WorldWideScience

Sample records for polarization molecular dynamics

  1. Molecular electron recollision dynamics in intense circularly polarized laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2018-04-01

    Extreme UV and x-ray table top light sources based on high-order harmonic generation (HHG) are focused now on circular polarization for the generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses as new tools for controlling electron dynamics, such as charge transfer and migration and the generation of attosecond quantum electron currents for ultrafast magneto-optics. A fundamental electron dynamical process in HHG is laser induced electron recollision with the parent ion, well established theoretically and experimentally for linear polarization. We discuss molecular electron recollision dynamics in circular polarization by theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The control of the polarization of HHG with circularly polarized ionizing pulses is examined and it is shown that bichromatic circularly polarized pulses enhance recollision dynamics, rendering HHG more efficient, especially in molecules because of their nonspherical symmetry. The polarization of the harmonics is found to be dependent on the compatibility of the rotational symmetry of the net electric field created by combinations of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses with the dynamical symmetry of molecules. We show how the field and molecule symmetry influences the electron recollision trajectories by a time-frequency analysis of harmonics. The results, in principle, offer new unique controllable tools in the study of attosecond molecular electron dynamics.

  2. Polarization as a field variable from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K.; Templeton, Jeremy; Lee, Jonathan

    2012-11-01

    In this talk, we show that polarization density, an important quantity in electromagnetism, can be obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the Irving and Kirkwood procedure used for obtaining stresses and heat fluxes in terms of the microscopic quantities can be extended to the case of electrostatics where the macroscopic electrostatic equation can be derived starting with the microscopic electrostatic equation, microscopic density of charges and using a phase-space distribution function and a suitable localization function. As a result, we obtain an expression for polarization density as a field variable in terms of the microscopic dipole moments and quadrupole moments and higher order terms depending upon the degree of the polynomial used for the localization function. Finally, we apply this method to obtain the dielectric constant of bulk water and to study the polarization effects in electric double layer calculations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Transient molecular dynamics simulations of liquid viscosity for nonpolar and polar fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jason C.; Rowley, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    A transient molecular dynamics (TMD) method for obtaining fluid viscosity is extended to multisite, force-field models of both nonpolar and polar liquids. The method overlays a sinusoidal velocity profile over the peculiar particle velocities and then records the transient decay of the velocity profile. The viscosity is obtained by regression of the solution of the momentum equation with an appropriate constitutive equation and initial and boundary conditions corresponding to those used in the simulation. The transient velocity decays observed appeared to include both relaxation and retardation effects. The Jeffreys viscoelastic model was found to model accurately the transient responses obtained for multisite models for n-butane, isobutane, n-hexane, water, methanol, and 1-hexanol. TMD viscosities obtained for saturated liquids over a wide range of densities agreed well for the polar fluids, both with nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) results using the same force-field models and with correlations based on experimental data. Viscosities obtained for the nonpolar fluids agreed well with the experimental and NEMD results at low to moderate densities, but underpredicted experimental values at higher densities where shear-thinning effects and viscous heating may impact the TMD simulations.

  4. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of High-Density Atomic Hydrogen in Solid Mixtures of Molecular Hydrogen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheludiakov, S.; Ahokas, J.; Järvinen, J.; Zvezdov, D.; Vainio, O.; Lehtonen, L.; Vasiliev, S.; Mao, S.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on magnetic resonance studies of high-density atomic hydrogen and deuterium in solid hydrogen matrices at temperatures below 1 K. Average concentrations of H atoms ≈3 ×1019 cm-3 are obtained in chemical tunneling reactions of isotope exchange with D atoms. The products of these reactions are closely located pairs of H atoms near D2 molecules with strong exchange interactions. We discovered a dynamic nuclear polarization effect on H atoms created by pumping the center of the H electron spin resonance spectrum, similar to the Overhauser effect in metals. Our results indicate that H atoms may be arranged inside molecular matrices at separations equivalent to local concentrations of 2.6 ×1021 cm-3 . This opens up a way to build a metallic state of atomic hydrogen at zero pressure.

  5. Femtosecond Raman induced polarization spectroscopy studies of coherent rotational dynamics in molecular fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgen, Michael Mark [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-05-01

    We develop a polarization-sensitive femtosecond pump probe technique, Raman induced polarization spectroscopy (RIPS), to study coherent rotation in molecular fluids. By observing the collisional dephasing of the coherently prepared rotational states, we are able to extract information concerning the effects of molecular interactions on the rotational motion. The technique is quite sensitive because of the zero background detection method, and is also versatile due to its nonresonant nature.

  6. Circularly Polarized X Rays: Another Probe of Ultrafast Molecular Decay Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travnikova, Oksana; Lindblad, Andreas; Nicolas, Christophe; Soederstroem, Johan; Kimberg, Victor; Miron, Catalin; Liu Jicai; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-01-01

    Dissociative nuclear motion in core-excited molecular states leads to a splitting of the fragment Auger lines: the Auger-Doppler effect. We present here for the first time experimental evidence for an Auger-Doppler effect following F1s→a 1g * inner-shell excitation by circularly polarized x rays in SF 6 . In spite of a uniform distribution of the dissociating S-F bonds near the polarization plane of the light, the intersection between the subpopulation of molecules selected by the core excitation with the cone of dissociation induces a strong anisotropy in the distribution of the S-F bonds that contributes to the scattering profile measured in the polarization plane.

  7. Accounting for Electronic Polarization Effects in Aqueous Sodium Chloride via Molecular Dynamics Aided by Neutron Scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohagen, Miriam; Mason, Philip E.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 8 (2016), s. 1454-1460 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics * neutron scattering * agueous sodium chloride Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.177, year: 2016

  8. Molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Bethke, I.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is a model for the structure and meaning of object based programming systems. In molecular dynamics the memory state of a system is modeled as a fluid consisting of a collection of molecules. Each molecule is a collection of atoms with bindings between them. A computation is

  9. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  10. Accounting for Electronic Polarization Effects in Aqueous Sodium Chloride via Molecular Dynamics Aided by Neutron Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohagen, Miriam; Mason, Philip E; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2016-03-03

    Modeled ions, described by nonpolarizable force fields, can suffer from unphysical ion pairing and clustering in aqueous solutions well below their solubility limit. The electronic continuum correction takes electronic polarization effects of the solvent into account in an effective way by scaling the charges on the ions, resulting in a much better description of the ionic behavior. Here, we present parameters for the sodium ion consistent with this effective polarizability approach and in agreement with experimental data from neutron scattering, which could be used for simulations of complex aqueous systems where polarization effects are important.

  11. First principles molecular dynamics of molten NaI: Structure, self-diffusion, polarization effects, and charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N.; Costa Cabral, B. J.

    2007-09-01

    The structure and self-diffusion of NaI and NaCl at temperatures close to their melting points are studied by first principles Hellmann-Feynman molecular dynamics (HFMD). The results are compared with classical MD using rigid-ion (RI) and shell-model (ShM) interionic potentials. HFMD for NaCl was reported before at a higher temperature [N. Galamba and B. J. Costa Cabral, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 124502 (2007)]. The main differences between the structures predicted by HFMD and RI MD for NaI concern the cation-cation and the anion-cation pair correlation functions. A ShM which allows only for the polarization of I- reproduces the main features of the HFMD structure of NaI. The inclusion of polarization effects for both ionic species leads to a more structured ionic liquid, although a good agreement with HFMD is also observed. HFMD Green-Kubo self-diffusion coefficients are larger than those obtained from RI and ShM simulations. A qualitative study of charge transfer in molten NaI and NaCl was also carried out with the Hirshfeld charge partitioning method. Charge transfer in molten NaI is comparable to that in NaCl, and results for NaCl at two temperatures support the view that the magnitude of charge transfer is weakly state dependent for ionic systems. Finally, Hirshfeld charge distributions indicate that differences between RI and HFMD results are mainly related to polarization effects, while the influence of charge transfer fluctuations is minimal for these systems.

  12. Interaction of polar and nonpolar organic pollutants with soil organic matter: sorption experiments and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashour A; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Aziz, Saadullah G; Hilal, Rifaat H; Elroby, Shaaban A; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O; Leinweber, Peter; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    The fate of organic pollutants in the environment is influenced by several factors including the type and strength of their interactions with soil components especially SOM. However, a molecular level answer to the question "How organic pollutants interact with SOM?" is still lacking. In order to explore mechanisms of this interaction, we have developed a new SOM model and carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in parallel with sorption experiments. The new SOM model comprises free SOM functional groups (carboxylic acid and naphthalene) as well as SOM cavities (with two different sizes), simulating the soil voids, containing the same SOM functional groups. To examine the effect of the hydrophobicity on the interaction, the organic pollutants hexachlorobenzene (HCB, non-polar) and sulfanilamide (SAA, polar) were considered. The experimental and theoretical investigations explored four major points regarding sorption of SAA and HCB on soil, yielding the following results. 1--The interaction depends on the SOM chemical composition more than the SOM content. 2--The interaction causes a site-specific adsorption on the soil surfaces. 3--Sorption hysteresis occurs, which can be explained by inclusion of these pollutants inside soil voids. 4--The hydrophobic HCB is adsorbed on soil stronger than the hydrophilic SAA. Moreover, the theoretical results showed that HCB forms stable complexes with all SOM models in the aqueous solution, while most of SAA-SOM complexes are accompanied by dissociation into SAA and the free SOM models. The SOM-cavity modeling had a significant effect on binding of organic pollutants to SOM. Both HCB and SAA bind to the SOM models in the order of models with a small cavity>a large cavity>no cavity. Although HCB binds to all SOM models stronger than SAA, the latter is more affected by the presence of the cavity. Finally, HCB and SAA bind to the hydrophobic functional group (naphthalene) stronger than to the hydrophilic one (carboxylic acid

  13. Polarization of fluorescence: a probe of molecular autoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroi, G.E.; Dehmer, J.L.; Parr, A.C.; Poliakoff, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    The polarization of fluorescence from excited-state molecular photoions provides a direct probe of the photoionization dynamics and the symmetry signatures of autoionizing resonances. Measurements on CO 2 and CS 2 are presented as examples

  14. The truncated conjugate gradient (TCG), a non-iterative/fixed-cost strategy for computing polarization in molecular dynamics: Fast evaluation of analytical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviat, Félix; Lagardère, Louis; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2017-10-01

    In a recent paper [F. Aviat et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 13, 180-190 (2017)], we proposed the Truncated Conjugate Gradient (TCG) approach to compute the polarization energy and forces in polarizable molecular simulations. The method consists in truncating the conjugate gradient algorithm at a fixed predetermined order leading to a fixed computational cost and can thus be considered "non-iterative." This gives the possibility to derive analytical forces avoiding the usual energy conservation (i.e., drifts) issues occurring with iterative approaches. A key point concerns the evaluation of the analytical gradients, which is more complex than that with a usual solver. In this paper, after reviewing the present state of the art of polarization solvers, we detail a viable strategy for the efficient implementation of the TCG calculation. The complete cost of the approach is then measured as it is tested using a multi-time step scheme and compared to timings using usual iterative approaches. We show that the TCG methods are more efficient than traditional techniques, making it a method of choice for future long molecular dynamics simulations using polarizable force fields where energy conservation matters. We detail the various steps required for the implementation of the complete method by software developers.

  15. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Wm.G.Hoover; C.G.Hoover

    2005-01-01

    Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics is a powerful simulation tool. Like its equilibrium cousin, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is based on time-reversible equations of motion. But unlike conventional mechanics, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics provides a consistent microscopic basis for the irreversible macroscopic Second Law of Thermodynamics. We recall here how fast computers led to the development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics from the statistical mechanics of the 1950s. Computer-...

  16. Conformational changes and slow dynamics through microsecond polarized atomistic molecular simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Bjelkmar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Structure and dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels, in particular the motion of the S4 helix, is a highly interesting and hotly debated topic in current membrane protein research. It has critical implications for insertion and stabilization of membrane proteins as well as for finding how transitions occur in membrane proteins-not to mention numerous applications in drug design. Here, we present a full 1 micros atomic-detail molecular dynamics simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel, comprising 120,000 atoms. By applying 0.052 V/nm of hyperpolarization, we observe structural rearrangements, including up to 120 degrees rotation of the S4 segment, changes in hydrogen-bonding patterns, but only low amounts of translation. A smaller rotation ( approximately 35 degrees of the extracellular end of all S4 segments is present also in a reference 0.5 micros simulation without applied field, which indicates that the crystal structure might be slightly different from the natural state of the voltage sensor. The conformation change upon hyperpolarization is closely coupled to an increase in 3(10 helix contents in S4, starting from the intracellular side. This could support a model for transition from the crystal structure where the hyperpolarization destabilizes S4-lipid hydrogen bonds, which leads to the helix rotating to keep the arginine side chains away from the hydrophobic phase, and the driving force for final relaxation by downward translation is partly entropic, which would explain the slow process. The coordinates of the transmembrane part of the simulated channel actually stay closer to the recently determined higher-resolution Kv1.2 chimera channel than the starting structure for the entire second half of the simulation (0.5-1 micros. Together with lipids binding in matching positions and significant thinning of the membrane also observed in experiments, this provides additional support for the predictive power of microsecond-scale membrane

  17. Molecular photoelectron holography with circularly polarized laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weifeng; Sheng, Zhihao; Feng, Xingpan; Wu, Miaoli; Chen, Zhangjin; Song, Xiaohong

    2014-02-10

    We investigate the photoelectron momentum distribution of molecular-ion H2+driven by ultrashort intense circularly polarized laser pulses. Both numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) and a quasiclassical model indicate that the photoelectron holography (PH) with circularly polarized pulses can occur in molecule. It is demonstrated that the interference between the direct electron wave and rescattered electron wave from one core to its neighboring core induces the PH. Moreover, the results of the TDSE predict that there is a tilt angle between the interference pattern of the PH and the direction perpendicular to the molecular axis. Furthermore, the tilt angle is sensitively dependent on the wavelength of the driven circularly polarized pulse, which is confirmed by the quasiclassical calculations. The PH induced by circularly polarized laser pulses provides a tool to resolve the electron dynamics and explore the spatial information of molecular structures.

  18. NMR dispersion measurement of dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, K.; Cox, S.F.J.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring dynamic nuclear polarization from the NMR dispersive susceptibility is examined. Two prototype instruments are tested in a polarized proton target using organic target material. The more promising employs a tunnel diode oscillator, inside the target cavity, and should provide a precise polarization measurement working at a frequency far enough from the main resonance for the disturbance of the measured polarization to be negligible. Other existing methods for measuring target polarization are briefly reviewed. (author)

  19. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology.

  20. Microwave-gated dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornet, Aurélien; Pinon, Arthur; Jhajharia, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) has become a method of choice to enhance signals in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Recently, we have proposed to combine cross-polarization (CP) with D-DNP to provide high polarization P((13)C) in short build-up times. In this paper, we show...

  1. Thomas-Fermi molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerouin, J.; Pollock, E.L.; Zerah, G.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional density-functional molecular-dynamics code is developed for the Thomas-Fermi density functional as a prototype for density functionals using only the density. Following Car and Parrinello [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)], the electronic density is treated as a dynamical variable. The electronic densities are verified against a multi-ion Thomas-Fermi algorithm due to Parker [Phys. Rev. A 38, 2205 (1988)]. As an initial application, the effect of electronic polarization in enhancing ionic diffusion in strongly coupled plasmas is demonstrated

  2. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wm.G.Hoover

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics is a powerful simulation tool. Like its equilibrium cousin, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is based on time-reversible equations of motion. But unlike conventional mechanics, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics provides a consistent microscopic basis for the irreversible macroscopic Second Law of Thermodynamics. We recall here how fast computers led to the development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics from the statistical mechanics of the 1950s. Computer-based theories facilitated revolutionary breakthroughs in understanding during the 1970s and 1980s. The new idea key to the nonequilibrium development was the replacement of the external thermodynamic environment by internal control variables. The new variables can control temperature, or pressure, or energy, or stress, or heat flux. These thermostat, barostat, ergostat, ... variables can control and maintain nonequilibrium states. We illustrate the methods with a simple example well-suited to student exploration, a thermostatted harmonic oscillator exposed to a temperature gradient.

  3. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, W.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  5. Molecular hydrogen polarization images of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Michael G.; Minchin, N. R.; Hough, J. H.; Aspin, C.; Axon, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    An image of the polarization of the shocked H2 v = 1-0 S(1) line emission in the core of OMC-1 has been obtained. Along the molecular outflow of the source, the line is dichroically polarized by a medium of aligned grains located between the earth and the shock fronts. The polarization pattern traces the magnetic field direction, which is parallel to the outflow axis and to the large-scale field direction determined from far-IR continuum measurements. Close to the IR source IRc2, the likely source of the outflow, the aligned vectors twist, indicating that the magnetic field direction changes. Modeling the line ratios of scattered H2 lines in the reflection nebula, it is concluded that the size distribution of grains there is typical of the small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. By contrast, the scattered continuum radiation from the core region suggests that the grains there are larger than this.

  6. Dynamic elections and ideological polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunnari, S.; Zápal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2017), s. 505-534 ISSN 1047-1987 Institutional support: Progres-Q24 Keywords : elections * political polarization Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Economic Theory Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  7. Dynamic elections and ideological polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nunnari, S.; Zápal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2017), s. 505-534 ISSN 1047-1987 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : elections * political polarization Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Economic Theory Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2016

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization of irradiated target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polarized nucleon targets used in high energy physics experiments usually employ the method of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to polarize the protons or deuterons in an alcohol. DNP requires the presence of paramagnetic centers, which are customarily provided by a chemical dopant. These chemically doped targets have a relatively low polarizable nucleon content and suffer from loss of polarization when subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation. If the paramagnetic centers formed when the target is irradiated can be used in the DNP process, it becomes possible to produce targets using materials which have a relatively high polarizable nucleon content, but which are not easily doped by chemical means. Furthermore, the polarization of such targets may be much more radiation resistant. Dynamic nuclear polarization in ammonia, deuterated ammonia, ammonium hydroxide, methylamine, borane ammonia, butonal, ethane and lithium borohydride has been studied. These studies were conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center using the Yale-SLAC polarized target system. Results indicate that the use of ammonia and deuterated ammonia as polarized target materials would make significant increases in polarized target performance possible

  9. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  10. TREC Dynamic Domain: Polar Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-20

    similarity. However, not all teams that submitted web crawls to this dataset applied their jaccard- similarity algorithms . 4.2 Data Format ...analysis. These algorithms were focused then on allowing better answers to the below representative science queries of our Polar data: 1. What...

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has evolved from a niche method mainly applicable to model systems into a cornerstone in molecular biology. It provides us with a powerful toolbox that enables us to follow and understand structure and dynamics with extreme detail-literally on scales where individual atoms can be tracked. However, with great power comes great responsibility: Simulations will not magically provide valid results, but it requires a skilled researcher. This chapter introduces you to this, and makes you aware of some potential pitfalls. We focus on the two basic and most used methods; optimizing a structure with energy minimization and simulating motion with molecular dynamics. The statistical mechanics theory is covered briefly as well as limitations, for instance the lack of quantum effects and short timescales. As a practical example, we show each step of a simulation of a small protein, including examples of hardware and software, how to obtain a starting structure, immersing it in water, and choosing good simulation parameters. You will learn how to analyze simulations in terms of structure, fluctuations, geometrical features, and how to create ray-traced movies for presentations. With modern GPU acceleration, a desktop can perform μs-scale simulations of small proteins in a day-only 15 years ago this took months on the largest supercomputer in the world. As a final exercise, we show you how to set up, perform, and interpret such a folding simulation.

  12. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostol, M., E-mail: apoma@theory.nipne.ro; Cune, L.C.

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • New method for rotation molecular spectra in high electric fields. • Parametric resonances – new features in spectra. • New elementary excitations in polar solids from dipolar interaction (“dipolons”). • Discussion about a possible origin of the ferroelectricity from dipolar interactions. - Abstract: Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called “dipolons”); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  13. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • New method for rotation molecular spectra in high electric fields. • Parametric resonances – new features in spectra. • New elementary excitations in polar solids from dipolar interaction (“dipolons”). • Discussion about a possible origin of the ferroelectricity from dipolar interactions. - Abstract: Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called “dipolons”); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  14. Interactive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  15. The nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1992-03-01

    MOLECULAR DYNAMICS has been generalized in order to simulate a variety of NONEQUILIBRIUM systems. This generalization has been achieved by adopting microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress. Some of the problems already treated include rapid plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, strong shockwaves simulation, and far-from-equilibrium phase transformations. Continuing advances in technique and in the modeling of interatomic forces, coupled with qualitative improvements in computer hardware, are enabling such simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments

  16. Molecular potentials and relaxation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karo, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of empirical pseudopotentials, in evaluating interatomic potentials, provides an inexpensive and convenient method for obtaining highly accurate potential curves and permits the modeling of core-valence correlation, and the inclusion of relativistic effects when these are significant. Recent calculations of the X 1 Σ + and a 3 Σ + states of LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH and the X 2 Σ + states of their anions are discussed. Pseudopotentials, including core polarization terms, have been used to replace the core electrons, and this has been coupled with the development of compact, higly-optimized basis sets for the corresponding one- and two-electron atoms. Comparisons of the neutral potential curves with experiment and other ab initio calculations show good agreement (within 1000 cm -1 over most of the potential curves) with the difference curves being considerably more accurate. In the method of computer molecular dynamics, the force acting on each particle is the resultant of all interactions with other atoms in the neighborhood and is obtained as the derivative of an effective many-body potential. Exploiting the pseudopotential approach, in obtaining the appropriate potentials may be very fruitful in the future. In the molecular dynamics example considered here, the conventional sum-of-pairwise-interatomic-potentials (SPP) approximation is used with the potentials derived either from experimental spectroscopic data or from Hartree-Fock calculations. The problem is the collisional de-excitation of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen at an Fe surface. The calculations have been carried out for an initial vibrotational state v = 8, J = 1 and a translational temperature corresponding to a gas temperature of 500 0 K. Different angles of approach and different initial random impact points on the surface have been selected. For any given collision with the wall, the molecule may pick up or lose vibrotatonal and translational energy

  17. Polarization dynamics of VCSELs in external cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, M.; Javaloyes, J.; Barland, S.; Balle, S.; Giudici, M.

    2014-05-01

    We review the dynamics of VCSELs that experience both Polarization-Selective Feedback (PSF) and Crossed- Polarization Reinjection (XPR). Different regimes of regular pulsation were found. For strong enough XPR levels, the VCSEL emission in each of its linearly-polarized components displays a square-wave modulation which regularity is greatly enhanced by small levels of PSF. Such a square-wave is in antiphase for the two polarizations, and it turns out to be stable and robust over broad intervals of current. The frequency of the square-wave is determined by the length of the XPR arm. For weak levels of PSF and XPR, the VCSEL emits a regular train of short optical pulses arising from the locking of the modes in the PSF cavity. The frequency of the pulse train is stable on short time scales, but it wanders with a characteristic time scale of hundreds of roundtrips in the PSF cavity. The experimental results are successfully explained by an extension of the Spin-Flip Model that incorporates gain saturation and the effects of PSF and XPR.

  18. Rapid-melt Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Janssen, G.; Leggett, J.; Kentgens, A. P. M.; van Bentum, P. J. M.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has re-emerged as a means to ameliorate the inherent problem of low sensitivity in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Here, we present a novel approach to DNP enhanced liquid-state NMR based on rapid melting of a solid hyperpolarized sample followed by 'in situ' NMR detection. This method is applicable to small (10 nl to 1 μl) sized samples in a microfluidic setup. The method combines generic DNP enhancement in the solid state with the high sensitivity of stripline 1 H NMR detection in the liquid state. Fast cycling facilitates options for signal averaging or 2D structural analysis. Preliminary tests show solid-state 1 H enhancement factors of up to 500 for H2O/D2O/d6-glycerol samples doped with TEMPOL radicals. Fast paramagnetic relaxation with nitroxide radicals, In nonpolar solvents such as toluene, we find proton enhancement factors up to 400 with negligible relaxation losses in the liquid state, using commercially available BDPA radicals. A total recycling delay (including sample freezing, DNP polarization and melting) of about 5 s can be used. The present setup allows for a fast determination of the hyper-polarization as function of the microwave frequency and power. Even at the relatively low field of 3.4 T, the method of rapid melting DNP can facilitate the detection of small quantities of molecules in the picomole regime.

  19. Spin polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczewski, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews tunneling of spin-polarized electrons through molecules positioned between ferromagnetic electrodes, which gives rise to tunneling magnetoresistance. Such measurements yield important insight into the factors governing spin-polarized electron injection into organic semiconductors, thereby offering the possibility to manipulate the quantum-mechanical spin degrees of freedom for charge carriers in optical/electrical devices. In the first section of the chapter a brief description of the Jullière model of spin-dependent electron tunneling is reviewed. Next, a brief description of device fabrication and characterization is presented. The bulk of the review highlights experimental studies on spin-polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions. In addition, some experiments describing spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy on single molecules are mentioned. Finally, some general conclusions and prospectus on the impact of spin-polarized tunneling in molecular junctions are offered.

  20. Physical adsorption and molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohan, N.V.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of noble gases adsorption (except He) on graphite substracts are reviewed. Experimental results from this adsorption are analyzed and compared with molecular dynamics calculations. (L.C.) [pt

  1. Electron Interference in Molecular Circular Polarization Attosecond XUV Photoionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jun Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-center electron interference in molecular attosecond photoionization processes is investigated from numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Both symmetric H\\(_2^+\\ and nonsymmetric HHe\\(^{2+}\\ one electron diatomic systems are ionized by intense attosecond circularly polarized XUV laser pulses. Photoionization of these molecular ions shows signature of interference with double peaks (minima in molecular attosecond photoelectron energy spectra (MAPES at critical angles \\(\\vartheta_c\\ between the molecular \\(\\textbf{R}\\ axis and the photoelectron momentum \\(\\textbf{p}\\. The interferences are shown to be a function of the symmetry of electronic states and the interference patterns are sensitive to the molecular orientation and pulse polarization. Such sensitivity offers possibility for imaging of molecular structure and orbitals.

  2. Multiscale Reactive Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    as a linear combination of several possible bond- ing topologies ( diabatic states) that are coupled to one an- other through the off-diagonal elements...adapts and dynamically identifies bonding topolo- gies to include as the simulation progresses. These bonding topologies form a basis of diabatic ...the original geometric factor. The diabatic correction term, VCORR , used here was labeled in previous MS-EVB models as a repulsive interaction, VREP

  3. State-Dependent Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciann-Dong Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new mixed quantum mechanics (QM—molecular mechanics (MM approach, where MM is replaced by quantum Hamilton mechanics (QHM, which inherits the modeling capability of MM, while preserving the state-dependent nature of QM. QHM, a single mechanics playing the roles of QM and MM simultaneously, will be employed here to derive the three-dimensional quantum dynamics of diatomic molecules. The resulting state-dependent molecular dynamics including vibration, rotation and spin are shown to completely agree with the QM description and well match the experimental vibration-rotation spectrum. QHM can be incorporated into the framework of a mixed quantum-classical Bohmian method to enable a trajectory interpretation of orbital-spin interaction and spin entanglement in molecular dynamics.

  4. State-dependent molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ciann-Dong; Weng, Hung-Jen

    2014-10-09

    This paper proposes a new mixed quantum mechanics (QM)-molecular mechanics (MM) approach, where MM is replaced by quantum Hamilton mechanics (QHM), which inherits the modeling capability of MM, while preserving the state-dependent nature of QM. QHM, a single mechanics playing the roles of QM and MM simultaneously, will be employed here to derive the three-dimensional quantum dynamics of diatomic molecules. The resulting state-dependent molecular dynamics including vibration, rotation and spin are shown to completely agree with the QM description and well match the experimental vibration-rotation spectrum. QHM can be incorporated into the framework of a mixed quantum-classical Bohmian method to enable a trajectory interpretation of orbital-spin interaction and spin entanglement in molecular dynamics.

  5. GPS scintillations associated with cusp dynamics and polar cap patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yaqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the relative scintillation level associated with cusp dynamics (including precipitation, flow shears, etc. with and without the formation of polar cap patches around the cusp inflow region by the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR and two GPS scintillation receivers. A series of polar cap patches were observed by the ESR between 8:40 and 10:20 UT on December 3, 2011. The polar cap patches combined with the auroral dynamics were associated with a significantly higher GPS phase scintillation level (up to 0.6 rad than those observed for the other two alternatives, i.e., cusp dynamics without polar cap patches, and polar cap patches without cusp aurora. The cusp auroral dynamics without plasma patches were indeed related to GPS phase scintillations at a moderate level (up to 0.3 rad. The polar cap patches away from the active cusp were associated with sporadic and moderate GPS phase scintillations (up to 0.2 rad. The main conclusion is that the worst global navigation satellite system space weather events on the dayside occur when polar cap patches enter the polar cap and are subject to particle precipitation and flow shears, which is analogous to the nightside when polar cap patches exit the polar cap and enter the auroral oval.

  6. GPS scintillations associated with cusp dynamics and polar cap patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqi; Moen, Jøran I.; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Spicher, Andres; Clausen, Lasse B. N.; Miloch, Wojciech J.

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the relative scintillation level associated with cusp dynamics (including precipitation, flow shears, etc.) with and without the formation of polar cap patches around the cusp inflow region by the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) and two GPS scintillation receivers. A series of polar cap patches were observed by the ESR between 8:40 and 10:20 UT on December 3, 2011. The polar cap patches combined with the auroral dynamics were associated with a significantly higher GPS phase scintillation level (up to 0.6 rad) than those observed for the other two alternatives, i.e., cusp dynamics without polar cap patches, and polar cap patches without cusp aurora. The cusp auroral dynamics without plasma patches were indeed related to GPS phase scintillations at a moderate level (up to 0.3 rad). The polar cap patches away from the active cusp were associated with sporadic and moderate GPS phase scintillations (up to 0.2 rad). The main conclusion is that the worst global navigation satellite system space weather events on the dayside occur when polar cap patches enter the polar cap and are subject to particle precipitation and flow shears, which is analogous to the nightside when polar cap patches exit the polar cap and enter the auroral oval.

  7. A sampling of molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhikara, Daniel Jon

    The sheer vastness of the number of computations required to simulate a biological molecule puts incredible pressure on algorithms to be efficient while maintaining sufficient accuracy. This dissertation summarizes various projects whose purposes address the large span of types of problems in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems including: increasing efficiency, measuring convergence, avoiding pitfalls, and an application and analysis of a biological system. Chapters 3 and 4 deal with an enhanced sampling algorithm called "replica exchange molecular dynamics" which is designed to speed-up molecular dynamics simulations. The optimization of a key parameter of these simulations is analyzed. In these successive projects, it was found conclusively that maximizing "exchange attempt frequency" is the most efficient way to run a replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation. Chapter 5 describes an enhanced metric for convergence in parallel simulations called the normalized ergodic measure. The metric is applied to several properties for several replica exchange simulations. Advantages of this metric over other methods are described. Chapter 6 describes the implementation and optimization of an enhanced sampling algorithm similar to replica exchange molecular dynamics called multicanonical algorithm replica exchange molecular dynamics. The algorithm was implemented into a biomolecular simulation suite called AMBER. Additionally several parameters were analyzed and optimized. In Chapter 7, a pitfall in molecular dynamics is observed in biological systems that is caused by negligent use of a simulation's "thermostat". It was found that if the same pseudorandom number seed were used for multiple systems, they eventually synchronize. In this project, synchronization was observed in biological molecules. Various negative effects including corruption of data are pointed out. Chapter 8 describes molecular dynamics simulation of NikR, a homotetrameric nickel

  8. Dynamic polarization of 19F in a fluorinated alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.; Kasprzyk, T.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttilae, S.; Krumpolc, M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Purcell, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied microwave dynamic cooling of 19 F and 1 H nuclei in mixtures of 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and water, doped with Cr(V) complex. Equal spin temperatures of the two nuclei are produced, and the highest spin polarizations (/approximately/80%) are found in mixtures near the eutectic ratio. The high fluorine content and polarization make this a suitable material for polarized nuclear scattering experiments. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. Generating highly polarized nuclear spins in solution using dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolber, J.; Ellner, F.; Fridlund, B.

    2004-01-01

    A method to generate strongly polarized nuclear spins in solution has been developed, using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) at a temperature of 1.2K, and at a field of 3.354T, corresponding to an electron spin resonance frequency of 94GHz. Trityl radicals are used to directly polarize 13C...... and other low-γ nuclei. Subsequent to the DNP process, the solid sample is dissolved rapidly with a warm solvent to create a solution of molecules with highly polarized nuclear spins. Two main applications are proposed: high-resolution liquid state NMR with enhanced sensitivity, and the use...

  10. Hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurd, Ralph E.; Yen, Yi‐Fen; Chen, Albert

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the basic physics of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution‐DNP), and the impact of the resulting highly nonequilibrium spin states, on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection. The hardware requirements for clinical translation of this techn......This article describes the basic physics of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution‐DNP), and the impact of the resulting highly nonequilibrium spin states, on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection. The hardware requirements for clinical translation...

  11. Self-Sustaining Dynamical Nuclear Polarization Oscillations in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudner, Mark Spencer; Levitov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Early experiments on spin-blockaded double quantum dots revealed robust, large-amplitude current oscillations in the presence of a static (dc) source-drain bias. Despite experimental evidence implicating dynamical nuclear polarization, the mechanism has remained a mystery. Here we introduce......) and nuclear spin diffusion, which governs dynamics of the spatial profile of nuclear polarization. The proposed framework naturally explains the differences in phenomenology between vertical and lateral quantum dot structures as well as the extremely long oscillation periods....

  12. Conformation analysis of trehalose. Molecular dynamics simulation and molecular mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnamaira, M.C.; Howard, E.I.; Grigera, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    Conformational analysis of the disaccharide trehalose is done by molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics. In spite of the different force fields used in each case, comparison between the molecular dynamics trajectories of the torsional angles of glycosidic linkage and energy conformational map shows a good agreement between both methods. By molecular dynamics it is observed a moderate mobility of the glycosidic linkage. The demands of computer time is comparable in both cases. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  13. A dynamically polarized hydrogen and deuterium target at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polarized electron beams have been successfully used at Jefferson Lab for over a year. The authors now report the successful achievement of polarized targets for nuclear and particle physics experiments using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)technique. The technique involves initial irradiation of frozen ammonia crystals (NH 3 and ND 3 ) using the electron beam from the new Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility at Jefferson Lab, and transferring the crystals to a special target holder for use in Experimental Halls. By subjecting the still ionized and frozen ammonia crystals to a strong magnetic field and suitably tuned RF, the high electron polarization is transmitted to the nucleus thus achieving target polarization. Details of the irradiation facility, the target holder, irradiation times, ionized crystal shelf life, and achieved polarization are discussed

  14. Rheology via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1982-10-01

    The equilibrium molecular dynamics formulated by Newton, Lagrange, and Hamilton has been modified in order to simulate rheologial molecular flows with fast computers. This modified Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) has been applied to fluid and solid deformations, under both homogeneous and shock conditions, as well as to the transport of heat. The irreversible heating associated with dissipation could be controlled by carrying out isothermal NEMD calculations. The new isothermal NEMD equations of motion are consistent with Gauss' 1829 Least-Constraint principle as well as certain microscopic equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical formulations due to Gibbs and Boltzmann. Application of isothermal NEMD revealed high-frequency and high-strain-rate behavior for simple fluids which resembled the behavior of polymer solutions and melts at lower frequencies and strain rates. For solids NEMD produces plastic flows consistent with experimental observations at much lower strain rates. The new nonequilibrium methods also suggest novel formulations of thermodynamics in nonequilibrium systems and shed light on the failure of the Principle of Material Frame Indifference

  15. Growth dynamics of Australia's polar dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly N Woodward

    Full Text Available Analysis of bone microstructure in ornithopod and theropod dinosaurs from Victoria, Australia, documents ontogenetic changes, providing insight into the dinosaurs' successful habitation of Cretaceous Antarctic environments. Woven-fibered bone tissue in the smallest specimens indicates rapid growth rates during early ontogeny. Later ontogeny is marked by parallel-fibered tissue, suggesting reduced growth rates approaching skeletal maturity. Bone microstructure similarities between the ornithopods and theropods, including the presence of LAGs in each group, suggest there is no osteohistologic evidence supporting the hypothesis that polar theropods hibernated seasonally. Results instead suggest high-latitude dinosaurs had growth trajectories similar to their lower-latitude relatives and thus, rapid early ontogenetic growth and the cyclical suspensions of growth inherent in the theropod and ornithopod lineages enabled them to successfully exploit polar regions.

  16. Growth dynamics of Australia's polar dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Holly N; Rich, Thomas H; Chinsamy, Anusuya; Vickers-Rich, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of bone microstructure in ornithopod and theropod dinosaurs from Victoria, Australia, documents ontogenetic changes, providing insight into the dinosaurs' successful habitation of Cretaceous Antarctic environments. Woven-fibered bone tissue in the smallest specimens indicates rapid growth rates during early ontogeny. Later ontogeny is marked by parallel-fibered tissue, suggesting reduced growth rates approaching skeletal maturity. Bone microstructure similarities between the ornithopods and theropods, including the presence of LAGs in each group, suggest there is no osteohistologic evidence supporting the hypothesis that polar theropods hibernated seasonally. Results instead suggest high-latitude dinosaurs had growth trajectories similar to their lower-latitude relatives and thus, rapid early ontogenetic growth and the cyclical suspensions of growth inherent in the theropod and ornithopod lineages enabled them to successfully exploit polar regions.

  17. Molecular dynamics study of silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, J.I.; Yaldram, K.; Ahmad, W.; Khan, M.K.; Rehman, T.S.

    1995-03-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics study using the embedded atom potential to examine the equilibrium bulk properties of Ag. We calculate the total energy and the lattice parameters as a function of temperature. From these we determine the specific heat and linear coefficient of thermal expansion. The comparison with experimental results of these two quantities is found to be excellent. We have also calculated the mean square displacement of the atoms in the three directions. As expected because of symmetry the displacements in the three directions are comparable and increase with increasing temperature. (author) 5 figs

  18. Dynamically Switching the Polarization State of Light Based on the Phase Transition of Vanadium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhi-Yong; Shu, Fang-Zhou; Gao, Ya-Jun; Cheng, Feng; Peng, Ru-Wen; Fan, Ren-Hao; Liu, Yongmin; Wang, Mu

    2018-03-01

    There have been great endeavors devoted to manipulating the polarization state of light by plasmonic nanostructures in recent decades. However, the topic of active polarizers has attracted much less attention. We present a composite plasmonic nanostructure consisting of vanadium dioxide that can dynamically modulate the polarization state of the reflected light through a thermally induced phase transition of vanadium dioxide. We design a system consisting of anisotropic plasmonic nanostructures with vanadium dioxide that exhibits distinct reflections subjected to different linearly polarized incidence at room temperature and in the heated state. Under a particular linearly polarized incidence, the polarization state of the reflected light changes at room temperature, and reverts to its original polarization state above the phase-transition temperature. The composite structure can also be used to realize a dynamically switchable infrared image, wherein a pattern can be visualized at room temperature while it disappears above the phase-transition temperature. The composite structure could be potentially used for versatile optical modulators, molecular detection, and polarimetric imaging.

  19. Cometary dust dynamics and polarization in electromagnetic radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranen, J.; Markkanen, J.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-09-01

    In our work, we apply a fast solution of electromagnetic scattering to determine the induced spin and movement of a dust particle in a cometary coma. The resulted aligned spinning state is then used to determine the observable polarization of the dust, and compared against the randomly averaged polarization of the same particle. We find that measurable effects arise due to the alignment. In the future, similar methods can be used to model the dynamics and in turn the polarization of the whole coma.

  20. Polarized hyperons probe dynamics of quark spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel S. Carman; T. S. Harry Lee; Mac Mestayer; Reinhard Schumacher

    2007-01-01

    Researchers at Jefferson Laboratory demonstrate how two analyses of the same data provide two plausible models of spin transfer in exclusive hyperon production, yielding quite different pictures of quark spin dynamics and challenging existing theories

  1. Modelling dust polarization observations of molecular clouds through MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Patrick K.; Fissel, Laura M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2018-03-01

    The BLASTPol observations of Vela C have provided the most detailed characterization of the polarization fraction p and dispersion in polarization angles S for a molecular cloud. We compare the observed distributions of p and S with those obtained in synthetic observations of simulations of molecular clouds, assuming homogeneous grain alignment. We find that the orientation of the mean magnetic field relative to the observer has a significant effect on the p and S distributions. These distributions for Vela C are most consistent with synthetic observations where the mean magnetic field is close to the line of sight. Our results point to apparent magnetic disorder in the Vela C molecular cloud, although it can be due to either an inclination effect (i.e. observing close to the mean field direction) or significant field tangling from strong turbulence/low magnetization. The joint correlations of p with column density and of S with column density for the synthetic observations generally agree poorly with the Vela C joint correlations, suggesting that understanding these correlations requires a more sophisticated treatment of grain alignment physics.

  2. Molecular polarization potential maps of the nucleic acid bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkorta, I.; Perez, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Ab initio calculations at the SCF level were carried out to compute the polarization potential map NM of the nucleic acid bases: cytosine, thymine, uracil, adedine, and guanine. For this purpose, the Dunning's 9s5p basis set contracted to a split-valence, was selected to perform the calculations. The molecular polarization potential (MPP) at each point was evaluated by the difference between the interaction energy of the molecule with a unit point charge and the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) at that point. MEPS and MPPS for the different molecules were computed with a density of 5 points/Angstrom 2 on the van der Waals surface of each molecule, defined using the van der Waals radii. Due to the symmetry of the molecules, only half the points were computed. The total number of points calculated was 558 for cytosine, 621 for thymine, 526 for uracil, 666 for adenine, and 699 for guanine. The results of these calculations are analyzed in terms of their implications on the molecular interactions between pairs of nucleic acid bases. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. A concurrent multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaofan; Tong, Qi

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have derived a multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) from first principle to extend the (Andersen)-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to mesoscale and continuum scale. The multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics is a con-current three-scale dynamics that couples a fine scale molecular dynamics, a mesoscale micromorphic dynamics, and a macroscale nonlocal particle dynamics together. By choosing proper statistical closure conditions, we have shown that the original Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics is the homogeneous and equilibrium case of the proposed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics. In specific, we have shown that the Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics can be rigorously formulated and justified from first principle, and its general inhomogeneous case, i.e., the three scale con-current multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics can take into account of macroscale continuum mechanics boundary condition without the limitation of atomistic boundary condition or periodic boundary conditions. The discovered multiscale scale structure and the corresponding multiscale dynamics reveal a seamless transition from atomistic scale to continuum scale and the intrinsic coupling mechanism among them based on first principle formulation

  4. Dynamics of plasmonic field polarization induced by quantum coherence in quantum dot-metallic nanoshell structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, S M

    2014-09-01

    When a hybrid system consisting of a semiconductor quantum dot and a metallic nanoparticle interacts with a laser field, the plasmonic field of the metallic nanoparticle can be normalized by the quantum coherence generated in the quantum dot. In this Letter, we study the states of polarization of such a coherent-plasmonic field and demonstrate how these states can reveal unique aspects of the collective molecular properties of the hybrid system formed via coherent exciton-plasmon coupling. We show that transition between the molecular states of this system can lead to ultrafast polarization dynamics, including sudden reversal of the sense of variations of the plasmonic field and formation of circular and elliptical polarization.

  5. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization capability study with fluid path

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinowski, Ronja Maja; Lipsø, Hans Kasper Wigh; Lerche, Mathilde Hauge

    2016-01-01

    Signal enhancement by hyperpolarization is a way of overcoming the low sensitivity in magnetic resonance; MRI in particular. One of the most well-known methods, dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, has been used clinically in cancer patients. One way of ensuring a low bioburden of the hyperp......Signal enhancement by hyperpolarization is a way of overcoming the low sensitivity in magnetic resonance; MRI in particular. One of the most well-known methods, dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, has been used clinically in cancer patients. One way of ensuring a low bioburden...

  6. Simulation and Automation of Microwave Frequency Control in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for Solid Polarized Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Gonaduwage; Johnson, Ian; Keller, Dustin

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is used in most of the solid polarized target scattering experiments. Those target materials must be irradiated using microwaves at a frequency determined by the difference in the nuclear Larmor and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) frequencies. But the resonance frequency changes with time as a result of radiation damage. Hence the microwave frequency should be adjusted accordingly. Manually adjusting the frequency can be difficult, and improper adjustments negatively impact the polarization. In order to overcome these difficulties, two controllers were developed which automate the process of seeking and maintaining the optimal frequency: one being a standalone controller for a traditional DC motor and the other a LabVIEW VI for a stepper motor configuration. Further a Monte-Carlo simulation was developed which can accurately model the polarization over time as a function of microwave frequency. In this talk, analysis of the simulated data and recent improvements to the automated system will be presented. DOE.

  7. Emergence and Dynamics of Polar Order in Developing Epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadifar, Reza

    2011-03-01

    Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) is a conserved process in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues, and is fundamental for the coordination of cell behavior and patterning. A well-studied example is the orientational pattern of hairs in the wing of the adult fruit fly Drosophila, which is an important model organism in biology. The Drosophila wing is an epithelium, i.e., a two-dimensional sheet of cells, which grows from a few cells to thousands of cells during the course of development. In the wing epithelium, planar polarity is established by an anisotropic distribution of PCP proteins within cells. The distribution of these proteins in a given cell affects the polarity of neighboring cells, such that at the end of wing development a large-scale PCP orientational order emerges. Here we present a theoretical study of planar polarity in developing epithelia based on a vertex model, which takes into account cell mechanics, cell adhesion, and cell division, combined with experimental results obtained from time-lapse imaging of the wing development. We show that in experiment, polarity order does not develop de novo at the end of wing development, but rather cells are initially polarized at an angle with respect to their final polarity axis. During wing development, the polarity axes of cells reorient towards their final direction. We identify a basic mechanism to generate such a large-scale initial polarization, based on the growth of a small number of cells with an initially random PCP distribution. Finally, we study the effect of shear and oriented cell division on dynamics of PCP order, showing that these two processes can robustly reorient the polarity axes of cells.

  8. Theoretical Concepts in Molecular Photodissociation Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1995-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Quantum Dynamics of Molecular Photofragmentation The Total Reaction Probability Final Product Distributions Time-Independent Approach, Stationary Scattering States Gaussian Wave Packet Dynamics Wigner Phase Space Representation The Diatomic...

  9. Molecular mechanisms that regulate the macrophage M1/M2 polarization balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan eWang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available As an essential component of innate immunity, macrophages have multiple functions in both inhibiting or promoting cell proliferation and tissue repair. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of macrophages. Classical M1 and alternative M2 activation of macrophages, mirroring the Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells, represent two extremes of a dynamic changing state of macrophage activation. M1-type macrophages release cytokines that inhibit the proliferation of surrounding cells and damage contiguous tissue, and M2-type macrophages release cytokines that promote the proliferation of contiguous cells and tissue repair. M1-M2 polarization of macrophage is a tightly controlled process entailing a set of signaling pathways, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory networks. An imbalance of macrophage M1-M2 polarization is often associated with various diseases or inflammatory conditions. Therefore identification of the molecules associated with the dynamic changes of macrophage polarization and understanding their interactions is crucial for elucidating the molecular basis of disease progression and designing novel macrophage-mediated therapeutic strategies.

  10. Theory of coherent dynamic nuclear polarization in quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neder, Izhar; Rudner, Mark Spencer; Halperin, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    We consider the production of dynamic nuclear spin polarization (DNP) in a two-electron double quantum dot, in which the electronic levels are repeatedly swept through a singlet-triplet avoided crossing. Our analysis helps to elucidate the intriguing interplay between electron-nuclear hyperfine...

  11. Increasing Spin Coherence in Nanodiamond via Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, Torsten; Rej, Ewa; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David; Reilly, David

    Nanodiamonds are of interest for quantum information technology, as metrological sensors, and more recently as a probe of biological environments. Here we present results examining how intrinsic defects can be used for dynamic nuclear polarization that leads to a dramatic increase in both T1 and T2 for 13C spins in nanodiamond. Mechanisms to explain this enhancement are discussed.

  12. Template-directed self-assembly of dynamic covalent capsules with polar interiors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Albano; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C; Ballester, Pablo

    2017-11-01

    Chiral polyimine molecular capsules with polar interiors have been prepared through template covalent dynamic self-assembly. An aryl-extended tetraaldehyde calix[4]pyrrole scaffold was condensed with suitable diamines as linkers using templates for efficient self-assembly. The capsular complexes were characterized in solution, gas phase and the solid-state. Unprecedented transfer of asymmetry was observed from a chiral diamine linker to the resulting supramolecular capsular assembly.

  13. Exploring viscosity, polarity and temperature sensitivity of BODIPY-based molecular rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyšniauskas, Aurimas; López-Duarte, Ismael; Duchemin, Nicolas; Vu, Thanh-Truc; Wu, Yilei; Budynina, Ekaterina M; Volkova, Yulia A; Peña Cabrera, Eduardo; Ramírez-Ornelas, Diana E; Kuimova, Marina K

    2017-09-27

    Microviscosity is a key parameter controlling the rate of diffusion and reactions on the microscale. One of the most convenient tools for measuring microviscosity is by fluorescent viscosity sensors termed 'molecular rotors'. BODIPY-based molecular rotors in particular proved extremely useful in combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, for providing quantitative viscosity maps of living cells as well as measuring dynamic changes in viscosity over time. In this work, we investigate several new BODIPY-based molecular rotors with the aim of improving on the current viscosity sensing capabilities and understanding how the structure of the fluorophore is related to its function. We demonstrate that due to subtle structural changes, BODIPY-based molecular rotors may become sensitive to temperature and polarity of their environment, as well as to viscosity, and provide a photophysical model explaining the nature of this sensitivity. Our data suggests that a thorough understanding of the photophysics of any new molecular rotor, in environments of different viscosity, temperature and polarity, is a must before moving on to applications in viscosity sensing.

  14. The Kinesin Adaptor Calsyntenin-1 Organizes Microtubule Polarity and Regulates Dynamics during Sensory Axon Arbor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C. Halloran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Axon growth and branching, and development of neuronal polarity are critically dependent on proper organization and dynamics of the microtubule (MT cytoskeleton. MTs must organize with correct polarity for delivery of diverse cargos to appropriate subcellular locations, yet the molecular mechanisms regulating MT polarity remain poorly understood. Moreover, how an actively branching axon reorganizes MTs to direct their plus ends distally at branch points is unknown. We used high-speed, in vivo imaging of polymerizing MT plus ends to characterize MT dynamics in developing sensory axon arbors in zebrafish embryos. We find that axonal MTs are highly dynamic throughout development, and that the peripheral and central axons of sensory neurons show differences in MT behaviors. Furthermore, we show that Calsyntenin-1 (Clstn-1, a kinesin adaptor required for sensory axon branching, also regulates MT polarity in developing axon arbors. In wild type neurons the vast majority of MTs are directed in the correct plus-end-distal orientation from early stages of development. Loss of Clstn-1 causes an increase in MTs polymerizing in the retrograde direction. These misoriented MTs most often are found near growth cones and branch points, suggesting Clstn-1 is particularly important for organizing MT polarity at these locations. Together, our results suggest that Clstn-1, in addition to regulating kinesin-mediated cargo transport, also organizes the underlying MT highway during axon arbor development.

  15. Fluorescence depolarization as a probe of molecular dynamics within liquid jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, A. J.; McCaffery, A. J.; Quintella, C. M.

    Preliminary results are presented from a study of fluorescence depolarization within a thin laminar jet of rhodamine 6 G in ethylene glycol. A large number of polarization measurements taken across the jet have enabled us to build up a detailed polarization map of the liquid flow. Relating the degree of depolarization to molecular alignment caused by the presence of shear forces within the jet, we propose that this method may be used as a sensitive probe of the molecular dynamics of liquid flow.

  16. MDVRY: a polarizable classical molecular dynamics package for biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souaille, M.; Loirat, H.; Borgis, D.; Gaigeot, M. P.

    2009-02-01

    The MDVRY classical molecular dynamics package is presented for the study of biomolecules in the gas and liquid phase. Electrostatic polarization has been implemented in the formalism of point induced dipoles following the model of Thole. Two schemes have been implemented for the calculation of induced dipoles, i.e. resolution of the self-consistent equations and a 'Car-Parrinello' dynamical approach. In this latter, the induced dipoles are calculated at each time step of the dynamics through the dynamics of additional degrees of freedom associated with the dipoles. This method saves computer time and allows to study polarized solvated proteins at a very low CPU cost. The program is written in C-language and runs on LINUX machines. A detailed manual of the code is given. The main features of the package are illustrated taking on examples of proteins in the gas phase or immersed in liquid water. Program summaryProgram title: MDVRY Catalogue identifier: AEBY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 39 156 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 277 197 Distribution format: tar.bz2 Programming language: C Computer: Linux machines with FFTW Fourier Transform package installed Operating system: Linux machines, SUSE & RedHat distributions Classification: 3, 16.13, 23 External routines: FFTW ( http://www.fftw.org/) Nature of problem: Molecular Dynamics Software package. Solution method: Velocity Verlet algorithm. The implemented force field is composed of intra-molecular interactions and inter-molecular interactions (electrostatics, polarization, van der Waals). Polarization is accounted through induced point dipoles at each atomic site. Supplementary degrees of freedom are

  17. Molecular dynamics of polarizable point dipole models for molten NaI. Comparison with first principles simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trullàs J.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations of molten NaI at 995 K have been carried out using polarizable ion models based on rigid ion pair potentials to which the anion induced dipole polarization is added. The polarization is added in such a way that point dipoles are induced on the anions by both local electric field and deformation short-range damping interactions that oppose the electrically induced dipole moments. The structure and self-diffusion results are compared with those obtained by Galamba and Costa Cabral using first principles Hellmann-Feynman molecular dynamics simulations and using classical molecular dynamics of a shell model which allows only the iodide polarization

  18. Artificial surface-mounted molecular rotors: Molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacek, Jaroslav; Michl, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2007), s. 730-739 ISSN 1616-301X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550616; GA MŠk ME 857 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : molecular dynamics * molecular machines * nanomaterials Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.496, year: 2007

  19. Thermally driven molecular linear motors - A molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    We conduct molecular dynamics simulations of a molecular linear motor consisting of coaxial carbon nanotubes with a long outer carbon nanotube confining and guiding the motion of an inner short, capsule-like nanotube. The simulations indicate that the motion of the capsule can be controlled...

  20. Dynamic polarization in paramagnetic solids and microscopic correlation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, Jean-Paul

    1972-01-01

    The different effects of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in paramagnetic solids are described by means of a single thermodynamic formalism. In the case of large exchange interactions, the Overhauser effect correlated with nuclear relaxation time measurements can provide a way of studying correlation functions between electronic spins. This method is used to study the low-frequency behaviour of the microscopic spectral density which should diverge as ω → 0, in the case of a linear exchange chain. (author) [fr

  1. Exploring Anomalous Polarization Dynamics in Organometallic Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mahshid; Collins, Liam; Puretzky, Alexander; Zhang, Jia; Keum, Jong Kahk; Lu, Wei; Ivanov, Ilia; Kalinin, Sergei V; Hu, Bin

    2018-03-01

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OMHPs) have attracted broad attention as prospective materials for optoelectronic applications. Among the many anomalous properties of these materials, of special interest are the ferroelectric properties including both classical and relaxor-like components, as a potential origin of slow dynamics, field enhancement, and anomalous mobilities. Here, ferroelectric properties of the three representative OMHPs are explored, including FAPb x Sn 1- x I 3 (x = 0, x = 0.85) and FA 0.85 MA 0.15 PbI 3 using band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy and contact mode Kelvin probe force microscopy, providing insight into long- and short-range dipole and charge dynamics in these materials and probing ferroelectric density of states. Furthermore, second-harmonic generation in thin films of OMHPs is observed, providing a direct information on the noncentrosymmetric polarization in such materials. Overall, the data provide strong evidence for the presence of ferroelectric domains in these systems; however, the domain dynamics is suppressed by fast ion dynamics. These materials hence present the limit of ferroelectric materials with spontaneous polarization dynamically screened by ionic and electronic carriers. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Chirality in molecular collision dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Andrea; Palazzetti, Federico

    2018-02-01

    Chirality is a phenomenon that permeates the natural world, with implications for atomic and molecular physics, for fundamental forces and for the mechanisms at the origin of the early evolution of life and biomolecular homochirality. The manifestations of chirality in chemistry and biochemistry are numerous, the striking ones being chiral recognition and asymmetric synthesis with important applications in molecular sciences and in industrial and pharmaceutical chemistry. Chiral discrimination phenomena, due to the existence of two enantiomeric forms, very well known in the case of interaction with light, but still nearly disregarded in molecular collision studies. Here we review some ideas and recent advances about the role of chirality in molecular collisions, designing and illustrating molecular beam experiments for the demonstration of chiral effects and suggesting a scenario for a stereo-directional origin of chiral selection.

  3. Molecular Catalysis at Polarized Interfaces Created by Ferroelectric BaTiO3 (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-06

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2016-0197 MOLECULAR CATALYSIS AT POLARIZED INTERFACES CREATED BY FERROELECTRIC BaTiO3 (POSTPRINT) Eugene S. Beh, Xiaofeng Feng, and...TITLE AND SUBTITLE MOLECULAR CATALYSIS AT POLARIZED INTERFACES CREATED BY FERROELECTRIC BaTiO3 (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-09-D-5434...way to inves- tigate and exploit the effects of interfacial polarization on catalysis . Acknowledgements We thank the Air Force Office of Scientic

  4. Dynamic nuclear polarization of nucleic acid with endogenously bound manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenk, Patricia [University of Tübingen, Werner Siemens Imaging Center and Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy (Germany); Kaushik, Monu; Richter, Diane [Goethe University, Institute of Physical und Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry und Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany); Vogel, Marc; Suess, Beatrix [Technical University Darmstadt, Department of Biology (Germany); Corzilius, Björn, E-mail: corzilius@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University, Institute of Physical und Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry und Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We report the direct dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of {sup 13}C nuclei of a uniformly [{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N]-labeled, paramagnetic full-length hammerhead ribozyme (HHRz) complex with Mn{sup 2+} where the enhanced polarization is fully provided by the endogenously bound metal ion and no exogenous polarizing agent is added. A {sup 13}C enhancement factor of ε = 8 was observed by intra-complex DNP at 9.4 T. In contrast, “conventional” indirect and direct DNP experiments were performed using AMUPol as polarizing agent where we obtained a {sup 1}H enhancement factor of ε ≈ 250. Comparison with the diamagnetic (Mg{sup 2+}) HHRz complex shows that the presence of Mn{sup 2+} only marginally influences the (DNP-enhanced) NMR properties of the RNA. Furthermore two-dimensional correlation spectra ({sup 15}N–{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C–{sup 13}C) reveal structural inhomogeneity in the frozen, amorphous state indicating the coexistence of several conformational states. These demonstrations of intra-complex DNP using an endogenous metal ion as well as DNP-enhanced MAS NMR of RNA in general yield important information for the development of new methods in structural biology.

  5. Cloud morphology and dynamics in Saturn's northern polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antuñano, Arrate; del Río-Gaztelurrutia, Teresa; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín; Rodríguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of the cloud morphology and motions in the north polar region of Saturn, from latitude ∼ 70°N to the pole based on Cassini ISS images obtained between January 2009 and November 2014. This region shows a variety of dynamical structures: the permanent hexagon wave and its intense eastward jet, a large field of permanent ;puffy; clouds with scales from 10 - 500 km, probably of convective origin, local cyclone and anticyclones vortices with sizes of ∼1,000 km embedded in this field, and finally the intense cyclonic polar vortex. We report changes in the albedo of the clouds that delineate rings of circulation around the polar vortex and the presence of ;plume-like; activity in the hexagon jet, in both cases not accompanied with significant variations in the corresponding jets. No meridional migration is observed in the clouds forming and merging in the field of puffy clouds, suggesting that their mergers do not contribute to the maintenance of the polar vortex. Finally, we analyze the dominant growing modes for barotropic and baroclinic instabilities in the hexagon jet, showing that a mode 6 barotropic instability is dominant at the latitude of the hexagon.

  6. Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    ARL-TR-8234 ● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations by DeCarlos E...return it to the originator. ARL-TR-8234● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics...REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 October 2015–30 September 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Visualizing Energy on Target

  7. Molecular dynamics for irradiation driven chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sushko, Gennady B.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    that describe the classical MD of complex molecular systems under irradiation. The proposed irradiation driven molecular dynamics (IDMD) methodology is designed for the molecular level description of the irradiation driven chemistry. The IDMD approach is implemented into the MBN Explorer software package......A new molecular dynamics (MD) approach for computer simulations of irradiation driven chemical transformations of complex molecular systems is suggested. The approach is based on the fact that irradiation induced quantum transformations can often be treated as random, fast and local processes...... capable to operate with a large library of classical potentials, many-body force fields and their combinations. IDMD opens a broad range of possibilities for modelling of irradiation driven modifications and chemistry of complex molecular systems ranging from radiotherapy cancer treatments to the modern...

  8. The teaching of polar coordinates with dynamic mathematics software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Yılmaz; Tatar, Enver

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dynamic mathematics software on the achievement of pre-service mathematics teachers in the topic of polar coordinates and to solicit their opinions about computer-assisted instruction. The study was conducted for 11 weeks with 33 pre-service teachers in the Department of Mathematics Education Program of a state university in Turkey. Data collection tools comprised a knowledge test of polar coordinates and administration of a semi-structured interview form developed by the researchers who conducted the study using an embedded design as part of a mixed-method research. The results of data analysis showed that the computer-assisted instruction method in which dynamic mathematics software was used positively contributed to the success of pre-service teachers in understanding the subject of polar coordinates. Furthermore, it was found that pre-service teachers supported the use of this method in lessons as it provides visualization, increases retention, concretization of abstract mathematical structures, better understanding and learning, and creates an interesting and interactive learning environment.

  9. Molecular dynamics of a proguanil derivative

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    ABSTRACT. Proguanil is a prophylactic antimalarial drug t stopping the malaria parasites from reprod molecular dynamics of a derivative of Progua benzene ring of the molecule of Proguanil derivative. The molecular geometries of chemical calculations at the Restricted Hatre. 31G(d,p) and 6-31++G. Also, Density Func.

  10. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering

  11. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungen, Ch. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, Université de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  12. Molecular simulation of polar molecules interaction with MOFs family materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Toni, M.

    2012-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the adsorption of simple molecular fluids in nano-porous materials. Many industrial processes are based on this phenomenon, including ionic exchange, selective separation and heterogeneous catalysis. I used molecular simulation to study the adsorption properties of polar molecules of industrial interest (CO 2 and H 2 O) in a new class of crystalline microporous hybrid organic-inorganic materials called Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs). They have exceptional adsorption properties due to their topological variety and their versatility, allowed by the large range of possibilities offered by organic and coordination chemistry and functionalizations. I first studied the adsorption of CO 2 in a family of materials called IRMOFs, which share the same topology but have different porous volume, in order to characterize the effect of confinement on their adsorption performance. In particular, a general behavior has been highlighted: the critical temperature decreases when the confinement increases. Then, I looked at a recently synthesized cationic MOF called Zn2(CBTACN). After having localized the extra-framework halogen anions in the unit cell of the material, something which was not possible experimentally, I characterized CO 2 adsorption in this system first as a pure gas and then as a component of different mixtures. Finally, I was interested in the hydrothermal stability of MOFs, a crucial issue for their use in industrial applications. I observed the hydration mechanism of system that is analogous to the MOF-5 (IRMOF-0h) and shed light on some collaborative effects of the attack of water that were unknown to in the literature. (author)

  13. A sensitive fluorescent probe for the polar solvation dynamics at protein-surfactant interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priya; Choudhury, Susobhan; Singha, Subhankar; Jun, Yongwoong; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Jhimli; Das, Ranjan; Ahn, Kyo-Han; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2017-05-17

    Relaxation dynamics at the surface of biologically important macromolecules is important taking into account their functionality in molecular recognition. Over the years it has been shown that the solvation dynamics of a fluorescent probe at biomolecular surfaces and interfaces account for the relaxation dynamics of polar residues and associated water molecules. However, the sensitivity of the dynamics depends largely on the localization and exposure of the probe. For noncovalent fluorescent probes, localization at the region of interest in addition to surface exposure is an added challenge compared to the covalently attached probes at the biological interfaces. Here we have used a synthesized donor-acceptor type dipolar fluorophore, 6-acetyl-(2-((4-hydroxycyclohexyl)(methyl)amino)naphthalene) (ACYMAN), for the investigation of the solvation dynamics of a model protein-surfactant interface. A significant structural rearrangement of a model histone protein (H1) upon interaction with anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) as revealed from the circular dichroism (CD) studies is nicely corroborated in the solvation dynamics of the probe at the interface. The polarization gated fluorescence anisotropy of the probe compared to that at the SDS micellar surface clearly reveals the localization of the probe at the protein-surfactant interface. We have also compared the sensitivity of ACYMAN with other solvation probes including coumarin 500 (C500) and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylamino-styryl)-4H-pyran (DCM). In comparison to ACYMAN, both C500 and DCM fail to probe the interfacial solvation dynamics of a model protein-surfactant interface. While C500 is found to be delocalized from the protein-surfactant interface, DCM becomes destabilized upon the formation of the interface (protein-surfactant complex). The timescales obtained from this novel probe have also been compared with other femtosecond resolved studies and molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Programming an interpreter using molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    PGA (ProGram Algebra) is an algebra of programs which concerns programs in their simplest form: sequences of instructions. Molecular dynamics is a simple model of computation developed in the setting of \\PGA, which bears on the use of dynamic data structures in programming. We consider the

  15. Propagation of intense and short circularly polarized pulses in a molecular gas: From multiphoton ionization to nonlinear macroscopic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytova, M.; Lorin, E.; Bandrauk, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the propagation dynamics of short and intense circularly polarized pulses in an aligned diatomic gas. Compared to linearly polarized intense pulses, high harmonic generation (HHG) and the coherent generation of attosecond pulses in the intense-circular-polarization case are a new research area. More specifically, we numerically study the propagation of intense and short circularly polarized pulses in the one-electron H2+ molecular gas, using a micro-macro Maxwell-Schrödinger model. In this model, the macroscopic polarization is computed from the solution of a large number of time-dependent Schrödinger equations, the source of dipole moments, and using a trace operator. We focus on the intensity and the phase of harmonics generated in the H2+ gas as a function of the pulse-propagation distance. We show that short coherent circularly polarized pulses of same helicity can be generated in the molecular gas as a result of cooperative phase-matching effects.

  16. Multiple grid methods for classical molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeel, Robert D; Tezcan, Ismail; Hardy, David J

    2002-04-30

    Presented in the context of classical molecular mechanics and dynamics are multilevel summation methods for the fast calculation of energies/forces for pairwise interactions, which are based on the hierarchical interpolation of interaction potentials on multiple grids. The concepts and details underlying multigrid interpolation are described. For integration of molecular dynamics the use of different time steps for different interactions allows longer time steps for many of the interactions, and this can be combined with multiple grids in space. Comparison is made to the fast multipole method, and evidence is presented suggesting that for molecular simulations multigrid methods may be superior to the fast multipole method and other tree methods.

  17. Thermal conductivity of ionic systems from equilibrium molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanne, Mathieu; Marrocchelli, Dario; Merlet, Céline; Ohtori, Norikazu; Madden, Paul A

    2011-03-16

    Thermal conductivities of ionic compounds (NaCl, MgO, Mg(2)SiO(4)) are calculated from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations using the Green-Kubo method. Transferable interaction potentials including many-body polarization effects are employed. Various physical conditions (solid and liquid states, high temperatures, high pressures) relevant to the study of the heat transport in the Earth's mantle are investigated, for which experimental measures are very challenging. By introducing a frequency-dependent thermal conductivity, we show that important coupled thermoelectric effects occur in the energy conduction mechanism in the case of liquid systems.

  18. Frozen Acrylamide Gels as Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Matrices.

    KAUST Repository

    Viger-Gravel, Jasmine

    2017-05-24

    We show that aqueous acrylamide gels can be used to provide dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR signal enhancements of around 200 at 9.4 T and 100 K. The enhancements are shown to increase with cross linker concentration and low concentrations of the AMUPol biradical. We show that this DNP matrix can be used in situations where conventional incipient wetness methods fail, such as to obtain DNP surface enhanced NMR spectra from inorganic nanoparticles. In particular, we obtain 113Cd spectra from CdTe-COOH NPs in minutes. The spectra clearly indicate a highly-disordered cadmium rich surface.

  19. Molecular potentials and relaxation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karo, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of empirical pseudopotentials, in evaluating interatomic potentials, provides an inexpensive and convenient method for obtaining highly accurate potential curves and permits the modeling of core-valence correlation, and the inclusion of relativistic effects when these are significant. As an example, recent calculations of the chi 1 Σ + and a 3 Σ + states of LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH and the chi 2 Σ + states of their anions are discussed. Pseudopotentials, including core polarization terms, have been used to replace the core electrons, and this has been coupled with the development of compact, highly-optimized basis sets for the corresponding one- and two-electron atoms. Comparisons of the neutral potential curves with experiment and other ab initio calculations show good agreement (within 1000 cm -1 over most of the potential curves) with the difference curves being considerably more accurate

  20. Polarization-Dependent Measurements of Molecular Super Rotors with Oriented Angular Momenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Matthew J.; Toro, Carlos; Liu, Qingnan; Mullin, Amy S.

    2014-05-01

    Controlling molecular motion would enable manipulation of energy flow between molecules. Here we have used an optical centrifuge to investigate energy transfer between molecular super rotors with oriented angular momenta. The polarizable electron cloud of the molecules interacts with the electric field of linearly polarized light that angularly accelerates over the time of the optical pulse. This process drives molecules into high angular momentum states that are oriented with the optical field and have energies far from equilibrium. High resolution transient IR spectroscopy reveals the dynamics of collisional energy transfer for these super excited rotors. The results of this study leads to a more fundamental understanding of energy balance in non-equilibrium environments and the physical and chemical properties of gases in a new regime of energy states. Results will be presented for several super rotor species including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and acetylene. Polarization-dependent measurements reveal the extent to which the super rotors maintain spatial orientation of high angular momentum states.

  1. Enhancement of molecular NMR signal induced by polarization transfer from laser-polarized 129Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xianping

    2001-01-01

    There is a large non-equilibrium nuclear polarization and a longer relaxation time in the laser-polarized 129 Xe produced by means of optical pumping and spin exchange. The characteristics of the laser-polarized 129 Xe permit the transfer of the polarization to enhance the atomic nuclear spin in liquid, solid and surface of solid molecules. Therefore, the sensitivity in nuclear magnetic resonance measurements for the molecules is enhanced and applications in the investigations of materials and surface sciences are expanded. The progress in the investigations of materials and surface sciences are expanded. The progress in the investigations of the polarization transfer between laser-polarized 129 Xe and the atomic nuclei in the molecules, the relative physics and the measurement of some parameters are introduced

  2. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Molecular Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubeva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    mechanics. The first part focuses on noninteracting molecular machines described by a paradigmatic continuum model with the aim of comparing and contrasting such a description to the one offered by the widely used discrete models. Many molecular motors, for example, kinesin involved in cellular cargo......Molecular machines, or molecular motors, are small biophysical devices that perform a variety of essential metabolic processes such as DNA replication, protein synthesis and intracellular transport. Typically, these machines operate by converting chemical energy into motion and mechanical work. Due...... to their microscopic size, molecular motors are governed by principles fundamentally different from those describing the operation of man-made motors such as car engines. In this dissertation the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of molecular machines are studied using the tools of nonequilibrium statistical...

  3. Advances in molecular vibrations and collision dynamics molecular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bacic, Zatko

    1998-01-01

    This volume focuses on molecular clusters, bound by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds. Twelve chapters review a wide range of recent theoretical and experimental advances in the areas of cluster vibrations, spectroscopy, and reaction dynamics. The authors are leading experts, who have made significant contributions to these topics.The first chapter describes exciting results and new insights in the solvent effects on the short-time photo fragmentation dynamics of small molecules, obtained by combining heteroclusters with femtosecond laser excitation. The second is on theoretical work on effects of single solvent (argon) atom on the photodissociation dynamics of the solute H2O molecule. The next two chapters cover experimental and theoretical aspects of the energetics and vibrations of small clusters. Chapter 5 describes diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations and non additive three-body potential terms in molecular clusters. The next six chapters deal with hydrogen-bonded clusters, refle...

  4. Molecular density functional theory of water including density–polarization coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Lévy, Nicolas; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We present a three-dimensional molecular density functional theory of water derived fromfirst-principles that relies on the particle’s density and multipolar polarization density andincludes the density–polarization coupling. This brings two main benefits: (i) scalar densityand vectorial multipolar polarization density fields are much more tractable and give morephysical insight than the full position and orientation densities, and (ii) it includes the fulldensity–pola...

  5. Scalable Molecular Dynamics for Large Biomolecular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Brunner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an optimized parallelization scheme for molecular dynamics simulations of large biomolecular systems, implemented in the production-quality molecular dynamics program NAMD. With an object-based hybrid force and spatial decomposition scheme, and an aggressive measurement-based predictive load balancing framework, we have attained speeds and speedups that are much higher than any reported in literature so far. The paper first summarizes the broad methodology we are pursuing, and the basic parallelization scheme we used. It then describes the optimizations that were instrumental in increasing performance, and presents performance results on benchmark simulations.

  6. Theory and application of quantum molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng Hui Zhang, John

    1999-01-01

    This book provides a detailed presentation of modern quantum theories for treating the reaction dynamics of small molecular systems. Its main focus is on the recent development of successful quantum dynamics theories and computational methods for studying the molecular reactive scattering process, with specific applications given in detail for a number of benchmark chemical reaction systems in the gas phase and the gas surface. In contrast to traditional books on collision in physics focusing on abstract theory for nonreactive scattering, this book deals with both the development and the appli

  7. First-principles molecular dynamics for metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernando, G.W.; Qian, G.; Weinert, M.; Davenport, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    A Car-Parrinello-type first-principles molecular-dynamics approach capable of treating the partial occupancy of electronic states that occurs at the Fermi level in a metal is presented. The algorithms used to study metals are both simple and computationally efficient. We also discuss the connection between ordinary electronic-structure calculations and molecular-dynamics simulations as well as the role of Brillouin-zone sampling. This extension should be useful not only for metallic solids but also for solids that become metals in their liquid and/or amorphous phases

  8. Control of Mechanotransduction by Molecular Clutch Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Trepat, Xavier; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2018-02-26

    The linkage of cells to their microenvironment is mediated by a series of bonds that dynamically engage and disengage, in what has been conceptualized as the molecular clutch model. Whereas this model has long been employed to describe actin cytoskeleton and cell migration dynamics, it has recently been proposed to also explain mechanotransduction (i.e., the process by which cells convert mechanical signals from their environment into biochemical signals). Here we review the current understanding on how cell dynamics and mechanotransduction are driven by molecular clutch dynamics and its master regulator, the force loading rate. Throughout this Review, we place a specific emphasis on the quantitative prediction of cell response enabled by combined experimental and theoretical approaches. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrafast molecular dynamics illuminated with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, John D.; Miron, Catalin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultrafast molecular dynamics probed with synchrotron radiation. • Core-excitation as probe of ultrafast dynamics through core-hole lifetime. • Review of experimental and theoretical methods in ultrafast dynamics using core-level excitation. - Abstract: Synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool for studying molecular dynamics in small molecules in spite of the absence of natural matching between the X-ray pulse duration and the time scale of nuclear motion. Promoting core level electrons to unoccupied molecular orbitals simultaneously initiates two ultrafast processes, nuclear dynamics on the potential energy surfaces of the highly excited neutral intermediate state of the molecule on the one hand and an ultrafast electronic decay of the intermediate excited state to a cationic final state, characterized by a core hole lifetime. The similar time scales of these processes enable core excited pump-probe-type experiments to be performed with long duration X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source. Recent results obtained at the PLIEADES beamline concerning ultrafast dissociation of core excited states and molecular potential energy curve mapping facilitated by changes in the geometry of the short-lived intermediate core excited state are reviewed. High brightness X-ray beams combined with state-of-the art electron and ion-electron coincidence spectrometers and highly sophisticated theoretical methods are required to conduct these experiments and to achieve a full understanding of the experimental results.

  10. Nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics behind molecular autoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical method for real-time dynamics of nonadiabatic reorganization of electronic configurations in molecules is developed, with dual aim that the intramolecular electron dynamics can be probed by means of direct and/or indirect photoionizations and that the physical origins behind photoionization signals attained in the time domain can be identified in terms of the language of time-dependent quantum chemistry. In doing so, we first formulate and implement a new computational scheme for nonadiabatic electron dynamics associated with molecular ionization, which well fits in the general theory of nonadiabatic electron dynamics. In this method, the total nonadiabatic electron wavepackets are propagated in time directly with complex natural orbitals without referring to Hartree-Fock molecular orbitals, and the amount of electron flux from a molecular region leading to ionization is evaluated in terms of the relevant complex natural orbitals. In the second half of this paper, we apply the method to electron dynamics in the elementary processes consisting of the Auger decay to demonstrate the methodological significance. An illustrative example is taken from an Auger decay starting from the 2a1 orbital hole-state of H2O+. The roles of nuclear momentum (kinetic) couplings in electronic-state mixing during the decay process are analyzed in terms of complex natural orbitals, which are schematically represented in the conventional language of molecular symmetry of the Hartree-Fock orbitals.

  11. Dynamics of actin cables in polarized growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eBergs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly polarized growth of filamentous fungi requires a continuous supply of proteins and lipids to the hyphal tip. This transport is managed by vesicle trafficking via the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and their associated motor proteins. Particularly, actin cables originating from the hyphal tip are essential for hyphal growth. Although specific marker proteins to visualize actin cables have been developed in filamentous fungi, the exact organization and dynamics of actin cables has remained elusive. Here we visualized actin cables using tropomyosin (TpmA and Lifeact fused to fluorescent proteins in Aspergillus nidulans and studied the dynamics and regulation. GFP tagged TpmA visualized dynamic actin cables formed from the hyphal tip with cycles of elongation and shrinkage. The elongation and shrinkage rates of actin cables were similar and approximately 0.6 μm/s. Comparison of actin markers revealed that high concentrations of Lifeact reduced actin dynamics. Simultaneous visualization of actin cables and microtubules suggests temporally and spatially coordinated polymerization and depolymerization between the two cytoskeletons. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ordered polarized growth regulated by actin cables and microtubules.

  12. Molecular Diagnosis of Classical Rabies Virus in Polar Foxes in Greeenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    Classical rabies virus continues to circulate in polar foxes in Greenland. Within the last 5 years more than 30 animals, mainly polar foxes have been tested positive for rabies. In this study, brain samples from this period were assessed for the presence of rabies viral RNA using molecular...

  13. First Observation of the Submillimeter Polarization Spectrum in a Translucent Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Peter C.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Soler, Juan D.; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2018-04-01

    Polarized emission from aligned dust is a crucial tool for studies of magnetism in the ISM, but a troublesome contaminant for studies of cosmic microwave background polarization. In each case, an understanding of the significance of the polarization signal requires well-calibrated physical models of dust grains. Despite decades of progress in theory and observation, polarized dust models remain largely underconstrained. During its 2012 flight, the balloon-borne telescope BLASTPol obtained simultaneous broadband polarimetric maps of a translucent molecular cloud at 250, 350, and 500 μm. Combining these data with polarimetry from the Planck 850 μm band, we have produced a submillimeter polarization spectrum, the first for a cloud of this type. We find the polarization degree to be largely constant across the four bands. This result introduces a new observable with the potential to place strong empirical constraints on ISM dust polarization models in a previously inaccessible density regime. Compared to models by Draine & Fraisse, our result disfavors two of their models for which all polarization arises due only to aligned silicate grains. By creating simple models for polarized emission in a translucent cloud, we verify that extinction within the cloud should have only a small effect on the polarization spectrum shape, compared to the diffuse ISM. Thus, we expect the measured polarization spectrum to be a valid check on diffuse ISM dust models. The general flatness of the observed polarization spectrum suggests a challenge to models where temperature and alignment degree are strongly correlated across major dust components.

  14. ALMA’s Polarized View of 10 Protostars in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Erin G.; Harris, Robert J.; Looney, Leslie W.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Yang, Haifeng; Tobin, John J.; Stephens, Ian

    2018-03-01

    We present 870 μm ALMA dust polarization observations of 10 young Class 0/I protostars in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. At ∼0.″35 (80 au) resolution, all of our sources show some degree of polarization, with most (9/10) showing significantly extended emission in the polarized continuum. Each source has incredibly intricate polarization signatures. In particular, all three disk-candidates have polarization vectors roughly along the minor axis, which is indicative of polarization produced by dust scattering. On ∼100 au scales, the polarization is at a relatively low level (≲1%) and is quite ordered. In sources with significant envelope emission, the envelope is typically polarized at a much higher (≳5%) level and has a far more disordered morphology. We compute the cumulative probability distributions for both the small (disk-scale) and large (envelope-scale) polarization percentage. We find that the two are intrinsically different, even after accounting for the different detection thresholds in the high/low surface brightness regions. We perform Kolmogorov–Smirnov and Anderson–Darling tests on the distributions of angle offsets of the polarization from the outflow axis. We find disk-candidate sources are different from the non-disk-candidate sources. We conclude that the polarization on the 100 au scale is consistent with the signature of dust scattering for disk-candidates and that the polarization on the envelope-scale in all sources may come from another mechanism, most likely magnetically aligned grains.

  15. Quantum spin dynamics in molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuenberger, M.N.; Meier, F.; Loss, D.

    2003-01-01

    The detailed theoretical understanding of quantum spin dynamics in various molecular magnets is an important step on the roadway to technological applications of these systems. Quantum effects in both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic molecular clusters are, by now, theoretically well understood. Ferromagnetic molecular clusters allow one to study the interplay of incoherent quantum tunneling and thermally activated transitions between states with different spin orientation. The Berry phase oscillations found in Fe 8 are signatures of the quantum mechanical interference of different tunneling paths. Antiferromagnetic molecular clusters are promising candidates for the observation of coherent quantum tunneling on the mesoscopic scale. Although challenging, application of molecular magnetic clusters for data storage and quantum data processing are within experimental reach already with present day technology. Refs. 77 (author)

  16. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Molecular Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubeva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Molecular machines, or molecular motors, are small biophysical devices that perform a variety of essential metabolic processes such as DNA replication, protein synthesis and intracellular transport. Typically, these machines operate by converting chemical energy into motion and mechanical work. Due...... to their microscopic size, molecular motors are governed by principles fundamentally different from those describing the operation of man-made motors such as car engines. In this dissertation the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of molecular machines are studied using the tools of nonequilibrium statistical...... transport, move on crowded tracks where they can encounter other motors, a phenomenon referred to as molecular motor traffic. In the second part, traffic models of kinesin motors under an external mechanical load are considered, and the efficiency at maximum power (EMP) is calculated as a convenient measure...

  17. MicroRNA: Dynamic Regulators of Macrophage Polarization and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jezrom Bokcaerin Self-Fordham

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a healthy immune system to clear the plethora of antigens it encounters incessantly relies on the enormous plasticity displayed by the comprising cell types. Macrophages (MΦs are crucial member of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS that constantly patrol the peripheral tissues and are actively recruited to the sites of injury and infection. In tissues, infiltrating monocytes replenish MΦ. Under the guidance of the local micro-milieu, MΦ can be activated to acquire specialized functional phenotypes. Similar to T cells, functional polarization of macrophage phenotype viz., inflammatory (M1 and reparative (M2 is proposed. Equipped with diverse toll-like receptors (TLRs, these cells of the innate arm of immunity recognize and phagocytize antigens and secrete cytokines that activate the adaptive arm of the immune system and perform key roles in wound repair. Dysregulation of MΦ plasticity has been associated with various diseases and infection. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as critical regulators of transcriptome output. Their importance in maintaining health, and their contribution toward disease, encompasses virtually all aspects of human biology. Our understanding of miRNA-mediated regulation of MΦ plasticity and polarization can be utilized to modulate functional phenotypes to counter their role in the pathogenesis of numerous disease, including cancer, autoimmunity, periodontitis, etc. Here, we provide an overview of current knowledge regarding the role of miRNA in shaping MΦ polarization and plasticity through targeting of various pathways and genes. Identification of miRNA biomarkers of diagnostic/prognostic value and their therapeutic potential by delivery of miRNA mimics or inhibitors to dynamically alter gene expression profiles in vivo is highlighted.

  18. Molecular Memory of Morphologies by Septins during Neuron Generation Allows Early Polarity Inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubakar, Leila; Falk, Julien; Ducuing, Hugo; Thoinet, Karine; Reynaud, Florie; Derrington, Edmund; Castellani, Valérie

    2017-08-16

    Transmission of polarity established early during cell lineage history is emerging as a key process guiding cell differentiation. Highly polarized neurons provide a fascinating model to study inheritance of polarity over cell generations and across morphological transitions. Neural crest cells (NCCs) migrate to the dorsal root ganglia to generate neurons directly or after cell divisions in situ. Using live imaging of vertebrate embryo slices, we found that bipolar NCC progenitors lose their polarity, retracting their processes to round for division, but generate neurons with bipolar morphology by emitting processes from the same locations as the progenitor. Monitoring the dynamics of Septins, which play key roles in yeast polarity, indicates that Septin 7 tags process sites for re-initiation of process growth following mitosis. Interfering with Septins blocks this mechanism. Thus, Septins store polarity features during mitotic rounding so that daughters can reconstitute the initial progenitor polarity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular dynamic simulation results indicate that the imidazoline derivative molecules uses the imidazoline ring to effectively adsorb on the surface of iron, with the alkyl hydrophobic tail forming an n shape (canopy like covering) at geometry optimization and at 353 K. The n shape canopy like covering to a large extent may ...

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of a phospholipid membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egberts, Egbert; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Berendsen, Herman J.C.

    We present the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a phospholipid membrane in water, including full atomic detail. The goal of the simulations was twofold: first we wanted to set up a simulation system which is able to reproduce experimental results and can serve as a model membrane in

  1. An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The hydration structure and translocation of an excess proton in hydrogen bonded water clusters of two different sizes are investigated by means of finite tempera- ture quantum simulations. The simulations are performed by employing the method of. Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics where the forces on the ...

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of RNA motifs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Csaszar, K.; Špačková, Naďa; Šponer, Jiří; Leontis, N. B.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 223, - (2002), s. 154 ISSN 0065-7727. [Annual Meeting of the American Chemistry Society /223./. 07.04.2002-11.04.2002, Orlando ] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : molecular dynamics * RNA * hydration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahoshi, Y. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation on the interaction mechanism ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Investigation on the microscopic interaction between polymer inhibitors and calcium phosphate contributes to the understanding of their scale inhibition mechanism. The results obtained may provide a theoretical guidance to developing new scale inhibitors. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations have been ...

  5. Molecular dynamics modeling of structural battery components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verners, O.; Van Duin, A.C.T.; Wagemaker, M.; Simone, A.

    2015-01-01

    A crosslinked polymer based solid electrolyte prototype material –poly(propylene glycol) diacrylate– is studied using the reactive molecular dynamics force field ReaxFF. The focus of the study is the evaluation of the effects of equilibration and added plasticizer (ethylene carbonate) or anion

  6. Nanotribology investigations with classical molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a number of nanotribological problems investigated by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, within the context of the applicability of continuum mechanics contact theories at the atomic scale. Along these lines, three different themes can be recognized herein:

  7. Ab Initio molecular dynamics with excited electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alavi, A.; Kohanoff, J.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1994-01-01

    A method to do ab initio molecular dynamics suitable for metallic and electronically hot systems is described. It is based on a density functional which is costationary with the finite-temperature functional of Mermin, with state being included with possibly fractional occupation numbers.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahoshi, Y.; Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  9. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  10. A programmable metasurface with dynamic polarization, scattering and focusing control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huanhuan; Cao, Xiangyu; Yang, Fan; Gao, Jun; Xu, Shenheng; Li, Maokun; Chen, Xibi; Zhao, Yi; Zheng, Yuejun; Li, Sijia

    2016-10-01

    Diverse electromagnetic (EM) responses of a programmable metasurface with a relatively large scale have been investigated, where multiple functionalities are obtained on the same surface. The unit cell in the metasurface is integrated with one PIN diode, and thus a binary coded phase is realized for a single polarization. Exploiting this anisotropic characteristic, reconfigurable polarization conversion is presented first. Then the dynamic scattering performance for two kinds of sources, i.e. a plane wave and a point source, is carefully elaborated. To tailor the scattering properties, genetic algorithm, normally based on binary coding, is coupled with the scattering pattern analysis to optimize the coding matrix. Besides, inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) technique is also introduced to expedite the optimization process of a large metasurface. Since the coding control of each unit cell allows a local and direct modulation of EM wave, various EM phenomena including anomalous reflection, diffusion, beam steering and beam forming are successfully demonstrated by both simulations and experiments. It is worthwhile to point out that a real-time switch among these functionalities is also achieved by using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). All the results suggest that the proposed programmable metasurface has great potentials for future applications.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of weak detonations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Am-Shallem, Morag; Zeiri, Yehuda; Zybin, Sergey V; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2011-12-01

    Detonation of a three-dimensional reactive nonisotropic molecular crystal is modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. The detonation process is initiated by an impulse, followed by the creation of a stable fast reactive shock wave. The terminal shock velocity is independent of the initiation conditions. Further analysis shows supersonic propagation decoupled from the dynamics of the decomposed material left behind the shock front. The dependence of the shock velocity on crystal nonlinear compressibility resembles solitary behavior. These properties categorize the phenomena as a weak detonation. The dependence of the detonation wave on microscopic potential parameters was investigated. An increase in detonation velocity with the reaction exothermicity reaching a saturation value is observed. In all other respects the model crystal exhibits typical properties of a molecular crystal.

  12. Annular billiard dynamics in a circularly polarized strong laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamor, A.; Mauger, F.; Chandre, C.; Uzer, T.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a valence electron of the buckminsterfullerene molecule (C60) subjected to a circularly polarized laser field by modeling it with the motion of a classical particle in an annular billiard. We show that the phase space of the billiard model gives rise to three distinct trajectories: “whispering gallery orbits,” which hit only the outer billiard wall; “daisy orbits,” which hit both billiard walls (while rotating solely clockwise or counterclockwise for all time); and orbits that only visit the downfield part of the billiard, as measured relative to the laser term. These trajectories, in general, maintain their distinct features, even as the intensity is increased from 1010 to 1014Wcm-2. We attribute this robust separation of phase space to the existence of twistless tori.

  13. Molecular MRI based on hyper-polarized xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassali, Nawal

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has a high importance in medicine as it enables the observation of the organs inside the body without the use of radiative or invasive techniques. However it is known to suffer from poor sensitivity. To circumvent this limitation, a key solution resides in the use of hyper-polarized species. Among the entities with which we can drastically increase nuclear polarization, xenon has very specific properties through its interactions with its close environment that lead to a wide chemical shift bandwidth. The goal is thus to use it as a tracer. This PhD thesis focuses on the concept of 129 Xe MRI-based sensors for the detection of biological events. In this approach, hyper-polarized xenon is vectorized to biological targets via functionalized host systems, and then localized thanks to fast dedicated MRI sequences. The conception and set-up of a spin-exchange optical pumping device is first described. Then studies about the interaction of the hyper-polarized noble gas with new cryptophanes susceptible to constitute powerful host molecules are detailed. Also the implementation of recent MRI sequences optimized for the transient character of the hyper-polarization and taking profit of the xenon in-out exchange is described. Applications of this approach for the detection of metallic ions and cellular receptors are studied. Finally, our first in vivo results on a small animal model are presented. (author) [fr

  14. Ultrafast molecular photoionization by two-color orthogonally polarized ultraviolet laser pulses: Effects of relative pulse phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D.

    2017-09-01

    We present molecular photoionization by two-color 2ω1 =ω2 orthogonally polarized ultraviolet laser pulses. Simulations are performed on aligned H+ by numerically solving time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Two ionization processes with one ω2 photon interfering with two ω1 photon absorption are studied at different molecular alignments. Molecular frame photoelectron momentum and angular distributions exhibit asymmetries which are functions of the relative pulse phase. For resonant excitation processes by the ω1 pulse, symmetric distributions are obtained. An attosecond ionization model is adopted to describe the ultrafast ionization dynamics. The dependence of the ionization asymmetry on the molecular alignment allows to further monitor interference effects on orbital symmetry.

  15. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation

  16. Orthonormal Wavelet Bases for Quantum Molecular Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tymczak, C.; Wang, X.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the use of compactly supported, orthonormal wavelet bases for quantum molecular-dynamics (Car-Parrinello) algorithms. A wavelet selection scheme is developed and tested for prototypical problems, such as the three-dimensional harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, and the local density approximation to atomic and molecular systems. Our method shows systematic convergence with increased grid size, along with improvement on compression rates, thereby yielding an optimal grid for self-consistent electronic structure calculations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. Polarization dynamics of unidirectional optical pulse evolution in a laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabolotskii, A. A.

    2007-01-01

    Polarization dynamics of optical pulses in an isotropic two-level medium is analyzed by solving an integrable system of evolution equations without using the slowly varying envelope approximation. The analysis is focused on the regime of unidirectional pulse generation in an initially inverted medium. Qualitative difference in polarization dynamics is revealed between few-cycle and quasi-monochromatic pulse propagation

  18. Dynamic Changes of Microglia/Macrophage M1 and M2 Polarization in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Vanessa; Iskandar, Cut Dahlia; Kegler, Kristel; Hansmann, Florian; Elmarabet, Suliman Ahmed; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Reiner; Beineke, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Microglia and macrophages play a central role for demyelination in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis (TME) virus infection, a commonly used infectious model for chronic-progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to determine the dynamic changes of microglia/macrophage polarization in TME, the spinal cord of Swiss Jim Lambert (SJL) mice was investigated by gene expression profiling and immunofluorescence. Virus persistence and demyelinating leukomyelitis were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and histology. Electron microscopy revealed continuous myelin loss together with abortive myelin repair during the late chronic infection phase indicative of incomplete remyelination. A total of 59 genes out of 151 M1- and M2-related genes were differentially expressed in TME virus-infected mice over the study period. The onset of virus-induced demyelination was associated with a dominating M1 polarization, while mounting M2 polarization of macrophages/microglia together with sustained prominent M1-related gene expression was present during the chronic-progressive phase. Molecular results were confirmed by immunofluorescence, showing an increased spinal cord accumulation of CD16/32(+) M1-, arginase-1(+) M2- and Ym1(+) M2-type cells associated with progressive demyelination. The present study provides a comprehensive database of M1-/M2-related gene expression involved in the initiation and progression of demyelination supporting the hypothesis that perpetuating interaction between virus and macrophages/microglia induces a vicious circle with persistent inflammation and impaired myelin repair in TME. © 2014 International Society of Neuropathology.

  19. Excited-state molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    This review presents a survey of work using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and double-resonance techniques to study excited-state photoionization dynamics in molecules. These techniques routinely provide detail and precision that are difficult to achieve in single-photon ionization from the ground state. The review not only emphasizes new aspects of photoionization revealed in the excited-state experiments but also shows how the excited-state techniques can provide textbook illustrations of some fundamental mechanisms in molecular photoionization dynamics. Most of the examples are confined to diatomic molecules. (author)

  20. The importance of small polar radiometabolites in molecular neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Annette; Hansen, Hanne D; Svarer, Claus

    2018-01-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36, a 5-HT2A receptor agonist PET radioligand, contains three methoxy groups amenable to [11C]-labeling. In pigs, [11C]Cimbi-36 yields a polar (M1) and a less polar (M2) radiometabolite fraction, while changing the labeling to [11C]Cimbi-36_5 yields only the M1 fraction. We investigate...... substantially decrease the signal-to-background ratio of PET radioligands for neuroimaging. Further, we find that [11C]Cimbi-36 has a better signal-to-background ratio than [11C]Cimbi-36_5, and thus will be more sensitive to changes in 5-HT2A receptor levels in the brain....

  1. Towards the molecular bases of polymerase dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela Flores, J.

    1991-03-01

    One aspect of the strong relationship that is known to exist between the processes of DNA replication and transcription is manifest in the coupling of the rates of movement of the replication fork (r f ) and RNA polymerase (r t ). We address two issues concerning the largely unexplored area of polymerase dynamics: (i) The validity of an approximate kinematic formula linking r f and r t suggested by experiments in which transcription is initiated in some prokaryotes with the antibiotic streptolydigin, and (ii) What are the molecular bases of the kinematic formula? An analysis of the available data suggests possible molecular bases for polymerase dynamics. In particular, we are led to a hypothesis: In active chromatin r t may depend on the length (λ t ) of the transcript of the primary messenger RNA (pre-mRNA). This new effect is subject to experimental verification. We discuss possible experiments that may be performed in order to test this prediction. (author). Refs, 6 tabs

  2. Molecular quantum dynamics. From theory to applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    An educational and accessible introduction to the field of molecular quantum dynamics. Illustrates the importance of the topic for broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes. Presents chosen examples of striking applications, highlighting success stories, summarized by the internationally renowned experts. Including a foreword by Lorenz Cederbaum (University Heidelberg, Germany). This book focuses on current applications of molecular quantum dynamics. Examples from all main subjects in the field, presented by the internationally renowned experts, illustrate the importance of the domain. Recent success in helping to understand experimental observations in fields like heterogeneous catalysis, photochemistry, reactive scattering, optical spectroscopy, or femto- and attosecond chemistry and spectroscopy underline that nuclear quantum mechanical effects affect many areas of chemical and physical research. In contrast to standard quantum chemistry calculations, where the nuclei are treated classically, molecular quantum dynamics can cover quantum mechanical effects in their motion. Many examples, ranging from fundamental to applied problems, are known today that are impacted by nuclear quantum mechanical effects, including phenomena like tunneling, zero point energy effects, or non-adiabatic transitions. Being important to correctly understand many observations in chemical, organic and biological systems, or for the understanding of molecular spectroscopy, the range of applications covered in this book comprises broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes (such as the first steps of photosynthesis or vision). Nevertheless, many researchers refrain from entering this domain. The book ''Molecular Quantum Dynamics'' offers them an accessible introduction. Although the

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanobubbles and nanodrops

    OpenAIRE

    Maheshwari, Shantanu

    2018-01-01

    Understanding of bubbles and drops at the nanoscale is of primary importance to many technological applications. Although lot of theoretical understanding has been developed in the last few decades for larger size bubbles and drops, fundamental understanding of nanobubbles and nanodrops in some aspects is still inadequate. In this thesis we revealed and explained a few phenomena related to the stability and growth/dissolution of nanobubbles and nanodrops with the help from molecular dynamics ...

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of a chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, J.; Gryko, J.

    1988-06-01

    Molecular dynamics is used to study the chemical reaction A+A→B+B. It is shown that the reaction rate constant follows the Arrhenius law both for Lennard-Jones and hard sphere interaction potentials between substrate particles. A. For the denser systems the reaction rate is proportional to the value of the radial distribution function at the contact point of two hard spheres. 10 refs, 4 figs

  5. Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    from the increased number of intermolecular interactions at the higher mass densities . This may also be why the size of the hot spot increases with...of energy deposition by a shocked diatomic gas into a stationary target is studied as a function of multiple variables including gas density , impact...into the vibrational channels of the gas is a function of the density . 15. SUBJECT TERMS molecular dynamics, energy deposition, rovibrational

  6. Molecular Dynamics with Helical Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 21 (2014), s. 1552-1559 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551205; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : periodic boundary conditions * helical symmetry * molecular dynamics * protein structure * amyloid fibrils Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.589, year: 2014

  7. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics theory, algorithms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Billy D

    2017-01-01

    Written by two specialists with over twenty-five years of experience in the field, this valuable text presents a wide range of topics within the growing field of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). It introduces theories which are fundamental to the field - namely, nonequilibrium statistical mechanics and nonequilibrium thermodynamics - and provides state-of-the-art algorithms and advice for designing reliable NEMD code, as well as examining applications for both atomic and molecular fluids. It discusses homogenous and inhomogenous flows and pays considerable attention to highly confined fluids, such as nanofluidics. In addition to statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, the book covers the themes of temperature and thermodynamic fluxes and their computation, the theory and algorithms for homogenous shear and elongational flows, response theory and its applications, heat and mass transport algorithms, applications in molecular rheology, highly confined fluids (nanofluidics), the phenomenon of slip and...

  8. Coulomb interactions via local dynamics: a molecular-dynamics algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasichnyk, Igor; Duenweg, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    We derive and describe in detail a recently proposed method for obtaining Coulomb interactions as the potential of mean force between charges which are dynamically coupled to a local electromagnetic field. We focus on the molecular dynamics version of the method and show that it is intimately related to the Car-Parrinello approach, while being equivalent to solving Maxwell's equations with a freely adjustable speed of light. Unphysical self-energies arise as a result of the lattice interpolation of charges, and are corrected by a subtraction scheme based on the exact lattice Green function. The method can be straightforwardly parallelized using standard domain decomposition. Some preliminary benchmark results are presented

  9. Molecular dynamics studies of superionic conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.; Vashishta, P.

    1983-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of superionic conductors AgI and CuI are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. The model of these superionic conductors is based on the use of effective pair potentials. To determine the constants in these potentials, cohesive energy and bulk modulus are used as input: in addition one uses notions of ionic size based on the known crystal structure. Salient features of the MD technique are outlined. Methods of treating long range Coulomb forces are discussed in detail. This includes the manner of doing Ewald sum for MD cells of arbitrary shape. Features that can be incorporated to expedite the MD calculations are also discussed. A novel MD technique which allows for a dynamically controlled variation of the shape and size of the MD cell is described briefly. The development of this novel technique has made it possible to study structural phase transitions in superionic conductors. 68 references, 17 figures, 2 tables

  10. Spin-orbital dynamics in a system of polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syzranov, Sergey V.; Wall, Michael L.; Gurarie, Victor; Rey, Ana Maria

    2014-11-01

    Spin-orbit coupling in solids normally originates from the electron motion in the electric field of the crystal. It is key to understanding a variety of spin-transport and topological phenomena, such as Majorana fermions and recently discovered topological insulators. Implementing and controlling spin-orbit coupling is thus highly desirable and could open untapped opportunities for the exploration of unique quantum physics. Here we show that dipole-dipole interactions can produce an effective spin-orbit coupling in two-dimensional ultracold polar molecule gases. This spin-orbit coupling generates chiral excitations with a non-trivial Berry phase 2π. These excitations, which we call chirons, resemble low-energy quasiparticles in bilayer graphene and emerge regardless of the quantum statistics and for arbitrary ratios of kinetic to interaction energies. Chirons manifest themselves in the dynamics of the spin density profile, spin currents and spin coherences, even for molecules pinned in a deep optical lattice and should be observable in current experiments.

  11. Tunable 13C/1H dual channel matching circuit for dynamic nuclear polarization system with cross-polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr; Bowen, Sean; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report initial results of design and practical implementation of tuning and matching circuit to estimate a performance of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) at a magnetic field of 6.7 T. It is shown that developed circuit for signal observation is compact, easy to make and provides...

  12. Dynamic trapping of a polarization rotation vector soliton in a fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Luo, Ai-Ping; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Wen-Cheng

    2017-01-15

    Ultrafast fiber laser, as a dissipative nonlinear optical system, plays an important role in investigating various nonlinear phenomena and soliton dynamics. Vector features of solitons, including polarization locked and polarization rotation vector solitons (PRVSs), are interesting nonlinear dynamics in ultrafast fiber lasers. Herein, we experimentally reveal the trapping characteristics of PRVSs for the first time, to the best of our best knowledge. We show that, for the conventional soliton trapping in the ultrafast fiber laser, the soliton central wavelengths of the two polarization components are constant at the laser output port. However, it is found that the dynamic trapping can be observed for the PRVS. That is, the peak frequencies along the two orthogonal polarization directions are dynamically alternating, depending on the relative intensities of the two polarization components. The obtained results would further unveil the physical mechanism of PRVSs.

  13. 1H chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization in the photodecomposition of uranyl carboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykov, S.V.; Khudyakov, I.V.; Skakovsky, E.D.; Burrows, H.D.; Formosinho, S.J.; Miguel, M. da G.M.

    1991-01-01

    Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization ( 1 H CIDNP) has been observed during photolysis of uranyl salts of pivalic, propionic, and acetic acids in D 2 O solution, [ 2 H 6 ]acetone, [ 2 H 4 ]methanol, or in some other solvent. The multiplet polarization of isobutene and isobutane protons has been found under photolysis of deoxygenated pivalate solution. The polarized compounds are formed in the triplet pairs of tert-butyl free radicals. 1 H Emission of the tert-butylperoxyl group and emission of 1 H from isobutene have been recorded under photolysis of air-saturated pivalate solutions. The CIDNP of butane protons stays as a multiplet. Such changes in the presence of air/oxygen have arisen apparently because of the formation of tert-butylperoxyl free radical and its reaction with tert-butyl radical products, i.e. hydroperoxide (peroxide) and isobutene. Isobutene probably forms a complex with molecular oxygen which has a very short proton relaxation time. During the photolysis of uranyl pivalate in the presence of p-benzoquinone (5 x 10 -2 -0.1 mol dm -3 ) we have not observed any CIDNP, whereas under p-benzoquinone concentrations of 10 -3 -10 -2 mol dm -3 the CIDNP from both hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone has been followed. Photolysis of uranyl propionate has led to CIDNP from butane protons. An emission from methyl group protons of a compound with an ethylperoxyl fragment in the presence of air/oxygen has been observed. The same polarization picture has arisen under interaction of photoexcited uranyl with propionic acid. During the photolysis of uranyl acetate at relatively low concentrations (10 -2 mol dm -3 ) a CIDNP very similar to that registered for uranyl propionate was recorded. The ethyl fragment is probably obtained in reactions for two methyl radicals formed from acetate with the parent uranyl acetate, namely hydrogen-atom abstraction and addition reactions. (author)

  14. Chemically induced dynamic electron polarization: examples of S-T/sub +1/ polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.; Nelson, D.J.; Mottley, C.

    1977-01-01

    The observation of excess emission in the CIDEP-pulse radiolysis study of several radicals is ascribed to S-T/sub +-1/ polarization. Observations of this S-T/sub +-1/ polarization in H. radical reactions provide examples of hyperfine effect while the study of micellar systems and viscous solutions illustrates the effect of restricting radical diffusion

  15. Hydrogen Bond Dynamics in Aqueous Solutions: Ab initio Molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rate equation for the decay of CHB(t) · Definition of Hydrogen Bonds · Results of Molecular Dynamics · Dynamics of anion-water and water-water hydrogen bonds · Structural relaxation of anion-water & water-water H-bonds · Ab initio Molecular Dynamics : · Slide 14 · Dynamics of hydrogen bonds : CPMD results · Slide 16.

  16. Molecular dynamics algorithms for quantum Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Shinichi

    2009-11-01

    In the present Letter, novel molecular dynamics methods compatible with corresponding quantum Monte Carlo methods are developed. One is a variational molecular dynamics method that is a molecular dynamics analog of quantum variational Monte Carlo method. The other is a variational path integral molecular dynamics method, which is based on the path integral molecular dynamics method for finite temperature systems by Tuckerman et al. [M. Tuckerman, B.J. Berne, G.J. Martyna, M.L. Klein, J. Chem. Phys. 99 (1993) 2796]. These methods are applied to model systems including the liquid helium-4, demonstrated to work satisfactorily for the tested ground state calculations.

  17. Simulation of a lipid monolayer using molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kox, A. J.; Michels, J. P. J.; Wiegel, F. W.

    1980-09-01

    Numerical simulation is often a useful tool f or investigating the behaviour of complex systems with many degrees of freedom. Of the two major methods in this field, the Monte Carlo method and the molecular dynamics method, only the first has been applied to realistic models of lipid monolayers1-5. The term lipid monolayer is used here to describe a class of systems consisting of chain molecules on a liquid substrate, the characteristic properties of which can be summarized as follows. (1) The constituent molecules are amphipathic, that is they consist of a hydrophilic (polar) head group and one or more hydrophobic hydrocarbon chains. (2) Due to the amphipathic character of the molecules, the head groups are constrained to the plane of the substrate, whereas the tails are directed outwards from this plane. (3) The collective properties of the molecules are determined by their short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions and by the steric repulsion of the tails. We now present what we believe to be the first molecular dynamics simulation of a realistic model of a lipid monolayer. The model system, which has all three properties enumerated above, shows a first order phase transition from an ordered fluid-like state to a disordered, gas-like state.

  18. Molecular dynamic results on transport properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alder, B.J.; Alley, W.E.

    1978-06-01

    Following a broad discussion of generalized hydrodynamics, three examples are given to illustrate how useful this approach is in extending hydrodynamics to nearly the scale of molecular dimensions and the time between collisions, principally by including viscoelastic effects. The three examples concern the behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function, the decay of fluctuations in a resonating system, and the calculation of the dynamic structure factor obtained from neutron scattering. In the latter case the molecular dynamics results are also compared to the predictions of generalized kinetic theory. Finally it is shown how to implement generalized hydrodynamics both on a microscopic and macroscopic level. Hydrodynamics is unable to account for the long time tails in the velocity autocorrelation functions and the divergent Burnett coefficients observed for the Lorentz gas. Instead, the long time behavior of the Burnett coefficient and the distribution of displacements (the self part of the dynamic structure factor) can be accounted for by a random walk with a waiting time distribution which is chosen to give the correct velocity autocorrelation function. This random walk predicts, in agreement with the observations, that this displacement distribution is Gaussian at long times for the Lorentz gas, while for hard disks it has been found not to be so.

  19. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 Å), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 Å. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  20. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of the Time Reversible Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lin; Lu, Jianfeng; Shao, Sihong

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the time reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (TRBOMD) scheme, which preserves the time reversibility of the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics even with non-convergent self-consistent field iteration. In the linear response regime, we derive the stability condition as well as the accuracy of TRBOMD for computing physical properties such as the phonon frequency obtained from the molecular dynamic simulation. We connect and compare TRBOMD with the Car-Parrinello molecular...

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori

    2011-09-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We estimated the influence of the temperature and concentration of molecules on the hopping probability used in the ASEP model. Our model can also treat environmental effects on the translation process that cannot be explained by such cellular automaton models. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural and dynamical studies of Humanin in water and TFE/water mixture: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrnejad, Faramarz; Chaparzadeh, Nader

    2008-10-01

    The structural and dynamical properties of Humanin, a small peptide with neuroprotective activity against the insults of the Alzheimer's disease-related genes and the neurotoxic amyloid peptide, are studied in two different environments by molecular dynamics simulation. In this study, we have performed comparative molecular dynamics simulations in the absence and in the presence of TFE. The resulting trajectories were analyzed in terms of structural and dynamical properties of peptide and compared to the available NMR data. In water humanin is observed to partly unfold. The peptide is readily stabilized in an ordered helical conformation in the TFE/water mixture. Our simulations show that the peptide is flexible with definite turn point in its structure in water environment. It is free to interact with receptors that mediate its action in polar environment. Humanin may also find an alpha helix structure necessary for passage through biomembranes and/or specific interactions.

  4. Molecular density functional theory of water including density-polarization coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levy, Nicolas; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2016-06-22

    We present a three-dimensional molecular density functional theory of water derived from first-principles that relies on the particle's density and multipolar polarization density and includes the density-polarization coupling. This brings two main benefits: (i) scalar density and vectorial multipolar polarization density fields are much more tractable and give more physical insight than the full position and orientation densities, and (ii) it includes the full density-polarization coupling of water, that is known to be non-vanishing but has never been taken into account. Furthermore, the theory requires only the partial charge distribution of a water molecule and three measurable bulk properties, namely the structure factor and the Fourier components of the longitudinal and transverse dielectric susceptibilities.

  5. Temperature dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization in rotating solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiger, Michel-Andreas; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Märker, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization exploits electron spin polarization to boost signal-to-noise in magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR, creating new opportunities in materials science, structural biology, and metabolomics studies. Since protein NMR spectra recorded under DNP conditions can show improved...

  6. Formulation and utilization of choline based samples for dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Sean; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarization by the dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique permits the generation of high spin polarization of solution state. However, sample formulation for dissolution-DNP is often difficult, as concentration and viscosity must be optimized to yield a dissolved sample...

  7. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, R.; Krack, M.; Bertolus, M.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation using forces calculated from empirical potentials, commonly called classical molecular dynamics, is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermomechanical properties. This enables one to obtain insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, as well as parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models. The interaction potentials used for the force calculations are generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data and electronic structure calculations (see Chapter 12). We present here the different types of potentials currently available for UO 2 and illustrations of applications to the description of the behaviour of this material under irradiation. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials for UO 2 are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine these existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry, and validate the models and assumptions used. (authors)

  8. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinglong; Feixas, Ferran; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-07-30

    Folding of four fast-folding proteins, including chignolin, Trp-cage, villin headpiece and WW domain, was simulated via accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD). In comparison with hundred-of-microsecond timescale conventional molecular dynamics (cMD) simulations performed on the Anton supercomputer, aMD captured complete folding of the four proteins in significantly shorter simulation time. The folded protein conformations were found within 0.2-2.1 Å of the native NMR or X-ray crystal structures. Free energy profiles calculated through improved reweighting of the aMD simulations using cumulant expansion to the second-order are in good agreement with those obtained from cMD simulations. This allows us to identify distinct conformational states (e.g., unfolded and intermediate) other than the native structure and the protein folding energy barriers. Detailed analysis of protein secondary structures and local key residue interactions provided important insights into the protein folding pathways. Furthermore, the selections of force fields and aMD simulation parameters are discussed in detail. Our work shows usefulness and accuracy of aMD in studying protein folding, providing basic references in using aMD in future protein-folding studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Influence of light polarization on the dynamics of optically pumped lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjona, M.; Corbalan, R. (Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)); Laguarta, F.; Pujol, J. (Departament d' Optica i Optometria, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08222 Terrassa (Spain)); Vilaseca, R. (Departament I. D' Optica, Universitat de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot (Spain))

    1990-06-01

    The dynamic behavior of a coherently pumped ring laser with a homogeneously broadened four-level medium is analyzed theoretically, considering linearly polarized pump and generated laser beams. The laser is shown to be much more stable when these polarizations are parallel than when they are orthogonal. In the latter case the instability pump threshold can be as low as four times the first laser threshold, and the laser dynamics shows Lorenz-type features.

  10. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization and Relaxation of H and D Atoms in Solid Mixtures of Hydrogen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheludiakov, S.; Ahokas, J.; Järvinen, J.; Vainio, O.; Lehtonen, L.; Vasiliev, S.; Lee, D. M.; Khmelenko, V. V.

    2017-04-01

    We report on a study of dynamic nuclear polarization and electron and nuclear spin relaxation of atomic hydrogen and deuterium in solid molecular matrices of H2, D2, and HD mixtures. The electron and nuclear spin relaxation times (T_{1e} and T_{1N}) were measured within the temperature range 0.15-2.5 K in a magnetic field of 4.6 T, conditions which ensure a high polarization of electron spins. We found that T_{1e} is nearly temperature independent in this temperature range, while T_{1N} decreased by two orders of magnitude upon raising temperature. Such strong temperature dependence is typical for the nuclear Orbach mechanism of relaxation via the electron spins. We found that the nuclear spins of H atoms in solid D2 and D2{:}HD can be efficiently polarized by the Overhauser effect. Pumping the forbidden transitions of H atoms also leads to DNP, with the efficiency strongly dependent on the concentration of D atoms. This behavior indicates the cross effect mechanism of the DNP and nuclear relaxation, which turns out to be well resolved in the conditions of our experiments. Efficient DNP of H atoms was also observed when pumping the middle D line located in the center of the ESR spectrum. This phenomenon can be explained in terms of clusters or pairs of H atoms with a strong exchange interaction. These clusters have partially allowed transitions in the center of the ESR spectrum, and DNP may be created via the resolved cross effect.

  11. Molecular frame photoemission by a comb of elliptical high-order harmonics: a sensitive probe of both photodynamics and harmonic complete polarization state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrinas, K; Gruson, V; Weber, S J; Barreau, L; Ruchon, T; Hergott, J-F; Houver, J-C; Lucchese, R R; Salières, P; Dowek, D

    2016-12-16

    Due to the intimate anisotropic interaction between an XUV light field and a molecule resulting in photoionization (PI), molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions (MFPADs) are most sensitive probes of both electronic/nuclear dynamics and the polarization state of the ionizing light field. Consequently, they encode the complex dipole matrix elements describing the dynamics of the PI transition, as well as the three normalized Stokes parameters s 1 , s 2 , s 3 characterizing the complete polarization state of the light, operating as molecular polarimetry. The remarkable development of advanced light sources delivering attosecond XUV pulses opens the perspective to visualize the primary steps of photochemical dynamics in time-resolved studies, at the natural attosecond to few femtosecond time-scales of electron dynamics and fast nuclear motion. It is thus timely to investigate the feasibility of measurement of MFPADs when PI is induced e.g., by an attosecond pulse train (APT) corresponding to a comb of discrete high-order harmonics. In the work presented here, we report MFPAD studies based on coincident electron-ion 3D momentum imaging in the context of ultrafast molecular dynamics investigated at the PLFA facility (CEA-SLIC), with two perspectives: (i) using APTs generated in atoms/molecules as a source for MFPAD-resolved PI studies, and (ii) taking advantage of molecular polarimetry to perform a complete polarization analysis of the harmonic emission of molecules, a major challenge of high harmonic spectroscopy. Recent results illustrating both aspects are reported for APTs generated in unaligned SF 6 molecules by an elliptically polarized infrared driving field. The observed fingerprints of the elliptically polarized harmonics include the first direct determination of the complete s 1 , s 2 , s 3 Stokes vector, equivalent to (ψ, ε, P), the orientation and the signed ellipticity of the polarization ellipse, and the degree of polarization P. They are

  12. Internal polarization dynamics of vector dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in normal dispersion fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daojing; Shen, Deyuan; Li, Lei; Tang, Dingyuan; Su, Lei; Zhao, Luming

    2018-03-01

    Investigation of internal polarization dynamics of vector dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) pulses in a mode-locked fiber laser is presented. Stable vector DSR pulses are experimentally ob- served. Using a waveplate-analyzer configuration, we find that polarization is not uniform across a resonant dissipative soliton. Specifically, although the central plane wave of the resonant dissi- pative soliton acquires nearly a fixed polarization, the fronts feature polarization states that are different and spatially varying. This distinct polarizaiton distribution is maintained while the whole soliton structrue extends with varying gain conditions. Numerical simulation further confirms the experimental observations.

  13. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of laser shock phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Advanced Photon Research Center, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan).

    2001-10-01

    Recently, ultrashort-pulse lasers with high peak power have been developed, and their application to materials processing is expected as a tool of precision microfabrication. When a high power laser irradiates, a shock wave propagates into the material and dislocations are generated. In this paper, laser shock phenomena of the metal were analyzed using the modified molecular dynamics method, which has been developed by Ohmura and Fukumoto. The main results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The shock wave induced by the Gaussian beam irradiation propagates radially from the surface to the interior. (2) A lot of dislocations are generated at the solid-liquid interface by the propagation of a shock wave. (3) Some dislocations are moved instantaneously with the velocity of the longitudinal wave when the shock wave passes, and their velocity is not larger than the transverse velocity after the shock wave has passed. (author)

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Predicting Surface Wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of wetting of a solid surface by a liquid provides important insights; the contact angle of a liquid droplet on a surface provides a quantitative measurement of this interaction and the degree of attraction or repulsion of that liquid type by the solid surface. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations are a useful way to examine the behavior of liquids on solid surfaces on a nanometer scale. Thus, we surveyed the state of this field, beginning with the fundamentals of wetting calculations to an examination of the different MD methodologies used. We highlighted some of the advantages and disadvantages of the simulations, and look to the future of computer modeling to understand wetting and other liquid-solid interaction phenomena.

  16. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1992-08-01

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments

  17. On the parallelization of molecular dynamics codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabado, G. P.; Plata, O.; Zapata, E. L.

    2002-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) codes present a high degree of spatial data locality and a significant amount of independent computations. However, most of the parallelization strategies are usually based on the manual transformation of sequential programs either by completely rewriting the code with message passing routines or using specific libraries intended for writing new MD programs. In this paper we propose a new library-based approach (DDLY) which supports parallelization of existing short-range MD sequential codes. The novelty of this approach is that it can directly handle the distribution of common data structures used in MD codes to represent data (arrays, Verlet lists, link cells), using domain decomposition. Thus, the insertion of run-time support for distribution and communication in a MD program does not imply significant changes to its structure. The method is simple, efficient and portable. It may be also used to extend existing parallel programming languages, such as HPF.

  18. Molecular dynamics of ultradian glucocorticoid receptor action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway-Campbell, Becky L; Pooley, John R; Hager, Gordon L; Lightman, Stafford L

    2012-01-30

    In recent years it has become evident that glucocorticoid receptor (GR) action in the nucleus is highly dynamic, characterized by a rapid exchange at the chromatin template. This stochastic mode of GR action couples perfectly with a deterministic pulsatile availability of endogenous ligand in vivo. The endogenous glucocorticoid hormone (cortisol in man and corticosterone in rodent) is secreted from the adrenal gland with an ultradian rhythm made up of pulses at approximately hourly intervals. These two components - the rapidly fluctuating ligand and the rapidly exchanging receptor - appear to have evolved to establish and maintain a system that is exquisitely responsive to the physiological demands of the organism. In this review, we discuss recent and innovative work that questions the idea of steady state, static hormone receptor responses, and replaces them with new concepts of stochastic mechanisms and oscillatory activity essential for optimal function in molecular and cellular systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular dynamic simulation study of molten cesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeganegi Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study thermodynamics and structural properties of expanded caesium fluid. Internal pressure, radial distribution functions (RDFs, coordination numbers and diffusion coefficients have been calculated at temperature range 700–1600 K and pressure range 100–800 bar. We used the internal pressure to predict the metal–non-metal transition occurrence region. RDFs were calculated at wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The coordination numbers decrease and positions of the first peak of RDFs slightly increase as the temperature increases and pressure decreases. The calculated self-diffusion coefficients at various temperatures and pressures show no distinct boundary between Cs metallic fluid and its expanded fluid where it continuously increases with temperature.

  20. Fiber lubrication: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyi

    Molecular and mesoscopic level description of friction and lubrication remains a challenge because of difficulties in the phenomenological understanding of to the behaviors of solid-liquid interfaces during sliding. Fortunately, there is the computational simulation approach opens an opportunity to predict and analyze interfacial phenomena, which were studied with molecular dynamics (MD) and mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) simulations. Polypropylene (PP) and cellulose are two of most common polymers in textile fibers. Confined amorphous surface layers of PP and cellulose were built successfully with xenon crystals which were used to compact the polymers. The physical and surface properties of the PP and cellulose surface layers were investigated by MD simulations, including the density, cohesive energy, volumetric thermal expansion, and contact angle with water. The topology method was employed to predict the properties of poly(alkylene glycol) (PAG) diblock copolymers and Pluronic triblock copolymers used as lubricants on surfaces. Density, zero shear viscosity, shear module, cohesive energy and solubility parameter were predicted with each block copolymer. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the interaction energy per unit contact area of block copolymer melts with PP and cellulose surfaces. The interaction energy is defined as the ratio of interfacial interaction energy to the contact area. Both poly(proplene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments provided a lipophilic character to both PP and cellulose surfaces. The PPO/PEO ratio and the molecular weight were found to impact the interaction energy on both PP and cellulose surfaces. In aqueous solutions, the interaction energy is complicated due to the presence of water and the cross interactions between the multiple molecular components. The polymer-water-surface (PWS) calculation method was proposed to calculate such complex systems. In a contrast with a vacuum condition, the presence

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of irradiation damage in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Na-Young [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yu-Chan; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Han, Seung-Hee [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [Reactor Engineering Team, Division of Research and Development, National Fusion Research Center, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Pil-Ryung [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: cprdream@kookmin.ac.kr

    2007-12-15

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed for the radiation damage of tungsten using a modified Finnis-Sinclair type many-body interatomic potential. The interstitial defects and vacancies are distinguished by the Wigner-Seitz cell method and the types of the interstitial dumbbells are also identified by the azimuth and polar angles of dumbbell line vectors. It is observed that the number of interstitial defects and vacancies initially sharply increases and passing through the peak position, relaxes to the steady state for all PKA energies and that all residual interstitial dumbbells at the steady state are the <1 1 1>-oriented. Based on the variation of the orientation angles of dumbbells during the radiation damage simulation, it is found that the recombination of the <1 1 1>-oriented dumbbells with the vacancies is much faster than that of two other types of dumbbells and that the population of the <1 0 0> dumbbells is much larger than that of the <1 1 0> ones in spite of its higher formation energy, the reason of which is explained with the dynamics of the individual dumbbell.

  2. Calcium binding to calmodulin by molecular dynamics with effective polarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohagen, Miriam; Lepšík, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 22 (2014), s. 3964-3969 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA MŠk LH12001 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : EF-hand motif * free energy calculations * charge scaling * calcium -binding protein * umbrella sampling Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.458, year: 2014

  3. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations and novel drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuewei; Shi, Danfeng; Zhou, Shuangyan; Liu, Hongli; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2018-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can provide not only plentiful dynamical structural information on biomacromolecules but also a wealth of energetic information about protein and ligand interactions. Such information is very important to understanding the structure-function relationship of the target and the essence of protein-ligand interactions and to guiding the drug discovery and design process. Thus, MD simulations have been applied widely and successfully in each step of modern drug discovery. Areas covered: In this review, the authors review the applications of MD simulations in novel drug discovery, including the pathogenic mechanisms of amyloidosis diseases, virtual screening and the interaction mechanisms between drugs and targets. Expert opinion: MD simulations have been used widely in investigating the pathogenic mechanisms of diseases caused by protein misfolding, in virtual screening, and in investigating drug resistance mechanisms caused by mutations of the target. These issues are very difficult to solve by experimental methods alone. Thus, in the future, MD simulations will have wider application with the further improvement of computational capacity and the development of better sampling methods and more accurate force fields together with more efficient analysis methods.

  5. Pre-polarization enhancement by dynamic nuclear polarization in SQUID-based ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Kim, Kiwoong; Kang, Chan Seok; Hwang, Seong-min; Lee, Yong-Ho, E-mail: kwkim@kriss.re.k [Brain and Cognition Measurement Laboratory, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Doryong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We achieved enhanced pre-polarization in a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based microtesla nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The pre-polarization field is necessary to provide enough signal to noise to perform SQUID-based ultra-low-field (ULF) NMR/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments. However, it is quite tricky to deal with the strong transient magnetic field when operating the SQUID in a magnetically shielded room (MSR); besides the direct interference with the sensitive SQUID sensor, the strong magnetic field and its abrupt change generate magnetization in local areas in the MSR and eddy currents along the wall, which makes the NMR measurement difficult. The enhanced {sup 1}H NMR signals of water in TEMPOL and TEMPO solutions were obtained with a relatively weak radio-frequency (rf) field and double-relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROS) at a few mT pre-polarization fields. In our experimental condition, the enhancement factor was near ten in spite of the rf power far below the saturation in both samples.

  6. Pre-polarization enhancement by dynamic nuclear polarization in SQUID-based ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Kim, Kiwoong; Kang, Chan Seok; Hwang, Seong-min; Lee, Yong-Ho

    2010-11-01

    We achieved enhanced pre-polarization in a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based microtesla nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The pre-polarization field is necessary to provide enough signal to noise to perform SQUID-based ultra-low-field (ULF) NMR/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments. However, it is quite tricky to deal with the strong transient magnetic field when operating the SQUID in a magnetically shielded room (MSR); besides the direct interference with the sensitive SQUID sensor, the strong magnetic field and its abrupt change generate magnetization in local areas in the MSR and eddy currents along the wall, which makes the NMR measurement difficult. The enhanced 1H NMR signals of water in TEMPOL and TEMPO solutions were obtained with a relatively weak radio-frequency (rf) field and double-relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROS) at a few mT pre-polarization fields. In our experimental condition, the enhancement factor was near ten in spite of the rf power far below the saturation in both samples.

  7. Approximation of quantum observables by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sandberg, Mattias

    2016-01-06

    In this talk I will discuss how to estimate the uncertainty in molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics is a computational method to study molecular systems in materials science, chemistry, and molecular biology. The wide popularity of molecular dynamics simulations relies on the fact that in many cases it agrees very well with experiments. If we however want the simulation to predict something that has no comparing experiment, we need a mathematical estimate of the accuracy of the computation. In the case of molecular systems with few particles, such studies are made by directly solving the Schrodinger equation. In this talk I will discuss theoretical results on the accuracy between quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics, to be used for systems that are too large to be handled computationally by the Schrodinger equation.

  8. Polarization of molecular angular momentum in the chemical reactions Li + HF and F + HD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, Mikhail B.; Popov, Ruslan S.; Roncero, Octavio; De Fazio, Dario; Cavalli, Simonetta; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.

    2013-06-01

    The quantum mechanical approach to vector correlation of angular momentum orientation and alignment in chemical reactions [G. Balint-Kurti and O. S. Vasyutinskii, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 14281 (2009)], 10.1021/jp902796v is applied to the molecular reagents and products of the Li + HF [L. Gonzalez-Sanchez, O. S. Vasyutinskii, A. Zanchet, C. Sanz-Sanz, and O. Roncero, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 13656 (2011)], 10.1039/c0cp02452j and F + HD [D. De Fazio, J. Lucas, V. Aquilanti, and S. Cavalli, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 8571 (2011)], 10.1039/c0cp02738c reactions for which accurate scattering information has become recently available through time-dependent and time-independent approaches. Application of the theory to two important particular cases of the reactive collisions has been considered: (i) the influence of the angular momentum polarization of reactants in the entrance channel on the spatial distribution of the products in the exit channel and (ii) angular momentum polarization of the products of the reaction between unpolarized reactants. In the former case, the role of the angular momentum alignment of the reactants is shown to be large, particularly when the angular momentum is perpendicular to the reaction scattering plane. In the latter case, the orientation and alignment of the product angular momentum was found to be significant and strongly dependent on the scattering angle. The calculation also reveals significant differences between the vector correlation properties of the two reactions under study which are due to difference in the reaction mechanisms. In the case of F + HD reaction, the branching ratio between HF and DF production points out interest in the insight gained into the detailed dynamics, when information is available either from exact quantum mechanical calculations or from especially designed experiments. Also, the geometrical arrangement for the experimental determination of the product angular momentum orientation and alignment based

  9. Molecular Binding Contributes to Concentration Dependent Acrolein Deposition in Rat Upper Airways: CFD and Molecular Dynamics Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxiang Xi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing in vivo experiments show significantly decreased acrolein uptake in rats with increasing inhaled acrolein concentrations. Considering that high-polarity chemicals are prone to bond with each other, it is hypothesized that molecular binding between acrolein and water will contribute to the experimentally observed deposition decrease by decreasing the effective diffusivity. The objective of this study is to quantify the probability of molecular binding for acrolein, as well as its effects on acrolein deposition, using multiscale simulations. An image-based rat airway geometry was used to predict the transport and deposition of acrolein using the chemical species model. The low Reynolds number turbulence model was used to simulate the airflows. Molecular dynamic (MD simulations were used to study the molecular binding of acrolein in different media and at different acrolein concentrations. MD results show that significant molecular binding can happen between acrolein and water molecules in human and rat airways. With 72 acrolein embedded in 800 water molecules, about 48% of acrolein compounds contain one hydrogen bond and 10% contain two hydrogen bonds, which agreed favorably with previous MD results. The percentage of hydrogen-bonded acrolein compounds is higher at higher acrolein concentrations or in a medium with higher polarity. Computational dosimetry results show that the size increase caused by the molecular binding reduces the effective diffusivity of acrolein and lowers the chemical deposition onto the airway surfaces. This result is consistent with the experimentally observed deposition decrease at higher concentrations. However, this size increase can only explain part of the concentration-dependent variation of the acrolein uptake and acts as a concurrent mechanism with the uptake-limiting tissue ration rate. Intermolecular interactions and associated variation in diffusivity should be considered in future dosimetry modeling of

  10. Molecular Binding Contributes to Concentration Dependent Acrolein Deposition in Rat Upper Airways: CFD and Molecular Dynamics Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Hu, Qin; Zhao, Linlin; Si, Xiuhua April

    2018-03-27

    Existing in vivo experiments show significantly decreased acrolein uptake in rats with increasing inhaled acrolein concentrations. Considering that high-polarity chemicals are prone to bond with each other, it is hypothesized that molecular binding between acrolein and water will contribute to the experimentally observed deposition decrease by decreasing the effective diffusivity. The objective of this study is to quantify the probability of molecular binding for acrolein, as well as its effects on acrolein deposition, using multiscale simulations. An image-based rat airway geometry was used to predict the transport and deposition of acrolein using the chemical species model. The low Reynolds number turbulence model was used to simulate the airflows. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were used to study the molecular binding of acrolein in different media and at different acrolein concentrations. MD results show that significant molecular binding can happen between acrolein and water molecules in human and rat airways. With 72 acrolein embedded in 800 water molecules, about 48% of acrolein compounds contain one hydrogen bond and 10% contain two hydrogen bonds, which agreed favorably with previous MD results. The percentage of hydrogen-bonded acrolein compounds is higher at higher acrolein concentrations or in a medium with higher polarity. Computational dosimetry results show that the size increase caused by the molecular binding reduces the effective diffusivity of acrolein and lowers the chemical deposition onto the airway surfaces. This result is consistent with the experimentally observed deposition decrease at higher concentrations. However, this size increase can only explain part of the concentration-dependent variation of the acrolein uptake and acts as a concurrent mechanism with the uptake-limiting tissue ration rate. Intermolecular interactions and associated variation in diffusivity should be considered in future dosimetry modeling of high-polarity

  11. Characterization of molecularly imprinted polymers using a new polar solvent titration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Di; Zhang, Yagang; Geer, Michael F; Shimizu, Ken D

    2014-07-01

    A new method of characterizing molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed and tested, which provides a more accurate means of identifying and measuring the molecular imprinting effect. In the new polar solvent titration method, a series of imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were prepared in solutions containing increasing concentrations of a polar solvent. The polar solvent additives systematically disrupted the templation and monomer aggregation processes in the prepolymerization solutions, and the extent of disruption was captured by the polymerization process. The changes in binding capacity within each series of polymers were measured, providing a quantitative assessment of the templation and monomer aggregation processes in the imprinted and non-imprinted polymers. The new method was tested using three different diphenyl phosphate imprinted polymers made using three different urea functional monomers. Each monomer had varying efficiencies of templation and monomer aggregation. The new MIP characterization method was found to have several advantages. To independently verify the new characterization method, the MIPs were also characterized using traditional binding isotherm analyses. The two methods appeared to give consistent conclusions. First, the polar solvent titration method is less susceptible to false positives in identifying the imprinting effect. Second, the method is able to differentiate and quantify changes in binding capacity, as measured at a fixed guest and polymer concentration, arising from templation or monomer aggregation processes in the prepolymerization solution. Third, the method was also easy to carry out, taking advantage of the ease of preparing MIPs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of electronic polarization energy in oligoacene molecular crystals using the solvated supermolecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Wang, Wenliang; Yin, Shiwei; Wang, Yun

    2017-06-07

    The solvated supermolecular approach, i.e., block-localized wave function coupled with polarizable continuum model (BLW/PCM), was proposed to calculate molecular ionization potential (IP), electron affinity (EA) in the solid phase, and related electronic polarization. Via the calculations of a solvated supermolecule (5M), including four closest molecules, BLW/PCM overcomes the limitation in the calculation for the monomer PCM, that is, nearly same electronic polarization for cation (P + ) and anion (P - ). The solvated supermolecular approach successfully described asymmetric behaviors of P + and P - for oligoacene crystals. In addition, we also compared two charge-localized methods, i.e., BLW and constrained density functional theory (CDFT), to calculate the molecular IP and EA in supermolecules with/without PCM. Our results demonstrate that both the BLW and CDFT correctly estimate the EA and IP values in the gas phase cluster, whereas CDFT/PCM fails to evaluate the P - value of the bulk system.

  13. The influence of non-polar lipids on tear film dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, M.

    2014-04-04

    © 2014 Cambridge University Press. In this paper we examine the effect that physiological non-polar lipids, residing on the surface of an aqueous tear film, have on the film evolution. In our model we track the evolution of the thickness of the non-polar lipid layer, the thickness of the aqueous layer and the concentration of polar lipids which reside at the interface between the two. We also utilise a force balance in the non-polar lipid layer in order to determine its velocity. We show how to obtain previous models in the literature from our model by making particular choices of the parameters. We see the formation of boundary layers in some of these submodels, across which the concentration of polar lipid and the non-polar lipid velocity and film thickness vary. We solve our model numerically for physically realistic parameter values, and we find that the evolution of the aqueous layer and the polar lipid layer are similar to that described by previous authors. However, there are interesting dynamics for the non-polar lipid layer. The effects of altering the key parameters are highlighted and discussed. In particular, we see that the Marangoni number plays a key role in determining how far over the eye the non-polar lipid spreads.

  14. The Effect of Polar Lipids on Tear Film Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Aydemir, E.

    2010-06-17

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model describing the effect of polar lipids, excreted by glands in the eyelid and present on the surface of the tear film, on the evolution of a pre-corneal tear film. We aim to explain the interesting experimentally observed phenomenon that the tear film continues to move upward even after the upper eyelid has become stationary. The polar lipid is an insoluble surface species that locally alters the surface tension of the tear film. In the lubrication limit, the model reduces to two coupled non-linear partial differential equations for the film thickness and the concentration of lipid. We solve the system numerically and observe that increasing the concentration of the lipid increases the flow of liquid up the eye. We further exploit the size of the parameters in the problem to explain the initial evolution of the system. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  15. Dynamic nuclear polarization in thin polymer foils and tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Mango, S.

    1995-02-01

    First results of DNP at 2.5 T and below 0.3 K in thin polymer foils and tubes with the chemical composition (CX 2) n, [ X = 1H, 2D, 19F ], doped with TEMPO, are presented. Appreciable polarization of protons, deuterons, and 19F-nuclei were obtained. The samples can be handled at room temperature for several hours, and therefore they are suitable for new applications.

  16. Dynamic nuclear polarization in thin polymer foils and tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B. van den [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Bunyatova, E.I. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Hautle, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Konter, J.A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Mango, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-03-01

    First results of DNP at 2.5 T and below 0.3 K in thin polymer foils and tubes with the chemical composition (CX{sub 2}){sub n}, [X={sup 1}H, {sup 2}D, {sup 19}F], doped with TEMPO, are presented. Appreciable polarizations of protons, deuterons, and {sup 19}F-nuclei were obtained. The samples can be handled at room temperature for several hours, and therefore they are suitable for new applications. ((orig.))

  17. Magnetic Switching of a Single Molecular Magnet due to Spin-Polarized Current

    OpenAIRE

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnas, Józef

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic switching of a single molecular magnet (SMM) due to spin-polarized current flowing between ferromagnetic metallic electrodes is investigated theoretically. Magnetic moments of the electrodes are assumed to be collinear and parallel to the magnetic easy axis of the molecule. Electrons tunneling through a barrier between magnetic leads are coupled to the SMM via exchange interaction. The current flowing through the system as well as the spin relaxation times of the SMM are calculated f...

  18. Investigating Ebola virus pathogenicity using molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Morena; Collu, Francesca; Macpherson, James; Michaelis, Martin; Fraternali, Franca; Wass, Mark N

    2017-08-11

    Ebolaviruses have been known to cause deadly disease in humans for 40 years and have recently been demonstrated in West Africa to be able to cause large outbreaks. Four Ebolavirus species cause severe disease associated with high mortality in humans. Reston viruses are the only Ebolaviruses that do not cause disease in humans. Conserved amino acid changes in the Reston virus protein VP24 compared to VP24 of other Ebolaviruses have been suggested to alter VP24 binding to host cell karyopherins resulting in impaired inhibition of interferon signalling, which may explain the difference in human pathogenicity. Here we used protein structural analysis and molecular dynamics to further elucidate the interaction between VP24 and KPNA5. As a control experiment, we compared the interaction of wild-type and R137A-mutant (known to affect KPNA5 binding) Ebola virus VP24 with KPNA5. Results confirmed that the R137A mutation weakens direct VP24-KPNA5 binding and enables water molecules to penetrate at the interface. Similarly, Reston virus VP24 displayed a weaker interaction with KPNA5 than Ebola virus VP24, which is likely to reduce the ability of Reston virus VP24 to prevent host cell interferon signalling. Our results provide novel molecular detail on the interaction of Reston virus VP24 and Ebola virus VP24 with human KPNA5. The results indicate a weaker interaction of Reston virus VP24 with KPNA5 than Ebola virus VP24, which is probably associated with a decreased ability to interfere with the host cell interferon response. Hence, our study provides further evidence that VP24 is a key player in determining Ebolavirus pathogenicity.

  19. Spin-polarized transport properties of a pyridinium-based molecular spintronics device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Xu, B.; Qin, Z.

    2018-05-01

    By applying a first-principles approach based on non-equilibrium Green's functions combined with density functional theory, the transport properties of a pyridinium-based "radical-π-radical" molecular spintronics device are investigated. The obvious negative differential resistance (NDR) and spin current polarization (SCP) effect, and abnormal magnetoresistance (MR) are obtained. Orbital reconstruction is responsible for novel transport properties such as that the MR increases with bias and then decreases and that the NDR being present for both parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations, which may have future applications in the field of molecular spintronics.

  20. Boosting the Amount of Molecular Information Through Polarized Resolved Resonance Raman Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassing, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Vibrational Raman spectroscopy, one of the experimental techniques available, is applied for characterization and analysis of molecular samples in different areas such as medical, food and environmental analysis. Application of the Raman technique is mostly similar to the application of infrared...... and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy, i.e. only the spectral distribution is analysed. The goal of the present chapter is to demonstrate that the amount of molecular information (also for solutions and powders) can be increased considerably by analysing also the polarization of the Raman and resonance...

  1. Precise Molecular Sieving Architectures with Janus Pathways for Both Polar and Nonpolar Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangtao; Hua, Dan; Zhang, Yu; Japip, Susilo; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2018-03-01

    Precise molecular sieving architectures with Janus superhighways are constructed via a molecularly engineered interfacial reaction between cyclodextrin (CD) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC). Interestingly, the CD/TMC nanofilms constructed with both hydrophobic inner cavities and hydrophilic channels exhibit exceptionally high permeances for both polar and nonpolar solvents. The precise molecular sieving functions are determined by the type of CD building blocks and the inner cavities of intrinsic 3D hollow bowls. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) confirms that a larger inner CD cavity tends to generate a larger free volume and higher microporosity. Based on the rejection ratio of various dyes, the estimated molecular weight cutoff of CD/TMC nanofilms follows the trend of α-CD/TMC (320 Da) sieving membrane with intrinsic microporosity containing tunable pore size and sharp pore-size distribution can effectively discriminate molecules with different 3D sizes. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Managing the solvent water polarization to obtain improved NMR spectra of large molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, Sebastian; Wider, Gerhard; Etezady-Esfarjani, Touraj; Horst, Reto; Wuethrich, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    In large molecular structures, the magnetization of all hydrogen atoms in the solute is strongly coupled to the water magnetization through chemical exchange between solvent water and labile protons of macromolecular components, and through dipole-dipole interactions and the associated 'spin diffusion' due to slow molecular tumbling. In NMR experiments with such systems, the extent of the water polarization is thus of utmost importance. This paper presents a formalism that describes the propagation of the water polarization during the course of different NMR experiments, and then compares the results of model calculations for optimized water polarization with experimental data. It thus demonstrates that NMR spectra of large molecular structures can be improved with the use of paramagnetic spin relaxation agents which selectively enhance the relaxation of water protons, so that a substantial gain in signal-to-noise can be achieved. The presently proposed use of a relaxation agent can also replace the water flip-back pulses when working with structures larger than about 30 kDa. This may be a valid alternative in situations where flip-back pulses are difficult to introduce into the overall experimental scheme, or where they would interfere with other requirements of the NMR experiment

  3. Accelerating molecular dynamics simulations by linear prediction of time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutovsky, B.; Mülders, T.; Kneller, G. R.

    2003-04-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation scheme which allows to speed up molecular dynamics simulations by linear prediction of force time series. The explicit calculation of nonbonding forces is periodically replaced by linear prediction from past values. Applying our method to liquid oxygen consisting of flexible molecules we obtained real speedups between 5.4 and 6.5, compared to conventional molecular dynamics simulations. Here only the bond-stretching forces were calculated at each time step. We demonstrate that essential dynamical quantities, such as the mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function, are preserved.

  4. Folding very short peptides using molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosco K Ho

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Peptides often have conformational preferences. We simulated 133 peptide 8-mer fragments from six different proteins, sampled by replica-exchange molecular dynamics using Amber7 with a GB/SA (generalized-Born/solvent-accessible electrostatic approximation to water implicit solvent. We found that 85 of the peptides have no preferred structure, while 48 of them converge to a preferred structure. In 85% of the converged cases (41 peptides, the structures found by the simulations bear some resemblance to their native structures, based on a coarse-grained backbone description. In particular, all seven of the beta hairpins in the native structures contain a fragment in the turn that is highly structured. In the eight cases where the bioinformatics-based I-sites library picks out native-like structures, the present simulations are largely in agreement. Such physics-based modeling may be useful for identifying early nuclei in folding kinetics and for assisting in protein-structure prediction methods that utilize the assembly of peptide fragments.

  5. Spin-diffusions and diffusive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Brittan; Luskin, Mitchell; Plecháč, Petr; Simpson, Gideon

    2017-12-01

    Metastable configurations in condensed matter typically fluctuate about local energy minima at the femtosecond time scale before transitioning between local minima after nanoseconds or microseconds. This vast scale separation limits the applicability of classical molecular dynamics (MD) methods and has spurned the development of a host of approximate algorithms. One recently proposed method is diffusive MD which aims at integrating a system of ordinary differential equations describing the likelihood of occupancy by one of two species, in the case of a binary alloy, while quasistatically evolving the locations of the atoms. While diffusive MD has shown itself to be efficient and provide agreement with observations, it is fundamentally a model, with unclear connections to classical MD. In this work, we formulate a spin-diffusion stochastic process and show how it can be connected to diffusive MD. The spin-diffusion model couples a classical overdamped Langevin equation to a kinetic Monte Carlo model for exchange amongst the species of a binary alloy. Under suitable assumptions and approximations, spin-diffusion can be shown to lead to diffusive MD type models. The key assumptions and approximations include a well-defined time scale separation, a choice of spin-exchange rates, a low temperature approximation, and a mean field type approximation. We derive several models from different assumptions and show their relationship to diffusive MD. Differences and similarities amongst the models are explored in a simple test problem.

  6. Micromagnetic investigation of the dynamics of magnetization switching induced by a spin polarized current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Jin; Dieny, Bernard

    2006-03-01

    Using micromagnetic modeling, we tested a prediction of single-domain spin-torque theory which switching current density depends only weakly on magnetic cell size. The switching time and current density are strongly affected by the cell size for low spin polarization. Larger samples with a small length-to-width ratio and small spin polarization can exhibit a nonmonotonous dependence of switching time on current. Excitation of incoherent spin waves caused by the circular Oersted field due to the current is responsible for this nonmonotonous dependence. However, the magnetic dynamics recovers a single-domain-like behavior when the spin polarization is high and/or the cell size is small.

  7. Experimental and molecular dynamics study on the inhibition performance of some nitrogen containing compounds for iron corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, K.F.

    2010-01-01

    A molecular dynamics study for the adsorption of three benzimidazole derivatives and their inhibition characteristics was studied using chemical (weight loss) and electrochemical measurements (potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, EIS). Electrochemical measurements results revealed that the inhibition efficiencies increased with the concentration of inhibitors. Results obtained from weight loss, dc polarization and ac impedance measurements are in reasonably good agreement and show increased inhibitor efficiency with increasing inhibitor concentration. The molecular dynamics calculations showed that the higher the binding energy between the inhibitor and metal surface, the higher the inhibition efficiency. Also, the higher the adsorption energy, the higher the inhibition efficiency. The molecular dynamics study revealed that the benzimidazole ring as well as the side chain are the active sites in these inhibitors and they can absorb on Fe surface by donating electrons to Fe d-orbital.

  8. Dynamically polarized samples for neutron protein crystallography at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinkui; Pierce, Josh; Myles, Dean; Robertson, J. L.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Standaert, Bob; Cuneo, Matt; Li, Le; Meilleur, Flora

    2016-09-01

    To prepare for the next generation neutron scattering instruments for the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and to broaden the scientific impact of neutron protein crystallography at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have recently ramped up our efforts to develop a dynamically polarized target for neutron protein crystallography at the SNS. Proteins contain a large amount of hydrogen which contributes to incoherent diffraction background and limits the sensitivity of neutron protein crystallography. This incoherent background can be suppressed by using polarized neutron diffraction, which in the same time also improves the coherent diffraction signal. Our plan is to develop a custom Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) setup tailored to neutron protein diffraction instruments. Protein crystals will be polarized at a magnetic field of 5 T and temperatures of below 1 K. After the dynamic polarization process, the sample will be brought to a frozen-spin mode in a 0.5 T holding field and at temperatures below 100 mK. In a parallel effort, we are also investigating various ways of incorporating polarization agents needed for DNP, such as site specific spin labels, into protein crystals.

  9. Many-body kinetics of dynamic nuclear polarization by the cross effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabanov, A.; Wiśniewski, D.; Raimondi, F.; Lesanovsky, I.; Köckenberger, W.

    2018-03-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is an out-of-equilibrium method for generating nonthermal spin polarization which provides large signal enhancements in modern diagnostic methods based on nuclear magnetic resonance. A particular instance is cross-effect DNP, which involves the interaction of two coupled electrons with the nuclear spin ensemble. Here we develop a theory for this important DNP mechanism and show that the nonequilibrium nuclear polarization buildup is effectively driven by three-body incoherent Markovian dissipative processes involving simultaneous state changes of two electrons and one nucleus. We identify different parameter regimes for effective polarization transfer and discuss under which conditions the polarization dynamics can be simulated by classical kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Our theoretical approach allows simulations of the polarization dynamics on an individual spin level for ensembles consisting of hundreds of nuclear spins. The insight obtained by these simulations can be used to find optimal experimental conditions for cross-effect DNP and to design tailored radical systems that provide optimal DNP efficiency.

  10. Emission of water clusters: molecular dynamic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutliev, U.O.; Kalandarov, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a wonderful technique for providing mass spectrometric information of molecules on surfaces. Theoretical studies of the keV bombardment of organic films on metallic surfaces have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms governing these processes. Many experiments of keV bombardment, however, are performed both thick and thin organic targets [1]. Molecular systems investigated experimentally by SIMS include adsorbed films on a metal substrate, molecular solids, polymers, or even biological cells. In this account, we focus on thin organic layers on metal substrates as they are used for analytical purposes, are intriguing from a fundamental viewpoint, and are computationally tractable [2]. There are we present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations aimed at obtaining such a microscopic picture and mass spectrum of sputtering particles. Because of the importance of H 2 O in many of the experiments, we have chosen it as our system. Water is also attractive as a system because of the extensive literature available on its physical properties. The interaction potentials available for MD simulations of H 2 O are sufficiently reliable such that a quantitative analysis of the simulation results can be directly related to the parameters of water. From the variety of substrate materials used in different experiments, we have chosen to perform our simulations using Au. This substance is chosen to match preliminary experiments with the selective killing of cells by inserted Au nanoparticles and because of the availability of good interaction potentials for gold. In the simulations, we bombarded by ions Ar the surface Au(III) covered by ice film. The interaction potential employed to describe the H 2 O-H 2 O interaction is the simple-point-charge (SPC) water potential developed by Berendsen et al. [3]. This potential has been used extensively to study the properties of H 2 O as a solid [4, 5]. It has been shown that the

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization and optimal control spatial-selective 13C MRI and MRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Mads Sloth; Laustsen, Christoffer; Maximov, Ivan I.

    2013-01-01

    Aimed at 13C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) applications, we demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) may be combined with optimal control 2D spatial selection to simultaneously obtain high sensitivity and well-defined spatial restriction. This is ach......Aimed at 13C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) applications, we demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) may be combined with optimal control 2D spatial selection to simultaneously obtain high sensitivity and well-defined spatial restriction....... This is achieved through the development of spatial-selective single-shot spiral-readout MRI and MRS experiments combined with dynamic nuclear polarization hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate on a 4.7T pre-clinical MR scanner. The method stands out from related techniques by facilitating anatomic shaped region...

  12. TE-TM dynamics in a semiconductor laser subject to polarization-rotated optical feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heil, T.; Uchida, A.; Davis, P.; Aida, T.

    2003-01-01

    We present a comprehensive experimental characterization of the dynamics of semiconductor lasers subject to polarization-rotated optical feedback. We find oscillatory instabilities appearing for large feedback levels and disappearing at large injection currents, which we classify in contrast to the well-known conventional optical-feedback-induced dynamics. In addition, we compare our experiments to theoretical results of a single-mode model assuming incoherence of the optical feedback, and we identify differences concerning the average power of the laser. Hence, we develop an alternative model accounting for both polarizations, where the emission of the dominant TE mode is injected with delay into the TM mode of the laser. Numerical simulations using this model show good qualitative agreement with our experimental results, correctly reproducing the parameter dependences of the dynamics. Finally, we discuss the application of polarization-rotated-feedback induced instabilities in chaotic carrier communication systems

  13. Evolutionary dynamics at high latitudes: speciation and extinction in polar marine faunas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Andrew; Crame, J Alistair

    2010-11-27

    Ecologists have long been fascinated by the flora and fauna of extreme environments. Physiological studies have revealed the extent to which lifestyle is constrained by low temperature but there is as yet no consensus on why the diversity of polar assemblages is so much lower than many tropical assemblages. The evolution of marine faunas at high latitudes has been influenced strongly by oceanic cooling during the Cenozoic and the associated onset of continental glaciations. Glaciation eradicated many shallow-water habitats, especially in the Southern Hemisphere, and the cooling has led to widespread extinction in some groups. While environmental conditions at glacial maxima would have been very different from those existing today, fossil evidence indicates that some lineages extend back well into the Cenozoic. Oscillations of the ice-sheet on Milankovitch frequencies will have periodically eradicated and exposed continental shelf habitat, and a full understanding of evolutionary dynamics at high latitude requires better knowledge of the links between the faunas of the shelf, slope and deep-sea. Molecular techniques to produce phylogenies, coupled with further palaeontological work to root these phylogenies in time, will be essential to further progress.

  14. Living Cells and Dynamic Molecules Observed with the Polarized Light Microscope: the Legacy of Shinya Inoué.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Tomomi; Shribak, Michael; Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    In 1948, Shinya Inoué arrived in the United States for graduate studies at Princeton. A year later he came to Woods Hole, starting a long tradition of summer research at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), which quickly became Inoué's scientific home. Primed by his Japanese mentor, Katsuma Dan, Inoué followed Dan's mantra to work with healthy, living cells, on a fundamental problem (mitosis), with a unique tool set that he refined for precise and quantitative observations (polarized light microscopy), and a fresh and brilliant mind that was unafraid of challenging current dogma. Building on this potent combination, Inoué contributed landmark observations and concepts in cell biology, including the notion that there are dynamic, fine structures inside living cells, in which molecular assemblies such as mitotic spindle fibers exist in delicate equilibrium with their molecular building blocks suspended in the cytoplasm. In the late 1970s and 1980s, Inoué and others at the MBL were instrumental in conceiving video microscopy, a groundbreaking technique which married light microscopy and electronic imaging, ushering in a revolution in how we know and what we know about living cells and the molecular mechanisms of life. Here, we recount some of Inoué's accomplishments and describe how his legacy has shaped current activities in polarized light imaging at the MBL. © 2016 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy of N-polar InGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, Digbijoy N.; Ringel, Steven A.; Rajan, Siddharth; Guer, Emre

    2010-01-01

    We report on the growth of N-polar In x Ga 1-x N by N 2 plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Ga-polar and N-polar InGaN films were grown at different growth temperatures and the composition was estimated by photoluminescence (PL) measurements. A growth model that incorporates the incoming and desorbing atomic fluxes is proposed to explain the compositional dependence of InGaN on the flux of incoming atomic species and growth temperature. The growth model is found to be in agreement with the experimental data. The peak PL intensity for N-face samples is found to exhibit a two order of magnitude increase for a 100 deg. C increase in growth temperature. Besides, at 600 nm, the N-face sample shows more than 100 times higher PL intensity than Ga-face sample at comparable wavelengths indicating its superior optical quality. The understanding of growth kinetics of InGaN presented here will guide the growth of N-polar InGaN in a wide range of growth temperatures.

  16. A 282 GHz Probe for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr; Bowen, Sean; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    of the coil is976 MHz. A magnetic field distribution at 108 MHz and 430 MHz was calculated for the RF coil, the results revealedgood homogeneity and intensity along x,y,z axes. Figure 1 shows the general view of the probe and cross section through the microwave container with field distribution. Operating......Introduction In DNP, microwave irradiation of a sample facilitates the transfer of spin polarization from electrons tonuclei. One of the way to improve the DNP enhancement is to transfer microwave power from the mm-wave source tothe sample more effectively. Several methods and techniques...... to efficiently transport microwave energy from the microwave source to the sample have been developed. For example, a corrugated waveguide allows to deliver mm-wave energy from external source to the probe with minimum losses1.The conventional approach at high frequencies is to irradiate the sample directly from...

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Membranes and a Transmembrane Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Tap Ha; Mehler, Ernest L.; Weinstein, Harel

    1999-05-01

    Three molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 1.5-ns length were carried out on fully hydrated patches of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase. The simulations were performed using different ensembles and electrostatic conditions: a microcanonical ensemble or constant pressure-temperature ensemble, with or without truncated electrostatic interactions. Calculated properties of the membrane patches from the three different protocols were compared to available data from experiments. These data include the resulting overall geometrical dimensions, the order characteristics of the lipid hydrocarbon chains, as well as various measures of the conformations of the polar head groups. The comparisons indicate that the simulation carried out within the microcanonical ensemble with truncated electrostatic interactions yielded results closest to the experimental data, provided that the initial equilibration phase preceding the production run was sufficiently long. The effects of embedding a non-ideal helical protein domain in the membrane patch were studied with the same MD protocols. This simulation was carried out for 2.5 ns. The protein domain corresponds to the seventh transmembrane segment (TMS7) of the human serotonin 5HT 2Areceptor. The peptide is composed of two α-helical segments linked by a hinge domain around a perturbing Asn-Pro motif that produces at the end of the simulation a kink angle of nearly 80° between the two helices. Several aspects of the TMS7 structure, such as the bending angle, backbone Φ and Ψ torsion angles, the intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and the overall conformation, were found to be very similar to those determined by NMR for the corresponding transmembrane segment of the tachykinin NK-1 receptor. In general, the simulations were found to yield structural and dynamic characteristics that are in good agreement with experiment. These findings support the application of simulation methods to the study

  18. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations of opening reaction of molecular junctions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zobač, Vladimír; Lewis, J.P.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 28 (2016), 1-8, č. článku 285202. ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02079S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : non-adiabatic molecular dynamics * molecular junctions * molecular switches * DFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2016

  19. High-frequency dynamics of spin-polarized carriers and photons in a laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, D.; Basu, D.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2010-11-01

    The high-frequency dynamics of spin-polarized carriers and photons in a spin laser have been studied. The transient response of the device obtained from the rate equations is characterized by two sets of relaxation oscillations in the carrier and photon distributions corresponding to the two polarization modes. Consequently two distinct resonant peaks are observed in the small-signal modulation response. The calculated transient characteristics indicate that the best results are obtained from a spin laser when only the favored polarization mode, with lower threshold, is operational. Under this condition the small-signal modulation bandwidth is higher than that in a conventional laser, the threshold current is lower and the output polarization can be 100% with appropriate bias conditions, independent of the spin polarization of carriers in the active region. Measurements were made at 230 K on a InAs/GaAs quantum dot spin vertical cavity surface emitting laser. A time-averaged output polarization of 55% is measured with an active region spin polarization of 5-6% . The experimental results are in good agreement with calculated data.

  20. Molecular dynamics using quasielastic neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, S

    2003-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is well suited to study the molecular motions (rotations and translations) in solids or liquids. It offers a unique possibility of analysing spatial dimensions of atomic or molecular processes in their development over time. We describe here some of the systems studied using the QENS spectrometer, designed, developed and commissioned at Dhruva reactor in Trombay. We have studied a variety of systems to investigate the molecular motion, for example, simple molecular solids, molecules adsorbed in confined medium like porous systems or zeolites, monolayer-protected nano-sized metal clusters, water in Portland cement as it cures with time, etc. (author)

  1. Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics: A flexible and modular molecular dynamics code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sergio; Loyola, Claudia; González, Felipe; Peralta, Joaquín

    2010-12-01

    Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics (LPMD) is a highly modular and extensible molecular dynamics (MD) code using interatomic potential functions. LPMD is able to perform equilibrium MD simulations of bulk crystalline solids, amorphous solids and liquids, as well as non-equilibrium MD (NEMD) simulations such as shock wave propagation, projectile impacts, cluster collisions, shearing, deformation under load, heat conduction, heterogeneous melting, among others, which involve unusual MD features like non-moving atoms and walls, unstoppable atoms with constant-velocity, and external forces like electric fields. LPMD is written in C++ as a compromise between efficiency and clarity of design, and its architecture is based on separate components or plug-ins, implemented as modules which are loaded on demand at runtime. The advantage of this architecture is the ability to completely link together the desired components involved in the simulation in different ways at runtime, using a user-friendly control file language which describes the simulation work-flow. As an added bonus, the plug-in API (Application Programming Interface) makes it possible to use the LPMD components to analyze data coming from other simulation packages, convert between input file formats, apply different transformations to saved MD atomic trajectories, and visualize dynamical processes either in real-time or as a post-processing step. Individual components, such as a new potential function, a new integrator, a new file format, new properties to calculate, new real-time visualizers, and even a new algorithm for handling neighbor lists can be easily coded, compiled and tested within LPMD by virtue of its object-oriented API, without the need to modify the rest of the code. LPMD includes already several pair potential functions such as Lennard-Jones, Morse, Buckingham, MCY and the harmonic potential, as well as embedded-atom model (EAM) functions such as the Sutton-Chen and Gupta potentials. Integrators to

  2. Identification of potent inhibitors against snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) using molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnasamy, Sathishkumar; Chinnasamy, Selvakkumar; Nagamani, Selvaraman; Muthusamy, Karthikeyan

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) (Echis coloratus (Carpet viper) is a multifunctional enzyme that is involved in producing several symptoms that follow a snakebite, such as severe local hemorrhage, nervous system effects and tissue necrosis. Because the three-dimensional (3D) structure of SVMP is not known, models were constructed, and the best model was selected based on its stereo-chemical quality. The stability of the modeled protein was analyzed through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. Structure-based virtual screening was performed, and 15 potential molecules with the highest binding energies were selected. Further analysis was carried out with induced fit docking, Prime/MM-GBSA (ΔGBind calculations), quantum-polarized ligand docking, and density functional theory calculations. Further, the stability of the lead molecules in the SVMP-active site was examined using MD simulation. The results showed that the selected lead molecules were highly stable in the active site of SVMP. Hence, these molecules could potentially be selective inhibitors of SVMP. These lead molecules can be experimentally validated, and their backbone structural scaffold could serve as building blocks in designing drug-like molecules for snake antivenom.

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance and dynamic nuclear polarization of char suspensions: surface science and oximetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarkson, R B; Odintsov, B M; Ceroke, P J

    1998-01-01

    ; they can be calibrated and used for oximetry. Biological stability and low toxicity make chars good sensors for in vivo measurements. Scalar and dipolar interactions of water protons at the surfaces of chars may be utilized to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the nuclear spin population...

  4. Stable isotope-resolved analysis with quantitative dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Mathilde Hauge; Yigit, Demet; Frahm, Anne Birk

    2018-01-01

    Metabolite profiles and their isotopomer distributions can be studied non-invasively in complex mixtures with NMR. The advent of dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (dDNP) and isotope enrichment add sensitivity and resolution to such met-abolic studies. Metabolic pathways and networks can...

  5. Dynamical nuclear polarization by means of shallow donors in ZnO quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baranov, P.G.; Orlinskii, S.B.; de Mello-Donega, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125593899; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986; Blok, H.; Schmidt, J.

    2009-01-01

    The almost complete dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of nuclear spins has been demonstrated can be achieved in ZnO and AgCl single crystals by saturating the EPR transition of the shallow donor (SD) present in this crystals with using high-frequency (275 and 95 GHz) at low temperatures. DNP

  6. Using polarized Raman spectroscopy and the pseudospectral method to characterize molecular structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Andrew L.

    Electronic structure calculation is an essential approach for determining the structure and function of molecules and is therefore of critical interest to physics, chemistry, and materials science. Of the various algorithms for calculating electronic structure, the pseudospectral method is among the fastest. However, the trade-off for its speed is more up-front programming and testing, and as a result, applications using the pseudospectral method currently lag behind those using other methods. In Part I of this dissertation, we first advance the pseudospectral method by optimizing it for an important application, polarized Raman spectroscopy, which is a well-established tool used to characterize molecular properties. This is an application of particular importance because often the easiest and most economical way to obtain the polarized Raman spectrum of a material is to simulate it; thus, utilization of the pseudospectral method for this purpose will accelerate progress in the determination of molecular properties. We demonstrate that our implementation of Raman spectroscopy using the pseudospectral method results in spectra that are just as accurate as those calculated using the traditional analytic method, and in the process, we derive the most comprehensive formulation to date of polarized Raman intensity formulas, applicable to both crystalline and isotropic systems. Next, we apply our implementation to determine the orientations of crystalline oligothiophenes -- a class of materials important in the field of organic electronics -- achieving excellent agreement with experiment and demonstrating the general utility of polarized Raman spectroscopy for the determination of crystal orientation. In addition, we derive from first-principles a method for using polarized Raman spectra to establish unambiguously whether a uniform region of a material is crystalline or isotropic. Finally, we introduce free, open-source software that allows a user to determine any of a

  7. Olefin Metathesis in Peptidomimetics, Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry, and Molecular Imprinting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Low, Tammy K

    2006-01-01

    .... Our research goals consisted of employing olefin metathesis in the synthesis of peptidomimetics, and studying the feasibility of this method in dynamic combinatorial chemistry and molecular imprinting of nerve agents...

  8. Crystal structure and pair potentials: A molecular-dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1980-10-06

    With use of a Lagrangian which allows for the variation of the shape and size of the periodically repeating molecular-dynamics cell, it is shown that different pair potentials lead to different crystal structures.

  9. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellman, M.E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  10. Dynamic control of function by light-driven molecular motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S.; Stacko, Peter; Wezenberg, Sander J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2017-01-01

    The field of dynamic functional molecular systems has progressed enormously over the past few decades. By coupling the mechanical properties of molecular switches and motors to chemical and biological processes, exceptional control of function has been attained. Overcrowded alkene-based light-driven

  11. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Efficient SO2 Absorption by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANIRBAN MONDAL

    TMG][L]) that absorbs an equimolar amount of SO2 through chemisorption.12 Subsequently, a sig- ...... Visual molecular dynamics J. Mol. Graphics 14 33. 83. Fiorin G, Klein M L and Hénin J 2013 Using collective variables to drive molecular ...

  12. Polarization Sensitive Measurements of Molecular Reorientation in a Glass Capacitor Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Nathan; Lawhead, Carlos; Anderson, Josiah; Shiver, Tegan; Prayaga, Chandra; Ujj, Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that molecules having a permanent dipole moment tend to orient in the direction of the electric field at room temperature. The reorientation can be probed with the help of linear spectroscopy methods such as fluorescence anisotropy measurements. We have used nonlinear polarization sensitive Raman scattering spectroscopy to quantify the orientation effect of the dipoles. Vibrational spectra of the molecules has been recorded as a function of the external electric field. The polarization changes observed during the measurement are directly linked to the molecular reorientation rearrangement. Spectra has been recorded with a laser spectrometer comprised of a Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator and an imaging spectrometer with a CCD detector. In order to make this measurement we have constructed a glass capacitor cell coated in TiO and applied a significant electric field (0-3 kV/mm) to the sample. Our measurements showed that the orientation effect is most significant for liquid crystals as observed previously with non-polarization sensitive CARS spectroscopy.

  13. Par6b Regulates the Dynamics of Apicobasal Polarity during Development of the Stratified Xenopus Epidermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sha; Cha, Sang-Wook; Zorn, Aaron M.; Wylie, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    During early vertebrate development, epithelial cells establish and maintain apicobasal polarity, failure of which can cause developmental defects or cancer metastasis. This process has been mostly studied in simple epithelia that have only one layer of cells, but is poorly understood in stratified epithelia. In this paper we address the role of the polarity protein Partitioning defective-6 homolog beta (Par6b) in the developing stratified epidermis of Xenopus laevis. At the blastula stage, animal blastomeres divide perpendicularly to the apicobasal axis to generate partially polarized superficial cells and non-polarized deep cells. Both cell populations modify their apicobasal polarity during the gastrula stage, before differentiating into the superficial and deep layers of epidermis. Early differentiation of the epidermis is normal in Par6b-depleted embryos; however, epidermal cells dissociate and detach from embryos at the tailbud stage. Par6b-depleted epidermal cells exhibit a significant reduction in basolaterally localized E-cadherin. Examination of the apical marker Crumbs homolog 3 (Crb3) and the basolateral marker Lethal giant larvae 2 (Lgl2) after Par6b depletion reveals that Par6b cell-autonomously regulates the dynamics of apicobasal polarity in both superficial and deep epidermal layers. Par6b is required to maintain the “basolateral” state in both epidermal layers, which explains the reduction of basolateral adhesion complexes and epidermal cells shedding. PMID:24204686

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branam, Richard D.

    Axisymmetric injectors appear in a multitude of applications ranging from rocket engines to biotechnology. While experimentation is limited to larger injectors, much interest has been shown in the micro- and nano-scales as well. Experimentation at these scales can be cost prohibitive if even possible. Often, the operating regime involves supercritical fluids or complex geometries. Molecular dynamics modeling provides a unique way to explore these flow regimes, calculate hard to measure flow parameters accurately, and determine the value of potential improvements before investing in costly experiments or manufacturing. This research effort modeled sub- and supercritical fluid flow in a cylindrical tube being injected into a quiescent chamber. The ability of four wall models to provide an accurate simulation was compared. The simplest model, the diffuse wall, proved useful in getting results quickly but the results for the higher density cases are questionable, especially with respect to velocity profiles and density distributions. The one zone model, three layers of an fcc solid tethered to the lattice sites with a spring, proved very useful for this research primarily because it did not need as many CPU hours to equilibrate. The two zone wall uses springs as a two body potential and has a second stationary zone to hold the wall in place. The most complicated, the three zone wall, employed a reactionary zone, a stochastic zone and a stationary zone using a Lennard-Jones two body potential. Jet simulations were conducted on argon and nitrogen for liquid tube diameters from 20 to 65 A at both sub and supercritical temperatures (Ar: 130 K and 160 K, N2: 120 K and 130 K). The simulations focused on pressures above the critical pressure (Ar: 6 MPa, N2: 4 MPa). The diffusive wall showed some variation from the analytical velocity profile in the tube while the atomistically modeled walls performed very well. The walls were all able to maintain system temperature to reach

  15. The emergence of sarcomeric, graded-polarity and spindle-like patterns in bundles of short cytoskeletal polymers and two opposite molecular motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, E M; Dey, S; Mogilner, A

    2011-01-01

    We use linear stability analysis and numerical solutions of partial differential equations to investigate pattern formation in the one-dimensional system of short dynamic polymers and one (plus-end directed) or two (one is plus-end, another minus-end directed) molecular motors. If polymer sliding and motor gliding rates are slow and/or the polymer turnover rate is fast, then the polymer-motor bundle has mixed polarity and homogeneous motor distribution. However, if motor gliding is fast, a sarcomeric pattern with periodic bands of alternating polymer polarity separated by motor aggregates evolves. On the other hand, if polymer sliding is fast, a graded-polarity bundle with motors at the center emerges. In the presence of the second, minus-end directed motor, the sarcomeric pattern is more ubiquitous, while the graded-polarity pattern is destabilized. However, if the minus-end motor is weaker than the plus-end directed one, and/or polymer nucleation is autocatalytic, and/or long polymers are present in the bundle, then a spindle-like architecture with a sorted-out polarity emerges with the plus-end motors at the center and minus-end motors at the edges. We discuss modeling implications for actin-myosin fibers and in vitro and meiotic spindles.

  16. Polarization modulation laser scanning microscopy: A powerful tool to image molecular orientation and order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay K.; Kornfield, Julia A.

    1994-09-01

    To image the orientational order in a broad class of biological and manufactured materials, a new microscope has been developed that integrates laser scanning microscopy with polarization modulation polarimetry. Polarimetry allows quantitative characterization of the molecular orientation and the degree of order through characterization of optical anisotropy. Combined with laser scanning microscopy, it is used here to image the anisotropy with high spatial resolution, sensitivity, and speed. The design of the microscope is presented; and the vast improvement in sensitivity achieved using PM-LSM over conventional polarization microscopy is illustrated by imaging the linear dichroism of ultrathin Langmuir-Blodgett polymer films. PM-LSM allows imaging of the magnitude and orientation of linear dichroism in films as thin as three molecular layers (˜66 Å) at high resolution by rastering a diffraction limited spot of laser light across the sample. The rate of image acquisition is over 2000 pixels/s, two to three orders of magnitude faster than the previous methods of imaging optical anisotropy.

  17. Energy conservation in molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is analytic and the energy of an isolated system is conserved. The energy of such a system, obtained by the discrete “Verlet” algorithm commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations, fluctuates but is conserved in the mean. This is explained by the existence...

  18. Molecular dynamics study of two- and three-dimensional classical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation of two- and three- dimensional double Yukawa fluids near the triple point. We have compared some of the static and dynamic correlation functions with those of Lennard–Jones, when parameters occurring in double Yukawa potential are chosen to fit ...

  19. Interfacial Properties of an Ionic Liquid by Molecular Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heggen, B.; Zhao, W.; Leroy, F.; Dammers, A.T.; Müller-Plathe, F.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the influence of a liquid-vapor interface on dynamic properties like reorientation and diffusion as well as the surface tension of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]) by molecular dynamics simulations. In the interfacial region, reorientation of

  20. Cluster formation restricts dynamic nuclear polarization of xenon in solid mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Pourfathi, M.; Kara, H.

    2012-01-01

    During dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 1.5 K and 5 T, Xe-129 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of a homogeneous xenon/1-propanol/trityl-radical solid mixture exhibit a single peak, broadened by H-1 neighbors. A second peak appears upon annealing for several hours at 125 K. Its charac....... Subsequent DNP system modifications designed to reduce the overheating resulted in four-fold increase of Xe-129 polarization, from 5.3% to 21%. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4751021]...

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein–protein interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of sixfold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement effect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces

  2. Terazulene Isomers: Polarity Change of OFETs through Molecular Orbital Distribution Contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yuji; Takubo, Maki; Ogawa, Keisuke; Nakayama, Ken-Ichi; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Katagiri, Hiroshi

    2016-09-07

    Intermolecular orbital coupling is fundamentally important to organic semiconductor performance. Recently, we reported that 2,6':2',6″-terazulene (TAz1) exhibited excellent performance as an n-type organic field-effect transistor (OFET) via molecular orbital distribution control. To validate and develop this concept, here we present three other terazulene regioisomers, which have three azulene molecules connected at the 2- or 6-position along the long axis of the azulene, thus constructing a linear expanded π-conjugation system: 2,2':6',2″-terazulene (TAz2), 2,2':6',6″-terazulene (TAz3), and 6,2':6',6″-terazulene (TAz4). TAz2 and TAz3 exhibit ambipolar characteristics; TAz4 exhibits clear n-type transistor behavior as an OFET. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs) of all terazulenes are fully delocalized over the entire molecule. In contrast, the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) of TAz2 and TAz3 are delocalized over the 2,2'-biazulene units; the HOMOs of TAz4 are localized at one end of the azulene unit. These findings confirm that terazulene isomers which are simple hydrocarbon compounds are versatile materials with a tunable-polarity FET characteristic that depends on the direction of the azulene unit and the related contrast of the molecular orbital distribution in the terazulene backbone.

  3. Optimal control of molecular motion expressed through quantum fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Bijoy K.; Rabitz, Herschel; Askar, Attila

    2000-04-01

    A quantum fluid-dynamic (QFD) control formulation is presented for optimally manipulating atomic and molecular systems. In QFD the control quantum system is expressed in terms of the probability density ρ and the quantum current j. This choice of variables is motivated by the generally expected slowly varying spatial-temporal dependence of the fluid-dynamical variables. The QFD approach is illustrated for manipulation of the ground electronic state dynamics of HCl induced by an external electric field.

  4. Invariant molecular-dynamics approach to structural phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wentzcovitch, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Two fictitious Lagrangians to be used in molecular-dynamics simulations with variable cell shape and suitable to study problems like structural phase transitions are introduced. Because they are invariant with respect to the choice of the simulation cell edges and eliminate symmetry breaking associated with the fictitious part of the dynamics, they improve the physical content of numerical simulations that up to now have been done by using Parrinello-Rahman dynamics

  5. Molecular dynamics with deterministic and stochastic numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Leimkuhler, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the mathematical underpinnings of algorithms used for molecular dynamics simulation, including both deterministic and stochastic numerical methods. Molecular dynamics is one of the most versatile and powerful methods of modern computational science and engineering and is used widely in chemistry, physics, materials science and biology. Understanding the foundations of numerical methods means knowing how to select the best one for a given problem (from the wide range of techniques on offer) and how to create new, efficient methods to address particular challenges as they arise in complex applications.  Aimed at a broad audience, this book presents the basic theory of Hamiltonian mechanics and stochastic differential equations, as well as topics including symplectic numerical methods, the handling of constraints and rigid bodies, the efficient treatment of Langevin dynamics, thermostats to control the molecular ensemble, multiple time-stepping, and the dissipative particle dynamics method...

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of the penetration lengths: application within the fluctuation theory for diffusion coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galliero, Guillaume; Medvedev, Oleg; Shapiro, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    A 322 (2004) 151). In the current study, a fast molecular dynamics scheme has been developed to determine the values of the penetration lengths in Lennard-Jones binary systems. Results deduced from computations provide a new insight into the concept of penetration lengths. It is shown for four different...... binary liquid mixtures of non-polar components that computed penetration lengths, for various temperatures and compositions, are consistent with those deduced from experiments in the framework of the formalism of the fluctuation theory. Moreover, the mutual diffusion coefficients obtained from a coupled...

  7. Dynamics of molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2015-08-01

    We excite diatomic oxygen and nitrogen to high rotational states with an optical centrifuge and study their dynamics in an external magnetic field. Ion imaging is employed to directly visualize, and follow in time, the rotation plane of the molecular superrotors. The two different mechanisms of interaction between the magnetic field and the molecular angular momentum in paramagnetic oxygen and non-magnetic nitrogen lead to qualitatively different behaviour. In nitrogen, we observe the precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field vector. In oxygen, strong spin-rotation coupling results in faster and richer dynamics, encompassing the splitting of the rotation plane into three separate components. As the centrifuged molecules evolve with no significant dispersion of the molecular wave function, the observed magnetic interaction presents an efficient mechanism for controlling the plane of molecular rotation.

  8. Dynamics of molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2015-01-01

    We excite diatomic oxygen and nitrogen to high rotational states with an optical centrifuge and study their dynamics in an external magnetic field. Ion imaging is employed to directly visualize, and follow in time, the rotation plane of the molecular superrotors. The two different mechanisms of interaction between the magnetic field and the molecular angular momentum in paramagnetic oxygen and non-magnetic nitrogen lead to qualitatively different behaviour. In nitrogen, we observe the precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field vector. In oxygen, strong spin–rotation coupling results in faster and richer dynamics, encompassing the splitting of the rotation plane into three separate components. As the centrifuged molecules evolve with no significant dispersion of the molecular wave function, the observed magnetic interaction presents an efficient mechanism for controlling the plane of molecular rotation. (paper)

  9. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

  10. Dynamic polarization by coulomb excitation in the closed formalism for heavy ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frahn, W.E.; Hill, T.F.

    1978-01-01

    We present a closed-form treatment of the effects of dynamic polarization by Coulomb excitation on the elastic scattering of deformed heavy ions. We assume that this interaction can be represented by an absorptive polarization potential. The relatively long range of this potential entails a relatively slow variation of the associated reflection function in l-space. This feature leads to a simple generalization of the closed formula derived previously for the elastic scattering amplitude of spherical heavy nuclei. We use both the polarization potential of Love et al. and the recent improved potential of Baltz et al. to derive explicit expressions for the associated reflection functions in a Coulomb-distorted eikonal approximation. As an example we analyze the elastic scattering of 90-MeV 18 O ions by 184 W and show that both results give a quantitative description of the data. (orig.) [de

  11. Reactive surface organometallic complexes observed using dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (DNP SENS) is an emerging technique that allows access to high-sensitivity NMR spectra from surfaces. However, DNP SENS usually requires the use of radicals as an exogenous source of polarization, which has so far limited applications for organometallic surface species to those that do not react with the radicals. Here we show that reactive surface species can be studied if they are immobilized inside porous materials with suitably small windows, and if bulky nitroxide bi-radicals (here TEKPol) are used as the polarization source and which cannot enter the pores. The method is demonstrated by obtaining significant DNP enhancements from highly reactive complelxes [(equivalent to Si-O-)W(Me)(5)] supported on MCM-41, and effects of pore size (6.0, 3.0 and 2.5 nm) on the performance are discussed.

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization by frequency modulation of a tunable gyrotron of 260 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dongyoung; Soundararajan, Murari; Cuanillon, Philippe; Braunmueller, Falk; Alberti, Stefano; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    An increase in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) signal intensity is obtained with a tunable gyrotron producing frequency modulation around 260 GHz at power levels less than 1 W. The sweep rate of frequency modulation can reach 14 kHz, and its amplitude is fixed at 50 MHz. In water/glycerol glassy ice doped with 40 mM TEMPOL, the relative increase in the DNP enhancement was obtained as a function of frequency-sweep rate for several temperatures. A 68 % increase was obtained at 15 K, thus giving a DNP enhancement of about 80. By employing λ / 4 and λ / 8 polarizer mirrors, we transformed the polarization of the microwave beam from linear to circular, and achieved an increase in the enhancement by a factor of about 66% for a given power.

  13. Incident angle dependence of reactions between graphene and hydrogen atom by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Ito, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Incident angle dependence of reactions between graphene and hydrogen atoms are obtained qualitatively by classical molecular dynamics simulation under the NVE condition with modified Brenner reactive empirical bond order (REBO) potential. Chemical reaction depends on two parameters, i.e., polar angle θ and azimuthal angle φ of the incident hydrogen. From the simulation results, it is found that the reaction rates strongly depend on polar angle θ. Reflection rate becomes larger with increasing θ, and the θ dependence of adsorption rate is also found. The θ dependence is caused by three dimensional structure of the small potential barrier which covers adsorption sites. φ dependence of penetration rate is also found for large θ. (author)

  14. VUV studies of molecular photofragmentation dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved, photoion and photoelectron methods are used to study the neutral fragmentation and ionization dynamics of small molecules relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. Photodissociation and ionization are initiated by coherent VUV radiation and the fragmentation dynamics are extracted from measurements of product rovibronic state distributions, kinetic energies and angular distributions. The general aim of these studies is to investigate the multichannel interactions between the electronic and nuclear motions which determine the evolution of the photoexcited {open_quotes}complex{close_quotes} into the observed asymptotic channels.

  15. Site-specific hydration dynamics in the nonpolar core of a molten globule by dynamic nuclear polarization of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Brandon D; Choi, Jennifer; López, Carlos; Wesener, Darryl A; Hubbell, Wayne; Cavagnero, Silvia; Han, Songi

    2011-04-20

    Water-protein interactions play a direct role in protein folding. The chain collapse that accompanies protein folding involves extrusion of water from the nonpolar core. For many proteins, including apomyoglobin (apoMb), hydrophobic interactions drive an initial collapse to an intermediate state before folding to the final structure. However, the debate continues as to whether the core of the collapsed intermediate state is hydrated and, if so, what the dynamic nature of this water is. A key challenge is that protein hydration dynamics is significantly heterogeneous, yet suitable experimental techniques for measuring hydration dynamics with site-specificity are lacking. Here, we introduce Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization at 0.35 T via site-specific nitroxide spin labels as a unique tool to probe internal and surface protein hydration dynamics with site-specific resolution in the molten globular, native, and unfolded protein states. The (1)H NMR signal enhancement of water carries information about the local dynamics of the solvent within ∼10 Å of a spin label. EPR is used synergistically to gain insights on local polarity and mobility of the spin-labeled protein. Several buried and solvent-exposed sites of apoMb are examined, each bearing a covalently bound nitroxide spin label. We find that the nonpoloar core of the apoMb molten globule is hydrated with water bearing significant translational dynamics, only 4-6-fold slower than that of bulk water. The hydration dynamics of the native state is heterogeneous, while the acid-unfolded state bears fast-diffusing hydration water. This study provides a high-resolution glimpse at the folding-dependent nature of protein hydration dynamics.

  16. Molecular-dynamics analysis of the diffusion of molecular hydrogen in all-silica sodalite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, A.W.C.; Bromley, S.T.; Flikkema, E.; Wojdel, J.; Maschmeyer, T.; Jansen, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the technical feasibility of crystalline porous silicates as hydrogen storage materials, the self-diffusion of molecular hydrogen in all-silica sodalite is modeled using large-scale classical molecular-dynamics simulations employing full lattice flexibility. In the

  17. Simplistic Coulomb Forces in Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    salt model the SF approximation overall reproduces the structural and dynamical properties as accurately as does the Wolf method. It is shown that the optimal Wolf damping parameter depends on the property in focus and that neither the potential energy nor the radial distribution function are useful...

  18. Development of a mobile dynamic nuclear polarizer for continuous flow applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Sandro; Dollmann, Bjoern; Bauer, Christian; Koelzer, Michael; Spiess, Hans W.; Hinderberger, Dariush; Muennemann, Kerstin [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Bluemler, Peter [Johannes Gutenberg University, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Despite its wide applicability in natural science, NMR still suffers from its inherently low sensitivity. This could be overcome by hyperpolarization of molecules via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Here, we introduce a mobile DNP polarizer, based on an inexpensive Halbach magnet operating at 0.35 T. It shows an almost vanishing magnetic flux at its outer side and is not disturbing other instruments. It can be placed directly next to a superconducting magnet, thus limiting the transport time of the hyperpolarized sample. It will be shown, that the Halbach magnet has the same DNP performance like an electromagnet. Although DNP methods have found important applications in science, two problems remain: Firstly radicals are needed, which are mostly toxic. This problem becomes crucial with regard to medical applications. Secondly, the sample must be transported from the polarization magnet to the place of detection and polarization losses due to T1 occur. We are currently implementing a flow system to the mobile DNP polarizer, which should overcome both obstacles. The radicals will be immobilized in a gel matrix and the hyperpolarized radical free fluid is pumped subsequently directly in the MRI scanner.

  19. Single-molecule detection of chaperonin dynamics through polarization rotation modulation of CdSe QD luminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru; Araki, Daisuke; Miyashita, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Koudai; Arita, Mayuno; Yohda, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    We report our recent trials examining the single-molecule three-dimensional (3D) detection of protein conformational dynamics at room temperature. Using molecular chaperones as model proteins and cadmium selenide (CdSe) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as nanometer-scale probes, we monitored the temporal evolution of ATP-induced conformation changes with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging technique in buffer solutions. The two-dimensional (2D) degenerate nature of the emission dipoles of the QDs, due to the uniaxial wurtzite crystal structure, made it possible to capture the 3D orientation using a polarization modulation technique in real time. The temporal resolution was half the period of analyzer rotation. Although still insufficient, the obtained signals suggest possible 3D detection of specific motions, which supports the two-step conformational changes triggered by ATP attachment. - Highlights: • We report our recent trials examining the single-molecule three-dimensional (3D) detection of protein conformational dynamics at room temperature. • Using molecular chaperones as model proteins and cadmium selenide (CdSe) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as nanometer-scale probes, we monitored the temporal evolution of ATP-induced conformation changes with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging technique in buffer solutions. • The two-dimensional (2D) degenerate nature of the emission dipoles of the QDs, due to the uniaxial wurtzite crystal structure, made it possible to capture the 3D orientation using a polarization modulation technique in real time. • The temporal resolution was half the period of analyzer rotation. • Although still insufficient, the obtained signals suggest possible 3D detection of specific motions, which supports the two-step conformational changes triggered by ATP attachment

  20. Dynamic neutron scattering from conformational dynamics. II. Application using molecular dynamics simulation and Markov modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zheng; Lindner, Benjamin; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Noé, Frank; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-11-07

    Neutron scattering experiments directly probe the dynamics of complex molecules on the sub pico- to microsecond time scales. However, the assignment of the relaxations seen experimentally to specific structural rearrangements is difficult, since many of the underlying dynamical processes may exist on similar timescales. In an accompanying article, we present a theoretical approach to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations with a Markov State Model (MSM) that permits the direct identification of structural transitions leading to each contributing relaxation process. Here, we demonstrate the use of the method by applying it to the configurational dynamics of the well-characterized alanine dipeptide. A practical procedure for deriving the MSM from an MD is introduced. The result is a 9-state MSM in the space of the backbone dihedral angles and the side-chain methyl group. The agreement between the quasielastic spectrum calculated directly from the atomic trajectories and that derived from the Markov state model is excellent. The dependence on the wavevector of the individual Markov processes is described. The procedure means that it is now practicable to interpret quasielastic scattering spectra in terms of well-defined intramolecular transitions with minimal a priori assumptions as to the nature of the dynamics taking place.

  1. A Molecular Probe for the Detection of Polar Lipids in Live Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie A Bader

    Full Text Available Lipids have an important role in many aspects of cell biology, including membrane architecture/compartment formation, intracellular traffic, signalling, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism. Lipid biology is therefore integrally involved in major human diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, heart disease, immune disorders and cancers, which commonly display altered lipid transport and metabolism. However, the investigation of these important cellular processes has been limited by the availability of specific tools to visualise lipids in live cells. Here we describe the potential for ReZolve-L1™ to localise to intracellular compartments containing polar lipids, such as for example sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine. In live Drosophila fat body tissue from third instar larvae, ReZolve-L1™ interacted mainly with lipid droplets, including the core region of these organelles. The presence of polar lipids in the core of these lipid droplets was confirmed by Raman mapping and while this was consistent with the distribution of ReZolve-L1™ it did not exclude that the molecular probe might be detecting other lipid species. In response to complete starvation conditions, ReZolve-L1™ was detected mainly in Atg8-GFP autophagic compartments, and showed reduced staining in the lipid droplets of fat body cells. The induction of autophagy by Tor inhibition also increased ReZolve-L1™ detection in autophagic compartments, whereas Atg9 knock down impaired autophagosome formation and altered the distribution of ReZolve-L1™. Finally, during Drosophila metamorphosis fat body tissues showed increased ReZolve-L1™ staining in autophagic compartments at two hours post puparium formation, when compared to earlier developmental time points. We concluded that ReZolve-L1™ is a new live cell imaging tool, which can be used as an imaging reagent for the detection of polar lipids in

  2. A Molecular Probe for the Detection of Polar Lipids in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Christie A; Shandala, Tetyana; Carter, Elizabeth A; Ivask, Angela; Guinan, Taryn; Hickey, Shane M; Werrett, Melissa V; Wright, Phillip J; Simpson, Peter V; Stagni, Stefano; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Lay, Peter A; Massi, Massimiliano; Plush, Sally E; Brooks, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have an important role in many aspects of cell biology, including membrane architecture/compartment formation, intracellular traffic, signalling, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism. Lipid biology is therefore integrally involved in major human diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, heart disease, immune disorders and cancers, which commonly display altered lipid transport and metabolism. However, the investigation of these important cellular processes has been limited by the availability of specific tools to visualise lipids in live cells. Here we describe the potential for ReZolve-L1™ to localise to intracellular compartments containing polar lipids, such as for example sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine. In live Drosophila fat body tissue from third instar larvae, ReZolve-L1™ interacted mainly with lipid droplets, including the core region of these organelles. The presence of polar lipids in the core of these lipid droplets was confirmed by Raman mapping and while this was consistent with the distribution of ReZolve-L1™ it did not exclude that the molecular probe might be detecting other lipid species. In response to complete starvation conditions, ReZolve-L1™ was detected mainly in Atg8-GFP autophagic compartments, and showed reduced staining in the lipid droplets of fat body cells. The induction of autophagy by Tor inhibition also increased ReZolve-L1™ detection in autophagic compartments, whereas Atg9 knock down impaired autophagosome formation and altered the distribution of ReZolve-L1™. Finally, during Drosophila metamorphosis fat body tissues showed increased ReZolve-L1™ staining in autophagic compartments at two hours post puparium formation, when compared to earlier developmental time points. We concluded that ReZolve-L1™ is a new live cell imaging tool, which can be used as an imaging reagent for the detection of polar lipids in different intracellular

  3. A Molecular Probe for the Detection of Polar Lipids in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Christie A.; Shandala, Tetyana; Carter, Elizabeth A.; Ivask, Angela; Guinan, Taryn; Hickey, Shane M.; Werrett, Melissa V.; Wright, Phillip J.; Simpson, Peter V.; Stagni, Stefano; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Lay, Peter A.; Massi, Massimiliano; Brooks, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have an important role in many aspects of cell biology, including membrane architecture/compartment formation, intracellular traffic, signalling, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism. Lipid biology is therefore integrally involved in major human diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, heart disease, immune disorders and cancers, which commonly display altered lipid transport and metabolism. However, the investigation of these important cellular processes has been limited by the availability of specific tools to visualise lipids in live cells. Here we describe the potential for ReZolve-L1™ to localise to intracellular compartments containing polar lipids, such as for example sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine. In live Drosophila fat body tissue from third instar larvae, ReZolve-L1™ interacted mainly with lipid droplets, including the core region of these organelles. The presence of polar lipids in the core of these lipid droplets was confirmed by Raman mapping and while this was consistent with the distribution of ReZolve-L1™ it did not exclude that the molecular probe might be detecting other lipid species. In response to complete starvation conditions, ReZolve-L1™ was detected mainly in Atg8-GFP autophagic compartments, and showed reduced staining in the lipid droplets of fat body cells. The induction of autophagy by Tor inhibition also increased ReZolve-L1™ detection in autophagic compartments, whereas Atg9 knock down impaired autophagosome formation and altered the distribution of ReZolve-L1™. Finally, during Drosophila metamorphosis fat body tissues showed increased ReZolve-L1™ staining in autophagic compartments at two hours post puparium formation, when compared to earlier developmental time points. We concluded that ReZolve-L1™ is a new live cell imaging tool, which can be used as an imaging reagent for the detection of polar lipids in different intracellular

  4. Application of Connection in Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin

    2018-03-01

    The evolution of electronic states in molecule has two origins: dynamical one produced by Schrödinger equation and kinematical one caused by base transformation due to nuclear motion. In current theories, the former gets analytic expression; the latter depends on heavy numerical calculation, which contains uncertainty. By using connection of fiber bundles, this paper establishes an analytic formula for the latter, and the numerical work is simplified. It shows the mathematical structure of molecule is fiber bundle.

  5. Variational calculation of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy with electronic polarization of solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2012-04-01

    Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy calculation presents a significant challenge due to an excessive number of QM calculations. A useful approach for reducing the computational cost is that based on the mean field approximation to the QM subsystem. Here, we describe such a mean-field QM/MM theory for electronically polarizable systems by starting from the Hartree product ansatz for the total system and invoking a variational principle of free energy. The MM part is then recast to a classical polarizable model by introducing the charge response kernel. Numerical test shows that the potential of mean force (PMF) thus obtained agrees quantitatively with that obtained from a direct QM/MM calculation, indicating the utility of self-consistent mean-field approximation. Next, we apply the obtained method to prototypical reactions in several qualitatively different solvents and make a systematic comparison of polarization effects. The results show that in aqueous solution the PMF does not depend very much on the water models employed, while in nonaqueous solutions the PMF is significantly affected by explicit polarization. For example, the free energy barrier for a phosphoryl dissociation reaction in acetone and cyclohexane is found to increase by more than 10 kcal/mol when switching the solvent model from an empirical to explicitly polarizable one. The reason for this is discussed based on the parametrization of empirical nonpolarizable models.

  6. The Venus Emissivity Mapper - Investigating the Atmospheric Structure and Dynamics of Venus' Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widemann, T.; Marcq, E.; Tsang, C.; Mueller, N. T.; Kappel, D.; Helbert, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2017-12-01

    Venus' climate evolution is driven by the energy balance of its global cloud layers. Venus displays the best-known case of polar vortices evolving in a fast-rotating atmosphere. Polar vortices are pervasive in the Solar System and may also be present in atmosphere-bearing exoplanets. While much progress has been made since the early suggestion that the Venus clouds are H2O-H2SO4 liquid droplets (Young 1973), several cloud parameters are still poorly constrained, particularly in the lower cloud layer and optically thicker polar regions. The average particle size is constant over most of the planet but increases toward the poles. This indicates that cloud formation processes are different at latitudes greater than 60°, possibly as a result of the different dynamical regimes that exist in the polar vortices (Carlson et al. 1993, Wilson et al. 2008, Barstow et al. 2012). Few wind measurements exist in the polar region due to unfavorable viewing geometry of currently available observations. Cloud-tracking data indicate circumpolar circulation close to solid-body rotation. E-W winds decrease to zero velocity close to the pole. N-S circulation is marginal, with extremely variable morphology and complex vorticity patterns (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 2008, Luz et al. 2011, Garate-Lopez et al. 2013). The Venus Emissivity Mapper (VEM; Helbert et al., 2016) proposed for NASA's Venus Origins Explorer (VOX) and the ESA M5/EnVision orbiters has the capability to better constrain the microphysics (vertical, horizontal, time dependence of particle size distribution, or/and composition) of the lower cloud particles in three spectral bands at 1.195, 1.310 and 1.510 μm at a spatial resolution of 10 km. Circular polar orbit geometry would provide an unprecedented study of both polar regions within the same mission. In addition, VEM's pushbroom method will allow short timescale cloud dynamics to be assessed, as well as local wind speeds, using repeated imagery at 90 minute intervals

  7. The Venus Emissivity Mapper - Investigating the Atmospheric Structure and Dynamics of Venus’ Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widemann, Thomas; Marcq, Emmanuel; Tsang, Constantine; Mueller, Nils; Kappel, David; Helbert, Joern; Dyar, Melinda; Smrekar, Suzanne

    2017-10-01

    Venus displays the best-known case of polar vortices evolving in a fast-rotating atmosphere. Polar vortices are pervasive in the Solar System and may also be present in atmosphere-bearing exoplanets. While much progress has been made since the early suggestion that the Venus clouds are H2O-H2SO4 liquid droplets (Young 1973), several cloud parameters are still poorly constrained, particularly in the lower cloud layer and optically thicker polar regions. The average particle size is constant over most of the planet but increases toward the poles. This indicates that cloud formation processes are different at latitudes greater than 60°, possibly as a result of the different dynamical regimes that exist in the polar vortices (Carlson et al. 1993, Wilson et al. 2008, Barstow et al. 2012).Few wind measurements exist in the polar region due to unfavorable viewing geometry of currently available observations. Cloud-tracking data indicate circumpolar circulation close to solid-body rotation. E-W winds decrease to zero velocity close to the pole. N-S circulation is marginal, with extremely variable morphology and complex vorticity patterns (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 2008, Luz et al. 2011, Garate-Lopez et al. 2013).The Venus Emissivity Mapper (VEM; Helbert et al., 2016) proposed for NASA’s Venus Origins Explorer (VOX) and the ESA M5/EnVision orbiters has the capability to better constrain the microphysics (vertical, horizontal, time dependence of particle size distribution, or/and composition) of the lower cloud particles in three spectral bands at 1.195, 1.310 and 1.510 μm at a spatial resolution of ~10 km. Circular polar orbit geometry would provide an unprecedented simultaneous study of both polar regions within the same mission. In addition, VEM’s pushbroom method will allow short timescale cloud dynamics to be assessed, as well as local wind speeds, using repeated imagery at 90 minute intervals. Tracking lower cloud motions as proxies for wind measurements at high

  8. Magnetic switching of a single molecular magnet due to spin-polarized current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnaś, Józef

    2007-04-01

    Magnetic switching of a single molecular magnet (SMM) due to spin-polarized current flowing between ferromagnetic metallic leads (electrodes) is investigated theoretically. Magnetic moments of the leads are assumed to be collinear and parallel to the magnetic easy axis of the molecule. Electrons tunneling through the barrier between magnetic leads are coupled to the SMM via exchange interaction. The current flowing through the system, as well as the spin relaxation times of the SMM, are calculated from the Fermi golden rule. It is shown that spin of the SMM can be reversed by applying a certain voltage between the two magnetic electrodes. Moreover, the switching may be visible in the corresponding current-voltage characteristics.

  9. Electrically tunable dynamic nuclear spin polarization in GaAs quantum dots at zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, M.; Wang, G.; Kuroda, T.; Shree, S.; Balocchi, A.; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.; Durnev, M. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Sakoda, K.; Mano, T.; Amand, T.; Urbaszek, B.

    2018-04-01

    In III-V semiconductor nano-structures, the electron and nuclear spin dynamics are strongly coupled. Both spin systems can be controlled optically. The nuclear spin dynamics are widely studied, but little is known about the initialization mechanisms. Here, we investigate optical pumping of carrier and nuclear spins in charge tunable GaAs dots grown on 111A substrates. We demonstrate dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at zero magnetic field in a single quantum dot for the positively charged exciton X+ state transition. We tune the DNP in both amplitude and sign by variation of an applied bias voltage Vg. Variation of ΔVg on the order of 100 mV changes the Overhauser splitting (nuclear spin polarization) from -30 μeV (-22%) to +10 μeV (+7%) although the X+ photoluminescence polarization does not change sign over this voltage range. This indicates that absorption in the structure and energy relaxation towards the X+ ground state might provide favourable scenarios for efficient electron-nuclear spin flip-flops, generating DNP during the first tens of ps of the X+ lifetime which is on the order of hundreds of ps. Voltage control of DNP is further confirmed in Hanle experiments.

  10. Atomistic interactions of clusters on surfaces using molecular dynamics and hyper molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Navarro, Carlos F.

    2002-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis describes the results of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations applied to the interaction of silver clusters with graphite surfaces and some numerical and theoretical methods concerning the extension of MD simulations to longer time scales (hyper-MD). The first part of this thesis studies the implantation of clusters at normal incidence onto a graphite surface in order to determine the scaling of the penetration depth (PD) against the impact energy. A comparison with experimental results is made with good agreement. The main physical observations of the impact process are described and analysed. It is shown that there is a threshold impact velocity above which the linear dependence on PD on impact energy changes to a linear dependence on velocity. Implantation of silver clusters at oblique incidence is also considered. The second part of this work analyses the validity and feasibility of the three minimisation methods for the hyper-MD simulation method whereby time scales of an MD simulation can be extended. A correct mathematical basis for the iterative method is derived. It is found that one of the iterative methods, upon which hyper-lD is based, is very likely to fail in high-dimensional situations because it requires a too expensive convergence. Two new approximations to the hyper-MD approach are proposed, which reduce the computational effort considerably. Both approaches, although not exact, can help to search for some of the most likely transitions in the system. Some examples are given to illustrate this. (author)

  11. Molecular Dynamics: from basic techniques to applications (A Molecular Dynamics Primer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, E. R.

    2008-11-01

    It is now 50 years since the first papers describing the use of Molecular Dynamics (MD) were published by Alder and Wainright, and since then, together with Monte Carlo (MC) techniques, MD has become an essential tool in the theoretical study of materials properties at finite temperatures. In its early days, MD was used in combination with simple yet general models, such as hard spheres or Lennard-Jones models of liquids, systems which, though simple, were nevertheless not amenable to an analytical statistical mechanical treatment. Nowadays, however, MD is most frequently used in combination with rather sophisticated models, ranging all the way between empirical force fields to first-principles methods, with the aim of describing as accurately as possible any given material. From a computational aid in statistical mechanics and many-body physics, MD has evolved to become a widely used tool in physical chemistry, condensed matter physics, biology, geology and materials science. The aim of this course is to describe the basic algorithms of MD, and to provide attendees with the necessary theoretical background in order to enable them to use MD simulations in their research work. Also, examples of the use of MD in different scientific disciplines will be provided, with the aim of illustrating the the many possibilities and the wide spread use of MD simulation techniques in scientific research today.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of atomic displacements in disordered solid alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.

    The effects of atomic displacements on the energetics of alloys plays important role in the determining the properties of alloys. We studied the atomic displacements in disordered solid alloys using molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo methods. The diffuse scattering of pure materials, copper, gold, nickel, and palladium was calculated. The experimental data for pure Cu was obtained from diffuse scattering intensity of synchrotron x-ray radiation. The comparison showed the advantages of molecular dynamics method for calculating the atomic displacements in solid alloys. The individual nearest neighbor separations were calculated for Cu 50Au50 alloy and compared to the result of XAFS experiment. The molecular dynamics method provided theoretical predictions of nearest neighbor pair separations in other binary alloys, Cu-Pd and Cu-Al for wide range of the concentrations. We also experimentally recovered the diffuse scattering maps for the Cu47.3Au52.7 and Cu85.2Al14.8 alloy.

  13. Protein dynamics governed by interfaces of high polarity and low packing density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Espinosa Angarica

    Full Text Available The folding pathway, three-dimensional structure and intrinsic dynamics of proteins are governed by their amino acid sequences. Internal protein surfaces with physicochemical properties appropriate to modulate conformational fluctuations could play important roles in folding and dynamics. We show here that proteins contain buried interfaces of high polarity and low packing density, coined as LIPs: Light Interfaces of high Polarity, whose physicochemical properties make them unstable. The structures of well-characterized equilibrium and kinetic folding intermediates indicate that the LIPs of the corresponding native proteins fold late and are involved in local unfolding events. Importantly, LIPs can be identified using very fast and uncomplicated computational analysis of protein three-dimensional structures, which provides an easy way to delineate the protein segments involved in dynamics. Since LIPs can be retained while the sequences of the interacting segments diverge significantly, proteins could in principle evolve new functional features reusing pre-existing encoded dynamics. Large-scale identification of LIPS may contribute to understanding evolutionary constraints of proteins and the way protein intrinsic dynamics are encoded.

  14. Studying Interactions by Molecular Dynamics Simulations at High Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Fogolari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study molecular encounters and recognition. In recent works, simulations using high concentration of interacting molecules have been performed. In this paper, we consider the practical problems for setting up the simulation and to analyse the results of the simulation. The simulation of beta 2-microglobulin association and the simulation of the binding of hydrogen peroxide by glutathione peroxidase are provided as examples.

  15. Driving Ordering Processes in Molecular-Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Harro; Kusalik, Peter G.

    2014-05-01

    Self-organized criticality describes the emergence of complexity in dynamical nonequilibrium systems. In this paper we introduce a unique approach whereby a driven energy conversion is utilized as a sampling bias for ordered arrangements in molecular dynamics simulations of atomic and molecular fluids. This approach gives rise to dramatically accelerated nucleation rates, by as much as 30 orders of magnitude, without the need of predefined order parameters, which commonly employed rare-event sampling methods rely on. The measured heat fluxes suggest how the approach can be generalized.

  16. Energy conserving, linear scaling Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, M J; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2012-10-07

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations with long-term conservation of the total energy and a computational cost that scales linearly with system size have been obtained simultaneously. Linear scaling with a low pre-factor is achieved using density matrix purification with sparse matrix algebra and a numerical threshold on matrix elements. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] yields microcanonical trajectories with the approximate forces obtained from the linear scaling method that exhibit no systematic drift over hundreds of picoseconds and which are indistinguishable from trajectories computed using exact forces.

  17. Femtochemistry and femtobiology ultrafast dynamics in molecular science

    CERN Document Server

    Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2002-01-01

    This book contains important contributions from top international scientists on the-state-of-the-art of femtochemistry and femtobiology at the beginning of the new millennium. It consists of reviews and papers on ultrafast dynamics in molecular science.The coverage of topics highlights several important features of molecular science from the viewpoint of structure (space domain) and dynamics (time domain). First of all, the book presents the latest developments, such as experimental techniques for understanding ultrafast processes in gas, condensed and complex systems, including biological mol

  18. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  19. Enhanced Molecular Dynamics Methods Applied to Drug Design Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziada, Sonia; Braka, Abdennour; Diharce, Julien; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Bonnet, Pascal

    2018-01-01

    Nobel Laureate Richard P. Feynman stated: "[…] everything that living things do can be understood in terms of jiggling and wiggling of atoms […]." The importance of computer simulations of macromolecules, which use classical mechanics principles to describe atom behavior, is widely acknowledged and nowadays, they are applied in many fields such as material sciences and drug discovery. With the increase of computing power, molecular dynamics simulations can be applied to understand biological mechanisms at realistic timescales. In this chapter, we share our computational experience providing a global view of two of the widely used enhanced molecular dynamics methods to study protein structure and dynamics through the description of their characteristics, limits and we provide some examples of their applications in drug design. We also discuss the appropriate choice of software and hardware. In a detailed practical procedure, we describe how to set up, run, and analyze two main molecular dynamics methods, the umbrella sampling (US) and the accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) methods.

  20. The photodissociation dynamics of ozone at 193 nm: An O(D-1(2)) angular momentum polarization study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouard, M.; Cireasa, D.R.; Clark, A.P.; Groenenboom, G.C.; Hancock, G.; Horrocks, S.J.; Quadrini, F.; Ritchie, G.A.D.; Vallance, C.

    2006-01-01

    Polarized laser photolysis, coupled with resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization detection of O(D-1(2)) and velocity-map ion imaging, has been used to investigate the photodissociation dynamics of ozone at 193 nm. The use of multiple pump and probe laser polarization geometries and probe

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojtíková, J.; Kalvoda, L.; Sedlák, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 4 (2015), s. 637-639 ISSN 0587-4246 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : molecular dynamics * poly(dimethylsiloxane) * dissipative particle dynamics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.525, year: 2015 http://przyrbwn.icm.edu.pl/APP/PDF/128/a128z4p40.pdf

  2. Electron trapping in amorphous silicon: A quantum molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lin H.; Kalia, R.K.; Vashishta, P.

    1990-12-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations provide the real-time dynamics of electrons and ions through numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger and Newton equations, respectively. Using the QMD approach we have investigated the localization behavior of an excess electron in amorphous silicon at finite temperatures. For time scales on the order of a few picoseconds, we find the excess electron is localized inside a void of radius {approximately}3 {Angstrom} at finite temperatures. 12 refs.

  3. Polar bear population dynamics in the southern Beaufort Sea during a period of sea ice decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.; McDonald, Trent L.; Stirling, Ian; Derocher, Andrew E.; Richardson, Evan S.; Regehr, Eric V.; Douglas, David C.; Durner, George M.; Atwood, Todd C.; Amstrup, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    In the southern Beaufort Sea of the United States and Canada, prior investigations have linked declines in summer sea ice to reduced physical condition, growth, and survival of polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Combined with projections of population decline due to continued climate warming and the ensuing loss of sea ice habitat, those findings contributed to the 2008 decision to list the species as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Here, we used mark–recapture models to investigate the population dynamics of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea from 2001 to 2010, years during which the spatial and temporal extent of summer sea ice generally declined. Low survival from 2004 through 2006 led to a 25–50% decline in abundance. We hypothesize that low survival during this period resulted from (1) unfavorable ice conditions that limited access to prey during multiple seasons; and possibly, (2) low prey abundance. For reasons that are not clear, survival of adults and cubs began to improve in 2007 and abundance was comparatively stable from 2008 to 2010, with ~900 bears in 2010 (90% CI 606–1212). However, survival of subadult bears declined throughout the entire period. Reduced spatial and temporal availability of sea ice is expected to increasingly force population dynamics of polar bears as the climate continues to warm. However, in the short term, our findings suggest that factors other than sea ice can influence survival. A refined understanding of the ecological mechanisms underlying polar bear population dynamics is necessary to improve projections of their future status and facilitate development of management strategies.

  4. A Coupling Tool for Parallel Molecular Dynamics-Continuum Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp

    2012-06-01

    We present a tool for coupling Molecular Dynamics and continuum solvers. It is written in C++ and is meant to support the developers of hybrid molecular - continuum simulations in terms of both realisation of the respective coupling algorithm as well as parallel execution of the hybrid simulation. We describe the implementational concept of the tool and its parallel extensions. We particularly focus on the parallel execution of particle insertions into dense molecular systems and propose a respective parallel algorithm. Our implementations are validated for serial and parallel setups in two and three dimensions. © 2012 IEEE.

  5. Cluster formation restricts dynamic nuclear polarization of xenon in solid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, N N; Pourfathi, M; Kara, H; Manasseh, P; Ghosh, R K; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, J H; Kadlecek, S J; Rizi, R R

    2012-09-14

    During dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 1.5 K and 5 T, (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of a homogeneous xenon/1-propanol/trityl-radical solid mixture exhibit a single peak, broadened by (1)H neighbors. A second peak appears upon annealing for several hours at 125 K. Its characteristic width and chemical shift indicate the presence of spontaneously formed pure Xe clusters. Microwave irradiation at the appropriate frequencies can bring both peaks to either positive or negative polarization. The peculiar time evolution of (129)Xe polarization in pure Xe clusters during DNP can be modelled as an interplay of spin diffusion and T(1) relaxation. Our simple spherical-cluster model offers a sensitive tool to evaluate major DNP parameters in situ, revealing a severe spin-diffusion bottleneck at the cluster boundaries and a significant sample overheating due to microwave irradiation. Subsequent DNP system modifications designed to reduce the overheating resulted in four-fold increase of (129)Xe polarization, from 5.3% to 21%.

  6. Molecular circuits for dynamic noise filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, Christoph; Seelig, Georg; Rullan, Marc; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-04-26

    The invention of the Kalman filter is a crowning achievement of filtering theory-one that has revolutionized technology in countless ways. By dealing effectively with noise, the Kalman filter has enabled various applications in positioning, navigation, control, and telecommunications. In the emerging field of synthetic biology, noise and context dependency are among the key challenges facing the successful implementation of reliable, complex, and scalable synthetic circuits. Although substantial further advancement in the field may very well rely on effectively addressing these issues, a principled protocol to deal with noise-as provided by the Kalman filter-remains completely missing. Here we develop an optimal filtering theory that is suitable for noisy biochemical networks. We show how the resulting filters can be implemented at the molecular level and provide various simulations related to estimation, system identification, and noise cancellation problems. We demonstrate our approach in vitro using DNA strand displacement cascades as well as in vivo using flow cytometry measurements of a light-inducible circuit in Escherichia coli.

  7. Conformity, Anticonformity and Polarization of Opinions: Insights from a Mathematical Model of Opinion Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyll Krueger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and quantifying polarization in social systems is important because of many reasons. It could for instance help to avoid segregation and conflicts in the society or to control polarized debates and predict their outcomes. In this paper, we present a version of the q-voter model of opinion dynamics with two types of responses to social influence: conformity (like in the original q-voter model and anticonformity. We put the model on a social network with the double-clique topology in order to check how the interplay between those responses impacts the opinion dynamics in a population divided into two antagonistic segments. The model is analyzed analytically, numerically and by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show that the system undergoes two bifurcations as the number of cross-links between cliques changes. Below the first critical point, consensus in the entire system is possible. Thus, two antagonistic cliques may share the same opinion only if they are loosely connected. Above that point, the system ends up in a polarized state.

  8. Molecular-level mechanisms of vibrational frequency shifts in a polar liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Christine M; Thompson, Ward H

    2011-06-16

    A molecular-level analysis of the origins of the vibrational frequency shifts of the CN stretching mode in neat liquid acetonitrile is presented. The frequency shifts and infrared spectrum are calculated using a perturbation theory approach within a molecular dynamics simulation and are in good agreement with measured values reported in the literature. The resulting instantaneous frequency of each nitrile group is decomposed into the contributions from each molecule in the liquid and by interaction type. This provides a detailed picture of the mechanisms of frequency shifts, including the number of surrounding molecules that contribute to the shift, the relationship between their position and relative contribution, and the roles of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. These results provide insight into what information is contained in infrared (IR) and Raman spectra about the environment of the probed vibrational mode. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Molecular dynamics studies of superionic conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.

    1979-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years computer modeling of liquids and solids has become a useful method of understanding the structural and dynamical correlations in these systems. Some characteristics of the method are presented with an example from work on homogeneous nucleation in monoatomic liquids; the interaction potential determines the structure: a Lennard--Jones system nucleates a close packed structure while an alkali metal potential nucleates a bcc packing. In the study of ionic systems like CaF 2 the Coulomb interaction together with the short range repulsion is enough to produce a satisfactory model for the motion of F - ions in CaF 2 at approx. 1600 0 K. Analysis of this motion shows that F - ions reside at their fluorite sites for about 6 x 10 -12 s and that the diffusion is mainly due to F - jumps in the 100 direction. The motion can be analyzed in terms of the generation and annihilation of anti-Frenkel pairs. The temperature dependence of the F - diffusion constant at two different densities has also been calculated. The computer model does not correspond with experiment in this regard

  10. Determining Equilibrium Constants for Dimerization Reactions from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Djurre H.; Schafer, Lars V.; De Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Berendsen, Herman J. C.; Grubmueller, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    With today's available computer power, free energy calculations from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations "via counting" become feasible for an increasing number of reactions. An example is the dimerization reaction of transmembrane alpha-helices. If an extended simulation of the two helices

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of oscillatory flows in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.S.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we apply the direct non-equilibrium molecular dynamics technique to oscillatory flows of fluids in microscopic channels. Initially, we show that the microscopic simulations resemble the macroscopic predictions based on the Navier–Stokes equation very well for large channel width, hi...

  12. Metal cluster fission: jellium model and Molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia

    2004-01-01

    Fission of doubly charged sodium clusters is studied using the open-shell two-center deformed jellium model approximation and it ab initio molecular dynamic approach accounting for all electrons in the system. Results of calculations of fission reactions Na_10^2+ --> Na_7^+ + Na_3^+ and Na_18...

  13. Hydration of Cd(II): molecular dynamics study | M. Mohammed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inclusion of the three-body correction was found to be crucial for the description of the system, and results thus obtained are in good agreement with experimental values. Radial ... KEY WORDS: Molecular dynamics, Umbrella sampling, Hydration structure, Cd(II), Water exchange, Three-body corrections. Bull. Chem.

  14. Projector augmented wave method: ab initio molecular dynamics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The projector augmented wave method is an all-electron method for efficient ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with full wave functions. .... In that case the muffin–tin approximation is used solely to define the basis set. ..... functions probe the local character of the auxiliary wave function in the atomic region. Examples ...

  15. Active site modeling in copper azurin molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzuti, B; Swart, M; Sportelli, L; Guzzi, R

    Active site modeling in molecular dynamics simulations is investigated for the reduced state of copper azurin. Five simulation runs (5 ns each) were performed at room temperature to study the consequences of a mixed electrostatic/constrained modeling for the coordination between the metal and the

  16. CF3+ etching silicon surface: A molecular dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, C.; Lu, X.; He, P.; Zhang, P.; Sun, W.; Zhang, Jingwei; Chen, F.; Gou, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a molecular dynamics simulation method has been employed to investigate CF3 + ions, bombarding Si surface with the energy of 100, 200, 300 and 400 eV and an incident angle of 45 degrees with respect to the normal. The simulation results show that when CF3+ ions approach the Si surface

  17. Molecular Dynamics and Bioactivity of a Novel Mutated Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    version 3.5,. Accelrys Inc., San Diego, CA) was used for protein design and molecular dynamics simulation. The analysis of the MD data was made using Origin Pro (version 9.0). Mean ± standard error of mean (SEM) of the data were computed.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy profile of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy profile of Paracetamol in DPPC and DMPC lipid bilayers. YOUSEF NADEMIa, SEPIDEH AMJAD IRANAGHb, ABBAS YOUSEFPOURa,. SEYEDEH ZAHRA MOUSAVIa and HAMID MODARRESSa,∗. aDepartment of Chemical Engineering, bDepartment of Chemistry, ...

  19. Molecular Dynamics and Bioactivity of a Novel Mutated Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To design and evaluate a novel human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) analog. Methods: Mutation stability prediction was processed on hPTH, docked the mutant hPTH with its receptor, and then proceeded with molecular dynamics using Discovery Studio 3.5 software package for the complex. The bioactivity of the ...

  20. Molecular dynamics study on the relaxation properties of bilayered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-31

    Aug 31, 2017 ... Abstract. The influence of defects on the relaxation properties of bilayered graphene (BLG) has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation in nanometre sizes. Type and position of defects were taken into account in the calculated model. The results show that great changes begin to occur in the ...

  1. Stability mechanisms of a thermophilic laccase probed by molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2013-01-01

    Laccases are highly stable, industrially important enzymes capable of oxidizing a large range of substrates. Causes for their stability are, as for other proteins, poorly understood. In this work, multiple-seed molecular dynamics (MD) was applied to a Trametes versicolor laccase in response...

  2. Improved Angle Potentials for Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulacu, Monica; Goga, Nicolae; Zhao, Wei; Rossi, Giulia; Monticelli, Luca; Periole, Xavier; Tieleman, D. Peter; Marrink, Siewert J.

    Potentials routinely used in atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are not always suitable for modeling systems at coarse-grained resolution. For example, in the calculation of traditional torsion angle potentials, numerical instability is often encountered in the case of very flexible molecules.

  3. Thermodynamics of small clusters of atoms: A molecular dynamics simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard Kristensen, W.; Jensen, E. J.; Cotterill, Rodney M J

    1974-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of clusters containing 55, 135, and 429 atoms have been calculated using the molecular dynamics method. Structural and vibrational properties of the clusters were examined at different temperatures in both the solid and the liquid phase. The nature of the melting...

  4. A molecular dynamics study of SiSe2 glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio, G.A.; Kalia, R.K.; Vashishta, P.

    1988-10-01

    We report the results of a molecular dynamics study of molten and glassy SiSe 2 using an effective interparticle interaction. Results for the partial pair-correlation functions, partial structure factors, bond-angle distributions and statistics of rings are reported. Results are in good agreement with the neutron diffraction experiments. 11 refs., 6 figs

  5. Young Modulus of Crystalline Polyethylene from ab Initio Molecular Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, J.C.L.; Meier, Robert J.; Heinemann, M.; Groot, R.A. de

    1997-01-01

    The Young modulus for crystalline polyethylene is calculated using ab initio molecular dynamics based on density functional theory in the local density approximation (DFT-LDA). This modulus, which can be seen as the ultimate value for the Young modulus of polyethylene fibers, is found to be 334 GPa.

  6. Structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon from ab initio molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buda, F. (Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 174 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio (USA)); Chiarotti, G.L. (International School for Advanced Studies, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy) Laboratorio Tecnologie Avanzate Superfici e Catalisi del Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Padriciano 99, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)); Car, R. (International School for Advanced Studies, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy) Institut Romard de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland Department of Condensed Matter Physics, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)); Parrinello, M. (IBM Research Division, Zurich Research Laboratory, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland))

    1991-09-15

    We have generated a model of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by first-principles molecular dynamics. Our results are in good agreement with the available experimental data and provide new insight into the microscopic structure of this material. The calculation lends support to models in which monohydride complexes are prevalent, and indicates a strong tendency of hydrogen to form small clusters.

  7. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of laser melting of silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1996-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite temperature density functional theory, is used to simulate laser heating of crystal silicon. We have found that a high concentration of excited electrons dramatically weakens the covalent bond. As a result, the system undergoes a melting

  8. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Efficient SO₂ Absorption by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ionic liquids are appropriate candidates for the absorption of acid gases such as SO₂. Six anion functionalized ionic liquids with different basicities have been studied for SO₂ absorption capacity by employing quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Gas phase quantum calculations ...

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of phase transformations in niti bicrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srinivasan, P.; Nicola, L.; Simone, A.; Floryan, J.M.; Tvergaard, V.; van Campen, D.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of grain boundaries and grain misorientation on the nucleation and growth of martensite in an equi-atomic nickeltitanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) is investigated by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bicrystals with a modified embedded atom method (MEAM)

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of lipid vesicle fusion in atomic detail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knecht, Volker; Marrink, Siewert-Jan

    The fusion of a membrane-bounded vesicle with a target membrane is a key step in intracellular trafficking, exocytosis, and drug delivery. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study the fusion of small unilamellar vesicles composed of a dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/palmitic

  11. Molecular dynamics of the structure and thermodynamics of dusty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The static structure and thermodynamic properties of two-dimensional dusty plasma are analyzed for some typical values of coupling and screening parameters using classical molecular dynamics. Radial distribution function and static structure factor are computed. The radial distribution functions display the typical ...

  12. Coarse – grained molecular dynamics simulation of cross – linking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coarse – grained molecular dynamics simulation of cross – linking of DGEBA epoxy resin and estimation of the adhesive strength. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more ...

  13. Dynamical photo-induced electronic properties of molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltako, K.; Michelini, F.; Cavassilas, N.; Raymond, L.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale molecular-electronic devices and machines are emerging as promising functional elements, naturally flexible and efficient, for next-generation technologies. A deeper understanding of carrier dynamics in molecular junctions is expected to benefit many fields of nanoelectronics and power devices. We determine time-resolved charge current flowing at the donor-acceptor interface in molecular junctions connected to metallic electrodes by means of quantum transport simulations. The current is induced by the interaction of the donor with a Gaussian-shape femtosecond laser pulse. Effects of the molecular internal coupling, metal-molecule tunneling, and light-donor coupling on photocurrent are discussed. We then define the time-resolved local density of states which is proposed as an efficient tool to describe the absorbing molecule in contact with metallic electrodes. Non-equilibrium reorganization of hybridized molecular orbitals through the light-donor interaction gives rise to two phenomena: the dynamical Rabi shift and the appearance of Floquet-like states. Such insights into the dynamical photoelectronic structure of molecules are of strong interest for ultrafast spectroscopy and open avenues toward the possibility of analyzing and controlling the internal properties of quantum nanodevices with pump-push photocurrent spectroscopy.

  14. Polarization Dependent Dynamics of CO2 Trapped in AN Optical Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Carlos; Echebiri, Geraldine; Liu, Qingnan; Mullin, Amy S.

    2012-06-01

    An optical centrifuge (Yuan {et al}. {PNAS} 2011, 108, 6872) has been employed to prepare carbon dioxide molecules in very high rotational states (``hot'' rotors, J ˜220) in order to investigate how collisions relax ensembles of molecules with an overall angular momentum that is spatially oriented. We have performed polarization-dependent high resolution transient IR absorption measurements to study the spatial dependence of the relaxation dynamics. Our results show that the net angular momentum of the initially centrifuged molecules persists for at least 10 gas kinetic collisions and that the translational energy distributions are dependent on the probe orientation and polarization. These studies indicate that the centrifuged molecules tend to maintain the orientation of their initial angular momentum for the first set of collisions and that relatively large changes in J are involved in the first collisions.

  15. Spin temperatures under dynamic polarization in a one-dimensional system, the TANOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjhoux, Yves.

    1974-01-01

    A quantitative model of Tanol submitted to dynamic polarization has been developed. The spin systems are described using a network of interconnected reservoirs. The model involves six (or ten) Zeeman nuclear reservoirs mutually coupled by nuclear-nuclear dipole interactions and coupled to electron spins by hyperfine interactions. When the electronic line is saturated, different nuclear temperatures appear in the molecule. These temperatures have been calculated as a function of the magnetic field orientation against the crystallographic axes. Experimental results are correctly reproduced. A quantitative agreement is obtained for the anisotropy of total polarization. The calculation also shows that, in certain directions, positive and negative spin temperatures simultaneously appear, that explains the complex shape of the signals observed. Nuclear relaxation processes involving two electron spins of the same exchange chain are taken into account for the calculation. The different possible chain directions (a, a+c, or c vectors) were envisaged. Only the c-vector hypothesis succeeded in interpreting experimental results [fr

  16. Structure and dynamics of alkali borate glasses: a molecular dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, A.H; den Hartog, H. W.

    Structural and dynamical properties of lithium, cesium and mixed alkali (i.e., lithium and cesium) borate glasses have been studied by the molecular dynamics method. The calculations yield glass structures consisting of planar BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedrons with no sixfold ring structures at

  17. Vibrational frequencies in Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Sheau Wei; Tok, Eng Soon; Kang, Hway Chuan

    2010-12-07

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) are widely used to investigate the dynamical properties of molecular systems. An important issue in such applications is the dependence of dynamical quantities such as molecular vibrational frequencies upon the fictitious orbital mass μ. Although it is known that the correct Born-Oppenheimer dynamics are recovered at zero μ, it is not clear how these dynamical quantities are to be rigorously extracted from CPMD calculations. Our work addresses this issue for vibrational frequencies. We show that when the system is sufficiently close to the ground state the calculated ionic vibrational frequencies are ω(M) = ω(0M)[1 -C(μ/M)] for small μ/M, where ω(0M) is the Born-Oppenheimer ionic frequency, M the ionic mass, and C a constant that depends upon the ion-orbital coupling force constants. Our analysis also provides a quantitative understanding of the orbital oscillation amplitudes, leading to a relationship between the adiabaticity of a system and the ion-orbital coupling constants. In particular, we show that there is a significant systematic dependence of calculated vibrational frequencies upon how close the CPMD trajectory is to the Born-Oppenheimer surface. We verify our analytical results with numerical simulations for N(2), Sn(2), and H/Si(100)-(2×1).

  18. Molecular Effects of Concentrated Solutes on Protein Hydration, Dynamics, and Electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriata, Luciano A; Spiga, Enrico; Peraro, Matteo Dal

    2016-08-23

    Most studies of protein structure and function are performed in dilute conditions, but proteins typically experience high solute concentrations in their physiological scenarios and biotechnological applications. High solute concentrations have well-known effects on coarse protein traits like stability, diffusion, and shape, but likely also perturb other traits through finer effects pertinent at the residue and atomic levels. Here, NMR and molecular dynamics investigations on ubiquitin disclose variable interactions with concentrated solutes that lead to localized perturbations of the protein's surface, hydration, electrostatics, and dynamics, all dependent on solute size and chemical properties. Most strikingly, small polar uncharged molecules are sticky on the protein surface, whereas charged small molecules are not, but the latter still perturb the internal protein electrostatics as they diffuse nearby. Meanwhile, interactions with macromolecular crowders are favored mainly through hydrophobic, but not through polar, surface patches. All the tested small solutes strongly slow down water exchange at the protein surface, whereas macromolecular crowders do not exert such strong perturbation. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations predict that unspecific interactions slow down microsecond- to millisecond-timescale protein dynamics despite having only mild effects on pico- to nanosecond fluctuations as corroborated by NMR. We discuss our results in the light of recent advances in understanding proteins inside living cells, focusing on the physical chemistry of quinary structure and cellular organization, and we reinforce the idea that proteins should be studied in native-like media to achieve a faithful description of their function. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Emulating Molecular Orbitals and Electronic Dynamics with Ultracold Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk-Sören Lühmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ultracold atoms in optical lattices have proven their great value as quantum simulators for studying strongly correlated phases and complex phenomena in solid-state systems. Here, we reveal their potential as quantum simulators for molecular physics and propose a technique to image the three-dimensional molecular orbitals with high resolution. The outstanding tunability of ultracold atoms in terms of potential and interaction offer fully adjustable model systems for gaining deep insight into the electronic structure of molecules. We study the orbitals of an artificial benzene molecule and discuss the effect of tunable interactions in its conjugated π electron system with special regard to localization and spin order. The dynamical time scales of ultracold atom simulators are on the order of milliseconds, which allows for the time-resolved monitoring of a broad range of dynamical processes. As an example, we compute the hole dynamics in the conjugated π system of the artificial benzene molecule.

  20. Water Dynamics in Protein Hydration Shells: The Molecular Origins of the Dynamical Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra. PMID:24479585

  1. A stochastic phase-field model determined from molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    von Schwerin, Erik

    2010-03-17

    The dynamics of dendritic growth of a crystal in an undercooled melt is determined by macroscopic diffusion-convection of heat and by capillary forces acting on the nanometer scale of the solid-liquid interface width. Its modelling is useful for instance in processing techniques based on casting. The phase-field method is widely used to study evolution of such microstructural phase transformations on a continuum level; it couples the energy equation to a phenomenological Allen-Cahn/Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling the dynamics of an order parameter determining the solid and liquid phases, including also stochastic fluctuations to obtain the qualitatively correct result of dendritic side branching. This work presents a method to determine stochastic phase-field models from atomistic formulations by coarse-graining molecular dynamics. It has three steps: (1) a precise quantitative atomistic definition of the phase-field variable, based on the local potential energy; (2) derivation of its coarse-grained dynamics model, from microscopic Smoluchowski molecular dynamics (that is Brownian or over damped Langevin dynamics); and (3) numerical computation of the coarse-grained model functions. The coarse-grained model approximates Gibbs ensemble averages of the atomistic phase-field, by choosing coarse-grained drift and diffusion functions that minimize the approximation error of observables in this ensemble average. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2010.

  2. A general-purpose coarse-grained molecular dynamics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Takeshi; Sawa, Fumio; Shoji, Tatsuya; Fukunaga, Hiroo; Takimoto, Jun-ichi; Doi, Masao

    2002-05-01

    In this article, we describe a general-purpose coarse-grained molecular dynamics program COGNAC ( COarse Grained molecular dynamics program by NAgoya Cooperation). COGNAC has been developed for general molecular dynamics simulation, especially for coarse-grained polymer chain models. COGNAC can deal with general molecular models, in which each molecule consists of coarse-grained atomic units connected by chemical bonds. The chemical bonds are specified by bonding potentials for the stretching, bending and twisting of the bonds, each of which are the functions of the position coordinates of the two, three and four atomic units. COGNAC can deal with both isotropic and anisotropic interactions between the non-bonded atomic units. As an example, the Gay-Berne potential is implemented. New potential functions can be added to the list of existing potential functions by users. COGNAC can do simulations for various situations such as under constant temperature, under constant pressure, under shear and elongational deformation, etc. Some new methods are implemented in COGNAC for modeling multiphase structures of polymer blends and block copolymers. A density biased Monte Carlo method and a density biased potential method can generate equilibrium chain configurations from the results of the self-consistent field calculations. Staggered reflective boundary conditions can generate interfacial structures with smaller system size compared with those of periodic boundary conditions.

  3. Dynamical polarizability of graphene irradiated by circularly polarized ac electric fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busl, Maria; Platero, Gloria; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2012-01-01

    We examine the low-energy physics of graphene in the presence of a circularly polarized electric field in the terahertz regime. Specifically, we derive a general expression for the dynamical polarizability of graphene irradiated by an ac electric field. Several approximations are developed...... that allow one to develop a semianalytical theory for the weak-field regime. The ac field changes qualitatively the single- and many-electron excitations of graphene: Undoped samples may exhibit collective excitations (in contrast to the equilibrium situation), and the properties of the excitations in doped...

  4. Graphene superlattices in strong circularly polarized fields: Chirality, Berry phase, and attosecond dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koochaki Kelardeh, Hamed; Apalkov, Vadym; Stockman, Mark I.

    2017-08-01

    We propose and theoretically explore states of graphene superlattices with relaxed P and T symmetries created by strong circularly polarized ultrashort pulses. The conduction-band electron distribution in the reciprocal space forms an interferogram with discontinuities related to topological (Berry) fluxes at the Dirac points. This can be studied using time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TR-ARPES). Our findings hold promise for control and observation of ultrafast electron dynamics in topological solids and may be applied to petahertz-scale information processing.

  5. Dynamical behaviour of FEL devices operating with two undulators having opposite circular polarizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Ottaviani, P. L.; Bucci, L.

    2000-01-01

    Optical-Klystron FELs operating with undulators having opposite circular polarizations are characterized by a spontaneous emission spectrum which does not exhibit the characteristic interference pattern. The use of the Madey theorem may allow the conclusion that, for such configuration, the dispersive section does not provide any gain enhancement. In this paper it has been analyzed the problem from a dynamical point of view and clarify how the optical field evolve, what is the role of the bunching and how the consequences of the Madey theorem should be correctly understood [it

  6. Solvent effect on dynamical TPA and optical limiting of BDMAS molecular media for nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Yong; Miao Quan; Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, 250014 Jinan (China); Gel' mukhanov, Faris, E-mail: ckwang@sdnu.edu.cn [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-01-14

    The dynamical two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section as well as optical limiting of a 4,4'-bis(dimethylamino) stilbene (BDMAS) molecular medium for the nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses is studied. This molecular medium can be described by a cascade three-level model in the visible light regime. Our numerical results show that the BDMAS molecular medium exhibits a strong optical limiting behaviour. The saturation TPA in the femtosecond time domain can be observed, and materials with larger nonlinear absorption cross sections would be much easier to saturate. Due to the contribution of the two-step TPA, the dynamical TPA cross section of BDMAS for nanosecond pulses is about three orders of magnitude larger than that for ultrashort femtosecond pulses. Special attention has been paid to the solvent effects on the optimal limiting performance. With an enhancement of the polarity of solvents, the dynamical optical limiting window becomes broader. In the origin of optical limiting, the dynamical TPA cross section of BDMAS decreases when the polarity of solvents increases, which is in good agreement with the experiment.

  7. Solvent effect on dynamical TPA and optical limiting of BDMAS molecular media for nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yong; Miao Quan; Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2011-01-01

    The dynamical two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section as well as optical limiting of a 4,4'-bis(dimethylamino) stilbene (BDMAS) molecular medium for the nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses is studied. This molecular medium can be described by a cascade three-level model in the visible light regime. Our numerical results show that the BDMAS molecular medium exhibits a strong optical limiting behaviour. The saturation TPA in the femtosecond time domain can be observed, and materials with larger nonlinear absorption cross sections would be much easier to saturate. Due to the contribution of the two-step TPA, the dynamical TPA cross section of BDMAS for nanosecond pulses is about three orders of magnitude larger than that for ultrashort femtosecond pulses. Special attention has been paid to the solvent effects on the optimal limiting performance. With an enhancement of the polarity of solvents, the dynamical optical limiting window becomes broader. In the origin of optical limiting, the dynamical TPA cross section of BDMAS decreases when the polarity of solvents increases, which is in good agreement with the experiment.

  8. Orbital free molecular dynamics; Approche sans orbitale des plasmas denses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, F

    2007-08-15

    The microscopic properties of hot and dense plasmas stay a field essentially studied thanks to classical theories like the One Component Plasma, models which rely on free parameters, particularly ionization. In order to investigate these systems, we have used, in this PhD work, a semi-classical model, without free parameters, that is based on coupling consistently classical molecular dynamics for the nuclei and orbital free density functional theory for the electrons. The electronic fluid is represented by a free energy entirely determined by the local density. This approximation was validated by a comparison with an ab initio technique, quantum molecular dynamics. This one is identical to the previous except for the description of the free energy that depends on a quantum-independent-particle model. Orbital free molecular dynamics was then used to compute equation of state of boron and iron plasmas in the hot and dense regime. Furthermore, comparisons with classical theories were performed on structural and dynamical properties. Finally, equation of state and transport coefficients mixing laws were studied by direct simulation of a plasma composed of deuterium and copper. (author)

  9. A Polarizable Atomic Multipole-Based Force Field for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Anionic Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Huiying; Peng, Xiangda; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yuebin; Li, Guohui

    2017-12-31

    In all of the classical force fields, electrostatic interaction is simply treated and explicit electronic polarizability is neglected. The condensed-phase polarization, relative to the gas-phase charge distributions, is commonly accounted for in an average way by increasing the atomic charges, which remain fixed throughout simulations. Based on the lipid polarizable force field DMPC and following the same framework as Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for BiomoleculAr (AMOEBA) simulation, the present effort expands the force field to new anionic lipid models, in which the new lipids contain DMPG and POPS. The parameters are compatible with the AMOEBA force field, which includes water, ions, proteins, etc. The charge distribution of each atom is represented by the permanent atomic monopole, dipole and quadrupole moments, which are derived from the ab initio gas phase calculations. Many-body polarization including the inter- and intramolecular polarization is modeled in a consistent manner with distributed atomic polarizabilities. Molecular dynamics simulations of the two aqueous DMPG and POPS membrane bilayer systems, consisting of 72 lipids with water molecules, were then carried out to validate the force field parameters. Membrane width, area per lipid, volume per lipid, deuterium order parameters, electron density profile, electrostatic potential difference between the center of the bilayer and water are all calculated, and compared with limited experimental data.

  10. Ferroelectric Polarization Switching Dynamics and Domain Growth of Triglycine Sulfate and Imidazolium Perchlorate

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, He

    2016-04-10

    The weak bond energy and large anisotropic domain wall energy induce many special characteristics of the domain nucleation, growth, and polarization switch in triglycine sulfate (TGS) and imidazolium perchlorate (IM), two typical molecular ferroelectrics. Their domain nucleation and polarization switch are rather slower than those of conventional oxide ferroelectrics, which may be due to the weaker bond energy of hydrogen bond or van der Waals bond than that of ionic bond. These chemical bonds dominate the elastic energy, with the latter being an important component of domain wall energy and playing an important role in domain nucleation and domain growth. The ratio of anisotropic domain wall energy to Gibbs free energy is large in TGS and IM, which allows a favorable domain shape and a special domain evolution under a certain electric field. Therefore, this study not only sheds light on the physical nature but also indicates the application direction for molecular ferroelectrics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  11. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  12. Molecular dynamics of TBP and DBP studied by neutron transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles Filho, J.B.V.; Refinetti, M.E.; Fulfaro, R.; Vinhas, L.A.

    1984-04-01

    Differences between the properties of TBP and DBP, concerning the uranium extraction processes, may be related to certain characteristics of the molecular dynamics of each compound. In order to investigate the dynamical behaviour of hydrogen in these molecules, neutron transmission of TBP and DBP has been measured as a function of neutron wavelenght in the range 4.0 - 6.0 A, at room temperature. Scattering cross sections per hydrogen atom have been obtained. From the comparison with results previously obtained for n-butanol, similar dynamical behaviour of butyl radicals in these compounds could be observed. This similarity indicates that the presence of two or three butyl radicals in butylphosphate molecules does not exert influence in the hydrogen motion of methyl and methylene groups. This suggests that the different chemical behaviour between TBP and DBP is related to the dynamics of the hydrogen directly bound to the DBP phosphate group.(Author) [pt

  13. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  14. Growth of N-polar GaN by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, M. N.; Li, Haoran; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.; Speck, James S.

    2018-01-01

    The homoepitaxial growth of N-polar GaN was investigated by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy. Systematic growth studies varying the V/III flux ratio and the growth temperature indicated that the strongest factor in realizing morphologically smooth films was the growth temperature; N-face films needed to be grown approximately 100 °C or greater than Ga-face films provided the same metal flux. Smooth N-face films could also be grown at temperatures only 50 °C greater than Ga-face films, albeit under reduced metal flux. Too high a growth temperature and too low a metal flux resulted in dislocation mediated pitting of the surface. The unintentional impurity incorporation of such films was also studied by secondary mass ion spectroscopy and most importantly revealed an oxygen content in the mid 1017 to the mid 1018 cm-3 range. Hall measurements confirmed that this oxygen impurity resulted in n-type films, with carrier concentrations and mobilities comparable to those of intentionally silicon doped GaN.

  15. Accelerating convergence of molecular dynamics-based structural relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn

    2005-01-01

    We describe strategies to accelerate the terminal stage of molecular dynamics (MD)based relaxation algorithms, where a large fraction of the computational resources are used. First, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the QuickMin family of MD relaxation algorithms and explore...... the influence of spectral properties and dimensionality of the molecular system on the algorithm efficiency. We test two algorithms, the MinMax and Lanczos, for spectral estimation from an MD trajectory, and use this to derive a practical scheme of time step adaptation in MD relaxation algorithms to improve...

  16. Stretching siloxanes: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, E. M.; Nonnenberg, C.; Frank, I.; Achenbach, F.; Weis, J.; Bräuchle, C.

    2005-10-01

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics study of siloxane elastomers placed under tensile stress for comparison with single molecule AFM experiments. Of particular interest is stress-induced chemical bond breaking in the high force regime, where a description of the molecular electronic structure is essential to determine the rupture mechanism. We predict an ionic mechanism for the bond breaking process with a rupture force of 4.4 nN for an isolated siloxane decamer pulled at a rate of 27.3 m/s and indicate lower values at experimental polymer lengths and pulling rates.

  17. Spectra modelling combining molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Vít; Bouř, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 48 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /13./. 19.03.2015-21.03.2015, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA ČR GA15-09072S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005; GA MŠk(CZ) ED3.2.00/08.0144 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Raman scattering * molecular dynamics * autocorrelation function Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  18. Carrier and polarization dynamics in monolayer MoS2: temperature and power dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbaszek, Bernhard; Lagarde, D.; Bouet, L.; Amand, T.; Marie, X.; Zhu, C. R.; Liu, B. L.; Tan, P. H.

    2014-03-01

    In monolayer (ML) MoS2 optical transitions across the direct bandgap are governed by chiral selection rules, allowing optical k-valley initialization. Here we present the first time resolved photoluminescence (PL) polarization measurements in MoS2 MLs, providing vital information on the electron valley dynamics. Using quasi-resonant excitation of the A-exciton transitions, we can infer that the PL decays within τ ~= 4ps. The PL polarization of Pc ~ 60 % remains nearly constant in time for experiments from 4K - 300K, a necessary condition for the success of future Valley Hall experiments. τ does not vary significantly over this temperature range. This is surprising when considering the decrease of Pc in continuous wave experiments when going from 4K to 300K reported in the literature. By tuning the laser following the shift of the A-exciton resonance with temperature we are able to recover at 300K ~ 80 % of the polarization observed at 4K. For pulsed laser excitation, we observe a decrease of Pc with increasing laser power at all temperatures.

  19. Overhauser Geomagnetic Sensor Based on the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Effect for Magnetic Prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian; Dong, Haobin; Liu, Huan; Yuan, Zhiwen; Dong, He; Zhao, Zhizhuo; Liu, Yonghua; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Based on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect, an alternative design of an Overhauser geomagnetic sensor is presented that enhances the proton polarization and increases the amplitude of the free induction decay (FID) signal. The short-pulse method is adopted to rotate the enhanced proton magnetization into the plane of precession to create an FID signal. To reduce the negative effect of the powerful electromagnetic interference, the design of the anti-interference of the pick-up coil is studied. Furthermore, the radio frequency polarization method based on the capacitive-loaded coaxial cavity is proposed to improve the quality factor of the resonant circuit. In addition, a special test instrument is designed that enables the simultaneous testing of the classical proton precession and the Overhauser sensor. Overall, comparison experiments with and without the free radical of the Overhauser sensors show that the DNP effect does effectively improve the amplitude and quality of the FID signal, and the magnetic sensitivity, resolution and range reach to 10 pT/Hz1/2@1 Hz, 0.0023 nT and 20–100 μT, respectively. PMID:27258283

  20. Overhauser Geomagnetic Sensor Based on the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Effect for Magnetic Prospecting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ge

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP effect, an alternative design of an Overhauser geomagnetic sensor is presented that enhances the proton polarization and increases the amplitude of the free induction decay (FID signal. The short-pulse method is adopted to rotate the enhanced proton magnetization into the plane of precession to create an FID signal. To reduce the negative effect of the powerful electromagnetic interference, the design of the anti-interference of the pick-up coil is studied. Furthermore, the radio frequency polarization method based on the capacitive-loaded coaxial cavity is proposed to improve the quality factor of the resonant circuit. In addition, a special test instrument is designed that enables the simultaneous testing of the classical proton precession and the Overhauser sensor. Overall, comparison experiments with and without the free radical of the Overhauser sensors show that the DNP effect does effectively improve the amplitude and quality of the FID signal, and the magnetic sensitivity, resolution and range reach to 10 pT/Hz 1 / 2 @1 Hz, 0.0023 nT and 20–100 μ T, respectively.

  1. Dynamic cholesteric liquid crystal superstructures photoaligned by one-step polarization holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen-Sen; Shen, Yuan; Chang, Zhen-Ni; Li, Wen-Song; Xu, Yan-Chao; Fan, Xing-Yu; Chen, Lu-Jian

    2017-12-01

    A convenient approach to modulate the fingerprint textures of methyl red (MR) doped cholesteric liquid crystals by asymmetric photoalignment in the green-light waveband is presented, resulting in the generation of voltage-controllable helical superstructures. The interaction between the MR molecules and the incident light polarization determines the initial twisted planar geometry, providing a multivariant control over the stripe directions of fingerprint textures by applying a proper electric field. The key factors for precise manipulation of fingerprint stripes in a predictable and rewritable manner are analyzed theoretically and investigated experimentally, which involves the alignment asymmetry, the ratio of cell gap to natural pitch length, and the chirality of chiral dopant. Dynamic periodic fingerprint textures in shapes of dashed curve and dashed line are further demonstrated by utilizing a facile one-step polarization holography process using two beams with orthogonal circular and orthogonal linear polarizations, respectively. It is believed that the practical approach described in this study would enrich the research contents of self-assembled hierarchical superstructures using soft liquid crystal building blocks.

  2. Thermosetting polymer for dynamic nuclear polarization: Solidification of an epoxy resin mixture including TEMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Yohei, E-mail: noda.yohei@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Centre, Sector of Nuclear Science Research, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kumada, Takayuki [Quantum Beam Science Centre, Sector of Nuclear Science Research, Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Shamoto, Shin-ichi [Quantum Beam Science Centre, Sector of Nuclear Science Research, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-03-11

    We investigated the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of typical thermosetting polymers (two-component type epoxy resins; Araldite{sup ®} Standard or Araldite{sup ®} Rapid) doped with a (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yl)oxy (TEMPO) radical. The doping process was developed by carefully considering the decomposition of TEMPO during the solidification of the epoxy resin. The TEMPO electron spin in each two-component paste decayed slowly, which was favorable for our study. Furthermore, despite the dissolved TEMPO, the mixture of the two-component paste successfully solidified. With the resulting TEMPO-doped epoxy-resin samples, DNP experiments at 1.2 K and 3.35 T indicated a magnitude of a proton-spin polarization up to 39%. This polarization is similar to that (35%) obtained for TEMPO-doped polystyrene (PS), which is often used as a standard sample for DNP. To combine this solidification of TEMPO-including mixture with a resin-casting technique enables a creation of polymeric target materials with a precise and complex structure.

  3. High-Frequency Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in the Nuclear Rotating Frame

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrar, C. T.; Hall, D. A.; Gerfen, G. J.

    2000-01-01

    A proton dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR signal enhancement (ϵ) close to thermal equilibrium, ϵ = 0.89, has been obtained at high field (B0 = 5 T, νepr = 139.5 GHz) using 15 mM trityl radical in a 40:60 water/glycerol frozen solution at 11 K. The electron-nuclear polarization transfer...... is performed in the nuclear rotating frame with microwave irradiation during a nuclear spin-lock pulse. The growth of the signal enhancement is governed by the rotating frame nuclear spin–lattice relaxation time (T1ρ), which is four orders of magnitude shorter than the nuclear spin–lattice relaxation time (T1n......). Due to the rapid polarization transfer in the nuclear rotating frame the experiment can be recycled at a rate of 1/T1ρ and is not limited by the much slower lab frame nuclear spin–lattice relaxation rate (1/T1n). The increased repetition rate allowed in the nuclear rotating frame provides an effective...

  4. Thermosetting polymer for dynamic nuclear polarization: Solidification of an epoxy resin mixture including TEMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Yohei; Kumada, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Shamoto, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of typical thermosetting polymers (two-component type epoxy resins; Araldite ® Standard or Araldite ® Rapid) doped with a (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yl)oxy (TEMPO) radical. The doping process was developed by carefully considering the decomposition of TEMPO during the solidification of the epoxy resin. The TEMPO electron spin in each two-component paste decayed slowly, which was favorable for our study. Furthermore, despite the dissolved TEMPO, the mixture of the two-component paste successfully solidified. With the resulting TEMPO-doped epoxy-resin samples, DNP experiments at 1.2 K and 3.35 T indicated a magnitude of a proton-spin polarization up to 39%. This polarization is similar to that (35%) obtained for TEMPO-doped polystyrene (PS), which is often used as a standard sample for DNP. To combine this solidification of TEMPO-including mixture with a resin-casting technique enables a creation of polymeric target materials with a precise and complex structure

  5. Dynamics of Molecular Gyroscopes Created by Strong Optical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Amy

    2015-03-01

    We explore the behavior of molecules in ultra-high angular momentum states prepared in an optical centrifuge and detected with transient IR absorption spectroscopy. In the optical centrifuge, the polarizable electron cloud of molecules interacts with the electric field of linearly polarized light that angularly accelerates over the time of the optical pulse. The centrifuge pulse is generated by combining oppositely chirped pulsed of light. Trapped molecules are driven into high angular momentum states that are spatially oriented with the optical field and have energies far above the average at 300 K. High resolution transient IR spectroscopy reveals the dynamics of collisional energy transfer for the super-rotors. Polarization-dependent studies show that the initial angular momentum orientation persists for many collisions, indicating that molecules in an optical centrifuge behave as quantum gyroscopes. Time-dependent population and energy profiles for individual J- states give information about the dynamics of super-rotors. Research support provided by NSF and the University of Maryland.

  6. A Series of Molecular Dynamics and Homology Modeling Computer Labs for an Undergraduate Molecular Modeling Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Donald E.; Guayasamin, Ryann C.; Kieffer, Madeleine E.

    2010-01-01

    As computational modeling plays an increasingly central role in biochemical research, it is important to provide students with exposure to common modeling methods in their undergraduate curriculum. This article describes a series of computer labs designed to introduce undergraduate students to energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulations,…

  7. Relativistic classical and quantum dynamics in intense crossed laser beams of various polarizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Verschl

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of an electron in crossed laser fields is investigated analytically. Two different standing wave configurations are compared. The counterpropagating laser waves are either linearly or circularly polarized. Both configurations have in common that there are one-dimensional trajectories on which the electron can oscillate with vanishing Lorentz force. The dynamics is analyzed for the situations when the electron moves in the vicinity of these ideal axes. If the laser intensities imply nonrelativistic electron dynamics, the system is described quantum mechanically. A semiclassical treatment renders the strongly relativistic regime accessible as well. To describe relativistic wave packets, the results of the classical analysis are employed for a Monte Carlo ensemble. This allows for a comparison of the wave packet dynamics for both configurations in the strongly relativistic regime. It is found for certain cases that relativity slows down the dynamics, i.e., for higher laser intensities, wave packet spreading and the drift away from the ideal axis of vanishing Lorentz force are shown to be increasingly suppressed.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Methodologies for Probing Cannabinoid Ligand/Receptor Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Diane L.; Hurst, Dow P.; Shore, Derek M.; Pitman, Mike C.; Reggio, Patricia H.

    2018-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 and 2 G-protein-coupled receptors are currently important pharmacological targets with significant drug discovery potential. These receptors have been shown to display functional selectivity or biased agonism, a property currently thought to have substantial therapeutic potential. Although recent advances in crystallization techniques have provided a wealth of structural information about this important class of membrane-embedded proteins, these structures lack dynamical information. In order to fully understand the interplay of structure and function for this important class of proteins, complementary techniques that address the dynamical aspects of their function are required such as NMR as well as a variety of other spectroscopies. Complimentary to these experimental approaches is molecular dynamics, which has been effectively used to help unravel, at the atomic level, the dynamics of ligand binding and activation of these membrane-bound receptors. Here, we discuss and present several representative examples of the application of molecular dynamics simulations to the understanding of the signatures of ligand-binding and -biased signaling at the cannabinoid type 1 and 2 receptors. PMID:28750815

  9. Experimental and molecular dynamic simulation study of perfluorooctane sulfonate adsorption on soil and sediment components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiming; Yan, Wei; Jing, Chuanyong

    2015-03-01

    Soil and sediment play a crucial role in the fate and transport of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in the environment. However, the molecular mechanisms of major soil/sediment components on PFOS adsorption remain unclear. This study experimentally isolated three major components in soil/sediment: humin/kerogen, humic/fulvic acid (HA/FA), and inorganic component after removing organics, and explored their contributions to PFOS adsorption using batch adsorption experiments and molecular dynamic simulations. The results suggest that the humin/kerogen component dominated the PFOS adsorption due to its aliphatic features where hydrophobic effect and phase transfer are the primary adsorption mechanism. Compared with the humin/kerogen, the HA/FA component contributed less to the PFOS adsorption because of its hydrophilic and polar characteristics. The electrostatic repulsion between the polar groups of HA/FA and PFOS anions was attributable to the reduced PFOS adsorption. When the soil organic matter was extracted, the inorganic component also plays a non-negligible role because PFOS molecules might form surface complexes on SiO2 surface. The findings obtained in this study illustrate the contribution of organic matters in soils and sediments to PFOS adsorption and provided new perspective to understanding the adsorption process of PFOS on micro-interface in the environment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Coalescence of silver unidimensional structures by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez A, M.; Gutierrez W, C.E.; Mondragon, G.; Arenas, J.

    2007-01-01

    The study of nanoparticles coalescence and silver nano rods phenomena by means of molecular dynamics simulation under the thermodynamic laws is reported. In this work we focus ourselves to see the conditions under which the one can be given one dimension growth of silver nano rods for the coalescence phenomenon among two nano rods or one nano rod and one particle; what allows us to study those structural, dynamic and morphological properties of the silver nano rods to different thermodynamic conditions. The simulations are carried out using the Sutton-Chen potentials of interaction of many bodies that allow to obtain appropriate results with the real physical systems. (Author)

  11. Study on the Characteristics of Gas Molecular Mean Free Pathin Nanopores by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixin Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents studies on the characteristics of gas molecular mean freepath in nanopores by molecular dynamics simulation. Our study results indicate that themean free path of all molecules in nanopores depend on both the radius of the nanoporeand the gas-solid interaction strength. Besides mean free path of all molecules in thenanopore, this paper highlights the gas molecular mean free path at different positions ofthe nanopore and the anisotropy of the gas molecular mean free path at nanopores. Themolecular mean free path varies with the molecule’s distance from the center of thenanopore. The least value of the mean free path occurs at the wall surface of the nanopore.The present paper found that the gas molecular mean free path is anisotropic when gas isconfined in nanopores. The radial gas molecular mean free path is much smaller than themean free path including all molecular collisions occuring in three directions. Our studyresults also indicate that when gas is confined in nanopores the gas molecule number densitydoes not affect the gas molecular mean free path in the same way as it does for the gas inunbounded space. These study results may bring new insights into understanding the gasflow’s characteristic at nanoscale.

  12. Balancing an accurate representation of the molecular surface in generalized Born formalisms with integrator stability in molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chocholoušová, Jana; Feig, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 6 (2006), s. 719-729 ISSN 0192-8651 Keywords : molecular surface * generalized Born formalisms * molecular dynamic simulations Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.893, year: 2006

  13. Molecular Dynamics and Electron Density Studies of Siderophores and Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidelis, Krzysztof Andrzej

    1990-08-01

    The dissertation comprises three separate studies of siderophores and peptides. In the first of these studies the relative potential energies for a series of diastereomers of a siderophore neocoprogen I are evaluated with molecular mechanics force field methods. Charges on the hydroxamate moiety are determined with a synthetic model siderophore compound using valence population refinements, and alternatively, with the theoretical ab initio/ESP calculations. The single diastereomer found in the crystal structure is among four characterized by the low potential energy, while prevalence of Delta vs. Lambda configuration about the iron is found to be a property of the entire series. In the second study the crystal structure of a ferrichrome siderophore ferrirhodin is reported. The crystal structure conformation of the molecular backbone as well as the iron coordination geometry compare well with other ferrichrome structures. The differences between the acyl groups of ferrirubin and ferrirhodin are explored using the methods of molecular mechanics. The third study a 300 ps, 300 K, in vacuo molecular dynamics simulation of didemnin A and B yields distinct molecular conformers, which are different from the one found in the crystal structure or modeled in solution, using the Nuclear Overhauser Effect data. Evaluations of the relative potential energy are performed with short 10 ps simulations in solution. Didemnins are natural depsipeptides isolated from a Caribbean tunicate and characterized by particularly potent antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activity. Conformationally rigid and flexible regions of the molecule are described. A short review of the molecular mechanics methodology is given in the introduction.

  14. Statistical ensembles and molecular dynamics studies of anisotropic solids. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, J.R.; Rahman, A.

    1985-01-01

    We have recently discussed how the Parrinello--Rahman theory can be brought into accord with the theory of the elastic and thermodynamic behavior of anisotropic media. This involves the isoenthalpic--isotension ensemble of statistical mechanics. Nose has developed a canonical ensemble form of molecular dynamics. We combine Nose's ideas with the Parrinello--Rahman theory to obtain a canonical form of molecular dynamics appropriate to the study of anisotropic media subjected to arbitrary external stress. We employ this isothermal--isotension ensemble in a study of a fcc→ close-packed structural phase transformation in a Lennard-Jones solid subjected to uniaxial compression. Our interpretation of the Nose theory does not involve a scaling of the time variable. This latter fact leads to simplifications when studying the time dependence of quantities

  15. Optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhizhin, GN

    1995-01-01

    The current volume is a single topic volume on the optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals. The book is divided into two parts. Part I covers both the theoretical and experimental investigations of organic crystals. Part II deals with the investigation of the structure, phase transitions and reorientational motion of molecules in organic crystals. In addition appendices are given which provide the parameters for the calculation of the lattice dynamics of molecular crystals, procedures for the calculation of frequency eigenvectors of utilizing computers, and the frequencies and eigenvectors of lattice modes for several organic crystals. Quite a large amount of Russian literature is cited, some of which has previously not been available to scientists in the West.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of polyacrylamides in potassium montmorillonite clay hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junfang; Rivero, Mayela; Choi, S K

    2007-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for polyacrylamide in potassium montmorillonite clay-aqueous systems. Interlayer molecular structure and dynamics properties are investigated. The number density profile, radial distribution function, root-mean-square deviation (RMSD), mean-square displacement (MSD) and diffusion coefficient are reported. The calculations are conducted in constant NVT ensembles, at T = 300 K and with layer spacing of 40 A. Our simulation results showed that polyacrylamides had little impact on the structure of interlayer water. Density profiles and radial distribution function indicated that hydration shells were formed. In the presence of polyacrylamides more potassium counterions move close to the clay surface while water molecules move away, indicating that potassium counterions are hydrated to a lesser extent than the system in which no polyacrylamides were added. The diffusion coefficients for potassium and water decreased when polyacrylamides were added

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of polyacrylamides in potassium montmorillonite clay hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Junfang [CSIRO Petroleum Resources, Ian Wark Laboratory, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Rivero, Mayela [CSIRO Petroleum, PO Box 1130, Bentley, Western Australia, 6102 (Australia); Choi, S K [CSIRO Petroleum Resources, Ian Wark Laboratory, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2007-02-14

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for polyacrylamide in potassium montmorillonite clay-aqueous systems. Interlayer molecular structure and dynamics properties are investigated. The number density profile, radial distribution function, root-mean-square deviation (RMSD), mean-square displacement (MSD) and diffusion coefficient are reported. The calculations are conducted in constant NVT ensembles, at T = 300 K and with layer spacing of 40 A. Our simulation results showed that polyacrylamides had little impact on the structure of interlayer water. Density profiles and radial distribution function indicated that hydration shells were formed. In the presence of polyacrylamides more potassium counterions move close to the clay surface while water molecules move away, indicating that potassium counterions are hydrated to a lesser extent than the system in which no polyacrylamides were added. The diffusion coefficients for potassium and water decreased when polyacrylamides were added.

  18. Molecular Modeling of Enzyme Dynamics Towards Understanding Solvent Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar

    ) in water and organic solvents. The effects of solvent on structural and dynamical enzyme properties are studied, and special attention is given to how enzyme properties in organic solvents are affected by the hydration level, which is shown to be related to the water activity. In experimental studies...... of enzyme kinetics in non-aqueous media, it has been a fruitful approach to fix the enzyme hydration level by controlling the water activity of the medium. In this work, a protocol is therefore developed for determining the water activity in non-aqueous protein simulations. The method relies on determining......This thesis describes the development of a molecular simulation methodology to study properties of enzymes in non-aqueous media at fixed thermodynamic water activities. The methodology is applied in a molecular dynamics study of the industrially important enzyme Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB...

  19. Accretion dynamics and polarized x-ray emission of magnetized neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arons, J.

    1991-01-01

    The basic ideas of accretion onto magnetized neutron stars are outlined. These are applied to a simple model of the structure of the plasma mound sitting at the magnetic poles of such as star, in which upward diffusion of photons is balanced by their downward advection. This steady flow model of the plasma's dynamical state is used to compute the emission of polarized X-rays from the optically thick, birefringent medium. The linear polarization of the continuum radiation emerging from the quasi-static mound is found to be as much as 40% at some rotation phases, but is insensitive to the geometry of the accretion flow. The role of the accretion shock, whose detailed polarimetric and spectral characteristics have yet to be calculated, is emphasized as the final determinant of the properties of the emerging X-rays. Some results describing the fully time dependent dynamics of the flow are also presented. In particular, steady flow onto a neutron star is shown to exhibit formation of ''photon bubbles,'' regions of greatly reduced plasma density filled with radiation which form and rise on millisecond time scales. The possible role of these complex structures in the flow for the formation of the emergent spectrum is briefly outlined

  20. Hole dynamics and spin currents after ionization in strong circularly polarized laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, Ingo; Smirnova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    We apply the time-dependent analytical R-matrix theory to develop a movie of hole motion in a Kr atom upon ionization by strong circularly polarized field. We find rich hole dynamics, ranging from rotation to swinging motion. The motion of the hole depends on the final energy and the spin of the photoelectron and can be controlled by the laser frequency and intensity. Crucially, hole rotation is a purely non-adiabatic effect, completely missing in the framework of quasistatic (adiabatic) tunneling theories. We explore the possibility to use hole rotation as a clock for measuring ionization time. Analyzing the relationship between the relative phases in different ionization channels we show that in the case of short-range electron-core interaction the hole is always initially aligned along the instantaneous direction of the laser field, signifying zero delays in ionization. Finally, we show that strong-field ionization in circular fields creates spin currents (i.e. different flow of spin-up and spin-down density in space) in the ions. This phenomenon is intimately related to the production of spin-polarized electrons in strong laser fields Barth and Smirnova (2013 Phys. Rev. A 88 013401). We demonstrate that rich spin dynamics of electrons and holes produced during strong field ionization can occur in typical experimental conditions and does not require relativistic intensities or strong magnetic fields. (paper)

  1. Distribution and dynamics of laser-polarized (129)Xe magnetization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, S D; Rosen, M S; Coulter, K P; Welsh, R C; Chupp, T E

    1999-12-01

    The first magnetic resonance imaging studies of laser-polarized (129)Xe, dissolved in the blood and tissue of the lungs and the heart of Sprague-Dawley rats, are described. (129)Xe resonances at 0, 192, 199, and 210 ppm were observed and assigned to xenon in gas, fat, tissue, and blood, respectively. One-dimensional chemical-shift imaging (CSI) reveals xenon magnetization in the brain, kidney, and lungs. Coronal and axial two-dimensional CSI show (129)Xe dissolved in blood and tissue in the thorax. Images of the blood resonance show xenon in the lungs and the heart ventricle. Images of the tissue resonance reveal xenon in lung parenchyma and myocardium. The (129)Xe spectrum from a voxel located in the heart ventricle shows a single blood resonance. Time-resolved spectroscopy shows that the dynamics of the blood resonance match the dynamics of the gas resonance and demonstrates efficient diffusion of xenon gas to the lung parenchyma and then to pulmonary blood. These observations demonstrate the utility of laser-polarized (129)Xe to detect exchange across the gas-blood barrier in the lungs and perfusion into myocardial tissue. Applications to measurement of lung function, kidney perfusion, myocardial perfusion, and regional cerebral blood flow are discussed. Magn Reson Med 42:1137-1145, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Dynamics and Morphology of Saturn’s North Polar Region During Cassini’s Final Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, John J.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ewald, Shawn; McCabe, Ryan M.; Gunnarson, Jacob; Garland, Justin; Gallego, Angelina

    2017-10-01

    We present an analysis of Saturn’s north polar region utilizing Cassini ISS images captured in visible and near-infrared wavelengths during late 2016 and 2017, including images captured during Cassini’s Grand Finale orbits. To measure the wind field in the region, we utilize the two-dimensional correlation imaging velocimetry (CIV) technique. We also calculate the relative vorticity and divergence from the wind field. To detect changes in the dynamics, we compare measurements of the wind, relative vorticity, and divergence in 2012 and 2013 with those from 2016/2017. We also compare cloud reflectivity between 2012/2013 and 2016/2017 in images that show the north pole under similar illumination conditions. To detect changes in cloud reflectivity, we utilize a Minnaert correction to calculate the zonal mean reflectivity as a function of latitude. Furthermore, we compare the winds and cloud reflectivity at several wavelengths in order to look for changes occurring at different altitudes. Our results indicate that while the dynamics of the north polar region have remained relatively stable, there have been significant morphology changes that have resulted in dramatic color changes. We hypothesize that these changes are a result of the seasonal cycle and linked to the increased production of photochemical hazes in the atmosphere. Our work has been supported by NASA PATM NNX14AK07G, NSF AAG 1212216, and NASA NESSF NNX15AQ70H.

  3. Dynamic exposure model analysis of continuous laser direct writing in Polar-coordinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan; Lv, Yingjun; Mao, Wenjie

    2018-01-01

    In order to exactly predict the continuous laser direct writing quality in Polar-coordinate, we take into consideration the effect of the photoresist absorbing beam energy, the Gaussian attribute of the writing beam and the dynamic exposure process, and establish a dynamic exposure model to describe the influence of the tangential velocity of the normal incident facular center and laser power on the line width and sidewall angle. Numerical simulation results indicate that while writing velocity remains unchanged, the line width and sidewall angle are all increased as the laser power increases; while laser power remains unchanged, the line width and sidewall angle are all decreased as the writing velocity increases; at the same time the line profile in the exposure section is asymmetry and the center of the line has tiny excursion toward the Polar-coordinate origin compared with the facular center. Then it is necessary to choose the right writing velocity and laser power to obtain the ideal line profile. The model makes up the shortcomings of traditional models that can only predict line width or estimate the profile of the writing line in the absence of photoresist absorption, and can be considered as an effect analysis method for optimizing the parameters of fabrication technique of laser direct writing.

  4. Surface Effect on Oil Transportation in Nanochannel: a Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haixia; Du, Yonggang; Xue, Qingzhong; Zhu, Lei; Li, Xiaofang; Lu, Shuangfang; Jin, Yakang

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics mechanism of oil transportation in nanochannel using molecular dynamics simulations. It is demonstrated that the interaction between oil molecules and nanochannel has a great effect on the transportation properties of oil in nanochannel. Because of different interactions between oil molecules and channel, the center of mass (COM) displacement of oil in a 6-nm channel is over 30 times larger than that in a 2-nm channel, and the diffusion coefficient of oil molecules at the center of a 6-nm channel is almost two times more than that near the channel surface. Besides, it is found that polarity of oil molecules has the effect on impeding oil transportation, because the electrostatic interaction between polar oil molecules and channel is far larger than that between nonpolar oil molecules and channel. In addition, channel component is found to play an important role in oil transportation in nanochannel, for example, the COM displacement of oil in gold channel is very few due to great interaction between oil and gold substrate. It is also found that nano-sized roughness of channel surface greatly influences the speed and flow pattern of oil. Our findings would contribute to revealing the mechanism of oil transportation in nanochannels and therefore are very important for design of oil extraction in nanochannels.

  5. Study of lanthanide tri-cations in aqueous solution by molecular dynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvail, M.

    2007-11-01

    This is essentially a lanthanide tri-cation hydration study by means of classical molecular dynamics (CLMD) simulations using explicit polarization. Explicit polarization is calculated with a Car-Parrinello type of dynamics on induced dipoles, which decreases the CPU time as compared to the self-consistent resolution. Several pair interaction potentials are parametrized from ab initio calculations (MP2) and tested for the La 3+ -OH 2 interaction. The best results are obtained with an exponential-6 Buckingham potential. Next, the La 3+ -OH 2 interaction potential parameters are extrapolated to the other Ln 3+ -OH 2 interactions, only by using the ionic radii. The CLMD results reproduce the reliable experimental data (EXAFS distances), and the sigmoidal variation of the coordination number (with S shape), from 9 for La 3+ to 8 for Lu 3+ . This variation is explained by the linear variation of DrG0 (9,298) vs. atomic number. Insights are also given on the Co 2+ hydration, CPMD simulations, reconstruction of EXAFS signal from MD simulations, and OH - complexation of La 3+ in aqueous solution. (author)

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Supercooled Water: An Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Niall J; Tse, John S

    2014-11-06

    The thermal conductivity of both supercooled and ambient-temperature water at atmospheric pressure has been computed over the 140-270 K temperature range for three popular water models via equilibrium molecular dynamics in the Green-Kubo setting. No strong temperature dependence of thermal conductivity was observed. The underlying phonon modes contributing to thermal conduction processes have been examined in the present work, and it has been established that (translational) acoustic modes dominate in supercooled water.

  7. Thermal Transport in Fullerene Derivatives Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Liang; Wang, Xiaojia; Kumar, Satish

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effects of alkyl chain on the thermal properties of fullerene derivatives, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the thermal conductivity of fullerene (C60) and its derivative phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The results of non-equilibrium MD simulations show a length-dependent thermal conductivity for C60 but not for PCBM. The thermal conductivity of C60, obtained from the linear extrapolation of inverse conductivity vs. inverse length cu...

  8. Spin dynamics of an ultra-small nanoscale molecular magnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciftja Orion

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe present mathematical transformations which allow us to calculate the spin dynamics of an ultra-small nanoscale molecular magnet consisting of a dimer system of classical (high Heisenberg spins. We derive exact analytic expressions (in integral form for the time-dependent spin autocorrelation function and several other quantities. The properties of the time-dependent spin autocorrelation function in terms of various coupling parameters and temperature are discussed in detail.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of freezing of water and salt solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrbka, Luboš; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 1 (2007), s. 64-70 ISSN 0167-7322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR(CZ) GD203/05/H001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ice freezing * salt ions * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.982, year: 2007

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline nickel: structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swygenhoven, H. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Caro, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1997-09-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of low temperature elastic and plastic deformation of Ni nanophase samples (3-7 nm) are performed. The samples are polycrystals nucleated from different seeds, with random locations and orientations. Bulk and Young`s modulus, onset of plastic deformation and mechanism responsible for the plastic behaviour are studied and compared with the behaviour of coarse grained samples. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  11. Reliable Approximation of Long Relaxation Timescales in Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many interesting rare events in molecular systems, like ligand association, protein folding or conformational changes, occur on timescales that often are not accessible by direct numerical simulation. Therefore, rare event approximation approaches like interface sampling, Markov state model building, or advanced reaction coordinate-based free energy estimation have attracted huge attention recently. In this article we analyze the reliability of such approaches. How precise is an estimate of long relaxation timescales of molecular systems resulting from various forms of rare event approximation methods? Our results give a theoretical answer to this question by relating it with the transfer operator approach to molecular dynamics. By doing so we also allow for understanding deep connections between the different approaches.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of ion mobility in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Rui; Dodds, Eric D.; Li, Hui

    2018-02-01

    A force field molecular dynamics method is developed to directly simulate ion drift in buffer gases driven by an electric field. The ion mobility and collision cross sections (CCSs) with relevance to ion mobility spectrometry can be obtained from the simulated drift velocity in high-density buffer gases (pressure ˜50 bars) and high electric fields (˜107 V/m). Compared to trajectory methods, the advantage of the molecular dynamics method is that it can simultaneously sample the internal dynamic motions of the ion and the ion-gas collisions. For ions with less than 100 atoms, the simulated collision cross section values can be converged to within ±1%-2% by running a 100 ns simulation for 5-19 h using one computer core. By using a set of element-based Lennard-Jones parameters that are not tuned for different atomic types in different molecules, the simulated collision cross sections for 15 small molecular ions (number of atoms ranging from 17 to 85, mass ranging from 74.1 to 609.4 g/mol) are consistent with experimental values: the mean unsigned error is 2.6 Å2 for He buffer gas and 4.4 Å2 for N2 buffer gas. The sensitivity of the simulated CCS values to random diffusion, drift velocity, electric field strength, temperature, and buffer gas density is examined.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, C.; Salvalaglio, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  14. Non-Adiabatic Molecular Dynamics Methods for Materials Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furche, Filipp [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Parker, Shane M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Muuronen, Mikko J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Roy, Saswata [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-04-04

    The flow of radiative energy in light-driven materials such as photosensitizer dyes or photocatalysts is governed by non-adiabatic transitions between electronic states and cannot be described within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation commonly used in electronic structure theory. The non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) methods based on Tully surface hopping and time-dependent density functional theory developed in this project have greatly extended the range of molecular materials that can be tackled by NAMD simulations. New algorithms to compute molecular excited state and response properties efficiently were developed. Fundamental limitations of common non-linear response methods were discovered and characterized. Methods for accurate computations of vibronic spectra of materials such as black absorbers were developed and applied. It was shown that open-shell TDDFT methods capture bond breaking in NAMD simulations, a longstanding challenge for single-reference molecular dynamics simulations. The methods developed in this project were applied to study the photodissociation of acetaldehyde and revealed that non-adiabatic effects are experimentally observable in fragment kinetic energy distributions. Finally, the project enabled the first detailed NAMD simulations of photocatalytic water oxidation by titania nanoclusters, uncovering the mechanism of this fundamentally important reaction for fuel generation and storage.

  15. Molecular reorientation in cross polarization gratings formed in thin photoreactive-polymer-liquid-crystal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Hiroshi [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)], E-mail: onoh@nagaokaut.ac.jp; Hatayama, Akira; Emoto, Akira [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro [Department of Materials Science and Chemistry, Himeji Institute of Technology, 2167 Shosha, Himeji 671-2201 (Japan)

    2008-04-30

    We present the results from some experimental and theoretical studies aimed at revealing the mechanism leading to the diffraction properties of two-dimensional cross polarization gratings in photocrosslinkable polymer liquid crystals. Although the polarization gratings are overwritten at the same place, each polarization grating works independently in our material system. The above-mentioned characteristic of our cross polarization gratings originates in the grating formation mechanism in the photocrosslinkable polymer liquid crystals, in which the molecules in the solid-state polymeric materials are not reoriented during exposure and reorientation is generated during the annealing process after multiple exposure.

  16. Protein Dynamics in Organic Media at Varying Water Activity Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar; Abildskov, Jens; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2012-01-01

    relies on determining the water content of the bulk phase and uses a combination of Kirkwood−Buff theory and free energy calculations to determine corresponding activity coefficients. We apply the method in a molecular dynamics study of Candida antarctica lipase B in pure water and the organic solvents......In nonaqueous enzymology, control of enzyme hydration is commonly approached by fixing the thermodynamic water activity of the medium. In this work, we present a strategy for evaluating the water activity in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in water/organic solvent mixtures. The method...

  17. Molecular dynamics algorithms for path integrals at constant pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyna, Glenn J.; Hughes, Adam; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    1999-02-01

    Extended system path integral molecular dynamics algorithms have been developed that can generate efficiently averages in the quantum mechanical canonical ensemble [M. E. Tuckerman, B. J. Berne, G. J. Martyna, and M. L. Klein, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 2796 (1993)]. Here, the corresponding extended system path integral molecular dynamics algorithms appropriate to the quantum mechanical isothermal-isobaric ensembles with isotropic-only and full system cell fluctuations are presented. The former ensemble is employed to study fluid systems which do not support shear modes while the latter is employed to study solid systems. The algorithms are constructed by deriving appropriate dynamical equations of motions and developing reversible multiple time step algorithms to integrate the equations numerically. Effective parallelization schemes for distributed memory computers are presented. The new numerical methods are tested on model (a particle in a periodic potential) and realistic (liquid and solid para-hydrogen and liquid butane) systems. In addition, the methodology is extended to treat the path integral centroid dynamics scheme, [J. Cao and G. A. Voth, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 10070 (1993)], a novel method which is capable of generating semiclassical approximations to quantum mechanical time correlation functions.

  18. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear pasta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D.; Briggs, C.; Chapman, M.; Clark, E.; Schneider, A.

    2014-09-01

    We report large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear pasta using from 50,000 to more than 3,000,000 nucleons. We use a simple phenomenological two-nucleon potential that reproduces nuclear saturation. We find a complex ``nuclear waffle'' phase in addition to more conventional rod, plate, and sphere phases. We also find long-lived topological defects involving screw like dislocations that may reduce the electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity of lasagna phases. From MD trajectories we calculate a variety of quantities including static structure factor, dynamical response function, shear modulus and breaking strain. We report large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear pasta using from 50,000 to more than 3,000,000 nucleons. We use a simple phenomenological two-nucleon potential that reproduces nuclear saturation. We find a complex ``nuclear waffle'' phase in addition to more conventional rod, plate, and sphere phases. We also find long-lived topological defects involving screw like dislocations that may reduce the electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity of lasagna phases. From MD trajectories we calculate a variety of quantities including static structure factor, dynamical response function, shear modulus and breaking strain. Supported in parts by DOE Grants No. DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and No. DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  19. The fluctuating ribosome: thermal molecular dynamics characterized by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccai, Giuseppe; Natali, Francesca; Peters, Judith; Řihová, Martina; Zimmerman, Ella; Ollivier, J.; Combet, J.; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada

    2016-11-01

    Conformational changes associated with ribosome function have been identified by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. These methods, however, inform poorly on timescales. Neutron scattering is well adapted for direct measurements of thermal molecular dynamics, the ‘lubricant’ for the conformational fluctuations required for biological activity. The method was applied to compare water dynamics and conformational fluctuations in the 30 S and 50 S ribosomal subunits from Haloarcula marismortui, under high salt, stable conditions. Similar free and hydration water diffusion parameters are found for both subunits. With respect to the 50 S subunit, the 30 S is characterized by a softer force constant and larger mean square displacements (MSD), which would facilitate conformational adjustments required for messenger and transfer RNA binding. It has been shown previously that systems from mesophiles and extremophiles are adapted to have similar MSD under their respective physiological conditions. This suggests that the results presented are not specific to halophiles in high salt but a general property of ribosome dynamics under corresponding, active conditions. The current study opens new perspectives for neutron scattering characterization of component functional molecular dynamics within the ribosome.

  20. The dynamics of molecular evolution over 60,000 generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Benjamin H; McDonald, Michael J; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Lenski, Richard E; Desai, Michael M

    2017-11-02

    The outcomes of evolution are determined by a stochastic dynamical process that governs how mutations arise and spread through a population. However, it is difficult to observe these dynamics directly over long periods and across entire genomes. Here we analyse the dynamics of molecular evolution in twelve experimental populations of Escherichia coli, using whole-genome metagenomic sequencing at five hundred-generation intervals through sixty thousand generations. Although the rate of fitness gain declines over time, molecular evolution is characterized by signatures of rapid adaptation throughout the duration of the experiment, with multiple beneficial variants simultaneously competing for dominance in each population. Interactions between ecological and evolutionary processes play an important role, as long-term quasi-stable coexistence arises spontaneously in most populations, and evolution continues within each clade. We also present evidence that the targets of natural selection change over time, as epistasis and historical contingency alter the strength of selection on different genes. Together, these results show that long-term adaptation to a constant environment can be a more complex and dynamic process than is often assumed.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in water/sugar solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerbret, A. [Department of Food Science, Cornell University, 101 Stocking Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Affouard, F. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)], E-mail: frederic.affouard@univ-lille1.fr; Bordat, P. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique et de Physico-Chimie Moleculaire, UMR 5624, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France); Hedoux, A.; Guinet, Y.; Descamps, M. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, Universite Lille I, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2008-04-18

    Structural and dynamical properties of the solvent at the protein/solvent interface have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in trehalose, maltose and sucrose solutions. Results are discussed in the framework of the bioprotection phenomena. The analysis of the relative concentration of water oxygen atoms around lysozyme suggests that lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. When comparing the three sugars, trehalose is seen more excluded than maltose and sucrose. The preferential exclusion of sugars from the protein surface induces some differences in the behavior of trehalose and maltose, particularly at 50 and 60 wt% concentrations, that are not observed experimentally in binary sugar/mixtures. The dynamical slowing down of the solvent is suggested to mainly arise from the homogeneity of the water/sugar matrices controlled by the percolation of the sugar hydrogen bonds networks. Furthermore, lysozyme strongly increases relaxation times of solvent molecules at the protein/solvent interface.

  2. Liquid-vapor coexistence by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranyai, Andras; Cummings, Peter T.

    2000-01-01

    We present a simple and consistent molecular dynamics algorithm for determining the equilibrium properties of a bulk liquid and its coexisting vapor phase. The simulation follows the dynamics of the two systems simultaneously while maintaining the volume and the number of particles of the composite system fixed. The thermostat can constrain either the total energy or the temperature at a desired value. Division of the extensive properties between the two phases is governed by the difference of the corresponding intensive state variables. Particle numbers are continuous variables and vary only in virtual sense, i.e., the real sizes of the two systems are the same and do not change during the course of the simulation. Calculation of the chemical potential is separate from the dynamics; thus, one can replace the particle exchange step with other method if it improves the efficiency of the code. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  3. A rotary nano ion pump: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrasebi, A; Feshanjerdi, M

    2012-09-01

    The dynamics of a rotary nano ion pump, inspired by the F (0) part of the F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase biomolecular motor, were investigated. This nanopump is composed of a rotor, which is constructed of two carbon nanotubes with benzene rings, and a stator, which is made of six graphene sheets. The molecular dynamics (MD) method was used to simulate the dynamics of the ion nanopump. When the rotor of the nanopump rotates mechanically, an ion gradient will be generated between the two sides of the nanopump. It is shown that the ion gradient generated by the nanopump is dependant on parameters such as the rotary frequency of the rotor, temperature and the amounts and locations of the positive and negative charges of the stator part of the nanopump. Also, an electrical potential difference is generated between the two sides of the pump as a result of its operation.

  4. Molecular dynamics of coalescence and collisions of silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara-Chapa, Enrique, E-mail: enrique_guevara@hotmail.com [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas (Mexico); Mejía-Rosales, Sergio [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Center for Innovation, Research and Development in Engineering and Technology (CIIDIT), and CICFIM-Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    We study how different relative orientations and impact velocity on the collision of two silver nanoparticles affect the first stages of the formation of a new, larger nanoparticle. In order to do this, we implemented a set of molecular dynamics simulations on the NVE ensemble on pairs of silver icosahedral nanoparticles at several relative orientations, that allowed us to follow the dynamics of the first nanoseconds of the coalescence processes. Using bond angle analysis, we found that the initial relative orientation of the twin planes has a critical role on the final stability of the resulting particle, and on the details of the dynamics itself. When the original particles have their closest twins aligned to each other, the formed nanoparticle will likely stabilize its structure onto a particle with a defined center and a low surface-to-volume ratio, while nanoparticles with misaligned twins will promote the formation of highly defective particles with a high inner energy.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in water/sugar solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerbret, A.; Affouard, F.; Bordat, P.; Hedoux, A.; Guinet, Y.; Descamps, M.

    2008-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of the solvent at the protein/solvent interface have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in trehalose, maltose and sucrose solutions. Results are discussed in the framework of the bioprotection phenomena. The analysis of the relative concentration of water oxygen atoms around lysozyme suggests that lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. When comparing the three sugars, trehalose is seen more excluded than maltose and sucrose. The preferential exclusion of sugars from the protein surface induces some differences in the behavior of trehalose and maltose, particularly at 50 and 60 wt% concentrations, that are not observed experimentally in binary sugar/mixtures. The dynamical slowing down of the solvent is suggested to mainly arise from the homogeneity of the water/sugar matrices controlled by the percolation of the sugar hydrogen bonds networks. Furthermore, lysozyme strongly increases relaxation times of solvent molecules at the protein/solvent interface

  6. Molecular diffusion of stable water isotopes in polar firn as a proxy for past temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Christian; Gkinis, Vasileios; Vinther, Bo M.

    2018-03-01

    Polar precipitation archived in ice caps contains information on past temperature conditions. Such information can be retrieved by measuring the water isotopic signals of δ18O and δD in ice cores. These signals have been attenuated during densification due to molecular diffusion in the firn column, where the magnitude of the diffusion is isotopologue specific and temperature dependent. By utilizing the differential diffusion signal, dual isotope measurements of δ18O and δD enable multiple temperature reconstruction techniques. This study assesses how well six different methods can be used to reconstruct past surface temperatures from the diffusion-based temperature proxies. Two of the methods are based on the single diffusion lengths of δ18O and δD , three of the methods employ the differential diffusion signal, while the last uses the ratio between the single diffusion lengths. All techniques are tested on synthetic data in order to evaluate their accuracy and precision. We perform a benchmark test to thirteen high resolution Holocene data sets from Greenland and Antarctica, which represent a broad range of mean annual surface temperatures and accumulation rates. Based on the benchmark test, we comment on the accuracy and precision of the methods. Both the benchmark test and the synthetic data test demonstrate that the most precise reconstructions are obtained when using the single isotope diffusion lengths, with precisions of approximately 1.0 °C . In the benchmark test, the single isotope diffusion lengths are also found to reconstruct consistent temperatures with a root-mean-square-deviation of 0.7 °C . The techniques employing the differential diffusion signals are more uncertain, where the most precise method has a precision of 1.9 °C . The diffusion length ratio method is the least precise with a precision of 13.7 °C . The absolute temperature estimates from this method are also shown to be highly sensitive to the choice of fractionation factor

  7. Estimating Allee dynamics before they can be observed: polar bears as a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter K Molnár

    Full Text Available Allee effects are an important component in the population dynamics of numerous species. Accounting for these Allee effects in population viability analyses generally requires estimates of low-density population growth rates, but such data are unavailable for most species and particularly difficult to obtain for large mammals. Here, we present a mechanistic modeling framework that allows estimating the expected low-density growth rates under a mate-finding Allee effect before the Allee effect occurs or can be observed. The approach relies on representing the mechanisms causing the Allee effect in a process-based model, which can be parameterized and validated from data on the mechanisms rather than data on population growth. We illustrate the approach using polar bears (Ursus maritimus, and estimate their expected low-density growth by linking a mating dynamics model to a matrix projection model. The Allee threshold, defined as the population density below which growth becomes negative, is shown to depend on age-structure, sex ratio, and the life history parameters determining reproduction and survival. The Allee threshold is thus both density- and frequency-dependent. Sensitivity analyses of the Allee threshold show that different combinations of the parameters determining reproduction and survival can lead to differing Allee thresholds, even if these differing combinations imply the same stable-stage population growth rate. The approach further shows how mate-limitation can induce long transient dynamics, even in populations that eventually grow to carrying capacity. Applying the models to the overharvested low-density polar bear population of Viscount Melville Sound, Canada, shows that a mate-finding Allee effect is a plausible mechanism for slow recovery of this population. Our approach is generalizable to any mating system and life cycle, and could aid proactive management and conservation strategies, for example, by providing a priori

  8. Estimating Allee dynamics before they can be observed: polar bears as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Péter K; Lewis, Mark A; Derocher, Andrew E

    2014-01-01

    Allee effects are an important component in the population dynamics of numerous species. Accounting for these Allee effects in population viability analyses generally requires estimates of low-density population growth rates, but such data are unavailable for most species and particularly difficult to obtain for large mammals. Here, we present a mechanistic modeling framework that allows estimating the expected low-density growth rates under a mate-finding Allee effect before the Allee effect occurs or can be observed. The approach relies on representing the mechanisms causing the Allee effect in a process-based model, which can be parameterized and validated from data on the mechanisms rather than data on population growth. We illustrate the approach using polar bears (Ursus maritimus), and estimate their expected low-density growth by linking a mating dynamics model to a matrix projection model. The Allee threshold, defined as the population density below which growth becomes negative, is shown to depend on age-structure, sex ratio, and the life history parameters determining reproduction and survival. The Allee threshold is thus both density- and frequency-dependent. Sensitivity analyses of the Allee threshold show that different combinations of the parameters determining reproduction and survival can lead to differing Allee thresholds, even if these differing combinations imply the same stable-stage population growth rate. The approach further shows how mate-limitation can induce long transient dynamics, even in populations that eventually grow to carrying capacity. Applying the models to the overharvested low-density polar bear population of Viscount Melville Sound, Canada, shows that a mate-finding Allee effect is a plausible mechanism for slow recovery of this population. Our approach is generalizable to any mating system and life cycle, and could aid proactive management and conservation strategies, for example, by providing a priori estimates of minimum

  9. Molecular design of responsive fluids: molecular dynamics studies of viscoelastic surfactant solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boek, E. S.; Jusufi, A.; Löwen, H.; Maitland, G. C.

    2002-10-01

    Understanding how macroscopic properties depend on intermolecular interactions for complex fluid systems is an enormous challenge in statistical mechanics. This issue is of particular importance for designing optimal industrial fluid formulations such as responsive oilfield fluids, based on viscoelastic surfactant solutions. We have carried out extensive molecular dynamics simulations, resolving the full chemical details in order to study how the structure of the lamellar phase of viscoelastic surfactant solutions depends on the head group (HG) chemistry of the surfactant. In particular, we consider anionic carboxylate and quaternary ammonium HGs with erucyl tails in aqueous solutions together with their sodium and chloride counterions at room temperature. We find a strong HG dependence of the lamellar structure as characterized by suitable pair correlation functions and density distributions. The depth of penetration of water into the bilayer membrane, the nature of counterion condensation on the HGs and even the order and correlation of the tails in the lamellae depend sensitively on the chemical details of the HG. We also determine the compressibility of the lamellar system as a first step to using atom-resolved molecular dynamics in order to link the molecular and macroscopic scales of length and time. The results give important insight into the links between molecular details and surfactant phase structure which is being exploited to develop more systematic procedures for the molecular design and formulation of industrial systems.

  10. Machine learning molecular dynamics for the simulation of infrared spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastegger, Michael; Behler, Jörg; Marquetand, Philipp

    2017-10-01

    Machine learning has emerged as an invaluable tool in many research areas. In the present work, we harness this power to predict highly accurate molecular infrared spectra with unprecedented computational efficiency. To account for vibrational anharmonic and dynamical effects - typically neglected by conventional quantum chemistry approaches - we base our machine learning strategy on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. While these simulations are usually extremely time consuming even for small molecules, we overcome these limitations by leveraging the power of a variety of machine learning techniques, not only accelerating simulations by several orders of magnitude, but also greatly extending the size of systems that can be treated. To this end, we develop a molecular dipole moment model based on environment dependent neural network charges and combine it with the neural network potential approach of Behler and Parrinello. Contrary to the prevalent big data philosophy, we are able to obtain very accurate machine learning models for the prediction of infrared spectra based on only a few hundreds of electronic structure reference points. This is made possible through the use of molecular forces during neural network potential training and the introduction of a fully automated sampling scheme. We demonstrate the power of our machine learning approach by applying it to model the infrared spectra of a methanol molecule, n -alkanes containing up to 200 atoms and the protonated alanine tripeptide, which at the same time represents the first application of machine learning techniques to simulate the dynamics of a peptide. In all of these case studies we find an excellent agreement between the infrared spectra predicted via machine learning models and the respective theoretical and experimental spectra.

  11. Haber Process Made Efficient by Hydroxylated Graphene: Ab Initio Thermochemistry and Reactive Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-07-07

    The Haber-Bosch process is the main industrial method for producing ammonia from diatomic nitrogen and hydrogen. We use a combination of ab initio thermochemical analysis and reactive molecular dynamics to demonstrate that a significant increase in the ammonia production yield can be achieved using hydroxylated graphene and related species. Exploiting the polarity difference between N2/H2 and NH3, as well as the universal proton acceptor behavior of NH3, we demonstrate a strong shift of the equilibrium of the Haber-Bosch process toward ammonia (ca. 50 kJ mol(-1) enthalpy gain and ca. 60-70 kJ mol(-1) free energy gain). The modified process is of significant importance to the chemical industry.

  12. Molecular origin of limiting shear stress of elastohydrodynamic lubrication oil film studied by molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washizu, Hitoshi; Ohmori, Toshihide; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2017-06-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of an elastohydrodynamic lubrication oil film are performed to study the effect of pressure. Fluid molecules of n-hexane are confined between two solid plates under a constant normal force of 0.1-8.0 GPa. Traction simulations are performed by applying relative sliding motion to the solid plates. A transition in the traction behavior is observed around 0.5-2.0 GPa, which corresponds to the viscoelastic region to the plastic-elastic region, which are experimentally observed. This phase transition is related to the suppression of the fluctuation in molecular motion.

  13. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods: introduction and recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Voter, Arthur F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perez, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shim, Y [UNIV OF TOLEDO; Amar, J G [UNIV OF TOLEDO

    2009-01-01

    A long-standing limitation in the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is that it can only be applied directly to processes that take place on very short timescales: nanoseconds if empirical potentials are employed, or picoseconds if we rely on electronic structure methods. Many processes of interest in chemistry, biochemistry, and materials science require study over microseconds and beyond, due either to the natural timescale for the evolution or to the duration of the experiment of interest. Ignoring the case of liquids xxx, the dynamics on these time scales is typically characterized by infrequent-event transitions, from state to state, usually involving an energy barrier. There is a long and venerable tradition in chemistry of using transition state theory (TST) [10, 19, 23] to directly compute rate constants for these kinds of activated processes. If needed dynamical corrections to the TST rate, and even quantum corrections, can be computed to achieve an accuracy suitable for the problem at hand. These rate constants then allow them to understand the system behavior on longer time scales than we can directly reach with MD. For complex systems with many reaction paths, the TST rates can be fed into a stochastic simulation procedure such as kinetic Monte Carlo xxx, and a direct simulation of the advance of the system through its possible states can be obtained in a probabilistically exact way. A problem that has become more evident in recent years, however, is that for many systems of interest there is a complexity that makes it difficult, if not impossible, to determine all the relevant reaction paths to which TST should be applied. This is a serious issue, as omitted transition pathways can have uncontrollable consequences on the simulated long-time kinetics. Over the last decade or so, we have been developing a new class of methods for treating the long-time dynamics in these complex, infrequent-event systems. Rather than trying to guess in advance what

  14. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods: introduction and recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Voter, Arthur F.; Perez, Danny; Shim, Y.; Amar, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    A long-standing limitation in the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is that it can only be applied directly to processes that take place on very short timescales: nanoseconds if empirical potentials are employed, or picoseconds if we rely on electronic structure methods. Many processes of interest in chemistry, biochemistry, and materials science require study over microseconds and beyond, due either to the natural timescale for the evolution or to the duration of the experiment of interest. Ignoring the case of liquids xxx, the dynamics on these time scales is typically characterized by infrequent-event transitions, from state to state, usually involving an energy barrier. There is a long and venerable tradition in chemistry of using transition state theory (TST) (10, 19, 23) to directly compute rate constants for these kinds of activated processes. If needed dynamical corrections to the TST rate, and even quantum corrections, can be computed to achieve an accuracy suitable for the problem at hand. These rate constants then allow them to understand the system behavior on longer time scales than we can directly reach with MD. For complex systems with many reaction paths, the TST rates can be fed into a stochastic simulation procedure such as kinetic Monte Carlo xxx, and a direct simulation of the advance of the system through its possible states can be obtained in a probabilistically exact way. A problem that has become more evident in recent years, however, is that for many systems of interest there is a complexity that makes it difficult, if not impossible, to determine all the relevant reaction paths to which TST should be applied. This is a serious issue, as omitted transition pathways can have uncontrollable consequences on the simulated long-time kinetics. Over the last decade or so, we have been developing a new class of methods for treating the long-time dynamics in these complex, infrequent-event systems. Rather than trying to guess in advance what

  15. Modification of S-Adenosyl-l-Homocysteine as Inhibitor of Nonstructural Protein 5 Methyltransferase Dengue Virus Through Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Nasution, Mochammad Arfin Fardiansyah; Azhima, Fauziah; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Toepak, Erwin Prasetya; Idrus, Syarifuddin; Kerami, Djati

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever is still a major threat worldwide, approximately threatening two-fifths of the world's population in tropical and subtropical countries. Nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) methyltransferase enzyme plays a vital role in the process of messenger RNA capping of dengue by transferring methyl groups from S -adenosyl-l-methionine to N7 atom of the guanine bases of RNA and the RNA ribose group of 2'OH, resulting in S -adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH). The modification of SAH compound was screened using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation, along with computational ADME-Tox (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity) test. The 2 simulations were performed using Molecular Operating Environment (MOE) 2008.10 software, whereas the ADME-Tox test was performed using various software. The modification of SAH compound was done using several functional groups that possess different polarities and properties, resulting in 3460 ligands to be docked. After conducting docking simulation, we earned 3 best ligands (SAH-M331, SAH-M2696, and SAH-M1356) based on ΔG binding and molecular interactions, which show better results than the standard ligands. Moreover, the results of molecular dynamics simulation show that the best ligands are still able to maintain the active site residue interaction with the binding site until the end of the simulation. After a series of molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation were performed, we concluded that SAH-M1356 ligand is the most potential SAH-based compound to inhibit NS5 methyltransferase enzyme for treating dengue fever.

  16. Modification of -Adenosyl--Homocysteine as Inhibitor of Nonstructural Protein 5 Methyltransferase Dengue Virus Through Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Sumo Friend Tambunan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is still a major threat worldwide, approximately threatening two-fifths of the world’s population in tropical and subtropical countries. Nonstructural protein 5 (NS5 methyltransferase enzyme plays a vital role in the process of messenger RNA capping of dengue by transferring methyl groups from S -adenosyl- l -methionine to N7 atom of the guanine bases of RNA and the RNA ribose group of 2′OH, resulting in S -adenosyl- l -homocysteine (SAH. The modification of SAH compound was screened using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation, along with computational ADME-Tox (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity test. The 2 simulations were performed using Molecular Operating Environment (MOE 2008.10 software, whereas the ADME-Tox test was performed using various software. The modification of SAH compound was done using several functional groups that possess different polarities and properties, resulting in 3460 ligands to be docked. After conducting docking simulation, we earned 3 best ligands (SAH-M331, SAH-M2696, and SAH-M1356 based on ΔG binding and molecular interactions, which show better results than the standard ligands. Moreover, the results of molecular dynamics simulation show that the best ligands are still able to maintain the active site residue interaction with the binding site until the end of the simulation. After a series of molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation were performed, we concluded that SAH-M1356 ligand is the most potential SAH-based compound to inhibit NS5 methyltransferase enzyme for treating dengue fever.

  17. Molecular dynamics study of response of liquid N,N-dimethylformamide to externally applied electric field using a polarizable force field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Weimin; Niu, Haitao; Lin, Tong; Wang, Xungai; Kong, Lingxue [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds VIC 3216 (Australia)

    2014-01-28

    The behavior of Liquid N,N-dimethylformamide subjected to a wide range of externally applied electric fields (from 0.001 V/nm to 1 V/nm) has been investigated through molecular dynamics simulation. To approach the objective the AMOEBA polarizable force field was extended to include the interaction of the external electric field with atomic partial charges and the contribution to the atomic polarization. The simulation results were evaluated with quantum mechanical calculations. The results from the present force field for the liquid at normal conditions were compared with the experimental and molecular dynamics results with non-polarizable and other polarizable force fields. The uniform external electric fields of higher than 0.01 V/nm have a significant effect on the structure of the liquid, which exhibits a variation in numerous properties, including molecular polarization, local cluster structure, rotation, alignment, energetics, and bulk thermodynamic and structural properties.

  18. Structural polarity and dynamics of male germline stem cells in an insect (milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, David C; Dorn, August

    2008-01-01

    Knowing the structure opens a door for a better understanding of function because there is no function without structure. Male germline stem cells (GSCs) of the milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) exhibit a very extraordinary structure and a very special relationship with their niche, the apical cells. This structural relationship is strikingly different from that known in the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) -- the most successful model system, which allowed deep insights into the signaling interactions between GSCs and niche. The complex structural polarity of male GSCs in the milkweed bug combined with their astonishing dynamics suggest that cell morphology and dynamics are causally related with the most important regulatory processes that take place between GSCs and niche and ensure maintenance, proliferation, and differentiation of GSCs in accordance with the temporal need of mature sperm. The intricate structure of the GSCs of the milkweed bug (and probably of some other insects, i.e., moths) is only accessible by electron microscopy. But, studying singular sections through the apical complex (i.e., GSCs and apical cells) is not sufficient to obtain a full picture of the GSCs; especially, the segregation of projection terminals is not tangible. Only serial sections and their overlay can establish whether membrane ingrowths merely constrict projections or whether a projection terminal is completely cut off. To sequence the GSC dynamics, it is necessary to include juvenile stages, when the processes start and the GSCs occur in small numbers. The fine structural analysis of segregating projection terminals suggests that these terminals undergo autophagocytosis. Autophagosomes can be labeled by markers. We demonstrated acid phosphatase and thiamine pyrophosphatase (TPPase). Both together are thought to identify autophagosomes. Using the appropriate substrate of the enzymes and cerium chloride, the precipitation of electron-dense cerium phosphate granules

  19. Molecular dynamics studies of protein folding and aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng

    This thesis applies molecular dynamics simulations and statistical mechanics to study: (i) protein folding; and (ii) protein aggregation. Most small proteins fold into their native states via a first-order-like phase transition with a major free energy barrier between the folded and unfolded states. A set of protein conformations corresponding to the free energy barrier, Delta G >> kBT, are the folding transition state ensemble (TSE). Due to their evasive nature, TSE conformations are hard to capture (probability ∝ exp(-DeltaG/k BT)) and characterize. A coarse-grained discrete molecular dynamics model with realistic steric constraints is constructed to reproduce the experimentally observed two-state folding thermodynamics. A kinetic approach is proposed to identify the folding TSE. A specific set of contacts, common to the TSE conformations, is identified as the folding nuclei which are necessary to be formed in order for the protein to fold. Interestingly, the amino acids at the site of the identified folding nuclei are highly conserved for homologous proteins sharing the same structures. Such conservation suggests that amino acids that are important for folding kinetics are under selective pressure to be preserved during the course of molecular evolution. In addition, studies of the conformations close to the transition states uncover the importance of topology in the construction of order parameter for protein folding transition. Misfolded proteins often form insoluble aggregates, amyloid fibrils, that deposit in the extracellular space and lead to a type of disease known as amyloidosis. Due to its insoluble and non-crystalline nature, the aggregation structure and, thus the aggregation mechanism, has yet to be uncovered. Discrete molecular dynamics studies reveal an aggregate structure with the same structural signatures as in experimental observations and show a nucleation aggregation scenario. The simulations also suggest a generic aggregation mechanism

  20. Molecular dynamics modeling and characterization of graphene/polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Rezwanur

    The current work focuses on the characterization of graphene based nanocomposites using molecular dynamic simulation and multiscale modeling approaches. Both graphene-epoxy and graphene-cellulose nanocomposites were considered in this study. A hierarchical multiscale modeling approach has been proposed using peridynamics and molecular dynamics simulation. Firstly, the mechanical properties of crosslinked graphene/epoxy (G-Ep) nanocomposites were investigated by molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The influence of graphene's weight concentration, aspect ratio and dispersion on stress-strain response and elastic properties were studied. The results show significant improvement in Young's modulus and shear modulus for the G-Ep system in comparison to the neat epoxy resin. It appears that the RDF, molecular energy and aspect ratios are influenced by both graphene concentrations and aspect ratios. The graphene concentrations in the range of 1-3% are seen to improve Young's modulus and shorter graphenes are observed to be more effective than larger ones. In addition, the dispersed graphene system is more promising in enhancing in-plane elastic modulus than the agglomerated graphene system. The cohesive and pullout forces versus displacements data were plotted under normal and shear modes in order to characterize interfacial properties. The cohesive force is significantly improved by attaching the graphene with a chemical bond at the graphene-epoxy interface. In the second part of the work, cellulose was considered to study the mechanical properties of graphene-cellulose bionanocomposite. Similar to graphene-epoxy systems, the effect of graphene dispersion and agglomeration were studied in the stress-strain plots of graphene-cellulose system. A pcff forcefield was used to define intermolecular and intramolecular interactions. The effect of graphene's aspect ratio and weight concentration on the structural property of each unitcell was

  1. Curvature effects on lipid packing and dynamics in liposomes revealed by coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular packing details of lipids in planar bilayers are well characterized. For curved bilayers, however, little data is available. In this paper we study the effect of temperature and membrane composition on the structural and dynamical properties of a liposomal membrane in the limit of high

  2. Reaction Ensemble Molecular Dynamics: Direct Simulation of the Dynamic Equilibrium Properties of Chemically Reacting Mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brennan, J.K.; Lísal, Martin; Gubbins, K.E.; Rice, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 6 (2004), 0611031-0611034 ISSN 1063-651X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/1588 Grant - others:NSF(US) CTS-0211792 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : reacting systems * simulation * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.352, year: 2004

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation, structure, and dynamics of small phospholipid vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, SJ; Mark, AE

    2003-01-01

    Here, we use coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the spontaneous aggregation of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids into small unilamellar vesicles. We show that the aggregation process occurs on a nanosecond time scale, with bicelles and cuplike vesicles formed at

  4. Linearly and circularly polarized laser photoinduced molecular order in azo dye doped polymer films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Bendaoud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Photo-induced behavior of Azo Disperse one (AZD1 doped Poly(Methyl MethAcrylate (PMMA using both linear and circular polarized light is studied. The anisotropy is not erased by the circular polarization light. The circular polarization light combined with relatively long lifetime of the cis state in azo dye doped polymers activate all transverse directions of the angular hole burning through the spot in the film inducing anisotropy. Under circular polarized light, there is no orientation perpendicularly to the helex described by the rotating electric field vector, trans molecules reorients in the propagation direction of the pump beam. The polarization state of the probe beam after propagation through the pumped spot depends strongly on the angle of incidence of both pump and probe beams on the input face. In the case where circular polarized pump and probe beams are under the same angle of incidence, the probe beam “sees” anisotropic film as if it is isotropic. Results of this work shows the possibility to reorient azobenzene-type molecules in two orthogonal directions using alternately linearly and circularly polarized beams.

  5. Dynamical changes of the polar cap potential structure: an information theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Coco

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Some features, such as vortex structures often observed through a wide spread of spatial scales, suggest that ionospheric convection is turbulent and complex in nature. Here, applying concepts from information theory and complex system physics, we firstly evaluate a pseudo Shannon entropy, H, associated with the polar cap potential obtained from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN and, then, estimate the degree of disorder and the degree of complexity of ionospheric convection under different Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF conditions. The aforementioned quantities are computed starting from time series of the coefficients of the 4th order spherical harmonics expansion of the polar cap potential for three periods, characterised by: (i steady IMF Bz > 0, (ii steady IMF Bz < 0 and (iii a double rotation from negative to positive and then positive to negative Bz. A neat dynamical topological transition is observed when the IMF Bz turns from negative to positive and vice versa, pointing toward the possible occurrence of an order/disorder phase transition, which is the counterpart of the large scale convection rearrangement and of the increase of the global coherence. This result has been confirmed by applying the same analysis to a larger data base of about twenty days of SuperDARN data, allowing to investigate the role of IMF By too.

  6. Enhanced solid-state NMR correlation spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei using dynamic nuclear polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel; Takahashi, Hiroki; Thankamony, Aany S L; Dacquin, Jean-Philippe; Bardet, Michel; Lafon, Olivier; Paëpe, Gaël De

    2012-11-14

    By means of a true sensitivity enhancement for a solid-state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR) experiment performed under dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) conditions, corresponding to 4-5 orders of magnitude of time savings compared with a conventional SSNMR experiment, it is shown that it is possible to record interface-selective (27)Al-(27)Al two-dimensional dipolar correlation spectra on mesoporous alumina, an advanced material with potential industrial applications. The low efficiency of cross-polarization and dipolar recoupling for quadrupolar nuclei is completely negated using this technique. The important presence of pentacoordinated Al has not only been observed, but its role in bridging interfacial tetra- and hexacoordinated Al has been determined. Such structural information, collected at low temperature (∼103 K) and 9.4 T with the use of DNP, would have been impossible to obtain under standard conditions, even using a higher magnetic field. However, here it is demonstrated that this information can be obtained in only 4 h. This work clearly opens a new avenue for the application of SSNMR to quadrupolar nuclei and notably the atomic-scale structure determination of catalysis materials such as mesoporous alumina.

  7. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Morphology and Dynamics of the Polar Cusp

    CERN Document Server

    Egeland, Alv

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings are based upon introductory talks, research reports and discussions from the NATO Advanced Workshop on the "Morphology and Dynamics of the Polar Cusp", held at Lillehammer, Norway, 7-12 May, 1984. The upper atmosphere at high latitudes is called the "Earth's win­ dow to outer space". Through various electrodynamic coupling process­ es as well as through direct transfer of particles many geophysical effects displayed there are direct manifestations of phenomena occurring in the deep space. The high latitude ionosphere will also exert a feedback on the regions of the magnetosphere and atmosphere to which it is coupled, acting as a momentum and energy source and sink, and a source of particles. Of particular interest are the sections of the near space known as the Polar Cusp. A vast portion of the earth's magnetic field envelope is electrically connected to these regions. This geometry results in a spatial mapping of the magnetospheric pro­ cesses and a focusing on to the ionosphere. In the ...

  8. A novel variable field system for field-cycled dynamic nuclear polarization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Keerthi; Caia, George L.; Kesselring, Eric; Samouilov, Alexandre; Petryakov, Sergey; Lurie, David J.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2010-08-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is an NMR-based technique which enables detection and spectral characterization of endogenous and exogenous paramagnetic substances measured via transfer of polarization from the saturated unpaired electron spin system to the NMR active nuclei. A variable field system capable of performing DNP spectroscopy with NMR detection at any magnetic field in the range 0-0.38 T is described. The system is built around a clinical open-MRI system. To obtain EPR spectra via DNP, partial cancellation of the detection field B0NMR is required to alter the evolution field B0EPR at which the EPR excitation is achieved. The addition of resistive actively shielded field cancellation coils in the gap of the primary magnet provides this field offset in the range of 0-100 mT. A description of the primary magnet, cancellation coils, power supplies, interfacing hardware, RF electronics and console are included. Performance of the instrument has been evaluated by acquiring DNP spectra of phantoms with aqueous nitroxide solutions (TEMPOL) at three NMR detection fields of 97 G, 200 G and 587 G corresponding to 413 kHz, 851.6 kHz and 2.5 MHz respectively and fixed EPR evolution field of 100 G corresponding to an irradiation frequency of 282.3 MHz. This variable-field DNP system offers great flexibility for the performance of DNP spectroscopy with independent optimum choice of EPR excitation and NMR detection fields.

  9. Dynamic nuclear polarization using frequency modulation at 3.34 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovav, Y.; Feintuch, A.; Vega, S.; Goldfarb, D.

    2014-01-01

    During dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments polarization is transferred from unpaired electrons to their neighboring nuclear spins, resulting in dramatic enhancement of the NMR signals. While in most cases this is achieved by continuous wave (cw) irradiation applied to samples in fixed external magnetic fields, here we show that DNP enhancement of static samples can improve by modulating the microwave (MW) frequency at a constant field of 3.34 T. The efficiency of triangular shaped modulation is explored by monitoring the 1H signal enhancement in frozen solutions containing different TEMPOL radical concentrations at different temperatures. The optimal modulation parameters are examined experimentally and under the most favorable conditions a threefold enhancement is obtained with respect to constant frequency DNP in samples with low radical concentrations. The results are interpreted using numerical simulations on small spin systems. In particular, it is shown experimentally and explained theoretically that: (i) The optimal modulation frequency is higher than the electron spin-lattice relaxation rate. (ii) The optimal modulation amplitude must be smaller than the nuclear Larmor frequency and the EPR line-width, as expected. (iii) The MW frequencies corresponding to the enhancement maxima and minima are shifted away from one another when using frequency modulation, relative to the constant frequency experiments.

  10. An Alderman-Grant resonator for S-Band Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudert, Oliver; Raich, Hans-Peter; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried; Münnemann, Kerstin

    2014-05-01

    An Alderman-Grant resonator with resonance at 2 GHz (S-Band) was simulated, developed and constructed for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) experiments at 73 mT. The resonator fits into magnet bores with a minimum diameter of 20 mm and is compatible with standard 3 mm NMR tubes. The compact resonator design achieves good separation of electric and magnetic fields and therefore can be used with comparatively large sample volumes with only small sample heating effects comparable to those obtained with optimized X- and W-Band DNP setups. The saturation efficiency and sample heating effects were investigated for Overhauser DNP experiments of aqueous solutions of TEMPOL radical, showing relative saturation better than 0.9 and sample heating not exceeding a few Kelvin even at high microwave power and long irradiation time. An application is demonstrated, combining the DNP setup with a commercial fast field cycling NMR relaxometer. Using this resonator design at low microwave frequencies can provide DNP polarization for a class of low-field and time-domain NMR experiments and therefore may enable new applications that benefit from increased sensitivity.

  11. Polarity, cell division, and out-of-equilibrium dynamics control the growth of epithelial structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Benedetta; Puliafito, Alberto; Shewan, Annette M.; Yu, Wei; Combes, Alexander N.; Little, Melissa H.; Chianale, Federica; Primo, Luca; Serini, Guido; Mostov, Keith E.; Celani, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The growth of a well-formed epithelial structure is governed by mechanical constraints, cellular apico-basal polarity, and spatially controlled cell division. Here we compared the predictions of a mathematical model of epithelial growth with the morphological analysis of 3D epithelial structures. In both in vitro cyst models and in developing epithelial structures in vivo, epithelial growth could take place close to or far from mechanical equilibrium, and was determined by the hierarchy of time-scales of cell division, cell–cell rearrangements, and lumen dynamics. Equilibrium properties could be inferred by the analysis of cell–cell contact topologies, and the nonequilibrium phenotype was altered by inhibiting ROCK activity. The occurrence of an aberrant multilumen phenotype was linked to fast nonequilibrium growth, even when geometric control of cell division was correctly enforced. We predicted and verified experimentally that slowing down cell division partially rescued a multilumen phenotype induced by altered polarity. These results improve our understanding of the development of epithelial organs and, ultimately, of carcinogenesis. PMID:24145168

  12. Bis-gadolinium complexes for solid effect and cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Monu; Corzilius, Bjoern [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie und Biomolekulares Magnetresonanzzentrum (BMRZ) (Germany); Qi, Mian; Godt, Adelheid [Fakultaet fuer Chemie und Centrum fuer Molekulare Materialien (CM2), Universitaet Bielefeld (Germany)

    2017-04-03

    High-spin complexes act as polarizing agents (PAs) for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in solid-state NMR spectroscopy and feature promising aspects towards biomolecular DNP. We present a study on bis(Gd-chelate)s which enable cross effect (CE) DNP owing to spatial confinement of two dipolar-coupled electron spins. Their well-defined Gd..Gd distances in the range of 1.2-3.4 nm allowed us to elucidate the Gd..Gd distance dependence of the DNP mechanism and NMR signal enhancement. We found that Gd..Gd distances above 2.1 nm result in solid effect DNP while distances between 1.2 and 2.1 nm enable CE for {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N nuclear spins. We compare 263 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra with the obtained DNP field profiles and discuss possible CE matching conditions within the high-spin system and the influence of dipolar broadening of the EPR signal. Our findings foster the understanding of the CE mechanism and the design of high-spin PAs for specific applications of DNP. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Synthesis, rotational dynamics, and photophysical characterization of a crystalline linearly conjugated phenyleneethynylene molecular dirotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughs, Melissa; Jimenez, Miguel; Khan, Saeed; Garcia-Garibay, Miguel A

    2013-06-07

    We report the synthesis, crystal structure, solid-state dynamics, and photophysical properties of 6,13-bis((4-(3-(3-methoxyphenyl)-3,3-diphenylprop-1-yn-1-yl)phenyl)ethynyl)-5,7,12,14-tetrahydro-5,14:7,12-bis([1,2]benzeno)pentacene (1), a molecular dirotor with a 1,4-bis((4-ethynylphenyl)ethynyl)benzene (BEPEB) chromophore. The incorporation of a pentiptycene into the molecular dirotor provides a central stator and a fixed phenylene ring relative to which the two flanking ethynylphenylene rotators can explore various torsion angles; this allows the BEPEB fluorophore dynamics to persist in the solid state. X-ray diffraction studies have shown that molecular dirotor 1 is packed so that all the BEPEB fluorophores adopt a parallel alignment, this is ideal for the development of functional materials. Variable temperature, quadrupolar echo (2)H NMR studies have shown that phenylene rotator flipping has an activation energy of 9.0 kcal/mol and a room temperature flipping frequency of ∼2.6 MHz. Lastly, with measurements in solution, glasses, and crystals, we obtained evidence that the fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the phenyleneethynylene chromophores is dependent on the extent of conjugation between the phenylene rings, as determined by their relative dihedral angles. This work provides a promising starting point for the development of molecular dirotors with polar groups whose amphidynamic nature will allow for the rapid shifting of solid-state absorption, fluorescence, and birefringence, in response to external electric fields.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of Pd-Ni transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kart, S. O.; Kart, H. H.; Uludogan, M.; Tomak, M.; Cagin, T.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations are performed to study bulk properties of fcc metals and metal alloys by using the quantum Sutton-Chen many-body potentials within the context of the tight-binding approach. The Molecular Dynamics algorithms we used in the simulations of Pd-Ni alloys are based on an extended Hamiltonian formalism arising from the works of Andersen (1980), Parinello and Rahman (1980), Nose (1984), Hoover (1985) and Cagin (1988). In these simulations, the effect of temperature and concentration on the solid and liquid properties are studied. Elastic constants and phonon dispersion relation are the solid properties we simulated in this work. Dynamic and static properties of liquid Pd-Ni are also computed by examining the behavior of density, enthalpy, pair distribution function and structure factor. The melting temperatures of Pd-Ni alloys are investigated. The diffusion coefficients are calculated from the mean square displacement using Einstein relation and from velocity auto-correlation function using Green-Kubo relations. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experiments

  15. Physical properties of Cu nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kart, H.H., E-mail: hkart@pau.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Pamukkale University, Kınıklı Campus, 20017 Denizli (Turkey); Yildirim, H.; Ozdemir Kart, S. [Department of Physics, Pamukkale University, Kınıklı Campus, 20017 Denizli (Turkey); Çağin, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77845-3003 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77845-3122 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Thermodynamical, structural and dynamical properties of Cu nanoparticles are investigated by using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations at various temperatures. In this work, MD simulations of the Cu-nanoparticles are performed by means of the MPiSiM codes by utilizing from Quantum Sutton-Chen (Q-SC) many-body force potential to define the interactions between the Cu atoms. The diameters of the copper nanoparticles are varied from 2 nm to 10 nm. MD simulations of Cu nanoparticles are carried out at low and high temperatures to study solid and liquid properties of Cu nanoparticles. Simulation results such as melting point, radial distribution function are compared with the available experimental bulk results. Radial distribution function, mean square displacement, diffusion coefficient, Lindemann index and Honeycutt–Andersen index are also calculated for estimating the melting point of the Copper nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Solid and liquid properties of Cu nanoparticles are studied. • Molecular dynamics utilizing the Quantum Sutton Chen potential is used in this work. • Melting temperatures of nanoparticles are strongly depended on nanoparticle sizes. • Heat capacity, radial distribution function and diffusion coefficients are studied. • Structures of nanoparticles are analyzed by Lindemann and Honeycutt–Andersen index.

  16. Physical properties of Cu nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kart, H.H.; Yildirim, H.; Ozdemir Kart, S.; Çağin, T.

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamical, structural and dynamical properties of Cu nanoparticles are investigated by using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations at various temperatures. In this work, MD simulations of the Cu-nanoparticles are performed by means of the MPiSiM codes by utilizing from Quantum Sutton-Chen (Q-SC) many-body force potential to define the interactions between the Cu atoms. The diameters of the copper nanoparticles are varied from 2 nm to 10 nm. MD simulations of Cu nanoparticles are carried out at low and high temperatures to study solid and liquid properties of Cu nanoparticles. Simulation results such as melting point, radial distribution function are compared with the available experimental bulk results. Radial distribution function, mean square displacement, diffusion coefficient, Lindemann index and Honeycutt–Andersen index are also calculated for estimating the melting point of the Copper nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Solid and liquid properties of Cu nanoparticles are studied. • Molecular dynamics utilizing the Quantum Sutton Chen potential is used in this work. • Melting temperatures of nanoparticles are strongly depended on nanoparticle sizes. • Heat capacity, radial distribution function and diffusion coefficients are studied. • Structures of nanoparticles are analyzed by Lindemann and Honeycutt–Andersen index

  17. Structure and dynamics of photosynthetic proteins studied by neutron scattering and molecular dynamic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellerue, Serge

    2000-01-01

    Understand the structure-dynamics-function relation in the case of proteins is essential. But few experimental techniques allow to have access to knowledge of fast internal movements of biological macromolecules. With the neutron scattering method, it has been possible to study the reorientation dynamics of side chains and of polypeptide skeleton for two proteins in terms of water or detergent and of temperature. With the use of the molecular dynamics method, essential for completing and interpreting the experimental data, it has been possible to assess the different contributions of the whole structure of proteins to the overall dynamics. It has been shown that the polypeptide skeleton presents an energy relaxation comparable to those of the side chains. Moreover, it has been explained that the protein dynamics can only be understood in terms of relaxation time distribution. (author) [fr

  18. Classical study of the rovibrational dynamics of a polar diatomic molecule in static electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inarrea, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.inarrea@unirioja.e [Area de Fisica, Universidad de la Rioja, E-26006 Logrono (Spain); Salas, J. Pablo [Area de Fisica, Universidad de la Rioja, E-26006 Logrono (Spain); Gonzalez-Ferez, Rosario [Instituto ' Carlos I' de Fisica Teorica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Schmelcher, Peter [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-01-04

    We study the classical dynamics of a polar diatomic molecule in the presence of a strong static homogeneous electric field. Our full rovibrational investigation includes the interaction with the field due to the permanent electric dipole moment and the polarizability of the molecule. Using the LiCs molecule as a prototype, we explore the stability of the equilibrium points and their bifurcations as the field strength is increased. The phase space structure and its dependence on the energy and field strength are analyzed in detail. We demonstrate that depending on the field strength and on the energy, the phase space is characterized either by regular features or by small stochastic layers of chaotic motion.

  19. Waveguide transition with vacuum window for multiband dynamic nuclear polarization systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr; Bowen, Sean; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    broadband than commercially available windows, which are usually optimized for single band operation. It is demonstrated that high-density polyethylene with urethane adhesive can be used as a low loss microwave vacuum window in multiband DNP systems. The overall assembly performance and dimensions are found......A low loss waveguide transition section and oversized microwave vacuum window covering several frequency bands (94 GHz, 140 GHz, 188 GHz) is presented. The transition is compact and was optimized for multiband Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) systems in a full-wave simulator. The window is more...... using full-wave simulations. The practical aspects of the window implementation in the waveguide are discussed. To verify the design and simulation results, the window is tested experimentally at the three frequencies of interest....

  20. Dynamics of ultra-intense circularly polarized solitons under inhomogeneous plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dong [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, C. Y.; He, X. T. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2013-06-15

    The dynamics of the ultra-intense circularly polarized solitons under inhomogeneous plasmas are examined. The interaction is modeled by the Maxwell and relativistic hydrodynamic equations and is solved with fully implicit energy-conserving numerical scheme. The soliton is self-consistently generated by the interaction between laser and plasma on the vacuum-plasma interface, and the generation mechanism is well confirmed by two dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that a propagating weak soliton can be decreased and reflected by increasing plasma background, which is consistent with the existing studies based on hypothesis of weak density response. However, it is found that ultra-intense soliton is well trapped and kept still when encountering increasing background. Probably, this founding can be applied for trapping and amplifying high-intensity laser-fields.

  1. The use of dynamic nuclear polarization in 1H and 13C solid state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijvestijn, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) effect is used at room temperature in combination with 13 C NMR. Due to the low natural abundance of 13 C spins (1%) the signal is very weak, but when the DNP effect is used the 13 C signal can be enhanced and therefore the number of scans and the measuring time considerably reduced. The theory is presented and the experimental set-up is described. Experiments on polystyrene, artificially doped with free radicals are described and it is examined whether the theory of the DNP effect can be used in a quantitative way. Applications of the use of the DNP effect in 13 C NMR are shown. Excellent spectra are presented of artificial and natural diamonds, possibly to be used for diamond characterization purposes. 161 refs.; 61 figs.; 3 tabs

  2. Gain dynamics of a free-space nitrogen laser pumped by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jinping; Xie, Hongqiang; Zeng, Bin; Chu, Wei; Li, Guihua; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Jing, Chenrui; Zhang, Chaojin; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-08-11

    We experimentally demonstrate ultrafast dynamic of generation of the 337-nm nitrogen laser by injecting an external seed pulse into a femtosecond laser filament pumped by a circularly polarized laser pulse. In the pump-probe scheme, it is revealed that the population inversion between the C(3)Π(u) and B(3)Π(g) states of N(2) for the free-space 337-nm laser is firstly built up on the timescale of several picoseconds, followed by a relatively slow decay on the timescale of tens of picoseconds, depending on the nitrogen gas pressure. By measuring the intensities of 337-nm signal from nitrogen gas mixed with different concentrations of oxygen gas, it is also found that oxygen molecules have a significant quenching effect on the nitrogen laser signal. Our experimental observations agree with the picture of electron-impact excitation.

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance and dynamic nuclear polarization of char suspensions: surface science and oximetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.; Ceroke, P.J.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, J.H.; Fruianu, M.; Belford, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon chars have been synthesized in our laboratory from a variety of starting materials, by means of a highly controlled pyrolysis technique. These chars exhibit electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line shapes which change with the local oxygen concentration in a reproducible and stable fashion; they can be calibrated and used for oximetry. Biological stability and low toxicity make chars good sensors for in vivo measurements. Scalar and dipolar interactions of water protons at the surfaces of chars may be utilized to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the 1 H nuclear spin population in conjunction with electron Zeeman pumping. Low-frequency EPR, DNP and DNP-enhanced MRI all show promise as oximetry methods when used with carbon chars. (author)

  4. Molecular stopwatches, cogwheels and ``spinflakes'': studying the dynamics of molecular superrotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Alexander; Hepburn, John; Milner, Valery

    2015-05-01

    Using the technique of an optical centrifuge, we excite diatomic molecules to ultrafast synchronous rotation. Femtosecond velocity-map imaging allows us to visualize and study the coherent dynamics of molecular superrotors under field free conditions and in external magnetic field. We demonstrate that when the created rotational wave packet is narrow, its free evolution is nondispersing and follows the motion of a classically rotating dumbbell or a hand of the smallest natural stopwatch. For wider rotational distributions, we observe the breakdown of classical rotation, when a dumbbell shape changes to that of a ``quantum cogwheel'' - a molecular state simultaneously aligned along multiple direction. Our measurements in external magnetic field reveal other peculiar aspects of the rich dynamics of molecular superrotors. The rotation of a non-magnetic molecule interacts with the applied field only weakly, giving rise to slow precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field direction. In contrast, the electronic spin of a paramagnetic superrotor mediates this interaction, causing the initial disk-like angular distribution to split into several spatial components, each precessing with its own frequency determined by the spin projection.

  5. Dynamics of double-polarity subduction: application to the Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peral, Mireia; Zlotnik, Sergio; Fernandez, Manel; Vergés, Jaume; Jiménez-Munt, Ivone; Torne, Montserrat

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of the Western Mediterranean is a highly debated question by geologists and geophysicists. Even though most scientists agree in considering slab roll-back to be the driving mechanism of the tectonic evolution of this area, there is still no consensus about the initial setup and its time evolution. A recent model suggests a lateral change in subduction polarity of the Ligurian-Thetys oceanic domain to explain the formation and evolution of the Betic-Rif orogenic system and the associated Alboran back-arc basin. Such geodynamic scenario is also proposed for different converging regions. The aim of this study is to analyze the dynamic evolution of a double-polarity subduction process and its consequences in order to test the physical feasibility of this interaction and provide geometries and evolutions comparable to those proposed for the Western Mediterranean. The 3D numerical model is carried out via the Underworld framework. Tectonic plate behavior is described by equations of fluid dynamics in the presence of several different phases. Underworld solves a non-linear Stokes flow problem using Finite Elements combined with particle-in-cell approach, thus the discretization combines a standard Eulerian Finite Element mesh with Lagrangian particles to track the location of the phases. The final model consists of two oceanic plates with viscoplastic rheology subducting into the upper mantle in opposite direction and the problem is driven by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We study the influence of the boundary conditions in the model evolution, and the slab deformation produced by the proximity between both plates. Moreover the case of asymmetric friction on the lateral sides of slabs is also considered. Simulations of single subduction models are used as a reference, to compare results and understand the influence of the second plate. We observe slight differences in the trench retreat velocity and the slab morphology near the contact area when plates are

  6. Imaging molecular structure and dynamics using laser driven recollisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marangos, J.P.; Baker, S.; Torres, R.; Kajumba, N.; Haworth, C.; Robinson, J.; Tisch, J.W.G.; Lein, M.; Chirila, C.; Vozzi, C.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Laser driven electron recollision provides a unique tool for measuring the structure and dynamics of matter. We illustrate this with experiments that use HHG to measure molecular structure with sub-Angstrom spatial and sub-femtosecond temporal resolution. Our recent work has looked in particular at the signal from high order harmonic generation which contains rich information about the structure and intra-molecular dynamics of small molecules. This we will illustrate by two types of experiment; (a) measurements of HHG from aligned molecular samples to observe two-centre recombination interference and electronic structure dependence of the angle dependent yield, (b) reconstruction of intra-molecular proton dynamics from the spectral dependence of the HHG using the intrinsic chirp of recolliding electrons. We experimentally investigate the process of intramolecular quantum interference in high-order harmonic generation in impulsively aligned CO 2 molecules. The recombination interference effect is clearly seen through the order dependence of the harmonic yield in an aligned sample. This confirms that the effective de Broglie wavelength of the returning electron wave is not significantly altered by acceleration in the Coulomb field of the molecular ion. For the first time, to our knowledge, we demonstrate that such interference effects can be effectively controlled by changing the ellipticity of the driving laser field. Here we also report the results of angular dependence measurements of high order harmonics (17 tt h - 27 th ) from impulsively aligned organic molecules: Acetylene, Ethylene, and Allene. Since these molecules have a relatively low I p an appropriately short pulse is required to produce as many harmonic orders as possible. This was provided by the ∼ 10 fs beam line of the ASTRA laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory whilst a somewhat longer pulse, properly forwarded with respect to the driving pulse, induced the

  7. Performance of a docking/molecular dynamics protocol for virtual screening of nutlin-class inhibitors of Mdmx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharatham, Nagakumar; Finch, Kristin E; Min, Jaeki; Mayasundari, Anand; Dyer, Michael A; Guy, R Kiplin; Bashford, Donald

    2017-06-01

    A virtual screening protocol involving docking and molecular dynamics has been tested against the results of fluorescence polarization assays testing the potency of a series of compounds of the nutlin class for inhibition of the interaction between p53 and Mdmx, an interaction identified as a driver of certain cancers. The protocol uses a standard docking method (AutoDock) with a cutoff based on the AutoDock score (ADscore), followed by molecular dynamics simulation with a cutoff based on root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) from the docked pose. An analysis of the experimental and computational results shows modest performance of ADscore alone, but dramatically improved performance when RMSD is also used. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrew; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    We will present results of thermal transport phenomena in Carbon Nanotube (CNT) structures. CNTs have many interesting physical properties, and have the potential for device applications. Specifically, CNTs are robust materials with high thermal conductance and excellent electrical conduction properties. A review of electrical and thermal conduction of the structures will be discussed. The research requires analytical analysis as well as simulation. The major thrust of this study is the usage of the molecular dynamics (MD) simulator, LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator). A significant investigation using the LAMMPS code is conducted on the existing Beowulf Computing Cluster at BSU. NanoHUB, an open online resource to the entire nanotechnology community developed by the researchers of Purdue University, is used for further supplementary resources. Results will include the time-dependence of temperature, kinetic energy, potential energy, heat flux correlation, and heat conduction.

  9. Sugar transport across lactose permease probed by steered molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Yin, Ying; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli lactose permease (LacY) transports sugar across the inner membrane of the bacterium using the proton motive force to accumulate sugar in the cytosol. We have probed lactose conduction across LacY using steered molecular dynamics, permitting us to follow molecular and energetic...... details of lactose interaction with the lumen of LacY during its permeation. Lactose induces a widening of the narrowest parts of the channel during permeation, the widening being largest within the periplasmic half-channel. During permeation, the water-filled lumen of LacY only partially hydrates lactose......, forcing it to interact with channel lining residues. Lactose forms a multitude of direct sugar-channel hydrogen bonds, predominantly with residues of the flexible N-domain, which is known to contribute a major part of LacY's affinity for lactose. In the periplasmic half-channel lactose predominantly...

  10. Spotting the difference in molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Shun; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2016-08-01

    Comparing two trajectories from molecular simulations conducted under different conditions is not a trivial task. In this study, we apply a method called Linear Discriminant Analysis with ITERative procedure (LDA-ITER) to compare two molecular simulation results by finding the appropriate projection vectors. Because LDA-ITER attempts to determine a projection such that the projections of the two trajectories do not overlap, the comparison does not suffer from a strong anisotropy, which is an issue in protein dynamics. LDA-ITER is applied to two test cases: the T4 lysozyme protein simulation with or without a point mutation and the allosteric protein PDZ2 domain of hPTP1E with or without a ligand. The projection determined by the method agrees with the experimental data and previous simulations. The proposed procedure, which complements existing methods, is a versatile analytical method that is specialized to find the "difference" between two trajectories.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Clathrate Hydrates on Specialised Hardware Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian R. Trott

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Classical equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD simulations have been performed to investigate the computational performance of the Simple Point Charge (SPC and TIP4P water models applied to simulation of methane hydrates, and also of liquid water, on a variety of specialised hardware platforms, in addition to estimation of various equilibrium properties of clathrate hydrates. The FPGA-based accelerator MD-GRAPE 3 was used to accelerate substantially the computation of non-bonded forces, while GPU-based platforms were also used in conjunction with CUDA-enabled versions of the LAMMPS MD software packages to reduce computational time dramatically. The dependence of molecular system size and scaling with number of processors was also investigated. Considering performance relative to power consumption, it is seen that GPU-based computing is quite attractive.

  12. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF LYSINE DENDRIMER AND SEMAX PEPTIDES INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Popova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the possibility of complex formation of therapeutic Semax peptides with lysine dendrimer by molecular modeling methods. Dendrimers are often used for delivery of drugs and biological molecules (e.g., DNA, peptides and polysaccharides. Since lysine dendrimers are less toxic than conventional synthetic dendrimers (e.g., polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer, we chose them and studied two systems containing dendrimer and the different number of Semax peptides. The study was carried out by molecular dynamics method. It was obtained that the stable complexes were formed in both cases. The equilibrium structures of these complexes were investigated. These complexes can be used in the future in therapy of various diseases as Semax peptides have significant antioxidant, antihypoxic and neuroprotecting action.

  13. Effect of the dynamic core-electron polarization of CO molecules on high-order harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Cam-Tu; Hoang, Van-Hung; Tran, Lan-Phuong; Le, Van-Hoang

    2018-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the influence of dynamic core-electron polarization (DCeP) of CO molecules on high-order harmonic generation (HHG) by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) within the single-active-electron (SAE) approximation. The effect of DCeP is shown to depend strongly on the molecular orientation angle θ . Particularly, compared to the calculations without DCeP, the inclusion of this effect gives rise to an enhancement of harmonic intensity at θ =0° when the electric field aligns along the O-C direction and to a suppression at θ =180° when the field heads in the opposite direction. Meanwhile, when the electric field is perpendicular to the molecular axis, the effect is almost insignificant. The phenomenon is thought to be linked to the ionization process. However, this picture is not completed yet. By solving the TDSE within the SAE approximation and conducting a classical simulation, we are able to obtain the ionization probability as well as the ionization rate and prove that HHG, in fact, receives a major contribution from electrons ionized at only a certain time interval, rather than throughout the whole pulse propagation. Including DCeP, the variation of the ionization rate in this interval highly correlates to that of the HHG intensity. To better demonstrate the origin of this manifestation, we also show the alternation DCeP makes on the effective potential that corresponds to the observed change in the ionization rate and consequently the HHG intensity. Our results confirm previous studies' observations and, more importantly, provide the missing physical explanation. With the role of DCeP now better understood for the entire range of the orientation angle, this effect can be handled more conveniently for calculating the HHG of other targets.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of oscillatory flows in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.S.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we apply the direct non-equilibrium molecular dynamics technique to oscillatory flows of fluids in microscopic channels. Initially, we show that the microscopic simulations resemble the macroscopic predictions based on the Navier–Stokes equation very well for large channel width, high...... density and low temperature. Further simulations for high temperature and low density show that the non-slip boundary condition traditionally used in the macroscopic equation is greatly compromised when the fluid–wall interactions are the same as the fluid–fluid interactions. Simulations of a system...

  15. Molecular dynamics study on microstructure of near grain boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J Y; Rifkin, J; Li, D X

    2001-01-01

    The molecular dynamics method is used to simulate a uniaxial tensile deformation of 3.8nm nano-NiAl alloy with curved amorphous-like interfaces at 0K. Plastic deformation behaviour is studied by examining the strain-stress relationship and the microstructural evolution characteristic. Atomic level analysis showed that the micro-strain is essentially heterogeneous in simulated nano-phase samples. The plastic deformation is not only attributed to the plasticity of interfaces, but also accompanied with the plastic shear strain mechanism inside lattice distortion regions and grains.

  16. Ti and Zr surfaces studied by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascuet, Maria I.; Passianot, Roberto C.; Monti, Ana M.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between point defects technique and the (0001), (1-210), (10-10) surfaces in Ti and Zr is studied by the molecular dynamics technique. Both of metals are in the hexagonal structure and within a temperature range of 100 to 900 K. The atomic interactions are modeled by EAM-type many-body potentials, that were used previously in static simulations. New migration mechanisms are unraveled and others are verified with respect to those already proposed in the static studies. Also included is an analysis of the vacancy stability in the sub-surface layers of the prismatic surfaces. (author)

  17. Full quantum treatment of charge dynamics in amorphous molecular semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Xander; Friederich, Pascal; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Coehoorn, Reinder; Bobbert, Peter A.

    2018-02-01

    We present a treatment of charge dynamics in amorphous molecular semiconductors that accounts for the coupling of charges to all intramolecular phonon modes in a fully quantum mechanical way. Based on ab initio calculations, we derive charge transfer rates that improve on the widely used semiclassical Marcus rate and obtain benchmark results for the mobility and energetic relaxation of electrons and holes in three semiconductors commonly applied in organic light-emitting diodes. Surprisingly, we find very similar results when using the simple Miller-Abrahams rate. We conclude that extracting the disorder strength from temperature-dependent charge transport studies is very possible but extracting the reorganization energy is not.

  18. The density functional theory and the charged fluid molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.P.; Zerah, G.

    1993-01-01

    Car and Parrinello had the idea of combining the density functional theory (Hohenberg, Kohn and Sham) to the 'molecular dynamics' numerical modelling method, in order to simulate metallic or co-valent solids and liquids from the first principles. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified version of this method ab initio, applicable to classical and quantal charged systems. The method is illustrated with recent results on charged colloidal suspensions and highly correlated electron-proton plasmas. 1 fig., 21 refs

  19. Dynamical evolution of supernova remnants breaking through molecular clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Wankee; Kim, Jongsoo; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-01-01

    We carry out three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the supernova remnants (SNRs) produced inside molecular clouds (MCs) near their surface using the HLL code (Harten et al. 1983). We explore the dynamical evolution and the X-ray morphology of SNRs after breaking through the MC surface for ranges of the explosion depths below the surface and the density ratios of the clouds to the intercloud media (ICM). We find that if an SNR breaks out through an MC surface in its Sedov stage, the ou...

  20. Porting of serial molecular dynamics code on MIMD platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celino, M.

    1995-05-01

    A molecular Dynamics (MD) code, utilized for the study of atomistic models of metallic systems has been parallelized for MIMD (Multiple Instructions Multiple Data) parallel platforms by means of the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) message passing library. Since the parallelization implies modifications of the sequential algorithms, these are described from the point of view of the Statistical Mechanics theory. Furthermore, techniques and parallelization strategies utilized and the MD parallel code are described in detail. Benchmarks on several MIMD platforms (IBM SP1 and SP2, Cray T3D, Cluster of workstations) allow performances evaluation of the code versus the different characteristics of the parallel platforms

  1. Hydrogen diffusion in liquid aluminum from ab initio molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2014-05-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are used to describe the diffusion of hydrogen in liquid aluminum at different temperatures. Quasi-instantaneous jumps separating periods of localized vibrations around a mean position are found to characterize the hydrogen motion at the microscopic scale. The hydrogen motion is furthermore analyzed using the van Hove function. We highlight a non-Fickian behavior for the hydrogen diffusion due to a large spatial distribution of hydrogen jumps. We show that a generalized continuous time random walk (CTRW) model describes the experimental diffusion coefficients in a satisfactory manner. Finally, the impact of impurities and alloying elements on hydrogen diffusion in aluminum is discussed.

  2. Quantum-Accurate Molecular Dynamics Potential for Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Mitchell; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this short contribution is to report on the development of a Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP) for tungsten. We have focused on the characterization of elastic and defect properties of the pure material in order to support molecular dynamics simulations of plasma-facing materials in fusion reactors. A parallel genetic algorithm approach was used to efficiently search for fitting parameters optimized against a large number of objective functions. In addition, we have shown that this many-body tungsten potential can be used in conjunction with a simple helium pair potential1 to produce accurate defect formation energies for the W-He binary system.

  3. Molecular-dynamics simulations with explicit hydrodynamics II: on the collision of polymers with molecular obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenward, M; Slater, G W

    2006-06-01

    We present a study of the dynamics of single polymers colliding with molecular obstacles using Molecular-dynamics simulations. In concert with these simulations we present a generalized polymer-obstacle collision model which is applicable to a number of collision scenarios. The work focusses on three specific problems: i) a polymer driven by an external force colliding with a fixed microscopic post; ii) a polymer driven by a (plug-like) fluid flow colliding with a fixed microscopic post; and iii) a polymer driven by an external force colliding with a free polymer. In all three cases, we present a study of the length-dependent dynamics of the polymers involved. The simulation results are compared with calculations based on our generalized collision model. The generalized model yields analytical results in the first two instances (cases i) and ii)), while in the polymer-polymer collision example (case iii)) we obtain a series solution for the system dynamics. For the case of a polymer-polymer collision we find that a distinct V-shaped state exists as seen in experimental systems, though normally associated with collisions with multiple polymers. We suggest that this V-shaped state occurs due to an effective hydrodynamic counter flow generated by a net translational motion of the two-chain system.

  4. Charge Carrier Dynamics at Silver Nanocluster-Molecular Acceptor Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Almansaf, Abdulkhaleq

    2017-07-01

    A fundamental understanding of interfacial charge transfer at donor-acceptor interfaces is very crucial as it is considered among the most important dynamical processes for optimizing performance in many light harvesting systems, including photovoltaics and photo-catalysis. In general, the photo-generated singlet excitons in photoactive materials exhibit very short lifetimes because of their dipole-allowed spin radiative decay and short diffusion lengths. In contrast, the radiative decay of triplet excitons is dipole forbidden; therefore, their lifetimes are considerably longer. The discussion in this thesis primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in charge separation (CS), charge transfer (CT), intersystem crossing (ISC) rate, triplet state lifetime, and carrier recombination (CR) at silver nanocluster (NCs) molecular-acceptors interfaces. A combination of steady-state and femto- and nanosecond broadband transient absorption spectroscopies were used to investigate the charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Additionally, this thesis was prolonged to investigate some important factors that influence the charge carrier dynamics in Ag29 silver NCs donor-acceptor systems, such as the metal doping and chemical structure of the nanocluster and molecular acceptors. Interestingly, clear correlations between the steady-state measurements and timeresolved spectroscopy results are found. In the first study, we have investigated the interfacial charge transfer dynamics in positively charged meso units of 5, 10, 15, 20-tetra (1- methyl-4-pyridino)-porphyrin tetra (p-toluene sulfonate) (TMPyP) and neutral charged 5, 10, 15, 20-tetra (4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (TPyP), with negatively charged undoped and gold (Au)- doped silver Ag29 NCs. Moreover, this study showed the impact of Au doping on the charge carrier dynamics of the system. In the second study, we have investigated the interfacial charge transfer dynamics in [Pt2 Ag23 Cl7 (PPh3

  5. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies

  6. Haptization of molecular dynamics simulation with thermal display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Yuichi; Fujiwara, Susumu; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    Thermal display, which is a type of haptic display, is effective in providing intuitive information of temperature. However, in many studies, the user has assumed a sitting position during the use of these devices. In contrast, the user generally watches 3D objects while standing and walking around in large-scale virtual reality system, In addition, in scientific visualization, the response time is very important for observing physical phenomena, especially for dynamic numerical simulation. One solution is to provide two types of thermal information: information about the rate of thermal change and information about the actual temperature. We propose a thermal display with two Peltier elements which can show above two pairs of information and the result (for example energy and temperature, as thermal information) of numerical simulation. Finally, we represent an example of visualizing and haptizing the result of molecular dynamics simulation. (author)

  7. Reaction dynamics of molecular hydrogen on silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratu, P.; Brenig, W.; Gross, A.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results on the dynamics of dissociative adsorption and recombinative desorption of hydrogen on silicon are presented. Using optical second-harmonic generation, extremely small sticking probabilities in the range 10(-9)-10(-5) could be measured for H-2 and D-2 on Si(111......)7X7 and Si(100)2X1. Strong phonon-assisted sticking was observed for gases at 300 K and surface temperatures between 550 K and 1050 K. The absolute values as well as the temperature variation of the adsorption and desorption rates show surprisingly little isotope effect, and they differ only little...... between the two surfaces. These results indicate that tunneling, molecular vibrations, and the structural details of the surface play only a minor role for the adsorption dynamics. Instead, they appear to be governed by the localized H-Si bonding and Si-Si lattice vibrations. Theoretically, an effective...

  8. Deformation mechanisms in nanotwinned copper by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xing; Lu, Cheng; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Pei, Linqing; Zhang, Liang; Su, Lihong; Zhan, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    Nanotwinned materials exhibit simultaneous ultrahigh strength and high ductility which is attributed to the interactions between dislocations and twin boundaries but the specific deformation mechanisms are rarely seen in experiments at the atomic level. Here we use large scale molecular dynamics simulations to explore this intricate interplay during the plastic deformation of nanotwinned Cu. We demonstrate that the dominant deformation mechanism transits dynamically from slip transfer to twin boundary migration to slip-twin interactions as the twin boundary orientation changes from horizontal to slant, and then to a vertical direction. Building on the fundamental physics of dislocation processes from computer simulations and combining the available experimental investigations, we unravel the underlying deformation mechanisms for nanotwinned Cu, incorporating all three distinct dislocation processes. Our results give insights into systematically engineering the nanoscale twins to fabricate nanotwinned metals or alloys that have high strength and considerable ductility.

  9. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Nanostructured Ceramic Materials on Parallel Computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashishta, Priya; Kalia, Rajiv

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to gain insight into: (1) sintering, structure, and mechanical behavior of nanophase SiC and SiO2; (2) effects of dynamic charge transfers on the sintering of nanophase TiO2; (3) high-pressure structural transformation in bulk SiC and GaAs nanocrystals; (4) nanoindentation in Si3N4; and (5) lattice mismatched InAs/GaAs nanomesas. In addition, we have designed a multiscale simulation approach that seamlessly embeds MD and quantum-mechanical (QM) simulations in a continuum simulation. The above research activities have involved strong interactions with researchers at various universities, government laboratories, and industries. 33 papers have been published and 22 talks have been given based on the work described in this report

  10. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. First principles molecular dynamics of molten NaCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N.; Costa Cabral, B. J.

    2007-03-01

    First principles Hellmann-Feynman molecular dynamics (HFMD) results for molten NaCl at a single state point are reported. The effect of induction forces on the structure and dynamics of the system is studied by comparison of the partial radial distribution functions and the velocity and force autocorrelation functions with those calculated from classical MD based on rigid-ion and shell-model potentials. The first principles results reproduce the main structural features of the molten salt observed experimentally, whereas they are incorrectly described by both rigid-ion and shell-model potentials. Moreover, HFMD Green-Kubo self-diffusion coefficients are in closer agreement with experimental data than those predicted by classical MD. A comprehensive discussion of MD results for molten NaCl based on different ab initio parametrized polarizable interionic potentials is also given.

  12. First Principles Modelling of Shape Memory Alloys Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Materials sciences relate the macroscopic properties of materials to their microscopic structure and postulate the need for holistic multiscale research. The investigation of shape memory alloys is a prime example in this regard. This particular class of materials exhibits strong coupling of temperature, strain and stress, determined by solid state phase transformations of their metallic lattices. The present book presents a collection of simulation studies of this behaviour. Employing conceptually simple but comprehensive models, the fundamental material properties of shape memory alloys are qualitatively explained from first principles. Using contemporary methods of molecular dynamics simulation experiments, it is shown how microscale dynamics may produce characteristic macroscopic material properties. The work is rooted in the materials sciences of shape memory alloys and  covers  thermodynamical, micro-mechanical  and crystallographical aspects. It addresses scientists in these research fields and thei...

  13. Nanomaterials under extreme environments: A study of structural and dynamic properties using reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Adarsh

    Nanotechnology is becoming increasingly important with the continuing advances in experimental techniques. As researchers around the world are trying to expand the current understanding of the behavior of materials at the atomistic scale, the limited resolution of equipment, both in terms of time and space, act as roadblocks to a comprehensive study. Numerical methods, in general and molecular dynamics, in particular act as able compliment to the experiments in our quest for understanding material behavior. In this research work, large scale molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the mechano-chemical behavior under extreme conditions of a variety of systems with many real world applications. The body of this work is divided into three parts, each covering a particular system: 1) Aggregates of aluminum nanoparticles are good solid fuel due to high flame propagation rates. Multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal the mechanism underlying higher reaction rate in a chain of aluminum nanoparticles as compared to an isolated nanoparticle. This is due to the penetration of hot atoms from reacting nanoparticles to an adjacent, unreacted nanoparticle, which brings in external heat and initiates exothermic oxidation reactions. 2) Cavitation bubbles readily occur in fluids subjected to rapid changes in pressure. We use billion-atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations on a 163,840-processor BlueGene/P supercomputer to investigate chemical and mechanical damages caused by shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water near amorphous silica. Collapse of an empty nanobubble generates high-speed nanojet, resulting in the formation of a pit on the surface. The pit contains a large number of silanol groups and its volume is found to be directly proportional to the volume of the nanobubble. The gas-filled bubbles undergo partial collapse and consequently the damage on the silica surface is mitigated. 3) The structure and dynamics of water confined in

  14. Efficient Synthesis of Molecular Precursors for Para-Hydrogen-Induced Polarization of Ethyl Acetate-1-(13) C and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepin, Roman V; Barskiy, Danila A; Coffey, Aaron M; Manzanera Esteve, Isaac V; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-05-10

    A scalable and versatile methodology for production of vinylated carboxylic compounds with (13) C isotopic label in C1 position is described. It allowed synthesis of vinyl acetate-1-(13) C, which is a precursor for preparation of (13) C hyperpolarized ethyl acetate-1-(13) C, which provides a convenient vehicle for potential in vivo delivery of hyperpolarized acetate to probe metabolism in living organisms. Kinetics of vinyl acetate molecular hydrogenation and polarization transfer from para-hydrogen to (13) C via magnetic field cycling were investigated. Nascent proton nuclear spin polarization (%PH ) of ca. 3.3 % and carbon-13 polarization (%P13C ) of ca. 1.8 % were achieved in ethyl acetate utilizing 50 % para-hydrogen corresponding to ca. 50 % polarization transfer efficiency. The use of nearly 100% para-hydrogen and the improvements of %PH of para-hydrogen-nascent protons may enable production of (13) C hyperpolarized contrast agents with %P13C of 20-50 % in seconds using this chemistry. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of divalent salts and ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-González, Víctor; Docampo-Álvarez, Borja; Cabeza, Oscar; Fedorov, Maxim; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M.; Gallego, Luis J.; Varela, Luis M.

    2015-09-01

    We report a molecular dynamics study of the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of a protic (ethylammonium nitrate) and an aprotic (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexaflurophosphate [BMIM][PF6]) room-temperature ionic liquids doped with magnesium and calcium salts with a common anion at 298.15 K and 1 atm. The solvation of these divalent cations in dense ionic environments is analyzed by means of apparent molar volumes of the mixtures, radial distribution functions, and coordination numbers. For the protic mixtures, the effect of salt concentration on the network of hydrogen bonds is also considered. Moreover, single-particle dynamics of the salt cations is studied by means of their velocity autocorrelation functions and vibrational densities of states, explicitly analyzing the influence of salt concentration, and cation charge and mass on these magnitudes. The effect of the valency of the salt cation on these properties is considered comparing the results with those for the corresponding mixtures with lithium salts. We found that the main structural and dynamic features of the local solvation of divalent cations in ionic liquids are similar to those of monovalent salts, with cations being localized in the polar nanoregions of the bulk mixture coordinated in monodentate and bidentate coordination modes by the [NO3]- and [PF6]- anions. However, stronger electrostatic correlations of these polar nanoregions than in mixtures with salts with monovalent cations are found. The vibrational modes of the ionic liquid (IL) are seen to be scarcely affected by the addition of the salt, and the effect of mass and charge on the vibrational densities of states of the dissolved cations is reported. Cation mass is seen to exert a deeper influence than charge on the low-frequency vibrational spectra, giving a red shift of the vibrational modes and a virtual suppression of the higher energy vibrational modes for the heavier Ca2+ cations. No qualitative difference with

  16. Protocadherin FAT1 binds Ena/VASP proteins and is necessary for actin dynamics and cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Marcus J; Soofi, Abdulsalam; Braun, Gerald S; Li, Xiaodong; Watzl, Carsten; Kriz, Wilhelm; Holzman, Lawrence B

    2004-10-01

    Cell migration requires integration of cellular processes resulting in cell polarization and actin dynamics. Previous work using tools of Drosophila genetics suggested that protocadherin fat serves in a pathway necessary for determining cell polarity in the plane of a tissue. Here we identify mammalian FAT1 as a proximal element of a signaling pathway that determines both cellular polarity in the plane of the monolayer and directed actin-dependent cell motility. FAT1 is localized to the leading edge of lamellipodia, filopodia, and microspike tips where FAT1 directly interacts with Ena/VASP proteins that regulate the actin polymerization complex. When targeted to mitochondrial outer leaflets, FAT1 cytoplasmic domain recruits components of the actin polymerization machinery sufficient to induce ectopic actin polymerization. In an epithelial cell wound model, FAT1 knockdown decreased recruitment of endogenous VASP to the leading edge and resulted in impairment of lamellipodial dynamics, failure of polarization, and an attenuation of cell migration. FAT1 may play an integrative role regulating cell migration by participating in Ena/VASP-dependent regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge and by transducing an Ena/VASP-independent polarity cue.

  17. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization at 9.4 T with a 30 mW microwave source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Kent R; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can provide large signal enhancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by transfer of polarization from electron spins to nuclear spins. We discuss several aspects of DNP experiments at 9.4 T (400 MHz resonant frequency for (1)H, 264 GHz for electron spins in organic radicals) in the 7-80K temperature range, using a 30 mW, frequency-tunable microwave source and a quasi-optical microwave bridge for polarization control and low-loss microwave transmission. In experiments on frozen glycerol/water doped with nitroxide radicals, DNP signal enhancements up to a factor of 80 are observed (relative to (1)H NMR signals with thermal equilibrium spin polarization). The largest sensitivity enhancements are observed with a new triradical dopant, DOTOPA-TEMPO. Field modulation with a 10 G root-mean-squared amplitude during DNP increases the nuclear spin polarizations by up to 135%. Dependencies of (1)H NMR signal amplitudes, nuclear spin relaxation times, and DNP build-up times on the dopant and its concentration, temperature, microwave power, and modulation frequency are reported and discussed. The benefits of low-temperature DNP can be dramatic: the (1)H spin polarization is increased approximately 1000-fold at 7 K with DNP, relative to thermal polarization at 80K. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at low temperature and high magnetic eld for biomedical applications in Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutailler, Florent

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis work was to design, build and optimize a large volume multi-samples DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) polarizer dedicated to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging applications. The experimental system is made up of a high magnetic field magnet (3,35 T) in which takes place a cryogenic system with a pumped bath of liquid helium ( 4 He) allowing temperatures lower than 1,2 K. A set of inserts is used for the different steps of DNP: irradiation of the sample by a microwave field (f=94 GHz and P=50 mW), polarization measurement by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance... With this system, up to three samples of 1 mL volume can be polarized to a rate of few per-cents. The system has a long autonomy of four hours, so it can be used for polarizing molecules with a long time constant of polarization. Finally, the possibility to get quasi-simultaneously, after dissolution, several samples with a high rate of polarization opens the way of new applications in biomedical imaging. (author) [fr

  19. Polar Expansion Dynamics in the Plant Kingdom: A Diverse and Multifunctional Journey on the Path to Pollen Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Domozych

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Polar expansion is a widespread phenomenon in plants spanning all taxonomic groups from the Charophycean Green Algae to pollen tubes in Angiosperms and Gymnosperms. Current data strongly suggests that many common features are shared amongst cells displaying polar growth mechanics including changes to the structural features of localized regions of the cell wall, mobilization of targeted secretion mechanisms, employment of the actin cytoskeleton for directing secretion and in many cases, endocytosis and coordinated interaction of multiple signal transduction mechanisms prompted by external biotic and abiotic cues. The products of polar expansion perform diverse functions including delivery of male gametes to the egg, absorption, anchorage, adhesion and photo-absorption efficacy. A comparative analysis of polar expansion dynamics is provided with special emphasis on those found in early divergent plants.

  20. Photo-induced deformations in azobenzene-containing side-chain polymers: molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Ilnytskyi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform molecular dynamics simulations of azobenzene containing side-chain liquid crystalline polymer subject to an external model field that mimicks the reorientations of the azobenzenes upon irradiation with polarized light. The smectic phase of the polymer is studied with the field applied parallel to the nematic director, forcing the trans isomers to reorient perpendicularly to the field (the direction of which can be assosiated with the light polarization. The coupling between the reorientation of azobenzenes and mechanical deformation of the sample is found to depend on the field strength. In a weak field the original smectic order is melted gradually with no apparent change in the simulation box shape, whereas in a strong field two regimes are observed. During the first one a rapid melting of the liquid crystalline order is accompanied by the contraction of the polymer along the field direction (the effect similar to the one observed experimentally in azobenzene containing elastomers. During the slower second regime, the smectic layers are rebuilt to accomodate the preferential direction of chromophores perperdicular to the field.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of ter-pyridine, BTP, and their complexes with La3+, Eu3+ and Lu3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilbaud, P.; Dognon, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    This poster presents molecular dynamics simulations performed to study ter-pyridine and bis-triazinyl-pyridine with lanthanide cations for the gas phase and for water solution. Different counter-ions have been tested in order to assess their influence on complexes structures and stabilities in both phases. For stable complexes, Gibbs free energy calculations have been achieved to estimate the selectivity of these complexes towards the lanthanide cations. Finally, some tests have been done adding a polarization term in the potential energy in order to have a more precise description of interaction energies. (authors)

  2. High-speed polarized light microscopy for in situ, dynamic measurement of birefringence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianyu; Pankow, Mark; Shadow Huang, Hsiao-Ying; Peters, Kara

    2018-01-01

    A high-speed, quantitative polarized light microscopy (QPLM) instrument has been developed to monitor the optical slow axis spatial realignment during controlled medium to high strain rate experiments at acquisition rates up to 10 kHz. This high-speed QPLM instrument is implemented within a modified drop tower and demonstrated using polycarbonate specimens. By utilizing a rotating quarter wave plate and a high-speed camera, the minimum acquisition time to generate an alignment map of a birefringent specimen is 6.1 ms. A sequential analysis method allows the QPLM instrument to generate QPLM data at the high-speed camera imaging frequency 10 kHz. The obtained QPLM data is processed using a vector correlation technique to detect anomalous optical axis realignment and retardation changes throughout the loading event. The detected anomalous optical axis realignment is shown to be associated with crack initiation, propagation, and specimen failure in a dynamically loaded polycarbonate specimen. The work provides a foundation for detecting damage in biological tissues through local collagen fiber realignment and fracture during dynamic loading.

  3. Dynamic Positioning Capability Analysis for Marine Vessels Based on A DPCap Polar Plot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Jian-min; Xu, Sheng-wen

    2018-03-01

    Dynamic positioning capability (DPCap) analysis is essential in the selection of thrusters, in their configuration, and during preliminary investigation of the positioning ability of a newly designed vessel dynamic positioning system. DPCap analysis can help determine the maximum environmental forces, in which the DP system can counteract in given headings. The accuracy of the DPCap analysis is determined by the precise estimation of the environmental forces as well as the effectiveness of the thrust allocation logic. This paper is dedicated to developing an effective and efficient software program for the DPCap analysis for marine vessels. Estimation of the environmental forces can be obtained by model tests, hydrodynamic computation and empirical formulas. A quadratic programming method is adopted to allocate the total thrust on every thruster of the vessel. A detailed description of the thrust allocation logic of the software program is given. The effectiveness of the new program DPCap Polar Plot (DPCPP) was validated by a DPCap analysis for a supply vessel. The present study indicates that the developed program can be used in the DPCap analysis for marine vessels. Moreover, DPCap analysis considering the thruster failure mode might give guidance to the designers of vessels whose thrusters need to be safer.

  4. Domain Wall Dynamics Driven by a Localized Injection of a Spin-Polarized Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchio, Giovanni; Maugeri, Natale; Torres, Luis; Azzerboni, Bruno

    2010-06-01

    This paper introduces an oscillator scheme based on the oscillations of magnetic domain walls due to spin-polarized currents, where the current is injected perpendicular to the sample plane in a localized part of a nanowire. Depending on the geometrical and physical characteristic of the system, we identify two different dynamical regimes (auto-oscillations) when an out-of-plane external field is applied. The first regime is characterized by nucleation of domain walls (DWs) below the current injection site and the propagation of those up to the end of the nanowire, we also found an oscillation frequency larger than 5GHz with a linear dependence on the applied current density. This simple system can be used as a tuneable steady-state domain wall oscillator. In the second dynamical regime, we observe the nucleation of two DWs which propagate back and forth in the nanowire with a sub-GHz oscillation frequency. The micromagnetic spectral mapping technique shows the spatial distribution of the output power is localized symmetrically in the nanowire. We suggest that this configuration can be used as micromagnetic transformer to decouple electrically two different circuits.

  5. Real-time calculation and visualization of spectra in field-cycled dynamic nuclear polarization spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuanmu; Shet, Keerthi; Li, Haihong; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Zweier, Jay L

    2006-04-01

    Field-cycled dynamic nuclear polarization (FC-DNP), which is based on the Overhauser effect, provides a new way to perform in vivo measurements of free radicals in biological systems. Since it measures the alterations of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal in the presence of paramagnetic molecules, a customized program is usually needed in FC-DNP experiments to extract spectral information from the acquired NMR signals. While this program can be designed to calculate the spectrum after all the NMR signals are collected, the batch-processing mode inevitably causes delay and is not convenient for in vivo applications. In this paper, we report the development of a real-time DNP spectrum calculation and visualization program, called RT_DNP, for FC-DNP experiments. A dynamic data exchange (DDE) client was implemented to enable real-time receipt of the system information and the NMR signals from a commercial NMR console. The received NMR signals and experimental parameters were then used to calculate the DNP spectrum during the data acquisition. The real-time DNP spectrum calculation and visualization program was tested in experiments. A seamless integration of the program into a commercial NMR console has been achieved.

  6. Static and dynamic properties of grafted ring polymer: Molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Su-Zhen; Holger, Merlitz; Su, Chan-Fei; Wu, Chen-Xu

    2013-01-01

    The static and dynamic properties of a system of end-grafted flexible ring polymer chains grafted to a flat substrate and exposed to a good solvent are studied by using a molecular dynamics method. The monomers are described by a coarse-grained bead-spring model. Varying the grafting density ρ and the degree of polymerization or chain length N, we obtain the density profiles of monomers, study the structural properties of the chain (radius of gyration, bond orientational parameters, etc.), and also present the dynamic characteristics such as chain energy and bond force. Compared with a linear polymer brush, the ring polymer brush exhibits different static and dynamic properties for moderate or short chain length, while it behaves like linear polymer brush in the regime of long chain length.

  7. Spin-wave dynamics in Invar Fe65Ni35 studied by small-angle polarized neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brück, E.H.; Grigoriev, S.V.; Deriglazov, V.V.; Okorokov, A.I.; Dijk van, N.H.; Klaasse, J.C.P.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract. Spin dynamics in Fe65Ni35 Invar alloy has been studied by left-right asymmetry of small-angle polarized neutron scattering below TC=485 K in external magnetic fields of H=0.05-0.25 T inclined relative to the incident beam. The spin-wave stiffness D and the damping & were obtained by

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest ligand's binding to nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Li, Zheng-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2012-01-01

    The research on the binding process of ligand to pyrazinamidase (PncA) is crucial for elucidating the inherent relationship between resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and PncA's activity. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods were performed to investigate the unbinding process of nicotinamide (NAM) from two PncA enzymes, which is the reverse of the corresponding binding process. The calculated potential of mean force (PMF) based on the steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations sheds light on an optimal binding/unbinding pathway of the ligand. The comparative analyses between two PncAs clearly exhibit the consistency of the binding/unbinding pathway in the two enzymes, implying the universality of the pathway in all kinds of PncAs. Several important residues dominating the pathway were also determined by the calculation of interaction energies. The structural change of the proteins induced by NAM's unbinding or binding shows the great extent interior motion in some homologous region adjacent to the active sites of the two PncAs. The structure comparison substantiates that this region should be very important for the ligand's binding in all PncAs. Additionally, MD simulations also show that the coordination position of the ligand is displaced by one water molecule in the unliganded enzymes. These results could provide the more penetrating understanding of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and be helpful for the development of new antituberculosis drugs.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest ligand's binding to nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Long Zhang

    Full Text Available The research on the binding process of ligand to pyrazinamidase (PncA is crucial for elucidating the inherent relationship between resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and PncA's activity. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD simulation methods were performed to investigate the unbinding process of nicotinamide (NAM from two PncA enzymes, which is the reverse of the corresponding binding process. The calculated potential of mean force (PMF based on the steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations sheds light on an optimal binding/unbinding pathway of the ligand. The comparative analyses between two PncAs clearly exhibit the consistency of the binding/unbinding pathway in the two enzymes, implying the universality of the pathway in all kinds of PncAs. Several important residues dominating the pathway were also determined by the calculation of interaction energies. The structural change of the proteins induced by NAM's unbinding or binding shows the great extent interior motion in some homologous region adjacent to the active sites of the two PncAs. The structure comparison substantiates that this region should be very important for the ligand's binding in all PncAs. Additionally, MD simulations also show that the coordination position of the ligand is displaced by one water molecule in the unliganded enzymes. These results could provide the more penetrating understanding of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and be helpful for the development of new antituberculosis drugs.

  10. Prediction of purification of biopharmeceuticals with molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustach, Vincent; Faller, Roland

    Purification of biopharmeceuticals remains the most expensive part of protein-based drug production. In ion exchange chromatography (IEX), prediction of the elution ionic strength of host cell and target proteins has the potential to reduce the parameter space for scale-up of protein production. The complex shape and charge distribution of proteins and pores complicates predictions of the interactions in these systems. All-atom molecular dynamics methods are beyond the scope of computational limits for mass transport regimes. We present a coarse-grained model for proteins for prediction of elution pH and ionic strength. By extending the raspberry model for colloid particles to surface shapes and charge distributions of proteins, we can reproduce the behavior of proteins in IEX. The average charge states of titratatable amino acid residues at relevant pH values are determined by extrapolation from all-atom molecular dynamics at pH 7. The pH specific all-atom electrostatic field is then mapped onto the coarse-grained surface beads of the raspberry particle. The hydrodynamics are reproduced with the lattice-Boltzmann scheme. This combination of methods allows very long simulation times. The model is being validated for known elution procedures by comparing the data with experiments. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (Grant Number HDTRA1-15-1-0054).

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations through GPU video games technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukatou, Styliani; Papageorgiou, Louis; Fakourelis, Paraskevas; Filntisi, Arianna; Polychronidou, Eleftheria; Bassis, Ioannis; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Makałowski, Wojciech; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia

    Bioinformatics is the scientific field that focuses on the application of computer technology to the management of biological information. Over the years, bioinformatics applications have been used to store, process and integrate biological and genetic information, using a wide range of methodologies. One of the most de novo techniques used to understand the physical movements of atoms and molecules is molecular dynamics (MD). MD is an in silico method to simulate the physical motions of atoms and molecules under certain conditions. This has become a state strategic technique and now plays a key role in many areas of exact sciences, such as chemistry, biology, physics and medicine. Due to their complexity, MD calculations could require enormous amounts of computer memory and time and therefore their execution has been a big problem. Despite the huge computational cost, molecular dynamics have been implemented using traditional computers with a central memory unit (CPU). A graphics processing unit (GPU) computing technology was first designed with the goal to improve video games, by rapidly creating and displaying images in a frame buffer such as screens. The hybrid GPU-CPU implementation, combined with parallel computing is a novel technology to perform a wide range of calculations. GPUs have been proposed and used to accelerate many scientific computations including MD simulations. Herein, we describe the new methodologies developed initially as video games and how they are now applied in MD simulations.

  12. Sex speeds adaptation by altering the dynamics of molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael J; Rice, Daniel P; Desai, Michael M

    2016-03-10

    Sex and recombination are pervasive throughout nature despite their substantial costs. Understanding the evolutionary forces that maintain these phenomena is a central challenge in biology. One longstanding hypothesis argues that sex is beneficial because recombination speeds adaptation. Theory has proposed several distinct population genetic mechanisms that could underlie this advantage. For example, sex can promote the fixation of beneficial mutations either by alleviating interference competition (the Fisher-Muller effect) or by separating them from deleterious load (the ruby in the rubbish effect). Previous experiments confirm that sex can increase the rate of adaptation, but these studies did not observe the evolutionary dynamics that drive this effect at the genomic level. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, comparison between the sequence-level dynamics of adaptation in experimental sexual and asexual Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations, which allows us to identify the specific mechanisms by which sex speeds adaptation. We find that sex alters the molecular signatures of evolution by changing the spectrum of mutations that fix, and confirm theoretical predictions that it does so by alleviating clonal interference. We also show that substantially deleterious mutations hitchhike to fixation in adapting asexual populations. In contrast, recombination prevents such mutations from fixing. Our results demonstrate that sex both speeds adaptation and alters its molecular signature by allowing natural selection to more efficiently sort beneficial from deleterious mutations.

  13. Partial multicanonical algorithm for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2008-09-28

    Partial multicanonical algorithm is proposed for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The partial multicanonical simulation samples a wide range of a part of the potential-energy terms, which is necessary to sample the conformational space widely, whereas a wide range of total potential energy is sampled in the multicanonical algorithm. Thus, one can concentrate the effort to determine the weight factor only on the important energy terms in the partial multicanonical simulation. The partial multicanonical, multicanonical, and canonical molecular dynamics algorithms were applied to an alanine dipeptide in explicit water solvent. The canonical simulation sampled the states of P(II), C(5), alpha(R), and alpha(P). The multicanonical simulation covered the alpha(L) state as well as these states. The partial multicanonical simulation also sampled the C(7) (ax) state in addition to the states that were sampled by the multicanonical simulation. In the partial multicanonical simulation, furthermore, backbone dihedral angles phi and psi rotated more frequently than those in the multicanonical and canonical simulations. These results mean that the partial multicanonical algorithm has a higher sampling efficiency than the multicanonical and canonical algorithms.

  14. Improved Angle Potentials for Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulacu, Monica; Goga, Nicolae; Zhao, Wei; Rossi, Giulia; Monticelli, Luca; Periole, Xavier; Tieleman, D Peter; Marrink, Siewert J

    2013-08-13

    Potentials routinely used in atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are not always suitable for modeling systems at coarse-grained resolution. For example, in the calculation of traditional torsion angle potentials, numerical instability is often encountered in the case of very flexible molecules. To improve the stability and accuracy of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we propose two approaches. The first makes use of improved forms for the angle potentials: the restricted bending (ReB) potential prevents torsion angles from visiting unstable or unphysical configurations and the combined bending-torsion (CBT) potential smoothly flattens the interactions when such configurations are sampled. In the second approach, dummy-assisted dihedral (DAD), the torsion potential is applied differently: instead of acting directly on the beads, it acts on virtual beads, bound to the real ones. For simple geometrical reasons, the unstable region is excluded from the accessible conformational space. The benefits of the new approaches are demonstrated in simulations of polyethylene glycol (PEG), polystyrene (PS), and polypeptide molecules described by the MARTINI coarse-grained force field. The new potentials are implemented in an in-house version of the Gromacs package, publicly available.

  15. Animated molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated Cesium-smectite interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, Rebecca; Sposito, Garrison

    2002-01-01

    Computer animation of center of mass coordinates obtained from 800 ps molecular dynamics simulations of Cs-smectite hydrates (1/3 and 2/3 water monolayers) provided information concerning the structure and dynamics of the interlayer region that could not be obtained through traditional analytical methods. Cs+ could be seen to jump from one attracting location near a layer charge site to the next, and water molecules were observed to migrate from the hydration shell of one ion to that of another. Neighboring ions maintained a partial hydration shell by sharing water molecules, such that a single water molecule hydrated two ions simultaneously for hundreds of picoseconds. The extent of this sharing interaction in the interlayer was determined by the smectite charge distribution, but increased with increasing water content. Water molecules also could be seen to interact directly with the mineral surface, entering its ditrigonal cavities to approach attracting charge sites. The frequency and duration of cavity habitation increased with increasing water content and tetrahedral charge, and was inhibited the more perpendicular was the structural hydroxyl orientation relative to the mineral surface. Competition between Cs+ and water molecules for surface sites was evident. These important cooperative and competitive features of interlayer molecular behavior were uniquely revealed by animation of an otherwise highly complex simulation output

  16. Computational Dehydration of Crystalline Hydrates Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Støttrup; Rantanen, Jukka; Johansson, Kristoffer E

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have evolved to an increasingly reliable and accessible technique and are today implemented in many areas of biomedical sciences. We present a generally applicable method to study dehydration of hydrates based on MD simulations and apply this approach to the de......Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have evolved to an increasingly reliable and accessible technique and are today implemented in many areas of biomedical sciences. We present a generally applicable method to study dehydration of hydrates based on MD simulations and apply this approach...... to the dehydration of ampicillin trihydrate. The crystallographic unit cell of the trihydrate is used to construct the simulation cell containing 216 ampicillin and 648 water molecules. This system is dehydrated by removing water molecules during a 2200 ps simulation, and depending on the computational dehydration...... rate, different dehydrated structures were observed. Removing all water molecules immediately and removing water relatively fast (10 water molecules/10 ps) resulted in an amorphous system, whereas relatively slow computational dehydration (3 water molecules/10 ps) resulted in a crystalline anhydrate...

  17. A new parallel molecular dynamics algorithm for organic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plimpton, S.; Hendrickson, B.; Heffelfinger, G.

    1993-01-01

    A new parallel algorithm for simulating bonded molecular systems such as polymers and proteins by molecular dynamics (MD) is presented. In contrast to methods that extract parallelism by breaking the spatial domain into sub-pieces, the new method does not require regular geometries or uniform particle densities to achieve high parallel efficiency. For very large, regular systems spatial methods are often the best choice, but in practice the new method is faster for systems with tens-of-thousands of atoms simulated on large numbers of processors. It is also several times faster than the techniques commonly used for parallelizing bonded MD that assign a subset of atoms to each processor and require all-to-all communication. Implementation of the algorithm in a CHARMm-like MD model with many body forces and constraint dynamics is discussed and timings on the Intel Delta and Paragon machines are given. Example calculations using the algorithm in simulations of polymers and liquid-crystal molecules will also be briefly discussed

  18. Huge-scale molecular dynamics simulation of multibubble nuclei

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    We have developed molecular dynamics codes for a short-range interaction potential that adopt both the flat-MPI and MPI/OpenMP hybrid parallelizations on the basis of a full domain decomposition strategy. Benchmark simulations involving up to 38.4 billion Lennard-Jones particles were performed on Fujitsu PRIMEHPC FX10, consisting of 4800 SPARC64 IXfx 1.848 GHz processors, at the Information Technology Center of the University of Tokyo, and a performance of 193 teraflops was achieved, which corresponds to a 17.0% execution efficiency. Cavitation processes were also simulated on PRIMEHPC FX10 and SGI Altix ICE 8400EX at the Institute of Solid State Physics of the University of Tokyo, which involved 1.45 billion and 22.9 million particles, respectively. Ostwald-like ripening was observed after the multibubble nuclei. Our results demonstrate that direct simulations of multiscale phenomena involving phase transitions from the atomic scale are possible and that the molecular dynamics method is a promising method that can be applied to petascale computers. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Approach in Designing Thermostable Aspergillus niger Xylanase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malau, N. D.; Sianturi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular dynamics methods we have applied as a tool in designing thermostable Aspergillus niger Xylanase, by examining Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) and The Stability of the Secondary Structure of enzymes structure at its optimum temperature and compare with its high temperature behavior. As RMSD represents structural fluctuation at a particular temperature, a better understanding of this factor will suggest approaches to bioengineer these enzymes to enhance their thermostability. In this work molecular dynamic simulations of Aspergillus niger xylanase (ANX) have been carried at 400K (optimum catalytic temperature) for 2.5 ns and 500K (ANX reported inactive temperature) for 2.5 ns. Analysis have shown that the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) significant increase at higher temperatures compared at optimum temperature and some of the secondary structures of ANX that have been damaged at high temperature. Structural analysis revealed that the fluctuations of the α-helix and β-sheet regions are larger at higher temperatures compared to the fluctuations at optimum temperature.

  20. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, Frank; Clementi, Cecilia

    2015-10-13

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly interconverting states. Here, we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance metric for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here, we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and protein-inhibitor association in trypsin and benzamidine. We find that the total kinetic variance (TKV) is an excellent indicator of model quality and can be used to rank different input feature sets.

  1. Investigation of the dynamics of aqueous proline solutions using neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo de Molina, Paula; Alvarez, Fernando; Frick, Bernhard; Wildes, Andrew; Arbe, Arantxa; Colmenero, Juan

    2017-10-18

    We applied quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) techniques to samples with two different contrasts (deuterated solute/hydrogenated solvent and the opposite label) to selectively study the component dynamics of proline/water solutions. Results on diluted and concentrated solutions (31 and 6 water molecules/proline molecule, respectively) were analyzed in terms of the susceptibility and considering a recently proposed model for water dynamics [Arbe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2016, 117, 185501] which includes vibrations and the convolution of localized motions and diffusion. We found that proline molecules not only reduce the average diffusion coefficient of water but also extend the time/frequency range of the crossover region ('cage') between the vibrations and purely diffusive behavior. For the high proline concentration we also found experimental evidence of water heterogeneous dynamics and a distribution of diffusion coefficients. Complementary molecular dynamics simulations show that water molecules start to perform rotational diffusion when they escape the cage regime but before the purely diffusive behavior is established. The rotational diffusion regime is also retarded by the presence of proline molecules. On the other hand, a strong coupling between proline and water diffusive dynamics which persists with decreasing temperature is directly observed using QENS. Not only are the temperature dependences of the diffusion coefficients of both components the same, but their absolute values also approach each other with increasing proline concentration. We compared our results with those reported using other techniques, in particular using dielectric spectroscopy (DS). A simple approach based on molecular hydrodynamics and a molecular treatment of DS allows rationalizing the a priori puzzling inconsistency between QENS and dielectric results regarding the dynamic coupling of the two components. The interpretation proposed is based on general grounds and therefore

  2. Analyzing the Molecular Kinetics of Water Spreading on Hydrophobic Surfaces via Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2017-09-07

    In this paper, we report molecular kinetic analyses of water spreading on hydrophobic surfaces via molecular dynamics simulation. The hydrophobic surfaces are composed of amorphous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with a static contact angle of ~112.4° for water. On the basis of the molecular kinetic theory (MKT), the influences of both viscous damping and solid-liquid retarding were analyzed in evaluating contact line friction, which characterizes the frictional force on the contact line. The unit displacement length on PTFE was estimated to be ~0.621 nm and is ~4 times as long as the bond length of C-C backbone. The static friction coefficient was found to be ~[Formula: see text] Pa·s, which is on the same order of magnitude as the dynamic viscosity of water, and increases with the droplet size. A nondimensional number defined by the ratio of the standard deviation of wetting velocity to the characteristic wetting velocity was put forward to signify the strength of the inherent contact line fluctuation and unveil the mechanism of enhanced energy dissipation in nanoscale, whereas such effect would become insignificant in macroscale. Moreover, regarding a liquid droplet on hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surfaces, an approximate solution to the base radius development was derived by an asymptotic expansion approach.

  3. Structure of the antimicrobial beta-hairpin peptide protegrin-1 in a DLPC lipid bilayer investigated by molecular dynamics simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    -18 to extend perpendicular to the beta-hairpin plane. This bend was driven by a highly persistent hydrogen-bond between the polar peptide side-chain of TYR7 and the unshielded backbone carbonyl oxygen atom of GLY17. The H-bond formation relieves the unfavorable free energy of insertion of polar groups......All atom molecular dynamics simulations of the 18-residue beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide protegrin-1 (PG-1, RGGRLCYCRRRFCVCVGR-NH(2)) in a fully hydrated dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) lipid bilayer have been implemented. The goal of the reported work is to investigate the structure......-550]), and to delineate specific peptide-membrane interactions which are responsible for the peptide's membrane binding properties. A novel, previously unknown, "kick" shaped conformation of the peptide was detected, where a bend at the C-terminal beta-strand of the peptide caused the peptide backbone at residues 16...

  4. Nucleation of Salt Crystals in Clay Minerals: Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtian, Hassan; Wang, Haimeng; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2017-07-20

    Nucleation of salt crystals in confined media occurs in many processes of high importance, such as injection of CO 2 in geological formations for its sequestration. In particular, salt precipitation in clays, a main component of sedimentary rock, is an important phenomenon. The crystals precipitate on the pores' surface, modify the pore space morphology, and reduce its flow and transport properties. Despite numerous efforts to understand the mechanisms of nucleation of salt crystals in confined media, the effect of the clay's chemistry on the growth, distribution, and properties of the crystals is not well understood. We report the results of extensive molecular dynamics simulation of nucleation and growth of NaCl crystals in a clay pore using molecular models of two types of clay minerals, Na-montmorillonite and kaolinite. Clear evidence is presented for the nucleation of the salt crystals that indicates that the molecular structure of clay minerals affects their spatial distribution, although the nucleation mechanism is the same in both types of clays.

  5. Formation of molecular complexes of salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in a mixture of supercritical carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, V. E.; Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.

    2015-08-01

    The solvate structures formed by salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent (methanol, 0.03 mole fractions) at a density of 0.7 g/cm3 and a temperature of 318 K were studied by the molecular dynamics method. Salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids were found to form highly stable hydrogen-bonded complexes with methanol via the hydrogen atom of the carboxyl group. For methyl salicylate in which the carboxyl hydrogen is substituted by a methyl radical, the formation of stable hydrogen bonds with methanol was not revealed. The contribution of other functional groups of the solute to the interactions with the cosolvent was much smaller. An analysis of correlations between the obtained data and the literature data on the cosolvent effect on the solubility of the compounds in SC CO2 showed that the dissolving ability of SC CO2 with respect to a polar organic substance in the presence of a cosolvent increased only when stable hydrogen-bonded complexes are formed between this substance and the cosolvent.

  6. In silico study of amphiphilic nanotubes based on cyclic peptides in polar and non-polar solvent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Vinodhkumar; Vijayaraj, Ramadoss; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2016-01-01

    The stability of cyclic peptide assemblies (CPs) forming a macromolecular nanotube structure was investigated in solvents of different polarity using computational methods. The stability and structure of the complexes were studied using traditional molecular dynamics (MD). Energy of dissociation ...

  7. Structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of amorphous silicon: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Car, R.; Parrinello, M.

    1988-01-18

    An amorphous silicon structure is obtained with a computer simulation based on a new molecular-dynamics technique in which the interatomic potential is derived from a parameter-free quantum mechanical method. Our results for the atomic structure, the phonon spectrum, and the electronic properties are in excellent agreement with experiment. In addition we study details of the microscopic dynamics which are not directly accessible to experiment. We find in particular that structural defects are associated with weak bonds. These may give rise to low-frequency vibrational modes.

  8. How many molecular layers of polar solvent molecules control chemistry? The concept of compensating dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhals, Heinz; Braun, Patricia; Dietl, Christian; Mayer, Peter

    2013-09-27

    The extension of the solvent influence of the shell into the volume of a polar medium was examined by means of anti-collinear dipoles on the basis of the E(T)(30) solvent polarity scale (i.e., the molar energy of excitation of a pyridinium-N-phenolatebetaine dye; generally: E(T) =28,591 nm kcal mol(-1)/λmax) where no compensation effects were found. As a consequence, solvent polarity effects are concentrated to a very thin layer of a few thousand picometres around the solute where extensions into the bulk solvent become unimportant. A parallelism to the thin surface layer of water to the gas phase is discussed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Molecular mechanism of allosteric communication in Hsp70 revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Chiappori

    Full Text Available Investigating ligand-regulated allosteric coupling between protein domains is fundamental to understand cell-life regulation. The Hsp70 family of chaperones represents an example of proteins in which ATP binding and hydrolysis at the Nucleotide Binding Domain (NBD modulate substrate recognition at the Substrate Binding Domain (SBD. Herein, a comparative analysis of an allosteric (Hsp70-DnaK and a non-allosteric structural homolog (Hsp110-Sse1 of the Hsp70 family is carried out through molecular dynamics simulations, starting from different conformations and ligand-states. Analysis of ligand-dependent modulation of internal fluctuations and local deformation patterns highlights the structural and dynamical changes occurring at residue level upon ATP-ADP exchange, which are connected to the conformational transition between closed and open structures. By identifying the dynamically responsive protein regions and specific cross-domain hydrogen-bonding patterns that differentiate Hsp70 from Hsp110 as a function of the nucleotide, we propose a molecular mechanism for the allosteric signal propagation of the ATP-encoded conformational signal.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanomaterials using an artificial neural net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Mark; Maguire, John F.

    2004-11-01

    We report a method of conducting molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that uses an artificial neural net (ANN) to significantly increase computational speed. The technique enables dynamical simulation of hard objects with essentially arbitrarily complex geometry and is well suited to the simulation of granular matter over a wide range of densities. In hard systems, binary collisions are well defined and the ANN approach enables an efficient algorithm to determine the time to next collision with high accuracy. The method has been used to enable an MD study of an ensemble of 1800 hard, smooth, impenetrable equilateral triangles in a two-dimensional periodic space. At high packing fraction (0.6translational order but in which there is nearly perfect long-range orientational order. As the packing fraction decreases, the LCP undergoes a transition to a fluid state in which the long-range orientational correlation vanishes but short-range order is retained. Long-lived clusters, notably hexamers, are clearly apparent in the liquid phase and appear to be stabilized by a sort of internal “orientational” osmotic pressure. Insofar as can be inferred from our machine calculations, the transition between the LCP and the liquid occurs around ρ˜0.57 and appears to be second order. At low density, the hard-triangle system undergoes “chattering” collisions in which pairs of triangles collide and become associated, undergoing multiple collisions with each other before colliding with a third particle. The radial distribution function obtained from both molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo calculations shows a weak peak at low packing fraction.

  11. Combining optimal control theory and molecular dynamics for protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkun, Yaman; Gur, Mert

    2012-01-01

    A new method to develop low-energy folding routes for proteins is presented. The novel aspect of the proposed approach is the synergistic use of optimal control theory with Molecular Dynamics (MD). In the first step of the method, optimal control theory is employed to compute the force field and the optimal folding trajectory for the Cα atoms of a Coarse-Grained (CG) protein model. The solution of this CG optimization provides an harmonic approximation of the true potential energy surface around the native state. In the next step CG optimization guides the MD simulation by specifying the optimal target positions for the Cα atoms. In turn, MD simulation provides an all-atom conformation whose Cα positions match closely the reference target positions determined by CG optimization. This is accomplished by Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD) which uses a bias potential or harmonic restraint in addition to the usual MD potential. Folding is a dynamical process and as such residues make different contacts during the course of folding. Therefore CG optimization has to be reinitialized and repeated over time to accomodate these important changes. At each sampled folding time, the active contacts among the residues are recalculated based on the all-atom conformation obtained from MD. Using the new set of contacts, the CG potential is updated and the CG optimal trajectory for the Cα atoms is recomputed. This is followed by MD. Implementation of this repetitive CG optimization-MD simulation cycle generates the folding trajectory. Simulations on a model protein Villin demonstrate the utility of the method. Since the method is founded on the general tools of optimal control theory and MD without any restrictions, it is widely applicable to other systems. It can be easily implemented with available MD software packages.

  12. Combining optimal control theory and molecular dynamics for protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaman Arkun

    Full Text Available A new method to develop low-energy folding routes for proteins is presented. The novel aspect of the proposed approach is the synergistic use of optimal control theory with Molecular Dynamics (MD. In the first step of the method, optimal control theory is employed to compute the force field and the optimal folding trajectory for the Cα atoms of a Coarse-Grained (CG protein model. The solution of this CG optimization provides an harmonic approximation of the true potential energy surface around the native state. In the next step CG optimization guides the MD simulation by specifying the optimal target positions for the Cα atoms. In turn, MD simulation provides an all-atom conformation whose Cα positions match closely the reference target positions determined by CG optimization. This is accomplished by Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD which uses a bias potential or harmonic restraint in addition to the usual MD potential. Folding is a dynamical process and as such residues make different contacts during the course of folding. Therefore CG optimization has to be reinitialized and repeated over time to accomodate these important changes. At each sampled folding time, the active contacts among the residues are recalculated based on the all-atom conformation obtained from MD. Using the new set of contacts, the CG potential is updated and the CG optimal trajectory for the Cα atoms is recomputed. This is followed by MD. Implementation of this repetitive CG optimization-MD simulation cycle generates the folding trajectory. Simulations on a model protein Villin demonstrate the utility of the method. Since the method is founded on the general tools of optimal control theory and MD without any restrictions, it is widely applicable to other systems. It can be easily implemented with available MD software packages.

  13. Microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization NMR probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B(1S)) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B(1S) field is 13μT/W(1/2), where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5W the corresponding value is γ(S)B(1S)=0.84MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement (ϵ) vs. ω(1S)/(2π) for a sample of (13)C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A table-top PXI based low-field spectrometer for solution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, Joshua R; Stupic, Karl F; Moreland, J

    2018-03-01

    We present the development of a portable dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrument based on the PCI eXtensions for Instrumentation platform. The main purpose of the instrument is for study of 1 H polarization enhancements in solution through the Overhauser mechanism at low magnetic fields. A DNP probe set was constructed for use at 6.7 mT, using a modified Alderman-Grant resonator at 241 MHz for saturation of the electron transition. The solenoid for detection of the enhanced 1 H signal at 288 kHz was constructed with Litz wire. The largest observed 1 H enhancements (ε) at 6.7 mT for 14 N-CTPO radical in air saturated aqueous solution was ε~65. A concentration dependence of the enhancement is observed, with maximum ε at 5.5 mM. A low resonator efficiency for saturation of the electron paramagnetic resonance transition results in a decrease in ε for the 10.3 mM sample. At high incident powers (42 W) and long pump times, capacitor heating effects can also decrease the enhancement. The core unit and program described here could be easily adopted for multi-frequency DNP work, depending on available main magnets and selection of the "plug and play" arbitrary waveform generator, digitizer, and radiofrequency synthesizer PCI eXtensions for Instrumentatione cards. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Temperature dependent conformation studies of Calmodulin Protein using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, Sahil; Bhartiya, Vivek Kumar; Negi, Sunita

    2016-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) protein plays a very crucial role in the calcium signaling inside the eukaryotic cell structure [1, 2]. It can also bind to other proteins/targets and facilitate various activities inside the cell [3, 4]. Temperature dependent conformation changes in the CaM protein are studied with extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The quantitative comparison of simulation data with various forms of experimental results probing different aspects of the folding process can facilitate robust assessment of the accuracy of the calculations. It can also provide a detailed structural interpretation for the experimental observations as well as physical interpretation for theory behind different aspects of the experiment. Earlier these kinds of studies have been performed experimentally using fluorescence measurements as in [5]. The calcium bound form of CaM is observed to undergo a reversible conformation change in the range 295-301 K at calcium ion concentration 150 mM. The transition temperature was observed to depend on the calcium ion concentration of the protein. Leap-dynamics approach was used earlier to study the temperature dependent conformation change of CaM [6]. At 290 K, both the N- and C-lobes were stable, at 325 K, the C-lobe unfolds whereas at 360 both the lobes unfold [6]. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of 100 ns each for the temperatures 325 K and 375 K on the apo form of CaM, 3CLN and 1CFD. A remarkable dependence of the temperature is observed on the overall dynamics of both the forms of the protein as reported in our earlier study [7, 8]. 1CFD shows a much flexible linker as compared to 3CLN whereas the overall dynamics of the lobes mainly N-lobe is observed to be more in later case. Salt bridge formation between the residues 2 (ASP) and 148 (LYS) leads to a more compact form of 1CFD at 325 K. The unfolding of the protein is observed to increase with the increase in the temperature similar to the earlier reported

  16. Dynamic signaling cascades: reversible covalent reaction-coupled molecular switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yulong; You, Lei

    2015-11-11

    The research of systems chemistry exploring complex mixtures of interacting synthetic molecules has been burgeoning recently. Herein we demonstrate for the first time the coupling of molecular switches with a dynamic covalent reaction (DCR) and the modulation of created chemical cascades with a variety of inputs, thus closely mimicking a biological signaling system. A novel Michael type DCR of 10-methylacridinium perchlorate and monothiols exhibiting excellent regioselectivity and tunable affinity was discovered. A delicate balance between the unique reactivity of the reactant and the stability of the adduct leads to the generation of a strong acid in a thermodynamically controlled system. The dynamic cascade was next created via coupling of the DCR and a protonation-induced configurational switch (E/Z isomerization) through a proton relay. Detailed examination of the interdependence of the equilibrium enabled us to rationally optimize the cascade and also shed light on the possible intermediate of the switching process. Furthermore, relative independence of the coupled reactions was verified by the identification of stimuli that are able to facilitate one reaction but suppress the other. To further enhance systematic complexity, a second DCR of electrophilic aldehydes and thiols was employed for the reversible inhibition of the binary system, thus achieving the interplay of multiple equilibria. Finally, a fluorescence switch was turned on through coupling with the DCR, showcasing the versatility of our strategy. The results described herein should pave the way for the exploitation of multifunctional dynamic covalent cascades.

  17. Dynamic imaging of molecular motion ultrashort intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, Andre D.

    2002-05-01

    The nonlinear nonperturbative response of atoms in intense laser fields has been extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically in the past twenty years leading to new unexpected effects such as Above Threshold Ionization, ATI, high order frequency generation etc. and these are documented in recent book The similar studies of molecules is a new chapter in the pursuit of laser control and manipulation of molecules. The nonlinear nonperturbative response of molecules to intense (Icm2 ) and ultrashort (V10 fs) laser pulses [2] is expected to yield new effects due to the extra degrees of freedom nuclear motion as compared to atoms [3], such as creation of Laser Induced Molecular Potentials, LIMP' s, Charge Resonance Enhanced Ionization, CREI [4] and molecular High Order Harmonic Generation [5]. These nonlinear nonperturbative in effects were seen in experiments [6] and were predicted and confirmed by high-level numerical simulations of appropriate time-dependent Schrodinger equations [3-5,7], TDSE's, of molecules in laser fields. Our recent supercomputer simulations of H2+ molecule dynamics in intense laser fields, [7-9] based on TDSE, also allowed us to propose two new molecular imaging techniques: a) LCEI, Laser Coulomb Explosion Imaging [8] and b) LPEI, Laser Photoelectron Imaging [9]. The first is based on the analysis of the kinetic energy of molecular fragments after Coulomb Explosion, CE, whereas the latter imaging uses the shape of ATI electron peaks, produced by an intense laser pulse. We describe summarily in the present communication these two imaging methods which were developed using high level supercomputer simulations

  18. ImaEdge - a platform for quantitative analysis of the spatiotemporal dynamics of cortical proteins during cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Lim, Yen Wei; Zhao, Peng; Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Motegi, Fumio

    2017-12-15

    Cell polarity involves the compartmentalization of the cell cortex. The establishment of cortical compartments arises from the spatial bias in the activity and concentration of cortical proteins. The mechanistic dissection of cell polarity requires the accurate detection of dynamic changes in cortical proteins, but the fluctuations of cell shape and the inhomogeneous distributions of cortical proteins greatly complicate the quantitative extraction of their global and local changes during cell polarization. To address these problems, we introduce an open-source software package, ImaEdge, which automates the segmentation of the cortex from time-lapse movies, and enables quantitative extraction of cortical protein intensities. We demonstrate that ImaEdge enables efficient and rigorous analysis of the dynamic evolution of cortical PAR proteins during Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. It is also capable of accurate tracking of varying levels of transgene expression and discontinuous signals of the actomyosin cytoskeleton during multiple rounds of cell division. ImaEdge provides a unique resource for quantitative studies of cortical polarization, with the potential for application to many types of polarized cells.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first authors of the paper. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Molecular packing in 1-hexanol-DMPC bilayers studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, U.R.; Peters, Günther H.j.; Westh, P.

    2007-01-01

    The structure and molecular packing density of a “mismatched” solute, 1-hexanol, in lipid membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) was studied by molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the average location and orientation of the hexanol molecules matched earlier experimental dat....... The average lateral area per chain in this region expands, resulting in a looser packing density. The net effect in the core is a 2–3% decrease in density corresponding to a total volume increase of ∼ 14 cm3 mol−1 hexanol partitioned.......) is stretched by about 4%. Concomitantly, the average lateral area per chain decreases and these two effects compensate so that the overall packing density in the outer region, where the hexanol molecules are located, remains practically constant. The core of the bilayer (C9–C13) is slightly thinned...

  20. The MM2QM tool for combining docking, molecular dynamics, molecular mechanics, and quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosielski, Marcin; Hoffmann, Marcin; Kuron, Aneta; Korycka-Machala, Malgorzata; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2013-04-05

    The use of the MM2QM tool in a combined docking + molecular dynamics (MD) + molecular mechanics (MM) + quantum mechanical (QM) binding affinity prediction study is presented, and the tool itself is discussed. The system of interest is Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) pantothenate synthetase in complexes with three highly similar sulfonamide inhibitors, for which crystal structures are available. Starting from the structure of MTB pantothenate synthetase in the "open" conformation and following the combined docking + MD + MM + QM procedure, we were able to capture the closing of the enzyme binding pocket and to reproduce the position of the ligands with an average root mean square deviation of 1.6 Å. Protein-ligand interaction energies were reproduced with an average error lower than 10%. The discussion on the MD part and a protein flexibility importance is carried out. The presented approach may be useful especially for finding analog inhibitors or improving drug candidates. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.