaniment of EPS, which must include: educational material which is based on integration of pedagogical and sporting preparation with support on context approach; algorithm of decision of tasks; questions of cognitive character.

  1. Position Paper. Safety for K-12 students: United States policy concerning LGBT student safety must provide inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Sanders

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT are at risk for harassment due to their sexual orientation or gender identification with over 85% of LGBT students in the United States (US reporting such harassment. These statistics demonstrate one aspect of the significance of this issue, but the cost of human life in some instances has revealed another layer of importance related to a need for safety policies for LGBT students. Even though a need exists for such policies, the practice of heteronormativity found in US policymaking regarding bullying does not protect victims or curb the violence. This essay highlights several recent developments in anti-bullying policy in US schools that shows the existence of heteronormativity, which is not helping to pro-tect LGBT students. By understanding the discrimination encouraged by current policy, future policy can be better shaped to protect LGBT students.

  2. Students' Awareness of Science Teachers' Leadership, Attitudes toward Science, and Positive Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying-Yan; Chen, Hsiang-Ting; Hong, Zuway-R.; Yore, Larry D.

    2016-01-01

    There appears to be a complex network of cognitive and affective factors that influence students' decisions to study science and motivate their choices to engage in science-oriented careers. This study explored 330 Taiwanese senior high school students' awareness of their science teacher's learning leadership and how it relates to the students'…

  3. Positive Teacher Influence Strategies to Improve Secondary Instrumental Students' Motivation and Perceptions of Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Olivia Gail

    2018-01-01

    Asmus's model of achievement motivation in music established a framework for the study of motivation in music education. Student perceptions of self were included in the model as a dynamic factor in student motivation to accomplish music learning tasks. Research has revealed further teacher influence on student motivation and perceptions of self…

  4. The Relationship between Positive Well-Being and Academic Assessment: Results from a Prospective Study on Dental Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Teodora Preoteasa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Presumably, the academic stress that builds throughout the academic year has a negative effect on dental students’ psychological well-being and may have a relationship with academic performance. This research aimed to analyse the variation of positive well-being in second-year dental students, across the academic semester, in relation to consecutive examinations as part of academic assessment system (1 and to observe the relationship between academic performance during semester evaluation period and dental students’ positive well-being (2. Methods. A prospective study was conducted on second-year dental students, data on positive well-being being collected with WHO-Five Well-Being Index (WHO-5, at the beginning of the semester and after three consecutive mandatory examinations. Results. One hundred and forty-six dental students were included (77% response rate. Repeated ANOVA showed a significant progressive decline of positive well-being over the semester, which was clinically significant for an important part of them. Students who performed better in the semester evaluation period registered higher well-being levels at the beginning of the semester but a more pronounced decline of it until the semester evaluation period. Conclusion. Based on this research, a relationship between positive well-being, academic assessments, and academic performance is suggested, when evaluating them in a prospective frame.

  5. Taking a Second Look: Following Surveys with Student's Descriptions of the Culture of Aggression in a Middle School

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Nicholson; Diana Nicholson

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a research study on aggressive behaviour among students in middle school. The study was initiated in response to concern about agressive behaviour held by the school administration. A survey on aggressive behaviour was administered and followed by interviews with a sample of students. Student interviews highlighted a number of very important issues to consider when assessing and responding to aggressive behaviour in a school: school crowding , the playing out of dominan...

  6. Academic stress and positive affect: Asian value and self-worth contingency as moderators among Chinese international students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kelly Yu-Hsin; Wei, Meifen

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical model proposed by Berry and colleagues (Berry, 1997; Berry, Kim, Minde, & Mok, 1987) highlights the importance of identifying moderators in the acculturation process. Accordingly, the current study examined the Asian cultural value of family recognition through achievement (FRTA) and contingency of self-worth on academic competence (CSW-AC) as moderators in the association between academic stress and positive affect among Chinese international students. A total of 370 Chinese international students completed online surveys. Results from a hierarchical regression indicated that while academic stress was negatively associated with positive affect, FRTA was positively associated with positive affect. In other words, those with high academic stress reported a lower level of positive affect. However, individuals who endorsed high levels of FRTA reported a higher level of positive affect. In addition, results also revealed a significant interaction between academic stress and CSW-AC on positive affect. Thus, the study's finding supported the moderator role of CSW-AC. Simple effect analyses were conducted to examine the significant interaction. The results showed that higher levels of CSW-AC strengthened the negative association between academic stress and positive affect but lower levels of CSW-AC did not. Future research directions and implications are discussed.

  7. Taking a Second Look: Following Surveys with Student's Descriptions of the Culture of Aggression in a Middle School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Nicholson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a research study on aggressive behaviour among students in middle school. The study was initiated in response to concern about agressive behaviour held by the school administration. A survey on aggressive behaviour was administered and followed by interviews with a sample of students. Student interviews highlighted a number of very important issues to consider when assessing and responding to aggressive behaviour in a school: school crowding , the playing out of dominant masculinity, involving students in finding solutions to identified problems, and considering the role of the whole school culture in sustaining agressive behaviour.

  8. Improved sleep patterns positively affect learning outcome among Danish nursing students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    physiology is taught at the nursing education programme; this does not mean that nursing students develop good sleep habits. Methods: To support learning an innovative method was chosen where nursing students were motivated to develop good sleep habits through peer learning. Nursing students were taught...... in groups by other students, so-called sleep ambassadors. On the basis of a training programme they developed a creative concept with exercises, tests (memory and power of concentration) and social activities in connection with theoretical teaching in the subject of sleep. This concept was followed......-up by social media activities motivated the nursing students to change their sleep habits. Results: This project has been completed by one of two classes of first semester students at the nursing education programme at UCN. This class demonstrated better examination results and a lower drop-oup rate compared...

  9. Experiences in Sense Making: Health Science Students' "I"-Positioning in an Online Philosophy of Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvaja, Maarit

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study on the dialogical approach to learning in the context of higher education. The aim was to shed light on the "I"-Position and multivoicedness in students' identity building and to provide empirical substantiation for these theoretical constructs, focusing especially on the connection between…

  10. Structural Modeling on the Relationship between Positive Perception, Deliberative Belief, and Friendship Quality: A Study with Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Wen

    2018-01-01

    Some of the key issues in pedagogy are the way of students' peer learning, collaboration, and team work at school. Friendship quality is essential for academic achievement by peer learning and team work. In line with that, the aim of the present study is to examine the associations between variables that are positive perception, deliberative…

  11. Validation of the Factor Structure of the Positive Life Assets Scale for High School Students in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Suriyadeo

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the factor structure of the Positive Life Assets Scale (PLAS), a new measure to identify both internal and external life assets among high school students in Thailand, and to further examine the usefulness of the PLAS for a comprehensive, developmental, and strengths-based school and community…

  12. Academic stress levels were positively associated with sweet food consumption among Korean high-school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonsoo; Yang, Hye Young; Kim, Ae-Jung; Lim, Yunsook

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to identify the association among levels of persistent academic stress, appetite, and dietary habits and to determine the specific types of sweet foods consumed by Korean high-school students according to their academic stress levels. The study participants included 333 high-school students in the 10th to 12th grades in Kyunggi Province, Korea. The level of academic stress was scored with a 75-item academic stress scale and was categorized as high, medium, or low. A food-frequency questionnaire was used to measure the sugar intake from sweet foods. Korean high-school students with a high academic stress level had larger meals than the other students. Compared with students with low academic stress, the students with high academic stress had a higher frequency of sugar intake from the following food types: confectionaries, candies and chocolates, breads, and flavored milk. Moreover, compared with students with low academic stress, the students with high academic stress had a higher total intake of sugar from the following food types: confectionaries, candies, chocolates, flavored milk, traditional Korean beverages, and spicy, sweet, and fried rice cakes. Unhealthy stress-related food choices may compromise high-school students' health and contribute to their morbidity. The findings of the present study could be used to help nutritionists develop effective strategies for nutritional education and counseling to improve adolescent health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Descriptive Study of Veteran Students Attending The University of South Carolina, Fall 1975. No. 30-76.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Robert G.; And Others

    The Office of Veteran Student Affairs (OVSA) at the University of South Carolina serves a total population of 3,310 veteran students. This survey, conducted during the fall semester of 1975, was designed to obtain data about the personal background of the respondents, their attitudes toward the services provided by the several offices serving…

  14. A Descriptive Study Examining the Impact of Digital Writing Environments on Communication and Mathematical Reasoning for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huscroft-D'Angelo, Jacqueline; Higgins, Kristina N.; Crawford, Lindy L.

    2014-01-01

    Proficiency in mathematics, including mathematical reasoning skills, requires students to communicate their mathematical thinking. Mathematical reasoning involves making sense of mathematical concepts in a logical way to form conclusions or judgments, and is often underdeveloped in students with learning disabilities. Technology-based environments…

  15. Daily Reports of Positive and Negative Affect and Alcohol and Marijuana Use Among College Student and Nonstudent Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Megan E; Yeomans-Maldonado, Gloria; Griffin, Jamie

    2016-01-02

    Daily affect and substance use covary among college students, but little is known about these associations among young adults not in college. The current pilot study examines associations between positive and negative affect and alcohol and marijuana use, with a focus on differences between college student and nonstudent young adults. High school seniors completed a baseline survey during the spring of 2012 and were then randomly selected to participate in an intensive measurement follow-up. Participants in the follow-up (N = 72, 40.3% men, 77.8% White, 66.7% full-time college students) completed up to 14 consecutive web-based daily surveys during the fall after high school completion. Multilevel models in which days (Level 1) were nested in persons (Level 2) were estimated. Weekend days were associated with increased alcohol use among all young adults, increased marijuana use among college students, and decreased marijuana use among nonstudents. For young adults not in college, greater daily positive affect was associated with increased likelihood of binge drinking, consuming a greater number of drinks, and lower odds of marijuana use; greater daily negative affect was associated with lower odds of alcohol use and lower odds of binge drinking for non-students. For college students, greater daily negative affect was associated with lower odds of marijuana use. Daily affect and alcohol and marijuana use covary among young adults, though these associations differ between students and non-students. Results highlight the need to examine predictors of alcohol and marijuana use among young adults who do not attend college.

  16. Process and Positive Development: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of University Student Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeela, Pádraig; Gannon, Niall

    2014-01-01

    Volunteering among university students is an important expression of civic engagement, but the impact of this experience on the development of emerging adults requires further contextualization. Adopting interpretative phenomenological analysis as a qualitative research approach, we carried out semistructured interviews with 10 students of one…

  17. The Market Positioning and the Selection of Destination Countries for Music Students from Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Ping; Ho, Hsuan-fu

    2014-01-01

    Students now-a-days have to develop international skills to be successful in this global environment, and choosing a sound destination country is a crucial issue to the success of their overseas study. On the other hand, since international students may contribute a great deal to the host country's educational quality and its economy, countries…

  18. The Value of Forensic Competition for Oral Interpretation Students. Position Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Bruce B.

    Student interest in individual events in intercollegiate forensics competition is on the rise in the United States. Not only does the individual events tournament format reward depth of analysis, it also rewards students' abilities to transfer their critical insights into appropriate physical and vocal cues. The individual events tournament…

  19. A Positive Model for Reducing and Preventing School Burnout in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aypay, Ayse

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to develop and test the validity of a model limited to attitude towards the future and subjective well-being for reducing and preventing the school burnout that high school students can experience. The study is designed as a relational screening model conducted over 389 high school students. The data in this study are analyzed…

  20. Teachers' and Students' Work-Culture Variables Associated with Positive School Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater, Orna D.; Nutt, Roberta L.

    1999-01-01

    Investigates whether goodness of fit between teachers' and students' backgrounds is associated with subjective grading and objective achievement at school. One hundred one seventh graders and twenty of their teachers completed the Self-Report Family Inventory. Similarity between teachers' and students' work-culture variables was associated with…

  1. Enhancing Student Engagement to Positively Impact Mathematics Anxiety, Confidence and Achievement for Interdisciplinary Science Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everingham, Yvette L.; Gyuris, Emma; Connolly, Sean R.

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary science educators must equip their students with the knowledge and practical know-how to connect multiple disciplines like mathematics, computing and the natural sciences to gain a richer and deeper understanding of a scientific problem. However, many biology and earth science students are prejudiced against mathematics due to…

  2. Identified Phases in the Building and Maintaining of Positive Teacher-Student Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Teacher-student relationships are accepted as influential but the dynamics of those relationships are not well understood, especially with difficult students. A series of interviews were combined with classroom observations and written reflections to understand in what ways a teacher negotiated her relationship with a behaviorally challenging…

  3. Across Borders and across Cultures: Vietnamese Students' Positioning of Teachers in a University Twinning Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Ha; Doyle, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    How do teachers and teaching appear to international students moving from the home country component of a twinning programme to the overseas partner university? This narrative study explored the perspectives of five Vietnamese students in their first months of studying for a commerce degree at a New Zealand university, having completed the first…

  4. Global Cultural Capital and Global Positional Competition: International Graduate Students' Transnational Occupational Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongyoung

    2016-01-01

    International graduate students' occupational trajectories have rarely been studied, although many studies exist on their learning experiences in foreign universities. Based on 80 qualitative interviews, this article aims to understand how, where, and why these students obtain jobs in academe and corporations. I focus particularly on Korean…

  5. Illustrative and descriptive format of pedagogic strategies and resources for the instruction of blind and low vision students in inclusive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Osmar Seabra Júnior

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The participation of all in a Physical Education class requires pedagogical resources and proper and/or adapted teaching strategies to each group of participants. The aim of this study was to: identify, interpret and categorize the suggestions found in the literature on teaching strategies and learning resources offered to teach blind and visually impaired students. The specific objectives were: 1 Presentation of teaching strategies and learning resources in an illustrative manual, and 2 A description of the illustrations, which can be read in Braille, enabling accessibility to the blind. The re - sults were obtained by the: 1 selection of propositions that describing teaching stra - tegies and pedagogic resources in literature, 2 the classification and categorization of the propositions, 3 development of the illustrative manual, and 4 description of the figures in the manual. The material produced will serve as a tool for academics, teachers, coaches of adapted sports, and for the daily use of teachers.

  6. Enhancing student engagement to positively impact mathematics anxiety, confidence and achievement for interdisciplinary science subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everingham, Yvette L.; Gyuris, Emma; Connolly, Sean R.

    2017-11-01

    Contemporary science educators must equip their students with the knowledge and practical know-how to connect multiple disciplines like mathematics, computing and the natural sciences to gain a richer and deeper understanding of a scientific problem. However, many biology and earth science students are prejudiced against mathematics due to negative emotions like high mathematical anxiety and low mathematical confidence. Here, we present a theoretical framework that investigates linkages between student engagement, mathematical anxiety, mathematical confidence, student achievement and subject mastery. We implement this framework in a large, first-year interdisciplinary science subject and monitor its impact over several years from 2010 to 2015. The implementation of the framework coincided with an easing of anxiety and enhanced confidence, as well as higher student satisfaction, retention and achievement. The framework offers interdisciplinary science educators greater flexibility and confidence in their approach to designing and delivering subjects that rely on mathematical concepts and practices.

  7. Survey of low vision among students attending schools for the blind in Nigeria: a descriptive and interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosuro, Adedamola L; Ajaiyeoba, Ayotunde I; Bekibele, Charles O; Eniola, Michael S; Adedokun, Babatunde A

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of low vision among students attending all the schools for the blind in Oyo State, Nigeria. The study set out to determine the proportion of students with low vision/severe visual impairment after best correction, to determine the causes of the low vision, to document the associated pathologies, to determine the types of treatment and visual aid devices required, and to provide the visual aids needed to the students in the schools. All schools students for the blind in Oyo State were evaluated between August 2007 and January 2008. All the students underwent a thorough ophthalmic examination that included measurement of visual acuity, retinoscopy and subjective refraction, tests for visual aids where indicated, and a structured questionnaire was administered. A total of 86 students were included in the study and the mean age was 19.4 ± 8.19 years. Twenty six (30%) were under 16 years of age. The most common cause of blindness was bilateral measles keratopathy/vitamin A deficiency (VAD) in 25 students (29.1%). The most common site affected was the cornea in 25 students (29.1%), the lens in 23 (26.7%), and the retina/optic nerve in 16 (18.6%). Preventable blindness was mainly from measles keratopathy/VAD (29.1%). Eleven students benefited from refraction and correction with visual aids; two having severe visual impairment (SVI), and nine having visual impairment (VI) after correction. The prevalence of low vision in the schools for the blind in Oyo State is 2.3%, while the prevalence of visual impairment is 10.5%. These results suggest that preventable and treatable ocular conditions are the source of significant childhood blindness in Oyo State.

  8. Emotional Creativity as predictor of intrinsic motivation and academic engagement in university students: The mediating role of positive emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBERTO AMUTIO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Emotional creativity implies experiencing a complex emotional life, which is becoming increasingly necessary in societies that demand innovation and constant changes. This research studies the relation of emotional creativity as a dispositional trait with intrinsic motivation and academic engagement.Methods: A sample of 428 university Chilean students, 36.5% men and 63.5% women, with ages from 18 to 45 years old (M = 20,37 DT = 2,71. Additionally, the mediating function of class-related positive emotions in this relation is explored.Results: The obtained data indicate that developing high levels of dispositional emotional creativity enhances the activation of positive emotions, such as gratitude, love and hope, in the classroom. Furthermore, emotional creativity predicts intrinsic motivation and academic engagement of university students by the experience of positive emotions. Conclusion: These results compel us to be aware of the importance that university students in their early years can understand the complexity of the emotional processes they undergo. A greater control of these emotions would allow students to maintain higher levels of interest in their studies at the different educational stages and to avoid the risk of school failure.

  9. Emotional Creativity as Predictor of Intrinsic Motivation and Academic Engagement in University Students: The Mediating Role of Positive Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriol, Xavier; Amutio, Alberto; Mendoza, Michelle; Da Costa, Silvia; Miranda, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Emotional creativity (EC) implies experiencing a complex emotional life, which is becoming increasingly necessary in societies that demand innovation and constant changes. This research studies the relation of EC as a dispositional trait with intrinsic motivation (IM) and academic engagement (AE). A sample of 428 university Chilean students, 36.5% men and 63.5% women, with ages from 18 to 45 years-old (M = 20.37; DT = 2.71). Additionally, the mediating function of class-related positive emotions in this relation is explored. The obtained data indicate that developing high levels of dispositional EC enhances the activation of positive emotions, such as gratitude, love and hope, in the classroom. Furthermore, EC predicts IM and AE of university students by the experience of positive emotions. These results compel us to be aware of the importance that university students can understand the complexity of the emotional processes they undergo. A greater control of these emotions would allow students to maintain higher levels of interest in their studies at the different educational stages and to avoid the risk of school failure.

  10. Comparative description of migrant farmworkers versus other students attending South Texas schools: demographic, academic, and health characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sharon P; Weller, Nancy F; Fox, Erin E; Cooper, Sara R; Shipp, Eva M

    2005-08-01

    Little is known about academic performance, health, and social functioning of youth from migrant farmworker families. This study was designed to compare demographic, academic, health, and social data between migrant and nonmigrant youth residing in South Texas. Anonymous cross-sectional survey data were collected from 6954 middle and 3565 high school students. About 5% of South Texas middle and high school students reported belonging to a migrant family. Compared with nonmigrant students, migrant youth were more likely to miss and arrive late to school, sleep in class, and study fewer hours weekly. Migrant students reported fewer hours of nightly sleep, fewer hours spent with their friends, and more minor illnesses than nonmigrant youth. These results demonstrate the need for interventions specifically targeted to this vulnerable adolescent population.

  11. Successfully recruiting, surveying, and retaining college students: a description of methods for the Risk, Religiosity, and Emerging Adulthood Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Devon M; Bass, Colleen P

    2012-12-01

    The selection of methods that purposefully reflect the norms of the target population increases the likelihood of effective recruitment, data collection, and retention. In the case of research among college students, researchers' appreciation of college student norms might be skewed by unappreciated generational and developmental differences. Our purpose in this article is to illustrate how attention to the generational and developmental characteristics of college students enhanced the methods of the Risk, Religiosity, and Emerging Adulthood study. We address the following challenges related to research with college students: recruitment, communication, data collection, and retention. Solutions incorporating Internet-based applications (e.g., Facebook) and sensitivity to the generational norms of participants (e.g., multiple means of communication) are described in detail. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A Descriptive Analysis of Students with Disabilities' Experiences in an Inclusive Setting: A Phenomenological Study of Belonging and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecni-Upton, Gail

    2010-01-01

    A sense of belonging is critical in the development of positive self-worth, the enhancement of social skills, and the definition of one's role in society. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe students with disabilities' perceptions of belonging and self-esteem in an inclusive classroom community by addressing a gap in practice…

  13. "A Fly in the Buttermilk": Descriptions of University Life by Successful Black Undergraduate Students at a Predominately White Southeastern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mitzi; Dias-Bowie, Yvonne; Greenberg, Katherine; Klukken, Gary; Pollio, Howard R.; Thomas, Sandra P.; Thompson, Charles L.

    2004-01-01

    "And so a lot of times I felt out of place, because you see all white faces. You know I'm the only fly in the buttermilk, so that took some getting used to ..." These words, shared by a black student during an interview for the present study, poignantly reflect the essence of the experience of being a minority student on a predominately white…

  14. peer interactions and positive student-lecturer relationship as a tool

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frederick Iraki

    USIU College Algebra is part of general education that is studied by all students and its normally taken for one ... challenges in the learning and teaching of College algebra and in broad sense mathematics at university .... Keeps low profile.

  15. Teaching pathology via online digital microscopy: positive learning outcomes for rurally based medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivamalai, Sundram; Murthy, Shashidhar Venkatesh; Gupta, Tarun Sen; Woolley, Torres

    2011-02-01

    Technology has revolutionised teaching. Teaching pathology via digital microscopy (DM) is needed to overcome increasing student numbers, a shortage of pathology academics in regional medical schools, and difficulties with teaching students on rural clinical placement. To identify whether an online DM approach, combining digital pathology software, Web-based slides and classroom management software, delivers effective, practical pathology teaching sessions to medical students located both on campus and on rural placement. An online survey collected feedback from fourth and fifth year undergraduate James Cook University medical students on the importance of 16 listed benefits and challenges of using online DM to teach pathology, via a structured five-point Likert survey. Fifty-three students returned the survey (response rate = 33%). Benefits of online DM to teach pathology rated as 'very important' or 'extremely important' by over 50% of students included: higher quality images; faster learning; more convenient; better technology; everyone sees the same image; greater accessibility; helpful annotations on slides; cost savings; and more opportunity for self-paced learning out-of-hours and for collaborative learning in class. Challenges of online DM rated as 'very important' or 'extremely important' by over 50% of students included: Internet availability in more remote locations and potential problems using online technology during class. Nearly all medical students welcomed learning pathology via online digital technology. DM should improve the quantity, quality, cost and accessibility of pathology teaching by regional medical schools, and has significant implications for the growing emphasis in Australia for decentralised medical education and rural clinical placements. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  16. Amazingly resilient Indigenous people! Using transformative learning to facilitate positive student engagement with sensitive material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Debra; Power, Tamara; Sherwood, Juanita; Geia, Lynore

    2013-12-01

    If health professionals are to effectively contribute to improving the health of Indigenous people, understanding of the historical, political, and social disadvantage that has lead to health disparity is essential. This paper describes a teaching and learning experience in which four Australian Indigenous academics in collaboration with a non-Indigenous colleague delivered an intensive workshop for masters level post-graduate students. Drawing upon the paedagogy of Transformative Learning, the objectives of the day included facilitating students to explore their existing understandings of Indigenous people, the impact of ongoing colonisation, the diversity of Australia's Indigenous people, and developing respect for alternative worldviews. Drawing on a range of resources including personal stories, autobiography, film and interactive sessions, students were challenged intellectually and emotionally by the content. Students experienced the workshop as a significant educational event, and described feeling transformed by the content, better informed, more appreciative of other worldviews and Indigenous resilience and better equipped to contribute in a more meaningful way to improving the quality of health care for Indigenous people. Where this workshop differs from other Indigenous classes was in the involvement of an Indigenous teaching team. Rather than a lone academic who can often feel vulnerable teaching a large cohort of non-Indigenous students, an Indigenous teaching team reinforced Indigenous authority and created an emotionally and culturally safe space within which students were allowed to confront and explore difficult truths. Findings support the value of multiple teaching strategies underpinned by the theory of transformational learning, and the potential benefits of facilitating emotional as well as intellectual student engagement when presenting sensitive material.

  17. The Role of Positive Psychological Capital and the Family Function in Prediction of Happiness in high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F rashidi kochi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the role of positive psychological capital and family functioning in predicting happiness among adolescence. Correlational research method was recruited to analyze the data. The sample comprised of 290 high Scholl students that selected by the convenience sampling method. In this research Snyder’s hope, Nezami and Colleagues self-efficacy, Scheier and Carver's optimism, McMaster's family functioning and Connor and Davidson's Resiliency and Oxford happiness questionnaire used to collect data. Pearson correlation and stepwise regression were used to analyze data. The finding showed that there was a significant positive relationship between family function components and positive psychological capital with happiness. The results of stepwise regression showed that roles, Resiliency, self-efficacy, optimism and emotion expression had significant and important role in predicting happiness. Totally, explained 35% of the variance happiness. In conclusion, these findings indicate the importance roles of family and positive psychological capital in adolescence's happiness.

  18. Journeying to the White Coat Ceremony: A description of the people, situations and experiences that inform student visions of the physician they hope to become

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel MA Brown

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the experiences that influence entering medical students’ internal concepts of themselves as future physicians. During orientation to medical school, students were asked to write stories in response to the cue, “Tell a story about a person or experience that inspired you to consider a career of service in medicine.” Qualitative methodology was employed to analyze 190 student stories. Thematic analysis identified descriptive details about content and allowed comparison between the students’ and School’s expectations. Inspirational settings, contexts, and individuals were identified. Nine different inspirational events were described. Student and School expectations for the kinds of physicians they hoped to become were generally consistent. The study demonstrates that students do indeed bring to medical school visions of the kinds of physicians they hope to become. Linking that vision with medical school activities including the White Coat Ceremony provides a bridge between medical school and students’ earlier lives, thus explicitly linking orientation to professional formation.

  19. THE ANALYSIS OF SYNTACTICAL INTERFERENCE IN ENGLISH PHRASES IN STUDENTS’ WRITING (A Descriptive Study at the Second Grade Students of SMP 2 Kuta Baro, Aceh Besar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Chaira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative-descriptive research attempts to describe Indonesian interference in building English phrases in writing. The research was undertaken to the second year students of SMP 2 Kuta Baro, Aceh Besar. This study aims to verify the Indonesian interference made by students in English phrases. The data were collected through document analysis which then the sample was selected to be analyzed. The sample of this study was twelve narrative texts composed by the students. The finding of data analysis reveals that there are some syntactical interference samples made by them as in scenery roads, voice strange, morning Sunday, water bath, garden flower, and advice future. These are resulted from Indonesian interference because they applied Indonesian structure in building English phrases. In conclusion, the research result shows that the students have lack of grammar knowledge in constructing English phrases. Therefore, they borrow Indonesian structure as a solution for their difficulties. For this reason, the teaching should focus more on how to build English phrases correctly by giving many samples of nounʸ + nounˣ (where nounˣ means head and nounʸ means modifier pattern all well as explaining the rule in English as the target language they are learning. It hopes that they will not transfer the Indonesian pattern when they are writing in English.Keywords: interference, syntactical, phrases

  20. Predictors of a positive attitude of medical students towards general practice - a survey of three Bavarian medical faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Antonius; Karsch-Völk, Marlies; Rupp, Alica; Fischer, Martin R; Drexler, Hans; Schelling, Jörg; Berberat, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Germany is witnessing an increasing shortage of general practitioners (GPs). The aim was to determine predictors of the job-related motivation of medical students of three medical faculties with different institutionalisation of general practice as an academic discipline. Medical students were surveyed with a standardised questionnaire about their attitudes towards general practice and their motivation to work as a GP in different working conditions. Predictors for positive attitudes and motivation were calculated using logistic regression models. 940 (15.2%) out of 6182 medical students from three Bavarian medical faculties participated in an online survey. 585 (62.7%) were female, and the average age was 25.0 (standard deviation 3.7). The average grade of a university-entrance diploma was 1.6 (standard deviation 0.5). 718 (76.4%) could imagine working as a GP. However, they favoured being employed within another organisation and not having their own private practice (65.5% vs. 35.1%). "Presence of a professorship of general practice" was associated with a positive attitude towards general practice (OR 1.57; 95%CI 1.13-2.417). Motivation for working as a GP was associated with "being female" (OR 2.56; 95%CI 1.80-3.56) and "presence of a professorship of general practice" (OR 1.68; 95%CI 1.14-2.46). Having a lower grade for one's university-entrance diploma was associated with a higher preference to work in one's own practice (OR 1.39; 95%CI 1.02-1.90). A high amount of medical students were open-minded towards general practice. However, they favoured employment within an organization over working in their own practice. Institutionalisation of general practice as an academic discipline might be of importance to gain positive attitudes towards general practice and motivate medical students to work as a GP.

  1. Medical Students' Perception of Their Educational Environment and Quality of Life: Is There a Positive Association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Sylvia Claassen; Perotta, Bruno; Paro, Helena B; Gannam, Silmar; Peleias, Munique; Mayer, Fernanda Brenneisen; Santos, Itamar Souza; Menezes, Marta; Senger, Maria Helena; Barelli, Cristiane; Silveira, Paulo S P; Martins, Milton A; Zen Tempski, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    To assess perceptions of educational environment of students from 22 Brazilian medical schools and to study the association between these perceptions and quality of life (QoL) measures. The authors performed a multicenter study (August 2011 to August 2012), examining students' views both of (1) educational environment using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) and (2) QoL using the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment, abbreviated version (WHOQOL-BREF). They also examined students' self-assessment of their overall QoL and medical-school-related QoL (MSQoL). The authors classified participants' perceptions into four quartiles according to DREEM total score, overall QoL, and MSQoL. Of 1,650 randomly selected students, 1,350 (81.8%) completed the study. The mean total DREEM score was 119.4 (standard deviation = 27.1). Higher total DREEM scores were associated with higher overall QoL and MSQoL scores (P student QoL.

  2. Can memory training positively affect the skills of learning a foreign language and support learning English by older students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Kozak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment covered in this paper was conducted from November 2011 until February 2012 in the University of Third Age at the University of Wrocław in Poland as a part of the Third Age and New Technologies (TANT project which was realised as a Grundtvig partnership programme. The aim of the experiment was to determine whether memory training can positively affect learning a foreign language (English by senior students.

  3. Position statement: start middle and high schools at 8:30 am or later to promote student health and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevorrow, Tracy; Zhou, Eric S; Dietch, Jessica R; Gonzalez, Brian D

    2018-03-13

    The Society of Behavioral Medicine recommends school officials start middle and high school classes at 8:30 am or later. Such a schedule promotes students' sleep health, resulting in improvements in physical health, psychological well-being, attention and concentration, academic performance, and driving safety. In this position statement, we propose a four-tiered approach to promote later school start times for middle and high schools.

  4. The association between Colombian medical students' healthy personal habits and a positive attitude toward preventive counseling: cross-sectional analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperly, John; Lobelo, Felipe; Segura, Carolina; Sarmiento, Francisco; Herrera, Deisy; Sarmiento, Olga L; Frank, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Background Physician-delivered preventive counseling is important for the prevention and management of chronic diseases. Data from the U.S. indicates that medical students with healthy personal habits have a better attitude towards preventive counseling. However, this association and its correlates have not been addressed in rapidly urbanized settings where chronic disease prevention strategies constitute a top public health priority. This study examines the association between personal health practices and attitudes toward preventive counseling among first and fifth-year students from 8 medical schools in Bogotá, Colombia. Methods During 2006, a total of 661 first- and fifth-year medical students completed a culturally adapted Spanish version of the "Healthy Doctor = Healthy Patient" survey (response rate = 78%). Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between overall personal practices on physical activity, nutrition, weight control, smoking, alcohol use (main exposure variable) and student attitudes toward preventive counseling on these issues (main outcome variable), stratified by year of training and adjusting by gender and medical training-related factors (basic knowledge, perceived adequacy of training and perception of the school's promotion on each healthy habit). Results The median age and percentage of females for the first- and fifth-year students were 21 years and 59.5% and 25 years and 65%, respectively. After controlling for gender and medical training-related factors, consumption of ≥ 5 daily servings of fruits and/or vegetables, not being a smoker or binge drinker were associated with a positive attitude toward counseling on nutrition (OR = 4.71; CI = 1.6–14.1; p = 0.006 smoking (OR = 2.62; CI = 1.1–5.9; p = 0.022), and alcohol consumption (OR = 2.61; CI = 1.3–5.4; p = 0.009), respectively. Conclusion As for U.S. physician and medical students, a positive association was found between the personal health habits of

  5. First Year University Students' Use of Formulaic Sequences in Oral and Written Descriptions (El uso de secuencias formulaicas de estudiantes de primer año en descripciones orales y escritas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Burgos, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The present article investigates the use of first year university students' formulaic sequences in written and oral texts in an English as a foreign language context. The corpus of the study consists of eight descriptive texts--four written and four oral--which were composed of four students of English Pedagogy at a university in Santiago, Chile.…

  6. Nepalese dental hygiene and dental students' career choice motivation and plans after graduation: a descriptive cross-sectional comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knevel, Ron J M; Gussy, Mark G; Farmer, Jane; Karimi, Leila

    2015-12-11

    This is the first study of its kind to provide data regarding the self-reported career choice motivation and intentions after graduation of dental and dental hygiene students in Nepal. The findings of this study can be used to inform future oral health workforce planning in Nepal. A cross-sectional survey of dentistry and dental hygiene students attending a large accredited dental college in Kathmandu, Nepal. Quantitative data were analysed using IBM® SPSS® 22. The respondents were given the opportunity to provide clarifying comments to some of the questions. Two hundred questionnaires were distributed, and 171 students completed the anonymous survey (response rate 86 %). Working in health care and serving the community were the most important initial motives for career choice, with significantly more dentistry students selecting their degree course because of the possibility to work flexible working hours (p work in rural areas after study. Most common preferred locations to live after graduation are urban (33 %) or abroad (38 %). Data suggest a preference to combine working in a hospital with working in their own practice (44 %) while interest in solely working in their own practice is low (work.

  7. A Descriptive Study: Parental Opinion and Teacher-Student Perceptions Regarding Parents' Involvement in Their Children's Education and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Maria A.; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    Using surveys and data from the Dallas Public School District (Texas), this study examined the perceptions of parents, students, and teachers about parents' involvement in their children's education and development. In addition, academic achievement at the two study schools was examined. At one school (School A), 63 of 100 parents surveyed…

  8. A Descriptive Study of Multicultural Elementary Student Playground Behaviors and Their Relationship to Gender, Age, Race and Socioeconomic Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmes, Victoria M.

    This paper examines the observable play behaviors of elementary school students to determine how children interact within and among cultural groups. Observations were conducted during the recess period at an urban elementary school attended by 623 boys and girls age 6 through 12. Recess periods and play areas were segregated by grade and sex. Data…

  9. A Descriptive-Comparative Analysis of Apology Strategies: The Case of Iranian EFL and Malaysian ESL University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farashaiyan, Atieh; Amirkhiz, Seyed Yasin Yazdi

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that was carried out to describe and compare the apology strategies utilized by Iranian EFL and Malaysian ESL learners in confronting identical apology situations. For this purpose, data were elicited from 15 Iranian and 15 Malaysian students through a "Discourse completion tasks" questionnaire. The…

  10. Do High-Ability Students Disidentify with Science? A Descriptive Study of U.S. Ninth Graders in 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lori; Chen, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes science expectancy-value motivation classes within a nationally representative sample of students who were U.S. ninth graders in 2009. An expectancy-value model was the basis for science-specific profile indicators (self-efficacy, attainment value, utility value, interest-enjoyment value). Using exploratory latent class…

  11. Predicting College Students' Positive Psychology Associated Traits with Executive Functioning Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Seth

    2016-01-01

    More research is needed that investigates how positive psychology-associated traits are predicted by neurocognitive processes. Correspondingly, the purpose of this study was to ascertain how, and to what extent, four traits, namely, grit, optimism, positive affect, and life satisfaction were predicted by the executive functioning (EF) dimensions…

  12. College students' perceptions of sexual orientation and gender given job descriptions and titles for interior decoration, interior design, and architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood-Nartker, B Jeanneane; Sepanski, Jungsywan; McCrady, Joe; Gligor, Andreea

    2007-06-01

    To examine perceptions of design professionals, this study was designed to examine possible gender-bias based on job title and description and whether there is a relationship between the two perceptions. A respondent's sex was significantly related to perceptions of a design professional's sex. Both respondents' sex and the perceived sex of the design professional had significant effects on the perceived sexual orientation of the design professionals. Furthermore, the results also indicated that if the design professional was perceived to be male, there was a higher tendency that he would be perceived as homosexual, especially by a male respondent.

  13. Academic Procrastination among College Students with Learning Disabilities: The Role of Positive and Negative Self-Oriented Perfectionism in Terms of Gender, Specialty and Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Adel Abdulla; Sherit, Asharaf Mohammed A.; Eissa, Mourad Ali; Mostafa, Amaal Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was three folds: to explore whether there were relationship between academic procrastination and positive and negative self-oriented perfectionism of college students with learning disabilities, the extent to which positive and negative self-oriented perfectionism of college students with learning disabilities predicts…

  14. vol 6. no. 1 2015 strategies for promoting positive lecturer-student

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frederick Iraki

    The purpose of this study is three fold namely: effective teaching, the role played ... A lecturer is expected to encourage quality interactions with the students and should ... involves scaffolding of knowledge from basic to more complex and quality of ... Teacher self-reports (self-evaluation) may not be a trustworthy measure of.

  15. Classroom Guitar and Students with Visual Impairments: A Positive Approach to Music Learning and Artistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, a collaborative effort began between the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI) and Austin Classical Guitar (ACG), a local 501(c) nonprofit music organization. The idea behind this collaboration was to start a small guitar program that would provide TSBVI students with quality classroom guitar instruction. At that time,…

  16. The Racialization of Arab Panethnic Identity: Exploring Students' Ingroup and Outgroup Social Positionings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Islamophobia has become increasingly evident in the sociocultural landscape of the United States. The current political climate which centers on the influx of refugees and concerns of extremists has in effect othered individuals of Arab ancestry as a bounded group. Arab students represent a heterogeneous group of individuals, encompassing a…

  17. Positive Psychology Factors as Predictors of Latina/o College Students' Psychological Grit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Javier Cavazos; Smith, Wayne D.; Whittenberg, James F.; Guardiola, Rebekah; Savage, Miranda

    2018-01-01

    Latina/o college students (N = 130) provided perceptions of psychological grit, presence of meaning in life, search for meaning in life, hope, life satisfaction, and mindfulness. Hope and mindfulness were significant predictors of psychological grit. A discussion regarding the importance of these findings and implications for counselors are…

  18. Positive Youth Development and Nutrition: Interdisciplinary Strategies to Enhance Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Oliver W.; Cheeley, Taylor

    2016-01-01

    Educational policies require the use of data and progress monitoring frameworks to guide instruction and intervention in schools. As a result, different problem-solving models such as multitiered systems of supports (MTSS) have emerged that use these frameworks to improve student outcomes. However, problem-focused models emphasize negative…

  19. Applying Challenge-Based Learning in the (Feminist) Communication Classroom: Positioning Students as Knowledgeable Change Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruger, Katherine M.

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the potential of challenge-based learning (CBL) for feminist pedagogy. In a qualitative case study of an introductory mass communication and social theory course, students were more likely to indicate sophisticated, intersectional understandings of course concepts following the CBL project. Before the CBL project, students…

  20. Obscuring Power Structures in the Physics Classroom: Linking Teacher Positioning, Student Engagement, and Physics Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Cass, Cheryl; Beattie, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In the process of reforming physics education over the last several decades, a tension has developed between engaging students with the content in more conceptually challenging ways and helping them identify with physics so they are personally motivated in their learning. Through comparative case studies of four high school physics teachers, we…

  1. Distraction by smartphone use during clinical practice and opinions about smartphone restriction policies: A cross-sectional descriptive study of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sumi; Lee, Eunjoo

    2016-05-01

    Smartphone use in healthcare settings may distract healthcare providers and disrupt patient care. Moreover, it may lead to adverse events, thereby threatening patient safety. This study assessed nursing students' smartphone use as a source of distraction in clinical practice and identified their opinions about policies restricting smartphone use during patient care. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used with convenience sampling. Third-year nursing students (n=312) from two nursing schools in the Republic of Korea completed the survey in 2012. A self-report questionnaire-based on addiction theories for problem behaviors and literature on the distraction caused by cellular phone use-was used to assess smartphone use, experiences of distraction caused by smartphone use, and opinions about restriction policies on smartphone use during clinical practice. Nearly half (46.2%) of the nursing students used smartphones at least sometimes during clinical practice and about a quarter of the respondents (24.7%) were at least sometimes distracted by smartphones during clinical practice. The majority of the respondents (83.7%) had witnessed nurses using smartphones at least sometimes during their work. A few respondents (15.7%) agreed or strongly agreed with the policy for restricting smartphone use in hospitals. Students who used smartphones more often tended to disagree with restriction policies for smartphone use in hospitals. Awareness about the risks of smartphone use, especially regarding patient safety, is necessary for nursing students in school and hospital settings. Educators and faculty of nursing schools need to develop policies that encourage intelligent and safe use of smartphones during clinical practice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. A descriptive, cross-sectional study of medical student preferences for vodcast design, format and pedagogical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Robin K; Kinney, Marjorie; McCoy, Lise

    2017-05-19

    Vodcasts (video podcasts) are becoming increasingly popular in medical education. At A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (ATSU SOMA), vodcasts are an essential component of our blended learning environment, where year 2-4 students train in a contextual setting at community health centers across the U.S. Vodcasts are used far less frequently in our year 1 residential learning environment at the main campus in Arizona, but we are considering moving to significantly more interactive educational experiences with on-demand videos followed by in-class activities. The aim of this study was to determine stakeholder (i.e. medical student) preferences for vodcast design, format, and pedagogical strategies. The overall goal was to increase opportunities for students to learn with this modality. An interactive Qualtrics™ survey was administered to three cohorts of medical students. The survey generated quantitative and open-ended response data that addressed principles of vodcast instructional design and learning. Responses to survey items were analyzed for statistical significance using the independent samples t-test for interval data, the chi-square test for categorical data, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for ordinal data, using the post-hoc Bonferroni procedure to determine the appropriate α level. Responses to open-ended prompts were categorized using open- and axial-coding. The most highly valued vodcast attributes, considered essential by all three cohorts, were clear explanations, organization, conciseness, high-yield for medical board exams, and the ability to speed vodcasts up. The least helpful vodcast attributes for all three cohorts were music and objects moving on screen. The average preferred vodcast length for each cohort was 27-28 min. There were significant differences between the less experienced learners in the residential setting and the more mature learners in the blended learning environment regarding certain vodcast

  3. Nursing students' evaluation of a new feedback and reflection tool for use in high-fidelity simulation - Formative assessment of clinical skills. A descriptive quantitative research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Elisabeth; Plathe, Hilde Syvertsen; Eide, Hilde

    2017-11-01

    Clinical skills training is an important part of nurses' education programmes. Clinical skills are complex. A common understanding of what characterizes clinical skills and learning outcomes needs to be established. The aim of the study was to develop and evaluate a new reflection and feedback tool for formative assessment. The study has a descriptive quantitative design. 129 students participated who were at the end of the first year of a Bachelor degree in nursing. After highfidelity simulation, data were collected using a questionnaire with 19 closed-ended and 2 open-ended questions. The tool stimulated peer assessment, and enabled students to be more thorough in what to assess as an observer in clinical skills. The tool provided a structure for selfassessment and made visible items that are important to be aware of in clinical skills. This article adds to simulation literature and provides a tool that is useful in enhancing peer learning, which is essential for nurses in practice. The tool has potential for enabling students to learn about reflection and developing skills for guiding others in practice after they have graduated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sleep hygiene and sleep quality as predictors of positive and negative dimensions of mental health in college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Peach

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available College students are one of the top at-risk groups for chronic sleep loss and poor sleep quality, which can yield deleterious effects on health. The college population is also notorious for poor sleep hygiene, or modifiable behaviors that promote sufficient sleep quantity and quality. Research suggests sleep can impact both positive and negative aspects of college mental health, but few studies have examined the effects of sleep on both subjective well-being and depression within one model. Further, little research has tested sleep hygiene as a modifiable risk factor for positive and mental aspects of health. The present study tested structural equation models in which sleep quality either partially or fully mediated the effects of sleep hygiene behaviors on depression and poor subjective well-being. A partial mediation model (CFI = .98, TLI = .94, RMSEA = .08 suggested a very good-fitting model, and sleep hygiene yielded significant direct and indirect effects on both depression and subjective well-being. Findings suggest intervention efforts targeting the improvement of sleep hygiene and sleep quality among college students may yield effects on student well-being, which can improve mental health among this at-risk population.

  5. Descriptive Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Descriptive research is described by Lathom-Radocy and Radocy (1995) to include Survey research, ex post facto research, case studies and developmental studies. Descriptive research also includes a review of the literature in order to provide both quantitative and qualitative evidence of the effect...... starts will allow effect size calculations to be made in order to evaluate effect over time. Given the difficulties in undertaking controlled experimental studies in the creative arts therapies, descriptive research methods offer a way of quantifying effect through descriptive statistical analysis...

  6. Description of 15 DNA-positive and antibody-negative "window-period" blood donations identified during prospective screening for Babesia microti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Erin D; Tonnetti, Laura; Hewins, Mary Ellen; Berardi, Victor P; Dodd, Roger Y; Stramer, Susan L

    2017-07-01

    Blood donation screening detecting only antibodies fails to identify donors in the earliest stage of infection, before a detectable immunologic response, that is, the "window period" (WP). We present data on WP donations identified during prospective screening for Babesia microti, a transfusion-transmissible parasite of increasing concern in the United States. Blood donations collected in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Wisconsin were screened using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and arrayed fluorescence immunoassay (AFIA) to detect B. microti DNA and antibodies, respectively. Parasite loads were estimated using quantitative PCR. Red blood cell (RBC) samples were inoculated into hamsters to assess infectivity. Donors screening reactive were indefinitely deferred, tested by supplemental methods, and followed to assess DNA and antibody clearance. Demographic data from WP donors (i.e., those screening PCR positive and AFIA negative) were compared to data from other positive donors. Of 220,479 donations screened from June 2012 to August 2016, a total of 700 were positive, of which 15 (2% of positive donations or 1 per 14,699 screened donations) were confirmed WP donations. The median estimated parasite load in WP donations was 350 parasites/mL, no different than AFIA-positive and PCR-positive donors. Parasite loads in RBC samples from WP units ranged from 14 to 11,022 parasites/mL; RBC samples from three of 10 (30%) WP donations infected hamsters. The mean age of WP donors was 48 years (range, 17-75 years); three (20%) were female. WP donor demographics did not differ significantly from demographics of other donors. We report one per 15,000 B. microti WP infections in blood donors in endemic areas, demonstrating the importance of nucleic acid testing to mitigate the risk of transfusion-transmitted babesiosis. © 2017 AABB.

  7. The Implementation of Virtual Instruction in Relation to X-ray Anatomy and Positioning in a Chiropractic Degree Program: A Descriptive Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Perry O; Boone, William R

    2009-01-01

    This article provides information regarding the introduction of virtual education into classroom instruction, wherein a method of classroom instruction was developed with the use of a computer, digital camera, and various software programs. This approach simplified testing procedures, thus reducing institutional costs substantially by easing the demand for manpower, and seemed to improve average grade performance. Organized files with hundreds of digital pictures have created a range of instructor resources. Much of the new course materials were organized onto compact disks to complement course notes. Customizing presentations with digital technology holds potential benefits for students, instructors and the institution.

  8. Transitions in the Swedish school system and the impact on student's positive self-reported-health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmström, Malin Rising; Olofsson, Niclas; Asplund, Kenneth; Kristiansen, Lisbeth

    2014-10-07

    To explore three school based transitions and their impact on positive self-reported-health (SRH), pre-school to elementary school (6-10 y), elementary school to junior high school (10-13 y), and junior high school to upper secondary school/high school (13-16 y), in a long-term longitudinal population based study. The study followed three cohorts through one school transition each. A longitudinal study with data from 6693 Health Dialogue questionnaires were used. Data were collected in the middle of Sweden during 2007-2012 with school children age 6-16 years old. Several significant factors were identified with an impact for a positive self-reported-health among children age 6-16 y; not feeling sad or depressed, afraid or worried, positive school environment (schoolyard and restrooms), not bullied, good sleep, daily physical activity and ability to concentrate. There was no single factor identified, the factors differed according to gender and age. The study have identified several gender and age specific factors for successful school transitions relevant for a positive SRH. This is valuable information for school staff, parents and school children and provides a possibility to provide support and assistance when needed.

  9. Positive and negative metacognitions about alcohol use among university students: Psychometric properties of the PAMS and NAMS French versions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierski, Fabien; Spada, Marcantonio M; Fois, Eveline; Picard, Aurélie; Naassila, Mickaël; Van der Linden, Martial

    2015-08-01

    Metacognitions about the positive and negative effects of alcohol use have been associated with various patterns of drinking. The aim of the present study was to validate French versions of the Positive Alcohol Metacognitions Scale (PAMS) and the Negative Alcohol Metacognitions Scale (NAMS) developed by Spada and Wells (2008, Addict. Behav. 33, 515) and to investigate the relationship between metacognitions and patterns of alcohol use among university students. Responses of 1600 university students who participated in an internet survey-based study on alcohol use were submitted to confirmatory (N=800, mean age 20.40 years, 45.50% male) and exploratory (N=800, mean age 20.34 years, 45.38% male) factor analyses in two separate samples. Alcohol use, binge drinking and mood were also assessed. In line with the original versions of the scales, results provided support for a two-factor structure of the French PAMS and NAMS. Both scales revealed adequate internal reliability. Good temporal stability was found for the two factors of the NAMS, whereas one factor of the PAMS showed weakness across time. Predictive validity revealed that negative alcohol metacognitions about the uncontrollability of alcohol use were found to be consistently associated with alcohol use and binge drinking, whereas positive metacognitions about alcohol use were found to be differentially associated with alcohol use and binge drinking. The French versions of the PAMS and NAMS exhibited suitable psychometric properties. This study also emphasized the role of metacognitions about alcohol use in drinking behaviour among university students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluating a Gender Diversity Workshop to Promote Positive Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, James; Lucassen, Mathijs F. G.; Hamilton, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on data from an Aotearoa/New Zealand study of more than 230 secondary students, this article evaluates the potential of a 60-min gender diversity workshop to address bullying and promote positive environments for learning. Students completed pre- and postworkshop questionnaires. The authors used descriptive statistics to summarize results…

  11. A descriptive survey investigating pre-registration student nurses' perceptions of clinical skill development in clinical placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stayt, Louise C; Merriman, Clair

    2013-04-01

    Clinical skill development is essential to nurse education. Clinical skills are frequently taught in higher education institutions using clinical simulation. It is unclear if clinical skills are subsequently consolidated and developed in clinical placements. The aim of this survey was to evaluate pre-registration student nurses perceptions of the frequency of opportunities to practise, the level of supervision and assessment of, clinical skills in their clinical placements. This was a cross-sectional survey design using an online, self-report questionnaire including a Likert-type scale and open ended comments. Four hundred and twenty one students, from all year groups, from a university in the south of England on a wide variety of clinical placements participated. Participants evaluated the frequency of opportunity to practise, level of supervision and assessment of and feedback on performance of specific clinical skills. Clinical skills evaluated were measurement of vital signs, aseptic non-touch technique, assisting with eating and drinking, and assisting with comfort and hygiene. Data were analysed utilising Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 19. The frequency of opportunities to practise skills in clinical placement was variable with some participants reporting that they never had opportunity to practise essential skills. Similarly the level of supervision and assessment was also inconsistent suggesting that participants frequently practised clinical skills unsupervised without being assessed as competent. Inconsistencies in clinical skill development may lead to graduates who are not work ready and as a result, insufficient clinical competence potentially leads to unsafe practice and poor patient care. This calls for stronger partnerships between educators and clinical areas and the prioritisation of mentor preparation and education as well as organisational support in terms of mentor workload planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. What factors influence the choice of urban or rural location for future practice of Nepalese medical students? A cross-sectional descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Bhim Prasad; Amatya, Archana

    2015-11-10

    Nepal is experiencing a public health issue similar to the rest of the world, i.e., the geographical maldistribution of physicians. Although there is some documentation about the reasons physicians elect to leave Nepal to work abroad, very little is known about the salient factors that influence the choice of an urban versus rural practice setting for those physicians who do not migrate. In recent years, around 1000 medical students became doctors within Nepal, but their distribution in rural locations is not adequate. The purpose of this study was to explore what factors influence the choice of urban or rural location for the future clinical practice of Nepalese medical students in the final year of their program A cross-sectional descriptive study design was used for this study involving Nepalese medical students in their final year of study and currently doing an internship in a medical college. The sample consisted of 393 medical students from four medical colleges in Nepal that were selected randomly. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. To determine the association with rural location choice for their future practice setting, a comparison was done that involved demographic, socio-economic, and educational factors. Data were entered in EpiData and analyzed by using SPSS version 16. Among the 393 respondents, two thirds were male (66.9%) and more than half were below 25 years of age. Almost all (93%) respondents were single and about two thirds (63.4%) were of Brahmin and Chhetri ethnic origin. About two thirds (64.1%) of the respondents were born in a rural setting, and 58.8% and 53.3% had a place of rearing and permanent address in a rural location, respectively. The predictors of future rural location choice for their clinical practice (based on the bivariate analysis) included: (a) Rural (versus urban) place of birth, place of rearing, and permanent address (b) Source of family income (service, business, and agriculture

  13. Low self-esteem and positive beliefs about smoking: a destructive combination for male college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Willie J; Perrotte, Jessica K; Baumann, Michael R; Garza, Raymond T

    2015-07-01

    Men exhibit higher rates of smoking relative to women (CDC, 2014). Given the associated health and socio-economic consequences, it would be valuable to explore the psychological factors underlying this variance. We contend that positive beliefs about smoking influence this difference, and that self-esteem moderates these beliefs. As part of a multi-institutional collaborative study funded by the American Legacy Foundation, 445 participants who reported being either steady or occasional smokers completed a series of questionnaires assessing their beliefs and behaviors involving smoking as well as several dispositional variables. Moderated mediation was used to test for conditional indirect effects. The total, indirect, and direct effects of gender were significant for individuals with lower, but not higher self-esteem. Males with lower self-esteem exhibited more positive beliefs and smoking behavior than females with lower self-esteem. No differences between males and females with higher self-esteem were observed. The gender gap in smoking behavior appears to occur primarily among individuals with lower self-esteem. It is a particularly detrimental risk factor for males, as it is related to higher positive views about smoking and increased tobacco consumption. These results highlight the importance of developing multifaceted gender specific belief-based preventative interventions to address smoking related behaviors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Educational and individual factors associated with positive change in and reaffirmation of medical students' intention to practice in underserved areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscardin, Christy K; Grbic, Douglas; Grumbach, Kevin; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2014-11-01

    The projected U.S. physician shortage will disproportionately affect underserved areas. This study examined the impact of medical school educational experiences on positive changes in and reaffirmation of students' intention to practice in underserved areas (practice intention). Medical students (n = 7,361) from 113 U.S. MD-granting medical schools who graduated in 2009-2010 and responded to both the Association of American Medical Colleges' 2006 Matriculating Student Questionnaire and 2010 Graduation Questionnaire were included. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine factors associated with change in and reaffirmation of practice intention. After controlling for individual characteristics, community health field experience (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.18, 1.57), learning another language (OR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.22, 1.63), cultural competence/awareness experience (OR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.21, 1.58), becoming more aware of perspectives of individuals from different backgrounds (OR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.48), and attending schools with higher social mission scores (OR: 1.66; 95% CI: 1.28, 2.16) were all significantly associated with positive changes in practice intention from matriculation to graduation. Field experience in community health (OR: 1.24; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.53), learning another language (OR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.65), and attending schools with higher social mission scores (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.09, 2.43) were all significantly associated with reaffirmation of practice intention at graduation. Multifaceted factors are associated with practice intention. This study suggests medical schools can play active roles in alleviating the physician shortage in underserved areas through targeted curricular interventions and recruitment.

  15. The Relationship of Level of Positive Mental Health with Current Mental Disorders in Predicting Suicidal Behavior and Academic Impairment in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Corey L. M.; Eisenberg, Daniel; Perry, Geraldine S.; Dube, Shanta R.; Kroenke, Kurt; Dhingra, Satvinder S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether level of positive mental health complements mental illness in predicting students at risk for suicidal behavior and impaired academic performance. Participants: A sample of 5,689 college students participated in the 2007 Healthy Minds Study and completed an Internet survey that included the Mental Health…

  16. The Effects of College Students' Positive Thinking, Learning Motivation and Self-Regulation through a Self-Reflection Intervention in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin-Hui; Chen, Hsiang-Ting; Lin, Huann-Shyang; Hong, Zuway-R

    2017-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study examined the effects of a self-reflection intervention on college (college in this article refers to university-level education) students' positive thinking, learning motivation and self-regulation in Taiwan. One hundred and two college students were selected to participate in an 18-week intervention forming the…

  17. [Renal denervation for the treatment of resistant hypertension: definition, patient selection and description of the procedure. 2012 Position paper of the Italian Society of Hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Massimo; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Ambrosioni, Ettore; Cottone, Santina; Cuspidi, Cesare; Borghi, Claudio; De Luca, Nicola; Fallo, Francesco; Ferri, Claudio; Mancia, Giuseppe; Morganti, Alberto; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Sarzani, Riccardo; Sechi, Leonardo; Tocci, Giuliano; Virdis, Agostino

    2012-12-01

    Hypertension is responsible for a relevant burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although several appropriate and integrated pharmacological strategies are available, blood pressure control still remains largely unsatisfactory. Failure to achieve effective blood pressure control in treated hypertensive patients may have a substantial impact on overall cardiovascular risk, since it significantly increases the risk of both macrovascular and microvascular complications. Hypertension is arbitrarily defined as "resistant" or "refractory" when recommended blood pressure goals (clinic blood pressure hypertension has recently become available. Renal sympathetic denervation is a minimally invasive procedure performed via femoral access that uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to disable renal sympathetic afferent and efferent nerves. It results in isolation of renal parenchymal and juxtaglomerular cells from the abnormal enhancement of renal adrenergic nerve activity. The present position paper of the Italian Society of Hypertension provides a diagnostic and therapeutic approach to the early identification and effective clinical management of patients with resistant hypertension, who may be candidates for renal denervation. These indications may have important implications not only from a clinical viewpoint but also from an economic perspective. The accurate identification of patients with resistant hypertension and the appropriate selection of patients eligible for this procedure may help improve blood pressure control and reduce the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications in these patients.

  18. Prediction of postural risk of fall initiation based on a two-variable description of body dynamics: position and velocity of center of mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Mohammad Hadi; Nakashima, Motomu

    2013-10-01

    This research addresses the question: what is the risk of fall initiation at a certain human posture? There are postures from which no one is able to keep their balance and a fall will surely initiate (risk=1), and others from which everyone may regain their stability (risk=0). In other postures, only a portion of people can control their stability. One may interpret risk to chance of a fall to be initiated, and based on the portion of fallers assign a risk value to a given human posture (postural risk). Human posture can be mapped to a point in a 2-dimensional space: the x-v plane, the axes of which are horizontal components of the position and velocity of the center of mass of the body. For every pair of (x, v), the outcome of the balance recovery problem defines whether a person with a given strength level is able to regain their stability when released from a posture corresponding to that point. Using strength distribution data, we estimated the portion of the population who will initiate a fall if starting at a certain posture. A fast calculation approach is also introduced to replace the time-consuming method of solving the recovery problem many times. Postural risk of fall initiation for situations expressed by (x, v) pairs for the entire x-v plane is calculated and shown in a color-map. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Time trends in the thesis work by post-graduate students of Community Medicine: A record based descriptive study of 40 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Nagargoje

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thesis work conducted by post-graduate students of Community Medicine is critically appraised by not only their examiners but also by many other public health experts and researchers. Issues related to the repetition of work and quality of thesis work is raised by various authors. Objective: To assess the time trend in the thesis work done by post-graduate students of Community Medicine. Material and methods: This is a record based descriptive observational study conducted in the department of Community Medicine of S. N. Medical College, Agra (Uttar Pradesh. Data from all the 66 theses which were submitted by the Post Graduate students of our department till date was collected and assessed systematically. Result: Most preferred areas of research were MCH/Family Planning (28.79% and Programme/Service evaluation (22.73%. 77.27% of theses were community based, 36.37% were done exclusively in a rural area, 24.24% of theses had children/adolescent as their study subjects and 28.79% were conducted exclusively among females. A knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP or Knowledge, attitude, behavior and practice (KABP study was part of many theses but exclusive KAP/KABP study was done only in 12.12% of theses. A purposive or convenience sampling was done in only 18.33% of theses, 86.67% were cross-sectional in design and median sample size was 450 participants per thesis. In comparison to the theses done upto the year 2000, theses thereafter were more often based in an urban area and less often done in an exclusive rural area (p=0.0003 and all KAP/KABP studies were done after the year 2000 (p=0.004. Conclusion: There is no repetition or excessive use of KAP/KABP studies in the theses done by post-graduate students of the department of Community Medicine, S. N. Medical College, Agra

  20. The positive impact of interprofessional education: a controlled trial to evaluate a programme for health professional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, Ben; Coleman, Karen; McKinlay, Eileen; Donovan, Sarah; Beckingsale, Louise; Gray, Ben; Neser, Hazel; Perry, Meredith; Stanley, James; Pullon, Sue

    2015-06-04

    Collaborative interprofessional practice is an important means of providing effective care to people with complex health problems. Interprofessional education (IPE) is assumed to enhance interprofessional practice despite challenges to demonstrate its efficacy. This study evaluated whether an IPE programme changed students' attitudes to interprofessional teams and interprofessional learning, students' self-reported effectiveness as a team member, and students' perceived ability to manage long-term conditions. A prospective controlled trial evaluated an eleven-hour IPE programme focused on long-term conditions' management. Pre-registration students from the disciplines of dietetics (n = 9), medicine (n = 36), physiotherapy (n = 12), and radiation therapy (n = 26) were allocated to either an intervention group (n = 41) who received the IPE program or a control group (n = 42) who continued with their usual discipline specific curriculum. Outcome measures were the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale (ATHCTS), Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS), the Team Skills Scale (TSS), and the Long-Term Condition Management Scale (LTCMS). Analysis of covariance compared mean post-intervention scale scores adjusted for baseline scores. Mean post-intervention attitude scores (all on a five-point scale) were significantly higher in the intervention group than the control group for all scales. The mean difference for the ATHCTS was 0.17 (95 %CI 0.05 to 0.30; p = 0.006), for the RIPLS was 0.30 (95 %CI 0.16 to 0.43; p < 0.001), for the TSS was 0.71 (95 %CI 0.49 to 0.92; p < 0.001), and for the LTCMS was 0.75 (95 %CI 0.56 to 0.94; p < 0.001). The mean effect of the intervention was similar for students from the two larger disciplinary sub-groups of medicine and radiation therapy. An eleven-hour IPE programme resulted in improved attitudes towards interprofessional teams and interprofessional learning, as well as self

  1. Descriptive statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, Todd G

    2007-01-01

    Statistics is defined by the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) thesaurus as the science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The two broad categories of summarizing and analyzing data are referred to as descriptive and inferential statistics. This chapter considers the science and art of summarizing data where descriptive statistics and graphics are used to display data. In this chapter, we discuss the fundamentals of descriptive statistics, including describing qualitative and quantitative variables. For describing quantitative variables, measures of location and spread, for example the standard deviation, are presented along with graphical presentations. We also discuss distributions of statistics, for example the variance, as well as the use of transformations. The concepts in this chapter are useful for uncovering patterns within the data and for effectively presenting the results of a project.

  2. A cross-sectional examination of psychological distress, positive mental health and their predictors in medical students in their clinical clerkships

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    Inge van Dijk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical students can experience the transition from theory to clinical clerkships as stressful. Scientific literature on the mental health of clinical clerkship students is scarce and mental health is usually defined as absence of psychological distress without assessing psychological, emotional and social wellbeing, together called ‘positive mental health’. This cross-sectional study examines the prevalence of psychological distress and positive mental health and explores possible predictors in a Dutch sample of clinical clerkship students. Methods Fourth-year medical students in their first year of clinical clerkships were invited to complete an online questionnaire assessing demographics, psychological distress (Brief Symptom Inventory, positive mental health (Mental Health Continuum- SF, dysfunctional cognitions (Irrational Beliefs Inventory and dispositional mindfulness skills (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to explore relationships between psychological distress, positive mental health (dependent variables and demographics, dysfunctional cognitions and dispositional mindfulness skills (predictors. Results Of 454 eligible students, 406 (89% completed the assessment of whom 21% scored in the clinical range of psychological distress and 41% reported a flourishing mental health. These proportions partially overlap each other. Female students reported a significantly higher mean level of psychological distress than males. In the regression analysis the strongest predictors of psychological distress were ‘acting with awareness’ (negative and ‘worrying’ (positive. Strongest predictors of positive mental health were ‘problem avoidance’ (negative and ‘emotional irresponsibility’ (negative. Conclusions The prevalence of psychopathology in our sample of Dutch clinical clerkship students is slightly higher than in the general population. Our results support

  3. A cross-sectional examination of psychological distress, positive mental health and their predictors in medical students in their clinical clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Inge; Lucassen, Peter L B J; van Weel, Chris; Speckens, Anne E M

    2017-11-17

    Medical students can experience the transition from theory to clinical clerkships as stressful. Scientific literature on the mental health of clinical clerkship students is scarce and mental health is usually defined as absence of psychological distress without assessing psychological, emotional and social wellbeing, together called 'positive mental health'. This cross-sectional study examines the prevalence of psychological distress and positive mental health and explores possible predictors in a Dutch sample of clinical clerkship students. Fourth-year medical students in their first year of clinical clerkships were invited to complete an online questionnaire assessing demographics, psychological distress (Brief Symptom Inventory), positive mental health (Mental Health Continuum- SF), dysfunctional cognitions (Irrational Beliefs Inventory) and dispositional mindfulness skills (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to explore relationships between psychological distress, positive mental health (dependent variables) and demographics, dysfunctional cognitions and dispositional mindfulness skills (predictors). Of 454 eligible students, 406 (89%) completed the assessment of whom 21% scored in the clinical range of psychological distress and 41% reported a flourishing mental health. These proportions partially overlap each other. Female students reported a significantly higher mean level of psychological distress than males. In the regression analysis the strongest predictors of psychological distress were 'acting with awareness' (negative) and 'worrying' (positive). Strongest predictors of positive mental health were 'problem avoidance' (negative) and 'emotional irresponsibility' (negative). The prevalence of psychopathology in our sample of Dutch clinical clerkship students is slightly higher than in the general population. Our results support conclusions of previous research that psychological distress and positive mental

  4. The Position of a Teacher as a Factor of Forming Students' Socio-Cultural Identities (On the Example of the Russian Civil Identity)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakurova, Marina V.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents experience of structuring and description of teachers' position in the process of forming socio-cultural identity of the person, detailed in regard to the process of formation of one of the subtypes of socio-cultural identity--Russian civil identity. We identified and described real subjective, nominally subjective and…

  5. TEACHING DESCRIPTIVE READING BY USING SURVEY, QUESTION, READ, WRITE AND (SQRW STRATEGY TO THE TENTH GRADE STUDENTS OF SMA MUHAMMADIYAH 1 PALEMBANG

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    marlen rahmawati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to find out whether or not there is a significant improvement before and after the treatment on the tenth grade students’ reading comprehension scores of SMA Muhammadiyah 1 Palembang by using SQRW strategy and to find out whether or not there is a significant difference on the tenth grade students’ reading comprehension scores of SMA Muhammadiyah 1 Palembang between the students who are taught by using SQRW strategy and those who are not. This study used quasi-experimental design using nonequivalent pretest-posttest design. There were 68 students from class X MIPA 4 and X MIPA 6 chosen as the sample. In collecting the data, test was used. The test was given twice to experimental and control groups, for pretest and posttest. To verify the hypotheses, the data of pretest and posttest were analyzed by using independent sample t-test and paired sample t-test in SPSS 18 program. The findings showed that the p-output from paired sample t-test (sig2-tailed was 0.000 which was lower than 0.05, and t-value 11.294 was higher than t-table (34-1 with df=33 (2.034. The result of p-output from independent sample t-test was 0.003 which was lower that 0.05 and the t-value 3.104 was higher than t-table (68-2 with df=66 (1.996. Therefore it could be stated that teaching reading descriptive text by using SQRW strategy had significant improvement and showed significant difference on the students’ reading comprehension scores.

  6. An Ergonomic Desk and Chair Prototype to Improve Seating Position on Senior High School Students at Kabupaten Gresik

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    Neffrety Nilamsari

    2015-04-01

    chair N, length = 48 cm, wide = 43 cm, cushion base’s height from floor surfaces = 47 cm, bag keeper’s height from floor surfaces =3cm, bag keeper’s wide= 43 cm, bag keeper’s length = 47 cm, cushion’s wide = 41 cm, cushion’s length = 46cm, handrest’s height = 22 cm, handrest’s length = 30 cm, backrest’s height = 38 cm, backrest’s wide = 43 cm, cushion’s foam thickness = 4 cm, backrest’s foam thickness = 4 cm; 2 Prototype desk N, length = 50 cm, wide = 66 cm, back section’s height = 85 cm, front section’s height = 75 cm, footrest from fl oor surfaces = 10 cm, drawer’s height = 10cm, front bamper’s height = 40 cm, and table’s angle = 10o. Discussion: An ergonomic desks and chairs are very important for students at school, it will help teaching learning process run well and comfortable. The measurement of desk and chair must be reviewed after fi ve years, because of student’s anthropometric development. So then students will feel no fatigue. Keywords: ergonomy, senior high school student’s seating position

  7. They Just Respect You for Who You Are: Contributors to Educator Positive Youth Development Promotion for Somali, Latino, and Hmong Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michele L; Rosas-Lee, Maira; Ortega, Luis; Hang, Mikow; Pergament, Shannon; Pratt, Rebekah

    2016-02-01

    Youth from immigrant communities may experience barriers to connecting with schools and teachers, potentially undermining academic achievement and healthy youth development. This qualitative study aimed to understand how educators serving Somali, Latino, and Hmong (SLH) youth can best promote educator-student connectedness and positive youth development, by exploring the perspectives of teachers, youth workers, and SLH youth, using a community based participatory research approach. We conducted four focus groups with teachers, 18 key informant interviews with adults working with SLH youth, and nine focus groups with SLH middle and high school students. Four themes emerged regarding facilitators to educators promoting positive youth development in schools: (1) an authoritative teaching approach where teachers hold high expectations for student behavior and achievement, (2) building trusting educator-student relationships, (3) conveying respect for students as individuals, and (4) a school infrastructure characterized by a supportive and inclusive environment. Findings suggest a set of skills and educator-student interactions that may promote positive youth development and increase student-educator connectedness for SLH youth in public schools.

  8. Quality of life, primary traumatisation, and positive and negative affects in primary school students in the Gaza Strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Guido; Pepe, Alessandro; Almurnak, Feda; Jaradah, Alaa; Hamdouna, Husam

    2018-02-21

    Many researchers have reported that exposure to war and ongoing political violence increases mental health problems in children. Results of studies have also shown a high prevalence (58-80%) of post-traumatic stress disorder in war-affected children living in the occupied Palestinian territory. The aim of this study was to estimate the direct and indirect effects of perceived life satisfaction on the consequences of children's exposure to trauma and the balance of positive and negative affect. Palestinian children were recruited from primary schools in four refugee camps in the Gaza Strip (Bureij, Gaza Beach Camp, Jabalia, Rafah). All children had been involved in or witnessed one or more episodes of violence involving other people in the 2 months prior to the study (the 2012 Gaza War). We used the Multidimensional Students Life Satisfaction Scale (peers, self, living environment, school, family), the Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Children, and the revised Children Impact of Events scale (intrusion and avoidance symptoms) to test (through structural equation modelling) the moderation effect of life satisfaction on war trauma via positive emotions. 1276 Palestinian children were enrolled in this study. The model tested with structural equation modelling was robust. Children's life satisfaction influenced both the intrusion (β=-0·48; p=0.003) and avoidance (β=-11; p=0·021) effects of primary traumatisation. The consequences of primary traumatisation by intrusion (β=0·34; p=0·008) and avoidance (β=0·27; p=0.011) contributed to increasing negative affect. Finally, perceived life satisfaction had direct effects on affective experience, specifically increasing positive affect and diminishing negative affect. Perceived quality of life in children has a role in controlling war-related traumas. Life satisfaction contributes both directly and indirectly to change affectivity. When children perceive themselves to be highly satisfied with their home and

  9. A creative-bonding intervention and a friendly visit approach to promote nursing students' self-transcendence and positive attitudes toward elders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sandra M; Chen, Shiue; Hacker, Marcia; Broschard, Dawn

    2008-04-01

    Nursing students' disinterest in caring for elders presents health care challenges. As the aged population increases, nursing faculty are challenged to improve students' attitudes toward elder care. Reed's self-transcendence theory guided this pilot study with nursing students (n=22) who implemented either a Creative-Bonding Intervention (CBI) or a Friendly Visit (FV) at senior citizen centers to test the effect of creative approaches on student self-transcendence and attitudes toward elders. Demographic data, a revised Kogan's Attitudes toward Old People statements, and Reed's Self-transcendence Scale were analyzed with descriptive, paired t test, ANCOVA, and Pearson correlation statistics. Results demonstrated significant differences in attitudes in the FV and changes in the expected directions in the CBI group. Self-transcendence had no significant changes. Valuable information was provided by students' comments about the interventions. Reed's belief that self-transcendence is present regardless of age was supported. Future studies are suggested with an increased sample size, a combined CBI/FV intervention, and supportive help during students' intervention delivery.

  10. Self-collection based HPV testing for cervical cancer screening among women living with HIV in Uganda: a descriptive analysis of knowledge, intentions to screen and factors associated with HPV positivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sheona M; Pedersen, Heather N; Eng Stime, Evelyn; Sekikubo, Musa; Moses, Erin; Mwesigwa, David; Biryabarema, Christine; Christilaw, Jan; Byamugisha, Josaphat K; Money, Deborah M; Ogilvie, Gina S

    2017-01-13

    Women living with HIV (WHIV) are disproportionately impacted by cervical dysplasia and cancer. The burden is greatest in low-income countries where limited or no access to screening exists. The goal of this study was to describe knowledge and intentions of WHIV towards HPV self-collection for cervical cancer screening, and to report on factors related to HPV positivity among women who participated in testing. A validated survey was administered to 87 HIV positive women attending the Kisenyi Health Unit aged 30-69 years old, and data was abstracted from chart review. At a later date, self-collection based HPV testing was offered to all women. Specimens were tested for high risk HPV genotypes, and women were contacted with results and referred for care. Descriptive statistics, Chi Square and Fischer-exact statistical tests were performed. The vast majority of WHIV (98.9%) women did not think it necessary to be screened for cervical cancer and the majority of women had never heard of HPV (96.4%). However, almost all WHIV found self-collection for cervical cancer screening to be acceptable. Of the 87 WHIV offered self-collection, 40 women agreed to provide a sample at the HIV clinic. Among women tested, 45% were oncogenic HPV positive, where HPV 16 or 18 positivity was 15% overall. In this group of WHIV engaged in HIV care, there was a high prevalence of oncogenic HPV, a large proportion of which were HPV genotypes 16 or 18, in addition to low knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer screening. Improved education and cervical cancer screening for WHIV are sorely needed; self-collection based screening has the potential to be integrated with routine HIV care in this setting.

  11. Linear equations and rap battles: how students in a wired classroom utilized the computer as a resource to coordinate personal and mathematical positional identities in hybrid spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer-Osuna, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    This paper draws on the constructs of hybridity, figured worlds, and cultural capital to examine how a group of African-American students in a technology-driven, project-based algebra classroom utilized the computer as a resource to coordinate personal and mathematical positional identities during group work. Analyses of several vignettes of small group dynamics highlight how hybridity was established as the students engaged in multiple on-task and off-task computer-based activities, each of which drew on different lived experiences and forms of cultural capital. The paper ends with a discussion on how classrooms that make use of student-led collaborative work, and where students are afforded autonomy, have the potential to support the academic engagement of students from historically marginalized communities.

  12. Assessing Whether Religious Behaviors and Positive and Negative Affect are Associated with Alcohol Use and Abuse Among a Sample of College Students Living in the Midwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, Chakema C; Lewis, Rhonda K

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol use and abuse are a problem on college campuses. Religious behaviors (religious attendance, prayer, and importance) have been shown to be a protective factor against alcohol use among college students. This study examined the role religious behaviors and positive and negative affect had on drinking (alcohol use and alcohol to intoxication). College students (765) completed an online survey. The results showed that college students who attended religious services were less likely to use alcohol than those who did not attend religious services. The results have important implications for college administrators and policy makers. Limitations and future research will be discussed.

  13. What's Our Position? A Critical Media Literacy Study of Popular Culture Websites with Eighth-Grade Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Ted; Tinio, Pablo P. L.; Nolan, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an action research project with 9 eighth-grade special education students in a self-contained classroom in an urban public school. The 1st author, in collaboration with the classroom teacher (3rd author), taught the students a critical media literacy framework to explore popular culture websites. Students learned to analyze…

  14. The Moderating Role of Positive and Negative Affect on the Relationship between Perceived Social Support and Stress in College Students

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    Çivitci, Asim

    2015-01-01

    During college years, which are known as a stressful time, students may often face stress personally, socially, academically, economically, and so forth in various areas of life. One of the important sources that students use to cope with stress is social support. Students can cope with stress easier via the support they receive from their friends…

  15. Between Instrumental and Developmental Learning: Ambivalence in Student Values and Identity Positions in Marketized UK Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The move towards a market-driven HE system in the UK and active policy promotion of students as consumers has generated much commentary on the ways in which students' expectations and experiences have been transformed. This article introduces and develops a conceptualization of contemporary higher students' views of their relationship to higher…

  16. The role of positive/negative outcome expectancy and refusal self-efficacy of Internet use on Internet addiction among college students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min-Pei; Ko, Huei-Chen; Wu, Jo Yung-Wei

    2008-08-01

    Based on Bandura's social cognitive theory, this study was designed to examine positive and negative outcome expectancy and refusal self-efficacy of Internet use and their contribution to Internet addiction among college students by using hierarchical multiple regression analyses in a cross-sectional study design. Schools were first stratified into technical or nontechnical colleges and then into seven majors. A cluster random sampling by department was further applied to randomly choose participants from each major. A representative sample of 4,456 college students participated in this study. The Outcome Expectancy and Refusal Self-Efficacy of Internet Use Questionnaire and the Chen Internet Addiction Scale were used to assess the cognitive factors and the levels of Internet addiction. Results showed that both positive outcome expectancy and negative outcome expectancy were significantly and positively correlated with Internet addiction, and refusal self-efficacy of Internet use was significantly and negatively related to Internet addiction. Further analyses revealed that refusal self-efficacy of Internet use directly and negatively predicted Internet addiction. Moreover, we discovered that positive outcome expectancy positively predicted Internet addiction via refusal self-efficacy of Internet use; however, surprisingly, negative outcome expectancy had both a direct and indirect positive relationship in predicting Internet addiction via the refusal self-efficacy of Internet use. These results give empirical evidence to verify the theoretical effectiveness of the three cognitive factors to Internet addiction and should be incorporated when designing prevention programs and strategies for Internet addicted college students.

  17. Producing more persuasive antiviolence messages for college students: testing the effects of framing, information sources, and positive/negative fact appeal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hyunjae Jay

    2012-06-01

    College students, between the ages of about 18 and 24, are the group of people who are most often exposed to situations involving diverse types of violence. They have greater access to alcohol and drugs and are under far less parental supervision than younger age groups; reports have shown that frequent involvement in several types of violent behaviors can seriously damage college students physically and psychologically. However, despite the high rate of violence among college students, there has not been enough discussion about how we can produce more effective antiviolence messages targeting college students. This research provides some useful insights into this issue by testing the possible effects of three antiviolence message conditions: gain/loss framing, different information sources, and negative/positive fact appeal. The results reveal that college students in this study find more appeal in antiviolence messages conveyed by a traditional public service announcement (PSA) than in a TV news report. The results also reveal that people pay more attention to messages that use negative fact appeal (e.g., "There are many people losing a lot of precious things because of their violent behaviors") than to those that use positive fact appeal (e.g., "There are many people gaining a lot of precious things by avoiding violent behaviors"). An interaction effect between information sources and positive/negative fact appeal was also detected.

  18. Developing Training Programs to Enhance Positive Attitude toward the ASEAN Community and Self-responsibility For Students in the 6th Grade Naku Distric Kalasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriporn Chooarerom

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to ; 1 Study the status and problem of an through attitude the ASEAN community for grade 6 students. 2 Develop training programs to enhance their positive attitude towards the ASEAN community and self-responsibility for grade 6 students. 3 Experiment training program to enhance their positive attitude towards the ASEAN community and self-responsibility for grade 6 students. The samples of this study were 21 students. They were selected though cluster random sampling method. The research instruments used in the study were the Training programs to enhance their positive attitude towards the ASEAN community and self-responsibility. Surveys of problems from the event ASEAN week. Lenarning ASEAN. Measuring a positive attitude towards the ASEAN community scale with discriminating power ranging 0.375 – 0.793 and Measuring self-responsibility scale with discriminating power ranging 0.411 – 0.893 and a reliability of 0.973. The statistics used for analyzing the collected data were mean, standard deviation, and One-way repeated measure MANOVA The study showed that 1 Study of the attitude of the ASEAN community condition survey found that teachers have trouble understanding, Interested to attend the event and have admired and awareness in preparation the ASEAN community, the levels are minimal. The students realized in preparation, understanding about . Attention to participation and appreciation the ASEAN community, the levels are minimal 2 Training programs to enhance their positive attitude toward the ASEAN community and self-responsibility for grade 6 students was created by. Activities focus on the students involved and take action. Remove group activities used in the event. Stage one consists of two steps leading to the involvement step 3 step 4 step by step analysis and application of the five-stage process and evaluation. By 5 experts have evaluated the overall level more appropriate. 3 Students attend their

  19. Intending to stay: Positive images, attitudes, and classroom experiences as influences on students' intentions to persist in science and engineering majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyer, Mary Beth

    2000-10-01

    Contemporary research on persistence in undergraduate education in science and engineering has focused primarily on identifying the structural, social, and psychological barriers to participation by students in underrepresented groups. As a result, there is a wealth of data to document why students leave their majors, but there is little direct empirical data to support prevailing presumptions about why students stay. Moreover, researchers have used widely differing definitions and measures of persistence, and they have seldom explored field differences. This study compared three ways of measuring persistence. These constituted three criterion variables: commitment to major, degree aspirations, and commitment to a science/engineering career. The study emphasized social factors that encourage students to persist, including four predictor variables---(1) positive images of scientists/engineers, (2) positive attitudes toward gender and racial equality, (3) positive classroom experiences, and (4) high levels of social integration. In addition, because researchers have repeatedly documented the degree to which women are more likely than men to drop out of science and engineering majors, the study examined the potential impact of gender in relation to these predictor variables. A survey was administered in the classroom to a total of 285 students enrolled in a required course for either a biological sciences and or an engineering major. Predictor variables were developed from standard scales, including the Images of Science/Scientists Scale, the Attitudes toward Women Scale, the Women in Science Scale, and the Perceptions of Prejudice Scale. Based on logistic regression models, results indicate that positive images of scientists and engineers was significantly related to improving the odds of students having a high commitment to major, high degree aspirations, and high commitment to career. There was also evidence that positive attitudes toward gender and racial equality

  20. Positive Classroom Management. A Step-by-Step Guide to Successfully Running the Show Without Destroying Student Dignity. 2nd Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiulio, Robert

    This book provides K-12 teachers with concrete, step-by-step guidance on how to improve student behavior through positive classroom management. It explains how to take control of the classroom, offering an alternative to threats, rewards, and punishments. The book is divided into an introduction and three sections with seven chapters. The…

  1. Long-Term Effects of Primary Schools on Educational Positions of Students 2 and 4 Years after the Start of Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwynsberghe, Griet; Vanlaar, Gudrun; Van Damme, Jan; De Fraine, Bieke

    2017-01-01

    Although the importance of primary schools in the long term is of interest in educational effectiveness research, few studies have examined the long-term effects of schools over the past decades. In the present study, long-term effects of primary schools on the educational positions of students 2 and 4 years after starting secondary education are…

  2. Examining the Effects of Self-Reported Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Positive Relations with Others on Self-Regulated Learning for Student Service Members/Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Bryan M.; Middleton, Michael J.; Hildebrandt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationships between self-reported posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, perceived positive relations with others, self-regulation strategy use, and academic motivation among student service members/veterans (SSM/V) enrolled in postsecondary education. Participants: SSM/V (N = 214), defined as veterans, active…

  3. The Impact of Positive and Negative Ecstasy-Related Information on Ecstasy Use among College Students: Results of a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kathryn B.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Wish, Eric D.; Arria, Amelia M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To: (1) estimate the proportion of students exposed to specific types of information regarding the positive and negative effects of ecstasy, (2) test models that quantified the relationship between exposure to these messages and subsequent ecstasy use, controlling for peer drug use and sensation-seeking. Methods: As part of the College Life…

  4. The Effect of Motion Analysis Activities in a Video-Based Laboratory in Students' Understanding of Position, Velocity and Frames of Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleza, Eugenia; Pappas, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we present the results of a qualitative research project on the effect of motion analysis activities in a Video-Based Laboratory (VBL) on students' understanding of position, velocity and frames of reference. The participants in our research were 48 pre-service teachers enrolled in Education Departments with no previous strong…

  5. Promoting Positive Learning in Australian Students Aged 10- to 12-Years-Old Using Attribution Retraining and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodkiewicz, Alicia R; Boyle, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This study piloted an intervention using attribution retraining and cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to promote positive learning experiences and outcomes for students. This research is an important step to revitalise the dwindling field of attribution retraining research by assessing whether these techniques effectively improve student…

  6. Contact with Young Adults with Disability Led to a Positive Change in Attitudes toward Disability among Physiotherapy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Shields, Nora; Taylor, Nicholas F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether contact over 8 weeks with a person with disability benefits physiotherapy students' attitudes toward disability and their development of professional behaviours and skills. Methods: Sixteen adults with Down syndrome were matched with 16 physiotherapy students (13 women, 3 men; mean age 22.5 [SD 3.0] years) and randomized to either an 8-week, twice-weekly walking programme or an 8-week, once-weekly social activities programme. Students completed the Interaction wi...

  7. Trauma exposure and heavy drinking and drug use among college students: Identifying the roles of negative and positive affect lability in a daily diary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Nicole H; Bold, Krysten W; Contractor, Ateka A; Sullivan, Tami P; Armeli, Stephen; Tennen, Howard

    2018-04-01

    Trauma exposure is linked to heavy drinking and drug use among college students. Extant research reveals positive associations between negative affect lability and both trauma exposure and alcohol use. This study aimed to extend past research by using daily diary methods to test whether (a) individuals with (versus without) trauma exposure experience greater negative and positive affect lability, (b) negative and positive affect lability are associated with heavy drinking and drug use, and (c) negative and positive affect lability mediate the relations between trauma exposure and heavy drinking and drug use. Participants were 1640 college students (M age=19.2, 54% female, 80% European American) who provided daily diary data for 30days via online surveys. Daily diaries assessed negative and positive affect and substance use (i.e., percent days of heavy drinking, percent days of drug use, total number of drugs used). Individuals with (versus without) a history of trauma exposure demonstrated higher levels of negative and positive affect lability. Negative, but not positive, affect lability was associated with percent days of heavy drinking, percent days of drug use, and total number of drugs used, and mediated the associations between trauma exposure and heavy drinking and drug use outcomes. Findings provide support for the underlying role of negative affect lability in the relations between trauma exposure and heavy drinking and drug use among college students, suggesting that treatments targeting negative affect lability may potentially serve to reduce heavy drinking and drug use among trauma-exposed college students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Controlling for Prior Attainment Reduces the Positive Influence that Single-Gender Classroom Initiatives Exert on High School Students' Scholastic Achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Charlotte R; Kaye, Linda K; Qureshi, Adam W; Heim, Derek

    2018-01-01

    Research points to the positive impact that gender-segregated schooling and classroom initiatives exert on academic attainment. An evaluation of these studies which reveal positive effects highlights, however, that students are typically selectively assigned to single- or mixed-gender instructional settings, presenting a methodological confound. The current study controls for students' prior attainment to appraise the efficacy of a single-gender classroom initiative implemented in a co-educational high school in the United Kingdom. Secondary data analysis (using archived data) was performed on 266 middle-ability, 11-12 year-old students' standardized test scores in Languages (English, foreign language), STEM-related (Mathematics, Science, Information and Communication Technology), and Non-STEM subjects (art, music, drama). Ninety-eight students (54, 55% female) were taught in single-gender and 168 (69, 41% female) in mixed-gender classrooms. Students undertook identical tests irrespective of classroom type, which were graded in accordance with U.K national curriculum guidelines. Controlling for students' prior attainment, findings indicate that students do not appear to benefit from being taught in single-gender relative to mixed-gender classrooms in Language and STEM-related subjects. Young women benefitted from being taught in mixed-gender relative to single-gender classes for Non-STEM subjects. However, when prior ability is not controlled for, the intervention appears to be effective for all school subjects, highlighting the confounding influence of selective admissions. These findings suggest that gender-segregated classroom initiatives may not bolster students' grades. It is argued that studies that do not control for selection effects may tell us little about the effectiveness of such interventions on scholastic achievement.

  9. Hot or Not: The Role of Instructor Quality and Gender on the Formation of Positive Illusions among Students Using RateMyProfessors.com

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine C. Theyson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Existing literature indicates that physical attractiveness positively affects variables such as income, perceived employee quality and performance evaluations. Similarly, in the academic arena, studies indicate instructors who are better looking receive better teaching evaluations from their students. Previous analysis of the website RateMyProfessors.com confirms this, indicating that instructors who are viewed by students as - hot- receive higher - quality- ratings than those who are - not.- However, psychology literature indicates that perceptions of attractiveness are influenced by positive illusions, a property whereby individuals with higher quality relationships view each other more positively than objective observers. This paper uses data from Rate My Professors to investigate the existence of positive illusions in the instructor-student relationship. It finds that positive illusions exist, suggesting that existing literature overestimates the premium associated with physical attractiveness. Furthermore, the source of these illusions varies significantly between male and female instructors with important implications for the role of gender in workplace evaluations, hiring, promotion, and tenure.

  10. Engaging Students in Constructive Youth-Adult Relationships: A Case Study of Urban School-Based Agriculture Students and Positive Adult Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, William A.; Martin, Michael J.; Tummons, John D.; Ball, Anna L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this bounded single case study was to explore the day-to-day functioning of a successful urban school-based agriculture veterinary program. Findings indicated student success was a product of multiple youth-adult relationships created through communal environments. Adults served as mentors with whom students felt constant, caring…

  11. Teaching Independent Learning Skills in the First Year: A Positive Psychology Strategy for Promoting Law Student Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Rachael; Duffy, James; Huggins, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Empirical evidence in Australia and overseas has established that in many university disciplines, students begin to experience elevated levels of psychological distress in their first year of study. There is now a considerable body of empirical data that establishes that this is a significant problem for law students. Psychological distress may…

  12. Intellectual Development Is Positively Related to Intrinsic Motivation and Course Grades for Female but Not Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortright, Ronald N.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Cox, Julie H.; Cortright, Maria A.; Langworthy, Brandon M.; Petta, Lorene M.; Tanner, Charles J.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the intellectual development of students, i.e., their beliefs about the nature of knowledge and learning, affects their intrinsic motivation and class performance. Specifically, we hypothesized that students with low intellectual development (i.e., the naive beliefs that knowledge is simple, absolute, and certain) have low…

  13. Chinese Secondary School Students' Conceptions of Assessment and Achievement Emotions: Endorsed Purposes Lead to Positive and Negative Feelings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjun; Brown, Gavin T. L.

    2018-01-01

    Student perceptions of the purposes of assessment have been shown to be significant predictors of self-regulated learning. Their relationship to achievement emotions is less well understood. This paper reports a survey study of Chinese middle and high school students (N = 1,393) self-reported conceptions of the purpose of assessment and their…

  14. How Can Service-Learning Prepare Students for the Workforce? Exploring the Potential of Positive Psychological Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElravy, L. J.; Matkin, Gina; Hastings, Lindsay J.

    2018-01-01

    Although service-learning increases several important development and learning outcomes in college students (Yorio & Ye, 2012), it is not clear whether service-learning is better preparing these students for their future careers (Gray, Ondaatje, Fricker, & Geschwind, 2000). To better understand the influence of service-learning on student…

  15. Practice Brief: Modeling Positive Behaviors for Postsecondary Students with Autism/Asperger's--The Use of "Television Coaching"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trammell, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Students on the Autism spectrum, including those with Asperger's, are attending postsecondary schools at record rates and bringing with them unique needs and challenges. Although students with this diagnosis qualify for and often use traditional academic accommodations such as testing in a separate room, they also commonly experience academic…

  16. A Holistic Conception of Nonacademic Support: How Four Mechanisms Combine to Encourage Positive Student Outcomes in the Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechur Karp, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Despite their best efforts, community colleges continue to see low rates of student persistence and degree attainment. Although such outcomes can be attributed in large part to students' lack of academic readiness, nonacademic issues also play a part. Building on Karp's 2011 framework of nonacademic support, this chapter explores the evidence that…

  17. Implementing School-Wide Positive Behavioural Interventions and Supports to Better Meet the Needs of Indigenous Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Kent; Moniz, Christina; Craft, Calli B.; Golby, Risha; Steinwand-Deschambeault, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the need for and importance of culturally responsive behaviour support for Indigenous students. Many of the educational challenges currently faced by Indigenous students can be explained by cultural disconnect and a mismatch between school expectations and cultural values. Principles of Indigenous approaches to behaviour…

  18. Progress in Teachers' Readiness to Promote Positive Youth Development among Students during the Lions Quest Teaching Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talvio, Markus; Berg, Minna; Ketonen, Elina; Komulainen, Erkki; Lonka, Kirsti

    2015-01-01

    Modern learning psychology places an emphasis on the ability of teachers to promote their students' social and emotional learning (SEL) and living a good life. Research on precisely how teachers promote SEL and well-being among their students, however, remains scarce. This study focused on evaluating the Lions Quest teaching workshop (LQ), which…

  19. Access, entry and researcher-participant position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louw, Arnt Vestergaard

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on methodological experiences obtained in an anthropologically inspired qualitative study among students of carpentry in Denmark. On the one hand the article deals with methodological issues of doing anthropological research among students of carpentry, while on the other...... it deals with the research findings that such a research design produced. As well as the methodological issues of researcher access, entry and participant position in the field, this article reports on the following questions: What kinds of implicit expectations of the students are embedded in the way...... the school introduces and initiates the programme? What kinds of effects does this have on the motivation of the students? How do the terms and professional language of the profession work on the individual students in including and excluding ways? These specific descriptions of classroom pedagogy, inspired...

  20. Algebraic Description of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidon, William C.

    1974-01-01

    An algebraic definition of time differentiation is presented and used to relate independent measurements of position and velocity. With this, students can grasp certain essential physical, geometric, and algebraic properties of motion and differentiation before undertaking the study of limits. (Author)

  1. Descriptive Geometry in Educational Process of Technical University in Russia Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Marianna V.; Tretyakova, Zlata O.; Moroz, Olga N.; Folomkin, Andrey I.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the investigated problem is caused by the need for monitoring the impact of the Unified State Examination (USE) on the level of mathematical culture and the level of geometric literacy of applicants and students of modern engineering universities of Russia. The need to determine the position of Descriptive Geometry in the…

  2. University students and faculty have positive perceptions of open/alternative resources and their utilization in a textbook replacement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Delimont

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This is contribution no. 16-114-J from the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station.The Kansas State University Open/Alternative Textbook Initiative provides grants to faculty members to replace textbooks with open/alternative educational resources (OAERs that are available at no cost to students. Open educational resources are available for anyone to access, while alternative educational resources are not open. The objective of this study was to determine the perceptions towards OAERs and the initiative, of students enrolled in, and faculty members teaching, courses using OAERs. A survey was sent out to 2,074 students in 13 courses using the OAERs. A total of 524 (25.3% students completed the survey and a faculty member from each of the 13 courses using OAERs was interviewed. Students rated the OAERs as good quality, preferred using them instead of buying textbooks for their courses, and agreed that they would like OAERs used in other courses. Faculty felt that student learning was somewhat better and it was somewhat easier to teach using OAERs than when they used the traditional textbooks. Nearly all faculty members preferred teaching with OAERs and planned to continue to do so after the funding period. These results, combined with the tremendous savings to students, support the continued funding of the initiative and similar approaches at other institutions.

  3. A multi-institutional study exploring the impact of positive mental health on medical students' professionalism in an era of high burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Harper, William; Moutier, Christine; Durning, Steven J; Power, David V; Massie, F Stanford; Eacker, Anne; Thomas, Matthew R; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff A; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2012-08-01

    Although burnout is associated with erosion of professionalism and serious personal consequences, whether positive mental health can enhance professionalism and how it shapes personal experience remain poorly understood. The study simultaneously explores the relationship between positive mental health and burnout with professionalism and personal experience. The authors surveyed 4,400 medical students at seven U.S. medical schools in 2009 to assess mental health (categorized as languishing, moderate, and flourishing) and burnout. Additional items explored professional behaviors, beliefs, suicidal ideation, and serious thoughts of dropping out. A total of 2,682/4,400 (61%) responded. Prevalence of suicidal ideation (55/114 [48.2%], 281/1,128 [24.9%], and 127/1,409 [9.1%]) and serious thoughts of dropping out (15/114 [13.2%], 30/1,128 [2.7%], and 14/1,409 [1.0%]) decreased as mental health improved from languishing, moderate, and flourishing, respectively (all P mental health persisted independent of burnout (all P mental health improved, the prevalence of unprofessional behaviors (i.e., cheating and dishonest behaviors) also declined, whereas students' altruistic beliefs regarding physicians' responsibility toward society improved. For example, 33/113 (29.2%), 426/1,120 (38.0%), and 718/1,391 (51.6%) of students with languishing, moderate, and flourishing mental health endorsed all five altruistic professional beliefs (P mental health persisted among students with burnout, whereas fewer relationships were found among students without burnout. Findings suggest that positive mental health attenuates some adverse consequences of burnout. Medical student wellness programs should aspire to prevent burnout and promote mental health.

  4. A Study on the Ability in Listening Comprehension on Descriptive Text by the 2nd Semester Students of English Study Program Fkip-ur

    OpenAIRE

    Ristanti, Septia Ristanti Septiana; ', Eliwarti Eliwarti; Sumbayak, Desri Maria Sumbayak Maria

    2016-01-01

    English is the most popular and most spoken language in the world which has been used effectively in many developing countries. One of the first skills that students should be learnt in English is listening. In learning language, students use listening to began the process of learning to comprehend and produce language. The problems that usually faced by students while listening are lack of control over the speed at which speakers speak, inability to concentrate (topic, effort, technical prob...

  5. Delaying Middle School and High School Start Times Promotes Student Health and Performance: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathaniel F; Martin, Jennifer L; Wise, Merrill S; Carden, Kelly A; Kirsch, Douglas B; Kristo, David A; Malhotra, Raman K; Olson, Eric J; Ramar, Kannan; Rosen, Ilene M; Rowley, James A; Weaver, Terri E; Chervin, Ronald D

    2017-04-15

    During adolescence, internal circadian rhythms and biological sleep drive change to result in later sleep and wake times. As a result of these changes, early middle school and high school start times curtail sleep, hamper a student's preparedness to learn, negatively impact physical and mental health, and impair driving safety. Furthermore, a growing body of evidence shows that delaying school start times positively impacts student achievement, health, and safety. Public awareness of the hazards of early school start times and the benefits of later start times are largely unappreciated. As a result, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine is calling on communities, school boards, and educational institutions to implement start times of 8:30 AM or later for middle schools and high schools to ensure that every student arrives at school healthy, awake, alert, and ready to learn. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  6. Medical Students' Exposure to the Humanities Correlates with Positive Personal Qualities and Reduced Burnout: A Multi-Institutional U.S. Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Salvatore; Chakraborti, Chayan; Staltari, Giuseppe; Harrison, Rebecca; Tunkel, Allan R; Liou, Kevin T; Cerceo, Elizabeth; Voeller, Megan; Bedwell, Wendy L; Fletcher, Keaton; Kahn, Marc J

    2018-05-01

    Literature, music, theater, and visual arts play an uncertain and limited role in medical education. One of the arguments often advanced in favor of teaching the humanities refers to their capacity to foster traits that not only improve practice, but might also reduce physician burnout-an increasing scourge in today's medicine. Yet, research remains limited. To test the hypothesis that medical students with higher exposure to the humanities would report higher levels of positive physician qualities (e.g., wisdom, empathy, self-efficacy, emotional appraisal, spatial skills), while reporting lower levels of negative qualities that are detrimental to physician well-being (e.g., intolerance of ambiguity, physical fatigue, emotional exhaustion, and cognitive weariness). An online survey. All students enrolled at five U.S. medical schools during the 2014-2015 academic year were invited by email to take part in our online survey. Students reported their exposure to the humanities (e.g., music, literature, theater, visual arts) and completed rating scales measuring selected personal qualities. In all, 739/3107 medical students completed the survey (23.8%). Regression analyses revealed that exposure to the humanities was significantly correlated with positive personal qualities, including empathy (p humanities and both a higher level of students' positive qualities and a lower level of adverse traits. These findings may carry implications for medical school recruitment and curriculum design. "[Science and humanities are] twin berries on one stem, grievous damage has been done to both in regarding [them]... in any other light than complemental." (William Osler, Br Med J. 1919;2:1-7).

  7. "I am a scientist": How setting conditions that enhance focused concentration positively relate to student motivation and achievement outcomes in inquiry-based science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, Robin B.

    This research investigated how student social interactions within two approaches to an inquiry-based science curriculum could be related to student motivation and achievement outcomes. This qualitative case study consisted of two cases, Off-Campus and On-Campus, and used ethnographic techniques of participant observation. Research participants included eight eighth grade girls, aged thirteen to fourteen years old. Data sources included formal and informal participant interviews, participant journal reflections, curriculum artifacts including quizzes, worksheets, and student-generated research posters, digital video and audio recordings, photographs, and researcher field notes. Data were transcribed verbatim and coded, then collapsed into emergent themes using NVIVO 9. The results of this research illustrate how setting conditions that promote focused concentration and communicative interactions can be positively related to student motivation and achievement outcomes in inquiry-based science. Participants in the Off-Campus case experienced more frequent states of focused concentration and out performed their peers in the On-Campus case on forty-six percent of classroom assignments. Off-Campus participants also designed and implemented a more cognitively complex research project, provided more in-depth analyses of their research results, and expanded their perceptions of what it means to act like a scientist to a greater extent than participants in the On-Campus case. These results can be understood in relation to Flow Theory. Student interactions that promoted the criteria necessary for initiating flow, which included having clearly defined goals, receiving immediate feedback, and maintaining a balance between challenges and skills, fostered enhanced student motivation and achievement outcomes. This research also illustrates the positive gains in motivation and achievement outcomes that emerge from student experiences with extended time in isolated areas referred to

  8. Could hands-on activities and smartphone in science CLIL teaching foster motivation and positive attitudes in students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolino, Immacolata; Maraffi, Sabina; Sacerdoti, Francesco M.

    2016-04-01

    Motivating students is one of the most challenging things we do as educators. We know that students need to be engaged to fully appreciate and learn what has been taught; the secret consists in nurturing student engagement. One of the newer ways to involve students and foster motivation in their Science learning consists in focusing on their usage and on applying knowledge and skills in their real-life. Students usually are engaged in authentic teaching pathway. Learning focusing on the experience helps teachers to improve classroom management by gathering students around a common organized activity. Hands-on activities support problem-based approaches to learning by focusing on the experience and process of investigating, proposing and creating solutions developing critical thinking skills and enlarge student's scientific glossary. We utilized in our classroom some lab activities that we learned at an ESA/GTTP Teacher training Workshop 2014 program at the Lorentz Center Leiden, Netherlands. "Cooking a comet - Ingredients for life" "Demonstration of the second Kepler's law using marbles" New media equipment, as student's own smartphones, can increase the teaching impact speaking the same language used by the students every day. They can measure magnetic fields, their GPS coordinates (longitude and latitude), and so on. In this way we can measure distances as parallax using mobile devices and simulating distance measurements in the classroom, on the school campus. The smartphone is the device with which the students answer questions, take decisions, and solve quests. Students infact can observe the Universe from their classroom and scientifically they can watch the Sun with "Google sky map" or "Star walk" are excellent tools to learn your way around the night sky .As teachers we used these apps in the classroom when Sun goes through the constellations so our students don't believe in horoscopes. This paper is focused on hands on activities and the effects of the

  9. Influence of Peer Social Experiences on Positive and Negative Indicators of Mental Health among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suldo, Shannon M.; Gelley, Cheryl D.; Roth, Rachel A.; Bateman, Lisa P.

    2015-01-01

    Modern definitions of complete mental health include both positive and negative indicators of psychological functioning. We examined the associations between peer relationships (victimization and receipt of prosocial acts) and multiple indicators of mental health that represent subjective well-being (i.e., life satisfaction, positive and negative…

  10. The use of Global Positioning System units and ArcGIS Online to engage K-12 Students in Research Being Done in their Local Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, C. E.; Sparrow, E. B.; Clucas, T.

    2015-12-01

    Incorporating K-12 students in scientific research processes and opportunities in their communities is a great way to bridge the gap between research and education and to start building science research capacity at an early age. One goal of the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) Alaska Adapting to Changing Environments project is to engage the local community in the research as well as to share results with the people. By giving K-12 students Global Positioning System (GPS) units, and allowing them to collect and map their own data, they are being exposed to some of the research methods being used by scientists in the Alaska ACE project. This hands-on, minds-on method has been successfully used in formal education settings such as a Junior High School classroom in Nuiqsut, Alaska as well as in informal education settings such as summer camps in Barrow, Alaska and Kenai, Alaska. The students progress from mapping by hand to collecting location data with their GPS units and cameras, and imputing this information into ArcGIS Online to create map products. The data collected were from sites ranging from important places in the community to sites visited during summer camps, with students reflecting on data and site significance. Collecting data, using technology, and creating map products contribute to science skills and practices students need to conduct research of their own and to understand research being done around them. The goal of this education outreach implementation is to bring students closer to the research, understand the process of science, and have the students continue to collect data and contribute to research in their communities. Support provided for this work from the Alaska EPSCoR NSF Award #OIA-1208927 and the state of Alaska is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Who Is the Competent Physics Student? A Study of Students' Positions and Social Interaction in Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a study which explored the social interaction and the reproduction and challenge of gendered discourses in small group discussions in physics. Data for the study consisted of video recordings of eight upper secondary school groups solving physics problems and 15 audiotaped individual interviews with participating students.…

  12. Descriptive study of burnout, compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction in undergraduate nursing students at a tertiary education institution in KwaZulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina T. Mathias

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: As shown in the study, some of the undergraduate students are experiencing compassion fatigue and burnout, associated with relieving suffering of others. Therefore, knowledge of compassion fatigue and burnout and the coping strategies should be part of nursing training.

  13. Building Assets Reducing Risks: Academic Success for All Students through Positive Relationships and Use of Real-Time Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsello, Maryann; Sharma, Anu; Jerabek, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Building Assets Reducing Risks (BARR) is a social emotional model that achieves academic outcomes through combining use of real-time student data with proven relationship-building strategies and intensive teacher collaboration to prevent course failure. BARR is a recipient of US Department of Education "Investing in Innovation (i3)"…

  14. Prison Field Trips: Can White-Collar Criminals Positively Affect the Ethical and Legal Behavior of Marketing and MBA Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleberry, Stephen B.

    2007-01-01

    Marketing educators bear some responsibility for teaching ethics and legal issues to their students. Visits to white-collar criminals in a federal prison camp are one method of achieving this task. This article develops and empirically assesses ten objectives for such a visit by MBA and undergraduate marketing classes. Undergraduates rated the…

  15. The Positive Impact of Creative Activity: Effects of Creative Task Engagement and Motivational Focus on College Students' Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Regina; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Assessed effectiveness of engaging students in a creative activity on a topic as a means of encouraging an active cognitive set toward learning that topic area. Creative task engagement was found to be an effective means of enhancing creativity (in the absence of evaluation expectation), intrinsic motivation, and long-term retention. (JBJ)

  16. Positioning Industrial Design Students to Operate at the "Fuzzy Front End": Investigating a New Arena of University Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormald, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes pedagogic research to instigate, support and understand a significant change in the education of undergraduate industrial design students. Design educators at Loughborough University, UK, have proposed that it will be critical for future industrial designers to learn new knowledge and abilities which will enable them to…

  17. Teacher Positivity towards Gender Diversity: Exploring Relationships and School Outcomes for Transgender and Gender-Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Transgender and gender diverse secondary students report routine social and curricular marginalisation at school, factors which have been linked to negative social and academic outcomes. This paper examines data from the "Free2Be?" project, which surveyed 704 same-sex attracted and gender-diverse Australian teenagers (aged 14-18), to…

  18. Where Does My Augmented Reality Learning Experience (ARLE) Belong? A Student and Teacher Perspective to Positioning ARLEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drljevic, Neven; Wong, Lung Hsiang; Boticki, Ivica

    2017-01-01

    The paper provides a high-level review of the current state of techno-pedagogical design in Augmented Reality Learning Experiences (ARLEs). The review is based on a rubric constructed from the Meaningful Learning with ICT framework and the Orchestration Load reduction framework, providing, respectively, a view of primarily student- and primarily…

  19. Fostering Positive Classroom Environments: The Relationship between Teacher Qualifications, Facility Management, and Perceptions of Leadership on Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Bryan Allan

    2011-01-01

    This study attempted to determine the effectiveness of schools that have highly qualified teachers, along with a well managed facility, and the administration's perception of the leadership role as an instructional specialist on the outcomes that students displayed. Also, the relationship between two instruments used to determine the quality of…

  20. Contextualizing Gay-straight Alliances: Student, Advisor, and Structural Factors Related to Positive Youth Development among Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V. Paul; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Calzo, Jerel P.; Gray, Mary L.; DiGiovanni, Craig D.; Lipkin, Arthur; Mundy-Shephard, Adrienne; Perrotti, Jeff; Scheer, Jillian R.; Shaw, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Gay-straight alliances (GSAs) may promote resilience. Yet, what GSA components predict well-being? Among 146 youth and advisors in 13 GSAs (58% lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning; 64% White; 38% received free/reduced-cost lunch), student (demographics, victimization, attendance frequency, leadership, support, control), advisor (years served,…

  1. Inuit Student Teachers' Agency, Positioning and Symbolic Action: Reflections from a "Qallunaat" on Music Teaching in the Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Joan

    2006-01-01

    This article examines how three Inuit student teachers in the Nunavut Teacher Education Program invested their "social and cultural capital" during a music course for classroom teachers, which the author taught in the Canadian Arctic. She describes how, through the musical games they invented for use in Inuit classrooms, these students…

  2. Educational Web-Based Intervention for High School Students to Increase Knowledge and Promote Positive Attitudes toward Organ Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokur, Amiram D.; Merion, Robert M.; Couper, Mick P.; Jones, Eleanor G.; Dong, Yihui

    2006-01-01

    A sample of 490 high school students from 81 schools in Michigan participated in an experiment in which they were randomly assigned to either a control or an experimental Web site. The experimental Web site provided exposure to educational material about the process of organ donation and organ transplantation. The control Web site provided…

  3. Peer Instruction in Introductory Physics: A Method to Bring about Positive Changes in Students' Attitudes and Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Ding, Lin; Mazur, Eric

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes pre-post matched gains in the epistemological views of science students taking the introductory physics course at Beijing Normal University (BNU) in China. In this study we examined the attitudes and beliefs of science majors (n = 441) in four classes, one taught using traditional (lecture) teaching methods, and the other three…

  4. The Cadaveric Skin Biopsy Project: description and student evaluation of an innovative approach to dermatology instruction in the preclerkship medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Mary Grace; Bradley, Elizabeth B; McCollum, Melanie A; Russell, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    Dermatology can develop creative ways of participating in the preclerkship medical school curriculum. We sought to describe and report student survey results of a novel collaborative learning activity for medical students, directed by dermatology, histology, and gross anatomy faculty, which used cadavers to replicate the process of skin lesion biopsy and provided a realistic setting in which to learn normal-appearing and abnormal skin histology. First-year medical students were surveyed regarding the impact of this activity on their understanding of skin histology and their appreciation of dermatology and dermatologic procedures. Students were appreciative of the opportunity to perform biopsies and discover the link between the clinical presentation of a lesion and its underlying histopathology. They were less impressed with the ability of the activity to improve their understanding of the characteristics of benign versus malignant lesions. This is an early feasibility trial at 1 institution. This project represents one approach to introducing students to dermatology and dermatologic procedures and achieves institutional, Liaison Committee on Medical Education, and Association of American Medical Colleges educational goals. Overall, students highly valued the opportunities to practice clinical procedures and found it aided their understanding and appreciation of dermatology. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Burnout syndrome in first to sixth-year medical students at a private university in the north of Mexico: descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asencio-López, Laura; Almaraz-Celis, Guillermo Daniel; Carrillo Maciel, Vicente; Huerta Valenzuela, Paola; Silva Goytia, Luis; Muñoz Torres, Marcos; Monroy Caballero, Fernando; Regalado Tapia, Joel; Dipp Martin, Kerigma; López Miranda, Dinorah; Medina Lavenant, Clyvia; Pizarro Rodríguez, Karen; Santiago Martínez, Cesar; Saucedo Aparicio, Alma Geovanna; Flores Lepe, Rodolfo

    2016-04-25

    Burnout syndrome is a three-dimensional clinical syndrome caused by stress at work. It is frequent in professions which require direct contact with people. In Mexico, the presence of Burnout Syndrome in doctors and medical students, is characterized as a threat to their health, quality of life and professional performance. To evaluate the prevalence of burnout syndrome in students of years 1 through 6 of medical school at a private university in northern Mexico. Cross-sectional study in the Escuela de Medicina Campus Laguna de la Universidad Autónoma de Durango. The one-dimensional scale of Burnout Student (EUBE) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) were applied to the participants. SPSS 19 was used to analyze the data. Of the 344 students, 255 participated; 153 from years 1 to 3 (group 1); and 72 from years 4 to 6 (group 2). We found that 94.1% of the students of group 1 had mild burnout syndrome, and 2.8% had moderate burnout syndrome. In Group 2, 27.8% had moderate burnout syndrome, and 8.3% had severe burnout syndrome. The prevalence of severe burnout syndrome was higher in group 2 than in group 1 (p=0.02). Burnout syndrome affects medical students across all stages of their studies, and develops in a progressive way. In our study, external factors have no influence on the development of burnout syndrome.

  6. Determination of student opinions in augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Bicen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of the new technology has changed classroom teaching methods and tools in a positive way. This study investigated the classroom learning with augmented reality and the impact of student opinions. 97 volunteer undergraduate students took part in this study. Results included data in the form of frequencies, percentages and descriptive statistics. The results show that, with gamification methods, augmented reality content affected students’ opinions in a positive way. When QR codes are used in the classroom, students feel independent from classroom materials and can access various resources. Moreover, students think that, when augmented reality in the classroom is used, education is more enjoyable.

  7. [Negative and positive predictive relationships between coping strategies and the three dimensions of burnout among Hungarian medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ádám, Szilvia; Nistor, Anikó; Nistor, Katalin; Hazag, Anikó

    2014-08-10

    Effective management and prevention of widespread burnout among medical students in Hungary require thorough understanding of its relations to coping strategies, which lacks sufficient data. To explore the prevalence of burnout and its relations to coping strategies among medical students. Cross-sectional study with 292 participants. Burnout was assessed by the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey. Coping strategies were evaluated by the Folkman-Lazarus Ways of Coping Questionnaire and questions about health-maintenance behaviours. Associations between burnout and coping strategies were explored with linear regression analyses. The prevalence of high-level burnout was 25-56%. Both problem-focused coping and support-seeking were protective factors of exhaustion and cynicism, however, they predicted reduced personal accomplishment. Emotion-focused coping predicted exhaustion and cynicism and correlated negatively with reduced personal accomplishment. Health-maintenance behaviours were protective factors for exhaustion and predicted reduced personal accomplishment. Deployment of coping strategies that target the most prevalent burnout dimension may improve effective management of burnout.

  8. Description of how the specialization influences the dynamics of the functional and motor abilities among the third to fifth year female students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernenko S.A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A research purpose is an analysis of influence of specializations (badminton, aerobics, kalanetik on the dynamics of development of functional and motive capabilities of students 3 - 5 courses. 303 students took part in pedagogical research. The followings indexes were registered: frequency of heart-throbs, at run of 100 m., broad jump from a place, bending, unbending of hands in support lying. The analysis of results of index of Ruff'e is executed, tests to Shtange, Genche, Romberga. The dynamics of development of the functional state and motive capabilities is exposed for students. The degree of influence of exercises of different orientation is certain on development of functional and motive capabilities for girls.

  9. [Educational program had a positive effect on the intake of fat, fruits and vegetables and physical activity in students attending public elementary schools of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quizán-Plata, Trinidad; Villarreal Meneses, Liliana; Esparza Romero, Julián; Bolaños Villar, Adriana V; Díaz Zavala, R Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Poor diet and lack of physical activity are the most important risk factors of mortality and burden of disease in Mexico and many other countries around the world. The purpose of this research was to analyze the effect of an educational intervention on The consumption of fruits, vegetables, fat, physical activity and inactivity in students attending public primary school of Sonora Mexico. The intervention consisted of educational workshops on nutrition and physical activity aimed to the students and educational talks on nutrition and physical activity aimed to parents. Anthropometric, 24 hours recall, nutrition-knowledge, and physical-activity questionnaires pre- and post-intervention were applied in order to evaluate changes in both groups. 126 of the initial 129 students (97.7%) were evaluated at the end of the intervention. the consumption of fruits and vegetables was significantly higher after the intervention (p=0.0032) and the consumption of total fat decreased (p=0.02) in the intervention schools. Moreover, intervention increased physical activity (p=0.04) and decreased sedentary activities (p=0.006). Intervention students obtained higher knowledge in nutrition (p=0.05) at the end of intervention. The intervention had a positive effect on improve fruits, vegetables and fat consumption, physical activity and nutrition knowledge. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  10. Ergo-effects of designed school furniture and sitting positions on students behaviour and Musculo-Skeletal Disorder in Nigerian tertiary institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I Musa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Improper design of school furniture is one of the contributing factors to back pain among students as indicated in some studies. In the case of designing school furniture where sitting constitutes a considerable time in the school, seat becomes important for comfort. This study is carried out in three selected institutions in Nigeria to determine level of musculoskeletal disorder in students’ and the furniture that they use. 720 questionnaires with 240 students (120 boys and 120 girls drawn from each participating institutions were administered and 675 responses were received. The results show that the number of students having MSD, accounted for 93.75%. However, the distributions of pain in the body parts in each school were different. The musculoskeletal pain, mostly concentrated on neck, right shoulders right elbow right wrist right hand, upper back and lower back. The result also reveals that most of the students are sitting on chairs with seat that are too high and too deep or too shallow and of tables that are too high. However, it is recommended that further study on effect of designed school furniture and sitting position in larger sample of students’ representative in Nigeria tertiary institutions should be carried out in order to reduce the effect of body pains.

  11. Positional games

    CERN Document Server

    Hefetz, Dan; Stojaković, Miloš; Szabó, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    This text serves as a thorough introduction to the rapidly developing field of positional games. This area constitutes an important branch of combinatorics, whose aim it is to systematically develop an extensive mathematical basis for a variety of two-player perfect information games. These range from such popular games as Tic-Tac-Toe and Hex to purely abstract games played on graphs and hypergraphs. The subject of positional games is strongly related to several other branches of combinatorics such as Ramsey theory, extremal graph and set theory, and the probabilistic method. These notes cover a variety of topics in positional games, including both classical results and recent important developments. They are presented in an accessible way and are accompanied by exercises of varying difficulty, helping the reader to better understand the theory. The text will benefit both researchers and graduate students in combinatorics and adjacent fields.

  12. Using a Blog to Guide Beginner Students to Use Adjectives Appropriately When Writing Descriptions in English (El uso de una bitácora o "blog" para guiar a estudiantes principiantes en el uso apropiado de los adjetivos cuando escriben descripciones en inglés)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarazo Jara, Omar Yesid

    2012-01-01

    Beginner students often have difficulties using adjectives when they write descriptions in English. This article focuses on the procedures used to help my sixth grade students understand and use adjectives in the correct order by using a blog. To achieve the objective of the project I decided to implement an innovation in and out of class…

  13. Appraisal of Student-Teacher's Attitude Toward Teaching Profession ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The disposition of teachers within and outside the school will in no little amount positively affect the academic achievement of students. Thus, this paper is a descriptive survey which sought to appraise the attitude of student-teacher's relationship across teacher training institutes in Lagos State, Nigeria. This study was ...

  14. A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study of Graduate Students' Perceptions of Learning Effectiveness in Face-to-Face and Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicole Stayton

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of student perceptions of learning effectiveness is often used as a tool at universities to enhance the quality of course offerings. The recent growth in online course offerings creates new challenges in evaluating learning effectiveness. This study used three principles of adult learning theory, foundation, self-concept, and…

  15. Returnees, Student-Migrants and Second Chance Learners: Case Studies of Positional and Transformative Outcomes of Australian International Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Shanthi; Hoare, Lynnel; Harwood, Aramiha

    2011-01-01

    There is a clear need for new research into the work and life outcomes for graduates of Australian international education. Drawing upon divergent post-study transitions, this article aims to present a multi-faceted, qualitative foundation for the consideration of both positional and transformative impacts of international education on graduates'…

  16. Faculty Scholarship Has a Profound Positive Association with Student Evaluations of Teaching--Except When It Doesn't

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that research-productive faculty are also the finest instructors. But, is this commonly held belief correct? In the current study, the notion that faculty scholarship exhibits a positive association with teaching evaluations is investigated. Reflecting the data structure of faculty nested within university, the current…

  17. Getting from Here to There and Knowing Where: Teaching Global Positioning Systems to Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Craig L.

    2011-01-01

    Global Positioning Systems' (GPS) technology is available for individuals with visual impairments to use in wayfinding and address Lowenfeld's "three limitations of blindness." The considerations and methodologies for teaching GPS usage have developed over time as GPS information and devices have been integrated into orientation and mobility…

  18. Basic Skills Resource Center: A Descriptive Study of Learning Strategy Applications by English-as a-Second-Langage Students and Teachers in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    collection activity is presented in Table 1. Initial classroom observation of ESL classes was undertaken to familiarize researchers with the DLI curriculum...initiative. However, no student was observed asking another for information or clarification. Only in one classroom observation were the soldiers...one classroom observation where the soldiers were required to perform the steps involved in caring for and maintaining a gas mask was enlightening, for

  19. [A survey on injuries among nurses and nursing students: a descriptive epidemiologic analysis between 2002 and 2012 at a University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanati, Armando; Boschetto, Piera; Previato, Sara; Kuhdari, Parvanè; De Paris, Paola; Nardini, Marco; Gabutti, Giovanni

    2015-05-04

    Biological risk is the main occupational hazard in hospitals (40-50% of the total). More than 130,000 injuries occur every year in Italy and nurses are the most affected occupational category. This study evaluated the incidence of injuries related to biological risk in nurses and nursing students in the University Hospital of Ferrara, how they occur, the knowledge on the topic and on behaviour during the department's activity. A retrospective study involving a sample of 8 departments (selected for the occurrence of more than 30 biological injuries between 1st January 2002 and 31 December 2012) recorded injuries related to biological risk; subsequently a cross-sectional survey was carried out through a questionnaire administered to nurses and nursing students. 909 biological accidents were reported (81.18% in nurses and 18.82% in students). Blood was the main biological material involved (83.72% of cases), mostly by percutaneous exposure (84.16%). According to the questionnaire, 53% of subjects reported having had at least one injury during their career, and 5.72% did not report it; 46% reported doing risky procedures (re-capping needles) and 95.45% that they had been informed about the correct use of PPE. The lower percentage of injuries in students could be linked to good university training and to less risky procedures being performed. Re-capping needles remains one of the most dangerous manoeuvers practised. Ongoing training on the correct use of PPE is essential to train prepared and aware health professionals.

  20. Emended description of Pasteuria nishizawae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Gregory R; Atibalentja, N; Domier, Leslie L

    2005-07-01

    The description of the Gram-positive, obligately parasitic, mycelial and endospore-forming bacterium, Pasteuria nishizawae, is emended to include additional observations on the life cycle, host specificity and endospore morphology. The nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene is also provided.

  1. [Communication skills in the curriculum of Medical students from Spain (1990-2014): From the Primary Health Care to the Bologna Plan. A descriptive study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Padilla, Guillermo; Ferrández Antón, Teresa; Baleriola Júlvez, José; Almeida Cabrera, Rut

    2015-01-01

    Analyse the currently situation of teaching in communication skills in the Spanish Medical Schools (MS) and the grade of implementation from the recommended by the National Agency of Evaluation of the Quality and Accreditation. Descriptive-comparative, transversal and quantitative-qualitative study. University teaching field. The whole population of MS in Spain. teaching during the academic year 2013-2014 the Degree in Medicine homologated by the National Agency of Evaluation of the Quality and Accreditation and offering information of their educational plans and teaching guides (online, telephonic or e-mail). 1) Existence of courses about communication skills; 2) type of teaching; 3) format of the course; 4) credits; 5) length, and 6) grade. They were analysed with descriptive parameters and the Cohen's coefficient (d). Forty-two MS: 10 privates and 32 publics. Thirty MS (71.43%) presented at least one course of communication skills. The 78.12% of the public MS contained this kind of teaching as an entire course versus the 50.00% of the private MS. The national average by MS was 2.77 (σ=2.41), lower than the 5.0 credits recommended by the the National Agency of Evaluation of the Quality and Accreditation (relevant difference: d=1.63>0,8). The 63.63% contained this teaching over the second cycle (mode: second degree). The course loads in terms of credits destined to this skills has increased considerably from 1990 to 2014 (d= 1,43>0,8). However, it has not been completely established yet the recommendations about this aspect in most of the Spanish MS. The public universities seem to be more aware of this teaching. Furthermore, it would be interesting strengthen this skills in the sixth grade. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. "It Takes a Village": A Case Study of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports Implementation in an Exemplary Urban Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman-Scott, Emily; Hays, Danica G.; Cholewa, Blaire E.

    2018-01-01

    Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a widely implemented, culturally responsive framework using prevention and intervention activities to promote a safe school climate and positive academic and behavioral student outcomes. Using a qualitative single-case study design, authors provide a rich description of PBIS implementation…

  3. Substance Use Among Nurses and Nursing Students: A Joint Position Statement of the Emergency Nurses Association and the International Nurses Society on Addictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobbe, Stephen; Crowley, Melanie

    Alcohol and other substance use by nurses potentially places patients, the public, and nurses themselves at risk for serious injury or death. Nursing students are also at risk for problems related to substance use. When viewed and treated as a chronic medical illness, treatment outcomes for substance use disorders are comparable with those of other diseases and can result in lasting benefits. Professional monitoring programs that employ an alternative-to-discipline approach have been shown to be effective in the treatment of health professionals with substance use disorders and are considered a standard for recovery, with high rates of completion and return to practice. It is the position of the Emergency Nurses Association and the International Nurses Society on Addictions that 1. health care facilities provide education to nurses and other employees regarding alcohol and other drug use and establish policies, procedures, and practices to promote safe, supportive, drug-free workplaces; 2. health care facilities and schools of nursing adopt alternative-to-discipline approaches to treating nurses and nursing students with substance use disorders, with stated goals of retention, rehabilitation, and reentry into safe, professional practice; 3. drug diversion, in the context of personal use, is viewed primarily as a symptom of a serious and treatable disease and not exclusively as a crime; and 4. nurses and nursing students are aware of the risks associated with substance use, impaired practice, and drug diversion and have the responsibility and means to report suspected or actual concerns.

  4. Audio Description as a Pedagogical Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Kleege

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Audio description is the process of translating visual information into words for people who are blind or have low vision. Typically such description has focused on films, museum exhibitions, images and video on the internet, and live theater. Because it allows people with visual impairments to experience a variety of cultural and educational texts that would otherwise be inaccessible, audio description is a mandated aspect of disability inclusion, although it remains markedly underdeveloped and underutilized in our classrooms and in society in general. Along with increasing awareness of disability, audio description pushes students to practice close reading of visual material, deepen their analysis, and engage in critical discussions around the methodology, standards and values, language, and role of interpretation in a variety of academic disciplines. We outline a few pedagogical interventions that can be customized to different contexts to develop students' writing and critical thinking skills through guided description of visual material.

  5. ‘The next step’ – alumni students' views on their preparation for their first position as a physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Lindberg

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although medical programmes are often thoroughly evaluated, these evaluations more seldom include workplace points of view. The present study focuses on how well a Swedish medical programme was judged to prepare students for work as a physician. Methods: Thirty-two competences in physicians'work were identified through interviews. A subsequent questionnaire was completed by 123 programme alumni who had worked for 1–2½ years in different parts of the country. Alumni were asked to rate the importance of each competence, their self-assessed competence as well as how these competences were addressed during their medical training. Results: The subsequent analysis identified areas where their training programme, according to the alumni, failed to prepare them satisfactorily. Problem areas included competences in clinical skills, handling stressful situations and in applied rather than foundational knowledge about common symptoms and diseases. Conclusion: Despite extensive practical training, medical education still faces some problems in the transition from education to work.

  6. Greenness and school-wide test scores are not always positively associated – A replication of "linking student performance in Massachusetts elementary schools with the 'greenness' of school surroundings using remote sensing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew H.E.M. Browning; Ming Kuo; Sonya Sachdeva; Kangjae Lee; Lynne Westphal

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies find vegetation around schools correlates positively with student test scores. To test this relationship in schools with less green cover and more disadvantaged students, we replicated a leading study, using six years of NDVI-derived greenness data to predict school-level math and reading achievement in 404 Chicago public schools. A direct replication...

  7. Risky sexual behaviors among sexually active first-year students matriculating at a historically Black college: Is a positive self-image an instigator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Walter L

    2016-01-01

    A sample of 498 sexually active first-year students matriculating at a historically Black college in North Carolina was used to determine correlates of risky sexual behaviors. In an Ordinary Least Squares regression, the self-esteem element "I take a positive attitude toward myself" (B = 1.12, p = .05), non-condom use because of partner issues (B = .53, p = .05) and being drunk or high (B = 1.20, p = .001), oral sex (B = 1.74, p = .001), anal sex (B = .61, p = .04), and bisexuality (B = .85, p = .03) all increased the number of these behaviors. Higher scores on the condom usage scale (B = -.38, p = .002) were found to decrease the number of risky sexual behaviors. Illicit drug use was an underpinning of the surprisingly positive relationship between positive self-image and risky sexual behaviors. It was concluded that school-based social workers, mental health care professionals, and community-based prevention providers can play a critical role in the training of peer facilitators, development, and supervision of peer-driven risk-reduction programs to address the complex interplay among self-esteem, sex, and substances.

  8. Positive Effects of Restricting Student Note-Taking in a Capstone Psychology Course: Reducing the Demands of Divided Attention in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Gerald M.

    2014-01-01

    Two versions of a senior-level capstone course with differing note-taking strategies were compared. In one semester, a traditional student note-taking format was used; in another semester, student note-taking was rendered unnecessary by providing students with complete instructor notes. Student performance in the course as well as student opinions…

  9. Want Positive Behavior? Use Positive Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chip; Freeman-Loftis, Babs

    2012-01-01

    Positive adult language is the professional use of words and tone of voice to enable students to learn in an engaged, active way. This includes learning social skills. To guide children toward choosing and maintaining positive behaviors, adults need to carefully choose the words and tone of voice used when speaking to them. Learning to use…

  10. Psychological Morbidity in Students of Medical College and Science and Art College Students - A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Mahawar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of quality of life in medical students we have conducted a cross sectional & descriptive study on screening of mental illness of 60 medical students of prefinal year and comparing it with 60 students of third year of Science and Art College. Students were selected via random sampling. GHQ-12 was used as a screening tool and after obtaining scores students were graded in 3 categories - individuals screened positive for psychological morbidity were of Grades 2 and 3 and individuals screened negative for psychological morbidity were of Grade 1 and they were compared according to college, gender & residence. Students screened positive for psychological morbidity as per GHQ-12 were found higher in medical college (87% as compared to Science and Art College (45% and a statistically significant association was found between psychological morbidity and medical students. Psychological morbidity was not significantly associated with residence and gender.

  11. Nursing Student Perceptions of Structural Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Shelley C; Ward, Karen S

    To meet role expectations for nurses, nurses must feel empowered. Faculty contributions to the learning environment for nursing students are critical. A descriptive analysis of student perceptions of empowerment within the learning environment was conducted using a form of Kanter's Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire; 203 participants from schools in 17 different states completed surveys. Subjects demonstrated moderate degrees of structural empowerment in their learning environment. This positive finding can be further investigated and used to fully prepare future nurses.

  12. Guidelines for Description

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Links, P.; Horsman, Peter; Kühnel, Karsten; Priddy, M.; Reijnhoudt, Linda; Merenmies, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Guidelines follow the conceptual metadata model (deliverable 17.2). They include guidelines for description of collection-holding institutions, document collections, organisations, personalities, events, camps and ghettos. As much as possible the guidelines comply with the descriptive standards

  13. Distinguishing Features and Similarities Between Descriptive Phenomenological and Qualitative Description Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Danny G; Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan; Knafl, Kathleen; Cohen, Marlene Z

    2016-09-01

    Scholars who research phenomena of concern to the discipline of nursing are challenged with making wise choices about different qualitative research approaches. Ultimately, they want to choose an approach that is best suited to answer their research questions. Such choices are predicated on having made distinctions between qualitative methodology, methods, and analytic frames. In this article, we distinguish two qualitative research approaches widely used for descriptive studies: descriptive phenomenological and qualitative description. Providing a clear basis that highlights the distinguishing features and similarities between descriptive phenomenological and qualitative description research will help students and researchers make more informed choices in deciding upon the most appropriate methodology in qualitative research. We orient the reader to distinguishing features and similarities associated with each approach and the kinds of research questions descriptive phenomenological and qualitative description research address. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. The effect of altering self-descriptive behavior on self-concept and classroom behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J; Muller, D

    1977-09-01

    This research examined the impact of operant reinforcement of positive self-descriptive behavior on the self-concepts and classroom behavior of 60 fifth-grade students. Three groups of 10 male and 10 female low self-concept students wrote a series of eight essays describing their school performance. The first group (P) received written reinforcement for positive self-descriptions of their school performance. The second group (G) received an equal number of reinforcements for general statements. The third group (C) received no reinforcement for written statements. Three areas of self-concept were measured with the Primary Self-Concept Inventory: personal-self, social-self, and intellectual-self. A frequency count was also made of nine classroom behaviors thought to be influenced by self-concept. The P group displayed increases in the frequency of positive self-descriptive statement and in intellectual self-concept but no changes in personal self-concept, social self-concept, or the nine classroom behaviors. The G and C groups showed no change in self-description, self-concept, or the nine classroom behaviors.

  15. THE POSITION OF INTEREST IN SPORTS AND RECREATION OF 7th GRADE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN THE FACTOR ANALYSIS OF DIFFERENT INTEREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Milošević

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Personal interests carry a great potential and are usually a drive to act. Therefore they usually point towards the activity of an individual in his interest area. An insight into the position of the interest in sports and recreation among other interests can be obtained by inspecting the interests of 7th grade elementary school students from Sremska Mitrovica and Jagodina. The sample consisted of 736 7th grade elementary school students of both genders. A non-experimental study of the students’ interests was done using a questionnaire that consisted of 5 interest indicators: job preference, self-estimation of affinity, use of free time, direct self-estimation of interests and reaction to key words-stimuli. Each indicator had 30 items that asses 30 interests. A t test was used to inspect the level of interest in sports and recreation. Also, factor analysis was done for each indicator separately. The reason for this approach is that there is no real confirmation that these 5 indicators are well suited for assessing the interests of young persons in the time we live in. Students’ interest in sports and recreation is about 4 on the scale of 1 to 5, on each of the indicators. The data shows that the interest of 7th grade elementary school students in sports and recreation is closely linked to interest in military, these two interests belong to the same factor regardless of the way the interests are assessed, that is, they belong to the same factor on each of the 5 indicators. The interest in adventure belongs to the same factor as the interest in sports and recreation on 4 out of 5 indicators, and interest in humor, interest in travel and hedonistic interest on 3 out of 5 indicators. These results might indicate that the motives for engaging in sports and recreation are unstable, because this composition of relatedness of the interests can be interpreted as the factor of fun. If that is so, these findings alert to the importance of building a

  16. Barriers to Participation in the National FFA Organization According to Urban Agriculture Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael J.; Kitchel, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Urban youth engaged in after-school organizations have more positive attributes compared to their unengaged contemporaries. The FFA is one particular intra-curricular organization with after-school components; yet, urban students do not participate in FFA at the same levels as rural students. The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore…

  17. The Impact of Lecturer-Student Relationship on Self-Esteem and Academic Performance at Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvester Dodzi Nyadanu; Mirrielle Yayra Garglo; Timothy Adampah; Rachel Libline Garglo

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the effects of lecturer-student relationship on the self-esteem and academic performance of nursing students at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. The descriptive statistics on the level-clustered random samples indicated two of the lecturer-student relationships, more connectedness and non-threatening, to be positive while the other two, independent and conflicting, were negative relationships. Thus the student-lecturer relationship was an average. With the exception...

  18. The Identification of Issues Serving as Barriers to Positive Educational Experiences for Saudi Arabian Students Studying in the State of Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, V. Jean

    2009-01-01

    The United States has experienced unrivaled success in attracting international students for higher education studies. Saudi Arabia has sponsored students for study in the United States since 1950, with the number of students on scholarship varying according to the fluctuation in oil prices. The cultures of Saudi Arabia and the United States…

  19. Descriptive set theory

    CERN Document Server

    Moschovakis, YN

    1987-01-01

    Now available in paperback, this monograph is a self-contained exposition of the main results and methods of descriptive set theory. It develops all the necessary background material from logic and recursion theory, and treats both classical descriptive set theory and the effective theory developed by logicians.

  20. Description logics of context

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Klarman, S

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce Description Logics of Context (DLCs) - an extension of Description Logics (DLs) for context-based reasoning. Our approach descends from J. McCarthy's tradition of treating contexts as formal objects over which one can quantify...

  1. Physics 3204. Course Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newfoundland and Labrador Dept. of Education.

    A description of the physics 3204 course in Newfoundland and Labrador is provided. The description includes: (1) statement of purpose, including general objectives of science education; (2) a list of six course objectives; (3) course content for units on sound, light, optical instruments, electrostatics, current electricity, Michael Faraday and…

  2. Word Processing Job Descriptions and Duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski-Johnson, Marlyce

    In order to develop a word processing career file at Milwaukee Area Technical College, employment managers at 124 Milwaukee-area businesses were asked to provide job descriptions for all word processing positions in the company; skill and knowledge requirements necessary to obtain these positions; employee appraisal forms; wage scales; a list of…

  3. Positioning health professional identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Krogh Christensen, Mette; Mørcke, Anne Mette

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on positioning theory, the purpose of this paper is to characterize the activities and positions of students and supervisors at workplaces and on-campus skills training sites across the higher health professional educations of medicine, sports science, and nursing. Furthermore, the study ...... explored the impact of work-based learning (WBL) and skills training on students’ personal professional identity development....

  4. Teaching Descriptive Writing through Visualization and the Five Senses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The descriptive paragraph and subsequent essay are usually among the first assignments students must complete in composition classes. Typically, students are told to describe their childhood home, a person of importance, a special object, or a summer vacation. Most students, especially learners of English as a foreign language (EFL), have…

  5. A Prospective, Descriptive, Quality Improvement Study to Investigate the Impact of a Turn-and-Position Device on the Incidence of Hospital-acquired Sacral Pressure Ulcers and Nursing Staff Time Needed for Repositioning Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kimberly D; Clark, Rebecca C

    2016-11-01

    Patients in critical care areas are at risk for developing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) due to their physical conditions and limited ability to reposition themselves. A prospective, 2-phase quality improvement study was conducted from September to November 2011 and from February to April 2012 in 1 medical and 1 surgical ICU to investigate the impact of a turn-and-assist device on the incidence of HAPUs and the time and personnel required to reposition patients reported as person/minutes (staff x minutes). A consecutive, convenience sample of patients was selected from newly admitted ICU patients who were at least 18 years old, nonambulatory, and required 2 or more people to assist with turning and repositioning. Sociodemographic data (patient age, gender, height, weight, body mass index, incontinence status); total Braden score and subscores for Activity, Mobility, and Moisture on admission; length of ICU stay and ventilator days; and sacral pressure ulcer incidence and stage and turn-and-assist data were collected. Fifty (50) patients participated in each phase. In phase 1, standard care for positioning included pillows, underpads, standard low-air-loss beds and additional staff as required for turning. In phase 2, the study product replaced standard care repositioning products including pillows; and a larger disposable moisture-wicking underpad (included as part of the turn study project kit) was substituted for the smaller, standard moisture-wicking disposable underpad. Turning procedures were timed with a stopwatch. Data were collected for a total of 32 hours during the observation periods; all patients were followed from admission until discharge from the ICU for a maximum of 14 days. T-tests were used to compare patient characteristics and person-minutes needed for repositioning differences, and Fisher's exact test was used to compare the incidence of sacral HAPUs during phase 1 and phase 2 of the study. No statistically significant

  6. Nursing Student Perceptions Regarding Simulation Experience Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Aimee A; Gruenke, Theresa; Alt-Gehrman, Penny; Hansen, Jamie

    2016-09-01

    The use of simulated learning experiences (SLEs) have increased within nursing curricula with positive learning outcomes for nursing students. The purpose of this study is to explore nursing students' perceptions of their clinical decision making (CDM) related to the block sequencing of different patient care experiences, SLEs versus hospital-based learning experiences (HLEs). A qualitative descriptive design used open-ended survey questions to generate information about the block sequencing of SLEs and its impact on nursing students' perceived CDM. Three themes emerged from the data: Preexperience Anxiety, Real-Time Decision Making, and Increased Patient Care Experiences. Nursing students identified that having SLEs prior to HLEs provided several benefits. Even when students preferred SLEs prior to HLEs, the sequence did not impact their CDM. This suggests that alternating block sequencing can be used without impacting the students' perceptions of their ability to make decisions. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(9):528-532.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Hardware description languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jerry H.

    1994-01-01

    Hardware description languages are special purpose programming languages. They are primarily used to specify the behavior of digital systems and are rapidly replacing traditional digital system design techniques. This is because they allow the designer to concentrate on how the system should operate rather than on implementation details. Hardware description languages allow a digital system to be described with a wide range of abstraction, and they support top down design techniques. A key feature of any hardware description language environment is its ability to simulate the modeled system. The two most important hardware description languages are Verilog and VHDL. Verilog has been the dominant language for the design of application specific integrated circuits (ASIC's). However, VHDL is rapidly gaining in popularity.

  8. Student Affairs Administrators & Well-Being: Examining Time in Field, Position Level and Factors That Have the Strongest Relationship to Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessman, Hollie M.

    2015-01-01

    The voice of higher education student affairs professionals is under-represented in the well-being literature even though these campus community members are responsible for providing key programs and services that facilitate the holistic development of students. In order to understand the role of well-being in the work-life of these professionals,…

  9. Conceptions of Knowledge in Research on Students' Understanding of the Greenhouse Effect: Methodological Positions and Their Consequences for Representations of Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Anders; Makitalo, Asa; Saljo, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Much of the research on students' understanding of the greenhouse effect and global warming reports poor results. Students are claimed to hold misconceptions and naive beliefs, and the impact of teaching on their conceptions is also low. In the present study, these results are called into question, and it is argued that they may to a large extent…

  10. First-Year College Students with ADHD And/or LD: Differences in Engagement, Positive Core Self-Evaluation, School Preparation, and College Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPaul, George J.; Pinho, Trevor D.; Pollack, Brittany L.; Gormley, Matthew J.; Laracy, Seth D.

    2017-01-01

    Students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or learning disabilities (LD) experience significant challenges in making the transition from high school to college. This study examined the ways first-year college students with ADHD, LD, ADHD+LD, and comparison peers differ in engagement, core self-evaluation, high school…

  11. Prevalência de CAGE positivo entre estudantes de segundo grau de Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, 1994 Prevalence of CAGE-positive secondary school students in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa C. Trois

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetiva descrever a prevalência de positividade do teste CAGE entre estudantes de terceiro ano do segundo grau de Porto Alegre, RS, em 1994. A amostra foi composta por 1.171 estudantes, 598 (51% procedentes de escolas públicas e 573 (49% de escolas particulares. Encontrou-se referência de consumo prévio de bebidas alcoólicas de 93%, com maior prevalência entre os estudantes do sexo masculino (pThis study aims to describe the prevalence of CAGE-positive third-year high school students in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, in 1994. The sample consisted of 1,171 students: 598 (51% from public and 573 (49% from private schools. We found reference to previous alcoholic beverage consumption in 93% of the interviewees. The highest prevalence was among male students (p<0.02 and students from private schools (p<0.03. Half of the students reported weekly consumption, usually when going to parties (60% and bars (17%. CAGE positiveness prevalence was 8.3% overall and 11% among males (p<0.02. When variables like gender, age, and socioeconomic status were controlled, there was no statistically significant difference between the kind of school and CAGE status.

  12. Phylogenetic position and emended description of the genus Methylovorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronina, Nina V; Ivanova, Ekaterina G; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2005-03-01

    The genus Methylovorus, currently represented by the restricted facultative methylotroph Methylovorus glucosotrophus Govorukhina and Trotsenko 1991 and the obligate methylotroph Methylovorus mays Doronina et al. 2001, is here established by direct sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA genes and DNA-DNA hybridization to be clearly separated from the extant ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway methylobacteria and to form a distinct branch within the beta-Proteobacteria.

  13. Positioning Ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassing, Gayle, Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A series of articles discusses the development of ballet instruction in secondary and higher education, beginning ballet in high school and in college, teaching techniques, ballet for visually handicapped students, and methods for the prevention of injuries in beginning students. (JN)

  14. Exploring Teacher Strategies in Teaching Descriptive Writing in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyanti, Sufatmi; Yaacob, Aizan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is the outcome of a study which examined teacher strategies in teaching descriptive writing to junior high school students in Delitua, North Sumatra, Indonesia. The study was based on two questions: 1) What are the teaching strategies used by EFL teachers in teaching descriptive writing? 2) To what extent did the descriptive…

  15. Addressing the Language Description Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ali Bolgiin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-described language features are key to successful teaching and learning, especially for achieving advanced levels of proficiency. Other measures, such as simply increasing the number of reading and listening passages in a language program alone are not enough to bring the student to a higher level in a given skill. In fact, even being present in the target culture does not suffice. Angelelli and Degueldre (2002 argue that at advanced levels, even spending time in a country where the language is spoken is not necessarily sufficient for learners: "They do not need just exposure; they need answers to questions and explanations that they can rarely get by simply being immersed in a language/ culture." Less commonly taught languages (LCTLs lack descriptions that have such answers and explanations (cf. Fotos, 2002. It is argued in this paper that corpuslinguistic analyses help to provide actual usage-based, rather than intuition-based, descriptions and explanations of language features. Such approach is illustrated through English and Turkish examples.

  16. CRAC2 model description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, L.T.; Alpert, D.J.; Burke, R.P.; Johnson, J.D.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Aldrich, D.C.; Blond, R.M.

    1984-03-01

    The CRAC2 computer code is a revised version of CRAC (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences) which was developed for the Reactor Safety Study. This document provides an overview of the CRAC2 code and a description of each of the models used. Significant improvements incorporated into CRAC2 include an improved weather sequence sampling technique, a new evacuation model, and new output capabilities. In addition, refinements have been made to the atmospheric transport and deposition model. Details of the modeling differences between CRAC2 and CRAC are emphasized in the model descriptions

  17. Olkiluoto site description 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    This fourth version of the Olkiluoto Site Report, produced by the OMTF (Olkiluoto Modelling Task Force), updates the Olkiluoto Site Report 2008 with the data and knowledge obtained up to December 2010. A descriptive model of the site (the Site Descriptive Model, SDM), i.e. a model describing the geological and hydrogeological structure of the site, properties of the bedrock and the groundwater and its flow, and the associated interacting processes and mechanisms. The SDM is divided into six parts: surface system, geology, rock mechanics, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and transport properties

  18. Olkiluoto site description 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    This fourth version of the Olkiluoto Site Report, produced by the OMTF (Olkiluoto Modelling Task Force), updates the Olkiluoto Site Report 2008 with the data and knowledge obtained up to December 2010. A descriptive model of the site (the Site Descriptive Model, SDM), i.e. a model describing the geological and hydrogeological structure of the site, properties of the bedrock and the groundwater and its flow, and the associated interacting processes and mechanisms. The SDM is divided into six parts: surface system, geology, rock mechanics, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and transport properties.

  19. Online formative MCQs to supplement traditional teaching: a very significant positive impact on student performance in the short and long run

    OpenAIRE

    Catley, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The paper builds on the research underpinning One Lecturer’s Experience of Blending E-learning with Traditional Teaching (Catley, 2005). It analyses the earlier findings in more depth and examines the longer term impact of online quizzes on student performance. Engagement with formative online MCQs is explored generally and the links between MCQ engagement and a range of student characteristics: seminar attendance, “A” level performance, age, nationality, gender and prior study of the discipl...

  20. First-year success in a nursing baccalaureate plan of study: A descriptive research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Vivian; Thomas, Jessica A; Fernando, Harshini

    2018-08-01

    Predicting students' aptitude for post-secondary success remains a widely studied topic. This descriptive study explored demographic variables contributing to success in quantitative courses required by the nursing degree plan. Identification of an "at risk" student profile may inform interventions with which to support attainment of an academic degree. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between demographic characteristics and successful completion of baccalaureate nursing courses thought to enhance quantitative reasoning skills: first-year math, first-year chemistry, and second-year pathopharmacology nursing. This retrospective analysis accessed 4521 academic records of students who took these three courses at a United States university sometime between Fall 2008 and Fall 2015. De-identified student data included course grades, gender, full-time study, income, marital status, first generation, secondary school (also known as high school) location, dual credit, and high school and university grade point averages. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to describe the important features of the data. Of the 4521 records, 2556 undergraduates (57%) passed the courses in which they were enrolled. Among successful students, females outnumbered males (66%), ages ranged from 20 to 24 years, 86% were classified as low income, 54% fit the designation of first generation, and 12% earned dual credit (university credit during secondary school). Our data demonstrate a positive relationship between dual credit and success, with the strongest correlation (0.62) noted for students in pathopharmacology. In the baccalaureate-nursing plan of study, courses thought to enhance students' quantitative reasoning skills remain difficult for some to successfully complete. We conclude that the more successful students tend to be older, have a higher income, and a higher high school grade point average, while those less successful are directly out of high

  1. Descriptive data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cheryl Bagley

    2009-01-01

    This 13th article of the Basics of Research series is first in a short series on statistical analysis. These articles will discuss creating your statistical analysis plan, levels of measurement, descriptive statistics, probability theory, inferential statistics, and general considerations for interpretation of the results of a statistical analysis.

  2. Osiris reactor descriptive report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    OSIRIS is a swimming pool reactor of 70 MW thermal power. Its main purpose is the irradiation of reactor materials in high neutron flux. A description is given of the air conditioning, ventilation, and radioactive gas removal system. (R.L.)

  3. Plot Description (PD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Plot Description (PD) form is used to describe general characteristics of the FIREMON macroplot to provide ecological context for data analyses. The PD data characterize the topographical setting, geographic reference point, general plant composition and cover, ground cover, fuels, and soils information. This method provides the general ecological data that can be...

  4. Generalizing: The descriptive struggle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D.; Hon Ph.D.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The literature is not kind to the use of descriptive generalizations. Authors struggle and struggle to find and rationalize a way to use them and then fail in spite of trying a myriad of work-arounds. And then we have Lincoln and Guba’s famous statement: “The only generalization is: there is no generalization” in referring to qualitative research. (op cit, p. 110 They are referring to routine QDA yielding extensive descriptions, but which tacitly include conceptual generalizations without any real thought of knowledge about them. In this chapter I wish to explore this struggle for the purpose of explaining that the various contra arguments to using descriptive generalizations DO NOT apply to the ease of using conceptual generalizations yielded in SGT and especially FGT. I will not argue for the use of descriptive generalization. I agree with Lincoln and Guba with respect to QDA, “the only generalization is: there is no generalization.” It is up to the QDA methodologists, of whom there are many; to continue the struggle and I wish them well.

  5. Fractal description of fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, C.W.

    1991-06-01

    Recent studies on the fractal description of fractures are reviewed. Some problems on this subject are discussed. It seems hopeful to use the fractal dimension as a parameter for quantitative fractography and to apply fractal structures to the development of high toughness materials. (author). 28 refs, 7 figs

  6. Tore Supra: technical description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    This report is aimed, after a brief recall of physics and technologic perspectives of Tore Supra, at giving a detailed description of the basic machine; details of each component are defined. Volume 1 is specifically concerned with the general aspects of Tore Supra and the toroidal field system [fr

  7. Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  8. The effectiveness of peer mentoring in promoting a positive transition to higher education for first-year undergraduate students: a mixed methods systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragher, Jean; McGaughey, Jennifer

    2016-04-22

    The global transfer of nursing and midwifery education to higher education institutes has led to student nurses and midwives experiencing challenges previously faced by traditional third-level students, including isolation, loneliness, financial difficulties and academic pressure. These challenges can contribute to increased stress and anxiety levels which may be detrimental to the successful transition to higher education, thus leading to an increase in attrition rates. Peer mentoring as an intervention has been suggested to be effective in supporting students in the transition to third-level education through enhancing a sense of belongingness and improving student satisfaction, engagement and retention rates. This proposed systematic review aims to determine the effectiveness of peer mentoring in enhancing levels of student engagement, sense of belonging and overall satisfaction of first-year undergraduate students following transition into higher education. MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, ProQuest, Embase, CINAHL, ERIC, PsycINFO and CENTRAL databases will be searched for qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods studies on the implementation of peer assessment strategies in higher education institutes (HEIs) or universities for full-time, first-year adult students (>17 years). Included studies will be limited to the English language. The quality of included studies will be assessed using a validated Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT). The findings will be presented as a narrative synthesis or meta-analysis as appropriate following sequential explanatory synthesis. The review will provide clear, non-biased evidence-based guidance to all third-level educators on the effectiveness of peer-mentoring programmes for first-year undergraduates. The review is necessary to help establish which type of peer mentoring is most effective. The evidence from qualitative and quantitative studies drawn from the international literature will be utilised to illustrate the best way

  9. Proactive Student Engagement with Fitness to Practise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Lo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fitness to practise (FTP is fundamental to health professional education and health service delivery, impacting on both practitioner and client wellbeing. Literature exploring FTP support policies primarily identifies retrospective student support and management. This study describes student perceptions of an innovative FTP policy which supports students and staff to proactively identify FTP management strategies prior to entering the clinical environment. Forty-nine final year physiotherapy students were surveyed regarding their perceptions of self-declaring FTP. Ordinal data from Likert scales were reported using descriptive statistics. Thematic analysis was undertaken for open text responses. The response rate was 88%. Forty-two percent of students stated that they had experienced FTP concerns during the course. Concerns included physical and mental impairment and clinical competence issues. The majority of students (80% indicated that they were “comfortable” or “very comfortable” in self-declaring FTP issues. Confidentiality, positive relationships with staff and a supportive environment enhanced likelihood of declaration. Eight students (19% met with university staff to develop management strategies and all rated these meetings as “helpful” or “very helpful.” Students had positive perceptions of self-declaring their FTP to enable early development of management strategies. This strategy successfully navigates sensitive ethicolegal issues, empowering students to take responsibility for their own FTP.

  10. Ubiquitous positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mannings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This groundbreaking resource offers a practical, in-depth understanding of Ubiquitous Positioning - positioning systems that identify the location and position of people, vehicles and objects in time and space in the digitized networked economy. The future and growth of ubiquitous positioning will be fueled by the convergence of many other areas of technology, from mobile telematics, Internet technology, and location systems, to sensing systems, geographic information systems, and the semantic web. This first-of-its-kind volume explores ubiquitous positioning from a convergence perspective, of

  11. Positioning consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente; Keller, Margit

    2014-01-01

    positionings emerges based on empirical examples of research in parent–children consumption. Positionings are flexible discursive fixations of the relationship between the performances of the practitioner, other practitioners, media discourse and consumption activities. The basic positioning types...... are the practice maintenance and the practice change position, with different sorts of adapting in between. Media discourse can become a resource for a resistant position against social control or for an appropriating position in favour of space for action. Regardless of the current relation to a particular media......This article analyses the ways in which media discourses become a part of contested consumption activities. We apply a positioning perspective with practice theory to focus on how practitioners relate to media discourse as a symbolic resource in their everyday practices. A typology of performance...

  12. Estudo descritivo de alterações posturais sagitais da coluna lombar em escolares da rede federal de ensino de Florianópolis Descriptive study of sagittal lumbar spine changes in students of the federal educational system of Florianópolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susane Graup

    2010-01-01

    part in this study. Photometry was used following a specific protocol for postural assessment, and a questionnaire was used to identify the prevalence and frequency of low back pain, and activities that triggered the problem. Descriptive statistics, Student's t-test for independent samples, chi-square test and Poisson's regression were used, with the level of significance set at p<0.05. RESULTS: The prevalence of low back pain was 49.3%, with weekly frequency in 43.1% of the sample. The prevalence of deviation was of 53.8%, and 90.9% corresponded to the rectification of the lumbar curve, affecting more males. Significant differences in lumbar angle between the sexes were found; higher prevalence ratios of lumbar postural deviations was found in the male group. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalences of low back pain and lumbar postural changes in adolescents were high, and no significant relationship between those variables was found. Practicing sports or vigorous activities and remaining in a seated position for extended periods of time were the principal causes of lumbar pain.

  13. RETRIEVAL EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Steinhoff

    1997-01-01

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) retrieval from the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. There are no quality assurance requirements or QA controls in this document. Retrieval under normal conditions is accomplished with the same fleet of equipment as is used for emplacement. Descriptions of equipment used for retrieval under normal conditions is found in Emplacement Equipment Descriptions, DI: BCAF00000-01717-5705-00002 (a document in progress). Equipment used for retrieval under abnormal conditions is addressed in this document and consists of the following: (1) Inclined Plane Hauler; (2) Bottom Lift Transporter; (3) Load Haul Dump (LHD) Loader; (4) Heavy Duty Forklift for Emplacement Drifts; (5) Covered Shuttle Car; (6) Multipurpose Vehicle; and (7) Scaler

  14. Multidimensional nonlinear descriptive analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Nishisato, Shizuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of categorical, or non-numerical, data is a problem that scientists face across a wide range of disciplines. Exploring data analysis in various areas of research, such as the social sciences and biology, Multidimensional Nonlinear Descriptive Analysis presents methods for analyzing categorical data that are not necessarily sampled randomly from a normal population and often involve nonlinear relations. This reference not only provides an overview of multidimensional nonlinear descriptive analysis (MUNDA) of discrete data, it also offers new results in a variety of fields. The first part of the book covers conceptual and technical preliminaries needed to understand the data analysis in subsequent chapters. The next two parts contain applications of MUNDA to diverse data types, with each chapter devoted to one type of categorical data, a brief historical comment, and basic skills peculiar to the data types. The final part examines several problems and then concludes with suggestions for futu...

  15. Tobacco point of sale advertising increases positive brand user imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, R J; Jancey, J; Jones, S

    2002-09-01

    To determine the potential impact of point of sale advertising on adolescents so as to inform changes to the Tobacco Control Act. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. In the control condition, students were exposed to a photograph of a packet of cigarettes; in the intervention condition, students were exposed to an ad for cigarettes, typical of point of sale advertising posters. All students then rated the brand user on a set of 12 bipolar adjectives. Two brands were used in the study: Benson & Hedges, and Marlboro. One hundred year (grade) 6 and 7 students (age range 10-12 years), from four Western Australian metropolitan primary schools, participated in the study. In a majority of the brand user descriptions, the cigarette advertisements increased brand user imagery in a positive way, especially for Benson & Hedges. For example, participants viewing the Benson & Hedges advertisement, as distinct from those viewing the Benson & Hedges pack only, were more likely to describe the Benson & Hedges user as relaxed, interesting, cool, rich, adventurous, and classy. Relative to the Marlboro pack only, the Marlboro ad increased positive perceptions of the Marlboro user on adventurous, interesting, and relaxed. The results presented here support restrictions being placed on advertising at point of sale, since such ads have the potential to increase positive brand user imagery directly in the situation where a product purchase can take place, and hence the potential to increase the likelihood of impulse purchasing.

  16. TMACS system description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaief, C.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a description of the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). It is intended as an introduction for those persons unfamiliar with the system as well as a reference document for the users, maintenance personnel, and system designers. In addition to describing the system, the document outlines the associated drawing documentation, provides maintenance and spare parts information, and discusses other TMACS documents that provide additional detail

  17. Input description for BIOPATH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, J.E.; Bergstroem, U.; Edlund, O.

    1980-01-01

    The computer program BIOPATH describes the flow of radioactivity within a given ecosystem after a postulated release of radioactive material and the resulting dose for specified population groups. The present report accounts for the input data necessary to run BIOPATH. The report also contains descriptions of possible control cards and an input example as well as a short summary of the basic theory.(author)

  18. Producing More Persuasive Antiviolence Messages for College Students: Testing the Effects of Framing, Information Sources, and Positive/Negative Fact Appeal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hyunjae

    2012-01-01

    College students, between the ages of about 18 and 24, are the group of people who are most often exposed to situations involving diverse types of violence. They have greater access to alcohol and drugs and are under far less parental supervision than younger age groups; reports have shown that frequent involvement in several types of violent…

  19. XML Diagnostics Description Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, A.; Fernandes, H.; Varandas, C.; Lister, J.; Yonekawa, I.

    2006-01-01

    A standard for the self-description of fusion plasma diagnostics will be presented, based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML). The motivation is to maintain and organise the information on all the components of a laboratory experiment, from the hardware to the access security, to save time and money when problems arises. Since there is no existing standard to organise this kind of information, every Association stores and organises each experiment in different ways. This can lead to severe problems when the organisation schema is poorly documented or written in national languages. The exchange of scientists, researchers and engineers between laboratories is a common practice nowadays. Sometimes they have to install new diagnostics or to update existing ones and frequently they lose a great deal of time trying to understand the currently installed system. The most common problems are: no documentation available; the person who understands it has left; documentation written in the national language. Standardisation is the key to solving all the problems mentioned. From the commercial information on the diagnostic (component supplier; component price) to the hardware description (component specifications; drawings) to the operation of the equipment (finite state machines) through change control (who changed what and when) and internationalisation (information at least in the native language and in English), a common XML schema will be proposed. This paper will also discuss an extension of these ideas to the self-description of ITER plant systems, since the problems will be identical. (author)

  20. Olkiluoto site description 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, J.; Ahokas, H.; Hudson, J.A.

    2007-03-01

    This second version of the Olkiluoto Site Report, produced by the OMTF (Olkiluoto Modelling Task Force), updates the Olkiluoto Site Report 2004 (Posiva 2005) with the data and knowledge obtained up to December 2005. The main product of the modelling has been to develop a descriptive model of the site (the Site Descriptive Model), i.e. a model describing the geometry, properties of the bedrock and the water and the associated interacting processes and mechanisms. For practical reasons, the Site Descriptive Model is divided into five parts: surface system, geology, rock mechanics, hydrogeology and hydrogeochemistry, which are presented in individual chapters. Four separated models are presented: the geological, rock mechanics, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical models. The consistency between the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical models is assessed in a joint chapter. Chapter 1 presents an outline of the report, explains the background to its development and sets out its objectives and scope. It is also introduces and explains the integrated modelling methodology, the nomenclature used in the descriptions of the models and the prediction/outcome studies. Chapter 2 provides a brief overview of the data used for producing the Site Description. Chapters 3 to 8 present the descriptive modelling, which involves interpreting data, interpolating or extrapolating between measurement points and calibrating the model against data, based on the various assumptions made about each conceptual model. Chapter 9 presents the results of the prediction/outcome studies performed during 2005 and Chapter 10 the overall consistency and confidence assessment. Overall conclusions are provided in Chapter 11. The main advances since Site Report 2004 are: A new geological model is presented in Chapter 4, representing a significant change from Bedrock Model 2003/1. There has been extensive use of geological data, whereas hydrogeological data have deliberately not been used and more

  1. Management control system description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bence, P. J.

    1990-10-01

    This Management Control System (MCS) description describes the processes used to manage the cost and schedule of work performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Richland, Washington. Westinghouse Hanford will maintain and use formal cost and schedule management control systems, as presented in this document, in performing work for the DOE-RL. This MCS description is a controlled document and will be modified or updated as required. This document must be approved by the DOE-RL; thereafter, any significant change will require DOE-RL concurrence. Westinghouse Hanford is the DOE-RL operations and engineering contractor at the Hanford Site. Activities associated with this contract (DE-AC06-87RL10930) include operating existing plant facilities, managing defined projects and programs, and planning future enhancements. This document is designed to comply with Section I-13 of the contract by providing a description of Westinghouse Hanford's cost and schedule control systems used in managing the above activities. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The Factorial Structure Study of the Positive Personality Traits Questionnaire for Chinese College Students%积极人格特质问卷PPTQ在中国大学生中的因素结构研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙妍; 郑静; 胡朝兵

    2013-01-01

    The factorial structure of Positive Personality Traits Questionnaire (PPTQ) in a sample of Chinese college students is explored. A total of 648 college students are recruited for this study;half of the samples are used for exploratory factor analysis and the others for confirmatory factor analysis. Exploratory factor analysis shows positive self image, extraversion and culture identification. The results of confirmatory factor analysis (χ2/df=2.230, GFI=0.841, AGFI=0.816, CFI=0.822, RMSEA=0.062) indicates that this model provides a reasonable good fit for Chinese college students. The study indicates that the three-factor model of PPTQ is adaptable to Chinese college students.%  探索积极人格特质问卷(PPTQ)在中国大学生中的因素结构。采用积极人格特质问卷(Positive Personality Traits Questionnaire)中文版,对648名大学生施测,对其中一半数据使用PASWStatistics18进行探索性因素分析,另一半数据使用AMOS16.0进行验证性因素分析(CFA)。探索性因素分析得出积极自我意象、外向性和文化认同三因素结构。累计解释率为50.457%,验证性因素分析结果显示:χ2/df=2.230,GFI=0.841。AGFI=0.816,CFI=0.822,RMSEA=0.062,中文版三因素结构在中国大学生人群中较为合理。

  3. Effective Instructor Feedback: Perceptions of Online Graduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Getzlaf

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study explored online graduate students' perceptions of effective instructor feedback. The objectives of the study were to determine the students’ perceptions of the content of effective instructor feedback (“what should be included in effective feedback?” and the process of effective instructor feedback (“how should effective feedback be provided?”. The participants were students completing health-related graduate courses offered exclusively online. Data were collected via a survey that included open ended questions inviting participants to share their perspectives regarding effective online instructor feedback. Thematic analysis revealed five major themes: student involvement/individualization, gentle guidance, being positively constructive, timeliness and future orientation. We conclude that effective instructor feedback has positive outcomes for the students. Future studies are warranted to investigate strategies to make feedback a mutual process between instructor and student that supports an effective feedback cycle.

  4. A Reply to ''Reinterpretation of Students' Ideas When Reasoning about Particle Model Illustrations. A Response to ''Using Animations in Identifying General Chemistry Students' Misconceptions and Evaluating Their Knowledge Transfer Relating to Particle Position in Physical Changes'' by Smith and Villarreal (2015)''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. Christopher; Villarreal, Savannah

    2015-01-01

    In this reply to Elon Langbeheim's response to an article recently published in this journal, authors Smith and Villarreal identify several types of general chemistry students' misconceptions concerning the concept of particle position during physical change. They focus their response on one of the misconceptions identified as such: Given a solid…

  5. a descriptive qualitative study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [3] found that podcasts had a beneficial impact on students' learning as they allowed for repetition, ... greater control over their own learning and reduced anxiety. .... my brain maybe just lit up, and it was like, oh, this is what I'm missing out on.'.

  6. Researcher positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Line Lerche; Khawaja, Iram

    2009-01-01

    abstract  This article focuses on the complex and multi-layered process of researcher positioning, specifically in relation to the politically sensitive study of marginalised and ‘othered' groups such as Muslims living in Denmark. We discuss the impact of different ethnic, religious and racial...... political and personal involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives on research and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance of constant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioning as a researcher influences the research...

  7. Description logic rules

    CERN Document Server

    Krötzsch, M

    2010-01-01

    Ontological modelling today is applied in many areas of science and technology,including the Semantic Web. The W3C standard OWL defines one of the most important ontology languages based on the semantics of description logics. An alternative is to use rule languages in knowledge modelling, as proposed in the W3C's RIF standard. So far, it has often been unclear how to combine both technologies without sacrificing essential computational properties. This book explains this problem and presents new solutions that have recently been proposed. Extensive introductory chapters provide the necessary

  8. MCO Monitoring activity description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEXTON, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description

  9. Radiographic positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, R.L.; Dennis, C.A.; May, C.

    1989-01-01

    This book concentrates on the routine radiographic examinations commonly performed. It details the wide variety of examinations possible and their place in initial learning and in the radiology department as references for those occasions when an unusual examination is requested. This book provides information ranging from basic terminology to skeletal positioning to special procedures. Positions are discussed and supplemented with a picture of a patient, the resulting radiograph, and a labeled diagram. Immobilization and proper shielding of the patient are also shown

  10. Position encoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goursky, Vsevolod

    1975-01-01

    A circuitry for deriving the quotient of signal delivered by position-sensitive detectors is described. Digital output is obtained in the form of 10- to 12-bit words. Impact position may be determined with 0.25% accuracy when the dynamic range of the energy signal is less 1:10, and 0.5% accuracy when the dynamic range is 1:20. The division requires an average time of 5μs for 10-bit words

  11. Position encoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goursky, V.

    1975-05-01

    This paper describes circuitry for deriving the quotient of signals delivered by position-sensitive detectors. Digital output is obtained in the form of 10 to 12 bit words. Impact position may be determined with 0.25% accuracy when the dynamic range of the energy signal is less than 1:10, and 0.5% accuracy when the dynamic range is 1:20. The division requires an average time of 5μs for 10-bit words [fr

  12. Adding Curvature to Minimum Description Length Shape Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur

    2003-01-01

    The Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach to shape modelling seeks a compact description of a set of shapes in terms of the coordinates of marks on the shapes. It has been shown that the mark positions resulting from this optimisation to a large extent solve the so-called point correspondence...

  13. Using the factors that have a positive impact on the retention of low socioeconomic students to prepare accelerated enrolled nurses for the science units of a nursing degree. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Doggrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available At a campus in a low socioeconomic (SES area, our University allows enrolled nurses entry into the second year of a Bachelor of Nursing, but attrition is high.  Using the factors, described by Yorke and Thomas (2003 to have a positive impact on the attrition of low SES students, we developed strategies to prepare the enrolled nurses for the pharmacology and bioscience units of a nursing degree with the aim of reducing their attrition.  As a strategy, the introduction of review lectures of anatomy, physiology and microbiology, was associated with significantly reduced attrition rates. The subsequent introduction of a formative website activity of some basic concepts in bioscience and pharmacology, and a workshop addressing study skills and online resources, were associated with a further reduction in attrition rates of enrolled nursing students in a Bachelor of Nursing

  14. Examining the Effects of Schoolwide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on Student Outcomes: Results from a Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial in Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Mitchell, Mary M.; Leaf, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    Schoolwide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) is a universal, schoolwide prevention strategy that is currently implemented in over 9,000 schools across the nation to reduce disruptive behavior problems through the application of behavioral, social learning, and organizational behavioral principles. SWPBIS aims to alter school…

  15. Science Careers and Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoda, Sue; Cremer, Bob

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes proceedings and student experiences at the 1980 Science Career Workshop for Physically Disabled Students at the Lawrence Hall of Science (University of California). Includes a description of the key-note speaker's topics, and other workshop activities. (DS)

  16. ``Physics and the girly girl—there is a contradiction somewhere'': doctoral students' positioning around discourses of gender and competence in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Allison J.

    2014-06-01

    Doctoral physics students have stories about what kinds of actions, behaviours and ways of doing physics allow individuals to be recognized as physicists. Viewing a physics department as a case study, and individual participants as embedded cases, this study used a sociocultural approach to examine the ways doctoral students construct these stories about becoming physicists. Through observations, photo-elicitation, and life history interviews, eleven men and women shared stories about their experiences with physics, and the contexts that have enabled or constrained their trajectories into doctoral physics. The results of this study revealed the salience of recognition in the constitution of physicist identities; but how recognition was achieved often entailed the reproduction or reworking of persistent discourses of gender norms. Various interchangeable forms of competence (technical, analytical, and academic) emerged as assets that can be used to achieve recognition in this physics community. However, competence was not the only means by which one might be recognized as a physicist. Contributing to the possibility for recognition was the performance of stereotypical Discourses for physicist that relied on traditional gender norms for the field. The results demonstrated that achieving recognition as a competent physicist often involved a complex negotiation of gender roles and the practice of physics.

  17. Attitudes of Students Studying In Health Related Departments towards the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sercan Özbek YAZICI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Negative attitudes towards the elderly may cause decreases in quality health service provided to the elderly. In the study, the aim was to determine attitudes of students studying in health related departments towards the elderly and relationships between the attitudes and various variables were analyzed. In a descriptive study, the sample included nursing, physiotherapy, and elderly care students. Kogan’s attitude towards old people scale (KAOP was used to measure attitudes towards the elderly and Stanley Coopersmith Self Esteem Inventory (SEI was used to assess the level of students’ self-esteem. The KOAP mean attitude score of the students was 125.6 ± 14.38 and the students had slightly positive attitudes towards the elderly. Students who were at the age of 20 or over and who were living in the city showed more positive attitudes. The students of the Elderly Care Department had the lowest mean score and there was a significant difference between mean KAOP scores of students at Nursing and Elderly Care Department. Also, weak positive correlation was found between the KAOP and SEI mean scores of students. The results implies that the students are required to enhance their positive attitudes towards the elderly. Therefore, students should be provided a training program that improves the positive attitudes

  18. Children and Discipline: Investigating Secondary School Students' Perception of Discipline through Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadik, Fatma

    2018-01-01

    This is a descriptive study investigating the perception of children about discipline through metaphors developed by them. A total of 445 students participated in the research and the data was collected with the "Discipline Metaphors Survey (DMS)" developed by the researchers. At the end of the study, 143 metaphors, 94 positive and 49…

  19. From Process to Outcome: The Effect of Portfolio Assessment on Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Agnes; Tang, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Three findings emerged from 12 Hong Kong student nurses' descriptions of their experiences of portfolio assessment: (1) despite initial anxiety, all favored portfolio use; (2) portfolios had positive academic and affective outcomes; and (3) unexpectedly, spontaneous collaborative learning and increased motivation resulted. (Contains 35…

  20. THULE: A detailed description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, M.J.

    1964-07-01

    This report describes the THULE scheme of lattice physics calculation which has been developed in FORTRAN for the IBM 7090. This scheme predicts the neutron flux over energy and space, for many groups and regions, together with reactivity and reaction rate edits for both a single lattice cell and a reactor core. This report describes in detail the input requirements for the THULE programme which forms the main part of the scheme. Brief descriptions of the 7090 programmes TED 6 and NOAH are included as appendices. TED 6 will produce the THULE edits from a WDSN output tape and NOAH is a version of the METHUSELAH programme which contains many of the THULE edits and will also produce input cards for THULE. (author)