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Sample records for polar frosts sublime

  1. HiRISE observations of gas sublimation-driven activity in Mars’ southern polar regions: I. Erosion of the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Thomas, N.; Portyankina, G.; McEwen, A.; Becker, T.; Byrne, S.; Herkenhoff, K.; Kieffer, H.; Mellon, M.

    2010-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has imaged the sublimation of Mars' seasonal CO 2 polar cap with unprecedented detail for one complete martian southern spring. In some areas of the surface, beneath the conformal coating of seasonal ice, radially-organized channels are connected in spidery patterns. The process of formation of this terrain, erosion by gas from subliming seasonal ice, has no earthly analog. The new capabilities (high resolution, color, and stereo images) of HiRISE enable detailed study of this enigmatic terrain. Two sites are analyzed in detail, one within an area expected to have translucent seasonal CO 2 ice, and the other site outside that region. Stereo anaglyphs show that some channels grow larger as they go uphill - implicating gas rather than liquid as the erosive agent. Dark fans of material from the substrate are observed draped over the seasonal ice, and this material collects in thin to thick layers in the channels, possibly choking off gas flow in subsequent years, resulting in inactive crisscrossing shallow channels. In some areas there are very dense networks of channels with similar width and depth, and fewer fans emerging later in the season are observed. Subtle variations in topography affect the channel morphology. A new terminology is proposed for the wide variety of erosional features observed.

  2. North Polar Surfaces of the Uranian Moons: Coated with CO2 Frost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Richard; Emery, Joshua; Rivkin, Andy; Trilling, David; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi

    2014-12-01

    We propose to investigate the near-surface composition of the Uranian moons Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon by using the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. Previous IRAC observations of these objects in Program 71 (2003 - 2005) indicate that the surfaces of their southern hemispheres are dominated by pure water ice (sub-observer latitudes 7 - 18 degree S). The observations we propose here are of these objects' now observable northern hemispheres (sub-observer latitudes 25 - 33 degree N). Unlike the Program 71 observations, which collected data near the end of southern summer when any seasonal CO2 frost would have migrated to the winter hemisphere, we are proposing to observe these moons at the beginning of northern summer when seasonal CO2 frost should still be present. Therefore, the 2015 - 2016 Cycle 11 opportunity window represents an ideal time frame to search for seasonal CO2 frost on these objects.

  3. Sublimation of new matrix candidates for high spatial resolution imaging mass spectrometry of lipids: enhanced information in both positive and negative polarities after 1,5-diaminonapthalene deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Aurélien; Charbonneau, Jade Laveaux; Fournaise, Erik; Chaurand, Pierre

    2012-02-21

    Matrix sublimation has demonstrated to be a powerful approach for high-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging of lipids, providing very homogeneous solvent-free deposition. This work presents a comprehensive study aiming to evaluate current and novel matrix candidates for high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of lipids from tissue section after deposition by sublimation. For this purpose, 12 matrices including 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), sinapinic acid (SA), α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 2,6-dihydroxyacetphenone (DHA), 2',4',6'-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP), 3-hydroxypicolinic acid (3-HPA), 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (DMAN), 1,8,9-anthracentriol (DIT), 1,5-diaminonapthalene (DAN), p-nitroaniline (NIT), 9-aminoacridine (9-AA), and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) were investigated for lipid detection efficiency in both positive and negative ionization modes, matrix interferences, and stability under vacuum. For the most relevant matrices, ion maps of the different lipid species were obtained from tissue sections at high spatial resolution and the detected peaks were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry. First proposed for imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) after sublimation, DAN has demonstrated to be of high efficiency providing rich lipid signatures in both positive and negative polarities with high vacuum stability and sub-20 μm resolution capacity. Ion images from adult mouse brain were generated with a 10 μm scanning resolution. Furthermore, ion images from adult mouse brain and whole-body fish tissue sections were also acquired in both polarity modes from the same tissue section at 100 μm spatial resolution. Sublimation of DAN represents an interesting approach to improve information with respect to currently employed matrices providing a deeper analysis of the lipidome by IMS.

  4. Towards a general scenario for spring sublimation of volatiles in the South Polar Regions of Mars: insights from MRO high-resolution observations by HiRISE and CRISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommerol, Antoine; Portyankina, Ganna; Thomas, Nicolas; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Vincendon, Mathieu; Langevin, Yves

    The sublimation of the seasonal deposits of volatiles during Martian spring results in strong temporal variations of the appearance of the southern Polar Regions terrains. The intense dust and CO2 jet-like activity [1] is the most spectacular manifestation of these processes. The high spatial resolution capabilities of the MRO instruments now offer the possibility of new analyses at an unprecedented level of detail. Results from the analyses of HiRISE images as well as complementary work on the physical modeling of the involved processes have recently been published [2,3,4]. We are now completing this work by extending the number of regions of interest and by including CRISM spectral information in our analyses. We have derived the temporal evolution of albedo during spring in ten different areas from the HiRISE and CRISM datasets. In addition, the evolution of the strengths of the CO2-and H2O-ice spectral features are extracted from the CRISM observations. The color imaging capabilities of HiRISE were extensively used to discriminate the different terrains. Composite color images built from spectra measured by CRISM in the visible spectral range provide the ideal context for the HiRISE images. Together, our observations allow us to propose a plausible scenario for the progressive subli-mation of the volatiles deposits that involves a succession of three steps characterized by the predominance of different processes. This updates and enhances the previous work of [5]. First, an intense and early episode of jet activity results in the deposition of large dust fans accom-panied by the condensation of fined grained CO2 frost. In an apparent contradiction with the "Kieffer model" [5], we do not observe the spectral signature of the hypothetical clean slab of CO2-ice at that time. The clean ice is hidden by a quasi-homogeneous layer that is highly contaminated by mineral dust, as already revealed by the OMEGA instrument [6]. We propose a hypothesis to bypass this

  5. On Sublimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitarese, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Although it encapsulates the Freudian theory of art, the theory of sublimation has become outmoded. What is more, since its inception there has always been something ill-defined about it. Does it use sexualized or de-sexualized drive energy? Is it a defence or an alternative to defence? Does it serve Eros or Thanatos? Is it useful in clinical work or is it unusable? The only, albeit uncertain, aid to a definition relies on the extrinsic criterion of concrete artistic realization. My aim here to revisit and possibly 'reinvent' sublimation in the light of certain principles of the pre-Romantic aesthetics of the sublime. Both are theories of spiritual elevation, in other words, elevation that moves towards abstract thinking, and of man's 'moral' achievement; and both attempt to explain the mystery of aesthetic experience. On the one hand, the aesthetics of the sublime offers a modern myth that helps us articulate a series of factors occasionally referred to by various authors as constitutive of sublimation but which have not been incorporated into a single organic framework: loss and early mourning work; the earlier existence of a catastrophic factor - to be regarded, depending on the situation, as either traumatic or simply 'negative'; the correspondence with a process of somatopsychic categorization which coincides with subjectivity. On the other hand, it also helps us grasp the experience of negative pleasure empathically, living it 'from the inside'. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  6. Robert Frost on Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Elaine

    This book is a collection of Frost's letters, reviews, introductions, lectures, and interviews on writing dating back to 1913. It provides Frost's view of literature, and its relation to language and social order. Part one, "Frost as a Literary Critic," discusses the scope of Frost's criticism and Frost as both critical theorist and…

  7. Instant Sublime Text starter

    CERN Document Server

    Haughee, Eric

    2013-01-01

    A starter which teaches the basic tasks to be performed with Sublime Text with the necessary practical examples and screenshots. This book requires only basic knowledge of the Internet and basic familiarity with any one of the three major operating systems, Windows, Linux, or Mac OS X. However, as Sublime Text 2 is primarily a text editor for writing software, many of the topics discussed will be specifically relevant to software development. That being said, the Sublime Text 2 Starter is also suitable for someone without a programming background who may be looking to learn one of the tools of

  8. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritchie B.G.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST. An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  9. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, Barry G. [Arizona State University

    2014-06-01

    The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST). An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  10. Io meteorology - How atmospheric pressure is controlled locally by volcanos and surface frosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1989-01-01

    The present modification of the Ingersoll et al. (1985) hydrodynamic model of the SO2 gas sublimation-driven flow from the day to the night side of Io includes the effects of nonuniform surface properties noted in observational studies. Calculations are conducted for atmospheric pressures, horizontal winds, sublimation rates, and condensation rates for such surface conditions as patchy and continuous frost cover, volcanic venting, surface temperature discontinuities, subsurface cold trapping, and the propagation of insolation into the frost. While pressure is found to follow local vapor pressure away from the plumes, it becomes higher inside them.

  11. Frost on Utopia Planitia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    This Viking Lander 2 picture from Utopia Planitia shows the first clear indication of frost accumulation on the Martian surface seen by lander cameras. The picture, looking due north, was obtained with a blue filter at 12:59 p.m. local lander time, Sept. 13, 1977. The season is late winter. Frost appears as a white accumulation around the bottom of rocks, in a trench dug by the lander sampler arm, and in scattered patches on the darker surface. The shadow of the lander, including the camera (center) and the meteorology boom (left), appears in foreground. As the sun moves, the shadow is moving from left to right, exposing areas covered by frost and previously protected from the sun by the lander shadow. (Another image taken one-half hour later suggests the frost patches have become smaller.) Apparently frost, formed during the Martian night, at least partially disappears during the warmer daytime. The composition of the frost, whether carbon dioxide or water or a mixture of the two (CO2 clathrate), is not known. Measurements from the meteorology instrument indicate minimum nighttime temperatures of 160 Kelvin (-171 Fahrenheit). At the time the image was taken, the temperature had risen to 175 Kelvin (-144 Fahrenheit). The atmospheric pressure was 8.835 millibars. This combination of pressure and temperature are inconsistent with carbon dioxide frost formation, but plausible near-surface mechanisms might have resulted in conditions favorable for CO2 frost formation. Viking orbiter thermal mapping and water vapor instruments indicate temperatures might have been slightly lower than measured by the lander, suggesting that the frost is more likely CO2 than H20. A remote, but possible, explanation is that the material is an extremely bright dust deposit. Color images to be taken will be able to discount this interpretation. The mechanism for frost deposition is unknown. Possibilities include formation directly on the surface, precipitation as snow, or material blown to

  12. O SUBLIME NA MODERNIDADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha de Almeida

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A obra Uma investigação filosófica sobre a origem de nossas idéias do sublime e dobelo, do sensualista inglês Edmund Burke (1757, data as origens do sublime na Modernidade. Nosublime ocorre é um prazer ligado à dor, um "horror delicioso" que sentimos quando acreditamosque estamos em perigo sem que isso esteja ocorrendo realmente. Em O mundo como Vontade erepresentação Schopenhauer assume as influências que sofreu de Kant no que diz respeito à suainterpretação sobre o belo e o sublime, porém difere dele quanto à natureza dessa impressão. ParaSchopenhauer a experiência estética pressupõe a dissolução da subjetividade num movimento decontemplação das idéias livre do querer imposto pela vontade individual. As idéias deSchopenhauer influenciaram a estética do Nietzsche de O nascimento da tragédia.

  13. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditionsThe Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for a...

  14. A sublimation heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Gary G.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-01-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid–vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation. PMID:25731669

  15. Alpha sources deposit by sublimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoudry, F.; Eloy, J.F.

    1983-09-01

    We studied and realized a device able to perform some very thin substracts used for alpha spectrometry measurements. Sources are prepared by sublimation of the sample in a vacuum container. The energy required for this sublimation is furnished by a laser beam [fr

  16. Los cuerpos sublimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Zangara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available La narración de crímenes en la prensa de masas y las pantallas parece constituir una versión contemporánea del magnetismo según Edgar Allan Poe. La estetización mediática (ya no la información de una serie reciente de feminicidios permite reconocer una cierta lógica de lo sublime como clave de la producción de noticias-mercancías. En su variante clásica, la ficción policial funciona como una matriz ideológica decisiva de la enunciación periodística.

  17. The Mars water cycle at other epochs - Recent history of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical model is presented of the integrated role of seasonal water cycle on the evolution of polar deposits on Mars over the last 10 million years. From the model, it is concluded that the only major difference between the polar caps which affects their long-term behavior is ultimately the difference in their elevations. Because of that difference, there is a preference for CO2 frost to stay longer on the northern polar cap. The average difference in sublimation at the caps results in a net south-to-north transport of water ice over long time scales. Superimposed on any long-term behavior is a transfer of water ice between the caps on the 10 exp 5 - 10 exp 6 yr time scales. The amount of water exchanged is small compared to the total ice content of the polar deposits.

  18. The significance of vertical moisture diffusion on drifting snow sublimation near snow surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Shi, Guanglei

    2017-12-01

    Sublimation of blowing snow is an important parameter not only for the study of polar ice sheets and glaciers, but also for maintaining the ecology of arid and semi-arid lands. However, sublimation of near-surface blowing snow has often been ignored in previous studies. To study sublimation of near-surface blowing snow, we established a sublimation of blowing snow model containing both a vertical moisture diffusion equation and a heat balance equation. The results showed that although sublimation of near-surface blowing snow was strongly reduced by a negative feedback effect, due to vertical moisture diffusion, the relative humidity near the surface does not reach 100 %. Therefore, the sublimation of near-surface blowing snow does not stop. In addition, the sublimation rate near the surface is 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that at 10 m above the surface and the mass of snow sublimation near the surface accounts for more than half of the total snow sublimation when the friction wind velocity is less than about 0.55 m s-1. Therefore, the sublimation of near-surface blowing snow should not be neglected.

  19. Frost evolution in tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    A review was carried out on the physical and thermal mechanisms of permafrost evaluation in soils and uranium tailings. The primary mechanism controlling permafrost evolution is conductive heat transfer with the latent heat of fusion of water being liberated as phase change occurs. Depending on the soil properties and freezing rate, pore water can be expelled from the frost front or pore water can migrate towards the frost front. Solute redistribution may occur as the frost front penetrates into the soil. The rate of frost penetration is a function of the thermal properties of the tailings and the climatic conditions. Computer modelling programmes capable of modelling permafrost evolution were reviewed. The GEOTHERM programme was selected as being the most appropriate for this study. The GEOTHERM programme uses the finite element method of thermal analysis. The ground surface temperature is determined by solving the energy balance equations a the ground surface. The GEOTHERM programme was used to simulate the permafrost evolution in the Key Lake Mine tailings located in north central Saskatchewan. The analyses indicated that the existing frozen zones in the tailing pond will eventually thaw if an average snow depth covers the tailings. Hundreds of years are required to thaw the tailings. If minimal snow cover is present the extent of the frozen zone in the tailings will increase

  20. Robert Frost, Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Nancy

    This biography explores poet Robert Frost's techniques as a teacher from the early days of teaching at Pinkerton Academy in Derry, New Hampshire, to his acceptance of a chair at Harvard University and his subsequent associations with numerous other schools. Also examined are his educational practices and philosophy--particularly his life-long…

  1. Tints, Shades and Frost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a classroom art project inspired by the work of Robert Frost, one of the most acclaimed and beloved American poets of all time. Using tints and shades in a composition, this project demonstrates how quality literature may be incorporated into elementary art lessons in a very useful way, making art an important complement to…

  2. The Mars water cycle at other epochs: Recent history of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1992-01-01

    The Martian polar caps and layered terrain presumably evolves by the deposition and removal of small amounts of water and dust each year, the current cap attributes therefore represent the incremental transport during a single year as integrated over long periods of time. The role was studied of condensation and sublimation of water ice in this process by examining the seasonal water cycle during the last 10(exp 7) yr. In the model, axial obliquity, eccentricity, and L sub s of perihelion vary according to dynamical models. At each epoch, the seasonal variations in temperature are calculated at the two poles, keeping track of the seasonal CO2 cap and the summertime sublimation of water vapor into the atmosphere; net exchange of water between the two caps is calculated based on the difference in the summertime sublimation between the two caps (or on the sublimation from one cap if the other is covered with CO2 frost all year). Results from the model can help to explain (1) the apparent inconsistency between the timescales inferred for layer formation and the much older crater retention age of the cap and (2) the difference in sizes of the two residual caps, with the south being smaller than the north.

  3. Sublime Views and Beautiful Explanations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barry, Daved; Meisiek, Stefan; Hatch, Mary Jo

    To create a generative theory that provides beautiful explanations and sublime views requires both a crafts and an art approach to scientific theorizing. The search for generativity leads scholars to perform various theorizing moves between the confines of simple, yet eloquent beauty...

  4. Eisenhower and the American Sublime

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Ned

    2008-01-01

    This essay presents Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidential rhetoric as an iteration of an American synecdochal sublime. Eisenhower's rhetoric sought to re-aim civic sight beyond corporeal objects to the nation's transcendental essence. This rhetoric is intimately connected to prevailing political anxieties and exigencies, especially the problem of…

  5. Measurements of seasonal frost depth by frost tube in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, K.; Yoshikawa, K.; Iwahana, G.; Stanilovskaya, J. V.; Sawada, Y.; Sone, T.

    2017-12-01

    Since 2011 winter season, frost depths have been measured as an outreach program in Hokkaido, northern part of Japan, where seasonal ground freezing occurs in winter. Frost depths were measured in elementary, junior high and high schools in order to emphasis their interest for earth sciences. At schools, using simple frost tube, measurements were conducted directly once a week by students or teacher during ground freezing under no snow-removal condition. A lecture was made in class and a frost tube was set at schoolyard, as the same tube and protocol as UAF's Permafrost Outreach Program, using clear tube with blue-colored water. In 2011 winter season, we started measurements at three schools, and the number of school extended to 32 in 2016 season, 26 elementary schools, 5 junior high schools and one high school. We visited schools in summer time or just before frost season to talk about the method of measurement, and measurements by students started just after ground freezing. After the end of frozen period, we visited schools again to explain results of each school or another schools in Japan, Alaska, Canada or Russia. The measured frost depths in Hokkaido ranged widely, from only a few centimeter to more than 50 cm. However, some schools had no frost depth due to heavy snow. We confirmed that the frost depth strongly depends on air temperature and snow depth. The lecture was made to student why the frost depth ranged widely, and the effect of snow was explained by using the example of igloo. In order to validate the effect of snow and to compare frost depths, we tried to measure frost depths under snow-removal and no snow-removal conditions at the same elementary school. At the end of December, depths had no significant difference between these conditions, and the difference went to 14 cm after one month, with about 30 cm of snow depth. After these measurements and lectures, students noticed snow has a role as insulator and affects the frost depth.

  6. Robert Frost: Teacher "Earner, Learner, Yearner."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Nancy Sue

    An account of Robert Frost's teaching, along with an assessment of it, are presented. Material consulted includes Frost's published letters, prose, and poetry; Lawrance Thompson's authorized biography; Lesley Frost's "New Hampshire's Child: The Derry Journals of Lesley Frost;" and additional sources such as films and periodicals,…

  7. Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and the Aesthetically Sublime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2003-01-01

    Much has been written on the relationship between Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche. Much remains to be said, however, concerning their respective theories of the sublime. In this article, the author first argues against the traditional, dialectical view of Schopenhauer's theory of the sublime that stresses the crucial role the sublime…

  8. Sacred Space and Sublime Sacramental Piety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2012-01-01

    Analyses and Discussions of Mozart's Sacramental Litanies K. 125 and K. 243 in relation to the notions of the Sacred and the Sublime.......Analyses and Discussions of Mozart's Sacramental Litanies K. 125 and K. 243 in relation to the notions of the Sacred and the Sublime....

  9. With Robert Frost in Tesolonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welninski, Virginia

    A teacher's guide and exercises for teaching poetry by Robert Frost to English as a second language students are presented. Suggestions are presented for developing meanings for words and other meaningful units through the use of realia, pictures, demonstrations, definitions, context clues, paraphrasing, completion exercises, solving and creating…

  10. Helicity Asymmetry in gamma p -> pi+ n with FROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen Strauch

    2012-04-01

    The main objective of the FROST experiment at Jefferson Lab is the study of baryon resonances. The polarization observable E for the reaction gamma p to pi+n has been measured as part of this program. A circularly polarized tagged photon beam with energies from 0.35 to 2.35 GeV was incident on a longitudinally polarized frozen-spin butanol target. The final-state pions were detected with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Preliminary polarization data agree fairly well with present SAID and MAID partial-wave analyses at low photon energies. In most of the covered energy range, however, significant deviations are observed. These discrepancies underline the crucial importance of polarization observables to further constrain these analyses.

  11. Blowing snow sublimation and transport over Antarctica from 11 years of CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Kayetha, Vinay; Yang, Yuekui; Pauly, Rebecca

    2017-11-01

    Blowing snow processes commonly occur over the earth's ice sheets when the 10 m wind speed exceeds a threshold value. These processes play a key role in the sublimation and redistribution of snow thereby influencing the surface mass balance. Prior field studies and modeling results have shown the importance of blowing snow sublimation and transport on the surface mass budget and hydrological cycle of high-latitude regions. For the first time, we present continent-wide estimates of blowing snow sublimation and transport over Antarctica for the period 2006-2016 based on direct observation of blowing snow events. We use an improved version of the blowing snow detection algorithm developed for previous work that uses atmospheric backscatter measurements obtained from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) satellite. The blowing snow events identified by CALIPSO and meteorological fields from MERRA-2 are used to compute the blowing snow sublimation and transport rates. Our results show that maximum sublimation occurs along and slightly inland of the coastline. This is contrary to the observed maximum blowing snow frequency which occurs over the interior. The associated temperature and moisture reanalysis fields likely contribute to the spatial distribution of the maximum sublimation values. However, the spatial pattern of the sublimation rate over Antarctica is consistent with modeling studies and precipitation estimates. Overall, our results show that the 2006-2016 Antarctica average integrated blowing snow sublimation is about 393 ± 196 Gt yr-1, which is considerably larger than previous model-derived estimates. We find maximum blowing snow transport amount of 5 Mt km-1 yr-1 over parts of East Antarctica and estimate that the average snow transport from continent to ocean is about 3.7 Gt yr-1. These continent-wide estimates are the first of their kind

  12. Assessing the Impact of Sublimation on the Stable Water Isotope Signal of Surface Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, D. P.; Ehrenfeucht, S.; Marchant, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    Sublimation is often a significant, if not the dominant, mechanism for ablation in polar and high elevation glacial systems. Previous field studies on firn and ice have suggested that sublimation can enrich the stable water isotope (δD and δ18O) signatures of these exposed materials. Several additional studies have attempted to replicate this effect through laboratory experiments. However, neither the magnitude of alteration caused by sublimation nor the maximum depth at which ice is affected are well-constrained. The effect of sublimation-induced alteration on the original meteoric signal relative to other post-depositional processes is additionally unknown. Here, we present the results of an experimental study on the effect of sublimation on stable water isotope ratios in surface ice. Using high-resolution data, we attempt to assess the suitability of δD and δ18O in near-surface and exposed ice for use as paleoclimate proxies. This type of analysis is particularly useful for future studies of ice from hyper-arid polar regions like the Antarctic McMurdo Dry Valleys, and may be extended to icy planetary bodies, including surface ice on Mars.

  13. Autonomy,Genius,and the Sublime

    OpenAIRE

    デュカウスキー, トム

    2003-01-01

    There has long been a link acknowledged between human autonomy and works of artistic genius, sublime works which are recognised as being somehow divine in nature. It is the purpose of this paper to study this link. In the introduction, I shall discuss what is meant by autonomy, and how it is that we may define a special kind of autonomy as it relates to artistic geniuses and their sublime artistic creations. I shall also define what is meant by the sublime, or divine artistry, in literature u...

  14. Anhydrous Ammonia Frost on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, W. D.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Ammonia has been suggested as a probable source for sustaining Titan's thick nitrogen-dominated atmosphere. Ammonia is believed to be important to maintaining nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere. Ammonia is seen in clouds in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, but has yet to be detected on any of the satellites. This may be because all forms of NH3 are unstable in the ambient conditions of the satellites surfaces or that its spectral features are altered by other components of the surface, and have not been identified. It has recently been demonstrated[1] that brightening occurs in Titan’s atmosphere that is transient on the time-scale of months. The spectral shape of the brightening is more consistent with that of the transient apparition of a pure ammonia frost than of an ammonia monohydrate or ammonia dihydrate frost. However, the phase behavior of the ammonia water system has peritectics at compositions of 1:1 and 1:2. These hydrate forms would be expected to dominate if the frost, or the reservoir from which the frost was derived had any water present. Physical mechanisms for producing measurable quanitities of anhydrous ammonia can include chemical dehydration or dehydration of the vapor phase - but it is challenging to store significant quantities of the anhydrous material because of the phase behavior in the solid state. [1] Nelson, R.M., et al. Saturn’s Titan: Surface Change, Ammonia, and Implications for Atmospheric and Tectonic Activity., Icarus, 199, pp. 429-441, 2009 This work was performed at JPL under contract to NASA

  15. Study of Remontant Raspberry Frost Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushchina M.Yu.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the second component of remontant raspberry cold hardiness - frost resistance, namely the ability of this raspberry type to tolerate the lowest temperature. Series of artificial freezing was carried out to check the frost-resistance. According to the data obtained the most frost-resistant varieties of remontant raspberries were detected. The critical low temperature for all studied varieties and forms of remontant raspberries was estimated.

  16. Frost resistance of alpine woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert eNeuner

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This report provides a brief review of key findings related to frost resistance in alpine woody plant species, summarizes data on their frost resistance, highlights the importance of freeze avoidance mechanisms, and indicates areas of future research.Freezing temperatures are possible throughout the whole growing period in the alpine life zone. Frost severity, comprised of both intensity and duration, becomes greater with increasing elevation and, there is also a greater probability, that small statured woody plants, may be insulated by snow cover.Several frost survival mechanisms have evolved in woody alpine plants in response to these environmental conditions. Examples of tolerance to extracellular freezing and freeze dehydration, life cycles that allow species to escape frost, and freeze avoidance mechanisms can all be found. Despite their specific adaption to the alpine environment, frost damage can occur in spring, while all alpine woody plants have a low risk of frost damage in winter. Experimental evidence indicates that premature deacclimation in Pinus cembra in the spring, and a limited ability of many species of alpine woody shrubs to rapidly reacclimate when they lose snow cover, resulting in reduced levels of frost resistance in the spring, may be particularly critical under the projected changes in climate.In this review, frost resistance and specific frost survival mechanisms of different organs (leaves, stems, vegetative and reproductive over-wintering buds, flowers and fruits and tissues are compared. The seasonal dynamics of frost resistance of leaves of trees, as opposed to woody shrubs, is also discussed. The ability of some tissues and organs to avoid freezing by supercooling, as visualized by high resolution infrared thermography, are also provided. Collectively, the report provides a review of the complex and diverse ways that woody plants survive in the frost dominated environment of the alpine life zone.

  17. Frost resistance in alpine woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of key findings related to frost resistance in alpine woody plant species, summarizes data on their frost resistance, highlights the importance of freeze avoidance mechanisms, and indicates areas of future research. Freezing temperatures are possible throughout the whole growing period in the alpine life zone. Frost severity, comprised of both intensity and duration, becomes greater with increasing elevation and, there is also a greater probability, that small statured woody plants, may be insulated by snow cover. Several frost survival mechanisms have evolved in woody alpine plants in response to these environmental conditions. Examples of tolerance to extracellular freezing and freeze dehydration, life cycles that allow species to escape frost, and freeze avoidance mechanisms can all be found. Despite their specific adaption to the alpine environment, frost damage can occur in spring, while all alpine woody plants have a low risk of frost damage in winter. Experimental evidence indicates that premature deacclimation in Pinus cembra in the spring, and a limited ability of many species of alpine woody shrubs to rapidly reacclimate when they lose snow cover, resulting in reduced levels of frost resistance in the spring, may be particularly critical under the projected changes in climate. In this review, frost resistance and specific frost survival mechanisms of different organs (leaves, stems, vegetative and reproductive over-wintering buds, flowers, and fruits) and tissues are compared. The seasonal dynamics of frost resistance of leaves of trees, as opposed to woody shrubs, is also discussed. The ability of some tissues and organs to avoid freezing by supercooling, as visualized by high resolution infrared thermography, are also provided. Collectively, the report provides a review of the complex and diverse ways that woody plants survive in the frost dominated environment of the alpine life zone.

  18. The Effect of CO2 Ice Cap Sublimation on Mars Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterson, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Sublimation of the polar CO2 ice caps on Mars is an ongoing phenomenon that may be contributing to secular climate change on Mars. The transfer of CO2 between the surface and atmosphere via sublimation and deposition may alter atmospheric mass such that net atmospheric mass is increasing despite seasonal variations in CO2 transfer. My study builds on previous studies by Kahre and Haberle that analyze and compare data from the Phoenix and Viking Landers 1 and 2 to determine whether secular climate change is happening on Mars. In this project, I use two years worth of temperature, pressure, and elevation data from the MSL Curiosity rover to create a program that allows for successful comparison of Curiosity pressure data to Viking Lander pressure data so a conclusion can be drawn regarding whether CO2 ice cap sublimation is causing a net increase in atmospheric mass and is thus contributing to secular climate change on Mars.

  19. Frost resistance of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    materials, has been developed.The importance of the pore structure on the development of stresses in the material during freezing is emphasized. To verify the model, experimental investigations are made on various concretes without air-entrainment and brick tiles with different porosities......In this thesis it is shown that the critical degree of saturation is suitable as parameter for the frost resistance of porous building materials. A numerical model for prediction of critical degrees of saturation based on fracture mechanics and phase geometry of two-phase materials, e.g. porous...

  20. Frost Heave in Colloidal Soils

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We develop a mathematical model of frost heave in colloidal soils. The theory accountsfor heave and consolidation while not requiring a frozen fringe assumption. Two solidificationregimes occur: a compaction regime in which the soil consolidates to accommodate the ice lenses, and a heave regime during which liquid is sucked into the consolidated soil from an external reservoir, and the added volume causes the soil to heave. The ice fraction is found to vary inversely with thefreezing velocity V , while the rate of heave is independent of V , consistent with field and laboratoryobservations. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  1. Schopenhauer e os paradoxos do sublime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Arnaud

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1677-2954.2012v11nesp1p153 A principal distinção entre a concepção schopenhaueriana e kantiana do sublime reside, segundo este artigo, no fato que o observador, no último caso, deve ser submetido a um perigo apenas possível, enquanto no primeiro caso ele deve ser realmente amedrontado. O principal impulso do sentimento do sublime é de fato, em Schopenhauer, a intervenção da vontade, que deve ser portanto realmente ameaçada. Daí resultam alguns paradoxos e originalidades da teoria do sublime de Schopenhauer, principalmente de um ponto de vista ético, cujos vestígios eu tento seguir.

  2. Frost damage of concrete subject to confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2016-01-01

    When internal frost damage is observed in real concrete structures, the usual pattern is cracks with a preferred orientation parallel to the exposed surface. When exposing concrete with poor frost resistance to a standardised freeze/thaw test in the laboratory, the orientations of the resulting...

  3. Mechanisms and environmental signals triggering frost hardening ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2004-10-28

    Oct 28, 2004 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 29; Issue 4. Plant resistance to cold stress: Mechanisms and environmental signals triggering frost hardening and dehardening ... Keywords. Cold acclimation of plants; environmental signals; frost hardening; photoperiod; phytochrome; Scots pine ...

  4. OECI TuBaFrost tumor biobanking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riegman, Peter H. J.; Bosch, Antonio Llombart; Riegman, P. H. J.; Dinjens, W. N. M.; Oomen, M. H. A.; Spatz, A.; Ratcliffe, C.; Knox, K.; Mager, R.; Kerr, D.; Pezzella, F.; van Damme, B.; van de Vijver, M.; van Boven, H.; Morente, M. M.; Alonso, S.; Kerjaschki, D.; Pammer, J.; Lopez-Guerrero, J. A.; Bosch, A. Llombart; Carbone, A.; Gloghini, A.; Teodorovic, I.; Isabelle, M.; Jaminé, D.; Passioukov, A.; Lejeune, S.; Therasse, P.; van Veen, E. B.; Lam, K. H.; Oosterhuis, J. W.

    2008-01-01

    OECI TuBaFrost harbors a complete infrastructure for the exchange of frozen tumor samples between European countries. OECI TuBaFrost consists of: * A code of conduct on how to exchange human residual samples in Europe, * A central database application accessible over the Internet (www.tubafrost.org)

  5. Robert Frost and the Poetry of Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, W. John; Tamres, David H.

    1992-01-01

    Examines five poems by Robert Frost that illustrate Frost's interest in science. The poems include allusions to renowned physicists, metaphoric descriptions of some famous physics experiments, explorations of complementarity as enunciated by Bohr, and poetic formulations of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. (20 references) (MDH)

  6. Robert Frost and the Uses of Biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lewis H., Jr.

    The persona Robert Frost communicated to most of his wide, diverse, and often non-academic audience was that of a rather isolated New England farmer, who--because of his limited experience with city folk and urban living--was untouched and thereby uncorrupted by the ways of the world. In teaching Frost, as in teaching any poet, some sort of…

  7. Recommended sublimation pressure and enthalpy of benzene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, K.; Fulem, Michal; Červinka, C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, Jan (2014), s. 40-47 ISSN 0021-9614 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : benzene * vapor pressure * heat capacity * ideal-gas thermodynamic properties * sublimation enthalpy * recommended vapor pressure Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.679, year: 2014

  8. Frost risks in the Mantaro river basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Trasmonte

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available As part of the study on the Mantaro river basin's (central Andes of Perú current vulnerability to climate change, the temporal and spatial characteristics of frosts were analysed. These characteristics included intensity, frequency, duration, frost-free periods, area distribution and historical trends. Maps of frost risk were determined for the entire river basin, by means of mathematical algorithms and GIS (Geographic Information Systems tools, using minimum temperature – 1960 to 2002 period, geomorphology, slope, land-use, types of soils, vegetation and life zones, emphasizing the rainy season (September to April, when the impacts of frost on agriculture are most severe. We recognized four categories of frost risks: low, moderate, high and critical. The critical risks (with a very high probability of occurrence were related to high altitudes on the basin (altitudes higher than 3800 m a.s.l., while the low (or null probability of occurring risks were found in the lower zones (less than 2500 m a.s.l.. Because of the very intense agricultural activity and the high sensitivity of the main crops (Maize, potato, artichoke in the Mantaro valley (altitudes between 3100 and 3300 m a.s.l., moderate to high frost risks can be expected, with a low to moderate probability of occurrence. Another significant result was a positive trend of 8 days per decade in the number of frost days during the rainy season.

  9. Alan Paton's Sublime: Race, Landscape and the Transcendence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article develops a postcolonial reading of the sublime by suggesting that aesthetic theories of the sublime were, in their classical philosophical formulations by Edmund Burke and Immanuel Kant, founded on problematic assumptions of racial difference. In the colonial sphere, it is argued, the sublime could discursively ...

  10. Determination of E and G Observables in n Photoproduction on the CLAS Frozen Spin Target (FROST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senderovich, Igor [University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Morrison, Brian T. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Dugger, Michael R. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Ritchie, Barry G. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Tucker, Ross J. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Polarization observables are vital for disentangling overlapping resonances in the baryon spectrum. Extensive data have been collected at Jefferson Lab in Hall B with circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beam incident on longitudinally polarized protons provided by the Frozen Spin Target (FROST). The focus of the described work is on η photoproduction, which acts as an "isospin filter", isolating the N*(I = 1/2) resonances. Preliminary results for the double-polarization observables E and G are presented. There are currently no data on these in the world database for η photoproduction.

  11. Delayed condensation and frost formation on superhydrophobic carbon soot coatings by controlling the presence of hydrophilic active sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmeryan, Karekin D.; Castano, Carlos E.; Mohammadi, Reza; Lazarov, Yuliyan; Radeva, Ekaterina I.

    2018-02-01

    Condensation frosting is an undesired natural phenomenon that could be impeded efficiently using appropriate wettability and morphologically patterned surfaces. The icephobic properties of carbon soot and the fabrication scalability of its synthesis method are a good foundation for anti-frosting applications; however, the fundamentals of frost growth and spreading on sooted surfaces have not been examined yet. In this study, we investigate the anti-frosting performance of three groups of superhydrophobic soot coatings by means of 16 MHz quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs). The analysis of the real-time sensor signal of each soot coated QCM pattern shows that frost formation and its propagation velocity depend on the quantity of oxygen functionalities and structural defects in the material. In turn, the reduction of both parameters shifts the onset of frost growth to temperatures below  -20 °C, whereas the interdroplet ice bridging is slowed by a factor of four. Moreover, high-resolution scanning electron micrographs of the samples imply delamination upon defrosting of the soot with spherical-like morphology via polar interactions driven mechanism. These results reveal an opportunity for control of frost incipiency on sooted surfaces by adjusting the synthesis conditions and depositing soot coatings with as low as possible content of hydrophilic active sites.

  12. Quantitative studies of the Martian south polar region using spacecraft images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herkenhoff, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Mariner 9 images were processed for comparison with nearly simultaneous infrared spectra of the south polar cap of Mars. Combined analysis of these observations indicates that the southern residual cap was covered by carbon dioxide frost throughout the summer of 1971-72. Five color/albedo units have been recognized and mapped in the southern layered deposits on Mars. Shadow brightnesses were measured and modeled in order to correct for the effects of atmospheric scattering and quantify the albedo and color of the surface. The layered deposits appear to be mantled by red dust, except where eolian stripping has exposed the darker, less red underlying bedrock. Frost and bare ground are mixed below the resolution of the images in many areas, some of which appear to be younger than the surrounding layered terrain. The available observational data suggest that the layered deposits are composed of bright dust, water ice, and a small amount of dark material. Weathering of the layered deposits by sublimation of water ice can account for the data presented here and previous observations of the north polar deposits. The non-volatile component of the layered deposits appears to consist mainly of bright red dust, with small amounts of dark dust or sand. Dark dust, perhaps similar to the magnetic material found at the Viking Lander sites, may preferentially form filamentary residue particle upon weathering of the deposits. Once eroded, these particles may saltate to form the dark dunes found in both polar regions. Eventual destruction of the particle could allow recycling of the dark dust into the layered deposits via atmospheric suspension

  13. Statistical-Synoptic Analysis of the Atmosphere Thickness Pattern of Iran’s Pervasive Frosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Rousta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at analyzing the synoptic pattern of atmospheric thickness of winter pervasive frosts in Iran. To this end, the data related to the daily minimum temperature of a 50-year period (1961–2010 were gathered from 451 synoptic and climatology stations. Then, the instances in which the temperature was below 0 °C for at least two consecutive days and this phenomenon covered at least 50% of the entirety of Iran were selected. Subsequently, the atmosphere thickness pattern was extracted for these days, with the representative day being identified and analyzed through cluster analysis. The results showed that the Siberian high pressure plays a significant role in the occurrence of pervasive frosts in Iran. In some other cases, the northeast–southwest direction of this pattern leads to its combination with the East Europe high pressure, causing widespread frosts in Iran. Furthermore, the interaction between counter clockwise currents in this system and the clockwise currents in the Azores high pressure tongue directs cold weather from northern parts of Europe toward Iran. The formation of blocking systems leads to the stagnation of cold weather over Iran, a phenomenon that results in significant reduction of temperature and severe frosts in these areas. In addition, the omega pattern (the fifth pattern and Deep Eastern European trough and polar low pressure pattern (the fourth pattern were the most dominant and severe frost patterns in Iran respectively.

  14. Freezer-sublimer for gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reti, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for freezing and subliming uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) as part of a gaseous diffusion plant from which a quantity of the UF 6 inventory is intermittently withdrawn and frozen to solidify it. A plurality of upright heat pipes holds a coolant and is arranged in a two compartment vessel, the lower compartment is exposed to UF 6 , the higher one serves for condensing the evaporated coolant by means of cooling water. In one embodiment, each pipe has a quantity of coolant such as freon, hermetically sealded therein. In the other embodiment, each pipe is sealed only at the lower end while the upper end communicates with a common vapor or cooling chamber which contains a water cooled condenser. The cooling water has a sufficiently low temperature to condense the evaporated coolant. The liquid coolant flows gravitationally downward to the lower end portion of the pipe. UF 6 gas is flowed into the tank where it contacts the finned outside surface of the heat pipes. Heat from the gas evaporates the coolant and the gas in turn is solidified on the exterior of the heat pipe sections in the tank. To recover UF 6 gas from the tank, the solidified UF 6 is sublimed by passing compressed UF 6 gas over the frozen UF 6 gas on the pipes or by externally heating the lower ends of the pipes sufficiently to evaporate the coolant therein above the subliming temperature of the UF 6 . The subliming UF 6 gas then condenses the coolant in the vertical heat pipes, so that it can gravitationally flow back to the lower end portions

  15. Art, Terrorism and the Negative Sublime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Berleant

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The range of the aesthetic has expanded to cover not only a wider range of objects and situations of daily life but also to encompass the negative. This includes terrorism, whose aesthetic impact is central to its use as a political tactic. The complex of positive and negative aesthetic values in terrorism are explored, introducing the concept of the sublime as a negative category to illuminate the analysis and the distinctive aesthetic of terrorism.

  16. Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1999-01-01

    Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete with 2.5-4.2% air and 6-9% air (% by volume in fresh concrete) casted in the laboratory and in-situ is compared. Steel fibres with hooked ends (ZP, length 30 mm) and polypropylene fibres (PP, CS, length 12 mm) are applied. It is shown that· addition...... of 0.4-1% by volume of fibres cannot replace air entrainment in order to secure a frost resistant concrete; the minimum amount of air needed to make the concrete frost resistant is not changed when adding fibres· the amount of air entrainment must be increased when fibres are added to establish...

  17. Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1999-01-01

    of 0.4-1% by volume of fibres cannot replace air entrainment in order to secure a frost resistant concrete; the minimum amount of air needed to make the concrete frost resistant is not changed when adding fibres· the amount of air entrainment must be increased when fibres are added to establish......Frost resistance of fibre reinforced concrete with 2.5-4.2% air and 6-9% air (% by volume in fresh concrete) casted in the laboratory and in-situ is compared. Steel fibres with hooked ends (ZP, length 30 mm) and polypropylene fibres (PP, CS, length 12 mm) are applied. It is shown that· addition...

  18. Science Sublime: The Philosophy of the Sublime, Dewey's Aesthetics, and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists and, in turn, science education has not accurately portrayed science to students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the classroom, this work draws on the writings of the sublime by Burke, Kant, Emerson, and Wordsworth…

  19. Masters of frost; Les maitres du verglas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblanc, J.

    2005-05-01

    Research at the University of Quebec at Chicoutimi, an internationally-ranked centre of excellence on research on hoar frost is discussed. Research currently in progress includes projects to characterize the nature of hoar frost on electrical equipment, projects to improve ways of predicting the occurrence of hoar frost, and projects to develop methods for de-icing electrical installations. Based on laboratory observations researchers prepare numerical models and by gaining a better understanding of the weather conditions in a region, they can deduce the probability of frost, and put in place precautionary measures that help to avoid the worst risks. The first type of problems concern the insulators: when first covered with ice they remain functional, but when the ice begins to melt the film of water is likely to conduct current and produce electric arcs. Other problems tend to be mechanical: e.g. the weight of ice on the wires, or asymmetric accumulation of ice, both of these could could cause the network to be dislodged. Projects involving the search for ways and means to de-ice long stretches of cables in winter in difficult-to-access terrain are also the subject of intense investigation.

  20. Air void structure and frost resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2014-01-01

    This article compiles results from 4 independent laboratory studies. In each study, the same type of concrete is tested at least 10 times, the air void structure being the only variable. For each concrete mix both air void analysis of the hardened concrete and a salt frost scaling test are conduc......This article compiles results from 4 independent laboratory studies. In each study, the same type of concrete is tested at least 10 times, the air void structure being the only variable. For each concrete mix both air void analysis of the hardened concrete and a salt frost scaling test...... is proportional to the product of total air content and specific surface. In all 4 cases, the conclusion is concurrent that the parameter of total surface area of air voids performs equally well or better than the spacing factor when linking air void characteristics to frost resistance (salt frost scaling......). This observation is interesting as the parameter of total surface area of air voids normally is not included in air void analysis. The following reason for the finding is suggested: In the air voids conditions are favourable for ice nucleation. When a capillary pore is connected to an air void, ice formation...

  1. A device for measuring soil frost

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Patric; Burley D. Fridley

    1969-01-01

    A water-filled plastic tube buried vertically in the soil in a copper casing permitted repeated observation of frost depth without damaging the sampling site. The device is simple and inexpensive and provides data on soil freezing at least as accurate as direct observation by digging through frozen soil.

  2. Robert Frost and the American College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newdick, Robert S.

    1999-01-01

    The life and works of poet Robert Frost are examined for insights into his philosophy concerning higher education, particularly formal education, his own style of teaching, perceptions of the teacher's role within and outside the classroom, and the relationship between student and teacher. (Originally published in 1936) (MSE)

  3. Robert Frost: Rural New England Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiss, Sheila M.

    1989-01-01

    Examines Robert Frost's teaching career, which lasted from 1893 to 1912. Discusses his extreme dislike of teaching, resulting in nervous exhaustion on several occasions, and his teaching innovations, which involved students writing about their own experiences and ideas, and reading aloud for expression and the sound of language. (SV)

  4. COMPARISON OF THE FROST RESISTANCE OF BARLEY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    immediate recovery of the photosynthetic quantum yield after freezing. Landraces which showed the highest cold tolerance were found to acclimatize best. Key words/phrases: Barley, chlorophyll fluorescence, cold acclimation, Ethiopia, frost tolerance. INTRODUCTION. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is a traditional crop.

  5. Por uma metafísica do sublime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha de Almeida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The sublime has been analyzed since ancient times with a striking compared with tragedy, whether as a literary genre, whether through Poetics, Aristotle's catharsis we translate the feeling the sublime. In modernity, new names were coming to work with this theory: Hume himself, in his essay The Tragedy, was impressed by the ability of this art form has to produce such strong effects on the viewer. But who else has strengthened analysis of the sublime in modernity, providing the basis for their own Kant was Edmund Burke, with his piece A philosophical investigation on the ideas of the sublime and the beautiful. The third criticism of Kant devoted a special moment to the analysis of the sublime, which had served as basis also for Schopenhauer, however, from her built his own aesthetic that would be of paramount importance Nieztsche for the young, mainly due to the consideration of music as sublime art. Nietzsche, then built his tragic wisdom, with based on the experience of the sublime tragedy.The question this paper wants to treat it exactly: It is possible think of a metaphysics of the sublime, based on Nietzsche?

  6. Reassessing Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature in the Kantian Sublime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The sublime has been a relatively neglected topic in recent work in philosophical aesthetics, with existing discussions confined mainly to problems in Kant's theory. Given the revival of interest in his aesthetic theory and the influence of the Kantian sublime compared to other eighteenth-century accounts, this focus is not surprising. Kant's…

  7. The Sublime, Ugliness and Contemporary Art: A Kantian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Kuplen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is twofold. First, to explain the distinction between Kant’s notions of the sublime and ugliness, and to answer an important question that has been left unnoticed in contemporary studies, namely why it is the case that even though both sublime and ugliness are contrapurposive for the power of judgment, occasioning the feeling of displeasure, yet that after all we should feel pleasure in the former, while not in the latter. Second, to apply my interpretation of the sublime and ugliness to contemporary art, and to resolve certain issues that have been raised in accounting for the possibility of artistic sublimity. I argue that an experience of a genuine artistic sublimity is an uncommon occurrence. I propose that the value of contemporary art can be best explained by referring to Kant’s notion of ugliness and his theory of aesthetic ideas.

  8. Snow sublimation on a high-altitude Himalayan glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigter, E.; Litt, M.; Steiner, J. F.; Bonekamp, P. N. J.; Bierkens, M. F.; Shea, J.; Immerzeel, W. W.

    2017-12-01

    Snow sublimation is a loss of water from a snowpack to the atmosphere due to direct phase transition of snow to water vapour. Conditions at high elevations in the Himalaya favour sublimation, i.e. low atmospheric pressure, high wind speed, dry air and high incoming solar radiation. Snow sublimation is a potential important component of the high-altitude water and glacier mass balance, but measurements are non-existent in the Himalaya and models generally ignore this process. Hence, we measured surface latent heat fluxes with an eddy covariance system on Yala Glacier (5350 m a.s.l) in the Nepalese Himalaya to quantify the role snow sublimation plays in the water budget. A one-month data set from October to November 2016 reveals that cumulative sublimation is substantial relative to the dry season precipitation (31 mm for a 32-day period). Sublimation parameterizations of different complexity were subsequently tested against our field measurements to quantify sublimation patterns in space and over longer periods based on nominal meteorological measurements. Results show that a multiple linear regression on wind speed and humidity performed best and this is used to simulate snow sublimation spatially distributed on Yala Glacier for the winter season 2016-2017. Averaged over an entire winter and over the entire glacier surface, sublimation plays a crucial role in the high altitude water balance and in the mass balance of glaciers. Future research should focus on quantifying the role of sublimation at the catchment scale, the development of larger scale parametrizations and efficient measurement strategies to validate the results.

  9. Sublime science: Teaching for scientific sublime experiences in middle school classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    Due to a historical separation of cognition and emotion, the affective aspects of learning are often seen as trivial in comparison to the more 'essential' cognitive qualities - particularly in the domain of science. As a result of this disconnect, feelings of awe, wonder, and astonishment as well as appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists. In turn, I believe that science education has not accurately portrayed the world of science to our students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the science classroom, I have drawn on past research in the field of aesthetic science teaching and learning as well as works by, Burke, Kant, and Dewey to explore a new construct I have called the "scientific sublime". Scientific sublime experiences represent a sophisticated treatment of the cognitive as well as affective qualities of science learning. The scientific sublime represents feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation that come from a deep understanding. It is only through this understanding of a phenomenon that we can appreciate its true complexity and intricacies, and these understandings when mixed with the emotions of awe and reverence, are sublime. Scientific sublime experiences are an attempt at the re-integration of cognition and feeling. The goal of this research was twofold: to create and teach a curriculum that fosters scientific sublime experiences in middle school science classes, and to better understand how these experiences are manifested in students. In order to create an approach to teaching for scientific sublime experiences, it was first necessary for me to identify key characteristics of such an experience and a then to create a pedagogical approach, both of which are described in detail in the dissertation. This research was conducted as two studies in two different middle schools. My pedagogical approach was used to create and teach two five-week 7 th grade science units---one on weather

  10. CLAS+FROST: new generation of photoproduction experiments at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eugene Pasyuk

    2009-12-01

    A large part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to baryon spectroscopy. Photoproduction experiments are essential part of this program. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and availability of circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beams provide unique conditions for this type of experiments. Recent addition of the Frozen Spin Target (FROST) gives a remarkable opportunity to measure double and triple polarization observables for different pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction processes. For the first time, a complete or nearly complete experiment becomes possible and will allow model independent extraction of the reaction amplitude. An overview of the experiment and its current status is presented.

  11. Sublime frequencies:  The construction of sublime listening experiences in the sonification of scientific data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supper, Alexandra

    2014-02-01

    In the past two decades, the sonification of scientific data - an auditory equivalent of data visualization in which data are turned into sounds - has become increasingly widespread, particularly as an artistic practice and as a means of popularizing science. Sonification is thus part of the recent trend, discussed in public understanding of science literature, towards increased emphasis on 'interactivity' and 'crossovers' between science and art as a response to the perceived crisis in the relationship between the sciences and their publics. However, sonification can also be understood as the latest iteration in a long tradition of theorizing the relations between nature, science and human experience. This article analyses the recent public fascination with sonification and argues that sonification grips public imaginations through the promise of sublime experiences. I show how the 'auditory sublime' is constructed through varying combinations of technological, musical and rhetorical strategies. Rather than maintain a singular conception of the auditory sublime, practitioners draw on many scientific and artistic repertoires. However, sound is often situated as an immersive and emotional medium in contrast to the supposedly more detached sense of vision. The public sonification discourse leaves intact this dichotomy, reinforcing the idea that sound has no place in specialist science.

  12. Frost-proof heat recovery; Frostsikker varmegjenvinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenbaek, Henning; Jenssen, Henning Bent

    2011-07-01

    Technical regulations (TEK10) sets high standards for temperature efficiency of ventilation systems. Heat recovery equipment should be selected from the risk of leakage. Rotating heat exchanger has normally no problem with icing before the temperature approaches -20 C. For the countercurrent heat exchanger bypass-icing is the best method of frost resistant heat exchanger. In addition to selecting the best frost protection method, it is also important how to monitor the formation of ice in the exchanger. The best way is to measure the pressure drop over the heat exchanger. Bypass deicing requires that the unit is designed so that outside air can be led outside heat exchanger and directly to the heater. (AG)

  13. On Medicine and Boundaries: Frost's Mending Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlow, Gabriel L; Furman, Andrew C

    2017-07-01

    Published just over a century ago, Robert Frost's Mending Wall stands as one of the most eloquent meditations on boundaries and the complex and nuanced role they play in interpersonal relationships. Often anthologized, and perhaps as often misunderstood, Mending Wall has much to teach medical educators and practicing clinicians about the physician-patient relationship and the evolving dynamic between healer and patient. Remembered mostly for the seemingly contradictory repetition of the adage "Good fences make good neighbors," and the opening "something there is that doesn't love a wall," Frost mischievously navigates through the many meanings and functions of boundaries; how they separate, unite, and ultimately, how they might mend. Mending Wall offers physicians an opportunity to look closely at the barriers and thresholds prevalent in medicine and explore how they both preclude and allow for intimate and healing relationships.

  14. Local variation of frost layer thickness and morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Kaiyang; Komori, Satoru [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Jiang, Yi [Department of Building Science, School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2006-02-15

    Frosting is an important phenomenon encountered in the cryogenic industries in connection with gas coolers, refrigerators, heat pumps, etc. It may adversely affect the performances of those devices. This paper experimentally studied the local frost formation process on a cold surface with natural airflows or forced airflows over it. The frost layer thickness was found to increase stepwise during the frost formation process. This increase pattern was ever indicated only by one literature. The literature attributed the pattern to the melting of frost crystals at the frost surface. However, present observation of the morphology of the frost layer surface suggested that the growth of water drops or ice particles at the initial period caused the first slowly increasing of the frost layer thickness; the following growth of acerose-shaped ice crystals caused the rapidly increasing of the frost layer thickness; thereafter, the column-shaped ice crystals on the surface grew in its length and radius alternatively, which caused the frost layer thickness increasing rapidly and slowly alternatively. (authors)

  15. Analysis and Simulation of Frost's Beamformer

    OpenAIRE

    Strupl, M.; Sovka, Pavel

    2003-01-01

    Sensor arrays are often used for a signal separation from noises using the information about the direction of arrival. The aim of this paper is to analyze Frost's beamformer with respect to the speech preprocessing for the hearing impaired people. The frequency response of the system including the background noise attenuation are derived as functions of the direction of arrival. The derivation supposes a uniform linear array of sensors and plane waves. It is shown that the number of possible ...

  16. Genetic engineering: frost damage trial halted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiansky, S

    The University of California at Berkeley has announced the postponement of a planned experiment involving the field testing of bacteria genetically engineered to reduce frost damage to crops. The action came after Jeremy Rifkin, who had earlier filed suit against the National Institutes of Health after its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee had approved the experiment, threatened to seek a temporary restraining order against the university to halt the experiment.

  17. Frost heave and pipeline upheaval buckling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A. C. [University Engineering Department, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Williams, P. J. [Carleton Univ., Geotechnical Science Laboratories, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2003-10-01

    The interaction between frost heave and upheaval buckling and the potential effect of these two phenomena on the safety of Arctic pipelines is discussed. When soils freeze, ice forms within the pores between the particles. If the surface is free to move, it heaves, because of the expansion that accompanies freezing. Upheaval buckling occurs in longitudinally constrained buried pipelines which can lead to large upward movements of a pipeline. The driving force for upheaval is the longitudinal compressive force induced by operation of the pipeline. While uniform vertical movement does not affect functionality, movements that induce curvature can overstress a pipeline to a dangerous extent. This paper examines the adverse interaction between the longitudinal variability of frost heave and the propensity of heave-induced overbends, and the conditions under which they might lead to upheaval. Results obtained suggest that discontinuities in frost heave can be sufficient to destabilize a high-pressure pipeline and induce upheaval, even when the original 'as-laid' profile is perfectly straight and level. The heave is most likely to occur in winter, with the upheaval following in the summer when the operating temperature is higher and the uplift resistance is reduced. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Frost heave modelling using porosity rate function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, Radoslaw L.; Zhu, Ming

    2006-07-01

    Frost-susceptible soils are characterized by their sensitivity to freezing that is manifested in heaving of the ground surface. While significant contributions to explaining the nature of frost heave in soils were published in late 1920s, modelling efforts did not start until decades later. Several models describing the heaving process have been developed in the past, but none of them has been generally accepted as a tool in engineering applications. The approach explored in this paper is based on the concept of the porosity rate function dependent on two primary material parameters: the maximum rate, and the temperature at which the maximum rate occurs. The porosity rate is indicative of ice growth, and this growth is also dependent on the temperature gradient and the stress state in the freezing soil. The advantage of this approach over earlier models stems from a formulation consistent with continuum mechanics that makes it possible to generalize the model to arbitrary three-dimensional processes, and use the standard numerical techniques in solving boundary value problems. The physical premise for the model is discussed first, and the development of the constitutive model is outlined. The model is implemented in a 2-D finite element code, and the porosity rate function is calibrated and validated. Effectiveness of the model is then illustrated in an example of freezing of a vertical cut in frost-susceptible soil.

  19. Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale: the portuguese version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Monteiro Amaral

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale is one of the most world widely used measures of perfectionism. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale. METHODS: Two hundred and seventeen (178 females students from two Portuguese Universities filled in the scale, and a subgroup (n = 166 completed a retest with a four weeks interval. RESULTS: The scale reliability was good (Cronbach alpha = .857. Corrected item-total correlations ranged from .019 to .548. The scale test-retest reliability suggested a good temporal stability with a test-retest correlation of .765. A principal component analysis with Varimax rotation was performed and based on the Scree plot, two robust factorial structures were found (four and six factors. The principal component analyses, using Monte Carlo PCA for parallel analyses confirmed the six factor solution. The concurrent validity with Hewitt and Flett MPS was high, as well as the discriminant validity of positive and negative affect (Profile of Mood Stats-POMS. DISCUSSION: The two factorial structures (of four and six dimensions of the Portuguese version of Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale replicate the results from different authors, with different samples and cultures. This suggests this scale is a robust instrument to assess perfectionism, in several clinical and research settings as well as in transcultural studies.

  20. An improved model for predicting performance of finned tube heat exchanger under frosting condition, with frost thickness variation along fin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tso, C.P. [Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, Melaka (Malaysia). Faculty of Engineering and Technology; Cheng, Y.C.; Lai, A.C.K. [Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore). School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    2006-01-15

    Frost accumulation on a heat exchanger, a direct result of combined heat and mass transfer between the moist air flowing across a cold surface, causes heat transfer performance degradation due to the insulating effect of frost layer and the coil blockage as the frost grows. The complex geometry of finned tube heat exchangers leads to uneven wall and air temperature distribution inside the coil, and causes variations of frost growth rate and densification along the coil. In this study, a general distributed model with frost formation was developed. The equations for finned tube heat exchanger were derived in non-steady-state manner and quasi-steady state in the frost model. In order to make the model more realistic, the variation of frost along fin due to uneven temperature distribution was included. The presented model is able to predict the dynamic behavior of an air cooler both under non-frost and frost condition. Comparisons were made based on the frost mass accumulation, pressure drop across coil and energy transfer coefficient, and results were found to agree well with reported experimental results. (author)

  1. The periglacial engine of mountain erosion – Part 1: Rates of frost cracking and frost creep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    2015-01-01

    of the soil mantle strongly modulates the relation between climate and the intensity of mechanical weathering and sediment flux. Our results also point to an offset between the conditions that promote frost cracking and those that promote frost creep, indicating that a stable climate can provide optimal....... Here we investigate the important role that periglacial processes also play in less steep parts of mountain landscapes. Understanding the influences of frost-driven processes in low-relief areas requires a focus on the consequences of an accreting soil mantle, which characterises such surfaces. We......With accelerating climate cooling in the late Cenozoic, glacial and periglacial erosion became more widespread on the surface of the Earth. The resultant shift in erosion patterns significantly changed the large-scale morphology of many mountain ranges worldwide. Whereas the glacial fingerprint...

  2. Changes in phenology and frost risks of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kartschall

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For a retrospective period of 110 years between 1901 and 2010 (observed data, and for the subsequent future period between 2011 and 2100 we calculated the phenological development (bud burst, harvest ripeness, and in particular the spring frost risk (frost after bud burst, as one important derived variable for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv Riesling for the whole of Germany. For the future climate we included two different scenarios (RCP8.5, RCP2.6 each of them containing a triple set with minimum, medium and maximum temperature increase. The time period between 1981 and 2010 as the last three decades in the observed data was chosen as reference. In general we found an acceleration of the phenological development (all main phases mainly beginning in the late 1980s. For the three-decade period between 2031 and 2060 this acceleration will reach 11±3$11\\pm3$ days in the RCP8.5-scenario. The acceleration for the other stages behaved similarly and results in an earlier harvest ripeness of 13±1$13\\pm1$ days. Since a warmer spring in general leads to earlier bud burst, but does not reduce the risk of frost events during this period in the same manner, changes in the risk of spring frost damage were relatively small. For the coming decades this risk will not decrease for all traditional German viticultural regions in the RCP8.5-scenarios; on the contrary, our results suggest it is likely to increase. The results showed an increasing spring frost risk not only for the debated “upcoming” potential viticultural areas in eastern Germany, an effect which will partly also reach the southernmost viticultural areas. This effect in northern and eastern Germany is due to earlier bud burst together with the stronger continental influence, but for the southern and western regions of Germany is mainly due to the even earlier bud burst. This could modify the regionally nuanced character of German wines.

  3. The periglacial engine of mountain erosion – Part 1: Rates of frost cracking and frost creep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Andersen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With accelerating climate cooling in the late Cenozoic, glacial and periglacial erosion became more widespread on the surface of the Earth. The resultant shift in erosion patterns significantly changed the large-scale morphology of many mountain ranges worldwide. Whereas the glacial fingerprint is easily distinguished by its characteristic fjords and U-shaped valleys, the periglacial fingerprint is more subtle but potentially prevails in some mid- to high-latitude landscapes. Previous models have advocated a frost-driven control on debris production at steep headwalls and glacial valley sides. Here we investigate the important role that periglacial processes also play in less steep parts of mountain landscapes. Understanding the influences of frost-driven processes in low-relief areas requires a focus on the consequences of an accreting soil mantle, which characterises such surfaces. We present a new model that quantifies two key physical processes: frost cracking and frost creep, as a function of both temperature and sediment thickness. Our results yield new insights into how climate and sediment transport properties combine to scale the intensity of periglacial processes. The thickness of the soil mantle strongly modulates the relation between climate and the intensity of mechanical weathering and sediment flux. Our results also point to an offset between the conditions that promote frost cracking and those that promote frost creep, indicating that a stable climate can provide optimal conditions for only one of those processes at a time. Finally, quantifying these relations also opens up the possibility of including periglacial processes in large-scale, long-term landscape evolution models, as demonstrated in a companion paper.

  4. Scanning electron microscope observations of sublimates from Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, R.

    1993-01-01

    Sublimates were sampled from high-temperature (up to 800??C) fumaroles at Merapi volcano in January 1984. Sampling is accomplished by inserting silica tubes into high-temperature vents. Volcanic glass flows through the tubes and sublimates precipitate on the inner walls in response to the temperature gradient. With decreasing temperature (800-500??C) in the tubes, there are five sublimate zones. Texturally, the sublimate phases grade from large, well-formed crystals at their highest-temperature occurrence to more numerous, smaller crystals that are less perfect at lower temperatures. These changes imply that the crystal nucleation and growth rates increase and decrease, respectively, as temperature decreases. Overall, the textural data suggest that the gas is saturated or slightly super-saturated with the phases at their hottest occurrence, but that the gas becomes increasingly super-saturated with the phases at lower temperatures. -from Author

  5. Sublimation as a Landform-Shaping Process on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; White, O. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Schenk, P. M.; Beyer, R. A.; McKinnon, W. B.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Several icy-world surfaces in the solar system exhibit sublimation-driven landform modification erosion, condensation, and mass wasting [1]. In addition to the obvious role of gravity, mass wasting can work in conjunction with internal disaggregation of a landform's relief-supporting material through the loss (or deteriorating alteration) of its cohesive matrix. To give a conspicuous example, Callisto's landscape exhibits widespread erosion from sublimation erosion of slopes, which results in smooth, undulating, low albedo plains composed of lag deposits, with isolated high albedo pinnacles perched on remnants of crater rims due to the re-precipitation of ice on local cold traps [2, 3, 4]. Sublimation-driven mass wasting was anticipated on Pluto prior to the encounter (see refs in [5]). Here we report on several landscapes on Pluto we interpret to be formed, or at least heavily modified, by sublimation erosion.

  6. Nietzsche's View of Sublimation in the Educational Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Ann Margaret

    1975-01-01

    Article outlined Nietzsche's beliefs on the primary aim of education, the conscious production of the free man through the process of sublimation, the active redirecting of one's life energy in the service of creativity. (Editor/RK)

  7. The Kantian theory of the sublime and humanist politics

    OpenAIRE

    Ayas, Tuğba

    2013-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Art, Design and Architecture, İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2013. Thesis (Ph. D.) -- Bilkent University, 2013. Includes bibliographical refences. The German philosopher Immanuel Kant’s rendition of cosmopolitanism and the sublime have been quite popular separately in various discussions on politics and aesthetics since the late 90s. In today’s political conjuncture the Kantian sublime is consulted in describing the social disasters that had b...

  8. O Sublime explicado às crianças

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Figueiredo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Como o próprio título indica, este ensaio pretende dialogar com a recepção do sublime kantiano pela filosofia francesa contemporânea, sobretudo com Jean-François Lyotard. Dessa forma, ao invés de ressaltar as consequências inevitável ou sistematicamente morais do sublime kantiano, como fez, de um modo geral, o comentário mais tradicional da filosofia crítica de Kant, este ensaio tenta interpretar o sublime como sendo essencialmente uma experiência da arte, seguindo assim de perto aquela tradição francesa. Mas, ao mesmo tempo, tomando alguma distância, este texto quer fazer uma objeção ao fundamento exclusivamente burkiano da concepção de sublime de Lyotard. Em suma, quero defender que é possível privilegiar o tempo (aspecto central do sublime de Edmund Burke, segundo Lyotard também na experiência do sublime kantiano.

  9. Sublimity and beauty: A view from nursing aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles-González, José; Solano-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Several authors have focused on the aesthetics of nursing care from diverse perspectives; however, there are few studies about the sublime and the beautiful in nursing. To identify beautiful and sublime moments in the context of the aesthetics of nursing care. A theoretical reflection has been contemplated about sublime and beautiful values in the context of the aesthetics of nursing care from the cultural history perspective. For that purpose, a revision of this issue has been completed. The terms 'beautiful' and 'sublime' have been analysed to identify the characteristics of both in the context of nursing care. We have followed all ethical requirements regarding the sources, conducting research and authorship. There is no conflict of interest in this paper. With aesthetic knowledge, the nurse expresses the artistic nature of nursing care by appreciating the act of caring for individuals. The sublime is a complex phenomenon, since apparently contrary feelings are interwoven. Nursing care is an art with an anthropological object-subject on which the 'artist' applies their prior knowledge and skills. Feelings and emotions that develop during the clinical nursing practice - especially at times sublime and beautiful, aesthetic - constitute experiences which are professionally significant. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Modelling snowdrift sublimation on an Antarctic ice shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. M. Lenaerts

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we estimate the contribution of snowdrift sublimation (SUds to the surface mass balance at Neumayer, located on the Ekström ice shelf in Eastern Antarctica. A single column version of the RACMO2-ANT model is used as a physical interpolation tool of high-quality radiosonde and surface measurements for a 15-yr period (1993–2007, and combined with a routine to calculate snowdrift sublimation and horizontal snow transport. The site is characterised by a relatively mild, wet and windy climate, so snowdrift is a common phenomenon. The modelled timing and frequency of snowdrift events compares well with observations. This is further illustrated by an additional simulation for Kohnen base, where the timing of snowdrift is realistic, although the modelled horizontal transport is overestimated. Snowdrift sublimation is mainly dependent on wind speed, but also on relative humidity and temperature. During high wind speeds, SUds saturates and cools the air, limiting its own strength. We estimate that SUds removes around 16%±8% of the accumulated snow from the surface. The total sublimation more than triples when snowdrift is considered, although snowdrift sublimation limits sublimation at the surface. SUds shows a strong seasonal cycle, as well as large inter-annual variability. This variability can be related to the variability of the atmospheric conditions in the surface layer.

  11. Frost formation on a plate with different surface hydrophilicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyunuk Lee; Jongmin Shin; Samchul Ha; Bongjun Choi [Digital Appliance Co. Research Lab., L G Electronics Inc., Changwon, Kyoungnam (Korea); Jaekeun Lee

    2004-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop frost maps for two different surfaces having two different hydrophilic characteristics and to find ambient conditions associated with the formation of frost structures. Test samples with two different surfaces having dynamic contact angle (DCA) of 23{sup o} and 88{sup o} were installed in a wind tunnel and exposed to a humid airflow. Frost structure is observed with a visualization system in the operating conditions of household refrigerator: airflow temperature in the range of 20 {sup o}C, humidity in the range of 2.64-9.36 g/kg, Reynolds number in the range of 7000-17,000 and cold plate temperature in the range of -11.6 to -28.4 {sup o}C. As a result of this study, frost structures are classified and frost maps are proposed for two different surface hydrophilicities. Surface with low DCA (23{sup o}) shows lower frost thickness and higher frost density than that with high DCA (88{sup o}). It was found that frost structures on surfaces with different DCA are similar. However, low DCA surface at low humidity provides 20-30% denser frost formation due to the shift of areas with different structures. (Author)

  12. Frost flowers and sea-salt aerosols over seasonal sea-ice areas in northwestern Greenland during winter–spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hara

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sea salts and halogens in aerosols, frost flowers, and brine play an important role in atmospheric chemistry in polar regions. Simultaneous sampling and observations of frost flowers, brine, and aerosol particles were conducted around Siorapaluk in northwestern Greenland during December 2013 to March 2014. Results show that water-soluble frost flower and brine components are sea-salt components (e.g., Na+, Cl−, Mg2+, K+, Ca2+, Br−, and iodine. Concentration factors of sea-salt components of frost flowers and brine relative to seawater were 1.14–3.67. Sea-salt enrichment of Mg2+, K+, Ca2+, and halogens (Cl−, Br−, and iodine in frost flowers is associated with sea-salt fractionation by precipitation of mirabilite and hydrohalite. High aerosol number concentrations correspond to the occurrence of higher abundance of sea-salt particles in both coarse and fine modes, and blowing snow and strong winds. Aerosol number concentrations, particularly in coarse mode, are increased considerably by release from the sea-ice surface under strong wind conditions. Sulfate depletion by sea-salt fractionation was found to be limited in sea-salt aerosols because of the presence of non-sea-salt (NSS SO42−. However, coarse and fine sea-salt particles were found to be rich in Mg. Strong Mg enrichment might be more likely to proceed in fine sea-salt particles. Magnesium-rich sea-salt particles might be released from the surface of snow and slush layer (brine on sea ice and frost flowers. Mirabilite-like and ikaite-like particles were identified only in aerosol samples collected near new sea-ice areas. From the field evidence and results from earlier studies, we propose and describe sea-salt cycles in seasonal sea-ice areas.

  13. O paradoxo sublime ou a alforria da arte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Figueiredo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste texto, pretendo analisar a tese principal do ensaio “A verdade sublime” de Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, a qual poderia ser formulada do seguinte modo: a verdade sublime é o Ereignis, esse é o fundamento a partir do qual se desenvolveu uma dificílima operação que consistiu em modificar a tradição do sublime sempre apresentado negativamente naquilo que Lacoue-Labarthe chamou de "compreensão afirmativa do sublime ou da grande arte". O autor estabelece uma astuciosa aliança entre o que há de mais radical no pensamento de Heidegger e o sublime, tratado de maneira bastante polêmica, como a principal teoria da arte de Kant. Dessa articulação fundamental, pode-se concluir que ele não está apenas à procura de uma “Estética” (sequer de uma “Teoria da Arte” sublime, mas, em busca de algo que é muito mais ambicioso, a saber: de um pensamento do sublime. Portanto, na minha opinião, o ensaio lacouelabarthiano constitui, por um lado, uma referência indispensável não só a quem quer que pretenda estudar a tradição do sublime, mas, por outro, compreender o pensamento heideggeriano sobre a arte e sua tentativa de encontrar uma determinação mais essencial e, sobretudo, ousaria dizer, mais política da arte.

  14. Grammatical Categories in Robert Frost's Blank Verse: A Quantitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyford, Roland Hazen

    Structural linguistic techniques were utilized to categorize the grammatical elements employed by Robert Frost in 46 blank-verse poems. Nineteen main grammatical categories and 26 verb sub-categories based on distinctive selection criteria were devised to examine the range and distribution of Frost's grammatical patterns. Five control poems by E.…

  15. Frost hardiness of tree species is independent of phenology and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The differences in timing in bud burst between species have been interpreted as an adaptation to late frost events in spring. Thus, it has been suggested that the degree of frost susceptibility of leaves is species-specific and depends on the species' phenology and geographic distribution range. To test for relationships ...

  16. The distribution of water frost on Charon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buie, Marc W.; Shriver, Scott K.

    1994-01-01

    We present high-spatial-resolution imaging observations of the Pluto-Charon system taken with ProtoCAM on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Our dataset consists of measurements from eight nights at widely separated rotational longitudes and covering five wavelengths -- standard J, H, and K, plus two special narrow band filters at 1.5 and 1.75 microns. The relative flux contributions of Pluto and Charon were extracted, when possible, by fitting a two-source Gaussian image model to the observed images. At K, we find the Charon-Pluto magnitude difference to be on average 1.8 mag, somewhat less than the value of 2.2 mag found by Bosh et al. (1992). The average differential magnitude at 1.5 and 1.75 microns is 2.0 and 1.6, respectively. The larger magnitude difference at 1.5 microns is due to a water-frost absorption band on the surface of Charon. Our observations are consistent with a surface of Charon dominated by water frost at all longitudes.

  17. Transmission line corona losses under hoar frost conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahti, K.; Nousiainen, K. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Power Engineering Group; Lahtinen, M.

    1997-04-01

    Transmission line corona losses under hoar frost conditions were studied in the climate room of the high voltage laboratory of Tampere University of Technology. The measurements were performed using a coaxial measurement arrangement with different bundle and conductor types. The effects of conductor and bundle type, temperature, applied voltage and hoar frost thickness on corona losses were investigated. A two-conductor bundle had corona losses about 2.5--5 times higher than a three-conductor bundle. Relatively thin hoar frosts were used in the tests. Even the thinnest hoar frost resulted in remarkable corona losses and the losses were very sensitive to changes in the hoar frost thickness. The ambient temperature had a strong influence on the measured losses.

  18. Effect of frost on phosphorescence for thermographic phosphor thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong; Kim, Mirae; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we analyzed phosphorescence lifetime and its accuracy by growing frost for thermographic phosphor thermometry in a low-temperature environment. Mg4FGeO6:Mn particles were coated on an aluminum plate and excited with a UV-LED to obtain phosphorescence signals. The surface temperature was maintained at  ‑20, ‑15, ‑10 °C, and the phosphorescence signal was acquired as the frost grew for 3700 s. The lifetime was calculated and compared with the calibration curve under no-frost conditions. The error of the measured lifetime was within 0.7% of that in the no-frost conditions. A 2D surface temperature profile of the target plate was successfully obtained with the frost formation.

  19. Changes in frost days in simulations of twentyfirst century climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehl, G.A.; Tebaldi, C.; Nychka, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Global coupled climate model simulations of twentieth and twentyfirst century climate are analyzed for changes in frost days (defined as nighttime minima less than freezing). The model simulations agree with the observed pattern for late twentieth century of a greater decrease of frost days in the west and southwest USA compared to the rest of the country, and almost no change in frost days in fall compared to relatively larger decreases in spring. Associated with general increases of nighttime minimum temperatures, in the future climate with increased greenhouse gases (GHGs) the number of frost days is fewer almost everywhere, but there are greatest decreases over the western parts of the continents. The numbers of frost days are most consistently related to sea level pressure, with more frost days occurring when high pressure dominates on the monthly time scale in association with clearer skies and lower nighttime minimum temperatures. Spatial patterns of relative changes of frost days are indicative of regional scale atmospheric circulation changes that affect nighttime minimum temperatures. Increases of soil moisture and clouds also contribute, but play secondary roles. The linkages among soil moisture, clouds, sea level pressure, and diurnal temperature range are quantified by a statistical multiple regression model. Coefficients for present and future climate are similar among the predictors, indicating physical processes that affect frost days in present and future climates do not appreciably change. Only the intercept changes in association with the significant warming of the mean climate state. This study highlights the fact that, though there is a general decrease in the number of frost days with global warming, the processes that affect the pattern of those changes, and thus the regional changes of frost days, are influenced by several interrelated physical processes, with changes in regional atmospheric circulation generally being most important. (orig.)

  20. Part 2. State of the art paper on frost heave : a review of frost heave theory and models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This technical review for a proposed pipeline in the Mackenzie Valley in the Northwest Territories represents the first of 3 reports that document the current state of knowledge about frost heave theory, testing and predictive modelling. The review considers whether frost heave is sufficiently understood and can be controlled to allow for the safe construction and operation of a large diameter chilled gas pipeline. It provides a complete review of frost heavy theory, prediction models acquisition of input data for prediction models, validation of theory and models by laboratory experiments. Details on most of the significant models and experiments were presented on small scale frost heave experiments for northern pipeline design and operation, frost heave prediction models, and frost heave prediction models for buried chilled gas pipelines. The most recent developments applicable to chilled pipelines include the discrete ice lens model, the 2 dimensional rigid ice model, and the development of a 3 dimensional hydrodynamic model. The authors noted that a comprehensive analysis of the pipeline/frost heave problem should consider coupled heat flow and moisture transport in frozen and unfrozen soils; mechanical behaviour of unfrozen soil; moving boundary challenges associated with a moving freezing front and frost heave; growth of pore ice and ice lenses; mechanical behavior of the buried pipe; and pipeline-soil interface behaviour. The other 2 accompanying reports have also been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  1. Sublimation rates of explosive materials : method development and initial results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelan, James M.; Patton, Robert Thomas

    2004-08-01

    Vapor detection of explosives continues to be a technological basis for security applications. This study began experimental work to measure the chemical emanation rates of pure explosive materials as a basis for determining emanation rates of security threats containing explosives. Sublimation rates for TNT were determined with thermo gravimetric analysis using two different techniques. Data were compared with other literature values to provide sublimation rates from 25 to 70 C. The enthalpy of sublimation for the combined data was found to be 115 kJ/mol, which corresponds well with previously reported data from vapor pressure determinations. A simple Gaussian atmospheric dispersion model was used to estimate downrange concentrations based on continuous, steady-state conditions at 20, 45 and 62 C for a nominal exposed block of TNT under low wind conditions. Recommendations are made for extension of the experimental vapor emanation rate determinations and development of turbulent flow computational fluid dynamics based atmospheric dispersion estimates of standoff vapor concentrations.

  2. MALDI imaging of lipids after matrix sublimation/deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert C; Hankin, Joseph A; Barkley, Robert M; Zemski Berry, Karin A

    2011-11-01

    Mass spectrometric techniques have been developed to record mass spectra of biomolecules including lipids as they naturally exist within tissues and thereby permit the generation of images displaying the distribution of specific lipids in tissues, organs, and intact animals. These techniques are based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) that requires matrix application onto the tissue surface prior to analysis. One technique of application that has recently shown significant advantages for lipid analysis is sublimation of matrix followed by vapor deposition directly onto the tissue. Explanations for enhanced sensitivity realized by sublimation/deposition related to sample temperature after a laser pulse and matrix crystal size are presented. Specific examples of sublimation/deposition in lipid imaging of various organs including brain, ocular tissue, and kidney are presented. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Por uma metafí­sica do sublime

    OpenAIRE

    Martha de Almeida

    2010-01-01

    O sublime vem sendo analisado desde a antiguidade com uma marcante relaçáo com a tragédia, seja como gênero literário, seja por meio da Poética, de Aristóteles que nos traduz pela catarse o sentimento do sublime. Na modernidade, novos nomes foram chegando para colaborar com esta teoria: o próprio Hume, em seu ensaio Da tragédia, mostrou-se impressionado com a capacidade que esta forma de arte tem de produzir efeitos táo intensos no espectador. Porém, quem mais fortaleceu a análise do sublime ...

  4. Canopy effects on snow sublimation from a central Arizona Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoma, Bohumil M.

    2017-01-01

    Guided by 30 m terrain and forest cover data, snow sublimation from the Salt River basin in the Southwest U.S. is simulated for years 2008 (wet year) and 2007 (dry year). Downscaled meteorological input correlates well (r 0.80) with independent observations at AmeriFlux sites. Additionally, model correlation and bias with eddy-covariance vapor flux observations is comparable to previous localized modeling efforts. Upon a 30% reduction in effective leaf area index, canopy sublimation decreases by 1.29 mm (27.0%) and 1.05 mm (23.0%) at the basin scale for the 2008 and 2007 simulations, respectively. Ground sublimation decreases 0.72 mm (4.75%) in 2008 and only 0.17 mm (1.5%) in 2007. Canopy snow-holding capacity and frequent unloading events at lower elevations limit the variability in canopy sublimation from wet year to dry year at the basin scale. The greater decrease in snowpack sublimation in the wet year is partly due to decreased longwave radiation from the canopy reduction over a more extensive snowpack than the dry year. This decrease overcomes the increased solar radiation and wind speed during winter. A second factor is that a greater extent of the snowpack persisted into spring in 2008 than 2007, and the large increase in shortwave flux upon canopy reduction increases melt rates, reducing duration. Only in heavily forested high elevations (>2900 m above sea level) in 2008 does the snowpack persist long enough into spring to result in increased ground sublimation upon canopy reduction. As forest cover change can occur rapidly, these results are critical from water resource and ecosystem function perspectives.

  5. Long-term water absorption tests for frost insulation materials taking into account frost attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni A. Pakkala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water absorption of several different frost insulation materials was tested for four years. The test took into account both immersion and frost attack to materials. On the basis of the research the water absorption on XPS specimens is significantly minor compared to EPS specimens that were studied. The most significant result was that freezing of test specimens did not affect on water absorption of XPS specimens but had a major effect on water absorption of EPS specimens. With frozen EPS specimen the absorption continued increasing even after 48 months of immersion. Presumably the reason for such a behaviour is that the pore structure of EPS is not able to resist the tension caused by freezing water and therefore cracks are formed. Thus, more water absorbs inside the EPS through the cracks and it causes cracking deeper in the specimen which is why absorption increases after every freezing period.

  6. Of images and ills. Uses and malaises of sublimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Didi-Huberman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This text is published as postface to the new edition of Invention de l'hystérie. Charcot et l’iconographie photographique de l’hystérie (Macula, Paris, 2012, pp. 364-405 with the title Des images et des maux. It’s also the full version of the lecture organized by the Association Psychanalytique de France (September 24, 2011, entitled L’Usage de la sublimation. Starting from some considerations on his first book, the Author examines limits and potentials of the notion of sublimation in reference with art and artistic creation, and suggests a different way to approach it.

  7. Snow sublimation in mountain environments and its sensitivity to forest disturbance and climate warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexstone, Graham A.; Clow, David W.; Fassnacht, Steven R.; Liston, Glen E.; Hiemstra, Christopher A.; Knowles, John F.; Penn, Colin A.

    2018-01-01

    Snow sublimation is an important component of the snow mass balance, but the spatial and temporal variability of this process is not well understood in mountain environments. This study combines a process‐based snow model (SnowModel) with eddy covariance (EC) measurements to investigate (1) the spatio‐temporal variability of simulated snow sublimation with respect to station observations, (2) the contribution of snow sublimation to the ablation of the snowpack, and (3) the sensitivity and response of snow sublimation to bark beetle‐induced forest mortality and climate warming across the north‐central Colorado Rocky Mountains. EC‐based observations of snow sublimation compared well with simulated snow sublimation at stations dominated by surface and canopy sublimation, but blowing snow sublimation in alpine areas was not well captured by the EC instrumentation. Water balance calculations provided an important validation of simulated sublimation at the watershed scale. Simulated snow sublimation across the study area was equivalent to 28% of winter precipitation on average, and the highest relative snow sublimation fluxes occurred during the lowest snow years. Snow sublimation from forested areas accounted for the majority of sublimation fluxes, highlighting the importance of canopy and sub‐canopy surface sublimation in this region. Simulations incorporating the effects of tree mortality due to bark‐beetle disturbance resulted in a 4% reduction in snow sublimation from forested areas. Snow sublimation rates corresponding to climate warming simulations remained unchanged or slightly increased, but total sublimation losses decreased by up to 6% because of a reduction in snow covered area and duration.

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations on Frost Heave in Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ming

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the construction in cold regions, frost heave and thaw settlement are the two factors which must be taken care of. Considered that a saturated soil column was subjected to an overburden pressure to model the ice lens growing process. A typical process, which coupled water, heat, and stress that happened in a saturated freezing soil column, was simulated by the finite element software. We did the numerical simulation under the same conditions as the experiment tests and then compared the results from temperature, frost heave, frozen structure, water content, and water intake. Result shows that the simulation results match well with the experimental results, and the correctness of the mathematical model is validated. On that basis, frost heave amount under different conditions by changing the temperature boundary and loading boundary is obtained. The frost heave has an optimum temperature gradient. Under the optimum value, the frost heave amount increases with increasing temperature gradient. Above the optimum value, frost heave decreases with increasing temperature gradient. Increasing the overburden pressure, frost heave amount always decreases. These results can provide references for the constrictions in cold regions.

  9. [Infrared spectroscopic analysis of Guilin watermelon frost products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-lan; Chen, Xiao-kang; Xu, Yong-qun; Sun, Su-qin; Zhou, Qun; Lu, Wen-guan

    2012-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to analyze different products of Guilin watermelon frost by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), second derivative infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-IR) under thermal perturbation. The structural information of the samples indicates that samples from the same factory but of different brands had some dissimilarities in the IR spectra, and the type and content of accessories of them were different compared with conventional IR spectra of samples, peaks at 638 and 616 cm(-1) all arise from anhydrous sodium sulfate in watermelon frost spray and watermelon frost capsule; the characteristic absorption peaks of the sucrose, dextrin or other accessories can be seen clearly in the spectra of watermelon frost throat-clearing buccal tablets, watermelon frost throat tablets and watermelon frost lozenge. And the IR spectra of watermelon frost lozenge is very similar to the IR spectra of sucrose, so it can be easily proved that the content of sucrose in watermelon frost lozenge is high. In the 2D-IR correlation spectra, the samples presented the differences in the position, number and relative intensity of autopeaks and correlation peak clusters. Consequently, the macroscopical fingerprint characters of FTIR, second derivative infrared spectra and 2D-IR spectra can not only provide the information about main chemical constituents in medical materials, but also analyze and identify the type and content of accessories in Guilin watermelon frost. In conclusion, the multi-steps IR macro-fingerprint method is rapid, effective, visual and accurate for pharmaceutical research.

  10. Morphological and genetic perspectives of peach fruit responses to spring frost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring frost is one of the most unpredictable cropping factors in many peach production areas. A severe spring frost can wipe out an entire peach crop whereas a mild spring frost may naturally help thinning as is common practice in commercial peach production. The extent of frost damage depends on t...

  11. Lepanto, before and after: Between the Republic and the Sublime Porte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem KUMRUlAR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The loss of Cyprus to the ottoman Turks, hand in hand with the Battle of Lepanto was the major reason of a period of frozen politics and caused the breaking of the traditional peace between Venice and Constantinople. Yet there is a notable difference between the historical and political Conseptualization of these two major episodes. The ottoman state didn’t interpret this catastrophe as the Republic did. As, it could be seen from the bilateral diplomacy carried out by both states, neither the loss of Cyprus, nor the myth-creating Lepanto could change the classical oriental policy of the Serenissima. The case was not different for the Sublime Porte. The aim of this paper is to analyse the post-war politics of these two states and the noteable change in the political polarization in Europe in the milieu of the ottoman-Hapsburg rivalry.

  12. Sublimation-Induced Shape Evolution of Silver Cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Yong

    2009-12-18

    The heat is on: Surface sublimation and shape transformation of silver cubes, enclosed by {100} surfaces and about 100nm in size, are examined by in situ transmission electron microscopy (see picture). High-index surfaces, such as {110}, of face-centered cubic metals are more stable when the temperature is close to the melting point.

  13. The Religious-Sublime in Music, Literature and Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cifuentes-Aldunate, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    ”. The sublime will be regarded as the representation (in the sense of staging) of a perception. I will propose how the subjective perception – in this case of the divinity - is (re)constructed by the subject in a piece of Spanish Gothic literature, in sacred music and in architecture – the room which houses...

  14. The sublime and the grotesque: obscenity in Hilda Hilst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo A-mi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to discuss the dialogical relationship between sublime and grotesque in the work A obscena Senhora D by Hilda Hilst, based on its status of contemporary fiction permeated by reconditioning of the language in its performance in the non-linear time. In this sense, it was used studies of the sublime, as a historical and philosophical and literary concept in the works of Longinus, Edmund Burke, Immanuel Kant, Victor Hugo and François Lyotard; issues relating to discussions on the grotesque and its dialogue with the sublime ways, the works of Mikhail Bakhtin and Michel Maffesoli had great importance - the poetic and obscene relationship of the work discussed in convergent concepts such as obscenity, eroticism, sacred and profane. From these analyzes, it was concluded that in A obscena senhora D the sublime and the grotesque show in a multifaceted character, contradictory, interlocutory, and therefore not exclusionary: solidifying the hybrid linguistic-imagistic flow of the hilstiana literature.

  15. Some attributes of snow occurrence and snowmelt/sublimation rates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, snowmelt rates are spatially highly variable given other factors such as wind deflation and wind-induced sublimation. The observed snow trends have important implications for biosystem functioning, regional climate and hydrology, earth surface processes, and rural livelihoods in the Lesotho Highlands.

  16. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R.A.

    1989-01-24

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid. 1 fig.

  17. Feasibility study of CO2 capture by anti-sublimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schach, M.O.; Oyarzun, B.A.; Schramm, H.; Schneider, R.; Repke, J.U.

    2011-01-01

    Processes for carbon capture and storage have the drawback of high energy demand. In this work the application of CO2 capture by anti-sublimation is analyzed. The process was simulated using Aspen Plus. Process description is accomplished by phase equilibria models which are able to reproduce the

  18. Shades of sublime : a design for landscape experiences as an instrument in the making of meaning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roncken, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    Historically, the idea of the sublime is often associated with grand and astounding natural scenery. This thesis investigates a twenty-first century idea of the sublime that includes dissonant phenomena such as ecosystem disruption and climate change. The subject of the sublime is symbolic of how

  19. Aerosol volatility and enthalpy of sublimation of carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Kent; Jonsson, Asa M; Andersson, Patrik U; Hallquist, Mattias

    2010-04-08

    The enthalpy of sublimation has been determined for nine carboxylic acids, two cyclic (pinonic and pinic acid) and seven straight-chain dicarboxylic acids (C(4) to C(10)). The enthalpy of sublimation was determined from volatility measurements of nano aerosol particles using a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) set-up. Compared to the previous use of a VTDMA, this novel method gives enthalpy of sublimation determined over an extended temperature range (DeltaT approximately 40 K). The determined enthalpy of sublimation for the straight-chain dicarboxylic acids ranged from 96 to 161 kJ mol(-1), and the calculated vapor pressures at 298 K are in the range of 10(-6)-10(-3) Pa. These values indicate that dicarboxylic acids can take part in gas-to-particle partitioning at ambient conditions and may contribute to atmospheric nucleation, even though homogeneous nucleation is unlikely. To obtain consistent results, some experimental complications in producing nanosized crystalline aerosol particles were addressed. It was demonstrated that pinonic acid "used as received" needed a further purification step before being suspended as a nanoparticle aerosol. Furthermore, it was noted from distinct differences in thermal properties that aerosols generated from pimelic acid solutions gave two types of particles. These two types were attributed to crystalline and amorphous configurations, and based on measured thermal properties, the enthalpy of vaporization was 127 kJ mol(-1) and that of sublimation was 161 kJ mol(-1). This paper describes a new method that is complementary to other similar methods and provides an extension of existing experimental data on physical properties of atmospherically relevant compounds.

  20. Advances in sublimation studies for particles of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Nguyen, Viet; Fischer, Thomas; Abrishami, Tara; Papantonakis, Michael; Kendziora, Chris; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    When handling explosives, or related surfaces, the hands routinely become contaminated with particles of explosives and related materials. Subsequent contact with a solid surface results in particle crushing and deposition. These particles provide an evidentiary trail which is useful for security applications. As such, the opto-physico-chemical characteristics of these particles are critical to trace explosives detection applications in DOD or DHS arenas. As the persistence of these particles is vital to their forensic exploitation, it is important to understand which factors influence their persistence. The longevity or stability of explosives particles on a substrate is a function of several environmental parameters or particle properties including: Vapor pressure, particle geometry, airflow, particle field size, substrate topography, humidity, reactivity, adlayers, admixtures, particle areal density, and temperature. In this work we deposited particles of 2,4-dinitrotoluene on standard microscopy glass slides by particle sieving and studied their sublimation as a function of airflow velocity, areal particle density and particle field size. Analysis of 2D microscopic images was used to compute and track particle size and geometrical characteristics. The humidity, temperature and substrate type were kept constant for each experiment. A custom airflow cell, using standard microscopy glass slide, allowed in-situ photomicroscopy. Areal particle densities and airflow velocities were selected to provide relevant loadings and flow velocities for a range of potential applications. For a chemical of interest, we define the radial sublimation velocity (RSV) for the equivalent sphere of a particle as the parameter to characterize the sublimation rate. The RSV is a useful parameter because it is independent of particle size. The sublimation rate for an ensemble of particles was found to significantly depend on airflow velocity, the areal density of the particles, and the

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Academic Award (Draths and Frost)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winners, Dr. Karen M. Draths and Professor John W. Frost, used benign, genetically engineered microbes and sugars (instead of benzene) to synthesize adipic acid and catechol.

  2. Long term pavement performance computed parameter : frost penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    As the pavement design process moves toward mechanistic-empirical techniques, knowledge of seasonal changes in pavement structural characteristics becomes critical. Specifically, frost penetration information is necessary for determining the effect o...

  3. Forecast of frost days based on monthly temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos, M. T.; Tarquis, A. M.; Corato, M. C.; Saa, A.

    2009-07-01

    Abstract Although frost can cause considerable crop damage, and practices have been developed to mitigate forecasted frost, frost forecasting technologies have not changed for years. This paper reports on a new method based on successive application of two models to forecast the number of monthly frost days for several Community of Madrid (Spain) meteorological stations. The first is an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) stochastic model that forecasts minimum monthly absolute temperature (t{sub m}in) and average monthly minimum temperature ({mu}{sub t}) following Box and Jenkins methodology. The second model relates monthly temperatures (t{sub m}in, {mu}{sub t}) to the minimum daily temperature distribution during one month. Three ARIMA models were identified. They present the same seasonal behaviour (integrated moving average model) and different non-seasonal part: autoregressive model (Model 1), integrated moving average model (Model 2) and autoregressive and moving average model (Model 3). The results indicate that minimum daily temperature (t{sub d}min) for the meteorological stations studied followed a normal distribution each month with a very similar standard deviation through out the years. This standard deviation obtained for each station and each month could be used as a risk index for cold months. The application of Model 1 to predict minimum monthly temperatures produced the best frost days forecast. This procedure provides a tool for crop managers and crop insurance companies to assess the risk of frost frequency and intensity, so that they can take steps to mitigate frost damage and estimate the damage that frost would cause. (Author) 41 refs.

  4. Building energy efficiency and its effect on the frost insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airaksinen, M., Email: miimu.airaksinen@vtt.fi

    2012-06-15

    The energy efficiency of new buildings has improved significantly and is still improving. As the thermal insulation of the building envelope increases other properties and 'thumb' values might also change. Especially when the thermal transmittance (U-value) of the slab on the ground decreases, the frost insulation should also be reconsidered. The aim of this study is to find out how the frost insulation changes when the base floor and foundation insulation change. (orig.)

  5. Modelling of frost formation and growth on microstuctured surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntaha, Md. Ali; Haider, Md. Mushfique; Rahman, Md. Ashiqur

    2016-07-01

    Frost formation on heat exchangers is an undesirable phenomenon often encountered in different applications where the cold surface with a temperature below freezing point of water is exposed to humid air. The formation of frost on the heat transfer surface results in an increase in pressure drop and reduction in heat transfer, resulting in a reduction of the system efficiency. Many factors, including the temperature and moisture content of air, cold plate temperature, surface wettability etc., are known to affect frost formation and growth. In our present study, a model for frost growth on rectangular, periodic microgroove surfaces for a range of microgroove dimension (ten to hundreds of micron) is presented. The mathematical model is developed analytically by solving the governing heat and mass transfer equations with appropriate boundary conditions using the EES (Engineering Equation Solver) software. For temperature, a convective boundary condition at frost-air interface and a fixed cold plate surface temperature is used. Instead of considering the saturation or super-saturation models, density gradient at the surface is obtained by considering experimentally-found specified heat flux. The effect of surface wettability is incorporated by considering the distribution of condensed water droplets at the early stage of frost formation. Thickness, density and thermal conductivity of frost layer on the micro-grooved surfaces are found to vary with the dimension of the grooves. The variation of density and thickness of the frost layer on these micro-grooved surfaces under natural convection is numerally determined for a range of plate temperature and air temperature conditions and is compared with experimental results found in the open literature.

  6. Spatial and temporal distributions of Martian north polar cold spots before, during, and after the global dust storm of 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, C.; Titus, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    In the 1970s, Mariner and Viking observed features in the Mars northern polar region that were a few hundred kilometers in diameter with 20 fj,m brightness temperatures as low as 130 K (considerably below C02 ice sublimation temperatures). Over the past decade, studies have shown that these areas (commonly called "cold spots") are usually due to emissivity effects of frost deposits and occasionally to active C02 snowstorms. Three Mars years of Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer data were used to observe autumn and wintertime cold spot activity within the polar regions. Many cold spots formed on or near scarps of the perennial cap, probably induced by adiabatic cooling due to orographic lifting. These topographically associated cold spots were often smaller than those that were not associated with topography. We determined that initial grain sizes within the cold spots were on the order of a few millimeters, assuming the snow was uncontaminated by dust or water ice. On average, the half-life of the cold spots was 5 Julian days. The Mars global dust storm in 2001 significantly affected cold spot activity in the north polar region. Though overall perennial cap cold spot activity seemed unaffected, the distribution of cold spots did change by a decrease in the number of topographically associated cold spots and an increase in those not associated with topography. We propose that the global dust storm affected the processes that form cold spots and discuss how the global dust storm may have affected these processes. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Delayed Frost Growth on Jumping-Drop Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an inter-drop frost wave. The growth of this inter-drop frost front is shown to be up to three times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of inter-drop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an inter-drop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser was found to be superior to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by minimizing the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  8. A passive solar water heating system for vineyard frost protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, M. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, School of the Built Environment, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (Ireland); Skates, H. [Environmental Engineering Research Centre, School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast BT9 5AG (Ireland)

    2009-03-15

    The threat of frost during spring time (after 'bud burst') is an ever present danger to the vineyard owner. To minimise the risk, in addition to good site selection and vineyard management, a number of active frost protection systems are available. Most active methods of frost protection are costly in monetary terms and can also have a detrimental effect on the environment. This work presents the design and performance of a passive solar water heating quilt system under real vineyard operating conditions. Two vineyard sites were selected, and the solar water heating quilt design was evaluated over a three-month period. Detailed measurements of the temperature below and above the soil surface, levels of incident solar radiation and the wind direction and speed were recorded. Field study results indicate that the quilts can improve the solar collection and heat retention of the soil, resulting in increased temperatures during frost events of up to 1 C in air space immediately adjacent to the solar quilts when compared to conditions off the protected area. In addition, the time period during which the frost remains a danger to the vine is also reduced. When heat collection, storage and extraction rates are investigated, simplified calculations indicate that the solar quilt can improve collection by 38.5% over bare soil, resulting in the release of 32% more heat. Extrapolated to vineyard coverage, this could result in an extra 3500 MJ of heat per hectare per (typical frost event condition) day. (author)

  9. Coupling of THALES and FROST using MPI Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Woo; Ryu, Seok Hee; Jung, Chan Do; Jung, Jee Hoon; Um, Kil Sup; Lee, Jae Il [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper presents the coupling method between THALES and FROST and the simulation results with the coupled code system. In this study, subchannel analysis code THALES and transient fuel performance code FROST were coupled using MPI method as the first stage of the development of the multi-dimensional safety analysis methodology. As a part of the validation, the CEA ejection accident was simulated using the coupled THALES-FROST code and the results were compared with the ShinKori 3 and 4 FSAR. Comparison results revealed that CHASER using MPI method predicts fuel temperatures and heat flux quantitatively well. Thus it was confirmed that the THALES and FROST are properly coupled. In near future, ASTRA, multi-dimensional core neutron kinetics code, will be linked to THALESFROST code for the detailed three-dimensional CEA ejection analysis. The current safety analysis methodology for a CEA ejection accident based on numerous conservative assumptions with the point kinetics model results in quite adverse consequences. Thus, KNF is developing the multi-dimensional safety analysis methodology to enhance the consequences of the CEA ejection accident. For this purpose, three-dimensional core neutron kinetics code ASTRA, subchannel analysis code THALES, and transient fuel performance analysis code FROST are being coupled using message passing interface(MPI). For the first step, THALES and FROST are coupled and tested.

  10. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frost Considering Mass Diffusion and Eddy Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    A physical model for the effective thermal conductivity of water frost is proposed for application to the full range of frost density. The proposed model builds on the Zehner-Schlunder one-dimensional formulation for porous media appropriate for solid-to-fluid thermal conductivity ratios less than about 1000. By superposing the effects of mass diffusion and eddy convection on stagnant conduction in the fluid, the total effective thermal conductivity of frost is shown to be satisfactorily described. It is shown that the effects of vapor diffusion and eddy convection on the frost conductivity are of the same order. The results also point out that idealization of the frost structure by cylindrical inclusions offers a better representation of the effective conductivity of frost as compared to spherical inclusions. Satisfactory agreement between the theory and the measurements for the effective thermal conductivity of frost is demonstrated for a wide range of frost density and frost temperature.

  11. Robust Magnetic Properties of a Sublimable Single-Molecule Magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefl, Evan; Mannini, Matteo; Bernot, Kevin; Yi, Xiaohui; Amato, Alex; Leviant, Tom; Magnani, Agnese; Prokscha, Thomas; Suter, Andreas; Sessoli, Roberta; Salman, Zaher

    2016-06-28

    The organization of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) on surfaces via thermal sublimation is a prerequisite for the development of future devices for spintronics exploiting the richness of properties offered by these magnetic molecules. However, a change in the SMM properties due to the interaction with specific surfaces is usually observed. Here we present a rare example of an SMM system that can be thermally sublimated on gold surfaces while maintaining its intact chemical structure and magnetic properties. Muon spin relaxation and ac susceptibility measurements are used to demonstrate that, unlike other SMMs, the magnetic properties of this system in thin films are very similar to those in the bulk, throughout the full volume of the film, including regions near the metal and vacuum interfaces. These results exhibit the robustness of chemical and magnetic properties of this complex and provide important clues for the development of nanostructures based on SMMs.

  12. Sublimator Driven Coldplate Engineering Development Unit Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially increasing reliability and reducing complexity while saving both mass and power. Because the SDC requires a consumable feedwater, it can only be used for short mission durations. Additionally, the SDC is ideal for a vehicle with small transport distances and low heat rejection requirements. An SDC Engineering Development Unit was designed and fabricated. Performance tests were performed in a vacuum chamber to quantify and assess the performance of the SDC. The test data was then used to develop correlated thermal math models. Nonetheless, an Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate (ISDC) concept is being developed. The ISDC couples a coolant loop with the previously described SDC hardware. This combination allows the SDC to be used as a traditional coldplate during long mission phases and provides for dissimilar system redundancy

  13. Forecast of Frost Days Based on Monthly Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, M. T.; Tarquis, A. M.; Morató, M. C.; Saa-Requejo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Although frost can cause considerable crop damage and mitigation practices against forecasted frost exist, frost forecasting technologies have not changed for many years. The paper reports a new method to forecast the monthly number of frost days (FD) for several meteorological stations at Community of Madrid (Spain) based on successive application of two models. The first one is a stochastic model, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), that forecasts monthly minimum absolute temperature (tmin) and monthly average of minimum temperature (tminav) following Box-Jenkins methodology. The second model relates these monthly temperatures to minimum daily temperature distribution during one month. Three ARIMA models were identified for the time series analyzed with a stational period correspondent to one year. They present the same stational behavior (moving average differenced model) and different non-stational part: autoregressive model (Model 1), moving average differenced model (Model 2) and autoregressive and moving average model (Model 3). At the same time, the results point out that minimum daily temperature (tdmin), for the meteorological stations studied, followed a normal distribution each month with a very similar standard deviation through years. This standard deviation obtained for each station and each month could be used as a risk index for cold months. The application of Model 1 to predict minimum monthly temperatures showed the best FD forecast. This procedure provides a tool for crop managers and crop insurance companies to asses the risk of frost frequency and intensity, so that they can take steps to mitigate against frost damage and estimated the damage that frost would cost. This research was supported by Comunidad de Madrid Research Project 076/92. The cooperation of the Spanish National Meteorological Institute and the Spanish Ministerio de Agricultura, Pesca y Alimentation (MAPA) is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. TRIGGERING SUBLIMATION-DRIVEN ACTIVITY OF MAIN BELT COMETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghighipour, N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96825 (United States); Maindl, T. I.; Dvorak, R. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Schäfer, C. [Institut für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, D-72076 Tübingen (Germany); Speith, R., E-mail: nader@ifa.hawaii.edu [Physikalisches Institut, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2016-10-10

    It has been suggested that the comet-like activity of main belt comets (MBCs) is due to the sublimation of sub-surface water–ice that has been exposed as a result of their surfaces being impacted by meter-sized bodies. We have examined the viability of this scenario by simulating impacts between meter-sized and kilometer-sized objects using a smooth particle hydrodynamics approach. Simulations have been carried out for different values of the impact velocity and impact angle, as well as different target material and water-mass fractions. Results indicate that for the range of impact velocities corresponding to those in the asteroid belt, the depth of an impact crater is slightly larger than 10 m, suggesting that if the activation of MBCs is due to the sublimation of sub-surface water–ice, this ice has to exist no deeper than a few meters from the surface. Results also show that ice exposure occurs in the bottom and on the interior surface of impact craters, as well as on the surface of the target where some of the ejected icy inclusions are re-accreted. While our results demonstrate that the impact scenario is indeed a viable mechanism to expose ice and trigger the activity of MBCs, they also indicate that the activity of the current MBCs is likely due to ice sublimation from multiple impact sites and/or the water contents of these objects (and other asteroids in the outer asteroid belt) is larger than the 5% that is traditionally considered in models of terrestrial planet formation, providing more ice for sublimation. We present the details of our simulations and discuss their results and implications.

  15. Surface engineering of SiC via sublimation etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokubavicius, Valdas; Yazdi, Gholam R.; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei; Iakimov, Tihomir; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Yakimova, Rositsa

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparison of 6H-, 4H- and 3C-SiC sublimation etching. • Effects of Si-C and Si-C-Ta chemical systems on etching mechanisms. • Effect of etching ambient on surface reconstruction. • Application of etched 4H-SiC surface for the growth of graphene nanoribbons is illustrated. - Abstract: We present a technique for etching of SiC which is based on sublimation and can be used to modify the morphology and reconstruction of silicon carbide surface for subsequent epitaxial growth of various materials, for example graphene. The sublimation etching of 6H-, 4H- and 3C-SiC was explored in vacuum (10 −5 mbar) and Ar (700 mbar) ambient using two different etching arrangements which can be considered as Si-C and Si-C-Ta chemical systems exhibiting different vapor phase stoichiometry at a given temperature. The surfaces of different polytypes etched under similar conditions are compared and the etching mechanism is discussed with an emphasis on the role of tantalum as a carbon getter. To demonstrate applicability of such etching process graphene nanoribbons were grown on a 4H-SiC surface that was pre-patterned using the thermal etching technique presented in this study.

  16. Surface engineering of SiC via sublimation etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokubavicius, Valdas, E-mail: valjo@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Yazdi, Gholam R.; Ivanov, Ivan G. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei [Max Lab, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Iakimov, Tihomir; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Yakimova, Rositsa [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Comparison of 6H-, 4H- and 3C-SiC sublimation etching. • Effects of Si-C and Si-C-Ta chemical systems on etching mechanisms. • Effect of etching ambient on surface reconstruction. • Application of etched 4H-SiC surface for the growth of graphene nanoribbons is illustrated. - Abstract: We present a technique for etching of SiC which is based on sublimation and can be used to modify the morphology and reconstruction of silicon carbide surface for subsequent epitaxial growth of various materials, for example graphene. The sublimation etching of 6H-, 4H- and 3C-SiC was explored in vacuum (10{sup −5} mbar) and Ar (700 mbar) ambient using two different etching arrangements which can be considered as Si-C and Si-C-Ta chemical systems exhibiting different vapor phase stoichiometry at a given temperature. The surfaces of different polytypes etched under similar conditions are compared and the etching mechanism is discussed with an emphasis on the role of tantalum as a carbon getter. To demonstrate applicability of such etching process graphene nanoribbons were grown on a 4H-SiC surface that was pre-patterned using the thermal etching technique presented in this study.

  17. El Silencio de la Sirena: lo Sublime en Alejandra Pizarnik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Lerman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Algunas poéticas de las décadas del cincuenta y del sesenta parecerían constituirse en torno a un vacío, un silencio que a veces inspira la palabra poética y otras veces la aborta. Esa ambigüedad, característica de la poética de Alejandra Pizarnik, podemos entenderla como una “reedición” de la estética de lo sublime. Lo sublime es un concepto estético-filosófico que plantearon filósofos como Inmanuel Kant y Edmund Burke para pensar el arte romántico y, en el siglo XX, otros autores como Jean-François Lyotard, lo retomaron para analizar el arte de vanguardia. Así, lo sublime nos permite repensar la poética de Pizarnik en sus coincidencias y oposiciones a otras de la tradición moderna (como la de Charles Baudelaire o de las vanguardias latinoamericanas (como Oliverio Girondo y Vicente Huidobro.

  18. El Silencio de la Sirena: lo Sublime en Alejandra Pizarnik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Lerman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1984-784X.2012v12n17p85 Algunas poéticas de las décadas del cincuenta y del sesenta parecerían constituirse en torno a un vacío, un silencio que a veces inspira la palabra poética y otras veces la aborta. Esa ambigüedad, característica de la poética de Alejandra Pizarnik, podemos entenderla como una “reedición” de la estética de lo sublime. Lo sublime es un concepto estético-filosófico que plantearon filósofos como Inmanuel Kant y Edmund Burke para pensar el arte romántico y, en el siglo XX, otros autores como Jean-François Lyotard, lo retomaron para analizar el arte de vanguardia. Así, lo sublime nos permite repensar la poética de Pizarnik en sus coincidencias y oposiciones a otras de la tradición moderna (como la de Charles Baudelaire o de las vanguardias latinoamericanas (como Oliverio Girondo y Vicente Huidobro.

  19. Frost-resistance of red ceramic products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramires, M. V. V.

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work is a study about degradation occurring with red ceramics whenever they are exposed to the environmental conditions of a cold and humid climate. Four different types of clay from Rio Grande do Sul were studied: two of them from the Serra Geral formation, and the other two from the formation of Strada Nova, which are commonly used to make roof tiles. The clay was characterised to identify its chemical and mineralogical composition. Also the physical properties were researched. In the ceramic processing, the pressure with four different sintering temperatures (850ºC, 900ºC, 950ºC, and 1000ºC at three different intervals (3, 12, and 24 hours were used. The ceramic materials thus obtained were characterised according to their physical properties (water absorption, total density, porosity, and porous size, and mechanical (mechanical resistance over four points. For the characterisation of the degradation mechanism, some trials were carried out to obtain the coefficient of saturation and on frost and defrost cycles. The microstructural analysis was made with a scanning electronic microscopy. On the basis of the results obtained, a model for the degradation mechanism is presented, and a degradation factor which relates the total volume of mesopores to the standard size of mesopores is suggested. It was concluded that the red ceramic products more prone to be frost-resistant are those presenting a degradation factor below 100.

    Se estudia la degradación que sufre la cerámica roja cuando se expone a la acción de los climas fríos e húmedos. La experimentación se ha realizado con cuatro arcillas de la son expuestas a los climas fríos y húmedos. Se investigaron cuatro diferentes arcillas de la provincia del Rio Grande do Sul, que se emplean tradicionalmente en la fabricación de tejas. Dos de ellas pertenecen a la formación de la Serra Geral y las otras dos de la formación Estrada Nova. La caracterización de las arcillas

  20. Passive anti-frosting surfaces using microscopic ice arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Farzad; Nath, Saurabh; Iliff, Grady; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Despite exceptional advances in surface chemistry and micro/nanofabrication, no engineered surface has been able to passively suppress the in-plane growth of frost occurring in humid, subfreezing environments. Motivated by this, and inspired by the fact that ice itself can evaporate nearby liquid water droplets, we present a passive anti-frosting surface in which the majority of the surface remains dry indefinitely. We fabricated an aluminum surface exhibiting an array of small metallic fins, where a wicking micro-groove was laser-cut along the top of each fin to produce elevated water ``stripes'' that freeze into ice. As the saturation vapor pressure of ice is less than that of supercooled liquid water, the ice stripes serve as overlapping humidity sinks that siphon all nearby moisture from the air and prevent condensation and frost from forming anywhere else on the surface. Our experimental results show that regions between stripes remain dry even after 24 hours of operation under humid and supercooled conditions. We believe that the presented anti-frosting technology has the potential to help solve the world's multi-billion dollar frosting problem that adversely affects transportation, power generation, and HVAC systems.

  1. Free convection frost growth in a narrow vertical channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanda, G.; Fossa, M. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria della Produzione, Termoenergetica e Modelli Matematici (DIPTEM), Universita degli Studi di Genova, via all' Opera Pia 15a, I-16145 Genova (Italy)

    2006-06-15

    Processes involving heat transfer from a humid air stream to a cold plate, with simultaneous deposition of frost, are of great importance in a variety of refrigeration equipment. In this work, frost growth on a vertical plate in free convection has been experimentally investigated. The cold plate (0.095m high, 0.282m wide) was placed in a narrow (2.395m high, 0.01m deep) vertical channel open at the top and bottom in order to permit the natural circulation of ambient air. The cold plate temperature and the air relative humidity were varied in the -40 to -4{sup o}C and 31-85% range, respectively, with the air temperature held fixed at 27{sup o}C (+/-1{sup o}C). The main quantities (thickness, temperature and mass of frost, heat flux at the cold plate), measured during the time evolution of the process, are presented as functions of the input parameters (relative humidity and cold plate temperature); in particular, the role exerted by the plate confinement on the frost growth is discussed. Data are recast in order to identify compact parameters able to correlate with good accuracy frost thickness, mass and density data. (author)

  2. The fate of meteoric metals in ice particles: Effects of sublimation and energetic particle bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, T. P.; Frankland, V. L.; Murray, B. J.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2017-08-01

    The uptake and potential reactivity of metal atoms on water ice can be an important process in planetary atmospheres and on icy bodies in the interplanetary and interstellar medium. For instance, metal atom uptake affects the gas-phase chemistry of the Earth's mesosphere, and has been proposed to influence the agglomeration of matter into planets in protoplanetary disks. In this study the fate of Mg and K atoms incorporated into water-ice films, prepared under ultra-high vacuum conditions at temperatures of 110-140 K, was investigated. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that Mg- and K-containing species do not co-desorb when the ice sublimates, demonstrating that uptake on ice particles causes irreversible removal of the metals from the gas phase. This implies that uptake on ice particles in terrestrial polar mesospheric clouds accelerates the formation of large meteoric smoke particles (≥1 nm radius above 80 km) following sublimation of the ice. Energetic sputtering of metal-dosed ice layers by 500 eV Ar+ and Kr+ ions shows that whereas K reacts on (or within) the ice surface to form KOH, adsorbed Mg atoms are chemically inert. These experimental results are consistent with electronic structure calculations of the metals bound to an ice surface, where theoretical adsorption energies on ice are calculated to be -68 kJ mol-1 for K, -91 kJ mol-1 for Mg, and -306 kJ mol-1 for Fe. K can also insert into a surface H2O to produce KOH and a dangling H atom, in a reaction that is slightly exothermic.

  3. Crushed aggregates for roads and their properties for frost protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Willy Danielsen, Svein

    2015-04-01

    Crushed aggregates for roads and their properties for frost protection Elena Kuznetsova, NTNU and Svein Willy Danielsen, SINTEF With natural (fluvial, glaciofluvial) sand/gravel resources being rapidly depleted in many countries, the last decade has seen a significant trend towards using more alternative materials for construction purpose. In Norway the development and implementation of crushed aggregate technology has been the most important way to get around the problem with increased resource scarcity. Today Norway is one the European countries with the highest percentage of crushed/manufactured aggregates. A crushed product will reveal a different particle size distribution, a sharper, more angular particle shape, and not least - a significantly different mineral composition. The latter may often be characterised by more polymineral composition, and it will also much more depend on the local bedrock. When handled with care and knowledge, these differences can give the user a lot of new opportunities relating to materials design. Norwegian road construction practice has changed significantly during the last 40 years due to the replacement of gravel by crushed rock materials in the granular layers of the pavements. The use of non-processed rock materials from blasting was allowed in the subbase layer until 2012. This was a reason for a lot of problems with frost heaving due to inhomogeneity of this material, and in practice it was difficult to control the size of large stones. Since 2012 there is a requirement that rock materials for use in the subbase layer shall be crushed (Handbook N200, 2014). During the spring 2014 The Norwegian Public Roads Administration introduced a new handbook with requirements for roads construction in Norway, including new specifications for the frost protection layer. When pavements are constructed over moist and/or frost susceptible soils in cold and humid environments, the frost protection layer also becomes a very important part

  4. Frost susceptibility of granular subbase materials contaminated by deicing chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Stuhr; Orlander, Tobias; Doré, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The increase in urban population in arctic areas leads to an increased demand for transportation infrastructures (such as roads and airfields) in the regions. This challenges the road constructions in terms of condition, bearing capacity and maintenance. It is believed that deicing agents used on...... data on the granular subbase material. © 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers....... on roads and airfields enter the granular subbase materials and thereby makes the soil more frost-susceptible. In this project a series of isothermal frost heave tests has been carried out on granular subbase material from the runway at Kuujjuaq Airport, Québec, Canada. The tests have been carried out...... in order to determine the frost susceptibility of the material when it is contaminated by a deicing agent. Two series of three freezing tests with isothermal cooling has been conducted using identical saline gradient added through brine. Two types of cooling ramp, an automatic cooling and a manual cooling...

  5. Heat and mass transfer in the melting of frost

    CERN Document Server

    Mohs, William F

    2015-01-01

    This Brief is aimed at engineers and researchers involved in the refrigeration industry: specifically, those interested in energy utilization and system efficiency. The book presents what the authors believe is the first comprehensive frost melting study involving all aspects of heat and mass transfer. The volume’s description of in-plane and normal digital images of frost growth and melting is also unique in the field, and the digital analysis technique offers an advantage over invasive measurement methods. The scope of book’s coverage includes modeling and experimentation for the frost formation and melting processes. The key sub-specialties to which the book are aimed include refrigeration system analysis and design, coupled heat and mass transfer, and phase-change processes.

  6. Frost sensor for use in defrost controls for refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Patrick D.; Butz, James R.; Veatch, Bradley D.; O'Connor, Michael W.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the total thermal resistance to heat flow from the air to the evaporative cooler fins of a refrigeration system. The apparatus is a frost sensor that measures the reduction in heat flow due to the added thermal resistance of ice (reduced conduction) as well as the reduction in heat flow due to the blockage of airflow (reduced convection) from excessive ice formation. The sensor triggers a defrost cycle when needed, instead of on a timed interval. The invention is also a method for control of frost in a system that transfers heat from air to a refrigerant along a thermal path. The method involves measuring the thermal conductivity of the thermal path from the air to the refrigerant, recognizing a reduction in thermal conductivity due to the thermal insulation effect of the frost and due to the loss of airflow from excessive ice formation; and controlling the defrosting of the system.

  7. Predictive modeling of freezing and thawing of frost-susceptible soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Frost depth is an essential factor in design of various transportation infrastructures. In frost : susceptible soils, as soils freezes, water migrates through the soil voids below the freezing line : towards the freezing front and causes excessive he...

  8. Analysis of railway subgrade frost heave deformation based on GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuxun Ma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the connection between the railway subgrade frost heave deformation and temperature variation, five GPS stations' data were used to monitor the deformation on a certain section of railway subgrade in northeast China. GAMIT software is used to process the data, providing daily solution, daytime solution and nighttime solution. Vertical trends of these five stations were analyzed to investigate frost heave effect on railway subgrade deformation. The results show that the temperature difference between daytime and night induces stations, significant vertical displacement, and the temperature difference between seasons causes settlement of station which appears linear trend.

  9. On the importance of sublimation to an alpine snow mass balance in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. MacDonald

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A modelling study was undertaken to evaluate the contribution of sublimation to an alpine snow mass balance in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Snow redistribution and sublimation by wind, snowpack sublimation and snowmelt were simulated for two winters over an alpine ridge transect located in the Canada Rocky Mountains. The resulting snowcover regimes were compared to those from manual snow surveys. Simulations were performed using physically based blowing snow (PBSM and snowpack ablation (SNOBAL models. A hydrological response unit (HRU-based spatial discretization was used rather than a more computationally expensive fully-distributed one. The HRUs were set up to follow an aerodynamic sequence, whereby eroded snow was transported from windswept, upwind HRUs to drift accumulating, downwind HRUs. That snow redistribution by wind can be adequately simulated in computationally efficient HRUs over this ridge has important implications for representing snow transport in large-scale hydrology models and land surface schemes. Alpine snow sublimation losses, in particular blowing snow sublimation losses, were significant. Snow mass losses to sublimation as a percentage of cumulative snowfall were estimated to be 20–32% with the blowing snow sublimation loss amounting to 17–19% of cumulative snowfall. This estimate is considered to be a conservative estimate of the blowing snow sublimation loss in the Canadian Rocky Mountains because the study transect is located in the low alpine zone where the topography is more moderate than the high alpine zone and windflow separation was not observed. An examination of the suitability of PBSM's sublimation estimates in this environment and of the importance of estimating blowing snow sublimation on the simulated snow accumulation regime was conducted by omitting sublimation calculations. Snow accumulation in HRUs was overestimated by 30% when neglecting blowing snow sublimation calculations.

  10. Risk analysis of first and last frost occurrences in central Alborz region, Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimi, M.; Khalili, A.; Hajjam, S.; Kamali, G.A.; Stigter, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    Central Alborz is one of the important agricultural regions of Iran. Occurrence of the first frost in fall and the last frost in spring causes damage to the crops in this region every year. Information about the probable dates of frost occurrence helps farmers in preventing or reducing the damages

  11. A method for assessing frost damage risk in sweet cherry orchards of South Patagonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cittadini, E.D.; Ridder, de N.; Peri, P.L.; Keulen, van H.

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of frost damage risk is important in planning the development of new orchard areas and for decision-making on design and installation of frost control systems. The objective of this study was to develop a comprehensive method to quantify frost damage risk in different sweet cherry

  12. Experimental study on the effect of frost parameters on domestic refrigerator finned tube evaporator coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OEzkan, Derya Burcu; OEzil, Eralp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, 34349 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-12-15

    In this study, parameters affecting the frost formation on the evaporator of a refrigerator and the structure of frost were examined. Air velocity measurements both at the air inlet and outlet channels of the evaporator were performed, and the effect of air velocity on frost formation was examined. The rate of evaporation of water inside the refrigerator cabin was also recorded. (author)

  13. Lessons in the Conversation That We Are: Robert Frost's "Death of the Hired Man."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Walter

    1996-01-01

    Looks at Robert Frost's "The Death of the Hired Man" as a "representative anecdote" for Frost's work, which, taken as a whole, shows readers how to lose themselves among the overlooked places and turnings, the topics and tropes, that make up Frost's rhetorical home, the place of everyday human talk and gossip. (TB)

  14. Figure del desiderio: l'amore fra distruzione e sublime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Franzone

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Attraverso due racconti di Cortázar, l'analisi di due figure del desiderio ci permette esplorare due estremi seguendo una verticalità. La distruzione, doppio tenebroso della nostra anima, ci rivela un erotismo legato alla morte e al desiderio morboso di possedere l'Altro; il suo contraltare è un'ascesa vertiginosa accompagnata da un godimento estetico, dall'amore sublime prossimo all'esperienza mistica che si concluderà con una discesa progressiva e nel rispetto di questo Altro. La creazione letteraria si presenta come uno sfogo alle nostre angosce, che sono anche una sorta d'espressione dell'erotismo.

  15. Genetic architecture of winter hardiness and frost tolerance in triticale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Liu

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress experienced by autumn-sown crops during winter is of great economic importance as it can have a severe negative impact on yield. In this study, we investigated the genetic architecture of winter hardiness and frost tolerance in triticale. To this end, we used a large mapping population of 647 DH lines phenotyped for both traits in combination with genome-wide marker data. Employing multiple-line cross QTL mapping, we identified nine main effect QTL for winter hardiness and frost tolerance of which six were overlapping between both traits. Three major QTL were identified on chromosomes 5A, 1B and 5R. In addition, an epistasis scan revealed the contribution of epistasis to the genetic architecture of winter hardiness and frost tolerance in triticale. Taken together, our results show that winter hardiness and frost tolerance are complex traits that can be improved by phenotypic selection, but also that genomic approaches hold potential for a knowledge-based improvement of these important traits in elite triticale germplasm.

  16. Condensation phenomena and frost problems in the air heat recuperators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamski Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation results of condensation phenomena and frost problems in the ventilation heat recuperators are presented. The experiments have been conducted for typical value of indoor temperature 20°C and a large range of humidity values from 20 to 75% and more of an exhausted air. The heat exchanger worked in the real conditions of the winter climate in Bialystok.

  17. Reduced-molecular-weight derivatives of frost grape polysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new Type II arabinogalactan was recently described as an abundant gum exudate from stems of wildfrost grape (Vitus riparia Michx.). The purpose of the current study is to more thoroughly characterize the physical properties of this frost grape polysaccharide (FGP), and develop methods to modify th...

  18. Enhancing Perspective, Inviting Response: Multiple Interpretations of a Frost Poem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Brian D.

    1992-01-01

    Asserts that literary criticism and scholarly analyses provide a broad and enriching resource with which to inform instruction and discussion in a pluralistic classroom. Offers examples of a postreading activity based on seven major interpretations of Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening." Presents follow-up and extension…

  19. In and Outdoor Schooling: Robert Frost and the Classics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Helen H.

    1974-01-01

    This is an abridged and modified form of an essay that the author, professor of Greek and Latin at Barnard College, delivered at the Library of Congress symposium held last spring on the hundredth anniversary of Robert Frost's birth. (Editor/RK)

  20. Holding emotional and linguistic rulers up to the poetry of Robert Frost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whissell, C

    1999-12-01

    The words in a large and representative sample of Robert Frost's poetry were compared with information in several data bases which provided estimates of the poetry's pleasantness, arousal, emotionality, imagery, and linguistic complexity. Findings confirmed that Frost's poetry was linguistically simple and emotionally restrained in comparison to that of his cohort. They also highlighted the increasing variability in Frost's poetry across time and its decreasing imagery. Frost's poetry was more restrained than that of his male cohort but similar to the poetry of his female cohort in its linguistic simplicity. Frost's acknowledged death poems were in fact quite pleasant and passive in emotional tone.

  1. Inhibition of Condensation Frosting by Arrays of Hygroscopic Antifreeze Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoda; Damle, Viraj G; Uppal, Aastha; Linder, Rubin; Chandrashekar, Sriram; Mohan, Ajay R; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2015-12-29

    The formation of frost and ice can have negative impacts on travel and a variety of industrial processes and is typically addressed by dispensing antifreeze substances such as salts and glycols. Despite the popularity of this anti-icing approach, some of the intricate underlying physical mechanisms are just being unraveled. For example, recent studies have shown that in addition to suppressing ice formation within its own volume, an individual salt saturated water microdroplet forms a region of inhibited condensation and condensation frosting (RIC) in its surrounding area. This occurs because salt saturated water, like most antifreeze substances, is hygroscopic and has water vapor pressure at its surface lower than water saturation pressure at the substrate. Here, we demonstrate that for macroscopic drops of propylene glycol and salt saturated water, the absolute RIC size can remain essentially unchanged for several hours. Utilizing this observation, we demonstrate that frost formation can be completely inhibited in-between microscopic and macroscopic arrays of propylene glycol and salt saturated water drops with spacing (S) smaller than twice the radius of the RIC (δ). Furthermore, by characterizing condensation frosting dynamics around various hygroscopic drop arrays, we demonstrate that they can delay complete frosting over of the samples 1.6 to 10 times longer than films of the liquids with equivalent volume. The significant delay in onset of ice nucleation achieved by dispensing propylene glycol in drops rather than in films is likely due to uniform dilution of the drops driven by thermocapillary flow. This transport mode is absent in the films, leading to faster dilution, and with that facilitated homogeneous nucleation, near the liquid-air interface.

  2. Analysis of early-stage frost formation in natural convection over a horizontal cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahavvor, Ali R. [School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran); Yaghoubi, Mahmood [School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran); Academy of Sciences (Iran)

    2009-09-15

    Frost growth process on a cold surface consists of two stages: The early-stage or one-dimensional growth of ice columns and multidimensional growth in the form of a porous structure. The transition time which marking these two stages is important for any numerical modeling of frost formation. This paper proposes a mathematical model to predict the transition time and frost properties in natural convection of frost formation over a cooled horizontal cylinder in the first stage of growth period. Comparison is performed among the results of this model and experimental observations reported in the literatures. It is observed that the presented model can be used more efficiently to determine transition time and frost properties in the early-stage of frost formation. Based on the obtained results a new correlation is developed for the duration time of early-stage of frost formation process (transition time) in natural convection. (author)

  3. Frost behavior of a fin surface with temperature variation along heat exchanger fins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Soo; Kim, Min Soo; Lee, Kwan Soo [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ook Joong [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for predicting the frost behavior formed on heat exchanger fins, considering fin heat conduction under frosting condition. The model is composed of air-side, the frost layer, and fin region, and they are coupled to the frost layer. The frost behavior is more accurately predicted with fin heat conduction considered (Case A) than with a constant fin surface temperature assumed (Case B). The results indicate that the frost thickness and heat transfer rate for Case B are over-predicted in most regions of the fin, as compared to those for Case A. Also, for Case A, the maximum frost thickness varies little with the fin length variations, and the extension of the fin length over 30 mm contributes insignificantly to heat transfer.

  4. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacramento, R. L.; Alves, B. X.; Silva, B. A.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, A. N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); INMETRO, Av. Nossa Senhora das Graças, 50 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Li, M. S. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Ave. Trabalhador São Carlense, 400, 13565-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H{sub 2} are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  5. Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF6 freezer/sublimer vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF 6 freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF 6 in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % 235 U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control

  6. The first frost in the Pipe Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Miwa; Bailey, Jeffrey D.; Hocuk, Seyit; Caselli, Paola; Esplugues, Gisela B.; Cazaux, Stephanie; Spaans, Marco

    2018-02-01

    Context. Spectroscopic studies of ices in nearby star-forming regions indicate that ice mantles form on dust grains in two distinct steps, starting with polar ice formation (H2O rich) and switching to apolar ice (CO rich). Aims: We test how well the picture applies to more diffuse and quiescent clouds where the formation of the first layers of ice mantles can be witnessed. Methods: Medium-resolution near-infrared spectra are obtained toward background field stars behind the Pipe Nebula. Results: The water ice absorption is positively detected at 3.0 μm in seven lines of sight out of 21 sources for which observed spectra are successfully reduced. The peak optical depth of the water ice is significantly lower than those in Taurus with the same AV. The source with the highest water-ice optical depth shows CO ice absorption at 4.7 μm as well. The fractional abundance of CO ice with respect to water ice is 16-6+7%, and about half as much as the values typically seen in low-mass star-forming regions. Conclusions: A small fractional abundance of CO ice is consistent with some of the existing simulations. Observations of CO2 ice in the early diffuse phase of a cloud play a decisive role in understanding the switching mechanism between polar and apolar ice formation. Based on data collected by SpeX at the Infrared Telescope Facility, which is operated by the University of Hawaii under contract NNH14CK55B with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.Based also on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.The final reduced spectra (FITS format) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/610

  7. The Mars water cycle at other epochs: History of the polar caps and layered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    1992-01-01

    The atmospheric water cycle at the present epoch involves summertime sublimation of water from the north polar cap, transport of water through the atmosphere, and condensation on one or both winter CO2 caps. Exchange with the regolith is important seasonally, but the water content of the atmosphere appears to be controlled by the polar caps. The net annual transport through the atmosphere, integrated over long timescales, must be the driving force behind the long-term evolution of the polar caps; clearly, this feeds back into the evolution of the layered terrain. We have investigated the behavior of the seasonal water cycle and the net integrated behavior at the pole for the last 10 exp 7 years. Our model of the water cycle includes the solar input, CO2 condensation and sublimation, and summertime water sublimation through the seasonal cycles, and incorporates the long-term variations in the orbital elements describing the Martian orbit.

  8. Methods of conveying fluids and methods of sublimating solid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-10-01

    A heat exchanger and associated methods for sublimating solid particles therein, for conveying fluids therethrough, or both. The heat exchanger includes a chamber and a porous member having a porous wall having pores in communication with the chamber and with an interior of the porous member. A first fluid is conveyed into the porous member while a second fluid is conveyed into the porous member through the porous wall. The second fluid may form a positive flow boundary layer along the porous wall to reduce or eliminate substantial contact between the first fluid and the interior of the porous wall. The combined first and second fluids are conveyed out of the porous member. Additionally, the first fluid and the second fluid may each be conveyed into the porous member at different temperatures and may exit the porous member at substantially the same temperature.

  9. Uranium hexaflouride freezer/sublimer process simulator/trainer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnal, C.L.; Belcher, J.D.; Tapp, P.A.; Ruppel, F.R.; Wells, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a software and hardware simulation of a freezer/sublimer unit used in gaseous diffusion processing of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). The objective of the project was to build a plant simulator that reads control signals and produces plant signals to mimic the behavior of an actual plant. The model is based on physical principles and process data. Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) was used to develop the model. Once the simulation was validated with actual plant process data, the ACSL model was translated into Advanced Communication and Control Oriented Language (ACCOL). A Bristol Babcock Distributed Process Controller (DPC) Model 3330 was the hardware platform used to host the ACCOL model and process the real world signals. The DPC will be used as a surrogate plant to debug control system hardware/software and to train operators to use the new distributed control system without disturbing the process. 2 refs., 4 figs

  10. FROST: an ASIC for digital mammography with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamaschi, A. E-mail: bergamaschi@ts.infn.it; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Arfelli, F.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, R.; Olivo, A.; Pani, S.; Castelli, E

    2003-09-01

    The FRONTier RADiography (FRONTRAD) collaboration is developing a digital system for mammography at the Elettra Synchrotron Light Source in Trieste. The system is based on a silicon microstrip detector array. The ASIC FROST (FRONTRAD Read Out sySTem) was developed as a collaboration between INFN Trieste and Aurelia Microelettronica and is designed to operate in single photon counting mode. FROST provides low-noise and high-gain performances and is able to work at incident photon rates higher than 100 kHz with almost 100% efficiency. The ASIC has been tested and the first images of mammographic test objects will be shown. The acquisition time per breast image should be of about 10 s.

  11. The Physics of Frost Heave and Ice-Lens Growth

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen S. L.

    2013-01-01

    The principle cause of frost heave is the formation of segregated ice-ice lenses-in freezing soil columns. Despite much experimental and theoretical work, there remain many questions about the fundamental process by which this occurs. Frost-heave models fall into two main classes: capillary and frozen-fringe models. Which model is appropriate depends on whether there is a frozen fringe; these are difficult to observe but some experimental evidence does exist. Recent advances have revitalized the capillary model, such as the engulfment model and the concept of geometrical supercooling. Key experimental and theoretical challenges remain to be resolved. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA. All rights reserved.

  12. H2O frost point detection on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The Viking Mars landers contain meteorological instrumentation to measure wind, temperature, and pressure but not atmospheric water content. The landings occurred during local summer, and it was observed that the nocturnal temperature decrease at sensor height (1.6 m) did not exhibit a uniform behavior at either site. It was expected that the rate of decrease would gradually slow, leveling off near sunrise. Instead, a leveling occurred several hours earlier. Temperature subsequently began a more rapid decrease which slowed by sunrise. This suggested that the temperature sensors may be detecting the frost point of water vapor. Analysis of alternative hypotheses demonstrates that none of these are viable candidates. The frost point interpretation is consistent with other lander and orbiter observations, with terrestrial experience, and with modeling of Mars' atmospheric behavior. It thus appears that the meteorology experiment can help provide a basis toward understanding the distribution and dynamics of Martian water vapor.

  13. Full-scale chilled pipeline frost heave testing, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, B. [Northern Engineering and Scientific, Anchorage, AK (United States); Isaacs, R.M. [RMI Associates, Camano Island, WA (United States); Myrick, J.E. [Myrick International, Tyler, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed a chilled pipeline frost-heave testing facility that was developed to simulate and record the rate of frost heave and frost-bulb growth for a buried, chilled pipeline in frost-susceptible soil and to determine the effectiveness of different mitigation techniques. The test facility, which was established near Fairbanks, Alaska, in 1979, has 10 test sections using 1.22-metre-diameter pipe. The testing involved un-insulated, insulated, and insulated with over-excavation and gravel berm configurations as well as the frost heave of the chilled pipeline. The test facility was described in detail. Frost heave and frost-bulb growth measurements from the first 10 months of testing were presented, as these are the first data to enter the public domain. The testing was undertaken to investigate the frost-heave relationships between sections, to better understand frost heave in permafrost, to explore possible mitigation options, and to advance the predicative capabilities of frost heave models. 12 refs., 1 tab., 17 figs.

  14. Influences of surface hydrophilicity on frost formation on a vertical cold plate under natural convection conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhongliang; Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Hongyan; Meng, Sheng; Cheng, Shuiyuan [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation, Ministry of Education and Key Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Energy Conversion, Beijing Education Commission, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Pingleyuan 100, Beijing 100022 (China)

    2007-07-15

    Surface hydrophilicity has a strong influence on frost nucleation according to phase transition theory. To study this effect, a close observation of frost formation and deposition processes on a vertical plate was made under free convection conditions. The formation and shape variation of frost crystals during the initial period are described and the frost thickness variation with time on both hydrophobic and plain copper cold surfaces are presented. The various influencing factors are discussed in depth. The mechanism of surface hydrophilicity influence on frost formation was analyzed theoretically. This revealed that increasing the contact angle can increase the potential barrier and restrain crystal nucleation and growth and thus frost deposition. The experimental results show that the initial water drops formed on a hydrophobic surface are smaller and remain in the liquid state for a longer time compared with ones formed on a plain copper surface. It is also observed that the frost layer deposited on a hydrophobic surface is loose and weak. Though the hydrophobic surface can retard frost formation to a certain extent and causes a looser frost layer, our experimental results show that it does not depress the growth of the frost layer. (author)

  15. Part 4. Review of centrifuge testing applicability of frost heave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, V. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada). C-Core; Phillips, R. [Geotechnical Engineering Consultants, Harpenden (United Kingdom); Clark, J. [J.I. Clark and Associates, St. John' s, NL (Canada); Haigh, S. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    This technical review of a proposed pipeline in the Mackenzie Valley in the Northwest Territories represents the third of 3 reports that document the current state of knowledge about frost heave theory, testing and predictive modelling. It summarizes the applicability of centrifuge testing to northern pipeline frost heave design. The advantages and limitations of this technology were described along with the reduced scale, accelerated time frame and cost effectiveness of centrifuge testing. Centrifuge testing is a viable tool for research into soil-structure interactions in Arctic pipeline design. The technique is also useful where the cost of large-scale testing would be prohibitive. This report describes a series of centrifuge modelling tests that were conducted by C-CORE to determine if the results of full-scale testing at the Calgary test site could be replicated. Work is ongoing for the Gas Research Institute and TransCanada Pipelines to further evaluate centrifuge technology as a tool for predicting the effects of frost heave and evaluating pipeline behaviour under a range of conditions, soil types, trench depths, soil temperature, pipe temperature and supply of water to the freezing front. The results from centrifuge testing were found to be in good agreement with the Calgary test site data, indicating similar patterns of heave displacement and time. It was concluded that centrifuge testing is a quick and cost effective method for testing geotechnical systems. The opportunity exists to extend its use to the prediction of frost heave and the design of Arctic pipelines. The other 2 accompanying reports have also been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  16. The frost peat production; Routapalaturpeen tuotantoketjun tekniikka, talous ja ympaeristoevaikutukset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyroenen, T. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Leiviskae, V. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Thule Inst.

    1997-12-01

    The frost peat production means the cutting of frozen peat in the winter time. The aim of this study is to test the possibilities to prolong the peat production season and to produce peat pieces for the horticultural peat industry. In the frost peat production method the frozen peat field is sawed throughout the length and breadth of by a circle saw. The sawed peat pieces are loosened from the field by a so-called `splitter`. The circle saw is equipped with the five circle saw blades (diameter 90 cm). The distance of the blades is adjustable. The splitter is equipped with a horizontal position blade (width 35 cm). The dimensions of the peat pieces are changeable, but from the point of drying the upper limit of the side of the peat cube can be 15-20 cm. The frost peat production method is technically suitable for production of slightly decomposed (H1-5) energy and horticultural peat. The energy peat pieces are allowed to dry up 70-75 % moisture content on the cutting field and then the pieces can be ridged by the screening ridger. If necessary, the ridges can be turned over. In the frost peat production, the conventional sod peat winning machines can be used in the following stages of the working tasks: harrowing, ridging, loading, turning of ridges and stockpiling. The measured output of the circle saw was about 45-50 m{sup 3}/h of energy peat and 58-63 m{sup 3}/h of horticultural peat. The output of the splitter was 120-150 m{sup 3}/h. Theoretically, the output of circle saw and the splitter can easily be doubled. Thereafter the production costs will be about 19 FIM/MWh of energy peat and 18,6 FIM/m{sup 3} of horticultural peat

  17. Polarization Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Fressengeas, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The physics of polarization optics *Polarized light propagation *Partially polarized light; DEA; After a brief introduction to polarization optics, this lecture reviews the basic formalisms for dealing with it: Jones Calculus for totally polarized light and Stokes parameters associated to Mueller Calculus for partially polarized light.

  18. Strength and Stiffness of Stabilized Alluvial Silt under Frost Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Yellow River alluvial silt was stabilized into pavement base materials for cold regions. The stabilizing additives were cement, fly ash, and lime, which were included in a range of combinations and dosages when mixed with the silt. Freeze-thaw cyclic impacts were conducted on the treated samples to assess materials performance of withstanding the frost actions. The tests were conducted on samples cured for 7 days to up to 180 days. Test results show that the cement-fly ash-treated samples outperform the other two stabilization categories with respect to material strength and stiffness developed under both normal and frost conditions. Under the normal conditions, the material unconfined compressive (UC strength rises to 3.0 MPa on day 28 depending on the cement and fly ash dosage used. If subjected to frost actions, the fly ash inclusions warrant a residual UC strength value of 1.3 MPa and above. The antifrost performance of the cement-fly ash-treated samples is related to thermal buffer capacity of the fly ash particles. Water adsorption and material soundness results agree with the strength and stiffness development. An optimal dosage was 3–6% for the cement and 0.3 for cement to fly ash mass ratio.

  19. Effect of snow cover on soil frost penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rožnovský, Jaroslav; Brzezina, Jáchym

    2017-12-01

    Snow cover occurrence affects wintering and lives of organisms because it has a significant effect on soil frost penetration. An analysis of the dependence of soil frost penetration and snow depth between November and March was performed using data from 12 automated climatological stations located in Southern Moravia, with a minimum period of measurement of 5 years since 2001, which belong to the Czech Hydrometeorological institute. The soil temperatures at 5 cm depth fluctuate much less in the presence of snow cover. In contrast, the effect of snow cover on the air temperature at 2 m height is only very small. During clear sky conditions and no snow cover, soil can warm up substantially and the soil temperature range can be even higher than the range of air temperature at 2 m height. The actual height of snow is also important - increased snow depth means lower soil temperature range. However, even just 1 cm snow depth substantially lowers the soil temperature range and it can therefore be clearly seen that snow acts as an insulator and has a major effect on soil frost penetration and soil temperature range.

  20. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or Sperling

    Full Text Available Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq. cm(-3 yr(-1 on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics.

  1. Seasonality of cavitation and frost fatigue in Acer mono Maxim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Feng, Feng; Tyree, Melvin T

    2017-12-08

    Although cavitation is common in plants, it is unknown whether the cavitation resistance of xylem is seasonally constant or variable. We tested the changes in cavitation resistance of Acer mono before and after a controlled cavitation-refilling and freeze-thaw cycles for a whole year. Cavitation resistance was determined from 'vulnerability curves' showing the percent loss of conductivity versus xylem tension. Cavitation fatigue was defined as a reduction of cavitation resistance following a cavitation-refilling cycle, whereas frost fatigue was caused by a freeze-thaw cycle. A. mono developed seasonal changes in native embolisms; values were relatively high during winter but relatively low and constant throughout the growing season. Cavitation fatigue occurred and changed seasonally during the 12-month cycle; the greatest fatigue response occurred during summer and the weakest during winter, and the transitions occurred during spring and autumn. A. mono was highly resistant to frost damage during the relatively mild winter months; however, a quite different situation occurred during the growing season, as the seasonal trend of frost fatigue was strikingly similar to that of cavitation fatigue. Seasonality changes in cavitation resistance may be caused by seasonal changes in the mechanical properties of the pit membranes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. CRYOLINK: Monitoring of permafrost and seasonal frost in southern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbrot, Herman; Hipp, Tobias; Etzelmüller, Bernd; Humlum, Ole; Isaksen, Ketil; Strand Ødegârd, Rune

    2010-05-01

    The modern southern boundary for Scandinavian permafrost is located in the mountains of Southern Norway. Permafrost and seasonal frost are considered key components of the cryosphere, and the climate-permafrost relation has acquired added importance with the increasing awareness and concern of rising air temperatures. The three-year research project CRYOLINK ("Permafrost and seasonal frost in southern Norway") aims at improving knowledge on past and present ground temperatures, seasonal frost, and distribution of mountain permafrost in Southern Norway by addressing the fundamental problem of heat transfer between the atmosphere and the ground surface. Hence, several shallow boreholes have been drilled in August 2008 in three areas (Juvvass, Jetta and Tron) situated along a west-east transect. On most borehole sites air and ground temperatures are measured. Further, vertical arrays of Miniature Temperature Dataloggers (MTDs; Thermochron iBottons®) at fixed heights above the ground surface have been installed to roughly determine the snow depths at the sites, which is also indicated by digital cameras providing daily pictures of snow and weather conditions. In addition individual MTDs have been placed out to measure ground surface temperature at different aspects and snow settings. This presentation will focus on the field set up and give examples of data obtained from the sites.

  3. A neurobiological enquiry into the origins of our experience of the sublime and beautiful

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro eIshizu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Philosophies of aesthetics have posited that experience of the sublime – commonly but not exclusively derived from scenes of natural grandeur – is distinct from that of beauty and is a counterpoint to it. We wanted to chart the pattern of brain activity which correlates with the declared intensity of experience of the sublime, and to learn whether it differs from the pattern that correlates with the experience of beauty, reported in our previous studies (e.g. Ishizu and Zeki, 2011. 21 subjects participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Prior to the experiment, they viewed pictures of landscapes, which they rated on a scale of 1–5, with 5 being the most sublime and 1 being the least. This allowed us to select, for each subject, five sets of stimuli – from ones experienced as very sublime to those experienced as not at all sublime – which subjects viewed and re-rated in the scanner while their brain activity was imaged. The results revealed a distinctly different pattern of brain activity from that obtained with the experience of beauty, with none of the areas active with the latter experience also active during experience of the sublime. Sublime and beautiful experiences thus appear to engage separate and distinct brain systems.

  4. A new model for predicting performance of fin-and-tube heat exchanger under frost condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, J. [Key Lab. of Ocean Energy Utilization and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, W.Z., E-mail: wzhongli@dlut.edu.c [Key Lab. of Ocean Energy Utilization and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Y.; Zhao, Y.S. [Key Lab. of Ocean Energy Utilization and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Accurate prediction of frost characteristics has crucial influence on designing effective heat exchangers. In this paper, a new CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model has been proposed to predict the frost behaviour. The initial period of frost formation can be predicted and the influence of surface structure can be considered. The numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the performance of fin-and-tube heat exchanger under frost condition. The results have been validated by comparison of simulations with the data computed by empirical formulas. The transient local frost formation has been obtained. The average frost thickness, heat exchanger coefficient and pressure drop on air side has been analysed as well. In addition, the influence factors have also been discussed, such as fin pitch, relative humidity, air flow rate and evaporating temperature of refrigerant.

  5. Observed variations in U.S. frost timing linked to atmospheric circulation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Courtenay; McCabe, Gregory J

    2017-05-23

    Several studies document lengthening of the frost-free season within the conterminous United States (U.S.) over the past century, and report trends in spring and fall frost timing that could stem from hemispheric warming. In the absence of warming, theory and case studies link anomalous frost timing to atmospheric circulation anomalies. However, recent efforts to relate a century of observed changes in U.S. frost timing to various atmospheric circulations yielded only modest correlations, leaving the relative importance of circulation and warming unclear. Here, we objectively partition the U.S. into four regions and uncover atmospheric circulations that account for 25-48% of spring and fall-frost timing. These circulations appear responsive to historical warming, and they consistently account for more frost timing variability than hemispheric or regional temperature indices. Reliable projections of future variations in growing season length depend on the fidelity of these circulation patterns in global climate models.

  6. Initial discussion on the damage propagation of rock under the frost and thaw condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.; Pu, Y. [Xian University of Science and Technology, Xian (China). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2002-08-01

    Based on the experimental results obtained from CT scanning of rocks under the condition of frost-and-thaw cycle, the characteristics of damage propagation of three types of rock materials (sandstone, shale and coal) were studied under the conditions of frost-and-thaw cycles. The effect of the number of frost-and-thaw cycles on the damage propagation of rock is emphasised in the discussion. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Experimental and numerical study on frost heave of saturated rock under uniform freezing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhitao; Xia, Caichu; Li, Qiang

    2018-04-01

    A series of freezing experiments are conducted on saturated sandstone and mortar specimens to investigate the frost heave of saturated rock under uniform freezing conditions. The experimental results show that the frost heave of saturated rock is isotropic under uniform freezing conditions. During the freezing process, three stages are observed in the curves of variation of total frost heaving strain versus time: the thermal contraction stage, the frost heaving stage and the steady stage. Moreover, the amount of final stable frost heave first increases and then decreases with decrease in freezing temperature, and the maximum final stable frost heave occurs at different freezing temperature in saturated sandstone and mortar. Furthermore, a coupled thermal-mechanical (TM) model of frost heave of saturated rock is proposed in which a constraint coefficient \\zeta is used to consider the susceptibility of the internal rock grain structure to the expansion of pore ice. Then, numerical simulations are implemented with COMSOL to solve the governing equations of the TM model. Comparisons of the numerical results with the experimental results are performed to demonstrate the reliability of the model. The influences of elastic modulus and porosity on frost heave are also investigated, and the results show that the total frost heaving strain decreases non-linearly with increasing elastic modulus, and the decrease is significant when the elastic modulus is less than 3000 MPa, or approximately five times the elastic modulus of ice. In addition, the total frost heaving strain increases linearly with increasing porosity. Finally, an empirical equation between total frost heaving strain and freezing temperature is proposed and the equation well describes the variation of total frost heaving strain with freezing temperature.

  8. Effects of Surface Wettability on the Porosity and Wickability of Frost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Katherine; Ahmadi, Farzad; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    The wicking of liquids through porous media has been studied for many materials, but never for frost, despite its implications for arctic oil spills and oil-infused surfaces. Here, we characterize silicone oils wicking up frost sheets. A layer of frost was grown on aluminum plates of varying surface wettability: superhydrophilic, hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic. Once the desired frost thickness was grown, a humidity chamber was used to maintain the frost at the dew point and the bottom of the plate was dipped in a reservoir of fluorescent silicone oil. For all surfaces, the wicking rate of the oil increased with increasing wettability. For the wetting surfaces, this is manifested in the length vs. time data following the classical Washburn equation, exhibiting a power slope of about 1/2 and resulting in a larger effective pore radius with increasing wettability. However, we observed that on the non-wetting surfaces, the discrete distribution of the frosted dew droplets resulted in a new scaling law with a slope much less than 1/2, especially for the superhydrophobic surface which promoted jumping-droplet condensation. This research shows that the wicking of oil up a layer of frost can give insight into the morphology of frost. Conversely, if the underlying wettability of a frost sheet can be controlled, the spread of oil can be widely tuned. This work was supported by a Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate Research Scholarship (PMPTX7EP).

  9. Ice/frost/debris assessment for space shuttle Mission STS-32 (61-C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Charles G.; Katnik, Gregory N.; Speece, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    An Ice/Frost/Debris assessment was conducted for Space Shuttle Mission STS-32 (61-C). This assessment begins with debris inspections of the flight elements and launch facilities before and after launch. Ice/Frost formations are calculated during cryogenic loading of the external tank followed by an on-pad assessment of the Shuttle vehicle and pad at T-3 hours in the countdown. High speed films are reviewed after launch to identify Ice/Frost/Debris sources and investigate potential vehicle damage. The Ice/Frost/Debris conditions and their effects on the Space Shuttle are documented.

  10. Anti-icing/frosting and self-cleaning performance of superhydrophobic aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Libang; Yan, Zhongna; Shi, Xueting; Sultonzoda, Firdavs

    2018-02-01

    Ice formation and frost deposition on cryogenic equipment and systems can result in serious problems and huge economic loss. Hence, it is quite necessary to develop new materials to prevent icing and frosting on cold surfaces in engineering fields. Here, a superhydrophobic aluminum alloy with enhanced anti-frosting, anti-icing, and self-cleaning performance has been developed by a facile one-step method. The anti-frosting/icing performance of superhydrophobic aluminum alloys is confirmed by frosting/icing time delay, consolidating and freezing temperature reduction, and lower amount of frost/ice adhesion. Meanwhile, the excellent self-cleaning performance is authenticated by the fact that simulated pollution particles can be cleaned out by rolling water droplets completely. Finally, based on the classical nucleation theory, anti-icing and anti-frosting mechanisms of the superhydrophobic aluminum alloys are deduced. Results show that grounded on "air cushion" and "heat insulation" effect, a larger nucleation barrier and a lower crystal growth rate can be observed, which, hence, inhibit ice formation and frost deposition. It can be concluded that preparing superhydrophobic surfaces would be an effective strategy for improving anti-icing, anti-frosting, and self-cleaning performance of aluminum alloys.

  11. Mimeses do sublime: a recepção de Kant pelo Romantismo e pelo Expressionismo Mimesis of sublime: the Romantism and Expressionism reception of Kant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Rossinetti Rufinoni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Partindo das analises do criticismo kantiano, este texto investiga as concepções romântica e moderna de sublime e de imaginação. Se, por um lado, a concepção romântica inaugura o mundo moderno, por outro, a expressionista mostra os limites dessa mesma modernidade. Para ambas, entretanto, a Crítica do Juízo de Kant é o âmbito privilegiado no qual podemos precisar as distinções.Starting from the analysis of the Kantian criticism, this text investigates the romantic and the modern conceptions of sublime and imagination. On the one hand, the romantic conceptions of sublime inaugurate the modern world. On the other hand, the expressionist conceptions show the confines of this world. The Critique of Judgment is the very locus where such distinctions can be drawn with precision.

  12. Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate for use in Active Thermal Control System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The original Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) design sought to provide significant mass savings over a traditional pumped fluid loop by combining the functions of a...

  13. Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate for use in Active Thermal Control System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The original Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) design sought to provide significant mass savings over a traditional pumped fluid loop by combining the functions of a...

  14. Schiller Goes to the Movies: Locating the Sublime in "Thelma and Louise."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyng, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Endeavors to make students aware of similarities between today's movie culture and the theater of the 18th century; parallels between a traditional drama and a movie script; and Schiller's understanding of the sublime. (36 references) (Author/CK)

  15. Bion and the sublime: the origins of an aesthetic paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitarese, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    In constructing his theory Bion drew on a number of symbolic matrices: psychoanalysis, philosophy, mathematics, literature, aesthetics. The least investigated of these is the last. True, we know that Bion cites many authors of the Romantic period, such as Coleridge, Keats, Blake and Wordsworth, as well as others who were held in high esteem in the Romantic period, such as Milton. However, less is known about the influence exerted on him by the aesthetics of the sublime, which while chronologically preceding Romanticism is in fact one of its components. My working hypothesis is that tracing a number of Bion's concepts back to this secret model can serve several purposes: firstly, it contributes to the study of the sources, and, secondly, it makes these concepts appear much less occasional and idiosyncratic than we might believe, being as they are mostly those less immediately understandable but not less important (O, negative capability, nameless dread, the infinite, the language of achievement, unison etc.). Finally, connecting these notions to a matrix, that is, disclosing the meaning of elements that are not simply juxtaposed but dynamically interrelated, in my view significantly increases not only their theoretical intelligibility but also their usefulness in clinical practice. In conclusion, one could legitimately argue that Bion gradually subsumed all the other paradigms he drew on within the aesthetic paradigm. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  16. Frost formation on fin-and-tube heat exchangers. Pt. 1. Modeling of frost formation on fin-and-tube heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seker, D.; Karatas, H. [Arcelik A.S., Istanbul (Turkey); Egrican, N. [Yeditepe University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-06-01

    In this study, the heat and mass transfer characteristics of heat exchangers during frost formation process are analyzed numerically. Unsteady heat and mass transfer coefficients of the air side, heat transfer coefficient of the refrigerant side, air-frost layer interface temperature, the surface efficiency of the heat exchanger and the mass flow rate of the frost accumulated on the heat exchanger surface are calculated. The total conductivity (UA) and pressure drop of the heat exchanger are reported for different air inlet temperature, relative humidity, air mass flow rate and the refrigerant temperature. (author)

  17. Frost heaving of planted tree seedlings in the boreal forest of northern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulet, France

    2000-01-01

    Frost heaving can be a leading cause of tree seedling mortality in many places in the boreal forest of Northern Sweden. The aim of this investigation was to improve our understanding of frost heaving of planted tree seedlings as related to snow cover, scarification, planting methods and soil types. The thesis is based on a review paper, three field experiments and one laboratory experiment. The experiments focus on different methods to control frost heaving of forest tree seedlings and on a number of factors affecting the extent of frost heaving. The review paper identifies the many aspects of frost heaving of forest tree seedlings and agricultural crops based on an intensive review of the research contributions made during the last century. Even if many investigations have been carried out with the aim to decrease the extent of frost heaving, very little quantitative results are available for tree seedlings. In a field experiment, the choice of planting positions was effective in decreasing frost heaving of planted seedlings following mounding or disc-trenching. Seedlings planted in the depressions were largely affected by frost heaving with a maximal vertical displacement of 5.4 cm while frost heaving did not occur on the top of the mound. On the other hand, the planting time and planting depth had no influence on the extent of frost heaving. In another field experiment the size of the scarified patches was strongly correlated to frost heaving which reached between 7.6 and 11.5 cm in 4 and 8-dm patches compared to between 4.4 and 5.3 in non-scarified soil and in a 1-dm patch. Ground vegetation probably decreases the diurnal temperature variation and the number of freezing-thawing cycles. The duration and magnitude of frost temperatures, the frost hour sum, increased with patch size. The difference between the 8-dm and 1-dm patch increased to 2064 hour-degrees at the end of the winter. In larger patches, the planting depth seemed to be effective in reducing the

  18. Frost heaving of planted tree seedlings in the boreal forest of northern Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulet, France

    2000-07-01

    Frost heaving can be a leading cause of tree seedling mortality in many places in the boreal forest of Northern Sweden. The aim of this investigation was to improve our understanding of frost heaving of planted tree seedlings as related to snow cover, scarification, planting methods and soil types. The thesis is based on a review paper, three field experiments and one laboratory experiment. The experiments focus on different methods to control frost heaving of forest tree seedlings and on a number of factors affecting the extent of frost heaving. The review paper identifies the many aspects of frost heaving of forest tree seedlings and agricultural crops based on an intensive review of the research contributions made during the last century. Even if many investigations have been carried out with the aim to decrease the extent of frost heaving, very little quantitative results are available for tree seedlings. In a field experiment, the choice of planting positions was effective in decreasing frost heaving of planted seedlings following mounding or disc-trenching. Seedlings planted in the depressions were largely affected by frost heaving with a maximal vertical displacement of 5.4 cm while frost heaving did not occur on the top of the mound. On the other hand, the planting time and planting depth had no influence on the extent of frost heaving. In another field experiment the size of the scarified patches was strongly correlated to frost heaving which reached between 7.6 and 11.5 cm in 4 and 8-dm patches compared to between 4.4 and 5.3 in non-scarified soil and in a 1-dm patch. Ground vegetation probably decreases the diurnal temperature variation and the number of freezing-thawing cycles. The duration and magnitude of frost temperatures, the frost hour sum, increased with patch size. The difference between the 8-dm and 1-dm patch increased to 2064 hour-degrees at the end of the winter. In larger patches, the planting depth seemed to be effective in reducing the

  19. Experimental Analysis of Sublimation Dynamics for Buried Glacier Ice in Beacon Valley, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfeucht, S.; Dennis, D. P.; Marchant, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    The age of the oldest known buried ice in Beacon Valley, McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) Antarctica is a topic of active debate due to its implications for the stability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Published age estimates range from as young as 300 ka to as old as 8.1 Ma. In the upland MDV, ablation occurs predominantly via sublimation. The relict ice in question (ancient ice from Taylor Glacier) lies buried beneath a thin ( 30-70 cm) layer of sublimation till, which forms as a lag deposit as underlying debris-rich ice sublimes. As the ice sublimates, the debris held within the ice accumulates slowly on the surface, creating a porous boundary between the buried-ice surface and the atmosphere, which in turn influences gas exchange between the ice and the atmosphere. Additionally, englacial debris adds several salt species that are ultimately concentrated on the ice surface. It is well documented the rate of ice sublimation varies as a function of overlying till thickness. However, the rate-limiting dynamics under varying environmental conditions, including the threshold thicknesses at which sublimation is strongly retarded, are not yet defined. To better understand the relationships between sublimation rate, till thickness, and long-term surface evolution, we build on previous studies by Lamp and Marchant (2017) and evaluate the role of till thickness as a control on ice loss in an environmental chamber capable of replicating the extreme cold desert conditions observed in the MDV. Previous work has shown that this relationship exhibits exponential decay behavior, with sublimation rate significantly dampened under less than 10 cm of till. In our experiments we pay particular attention to the effect of the first several cm of till in order to quantify the dynamics that govern the transition from bare ice to debris-covered ice. We also examine this transition for various forms of glacier ice, including ice with various salt species.

  20. A Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber Study of Sea Salt Particles Acting as Cloud Seeds: Deliquescence, Ice Nucleation and Sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, X.; Wolf, M. J.; Garimella, S.; Roesch, M.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Sea Salt Aerosols (SSA) are abundant in the atmosphere, and important to the Earth's chemistry and energy budget. However, the roles of sea salts in the context of cloud formation are still poorly understood, which is partially due to the complexity of the water-salt phase diagram. At ambient temperatures, even well below 0°C, SSA deliquesces at sub-water saturated conditions. Since the ratio of the partial pressure over ice versus super-cooled water continuously declines with decreasing temperatures, it is interesting to consider if SSA continues to deliquesce under a super-saturated condition of ice, or if particles act as depositional ice nuclei when a critical supersaturation is reached. Some recent studies suggest hydrated NaCl and simulated sea salt might deliquesce between -35°C to -44°C, and below that deposition freezing becomes possible. Deliquesced droplets can subsequently freeze via the immersion or homogenous freezing mode, depending on if the deliquescence processes is complete. After the droplets or ice particles are formed, it is also interesting to consider how the different processes influence physical properties after evaporation or sublimation. This data is important for climate modeling that includes bromine burst observed in Antarctica, which is hypothesized to be relevant to the sublimation of blowing snow particles. In this study we use a SPectrometer for Ice Nuclei (SPIN; DMT, Inc., Boulder, CO) to perform experiments over a wide range of temperature and RH conditions to quantify deliquescence, droplet formation and ice nucleation. The formation of droplets and ice particles is detected by an advanced Optical Particle Counter (OPC) and the liquid/solid phases are distinguished by a machine learning method based on laser scattering and polarization data. Using an atomizer, four different sea salt samples are generated: pure NaCl and MgCl2 solutions, synthetic seawater, and natural seawater. Downstream of the SPIN chamber, a Pumped

  1. Influence of coffee pruning on the severity of frost damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Androcioli Filho

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Frost damages in a field experiment of pruning types and systems for the cultivars of Coffea arabica Catuaí and Mundo Novo, were evaluated at Londrina (23º22’S, 52º10´W, State of Parana, southern Brazil, during the winter of 1990 and 1994. Pruning types evaluated were ‘esqueletamento’ (cutting off all plagiotropic branches at 20-30 cm from the orthotropic branch, ‘decote’ (cutting off the orthotropic branch at 1.5 m and 2.0 m above ground and ‘recepa’ (cutting off the orthotropic branch at 0.8 m above ground, performed on all rows and on alternate rows, and on different sections of the plant. Results indicated that frost damage could increase according to the type and height of pruning. The pruning type ‘esqueletamento’ and prunings at higher levels were more suitable for regions with frost risk. Under severe frost condition, pruning type did not affect the damage in anyone of the treatments evaluated.Foram avaliados os danos causados pelas geadas ocorridas em 1990 e 1994 em cafeeiros de duas cultivares de Coffea arabica L., Catuaí e Mundo Novo, conduzidos em Londrina-PR. Os tipos e sistemas de podas aplicados foram o esqueletamento a 20-30 cm do tronco, decote a 1,5 m e 2,0 m de altura e recepa a 0,80 m de altura. As podas foram feitas em área total e em linhas alternadas e em diferentes partes da planta. Os dados obtidos indicaram que os danos por geada podem ser intensificados em função do tipo e altura da poda. A poda do tipo esqueletamento e as podas altas são mais indicadas para o manejo das lavouras nas regiões mais sujeitas ao fenômeno de geada. No caso de geada severa, todos os cafeeiros foram afetados, independente do tipo de poda.

  2. Frost-bitten foot: dialogues we live by

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Carlos Augusto; Guimarães, Ana Paula

    2000-01-01

    Ao comparar versões portuguesas e brasileiras de “A Formiguinha e a Neve” (Thompson motivo Z.42: “Stronger and Strongest”: frost-bitten foot” / tipo AaTh 2031, Stronger and Strongest) e inserindo nos nossos passos um texto do Panchatantra (“A história da ratinha”), rumo à interpretação desta história aparentemente simples e infantil, propusémo-nos avançar algumas notas sobre dois tópicos particulares: um relacionado com a linguagem (o quarto passo do nosso artigo); e outro com a filosofia do ...

  3. Considering the method of frost resistance determination for Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н. І. Рябчун

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available There is the method represented in the article for frost resistance determination for Winter Wheat (soft and hard varieties by experts’ assessment of varieties submitted for Official Variety Studying. Prescribed temperature limits for artificial freezing of the plants, example varieties for frost-resistance groups, are indicated.

  4. Estimating winter survival of winter wheat by simulations of plant frost tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergjord Olsen, A.K.; Persson, T.; Wit, de A.; Nkurunziza, L.; Sindhøj, E.; Eckersten, H.

    2018-01-01

    Based on soil temperature, snow depth and the grown cultivar's maximum attainable level of frost tolerance (LT50c), the FROSTOL model simulates development of frost tolerance (LT50) and winter damage, thereby enabling risk calculations for winter wheat survival. To explore the accuracy of this

  5. Experimental study of frost heaving force based on transient shock response using piezoceramic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruolin; Peng, Tongxiao; Wang, Ming L.

    2016-04-01

    In seasonally frozen soil regions, the frost heaving problem made it difficult to monitor or evaluate the pile safety for long term. So far, no mature tool can be utilized to monitor the frost heaving force, which was unevenly distributed along the pile. In this paper, a piezoceramic sensing based transient excitation response approach was proposed to monitor the frost heaving force in real time. Freeze-thaw cycles can result in great changes of soil engineering properties, including the frost heaving force. So, the freeze-thaw cycle was repeated fourth to study its effect. In the experiment, transient horizontal shock on the top of the pile will be detected by the 6 PZT sensors glued on the pile. The signal data received by the 6 PZT sensors can be used to illustrate the frost heaving force distribution along the pile. Moisture content effect is also one of the important reasons that cause the variation of soil mechanical properties. So three different moisture content (6%, 12%, 18%) testing soil were used in this experiment to detect the variance of the frost heaving force. An energy indicator was developed to quantitatively evaluate the frost heaving force applied on the pile. The experimental results showed that the proposed method was effective in monitoring the uneven distribution of frost heaving force along the pile.

  6. Robert Frost as Teacher. A Poet's Interpretation of the Teacher's Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Mildred

    1979-01-01

    Robert Frost's method of teaching is explained. He saw all education as self-education, not something a teacher can give a student. Frost believed freedom to be a necessity and his method gives the student much freedom while also placing a heavy burden of responsibility on him. (Article originally published in 1951.) (AF)

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF VACUUM SUBLIMATION DRYERS USING THERMOELECTRIC MODULES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Barykin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The main directions of use of freeze-dryed products and ingredients are revealed. The analysis of sales markets of freeze-dryed products is provided. It is shown that introduction of innovative production technologies will allow to develop dynamically not only to the large companies, but also small firms that will create prerequisites for growth of the Russian market of freeze-dryed products. Tendencies of development of the freeze-drying equipment are analysed. Relevance of development of energy saving freeze-dryers is proved The integrated approach to creation of competitive domestic technologies and the equipment for sublimation dehydration of thermolabile products consists in use of the effective combined remedies of a power supply, a process intensification, reduction of specific energy consumption and, as a result, decrease in product cost at achievement of high quality indicators. Advantages of thermoelectric modules as alternative direction to existing vapor-compression and absorbing refrigerating appliances are given. Researches of process of freeze-drying dehydration with use of thermoelectric modules are conducted. It is scientifically confirmed, that the thermoelectric module working at Peltier effect, promotes increase in refrigerating capacity due to use of the principle of the thermal pump. Options of use of thermoelectric modules in designs of dryers are offered. Optimum operating modes and number of modules in section are defined. Ways of increase of power efficiency of freeze-dryers with use of thermoelectric modules are specified. The received results will allow to make engineering calculations and design of progressive freeze-drying installations with various ways of a power supply.

  8. Oxidation and sublimation of porous graphite during fiber laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Grady T.; Bauer, William A.; Gonzales, Ashley E.; Herr, Nicholas C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2017-02-01

    Porous graphite plates, cylinders and cones with densities of 1.55-1.82 g/cm3 were irradiated by a 10 kW fiber laser at 0.075 -3.525 kW/cm2 for 120 s to study mass removal and crater formation. Surface temperatures reached steady state values as high as 3767 K. The total decrease in sample mass ranged from 0.06 to 6.29 g, with crater volumes of 0.52 - 838 mm3, and penetration times for 12.7 mm thick plates as short as 38 s. Minor contaminants in the graphite samples produced calcium and iron oxide to be re-deposited on the graphite surface. Significantly increased porosity of the sample is observed even outside of the laser-irradiated region. Total mass removed increases with deposited laser energy at a rate of 4.83 g/MJ for medium extruded graphite with an apparent threshold of 0.15 MJ. Visible emission spectroscopy reveals C2 Swan and CN red, CN violet bands and Li, Na, and K 2P3/2,1/2 - 2S1/2 doublets. The reacting boundary layer is observed using a mid-wave imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) at 2 cm-1 spectral resolution, 0.5 mm/pixel spatial resolution, and 0.75 Hz data cube rate. A two-layer radiative transfer model was used to determine plume temperature, CO, and CO2 concentrations from spectral signatures. The new understanding of graphite combustion and sublimation during laser irradiation is vital to the more complex behavior of carbon composites.

  9. Growth of C02 frost thickness near Chasma Borealis during northern winter and spring.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, W. C. (William C.); Boynton, W. V. (William V.); Prettyman, T. H. (Thomas H.); Kelly, N.; Maurice, S. (Sylvestre)

    2003-01-01

    Epithermal neutron fluxes measured using the Neutron Spectrometer component of the Mars OdysscNGamma-Ray Spectrometer suite of instruments were studied to determ i ne the spatial and temporal dependence of CO2 frost cover of the nor t h polar cap for L, between 329 and 99 arcoccntric longitude. This time period spans the la t e northern xvinter through summer solstice . In the absence of a CO, cuvcr, the entire basement terrain p o l eward of about +55 latitude is vm, rich in I1 :0 . The consequent enhanced abundance of hydrogen in near-surface soils leads to an anomaluusly low flux of oumardly leaking cpithcrmal ncutrons, wh i ch is a prominent signatu r e of epi t hermal neutron maps measured after about L, = 90 . Because the epithermal neutron flux rises monotonically w i t h increasing thickness of t h e CO . fros t cover, it provides a robust measure of the CO2 thickness in space and time .

  10. Frost as a first wall for the ICF laboratory microfusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors introduce the concept of using frost as the first wall of the ICF Laboratory Microfusion Facility being designed to produce 200-1000 MJ of thermonuclear yield. They present one design incorporating 2cm of frost deposited at 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ on an LN-cooled fiber-reinforced polymer substrate. They calculate that such a frost layer will protect the substrate from ablation by target x rays and debris, and from shock-induced spallation. Postshot washdown with water should permit low-activation operation, and should preserve the original wall properties. The authors expect the impact of the frost on laser optics to be minimal, and expect the preshot lifetime of thermally unprotected cryogenic targets to be extended by operating the wall at 100-150 K. Moreover, they believe that such a frost first wall involves little technical risk, and will be inexpensive to construct and operate

  11. Experimental and numerical study of frost formation by natural convection over a cold horizontal circular cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahavvor, Ali R. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran); Yaghoubi, Mahmood [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran); Academy of Sciences (Iran)

    2010-11-15

    Frost growth over a cold horizontal circular cylinder by natural convection has been investigated experimentally and numerically. Ambient air relative humidity, temperature and the cold surface temperature have been varied between 30% and 60%, 20 and 35 C and -10 and -4 C respectively. For detail analysis a mathematical model is used to simulate numerically frost formation process. For the first time, multistage modeling and supersaturation assumption is taken into account in the modeling of frost formation under natural convection condition. Comparisons are performed among the results of numerical model and experimental measurements and it is shown that the present model can be used more efficiently to determine frost growth and its properties. Based on the results, new correlations are developed for frost properties. (author)

  12. Numerical and experimental investigation on frosting of energy-recovery ventilator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Stephane; Mercadier, Yves; Brousseau, Patrick

    Frosting of energy-recovery ventilators results in two major problems: increase of pressure losses and reduction of heat transfer rates. Frost formation of heat and mass exchangers used in these ventilation systems is investigated both experimentally and numerically. A numerical model for the prediction of the thermal behavior of the exchanger is presented. The model is validated with experimental data and is then employed to conduct a parametric study. Results indicate that the absolute humidity is the prevailing parameter for characterizing the frosting phenomenon. A frost-mass-fraction chart is established in terms of the absolute humidity of the warm exhaust stream and of the temperature of the cold supply stream. The effect of time and mass flowrate is also evaluated. The transient three-dimensional model shows that the absolute humidity and the temperature of both air flows vary nonlinearly in the frosted zone.

  13. Micrometeorological and Thermal Control of Frost Flower Growth and Decay on Young Sea Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galley, Ryan J.; Else, Brent G. T.; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    and the physical and thermal properties of the sea ice and atmosphere that form, decay and destroy frost flowers on young sea ice. Frost flower formation occurred during a high-pressure system that caused air temperatures to drop to -30°C, with relative humidity of 70% (an under saturated atmosphere), and very......Frost flowers are transient crystal structures that form on new and young sea ice surfaces. They have been implicated in a variety of biological, chemical and physical processes and interactions with the atmosphere at the sea ice surface. We describe the atmospheric and radiative conditions...... calm wind conditions. The sea ice surface temperature at the time of frost flower initiation was 10-13°C warmer than the air temperature. Frost flowers grew on nodules raised above the mean surface height by 5 mm, which were 4-6°C colder than the bare, brine-wetted, highly saline sea ice surface...

  14. Dynamics of frost resistance in various provenances of Abies grandis Lindl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Dolnicki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The frost resistance of one year old needles and shoots of Abies grandis (seven provenances and Abies alba (one provenance was determined using Dexter's method since early autumn till late spring (September-May. Material was collected from trees over ten year old, planted in Beskid Sądecki Range near Krynica, 800 m above sea level. In this study it was found, that in early autumn (September A. grandis develops weaker frost hardiness than Abies alba. In the late autumn and in winter, provenances coming from region II (according to Müller, and especially provenance 12016, are equal in respect to frost hardiness of shoots and needles to Abies alba. Among the provenances from Müller's region I exceptional frost hardiness is displayed by provenance 12005, which is also characterized by fast growth. In spring, Abies alba flushes earlier than A. grandis, which makes it more susceptible to late frosts.

  15. Managing potato biodiversity to cope with frost risk in the high Andes: a modeling perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condori, Bruno; Hijmans, Robert J; Ledent, Jean Francois; Quiroz, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Austral summer frosts in the Andean highlands are ubiquitous throughout the crop cycle, causing yield losses. In spite of the existing warming trend, climate change models forecast high variability, including freezing temperatures. As the potato center of origin, the region has a rich biodiversity which includes a set of frost resistant genotypes. Four contrasting potato genotypes--representing genetic variability--were considered in the present study: two species of frost resistant native potatoes (the bitter Solanum juzepczukii, var. Luki, and the non-bitter Solanum ajanhuiri, var. Ajanhuiri) and two commercial frost susceptible genotypes (Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum var. Alpha and Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigenum var. Gendarme). The objective of the study was to conduct a comparative growth analysis of four genotypes and modeling their agronomic response under frost events. It included assessing their performance under Andean contrasting agroecological conditions. Independent subsets of data from four field experiments were used to parameterize, calibrate and validate a potato growth model. The validated model was used to ascertain the importance of biodiversity, represented by the four genotypes tested, as constituents of germplasm mixtures in single plots used by local farmers, a coping strategy in the face of climate variability. Also scenarios with a frost routine incorporated in the model were constructed. Luki and Ajanhuiri were the most frost resistant varieties whereas Alpha was the most susceptible. Luki and Ajanhuiri, as monoculture, outperformed the yield obtained with the mixtures under severe frosts. These results highlight the role played by local frost tolerant varieties, and featured the management importance--e.g. clean seed, strategic watering--to attain the yields reported in our experiments. The mixtures of local and introduced potatoes can thus not only provide the products demanded by the markets but also reduce the impact of frosts

  16. Managing potato biodiversity to cope with frost risk in the high Andes: a modeling perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Condori

    Full Text Available Austral summer frosts in the Andean highlands are ubiquitous throughout the crop cycle, causing yield losses. In spite of the existing warming trend, climate change models forecast high variability, including freezing temperatures. As the potato center of origin, the region has a rich biodiversity which includes a set of frost resistant genotypes. Four contrasting potato genotypes--representing genetic variability--were considered in the present study: two species of frost resistant native potatoes (the bitter Solanum juzepczukii, var. Luki, and the non-bitter Solanum ajanhuiri, var. Ajanhuiri and two commercial frost susceptible genotypes (Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum var. Alpha and Solanum tuberosum ssp. andigenum var. Gendarme. The objective of the study was to conduct a comparative growth analysis of four genotypes and modeling their agronomic response under frost events. It included assessing their performance under Andean contrasting agroecological conditions. Independent subsets of data from four field experiments were used to parameterize, calibrate and validate a potato growth model. The validated model was used to ascertain the importance of biodiversity, represented by the four genotypes tested, as constituents of germplasm mixtures in single plots used by local farmers, a coping strategy in the face of climate variability. Also scenarios with a frost routine incorporated in the model were constructed. Luki and Ajanhuiri were the most frost resistant varieties whereas Alpha was the most susceptible. Luki and Ajanhuiri, as monoculture, outperformed the yield obtained with the mixtures under severe frosts. These results highlight the role played by local frost tolerant varieties, and featured the management importance--e.g. clean seed, strategic watering--to attain the yields reported in our experiments. The mixtures of local and introduced potatoes can thus not only provide the products demanded by the markets but also reduce the

  17. Severe soil frost reduced losses of carbon and nitrogen from the forest floor during simulated snowmelt: A laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew B. Reinmann; Pamela H. Templer; John L. Campbell

    2012-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the impacts of soil frost on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, but the effects of soil frost on C and N fluxes during snowmelt remain poorly understood. We conducted a laboratory experiment to determine the effects of soil frost on C and N fluxes from forest floor soils during snowmelt. Soil cores were collected...

  18. Enceladus' near-surface CO2 gas pockets and surface frost deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Johnson, Torrence V.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Thomas B.; Radebaugh, Jani; Singh, Sandeep

    2018-03-01

    Solid CO2 surface deposits were reported in Enceladus' South Polar Region by Brown et al. (2006). They noted that such volatile deposits are temporary and posited ongoing replenishment. We present a model for this replenishment by expanding on the Matson et al. (2012) model of subsurface heat and chemical transport in Enceladus. Our model explains the distributions of both CO2 frost and complexed CO2 clathrate hydrate as seen in the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data. We trace the journey of CO2 from a subsurface ocean. The ocean-water circulation model of Matson et al. (2012) brings water up to near the surface where gas exsolves to form bubbles. Some of the CO2 bubbles are trapped and form pockets of gas in recesses at the bottom of the uppermost ice layer. When fissures break open these pockets, the CO2 gas is vented. Gas pocket venting is episodic compared to the more or less continuous eruptive plumes, emanating from the "tiger stripes", that are supported by plume chambers. Two styles of gas pocket venting are considered: (1) seeps, and (2) blowouts. The presence of CO2 frost patches suggests that the pocket gas slowly seeped through fractured, cold ice and when some of the gas reached the surface it was cold enough to condense (i.e., T ∼70 to ∼119 K). If the fissure opening is large, a blowout occurs. The rapid escape of gas and drop in pocket pressure causes water in the pocket to boil and create many small aerosol droplets of seawater. These may be carried along by the erupting gas. Electrically charged droplets can couple to the magnetosphere, and be dragged away from Enceladus. Most of the CO2 blowout gas escapes from Enceladus and the remainder is distributed globally. However, CO2 trapped in a clathrate structure does not escape. It is much heavier and slower moving than the CO2 gas. Its motion is ballistic and has an average range of about 17 km. Thus, it contributes to deposits in the vicinity of the vent. Local heat

  19. Mechanism and kinetics for ammonium dinitramide (ADN) sublimation: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, R S; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lin, M C

    2012-11-08

    The mechanism for sublimation of NH(4)N(NO(2))(2) (ADN) has been investigated quantum-mechanically with generalized gradient approximation plane-wave density functional theory calculations; the solid surface is represented by a slab model and the periodic boundary conditions are applied. The calculated lattice constants for the bulk ADN, which were found to consist of NH(4)(+)[ON(O)NNO(2)](-) units, instead of NH(4)(+)[N(NO(2))(2)](-), agree quite well with experimental values. Results show that three steps are involved in the sublimation/decomposition of ADN. The first step is the relaxation of the surface layer with 1.6 kcal/mol energy per NH(4)ON(O)NNO(2) unit; the second step is the sublimation of the surface layer to form a molecular [NH(3)]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex with a 29.4 kcal/mol sublimation energy, consistent with the experimental observation of Korobeinichev et al. (10) The last step is the dissociation of the [H(3)N]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex to give NH(3) and HON(O)NNO(2) with the dissociation energy of 13.9 kcal/mol. Direct formation of NO(2) (g) from solid ADN costs a much higher energy, 58.3 kcal/mol. Our calculated total sublimation enthalpy for ADN(s) → NH(3)(g) + HON(O)NNO(2)) (g), 44.9 kcal/mol via three steps, is in good agreement with the value, 42.1 kcal/mol predicted for the one-step sublimation process in this work and the value 44.0 kcal/mol computed by Politzer et al. (11) using experimental thermochemical data. The sublimation rate constant for the rate-controlling step 2 can be represented as k(sub) = 2.18 × 10(12) exp (-30.5 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1), which agrees well with available experimental data within the temperature range studied. The high pressure limit decomposition rate constant for the molecular complex H(3)N···HON(O)NNO(2) can be expressed by k(dec) = 3.18 × 10(13) exp (-15.09 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1). In addition, water molecules were found to increase the sublimation enthalpy of ADN, contrary to that found in the ammonium

  20. Evaluation and improvement of frost durability of clay bricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroth, Surej Raghavan

    In cold regions like Canada, frost action was reported to be the major cause of disintegration of brick veneer. Two approaches to ensure frost durability of clay bricks were studied in this research. One involved the evaluation of durability, while the other studied the improvement of durability through impregnation. In order to carry out these studies, three major objectives were set out for this research. They were: (1) to develop an index to evaluate frost durability, (2) to investigate the feasibility of using nondestructive methods to evaluate durability, and (3) to study the effect of impregnation with different materials on improving durability. It was intended in this research to develop a general durability index for clay bricks, irrespective of the manufacturing process adopted. The performance of the brick was studied using laboratory freeze-thaw test. As the time and facility requirements necessary for the unidirectional freezing test were beyond the constraints which existed in this research, an accelerated omnidirectional freeze-thaw test was used. This fact must be considered while interpreting the results from the freeze-thaw test. The study carried out to compare the performance of existing durability indices showed that they had limitations in reliably assessing durability. Therefore new durability indices were developed based on water absorption properties of bricks. These indices were found to overcome the limitations of existing indices. The feasibility study on nondestructive evaluation of durability was carried out using ultrasonic pulse velocity. New durability provisions were derived based on pulse velocity, using ASTM C216 specifications. At this stage it can be used only along with the ASTM method but it can avoid the time consuming ASTM procedure in many cases. Studies on impregnated bricks showed that there was a general shifting of pore sizes towards lower diameter region. Paraffin impregnated brick showed excellent freeze

  1. Enthalpies of sublimation of ferrocene and nickelocene measured by calorimetry and the method of Langmuir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, Aaron, E-mail: arojas@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Quimica del Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, C.P. 07360, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Vieyra-Eusebio, Maria Teresa [Departamento de Quimica del Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, C.P. 07360, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Calorimetric enthalpies of sublimation of ferrocene and nickelocene are supplied. > Sublimation enthalpies of both metallocenes were also obtained by indirect Langmuir's method. > Calorimetric and indirect enthalpies of sublimation are comparable in accuracy and dispersion. > Sublimation enthalpies are congruent with both compounds being monoclinic and isostructural. - Abstract: A quick and accurate methodology that is based on Langmuir's equation and that is developed by utilising a DSC7 device is proposed for the measurement of the enthalpies of sublimation of substances characterised by vapour pressures of approximately 1.0 Pa at room temperature. The procedure was applied to ferrocene and nickelocene; the accuracy and uncertainty associated with the experimental results show that the reliability of the developed indirect method is comparable to the direct calorimetric measurements also performed in this work. Furthermore, the melting data and crystal-phase heat capacities for both metallocenes were calorimetrically measured, whereas the gas-phase heat capacity for each metallic bis(cyclopentadienyl) was theoretically estimated by DFT calculations.

  2. Distributed modelling of climate change impacts on snow sublimation in Northern Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menzel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Sublimation of snow is an important factor of the hydrological cycle in Mongolia and is likely to increase according to future climate projections. In this study the hydrological model TRAIN was used to assess spatially distributed current and future sublimation rates based on interpolated daily data of precipitation, air temperature, air humidity, wind speed and solar radiation. An automated procedure for the interpolation of the input data is provided. Depending on the meteorological parameter and the data availability for the individual days, the most appropriate interpolation method is chosen automatically from inverse distance weighting, Ordinary Least Squares interpolation, Ordinary or Universal Kriging. Depending on elevation simulated annual sublimation in the period 1986–2006 was 23 to 35 mm, i.e. approximately 80% of total snowfall. Moreover, future climate projections for 2071–2100 of ECHAM5 and HadCM3, based on the A1B emission scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, were analysed with TRAIN. In the case of ECHAM5 simulated sublimation increases by up to 17% (26...41 mm while it remains at the same level for HadCM3 (24...34 mm. The differences are mainly due to a distinct increase in winter precipitation for ECHAM5. Simulated changes of the all-season hydrological conditions, e.g. the sublimation-to-precipitation ratio, were ambiguous due to diverse precipitation patterns derived by the global circulation models.

  3. Enthalpies of sublimation of ferrocene and nickelocene measured by calorimetry and the method of Langmuir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Aaron; Vieyra-Eusebio, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Calorimetric enthalpies of sublimation of ferrocene and nickelocene are supplied. → Sublimation enthalpies of both metallocenes were also obtained by indirect Langmuir's method. → Calorimetric and indirect enthalpies of sublimation are comparable in accuracy and dispersion. → Sublimation enthalpies are congruent with both compounds being monoclinic and isostructural. - Abstract: A quick and accurate methodology that is based on Langmuir's equation and that is developed by utilising a DSC7 device is proposed for the measurement of the enthalpies of sublimation of substances characterised by vapour pressures of approximately 1.0 Pa at room temperature. The procedure was applied to ferrocene and nickelocene; the accuracy and uncertainty associated with the experimental results show that the reliability of the developed indirect method is comparable to the direct calorimetric measurements also performed in this work. Furthermore, the melting data and crystal-phase heat capacities for both metallocenes were calorimetrically measured, whereas the gas-phase heat capacity for each metallic bis(cyclopentadienyl) was theoretically estimated by DFT calculations.

  4. Modeling of frost crystal growth over a flat plate using artificial neural networks and fractal geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahavvor, Ali Reza

    2017-03-01

    In the present study artificial neural network and fractal geometry are used to predict frost thickness and density on a cold flat plate having constant surface temperature under forced convection for different ambient conditions. These methods are very applicable in this area because phase changes such as melting and solidification are simulated by conventional methods but frost formation is a most complicated phase change phenomenon consists of coupled heat and mass transfer. Therefore conventional mathematical techniques cannot capture the effects of all parameters on its growth and development because this process influenced by many factors and it is a time dependent process. Therefore, in this work soft computing method such as artificial neural network and fractal geometry are used to do this manner. The databases for modeling are generated from the experimental measurements. First, multilayer perceptron network is used and it is found that the back-propagation algorithm with Levenberg-Marquardt learning rule is the best choice to estimate frost growth properties due to accurate and faster training procedure. Second, fractal geometry based on the Von-Koch curve is used to model frost growth procedure especially in frost thickness and density. Comparison is performed between experimental measurements and soft computing methods. Results show that soft computing methods can be used more efficiently to determine frost properties over a flat plate. Based on the developed models, wide range of frost formation over flat plates can be determined for various conditions.

  5. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-01

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28-0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes.

  6. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-21

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28-0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes.

  7. Influence of aggregate type and chemical admixtures on frost resistance of lightweight mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Beata; Widomski, Marcin K.; Barnat-Hunek, Danuta

    2017-07-01

    The aim of studies presented in this paper covered analyses of type of lightweight aggregate as well as aeration and hydrophobic admixtures influence on absorbability and frost resistance of heat-insulating mortars applied in the energy-efficient construction. In the presented research, expanded perlite (EP) and expanded clay aggregate (ceramsite) were used as lightweight aggregates. The measurements of the basic mechanical and physical characteristics of tested mortars were performed, including, inter alia, compressive and flexural tensile strength, density, effective (open) and total porosity, absorbability, thermal conductivity as well as frost resistance after 25 cycles of freezing and thawing. Substitution of some part of sand fraction by the lightweight aggregates, expanded clay aggregate or perlite, resulted in changes in physical properties of the tested mortars. The observed decrease in density (specific weight), coefficient of heat transport and strength parameters were simultaneously accompanied by the increase in absorbability. Researches concerning frost resistance of mortars containing ceramsite and perlite showed the improved frost resistance of mortar utilizing perlite. Most of the tested mortars shoved satisfactory frost resistance, only samples of mortar containing ceramsite and aeration admixture were destroyed. The significant influence of aerating admixture on frost resistance of mortars was determined. Hydrophobic siloxanes addition failed to adequately protect the mortars against frost erosion, regardless the type of applied aggregate.

  8. Can the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale assess perfeccionismo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Alexandra M; DiBartolo, Patricia Marten; Rendón, María Jose

    2017-07-01

    Although culture-based measurement bias threatens the validity of intergroup comparison research, measurement invariance is often assumed rather than demonstrated by researchers who draw conclusions about cross-cultural similarities or differences. The current article investigates the cross-cultural invariance of a popular measure of perfectionism, the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (F-MPS; Frost, Marten, Lahart, & Rosenblate, 1990) for a Hispanic/Latina sample. Perfectionism, which encompasses high goal setting and sensitivity to critical evaluation, is a transdiagnostic risk factor for internalizing psychopathology that especially warrants focus among groups burdened by mental health disparities. Multiple samples were used in a series of analyses to construct a baseline first-order measurement model and test for cross-group equivalence. For model development, confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) were used with 320 female participants (M age = 19.61 years) who identified primarily (n = 301) as European/European American. Measurement invariance testing was conducted with multigroup CFAs using another sample of female adults (n = 574; Mage = 21.21 years), identifying either as European/European American (n = 217) or Hispanic/Latina/Latin American (n = 357). Evidence was found for invariance across the revised F-MPS factor structure, pattern of factor loadings, and factor variances/covariances. Results indicate that predictive relationships may be compared across these groups, but caution is suggested when interpreting raw mean score differences due to intercept nonequivalence. Further, second-order model testing demonstrated support for the bidimensional model of perfectionism cross-culturally. Future research on perfectionism within the Latino/a population is encouraged using this equivalent item set. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Dedicated Low Latitude Diurnal CO2 Frost Observation Campaigns by the Mars Climate Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, S.; Kass, D. M.; Kleinboehl, A.; Hayne, P. O.; Heavens, N. G.; McCleese, D. J.; Schofield, J. T.; Shirley, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    In December 2016 (Ls≈280, MY33) and July 2017 (Ls≈30, MY34), the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) conducted two distinct observation campaigns. The first one aimed at 1) confirming the presence of low latitude diurnal CO2 frost on Mars, and 2) refining the estimated mass of carbon dioxide condensed at the surface, whereas the second campaign was designed to 3) search for temporally and spatially varying spectral characteristics indicative of frost properties (i.e., crystal size, contamination, etc.) and relationship to the regolith. To meet these goals, MCS acquired thermal infrared observations of the surface and atmosphere at variable local times (≈1.70-3.80 h Local True Solar Time) and in the 10°-50°N latitude band where very low thermal inertia material (<< 100 Jm-2K-1s-0.5) is present. Atmospherically corrected surface brightness temperatures were retrieved in a wavelength region around 32 μm (MCS channel B1) as well as at 12 μm, 16 μm and 22 μm (MCS channels A4, A1, A5) where possible. A preliminary analysis of the data suggests a good general agreement between these new observations and earlier predictions in terms of frost distribution and spectral properties. In addition, pre-frost deposition surface cooling rates are found to be consistent with those predicted by numerical models (i.e., 1-2K per hour). Finally, we observe buffered surface temperatures near the local frost point, indicating a surface emissivity ≈1. (i.e., optically thin frost layers, or dust contaminated frost, or slab-like ice) and no discernable frost metamorphism. We will present a detailed analysis of these new and unique observations, and elaborate on the potential relationship between the regolith and this recurring frost cycle.

  10. Climate change and spring frost damages for sweet cherries in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Frank-M.; Götz, Klaus-P.; Weber, Katharina C.; Moryson, Susanne

    2018-02-01

    Spring frost can be a limiting factor in sweet cherry ( Prunus avium L.) production. Rising temperatures in spring force the development of buds, whereby their vulnerability to freezing temperatures continuously increases. With the beginning of blossom, flowers can resist only light frosts without any significant damage. In this study, we investigated the risk of spring frost damages during cherry blossom for historical and future climate conditions at two different sites in NE (Berlin) and SW Germany (Geisenheim). Two phenological models, developed on the basis of phenological observations at the experimental sweet cherry orchard in Berlin-Dahlem and validated for endodormancy release and for warmer climate conditions (already published), were used to calculate the beginning of cherry blossom in Geisenheim, 1951-2015 (external model validation). Afterwards, on the basis of a statistical regionalisation model WETTREG (RCP 8.5), the frequency of frost during cherry blossom was calculated at both sites for historical (1971-2000) and future climate conditions (2011-2100). From these data, we derived the final flower damage, defined as the percentage of frozen flowers due to single or multiple frost events during blossom. The results showed that rising temperatures in this century can premature the beginning of cherry blossom up to 17 days at both sites, independent of the used phenological model. The frequency and strength of frost was characterised by a high temporal and local variability. For both sites, no significant increase in frost frequency and frost damage during blossom was found. In Geisenheim, frost damages significantly decreased from the middle of the twenty-first century. This study additionally emphasises the importance of reliable phenological models which not only work for current but also for changed climate conditions and at different sites. The date of endodormancy release should always be a known parameter in chilling/forcing models.

  11. Numerical modeling and analytical modeling of cryogenic carbon capture in a de-sublimating heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhitao; Miller, Franklin; Pfotenhauer, John M.

    2017-12-01

    Both a numerical and analytical model of the heat and mass transfer processes in a CO2, N2 mixture gas de-sublimating cross-flow finned duct heat exchanger system is developed to predict the heat transferred from a mixture gas to liquid nitrogen and the de-sublimating rate of CO2 in the mixture gas. The mixture gas outlet temperature, liquid nitrogen outlet temperature, CO2 mole fraction, temperature distribution and de-sublimating rate of CO2 through the whole heat exchanger was computed using both the numerical and analytic model. The numerical model is built using EES [1] (engineering equation solver). According to the simulation, a cross-flow finned duct heat exchanger can be designed and fabricated to validate the models. The performance of the heat exchanger is evaluated as functions of dimensionless variables, such as the ratio of the mass flow rate of liquid nitrogen to the mass flow rate of inlet flue gas.

  12. On the Size Dependences of the Metallic Nanoparticle Evaporation and Sublimation Heats: Thermodynamics and Atomistic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembel, A. G.

    2017-02-01

    Size dependences of the nanocrystal sublimation and the evaporation heats of the corresponding nanodrops are investigated using the isothermal molecular dynamics and the tight-binding potential (on examples of Ni and Au nanoparticles). Results of computer simulation demonstrating linear dependences of the evaporation and sublimation heats on the particle reciprocal radius are compared with results of thermodynamic calculations as well as with experimental data for bulk phases of the same metals. It has been found that the size dependences of the evaporation and sublimation heats are directly related with the behavior of the size dependence of the melting heat that in its turn correlates with structural transformations in nanoparticles induced by the change of their size. The conclusion is drawn that there is some characteristic nanoparticle size (of the order of 1 nm) at which its crystal and liquid states become indistinguishable.

  13. Matrix Sublimation/Recrystallization for Imaging Proteins by Mass Spectrometry at High Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    We have employed matrix deposition by sublimation for protein image analysis on tissue sections using a hydration/recrystallization process that produces high quality MALDI mass spectra and high spatial resolution ion images. We systematically investigated different washing protocols, the effect of tissue section thickness, the amount of sublimated matrix per unit area and different recrystallization conditions. The results show that an organic solvent rinse followed by ethanol/water rinses substantially increased sensitivity for the detection of proteins. Both the thickness of tissue section and amount of sinapinic acid sublimated per unit area have optimal ranges for maximal protein signal intensity. Ion images of mouse and rat brain sections at 50, 20 and 10 µm spatial resolution are presented and are correlated with H&E stained optical images. For targeted analysis, histology directed imaging can be performed using this protocol where MS analysis and H&E staining are performed on the same section. PMID:21639088

  14. Numerical Model on Frost Height of Round Plate Fin Used for Outdoor Heat Exchanger of Mobile Electric Heat Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Yeon Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to provide the numerical model for prediction of the frost growth of the round plate fin for the purpose of using it as a round plate fin-tube heat exchanger (evaporator under frosting conditions. In this study, numerical model was considering the frost density change with time, and it showed better agreement with experimental data of Sahin (1994 than that of the Kim model (2004 and the Jonse and Parker model (1975. This is because the prediction on the frost height with time was improved by using the frost thermal conductivity reflecting the void fraction and density of ice crystal with frost growth. Therefore, the developed numerical model could be used for frosting performance prediction of the round plate fin-tube heat exchanger.

  15. The minimum temperatures in the winter 2006/07 in Slovenian frost hollows and cold basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Ogrin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The members of Slovenian Meteorological Forum, Department of Geography at University of Ljubljana and Slovenian Forestry Institute started to measure temperatures in Slovenian frost hollows and cold basins in 2004. The measurements, which improved during the period 2004.2006, continued also in the winter 2006.2007, all together, in more than 30 frost hollows and cold basins Alpine, Dinaridic and even Submediterranean areas. Although the winter 2006/2007 was very mild, minimum temperatures in frost hollow Hribarice fell below -35°C.

  16. Frost susceptibility of sub-base gravel used in Pearl-Chain Bridges: an experimental investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Andersen, Iben Brøndum

    2016-01-01

    , no actual frost tests have been carried out to verify this assumption. In the present study, the frost susceptibility of four different Danish gravel materials is categorised from their heave rate. We test two Danish sub-base gravel materials, with particle size distributions of 0–8 mm and 0–31.5 mm......, respectively, and also two modified sub-base gravel materials with increased and reduced fines contents. The fines content of the gravel materials is analysed by laser diffraction, and compared with two common frost susceptibility criteria, Casagrande’s and Schaible’s, and with Danish tender specifications...

  17. Seasonal frost penetration, Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The frost tube network is located within a 3.25-square-mile sub-watershed of the Sleepers River Research Watershed near Danville, Vermont, USA. Tubes were positioned...

  18. Frost sensivity and nutrient status  in a fertilized Norway spruce stand in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Anna Maria; Ingerslev, Morten; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the N, P and K status on frost sensitivity of Norway spruce needles in a fertilization experiment situated in a nutrient poor 29-year-old Picea abies stand in western Denmark. The relative difference in frost sensitivity among trees was assessed...... by an index of injury, based on conductivity measurements of ion leakage from needles. Despite fertilization, all trees indicated N, P and K deficiency. The foliage, collected in late winter, was generally not very frost sensitive, but foliage from trees with the lowest K and P status were more sensitive...... to frost, and the current year needles were more sensitive than the second and third year needles. The advancement of bud burst was assessed in May. Trees with a relatively high N concentration in the current year needles had a more advanced bud burst than trees with a lower N concentration, increasing...

  19. Frost formation and heat transfer on a cold surface in ice fog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mago, P.J. [Mississippi State University (United States). Department of Mechanical Engineering; Sherif, S.A. [University of Florida, Gainesville (United States). Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    2005-06-01

    In this paper a semi-empirical model describing heat and mass transfer on a cold surface in humid air under supersaturated frosting conditions is presented. The lack of psychrometric data in the supersaturated zone of the psychrometric chart has historically impeded the ability of researchers to accurately predict heat and mass transfer in supersaturated air. The work described in this paper has been partially made possible by developing a systematic procedure to compute the properties of supersaturated air, especially in the low temperature zone of the psychrometric chart. Development of such a capability will allow us to predict the amount of frost collected, the frost deposition and heat transfer rates, frost thickness and surface temperature, and other important parameters. (author)

  20. Seasonal frost and soil temperature data, Western Cape Mountains, South Africa, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Micro-climatic monitoring of air and ground was started in 1990 to evaluate climatic controls on the present-day diurnal soil frost environment in the Western Cape...

  1. Siim Nestor soovitab : Ben Frost ja Alexander Robotnik Eclectical / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2007-01-01

    Austraalia muusik ja helilooja Ben Frost projektiga "6 guitars" esinemas festivali Eclectica raames 6. sept. Tartu klubis Rock ja Roll ja itaalia diskor Alexander Robotnik 7. sept. klubis Trehv, esinejatest

  2. Risk Modelling of Late Spring Frost Damage on Fruit Trees, Case Study; Apple Tree, Mashhad Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rahimi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mashhad plain is one of the most important regions of Apple cultivated areas. Occurring spring late frost creates a lot of damages on bud and decreasing the yield of Apple in this region. Assessment and risk modeling of frost damage would be useful to manage and decrease the damage. The study area is a part of Khorasan Razavi province which is located in Mashhad plain. This region is located in Northeast Iran (36º to 37 º N, 58 º 30' to 60 º E. The area of this region is about 13000 square km which is about one tenth of Khorasan province area. In order to modeling frost damage risk 12 affective parameters including climatological(Minimum temperature, temperature decreasing rate, temperature Increasing rate, Julian days of frost, cumulative degree days, Area under zero line, and frost duration and geographical parameters (Elevation, Longitude, Latitude, Aspect, and slope were selected. 3 damage full radiative frosts were selected in the period of Apple flowering time which was dated 20 April 2003, 8 April 2005, and 28 March 2005. Required meteorological data were collected from 9 meteorological standard stations inside and outside of study area. Linear multiple regression were used to modeling the relationship. The map for each parameter was plotted by using suitable interpolation method including IDW; Spline; Kriging. A grid map was defined with 5 by 5 kilometers to extract enough data for entering to the model. The regression equation was significant at the level of 99% significance. By using this equation the predicted amounts of frost risk damage were calculated for each point of grid and also the map was plotted. The regression equation of observed and predicted frost damage risk was provided by correlation of 0.93 and the error map also was prepared. According to this study in frost of 31 Farvardin 1388 South West parts of the plain estimated as the most frost risk areas by %53.19 and the southeast parts were estimated as the least

  3. An inverse geometry problem in estimating frost growth on an evaporating tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C.H. [Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, National Cheng Kung University Tainan, Taiwan (Taiwan)

    2002-08-01

    When humid air comes into contact with a surface whose temperature is below the dew point of water vapor in air and also below the freezing point, frost deposition takes place over the surface. The phenomena of the frost growth are very complicated and therefore it is very difficult to model mathematically the behavior of frost growth and predict it. In the present study a transient inverse geometry heat conduction problem (shape identification problem) is solved using the conjugate gradient method (CGM) and boundary element method (BEM)-based inverse algorithm to estimate the unknown irregular frost thickness and shape. Results obtained by using the CGM to estimate the frost growth are justified based on the numerical experiments. It is concluded that the accurate frost shape can be estimated by the CGM except for the initial and final time. The reason and improvement of this singularity are addressed. Finally the effects of reducing the number of sensors and increasing the measurement errors on the inverse solutions are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Metal stress consequences on frost hardiness of plants at northern high latitudes: a review and hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taulavuori, Kari [Department of Biology, University of Oulu, PO Box 3000, FIN-90014, Oulu (Finland)]. E-mail: kari.taulavuori@oulu.fi; Prasad, M.N.V. [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046, Andhra Pradesh (India); Taulavuori, Erja [Department of Biology, University of Oulu, PO Box 3000, FIN-90014, Oulu (Finland); Laine, Kari [Department of Biology, University of Oulu, PO Box 3000, FIN-90014, Oulu (Finland)

    2005-05-01

    This paper reviews the potential of trace/heavy metal-induced stress to reduce plant frost hardiness at northern high latitudes. The scientific questions are first outlined prior to a brief summary of heavy metal tolerance. The concepts of plant capacity and survival adaptation were used to formulate a hypothesis, according to which heavy metal stress may reduce plant frost hardiness for the following reasons: (1) Heavy metals change membrane properties through impaired resource acquisition and subsequent diminution of the cryoprotectant pool. (2) Heavy metals change membrane properties directly through oxidative stress, i.e. an increase of active oxygen species. (3) The involved co-stress may further increase oxidative stress. (4) The risk of frost injury increases due to membrane alterations. An opposite perspective was also discussed: could metal stress result in enhanced plant frost hardiness? This phenomenon could be based on the metabolism (i.e. glutathione, polyamines, proline, heat shock proteins) underlying a possible general adaptation syndrome of stress (GAS). As a result of the review it was suggested that metal-induced stress seems to reduce rather than increase plant frost hardiness. - Metal stress may reduce plant frost hardiness.

  5. The vulnerability of silver fir populations to damage from late frosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klisz Marcin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the vulnerability of selected silver fir populations to damage from late frost in the climatic conditions of south-eastern Poland. To determine the vulnerability of apical and lateral shoots to damage caused by late frosts, we observed four test plots in 2009 and 2014, each containing progenies of selected seed stands. Our statistical analyses were based on a model incorporating the following variables: site, year, type of frost damage, population as well as the possible interaction between these variables. Significant differences between the populations were found in terms of their sensitivity to damage from low temperature occurring during the growth period. Furthermore, we indirectly demonstrated differences in the severity of late frost on the experimental plots, as well as the intensity and variability of late frost shoot damage. Based on these results, we divided the studied populations into two groups of low (EF, KRA1 and NAR and high (LES2 and BAL2 sensitivity to late frost damage.

  6. Delayed frost formation on hybrid nanostructured surfaces with patterned high wetting contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Youmin; Zhou, Peng; Yao, Shuhuai

    2014-11-01

    Engineering icephobic surfaces that can retard the frost formation and accumulation are important to vehicles, wind turbines, power lines, and HVAC systems. For condensation frosting, superhydrophobic surfaces promote self-removal of condensed droplets before freezing and consequently delay the frost growth. However, a small thermal fluctuation may lead to a Cassie-to-Wenzel transition, and thus dramatically enhance the frost formation and adhesion. In this work, we investigated the heterogeneous ice nucleation on hybrid nanostructured surfaces with patterned high wetting contrast. By judiciously introducing hydrophilic micro-patches into superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, we demonstrated that such a novel hybrid structure can efficiently defer the ice nucleation as compared to a superhydrophobic surface with nanostructures only. We observed efficient droplet jumping and higher coverage of droplets with diameter smaller than 10 μm, both of which suppress frost formation. The hybrid surface avoids the formation of liquid-bridges for Cassie-to-Wenzel transition, therefore eliminating the `bottom-up' droplet freezing from the cold substrate. These findings provide new insights to improve anti-frosting and anti-icing by using heterogeneous wettability in multiscale structures.

  7. Metal stress consequences on frost hardiness of plants at northern high latitudes: a review and hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taulavuori, Kari; Prasad, M.N.V.; Taulavuori, Erja; Laine, Kari

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential of trace/heavy metal-induced stress to reduce plant frost hardiness at northern high latitudes. The scientific questions are first outlined prior to a brief summary of heavy metal tolerance. The concepts of plant capacity and survival adaptation were used to formulate a hypothesis, according to which heavy metal stress may reduce plant frost hardiness for the following reasons: (1) Heavy metals change membrane properties through impaired resource acquisition and subsequent diminution of the cryoprotectant pool. (2) Heavy metals change membrane properties directly through oxidative stress, i.e. an increase of active oxygen species. (3) The involved co-stress may further increase oxidative stress. (4) The risk of frost injury increases due to membrane alterations. An opposite perspective was also discussed: could metal stress result in enhanced plant frost hardiness? This phenomenon could be based on the metabolism (i.e. glutathione, polyamines, proline, heat shock proteins) underlying a possible general adaptation syndrome of stress (GAS). As a result of the review it was suggested that metal-induced stress seems to reduce rather than increase plant frost hardiness. - Metal stress may reduce plant frost hardiness

  8. Evaluation of the contact angle and frost resistance of hydrophobised heat-insulating mortars with polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnat-Hunek, Danuta; Łagód, Grzegorz; Klimek, Beata

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the research presented in the paper was to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrophobic preparation based on organosilicon compounds for surface protection on the heat-insulating mortars modified with polystyrene. The work discusses issues related to wettability, absorptivity and frost resistance of the surface layer of mortars. The experimental part pertains to the physical and mechanical properties of polystyrene-modified mortars and the influence of hydrophobic preparation on the contact angle and frost resistance. The frost resistance of mortars was examined following 25 cycles of freezing and thawing. The contact angle of light mortars (θw) was determined before and after the tests of frost resistance, in the function of time using a single measurement liquid. This provided a basis for calculating the surface free energy with Neumann method, characterizing the wettability and adhesion of mortars under normal conditions and with damages resulting from frost weathering. The structure of mortars and the adhesion of lightweight aggregate to cement paste were presented by means of scanning electron microscopy. The studies enabled to determine the hydrophobisation efficiency of heat-insulating mortars with polystyrene. The obtained results confirmed the possibility of producing heat-insulating mortars modified with polystyrene along with proper surface protection against moisture and frost.

  9. Plant safety margin against frost damages has declined in Switzerland over the last four decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitasse, Yann; Schneider, Léonard; Klein, Geoffrey; Rixen, Christian; Rebetez, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Winters and early springs have become warmer over the last decades which has in turn promoted earlier plant development in temperate regions. While temperatures will on average continue to increase in the coming decades due to the rise of greenhouse gases concentration in the atmosphere, there is no consensus about how the occurrence of late spring frosts will change. If the frequency and the severity of late spring frosts remain unchanged in the future or advance less than vegetation onset, vulnerable plant organs (young leaves, flowers or dehardened buds) may be more exposed to frost damage. Here we analyzed long-term series of temperature data during the period 1975-2016 at 50 locations in Switzerland. We used different thresholds of growing degree days (GDD) as a proxy for spring phenology of fruit trees based on long-term series of phenological observations. Finally, we tested whether the time lag between the date when the GDD is reached and the latest occurrence of frost has changed over the study period. Overall we found that the safety margin against potential frost damage to plants has slightly decreased during the study period, irrespective of elevation (from 203 to 2283 m). Our results suggest that the cost for preventing frost damages on fruit trees could increase in the coming decades and the introduction of new varieties of fruit trees adapted to warmer climate should be carefully considered as they generally exhibit earlier spring phenology.

  10. CO2 Frost Phenomenon for Binary System of Methane-Carbon Dioxide Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Wibawa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the CO2 frost phenomenon of CH4-CO2 mixtures has been observed for the rational design of CO2 removal from natural gas using a controlled freeze out area. The CO2 frost conditions were estimated using the ZNE method and process simulation software (Aspen HYSYS® v7.3. The experiment was carried out using a double pipe heat exchanger (DPHE with the concentration of CO2 in the gas mixture at 5 and 10% and pressure of the gas mixture from 1 to 20 bar. The equilibrium temperature predictions of the ZNE method and the process simulation software only had a slight difference, with a magnitude deviation of less than 1% for pressures below 20 bar and 3% for pressures in the range of 20-30 bar, respectively. In the experimental study, CO2 frost formation was detected at pressures of 1, 5, 10 and 20 bar. The locations of the initial CO2 frost formation were determined using a pressure drop indicator associated with the predicted frost temperatures obtained from the ZNE method and the process simulation software. For all studied variables, the locations of initial CO2 frost formation were found at 0.887-1.531 m from the inlet.

  11. A re-determination and re-assessment of the thermodynamics of sublimation of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, R.J.; Rauh, E.G.; Rand, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    New mass-spectrometric measurements on the ion-intensity of UO 2 + over urania from 1813 to 2463 K are reported. Although the mean value for the enthalpy of sublimation calculated from these measurements is close to previous values, a detailed examination of the results indicates that there is an appreciable curvature in the log p versus reciprocal-temperature curve for the process: UO 2 (s)→UO 2 (g). This is attributed to a large negative ΔCsub(p) for the sublimation reaction, arising from the sharp increase in Csub(p) (UO 2 (s)) above approximately 1750 K. A thorough re-assessment of the previous studies on the sublimation of urania suggests an 'international' average value of psub(UO 2 )=(1.3+-0.1)x10 -6 atm at 2150 K; Knudsen effusion measurements above 2450 K (p>1x10 -4 atm) are thought to be in error due to departures from molecular flow. Thermal functions for UO 2 (g) have been calculated, assuming a linear molecule and electronic contributions to the partition function based on those of ThO(g). Anharmonicity corrections have been included. When these functions are combined with the thermal functions for UO 2 (s), recently assessed, the third law heat of sublimation at 298.15 K becomes 147.8 kcal.mol -1 with a trend of only 0.2 kcal.mol -1 across the temperature range 1800 to 2400 K. (author)

  12. How to Kill a Journalism School: The Digital Sublime in the Discourse of Discontinuance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Michael; Sindorf, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    The authors argue that journalism's uncertain identity in academia has made it vulnerable to unreflective instrumentalism in the digital era. They show how instrumentalism intertwined with the digital sublime constitutes a rhetorically resonate rationale for closing a journalism school. Evidence comes from documents and testimony associated with…

  13. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Facilitating Active Learning of Concepts in Transport Phenomena: Experiment with a Subliming Solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utgikar, Vivek P.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment based on the sublimation of a solid was introduced in the undergraduate Transport Phenomena course. The experiment required the students to devise their own apparatus and measurement techniques. The theoretical basis, assignment of the experiment, experimental results, and student/instructor observations are described in this paper.…

  14. Glacier mass balance reconstruction by sublimation induced enrichment of chemical species on Cerro Tapado (Chilean Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ginot

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36 m long ice core down to bedrock from the Cerro Tapado glacier (5536 m a.s.l, 30°08' S, 69°55' W was analyzed to reconstruct past climatic conditions for Northern Chile. Because of the marked seasonality in the precipitation (short wet winter and extended dry summer periods in this region, major snow ablation and related post-depositional processes occur on the glacier surface during summer periods. They include predominantly sublimation and dry deposition. Assuming that, like measured during the field campaign, the enrichment of chloride was always related to sublimation, the chemical record along the ice core may be applied to reconstruct the history of such secondary processes linked to the past climatic conditions over northern Chile. For the time period 1962–1999, a mean annual net accumulation of 316 mm water equivalent (weq and 327 mm weq loss by sublimation was deduced by this method. This corresponds to an initial total annual accumulation of 539 mm weq. The annual variability of the accumulation and sublimation is related with the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI: higher net-accumulation during El-Niño years and more sublimation during La Niña years. The deepest part of the ice record shows a time discontinuity; with an ice body deposited under different climatic conditions: 290 mm higher precipitation but with reduced seasonal distribution (+470 mm in winter and –180 mm in summer and –3°C lower mean annual temperature. Unfortunately, its age is unknown. The comparison with regional proxy data however let us conclude that the glacier buildup did most likely occur after the dry mid-Holocene.

  15. Modeling of a domestic frost-free refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, J.K.; Ram Gopal, M.; Chakraborty, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2007-03-15

    In the present study, a comprehensive thermo-fluidic model is developed for a domestic frost-free refrigerator. The governing equations, coupled with pertinent boundary conditions, are solved by employing a conservative control volume formulation, in the environment of a three-dimensional unstructured mesh. Experiments are also conducted to validate the results predicted by the present computational model. It is found that the computational and experimental results qualitatively agree with each other, although certain discrepancies can be observed in terms of the exact numerical values obtained. For the freezer compartment, the computationally predicted temperatures are somewhat higher than the experimental ones, whereas for the refrigerating compartment, the computed temperatures are lower than the corresponding experimental observations. The difference between experimental and computational results may be attributed to the lack of precise data on the airflow rates and the unaccounted heat transfer rates through the door gaskets and the compressor. From the heat transfer and fluid flow analysis, certain modifications in the design are also suggested, so as to improve the performance of the refrigerator. (author)

  16. Polarization developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist

  17. Possible recent and ancient glacial ice flow in the south polar region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.

    Martian polar science began almost as soon as small telescopes were trained on the planet. The seasonal expansion and contraction of the polar caps and their high albedoes led most astronomers to think that water ice is the dominant constituent. In 1911 Lowell perceived a bluish band around the retreating edge of the polar caps, and interpreted it as water from melting polar ice and seasonal snow. An alternative idea in his time was that the polar caps consist of frozen carbonic acid. Lowell rejected the carbonic acid hypothesis on account of his blue band. He also pointed out that carbonic acid would sublimate rather than melt at confining pressures near and below one bar, hence, carbonic acid could not account for the blue band. In comparing Lowell's theories with today's knowledge, it is recognized that (1) sublimation is mainly responsible for the growth and contraction of Mars' polar caps, (2) carbon dioxide is a major component of the southern polar cap, and (3) Lowell's blue band was probably seasonal dust and/or clouds. Geomorphic evidence that glacial ice and glacial melt waters once flowed over broad areas of the southern polar region. Two aspects of the south polar region suggest possible glacial processes during two distinct eras in Mars' history.

  18. The effect of stationary and sweeping frequency AC electric fields on frost crystal removal on a cold plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudor, V. [US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Advanced Thermal Systems Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department; Ohadi, M. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Smart and Small Thermal Systems Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department

    2006-06-15

    The effect of stationary and sweeping frequency AC electric fields on frost crystals growth and frost control/removal on a cold plate was studied for the first time in this paper. The main results of this study showed that the presence of AC electric fields can greatly affect both the frost crystals growth pattern and mass accumulation on cold surfaces. The ice surface electrical properties and basic electrostatics were used to explain the main findings in this paper. Up to 46% frost reduction was obtained when the electric field frequency spanned 370Hz to 7.5kHz while the applied voltage was 14.5kV. Two different sets of environmental conditions were tested, which showed that the plate temperature placed an important effect on frost crystals growth under electric fields. An optimum application time of the AC electric fields was found based on least frost mass accumulation on the cold plate. (author)

  19. Use of LST images from MODIS/AQUA sensor as an indication of frost occurrence in RS

    OpenAIRE

    Débora de S. Simões; Denise C. Fontana; Matheus B. Vicari

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTAlthough frost occurrence causes severe losses in agriculture, especially in the south of Brazil, the data of minimum air temperature (Tmin) currently available for monitoring and predicting frosts show insufficient spatial distribution. This study aimed to evaluate the MDY11A1 (LST – Land Surface Temperature) product, from the MODIS sensor on board the AQUA satellite as an estimator of frost occurrence in the southeast of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. LST images from ...

  20. Use of LST images from MODIS/AQUA sensor as an indication of frost occurrence in RS

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, Débora de S.; Fontana, Denise C.; Vicari, Matheus B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTAlthough frost occurrence causes severe losses in agriculture, especially in the south of Brazil, the data of minimum air temperature (Tmin) currently available for monitoring and predicting frosts show insufficient spatial distribution. This study aimed to evaluate the MDY11A1 (LST – Land Surface Temperature) product, from the MODIS sensor on board the AQUA satellite as an estimator of frost occurrence in the southeast of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. LST images from the ni...

  1. Frost induced damages within porous materials - from concrete technology to fuel cells technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palecki, Susanne; Gorelkov, Stanislav; Wartmann, Jens; Heinzel, Angelika

    2017-12-01

    Porous media like concrete or layers of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) within fuel cells are affected by a cyclic frost exposure due to different damage mechanisms which could lead to essential degradation of the material. In general, frost damages can only occur in case of a specific material moisture content. In fuel cells, residual water is generally available after shut down inside the membrane i.e. the gas diffusion layer (GDL). During subsequent freezing, this could cause various damage phenomena such as frost heaves and delamination effects of the membrane electrode assembly, which depends on the location of pore water and on the pore structure itself. Porous materials possess a pore structure that could range over several orders of magnitudes with different properties and freezing behaviour of the pore water. Latter can be divided into macroscopic, structured and pre-structured water, influenced by surface interactions. Therefore below 0 °C different water modifications can coexist in a wide temperature range, so that during frost exposure a high amount of unfrozen and moveable water inside the pore system is still available. This induces transport mechanisms and shrinkage effects. The physical basics are similar for porous media. While the freezing behaviour of concrete has been studied over decades of years, in order to enhance the durability, the know-how about the influence of a frost attack on fuel cell systems is not fully understood to date. On the basis of frost damage models for concrete structures, an approach to describe the impact of cyclic freezing and thawing on membrane electrode assemblies has been developed within this research work. Major aim is beyond a better understanding of the frost induced mechanisms, the standardization of a suitable test procedure for the assessment of different MEA materials under such kind of attack. Within this contribution first results will be introduced.

  2. Use of the delayed luminescence test for evaluation of changes in frost-resistance of winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Brzóstowicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of frost hardening conditions on the frost-resistance of three winter wheat cultivars ('Mironowska 808', 'Grana' and 'Maris Huntsman' was studied. Frost resistance was measured periodically during the autumn and winter season by the delayed luminescence method. Parallelly an electrical conductivity test was performed for comparison. It was found that the temperature which delayed luminescence reaches its maximum (tN correlates with (t50 obtained by the conductometric method. The differences in response of particular cultivars to frost and hardening conditions are described.

  3. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojcieszak, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Barnhurst, K.G.; Ikeda, K.; Maia, R.C.M.; Wessler, H.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass

  4. La libertad entre lo visible y lo invisible: límites y alcances de lo sublime katiano.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Amaya Villarreal .

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The following essay is a view of the Kantian refection on the sublime in light of an interpretation that understands the Critique of Judgement as a project that is born from a concern for the relationship that appears within the sensible and suprasensible dimension of the human being. Influenced by the view presented by Lyotard in Lessons on the analytics of the sublime, I explore some of the consequences brought on for the comprehension of Kantian morality and freedom by its contact with the category of the sublime.

  5. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  6. Snowmelt and sublimation: field experiments and modelling in the High Atlas Mountains of Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Schulz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Snow in the High Atlas Mountains is a major source for freshwater renewal and for water availability in the semi-arid lowlands of south-eastern Morocco. Snowfall- and snow-ablation monitoring and modelling is important for estimating potential water delivery from the mountain water towers to the forelands. This study is part of GLOWA-IMPETUS, an integrated management project dealing with scarce water resources in West Africa. The Ameskar study area is located to the south of the High Atlas Mountains, in their rain shadow. As a part of the M’Goun river basin within the upper Drâa valley, the study area is characterised by high radiation inputs, low atmospheric humidity and long periods with sub-zero temperatures. Its altitude ranges between 2000 m and 4000 m, with dominant north- and south-facing slopes. Snowfall occurs mainly from November to April but even summit regions can become repeatedly devoid of snow cover. Snow cover maps for the M’Goun basin (1240 km2 are derived from calculations of NDSI (Normalized Difference Snow Index from MODIS satellite images and snow depth is monitored at four automatic weather stations between 2000–4000 m. Snowfall events are infrequent at lower altitudes. The presence of snow penitentes at altitudes above 3000 m indicates that snow sublimation is an important component of snow ablation. Snow ablation was modelled with the UEB Utah Energy Balance Model (Tarboton and Luce, 1996. This single layer, physically-based, point energy and mass balance model is driven by meteorological variables recorded at the automatic weather stations at Tounza (2960 m and Tichki (3260 m. Data from snow pillows at Tounza and Tichki are used to validate the model’s physical performance in terms of energy and water balances for a sequence of two snowfall events in the winter of 2003/4. First UEB modelling results show good overall performance and timing of snowmelt and sublimation compared to field investigations. Up to 44

  7. Seasonal Nitrogen Cycles on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Paige, David A.

    1996-01-01

    A thermal model, developed to predict seasonal nitrogen cycles on Triton, has been modified and applied to Pluto. The model was used to calculate the partitioning of nitrogen between surface frost deposits and the atmosphere, as a function of time for various sets of input parameters. Volatile transport was confirmed to have a significant effect on Pluto's climate as nitrogen moved around on a seasonal time scale between hemispheres, and sublimed into and condensed out of the atmosphere. Pluto's high obliquity was found to have a significant effect on the distribution of frost on its surface. Conditions that would lead to permanent polar caps on Triton were found to lead to permanent zonal frost bands on Pluto. In some instances, frost sublimed from the middle of a seasonal cap outward, resulting in a "polar bald spot". Frost which was darker than the substrate did not satisfy observables on Pluto, in contrast to our findings for Triton. Bright frost (brighter than the substrate) came closer to matching observables. Atmospheric pressure varied seasonally. The amplitudes, and to a lesser extent the phase, of the variation depended significantly on frost and substrate properties. Atmospheric pressure was found to be determined both by Pluto's distance from the sun and by the subsolar latitude. In most cases two peaks in atmospheric pressure were observed annually: a greater one associated with the sublimation of the north polar cap just as Pluto receded from perihelion, and a lesser one associated with the sublimation of the south polar cap as Pluto approached perihelion. Our model predicted frost-free dark substrate surface temperatures in the 50 to 60 K range, while frost temperatures typically ranged between 30 to 40 K. Temporal changes in frost coverage illustrated by our results, and changes in the viewing geometry of Pluto from the Earth, may be important for interpretation of ground-based measurements of Pluto's thermal emission.

  8. Frost sensitivity of various deciduous plant species during leaf development in spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrella, Nicole; Heinzmann, Verena; Menzel, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Frost damage in deciduous woody plants is a major climate component affecting fitness and distribution of species. It is a trade-off between early bud burst enlarging the potential growing season and frost risk for deciduous plants in many regions. In a warming world observed earlier budburst may lead to an increased risk of spring frost damage caused by higher variability in temperatures (IPCC 2007). Lenz et al. (2013) showed that leaves are in general more sensitive to frost in later leaf development stages. But still there is little knowledge on stages of leaf development and their susceptibility to frost damage in many deciduous species. Additionally there might be variation with plant traits or different strategies within specific groups of species. Frost risk minimization can also be achieved by variability in bud burst within a specimen. Therefore, in this study we observed more than 174 individual plant specimen of 96 deciduous woody plant species growing in a comparable microclimate outside on the campus of the Technical University of Munich in Freising, southern Germany. Their phenology was intensively studied from 12th of March to 4th of May, including variation within a specimen. Several times twigs for the frost experiment were cut in different stages of leaf development and exposed to freezing temperatures of -4 and -6°C in two lab freezers. Since the leaf development in spring 2015 started comparably late, too many species emerged simultaneously leading to some capacity problems in the freezers. Nevertheless, our results still reveal novel aspects concerning leaf development and frost sensitivity. The phenological development proceeded in general from outside to inside of the crown (59%), in 33% of the cases all over the plant simultaneously. Sporadic, inside to outside or vertical development characteristics occurred in rare cases (8%). Mixed model analysis indicated impacts on phenology by plant family, natural origin, pollination mode, and

  9. Community impacts of mid-May frost event during an anomalously warm spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufkens, K.; Sonnentag, O.; Keenan, T. F.; Richardson, A. D.; Melaas, E. K.; Bailey, A.; O'Keefe, J.; Friedl, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Global land and ocean surface temperatures of 2010 have gone on record as one of the warmest of the last 131 years. In the northeastern US extraordinarily warm spring temperatures were recorded, averaging +3 °C above the long term mean, causing very early leaf development. However, the entire northeastern US region was hit by a severe frost event. Leveraging the coincidence of an anomalously warm spring and a late spring frost event we assess species specific responses of these combined extremes for three northern hardwood species(sugar maple, American beech, yellow birch) across an elevational gradient. We integrated ground observations with satellite and near-surface remote sensing data to address the following questions: 1) How did different species respond to a gradient in altitude / freezing temperatures? 2) How does phenological strategy influence this response? 3) To what extent were regional effects measurable? 4) How did the late spring frost event alter the carbon balance of a northern hardwood forest? 5) Finally, what changes do we foresee in community ecology? Our results show an early onset for all species, triggered by the anomalously warm spring. However, the three species responded differently to a late spring frost event. Where both yellow birch and American beech remained largely unaffected by frost, by comparison, sugar maple showed severe frost damage with increasing altitude resulting in leaf loss and delayed canopy development. Conservative estimates of gross carbon exchange losses due to the frost event ranged from 63 g C m-2 to 156 g C m-2, or ~5% to ~13 % of the annual gross carbon exchange of a northern hardwood forest. Our results suggest that the additional pressure on forest succession at high altitude range margins due to late spring frost events may provide a competitive advantage for yellow birch and American beech, at the expense of sugar maple. Consequently, a late spring frost does not only affect the short term carbon balance

  10. Potential sea salt aerosol sources from frost flowers in the pan-Arctic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Li [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Now at Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine California USA; Russell, Lynn M. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Burrows, Susannah M. [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-09-23

    In order to better represent observed wintertime aerosol concentrations at Barrow, Alaska, we implemented an observationally-based parameterization for estimating sea salt production from frost flowers in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). In this work, we evaluate the potential influence of this sea salt source on the pan-Arctic (60ºN-90ºN) climate. Results show that frost flower salt emissions substantially increase the modeled surface sea salt aerosol concentration in the winter months when new sea ice and frost flowers are present. The parameterization reproduces both the magnitude and seasonal variation of the observed submicron sea salt aerosol concentration at surface in Barrow during winter much better than the standard CESM simulation without a frost-flower salt particle source. Adding these frost flower salt particle emissions increases aerosol optical depth by 10% and results in a small cooling at surface. The increase in salt particle mass concentrations of a factor of 8 provides nearly two times the cloud condensation nuclei concentration, as well as 10% increases in cloud droplet number and 40% increases in liquid water content near coastal regions adjacent to continents. These cloud changes reduce longwave cloud forcing by 3% and cause a small surface warming, increasing the downward longwave flux at the surface by 2 W m-2 in the pan-Arctic under the present-day climate.

  11. An experimental study of the correlation for predicting the frost height in applying the photoelectric technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, J.; Wang, W.; Guo, Q.C.; Zhao, Y.H. [Department of Building Environment and Facility Engineering, College of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, No.100 Pingleyuan, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2010-08-15

    It is found that the photoelectric technology is suitable for the accurate measurement of the frost height. The objectives of this paper are to experimentally investigate the correspondence between the output signal of the photoelectric sensor and the frost height, and then develop a generalized correlation to predict the frost height directly and accurately. The experiments are conducted in a wide range of operating conditions for air temperature 17.7 C-27.2 C, relative humidity 21.6% RH to 64.9% RH, air velocity 0.5 m/s to 4.5 m/s and cold surface temperature -10.5 C to -6.5 C. Based on 21 groups of experiments with total 600 data, a linear correlation with a relative deviation of {+-}10% is setup. Further validation of this correlation is conducted by comparing the predicted results with 4 additional experiments, and approximately 95% of the predicted frost heights are consistent with the measured data within a relative deviation of {+-}10%. These results indicate that the photoelectric technology can predict the frost height directly. The application of the proposed correlation to provide defrost control strategy is also discussed in this paper. (author)

  12. Future bloom and blossom frost risk for Malus domestica considering climate model and impact model uncertainties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Hoffmann

    Full Text Available The future bloom and risk of blossom frosts for Malus domestica were projected using regional climate realizations and phenological ( = impact models. As climate impact projections are susceptible to uncertainties of climate and impact models and model concatenation, the significant horizon of the climate impact signal was analyzed by applying 7 impact models, including two new developments, on 13 climate realizations of the IPCC emission scenario A1B. Advancement of phenophases and a decrease in blossom frost risk for Lower Saxony (Germany for early and late ripeners was determined by six out of seven phenological models. Single model/single grid point time series of bloom showed significant trends by 2021-2050 compared to 1971-2000, whereas the joint signal of all climate and impact models did not stabilize until 2043. Regarding blossom frost risk, joint projection variability exceeded the projected signal. Thus, blossom frost risk cannot be stated to be lower by the end of the 21st century despite a negative trend. As a consequence it is however unlikely to increase. Uncertainty of temperature, blooming date and blossom frost risk projection reached a minimum at 2078-2087. The projected phenophases advanced by 5.5 d K(-1, showing partial compensation of delayed fulfillment of the winter chill requirement and faster completion of the following forcing phase in spring. Finally, phenological model performance was improved by considering the length of day.

  13. Restoring sedges and mosses into frost heaving iron fens, San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Chimner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rare iron fens in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado are frequently in poor condition due to mining, roads and ditches, which have left much of the fen completely bare of vegetation. Natural revegetation is slow to occur in the bare areas because of severe frost heave in the cold mountain climate. Therefore, experimental revegetation plots were conducted in a factorial design with mulching and no mulching, crossed with moss diaspores, sedge transplants, and moss and sedge combined. Mulching influenced surface soil temperatures by reducing the midday highs and increasing the night-time lows, which decreased the frequency and amount of frost heave. Peat moisture also modified frost heave, with the greatest frost heaving occurring near 75 % peat moisture content (water table 10–20 cm below the surface and the least when soils were either wetter or drier. Moss survival was dependent on mulch, with no moss surviving in plots without mulch. Mulching also increased sedge transplant survival. In summary, mulching significantly increased the success of vegetation restoration efforts for frost heave areas in mountain fens.

  14. Short communication. Harvest time in hedgerow Arbequina olive orchards in areas with early frosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracia, P.; Sanchez-Gimeno, A. C.; Benito, M.; Oria, R.; Lasa, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The shortening of harvest time attained in hedgerow olive (Olea europaea L.) orchards represents an advantage for the adoption of this cropping system in areas that are prone to suffer frost during the harvest period. To establish an optimal harvesting window, we carried out a study of the fruit ripening process on a hedgerow orchard of Arbequina olive trees, located in Zaragoza (Spain). From 2007 to 2009, oil accumulation on the fruit (% of dry weight) and oil yield (grams of oil per 100 fruits) were monitored, from early September to late November. Over the three years both variables peaked around November 15th, indicating that Arbequina reached full ripening earlier than has been reported previously for this variety. In two of the three seasons the orchard suffered several frosts during November. Long term climatic data from this area indicated that the risk of early frosts (< -2 degree centigrade) increases as November progresses with a high risk after November 20{sup t}h. In conclusion, the optimal harvesting period for Arbequina in this area should not extend beyond November 20{sup t}h. A rapid harvesting before this date is advisable to avoid the risk of damage caused by early frost in Zaragoza. Hedgerow planting provides an additional advantage in frost-prone areas, because mechanization of operations permits a short harvest period, easier to fit into the optimal harvesting window. (Author) 20 refs.

  15. Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  16. Concurrent freezing and sublimation of a liquid-saturated porous slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, N.; Shamsundar, N.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper analytical models are formulated for describing heat and mass transport during concurrent freezing and sublimation of a one-dimensional liquid-saturated porous slab. The models are based on transient heat transfer in the frozen and wet regions, and quasi-steady heat and mass transfer in the dried region. The enthalpy method in conjunction with a fully implicit finite-difference scheme is employed to obtain the solution in the frozen and wet regions. A quasi-steady solution is used in the dried region. The governing equations are nondimensionalized and parametric studies are performed. The results indicate that the Luikov number, the ambient vapor pressure, and the heat transfer Biot number are important parameters. The results also confirm that the sublimation interface temperature may show significant variations, in contrast to earlier studies in which it was assumed constant

  17. Practical sublimation source for large-scale chromium gettering in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, J.E.; Emerson, L.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the technique of chromium gettering with a large-scale sublimation source which resembles in its design the VARIAN Ti-Ball. It consists of a hollow chromium sphere with a diameter of approximately 3 cm and an incandescent filament for radiation heating from inside the ball. While the fabrication of the source is described in a companion paper, we discuss here the gettering technique. The experimental arrangement consists of an UHV system instrumented for total- and partial-pressure measurements, a film-thickness monitor, thermocouples, an optical pyrometer, and appropriate instrumentation to measure the heating power. The results show the temperature and corresponding sublimation rate of the Cr-Ball as function of input power. In addition, an example of the total pumping speed of a gettered surface is shown

  18. Practical sublimation source for large-scale chromium gettering in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, J.E.; Emerson, L.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the technique of chromium gettering with a large-scale sublimation source which resembles in its design the VARIAN Ti-Ball. It consists of a hollow chromium sphere with a diameter of approximately 3 cm and an incandescent filament for radiation heating from inside the ball. While the fabrication of the source is described in a companion paper, we discuss here the gettering technique. The experimental arrangement consists of an UHV system instrumented for total- and partial-pressure measurements, a film-thickness monitor, thermocouples, an optical pyrometer, and appropriate instrumentation to measure the heating power. The results show the temperature and corresponding sublimation rate of the Cr-Ball as function of input power. In addition, an example of the total pumping speed of a gettered surface is shown.

  19. Shades of Grey: The Role of the Sublime in the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Wilson Baptist

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As a ‘post-disaster’ landscape, the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe does, arguably, occupy ground where the mass extermination of the Jewish people of Europe was masterminded, but it is not physically a site of death. Commonly, memorial landscapes are erected upon the location where violence, tragedy and disaster have occurred. Divorced from the diasporic dead it seeks to honour, the memorial employs spatial form, the surrounding atmosphere and human memory to potentialise a sublime experience for visitors. The sublime plays an essential role in memorial landscapes because sublime experiences are heightened, unforgettable and enduring. This reduces the possibility that visitors will depart the memorial unscathed, leaving the monument to bear the burden of memory. While a sublime experience can be optimised, it cannot be given, thus, the onus of remembering the Holocaust remains our responsibility.

  20. GROTESQUE ENCOUNTERS: READING SHAKESPEARE’S THE MERCHANT OF VENICE ALONG THE PRINCIPLES OF THE SUBLIME, BEAUTIFUL AND GROTESQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Bartha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is an attempt to apply the basic principles of the aesthetic discourse on the sublime, beautiful and grotesque to William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. Even though it is a discourse that only begins in the course of the eighteenth century, I will argue that the structure of the play parallels the model of the traditional sublime, as it deals with a subject-object binary and meditates on the relationship between the material (body and the transcendental (mind. However, the play is also rich in disruptive — or grotesque — forces that unsettle this binary structure. The parallels between the play and the aesthetic discourse could not only help our understanding of postmodern criticism and rewriting of the sublime, but the sublime can also, in turn, shed light on the reception of the play.

  1. Spectroscopy of lithium atoms sublimated from isolation matrix of solid Ne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento, R L; Scudeller, L A; Lambo, R; Crivelli, P; Cesar, C L

    2011-10-07

    We have studied, via laser absorption spectroscopy, the velocity distribution of (7)Li atoms released from a solid neon matrix at cryogenic temperatures. The Li atoms are implanted into the Ne matrix by laser ablation of a solid Li precursor. A heat pulse is then applied to the sapphire substrate sublimating the matrix together with the isolated atoms at around 12 K. We find interesting differences in the velocity distribution of the released Li atoms from the model developed for our previous experiment with Cr [R. Lambo, C. C. Rodegheri, D. M. Silveira, and C. L. Cesar, Phys. Rev. A 76, 061401(R) (2007)]. This may be due to the sublimation regime, which is at much lower flux for the Li experiment than for the Cr experiment, as well as to the different collisional cross sections between those species to the Ne gas. We find a drift velocity compatible with Li being thermally sublimated at 11-13 K, while the velocity dispersion around this drift velocity is low, around 5-7 K. With a slow sublimation of the matrix we can determine the penetration depth of the laser ablated Li atoms into the Ne matrix, an important information that is not usually available in most matrix isolation spectroscopy setups. The present results with Li, together with the previous results with Cr suggest this to be a general technique for obtaining cryogenic atoms, for spectroscopic studies, as well as for trap loading. The release of the isolated atoms is also a useful tool to study and confirm details of the matrix isolated atoms which are masked or poorly understood in the solid. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  2. Vapor pressures and sublimation enthalpies of seven heteroatomic aromatic hydrocarbons measured using the Knudsen effusion technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, Jillian L., E-mail: JillianLGoldfarb@gmail.co [Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Suuberg, Eric M., E-mail: Eric_Suuberg@brown.ed [Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The vapor pressures of seven heteroatom-containing cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, ranging in molecular weight from (168.19 to 208.21) g . mol{sup -1} were measured over the temperature range of (301 to 486) K using the isothermal Knudsen effusion technique. The compounds measured include: anthraquinone, 9-fluorenone, 9-fluorenone oxime, phenoxazine, phenoxathiin, and 9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole. These solid-state sublimation measurements provided values that are compared to vapor pressures of parent aromatic compounds (anthracene and fluorene) and to others with substituent groups in order to examine the effects of alcohol, ketone, pyridine, and pyrrole functionality on this property. The enthalpies and entropies of sublimation for each compound were determined from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Though there is no consistent trend in terms of the effects of substitutions on changes in the enthalpy or entropy of sublimation, we note that the prevalence of enthalpic or entropic driving forces on vapor pressure depend on molecule-specific factors and not merely molecular weight of the substituents.

  3. New Perspectives on Blowing Snow Transport, Sublimation, and Layer Thermodynamic Structure over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, S. P.; Yang, Y.; Kayetha, V.; Pauly, R.

    2017-12-01

    Blowing snow over Antarctica is a widespread and frequent event. Satellite remote sensing using lidar has shown that blowing snow occurs over 70% of the time over large areas of Antarctica in winter. The transport and sublimation of blowing snow are important terms in the ice sheet mass balance equation and the latter is also an important part of the hydrological cycle. Until now the only way to estimate the magnitude of these processes was through model parameterization. We present a technique that uses direct satellite observations of blowing snow and model (MERRA-2) temperature and humidity fields to compute both transport and sublimation of blowing snow over Antarctica for the period 2006 to 2016. The results show a larger annual continent-wide integrated sublimation than current published estimates and a significant transport of snow from continent to ocean. The talk will also include the lidar backscatter structure of blowing snow layers that often reach heights of 200 to 300 m as well as the first dropsonde measurements of temperature, moisture and wind through blowing snow layers.

  4. Application of a Kalman filter to UF6 gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1992-03-01

    A signal is required to control the flow of UF 6 in gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems. The original strategy envisioned for deriving a flow signal was to take the derivative of the freezer/sublimer weigh cell signal. However, the derivative of the digitized weight signal is noisy, preventing good control. In addition, a bias is introduced into the weight derivative signal because a refrigerant is circulated through a shell-and-tube heat exchanger inside the freezer/sublimer. The weight of the refrigerant is included in the weight measured by the weigh cell. If the circulation rate of the refrigerent is not steady state, a bias exists. Measurements of upstream pressure, vessel pressure, and output to the system control valve are available to the control system. Thus, if the flow through the control valve is characterized properly by the measurements, a Kalman filter can be used in conjunction with these auxiliary inputs and the weigh cell input to overcome the noise and bias problem and provide an improve estimate of flow rate. A discussion of the development and the current status of a Kalman filter used for this application is given. 5 refs

  5. New Perspectives on Blowing Snow Transport, Sublimation, and Layer Thermodynamic Structure over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Steve; Kayetha, Vinay; Yang, Yuekui; Pauly, Rebecca M.

    2017-01-01

    Blowing snow over Antarctica is a widespread and frequent event. Satellite remote sensing using lidar has shown that blowing snow occurs over 70% of the time over large areas of Antarctica in winter. The transport and sublimation of blowing snow are important terms in the ice sheet mass balance equation and the latter is also an important part of the hydrological cycle. Until now the only way to estimate the magnitude of these processes was through model parameterization. We present a technique that uses direct satellite observations of blowing snow and model (MERRA-2) temperature and humidity fields to compute both transport and sublimation of blowing snow over Antarctica for the period 2006 to 2016. The results show a larger annual continent-wide integrated sublimation than current published estimates and a significant transport of snow from continent to ocean. The talk will also include the lidar backscatter structure of blowing snow layers that often reach heights of 200 to 300 m as well as the first dropsonde measurements of temperature, moisture and wind through blowing snow layers.

  6. Performance tests of air source heat pumps under frosting conditions. Quality of results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlen, P.

    This report focuses on the analysis of uncertainties in research regarding air-source heat pumps. The principles recommended by the Western European Calibration Conference (WECC) are applied and the generated information is condensed in the form of uncertainty budgets. The ensuring discussion, and the Measurement Assurance Program that was applied during the research work are also relevant to general testing of cooling coils, e.g. for air source heat pumps. The general conclusion of the analysis is that the method of determining frost mass by continuous weighing and frost density by inference from pressure drop considerations, which is presented in the report, has the potential to produce results with an accuracy on a par with the best previously used techniques to investigate frosting and defrosting phenomena. Furthermore, the methodology has the distinct advantage of yielding online measuring possibilities and being much less time consuming than traditional techniques.

  7. Frost Growth CFD Model of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    A frost growth model is incorporated into a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of a heat pump by means of a user-defined function in FLUENT, a commercial CFD code. The transient model is applied to the outdoor section of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop (IADR) unit in heating mode. IADR is a hybrid vapor compression and active desiccant unit capable of handling 100% outdoor air (dedicated outdoor air system) or as a total conditioning system, handling both outdoor air and space cooling or heating loads. The predicted increase in flow resistance and loss in heat transfer capacity due to frost build-up are compared to experimental pressure drop readings and thermal imaging. The purpose of this work is to develop a CFD model that is capable of predicting frost growth, an invaluable tool in evaluating the effectiveness of defrost-on-demand cycles.

  8. The application of photo-coupler for frost detecting in an air-source heat pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Ju-Suk; Lee, Jinho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Chang-Duk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chungju National University, Chung-Buk 380-702 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Ji-Hoon [Piping Engineering Team, Plant Engineering Center, Daelim Industrial Company, Seoul 150-010 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    This experimental study is carried out to investigate reliability and effectiveness of a new method of using photo-coupler for detecting frost formation in an air source heat pump, and further to determine the most efficient initiation point of the defrost cycle. This new method of using photo-coupler as a frost sensing device is evaluated by comparing its performance with conventional time control defrost system in which defrost cycle is set to start at predetermined interval, e.g. about at every 1-1.5h. Results indicate that overall heating capacity of photo-coupler detection method (case IV) is 5.5% higher than that of time control method. It is also shown that for maximum efficiency the defrost cycle must be initiated before the frost build-up area exceeds 45% of total front surface of the outdoor coil. (author)

  9. Delineation of frost characteristics on cold walls by using a new formula for psychrometrics demarcation boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed Hamza H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt)

    2009-06-15

    In this study, a direct formula that predicts either the frost formation on cold walls is correspondence to psychrometric-subsaturated or supersaturated regions is presented. The developed formula uses the data of the entering air dry-bulb temperature and absolute humidity, and the absolute humidity of the air at saturation corresponding to the coil surface temperature. Cases studies of demarcation criteria for frost formation on evaporator coil using experimental measured data, and on walls of cold storage freezer using measured data from literature are used to validate the formula and it is found that results are completely matches to the graphic plot of the data on the psychrometric chart. In case of cold storage freezers, the result clearly shows that a greater demarcation criteria value indicates frost formation under sever condition that is characterized as snow-like with low density and thermal conductivity. (author)

  10. Simulating the Probability of Grain Sorghum Maturity before the First Frost in Northeastern Colorado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S. McMaster

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Expanding grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench] production northward from southeastern Colorado is thought to be limited by shorter growing seasons due to lower temperatures and earlier frost dates. This study used a simulation model for predicting crop phenology (PhenologyMMS to estimate the probability of reaching physiological maturity before the first fall frost for a variety of agronomic practices in northeastern Colorado. Physiological maturity for seven planting dates (1 May to 12 June, four seedbed moisture conditions affecting seedling emergence (from Optimum to Planted in Dust, and three maturity classes (Early, Medium, and Late were simulated using historical weather data from nine locations for both irrigated and dryland phenological parameters. The probability of reaching maturity before the first frost was slightly higher under dryland conditions, decreased as latitude, longitude, and elevation increased, planting date was delayed, and for later maturity classes. The results provide producers with estimates of the reliability of growing grain sorghum in northeastern Colorado.

  11. Superabsorbent Polymers as a Means of Improving Frost Resistance of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Laustsen, Sara

    2015-01-01

    on how SAP influences concrete frost resistance. Moreover, it also presented a larger experimental study on the topic. The conclusions that were drawn from the experimental study were in line with the extract of the pool of results from the literature, first of all that SAP addition can improve frost......Superabsorbent polymer (SAP) was introduced in cementitious materials about 15 years ago. Since then, several studies on the frost resistance of concrete with SAP have been published. However, an up-to-date review across the different studies is missing. This paper presented a literature review...... resistance of concrete. The improvement was attributed to voids created by SAP. As was clearly demonstrated in the paper, it was crucial to document the void structure of the hardened concrete. Other factors than SAP could lead to void formation. For example, residue of surfactant on SAP particles...

  12. Void structure of concrete with superabsorbent polymers and its relation to frost resistance of concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Laustsen, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Superabsorbent polymers (SAP) can be used to control air void formation in concrete. However, due to surfactant left on suspension polymerized SAP particles during production, they may not only create SAP voids but also entrain extra air. In the present investigation, a method is tested to remove...... surfactant prior to concrete mixing. The method comprises rinsing of the SAP with ethanol. This effectively removes the surfactant. Freeze-thaw testing of concrete with rinsed and non-rinsed SAP shows that for equal dosages of SAP, the extra air entrained due to surfactant is considerable and can make...... the difference between poor and satisfactory frost-resistance. Furthermore, the results indicate that voids created directly by SAP protect concrete against frost deterioration just like other air voids; if the concrete contains enough SAP voids, these alone can provide sufficient frost resistance. © 2013 RILEM....

  13. PERSEPSI BERKEHIDUPAN BERMASYARAKAT MENURUT PUISI “MENDING WALL” KARYA ROBERT FROST: SUATU TINJAUAN STILISTIKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumino Jumino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human beings are one the best living creatures God created in the world. While living, as their existence, they have duties to do as individual creature,  as social creature, and as God creature. Each existence has its consequences. Through his poem “Mending Wall”, Robert Frost views human existence as social creature that needs relations to the others surrounding. One of human relations happens is described by two opposing characters on human beings within the poem. To make the poem more interested and challenging, Frost applied stylistic writing by choosing good diction and image of words used packed in some figurative language. The figurative language involves personification, metaphor, and symbol. In this article, the writer analyzes the elements of stylistics used by Frost in the poem “Mending Wall”.

  14. Influence of dispersants on aging and frost elastomeric compositions based on butadiene acrylonitrile rubbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Dolinskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of use of dispergators of various nature for production of rubber technical products with expanded temperature conditions of operation is studied. It is investigated influences of dispergators of Dispergator FL and INT 159 on properties of rubber mixes for receiving products with high resistance to thermal aging or frost resistance. Research of influence of modifiers was conducted for rubber mixes on the basis of butadienenitrile rubbers synthetic (BNRS-18 and BNRS-28. I’s established that at addition of a dispergator of Dispergator FL the indicator of relative deformatstion of compression (RDC and respectively heat stability of rubbers increases. Introduction to structure of elastomeric composition of a dispergator of INT 159 practically doesn’t influence frost resistance, and Dispergator FL worsens her (the coefficient of frost resistance decreases by 15.4–17.8%. Possibly it is connected with the fact that at the lowered temperatures in the presence of Dispergator FL there is a bigger delay of relaxation processes and decrease in energy of the thermal movement of links of macromolecules of rubbers. It becomes insufficient for overcoming of intermolecular interaction in the modified system and commission of conformational transitions of macromolecules under the influence of external loading. Mechanical energy is to a large extent mentioned not on change of a form of macromolecules, and on their mechanodestruction. However, it increases heat stability since it that is higher, than molecular mobility is lower. INT 159 dispergator components, settling down on borders of supramolecular formations of elastomers, increase mobility of links of macromolecules of rubbers, weaken chemical bonds in them, reduce thermal stability, but at the same time INT 159 dispergator practically doesn’t reduce frost resistance therefore it is expedient to apply it when receiving frost-resistant elastomeric composition. Thus, when receiving

  15. Design of UMTRA covers to mitigate the effect of frost penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banani, A.M.; Claire, R.F.

    1994-03-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, contracted by the US Department of Energy (DOE), requires construction of disposal cells for residual radioactive materials from abandoned uranium mill tailings. A disposal cell consists of contaminated material placed within a stabilized embankment with a top cover. The embankment and cover should be effective for up to 1000 years, to the extent reasonably achievable, and in any case for at least 200 years. The embankment cover usually consists of a radon/infiltration barrier, a frost barrier and erosion protection layer consisting of bedding and riprap layers. The radon/infiltration barrier and frost barrier are two important elements of the cover systems. A radon/infiltration barrier is designed to reduce the radon emissions from the contaminated materials and to limit the surface water infiltration into the contaminated material. However, a radon/infiltration barrier has to be protected from repeated freeze-thaw cycles to prevent an increase in permeability. Frost penetration depth is site specific and depends on local climatic conditions and soil properties of the cover system. However, placing a frost barrier is not only very costly but also reduces the disposal capacity of the embankment. Recent laboratory test results indicate that freeze-thaw cycles do not significantly effect the permeability of compacted sand-bentonite mixtures. Therefore, radon/infiltration barriers using sand-bentonite mixtures may not require frost barriers for protection against the effects of freeze-thaw. In this paper the design of UMTRA covers is briefly explained; the criteria to determine a 200 year freeze event, and the frost penetration depth are discussed. The results of freeze-thaw permeability tests on compacted clay and sand-bentonite mixtures are also presented.

  16. Influence of low temperature and frost duration on Phytophthora alni subsp. alni viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerny, K.; Filipova, N.; Strnadova, V.

    2012-11-01

    Limits on the survival of P. alni subsp. alni (PAA) due to low temperature can be expected based on previously published laboratory and field studies. This study presents a laboratory experiment to test the influence of low temperature and frost duration on PAA viability. Ten PAA isolates were incubated at different temperatures (-0.1, -2.5, -5.0, -7.5, and -10.0 degree centigrade) and frost durations (0 - 7, 14, 21, and 28 days). A regression analysis confirmed the significant influence of both factors (low temperature and frost duration, and their interaction) on the survival of the pathogen under laboratory conditions. The survival and failure time analysis showed that the survival of the pathogen differs significantly after mild frost (all the isolates tested survived temperatures between -0.1 and -5.0 degree centigrade during the entire testing period) and heavy frost (the pathogen died after 21 days of incubation at -7.5 degree centigrade and after 2 days at -10.0 degree centigrade). Moreover, the viability of the pathogen decreased significantly if the temperature of -5.0 degree centigrade was maintained for at least 1 week and the temperature of -7.5 degree centigrade persisted in laboratory conditions for at least 4 days. The results of the study proved the pathogen to be very sensitive to heavy frost. The low-temperature limits for PAA occur regularly in Central Europe in January. It is probable that these temperatures can reduce PAA populations in diseased black alder stems. The climate change characterised by increases in the lowest minimum winter temperatures in Central Europe (as hypothesised by IPCC) may pose a significant risk for affected alder population in the area. (Author) 21 refs.

  17. Chlorophyll fluorescence as a parameter for frost hardiness in winter wheat. A comparison with other hardiness parameters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clement, JMAM; vanHasselt, PR

    1996-01-01

    Frost hardiness of winter wheat leaves (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Urban) was measured during an eight weeks hardening period using chlorophyll fluorescence. Determination of frost induced damage after freezing, measured as the decrease of photochemical capacity of photosystem II (F-V/F-M =

  18. Frost flowers on young Arctic sea ice: The climatic, chemical, and microbial significance of an emerging ice type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barber, D. G.; Ehn, J. K.; Pucko, M.

    2014-01-01

    flowers primarily originated from the surface brine skim. Ikaite crystals were observed to form within an hour in both frost flowers and the thin pond ice. Average ikaite concentrations were 1013 mu molkg(-1) in frost flowers and 1061 mu molkg(-1) in the surface slush layer. Chamber flux measurements...

  19. The influence of thermal inertia on temperatures and frost stability on Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John R.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    1992-01-01

    It is presently argued, in view of (1) a thermal inertia model for the surface of Triton which (like previous ones) predicts a monotonic recession of permanent N2 deposits toward the poles and very little seasonal N2 frost in the southern hemisphere, and (2) new spectroscopic evidence for nonvolatile CO2 on Triton's bright southern hemisphere, that much of that bright southern material is not N2. Such bright southern hemisphere volatiles may allow the formation of seasonal frosts, thereby helping to explain the observed spectroscopic changes of Triton during the last decade.

  20. Designing a Frost Forecasting Service for Small Scale Tea Farmers in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, E. C.; Nyaga, J. W.; Ellenburg, W. L.; Limaye, A. S.; Mugo, R. M.; Flores Cordova, A. I.; Irwin, D.; Case, J.; Malaso, S.; Sedah, A.

    2017-12-01

    Kenya is the third largest tea exporter in the world, producing 10% of the world's black tea. Sixty percent of this production occurs largely by small scale tea holders, with an average farm size of 1.04 acres, and an annual net income of 1,075. According to a recent evaluation, a typical frost event in the tea growing region causes about 200 dollars in losses which can be catastrophic for a small holder farm. A 72-hour frost forecast would provide these small-scale tea farmers with enough notice to reduce losses by approximately $80 annually. With this knowledge, SERVIR, a joint NASA-USAID initiative that brings Earth observations for improved decision making in developing countries, sought to design a frost monitoring and forecasting service that would provide farmers with enough lead time to react to and protect against a forecasted frost occurrence on their farm. SERVIR Eastern and Southern Africa, through its implementing partner, the Regional Centre for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD), designed a service that included multiple stakeholder engagement events whereby stakeholders from the tea industry value chain were invited to share their experiences so that the exact needs and flow of information could be identified. This unique event allowed enabled the design of a service that fit the specifications of the stakeholders. The monitoring service component uses the MODIS Land Surface Temperature product to identify frost occurrences in near-real time. The prediction component, currently under testing, uses the 2-m air temperature, relative humidity, and 10-m wind speed from a series of high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction model runs over eastern Kenya as inputs into a frost prediction algorithm. Accuracy and sensitivity of the algorithm is being assessed with observations collected from the farmers using a smart phone app developed specifically to report frost occurrences, and from data shared through

  1. David Sanders. A Divided Poet: Robert Frost, North of Boston, and the Drama of Disappearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiani G. Rapatzikou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available David Sanders in his monograph entitled A Divided Poet: Robert Frost, North of Boston, and the Drama of Disappearance (2011 sheds light on the dilemmas, doubts and personal conflicts Frost confronted while composing his poetic collection North of Boston in which some of his most well-known lyrics, such as “Mending Wall,” “After Apple-Picking,” and “The Wood-Pile,” are contained. This book should be considered alongside a number of other publications either in monograph or essay form that app...

  2. Robert Frost's "The road not taken", Childhood, psychoanalytic symbolism, and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, J

    2001-01-01

    Robert Frost, often regarded as a folksy farmer-poet, was also a more profound, even terrifying, creator. His poem "The Road Not Taken" reveals his delight in multiple meanings, his ambivalence, and his penchant for misleading his readers. He denied that the poem proclaimed his striving for the unconventional and asserted that it was meant to tease his friend Edward Thomas for his compulsive indecisiveness. This essay also notes the unconscious meanings of the poem, including Frost's reactions to losing his close friend, his own indecisiveness, his conflict between heterosexual and homosexual object choices, his need for a "secret sharer," and his attachments.

  3. Frost heave modelling of buried pipelines using non-linear Fourier finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, R. G.; You, R.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical analysis of the response of a three-dimensional soil-pipeline system in a freezing environment using non-linear Fourier finite elements was described as an illustration of the effectiveness of this technique in analyzing plasticity problems. Plastic deformations occur when buried pipeline is under the action of non-uniform frost heave. The three-dimensional frost heave which develops over time including elastoplastic deformations of the soil and pipe are computed. The soil heave profile obtained in the numerical analysis was consistent with experimental findings for similar configurations. 8 refs., 8 figs

  4. In live interaction, does familiarity promote attraction or contempt? Reply to Norton, Frost, and Ariely (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Harry T; Maniaci, Michael R; Caprariello, Peter A; Eastwick, Paul W; Finkel, Eli J

    2011-09-01

    In this reply, we address and refute each of Norton, Frost, and Ariely's (see record 2011-18560-001) specific objections to the conclusion that, ceteris paribus, familiarity breeds liking in live interaction. In particular, we reiterate the importance of studying live interaction rather than decontextualized processes. These rebuttals notwithstanding, we concur with Norton et al.'s call for an integrative model that encompasses both Norton, Frost, and Ariely's (see record 2006-23056-008) results and ours (see record 2011-04644-001), and we point readers toward a description of a possible model presented in our original article. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Heat transfer and pressure drop amidst frost layer presence for the full geometry of fin-tube heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Jool; Choi, Ho Jin; Ha, Man Yeong [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Ro; Bang, Seon Wook [Home Appliance Company, LG Electronics, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The present study numerically solves the flow and thermal fields in the full geometry of heat exchanger modeling with frost layer presence on the heat exchanger surface. The effects of air inlet velocity, air inlet temperature, frost layer thickness, fin pitch, fin thickness, and heat exchanger shape on the thermo-hydraulic performance of a fin-tube heat exchanger are investigated. Heat transfer rate rises with increasing air inlet velocity and temperature, and decreasing frost layer thickness and fin pitch. Pressure drop rises with increasing air inlet velocity and frost layer thickness, and decreasing fin pitch. The effect of fin thickness on heat transfer and pressure drop is negligible. Based on the present results, we derived the correlations, which express pressure drop and temperature difference between air inlet and outlet as a function of air inlet velocity and temperature, as well as frost layer thickness

  6. Climate warming and the risk of frost damage to boreal forest trees : identification of critical ecophysiological traits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanninen, H. [Helsinki Univ., Helsinki (Finland). Plant Ecophysiology and Climate Change Group

    2006-07-15

    Eco-physiological traits critical to the occurrence of frost damage in trees in the boreal zone were identified. Two computer simulations were used to examine why 1 simulation predicted heavy frost damage as a consequence of climate warming, while another closely related model did not. The 2 models were developed and parametrized to predict the annual cycle of frost hardiness of trees in central Finland. Model{sub 1} was developed for a theoretical generalized tree species. Model{sub 2} was developed and parametrized to predict needle frost hardiness of Scots pine. Four conceptual traits were used to describe the environmental regulation of ontogenetic development during the ontogenetic phases of growth, lignification, rest and quiescence. The cycle of frost hardiness was developed as a 2-step process. Annual ontogenetic development was modelled with air temperature and night length as the driving forces. The rate of frost hardening and dehardening was then modelled as a function of air temperature, night length and the prevailing phase of the annual ontogenetic cycle. The process was carried out in both models by calculating the rate of change of frost hardiness as a first-order dynamic process. Examination of the risk of frost damage was based on mean values rather than the corresponding maxima of needle damage over the 92 cycles examined. The modelling comparison indicated that the response rates of ontogenetic development during quiescence to air temperature is a critical trait for the risk of frost damage following climate warming. It was suggested that determining the form of the non-linear response is crucial to the assessment of climate warming impacts. Results indicated that predictions of the risk of increased frost damage to trees in response to climate warming remain equivocal. It was concluded that further experimental work with a variety of tree species is needed. 57 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  7. Transcriptome profiling of fully open flowers in a frost-tolerant almond genotype in response to freezing stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Batool; Sepahvand, Sadegh; Kamali Aliabad, Kazem; Bakhtiarizadeh, MohammadReza; Imani, Ali; Assareh, Reza; Salami, Seyed Alireza

    2018-02-01

    Spring frost is a major limiting abiotic stress for the cultivation of almonds [Prunus dulcis (Mill.)] in Mediterranean areas or the Middle East. Spring frost, in particular, damages almond fully open flowers, resulting to significant reduction in yield. Little is known about the genetic factors expressed after frost stress in Prunus spp. as well as in almond fully open flowers. Here, we provide the molecular signature of pistils of fully open flowers from a frost-tolerant almond genotype. The level of frost tolerance in this genotype was determined for all three flowering stages and was confirmed by comparing it to two other cultivars using several physiological analyses. Afterwards, comprehensive expression profiling of genes expressed in fully open flowers was performed after being exposed to frost temperatures (during post-thaw period). Clean reads, 27,104,070 and 32,730,772, were obtained for non-frost-treated and frost-treated (FT) libraries, respectively. A total of 62.24 Mb was assembled, generating 50,896 unigenes and 66,906 transcripts. Therefore, 863 upregulated genes and 555 downregulated genes were identified in the FT library. Functional annotation showed that most of the upregulated genes were related to various biological processes involved in responding to abiotic stress. For the first time, a highly expressed cold-shock protein was identified in the reproductive organ of fruit trees. The expression of six genes was validated by RT-PCR. As the first comprehensive analysis of open flowers in a frost-tolerant almond genotype, this study represents a key step toward the molecular breeding of fruit tree species for frost tolerance.

  8. Seasonal erosion and restoration of Mars' northern polar dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C J; Bourke, M; Bridges, N T; Byrne, S; Colon, C; Diniega, S; Dundas, C; Herkenhoff, K; McEwen, A; Mellon, M; Portyankina, G; Thomas, N

    2011-02-04

    Despite radically different environmental conditions, terrestrial and martian dunes bear a strong resemblance, indicating that the basic processes of saltation and grainfall (sand avalanching down the dune slipface) operate on both worlds. Here, we show that martian dunes are subject to an additional modification process not found on Earth: springtime sublimation of Mars' CO(2) seasonal polar caps. Numerous dunes in Mars' north polar region have experienced morphological changes within a Mars year, detected in images acquired by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Dunes show new alcoves, gullies, and dune apron extension. This is followed by remobilization of the fresh deposits by the wind, forming ripples and erasing gullies. The widespread nature of these rapid changes, and the pristine appearance of most dunes in the area, implicates active sand transport in the vast polar erg in Mars' current climate.

  9. On the need for data for the verification of service life models for frost damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Engelund, Sven

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to draw the attention to the need for the verification of service life models for frost attack on concrete and the collection of relevant data. To illustrate the type of data needed the paper presents models for internal freeze/thaw damage (internal cracking including...

  10. Leaf fall, humus depth, and soil frost in a northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Hart; Raymond E. Leonard; Robert S. Pierce

    1962-01-01

    In the mound-and-depression microtopography of the northern hardwood forest, leaves are blown off the mounds and collect in the depressions. This influence of microtopography on leaf accumulation is responsible for much of the variation in humus depth; and this, in turn, affects the formation and depth of soil frost.

  11. Man, Nature, and Art in Robert Frost's Poetry | Elimimian | Lwati: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and it is along these three aesthetic trajectories that this essay will be divided and addressed. In discussing these areas, an attempt will be made to examine the diversity of Frost's lyricism, the poet's sense of Romanticism, and the particular rhetorical and poetic devices which he employs to elucidate or illuminate his work.

  12. Frost tolerance in wild potatoes : Assessing the predictivity of taxonomic, geographic and ecological factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, R.J.; Jacobs, M.; Bamberg, J.B.; Spooner, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    The use of genetic resources could be more effective and efficient if we were able to predict the presence or absence of useful traits in different populations or accessions. We analyzed the extent to which taxonomic, geographic and ecological factors can predict the presence of frost tolerance in

  13. Eucalypts and Their Potential for Invasiveness Particularly in Frost-Prone Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor H. Booth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eucalypts are being considered for biofuel production in the Lower Coastal Plain of the United States. The evolution of eucalypts in Australia has equipped some species to be successful in plantations and has also influenced their potential as invasive species. More than 200 eucalypt species have been evaluated in many countries around the world. Generally eucalypts have proved to have limited invasive potential for a number of reasons, including their poor dispersal capabilities. Two regions with climates similar to the Lower Coastal Plain of the United States are identified in Argentina and China. Frosts, particularly sudden frosts, are an important limitation for eucalypts in these regions, so existing plantations are very limited. However, invasive eucalypts do not appear to be a major problem in other regions of either country. The use of carefully selected frost-tolerant species and the development of genetically modified eucalypts may now open up more frost-affected areas for eucalypt plantations. Some control actions may be necessary and research needs are outlined, but it is concluded that experience in other regions around the world suggests that eucalypts are likely to be a relatively low risk as invasive species in the Lower Coastal Plain.

  14. Prediction of long-term frost heave of chilled gas pipelines by centrifuge modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, V.; Clark, J.; Hawlader, B. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada). C-Core; Zhou, J. [TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The behaviour of pipelines operating under harsh northern conditions has been studied at full-scale test facilities since the 1970s in order to develop and calibrate various theories and analytical models. The studies have addressed the issue of predicting frost heave of chilled pipelines. The use of chilled gas transmission for northern pipelines is touted as being an effective solution to preserve permafrost and to increase throughput. Frost heave occurs in soil as in-situ pore water freezes and additional free water advances to the freezing front leading to the formation of ice lenses. The amount of heave depends on soil type, cooling rate, thermal gradient and availability of a water source. The extent of deformation of both frozen and unfrozen soil also plays a role in the amount of heave. In recent years, centrifuge modeling of frost heave processes have provided useful information. Small-scale models have been constructed and tested under increased gravitational acceleration to replicate full-scale conditions. The key benefits are the reduced scale and time effects used in the modeling of the frost heave, allowing for sequential studies on soil types, pipe temperatures, groundwater and climatic conditions. This paper presented an interpretation of test results. Comparison with full-scale test sites has shown promising results, but some further verification exercises are warranted, particularly in the design methodology that allows for reliable and accurate prediction of pipeline behaviour as it passes through discontinuous permafrost or changing soil type. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  15. Development of frost tolerance in winter wheat as modulated by differential root and shoot temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, C.W.; van Hasselt, P.R

    Winter wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Urban), grown in nutrient solution, were exposed to differential shoot/root temperatures (i.e., 4/4, 4/20, 20/4 and 20/20 degrees C) for six weeks. Leaves grown at 4 degrees C showed an increase in frost tolerance from - 4 degrees C down to -11 degrees

  16. Expression of dehydrin 5 during the development of frost tolerance in barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kosová, K.; Holková, L.; Prášil, I.T.; Prášilová, P.; Bradáčová, M.; Vítámvás, P.; Čapková, Věra

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 165, č. 11 (2008), s. 1142-1151 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA MZe QF3191; GA MZe 1G57060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Cold acclimation * Dehydrin 5 * Frost tolerance Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding Impact factor: 2.437, year: 2008

  17. Frost flower chemical signature in winter snow on Vestfonna ice cap, Nordaustlandet, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Beaudon

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry of snow and ice cores from Svalbard is influenced by variations in local sea ice margin and distance to open water. Snow pits sampled at two summits of Vestfonna ice cap (Nordaustlandet, Svalbard, exhibit spatially heterogeneous soluble ions concentrations despite similar accumulation rates, reflecting the importance of small-scale weather patterns on this island ice cap. The snow pack on the western summit shows higher average values of marine ions and a winter snow layer that is relatively depleted in sulphate. One part of the winter snow pack exhibits a [SO42-/Na+] ratio reduced by two thirds compared with its ratio in sea water. This low sulphate content in winter snow is interpreted as the signature of frost flowers, which are formed on young sea ice when offshore winds predominate. Frost flowers have been described as the dominant source of sea salt to aerosol and precipitation in ice cores in coastal Antarctica but this is the first time their chemical signal has been described in the Arctic. The eastern summit does not show any frost flower signature and we interpret the unusually dynamic ice transport and rapid formation of thin ice on the Hinlopen Strait as the source of the frost flowers.

  18. Variation in damage from growing-season frosts among open-pollinated families of red alder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin C. Peeler; Dean S. DeBell

    1987-01-01

    Repeated growing-season frosts during late April and early May 1985 caused extensive damage to red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) seedlings in a newly planted research trial in western Washington. About two-thirds of the seedlings were severely damaged (entire stem damaged or necrotic). Such damage varied by family, from 50 percent of seedlings in the...

  19. Bacterial stem blight of alfalfa: A disease that increases frost damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalfa producers count on the first harvest in late spring to deliver the highest tonnage and best quality of forage of the year. A late frost can significantly reduce both yield and quality. Losses are due not only to the physical damage from freezing of the alfalfa stem and leaves but also from d...

  20. Some relationships among air, snow, and soil temperatures and soil frost

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Hart; Howard W. Lull

    1963-01-01

    Each winter gives examples of the insulating properties of snow cover. Seeds and soil fauna are protected from the cold by snow. Underground water pipes are less likely to freeze under snow cover. And, according to many observers, the occurrence, penetration, and thaw of soil frost are affected by snow cover. The depth of snow necessary to protect soil from freezing...

  1. Portrayal of Realism and Rationalism in the Selected Poems of Robert Frost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathi Veerraghava Reddy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Robert Frost (1874-1963 is a famous American Poet. As most of his poems are autobiographical in subject, it is evident that he has been mostly influenced by the environment around him in composing his masterpieces. Frost’s themes are very simple in the surface meaning endowed with an easily understandable diction and a liberal style of writing. Yet, a careful study of his works vividly reveals his greatness as a ‘true’ judge of various critical aspects associated with the everyday experiences of the humans. His major characters- the narrators in “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”, “Mending wall” and “The Road not Taken” are viewed as the real people with real struggles in real life. It is seen that Frost’s poetry is highly connotative and the same reader can interpret the poetry of Robert Frost in multiple ways in multiple settings. The present article aims at critically examining Frost’s ‘realistic’ and ‘rationalistic’ approaches in the elevation of human nature under the broad spectrum of human life. This article also aims at proving that no poem of Frost ends in an absolute imagination because Frost himself seems to believe in realism as the ultimate fate of the individuals though fancy and imagination provides a temporary relief to the disturbed soul.

  2. Cryoprotectants are metabolic fuels during long term frost exposure in the earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, S.; Overgaard, J.; Holmstrup, M.

    2008-01-01

    Ectothermic animals that live in the subarctic and temperate regions must have strategies to deal with periods of frost during winter. The earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra is a freeze tolerant species that accumulates large concentrations of the cryoprotectant glucose upon ice formation in the extr...... as anaerobic fuel source than as a cryoprotectant....

  3. Snow and frost measurements in a watershed-management research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard S. Sartz

    1957-01-01

    I am going to tell you about our snow and frost work on the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Hubbard Brook is one of several experimental areas scattered throughout the country on which personnel of the United States Forest Service are seeking to learn how different kinds of forests and methods of managing them affect...

  4. Frost hardiness of introduced sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. genotypes in Central Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozherelieva Zoya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. genotypes of different ecological and geographical origins were tested. Frost hardiness extent was determined during winter by artificial freezing, which allowed identify varietal differences in frost hardiness of buds and tissues of sea buckthorn shoots. In order to identify differences in adaptation to low temperature we determined the fractional composition of water in annual shoots; and proline and malone dialdehyde concentration and total amylase activity in bark of shoots of female and male genotypes. In December, the sea buckthorn genotypes were in deep dormancy, when maximum frost hardiness of buds and tissues of annual shoots occurred. During the next months, the frost hardiness of buds and shoot tissues decreased during the state of exogenous dormancy. The performed experiment gave an opportunity to select hardy genotypes ‘Kenigsbergskaya’, ‘Surpriz Baltiki’, B 23-34, and ‘Prima Dona’ for use in further breeding, as they had demonstrated stable hardiness during the whole winter period according to all of the components of winter hardiness.

  5. Frost Damage Detection in Sugarcane Crop Using Modis Images and Srtm Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudorff, B.; Alves de Aguiar, D.; Adami, M.

    2011-12-01

    Brazil is the largest world producer of sugarcane which is used to produce almost equal proportions of either sugar (food) or ethanol (biofuel). In recent years sugarcane crop production has increased fast to meet the growing market demand for sugar and ethanol. This increase has been mainly due to expansion in crop area, but sugarcane production is also subjected to several factors that influence both the agricultural crop yield (tons of stalks/ha) and the industrial yield (kg of sugar/ton of stalks). Sugarcane is a semi-perennial crop that experiences major growth during spring and summer seasons with large demands for water and high temperatures to produce good stalk formation (crop yield). The harvest is performed mainly during fall and winter seasons when water availability and temperature should be low in order to accumulate sucrose in the stalks (industrial yield). These favorable climatic conditions for sugarcane crop are found in several regions in Brazil, particularly in São Paulo state, which is the major sugarcane producer in Brazil being responsible for almost 60% of its production. Despite the favorable climate in São Paulo state there is a certain probability of frost occurrence from time to time that has a negative impact on sugarcane crop, particularly on industrial yield, reducing the amount of sugar in the stalks; having consequences on price increase and product shortage. To evaluate the impact of frost on sugarcane crop, in the field, on a state level, is not a trivial task; however, this information is relevant due to its direct impact on the consumer market. Remote sensing images allow a synoptic view and present great potential to monitor large sugarcane plantations as has been done since 2003 in São Paulo state by the Canasat Project with Landsat type images (http://www.dsr.inpe.br/laf/canasat/en/). Images acquired from sensors with high temporal resolution such as MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) present the

  6. Political polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Avinash K.; Weibull, Jörgen W.

    2007-01-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  7. Political polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avinash K; Weibull, Jörgen W

    2007-05-01

    Failures of government policies often provoke opposite reactions from citizens; some call for a reversal of the policy, whereas others favor its continuation in stronger form. We offer an explanation of such polarization, based on a natural bimodality of preferences in political and economic contexts and consistent with Bayesian rationality.

  8. Wasting the Future: The Technological Sublime, Communications Technologies, and E-waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebine Label

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Literally speaking, e-waste is the future of communications. E-waste is the fastest growing waste stream in the world, much of it communications technologies from cell phones to laptops, televisions to peripherals. As a result of policies of planned obsolescence working computers, cell phones, and tablets are routinely trashed. One of the most powerful and enduring discourses associated with emerging technologies is the technological sublime, in which technology is seen as intellectually, emotionally, or spiritually transcendent. It comprises a contradictory impulse that elevates technology with an almost religious fervor, while simultaneously overlooking some of the consequences of industrialism, as well as ignoring the necessity of social, economic, and governmental infrastructures necessary to the implementation and development of new technologies. The idea that a new technology will not pollute or harm the environment is a persistent, though often quickly passed over, theme in the technological sublime, echoed in discourses about emerging technologies such as the silicon chip, the internet, and other ICTs. In this paper, I make connections between the discourse of newness, the practice of planned obsolescence, and the mountains of trashed components and devices globally. Considering the global context demonstrates the realities of the penetration of ICTs and their enduring pollution and negative implications for the health of humans and nonhumans, including plants, animals, waterways, soil, air and so on. I use the discourse of the technological sublime to open up and consider the future of communications, to argue that this discourse not only stays with us but also contains within it two important and related components, the promise of ecological harmony and a future orientation. I argue that these lingering elements keep us from considering the real future of communications – e-waste – and that, as communications scholars, we must also

  9. Measuring Enthalpy of Sublimation of Volatiles by Means of Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirri, Fabrizio; Palomba, Ernesto; Longobardo, Andrea; Zampetti, Emiliano

    2017-12-01

    Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances (PCM's) are widely used to study the chemical processes involving volatile compounds in any environment, such as condensation process. Since PCM's are miniaturized sensor, they are very suitable for planetary in situ missions, where can be used to detect and to measure the mass amount of astrobiologically significant compounds, such as water and organics. This work focuses on the realization and testing of a new experimental setup, able to characterize volatiles which can be found in a planetary environment. In particular the enthalpy of sublimation of some dicarboxylic acids has been measured. The importance of dicarboxylic acids in planetology and astrobiology is due to the fact that they have been detected in carbonaceous chondritic material (e.g. Murchinson), among the most pristine material present in our Solar System. In this work, a sample of acid was heated in an effusion cell up to its sublimation. For a set of temperatures (from 30 °C to 75 °C), the deposition rate on the PCM surface has been measured. From these measurements, it has been possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of Adipic acid, i.e. ΔH = 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ/mol and Succinic acid, i.e. ΔH = 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ/mol. This technique has so demonstrated to be a good choice to recognise a single compound or a mixture (with an analysis upstream) even if some improvements concerning the thermal stabilization of the system will be implemented in order to enhance the results' accuracy. The experiment has been performed in support of the VISTA (Volatile In Situ Thermogravimetry Analyzer) project, which is included in the scientific payload of the ESA MarcoPolo-R mission study.

  10. Piezoelectric crystal microbalance measurements of enthalpy of sublimation of C2-C9 dicarboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Zampetti, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present here a novel experimental set-up that is able to measure the enthalpy of sublimation of a given compound by means of piezoelectric crystal microbalances (PCMs). The PCM sensors have already been used for space measurements, such as for the detection of organic and non-organic volatile species and refractory materials in planetary environments. In Earth atmospherics applications, PCMs can be also used to obtain some physical-chemical processes concerning the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in atmospheric environments. The experimental set-up has been developed and tested on dicarboxylic acids. In this work, a temperature-controlled effusion cell was used to sublimate VOC, creating a molecular flux that was collimated onto a cold PCM. The VOC recondensed onto the PCM quartz crystal, allowing the determination of the deposition rate. From the measurements of deposition rates, it has been possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of adipic acid, i.e. ΔHsub : 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1, succinic acid, i.e. 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ mol-1, oxalic acid, i.e. 62.5 ± 3.1 kJ mol-1, and azelaic acid, i.e. 124.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol-1. The results obtained show an accuracy of 1 % for succinic, adipic, and azelaic acid and within 5 % for oxalic acid and are in very good agreement with previous works (within 6 % for adipic, succinic, and oxalic acid and within 11 % or larger for azelaic acid).

  11. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of nitric acid uptake on frost point hygrometer performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Thornberry

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Chilled mirror hygrometers (CMH are widely used to measure water vapour in the troposphere and lower stratosphere from balloon-borne sondes. Systematic discrepancies among in situ water vapour instruments have been observed at low water vapour mixing ratios (<5 ppm in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Understanding the source of the measurement discrepancies is important for a more accurate and reliable determination of water vapour abundance in this region. We have conducted a laboratory study to investigate the potential interference of gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3 with the measurement of frost point temperature, and consequently the water vapour mixing ratio, determined by CMH under conditions representative of operation in the UT/LS. No detectable interference in the measured frost point temperature was found for HNO3 mixing ratios of up to 4 ppb for exposure times up to 150 min. HNO3 was observed to co-condense on the mirror frost, with the adsorbed mass increasing linearly with time at constant exposure levels. Over the duration of a typical balloon sonde ascent (90–120 min, the maximum accumulated HNO3 amounts were comparable to monolayer coverage of the geometric mirror surface area, which corresponds to only a small fraction of the actual frost layer surface area. This small amount of co-condensed HNO3 is consistent with the observed lack of HNO3 interference in the frost point measurement because the CMH utilizes significant reductions (>10% in surface reflectivity by the condensate to determine H2O.

  12. Evaluation and refinement of sprinkler application rate models used in frost protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, K.B.

    1979-01-01

    Two models of the sprinkled orchard which predict the application rates required for successful frost protection were evaluated. A Sprinkling Application Rate (SPAR79) model, used the heat budget approach to determine the rate of heat lost by the plant part through radiative, convective, and latent heat transfer processes at the actual plant part temperature and at the plant part's critical temperature. The difference between these two rates of heat loss is the rate at which heat must be added by the latent heat of fusion liberated as the applied water freezes. This model added consideration of humidity and ice accumulation to a refinement of the heat budget configuration of earlier models. It showed that humidity is not a contributing factor in the determination of application rates. Ice accumulation was shown to decrease the required application rate by 67% when it increased the characteristic plant part size from 0.2 to 2.0 cm. A distribution factor, a component of a factor previously only estimated, was shown to increase by 30% (from 1.0 to 1.3) as blossom and leaf development progressed. Pulsed sprinkling for frost protection was carried out during six frost nights. Blossom temperatures, application rate, pulsing cycle, wind speed and air temperature were simultaneously recorded. These observations illustrated that in order to provide adequate protection an appropriate application rate and pulsing cycle must be provided by the model. It was concluded that by varying the distribution factor through the growing season and varying the application rate through a single frost night by pulsing, according to atmospheric parameters and ice accumulation, a significant decrease in amount of water applied may be realized. This decrease in water applied will alleviate ice buildup, water cost, soil drainage and nutrient leaching problems associated with sprinkling for frost protection.

  13. Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for improvement of Balloon Borne Frost Point Hygrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Teresa; Brunamonti, Simone; Wienhold, Frank G.; Peter, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In the StratoClim 2016 Balloon Campaign in Nainital (India) during the Asian Summer Monsoon, balloon born payloads containing the EN-SCI CFH - Cryogenic Frost point Hygrometer - were flown to observe water vapor and cloud formation processes in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere. Some of the recorded atmospheric water vapor profiles showed unexpected values above the tropopause and were considered contaminated. To interpret these contaminated results and in the scope of the development of a new frost point hygrometer - the Peltier Cooled Frost point Hygrometer (PCFH) - computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations with ANSYS Fluent software have been carried out. These simulations incorporate the fluid and thermodynamic characteristics of stratospheric air to predict airflow in the inlet tube of the instrument. An ice wall boundary layer based on the Murphy and Koop 2005 ice-vapor parametrization was created as a cause of the unexpected water vapor. Sensitivity was tested in relation to the CFD mesh, ice wall surface, inlet flow, inlet tube dimension, sensor head location and variation of atmospheric conditions. The development of the PCFH uses the results of this study and other computational fluid dynamic studies concerning the whole instrument boundary layer and heat exchanger design to improve on previous realizations of frost point hygrometers. As a novelty in the field of frost point hygrometry, Optimal Control Theory will be used to optimize the cooling of the mirror by the Peltier element, which will be described in a physical "plant model", since the cooling capacity of a cryogenic liquid will no longer be available in the new instrument.

  14. “Quedarán siempre las afueras”: hacia un nuevo sublime periférico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Gutiérrez Valencia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dentro de la variedad de poéticas en el actual panorama español hay un grupo de autores (Alberto Santamaría, García Casado, Mercedes Díaz Villarías y Fernández Mallo que, aunque diferentes, tienen en común un nuevo romanticismo de ascendencia americana caracterizado por la búsqueda de un nuevo sublime basado en lo periférico de su escenario y su nueva mirada sobre la realidad.

  15. Simulation of wind-induced snow transport and sublimation in alpine terrain using a fully coupled snowpack/atmosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, V.; Martin, E.; Masson, V.; Guyomarc'h, G.; Naaim-Bouvet, F.; Prokop, A.; Durand, Y.; Lac, C.

    2014-03-01

    In alpine regions, wind-induced snow transport strongly influences the spatio-temporal evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. To gain understanding on the complex processes that drive the redistribution of snow, a new numerical model is developed. It directly couples the detailed snowpack model Crocus with the atmospheric model Meso-NH. Meso-NH/Crocus simulates snow transport in saltation and in turbulent suspension and includes the sublimation of suspended snow particles. The coupled model is evaluated against data collected around the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (2720 m a.s.l., French Alps). First, 1-D simulations show that a detailed representation of the first metres of the atmosphere is required to reproduce strong gradients of blowing snow concentration and compute mass exchange between the snowpack and the atmosphere. Secondly, 3-D simulations of a blowing snow event without concurrent snowfall have been carried out. Results show that the model captures the main structures of atmospheric flow in alpine terrain. However, at 50 m grid spacing, the model reproduces only the patterns of snow erosion and deposition at the ridge scale and misses smaller scale patterns observed by terrestrial laser scanning. When activated, the sublimation of suspended snow particles causes a reduction of deposited snow mass of 5.3% over the calculation domain. Total sublimation (surface + blowing snow) is three times higher than surface sublimation in a simulation neglecting blowing snow sublimation.

  16. FROST - FReezing Of coated and uncoated duST particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, H.

    2009-04-01

    In April 2008, the measurement campaign FROST (FReezing Of coated and uncoated duST particles) was conducted at the ACCENT (Atmospheric Composition Change - the European NeTwork of excellence) infrastructure site LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator). During the campaign, size selected coated and uncoated Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles were characterized with respect to shape, chemical composition, hygroscopic growth and activation, and their ability to act as IN (Ice Nuclei). The ATD particles were dispersed by means of a fluidized bed generator. Coatings were applied in different furnaces, operated at different temperatures. The coatings were either succinic acid, sulphuric acid, or ammonium sulphate. A DMA (Differential Mobility Analyzer) was used for selecting particles with a mobility diameter of 300 nm. The following measurements were done: Three AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometers, e.g. Schneider et al. (2005) and references therein) were used to determine particle composition. Particles were collected on grids for subsequent TEM (Transmission Electron Micoscropy) analysis. Hygroscopic growth factors were determined by means of a HH-TDMA (High Humidity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer) that measured up to relative humidities (RH) of 98% (Hennig et al. (2005)). The critical super-saturations needed for the activation of the investigated particles into cloud droplets were measured with a continuous flow CCNc (Cloud Condensation Nucleus counter) from DMT (Droplet Measurement Technologies, Roberts and Nenes (2005)). The LACIS flow tube was extended to a length of 8 m, so LACIS could be used to examine the immersion freezing behaviour of the coated and uncoated ATD particles. By a bulk analysis and by the AMS measurements, the ATD particles were found to contain water soluble material, however in small quantities. By means of the online AMS measurements, it was possible to distinguish between thin and thick H2SO4 coatings. For the thin coatings

  17. The object of desire in lyric poetry: some considerations on sublimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Giusti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sublimation is an idea often used to give a psychoanalytic interpretation of artistic creativity. Focusing on the lyric speaker within the poem and considering the text as a mise-en-scène of poetic creation, the paper intends to investigate why sublimation could not be the right key to understanding the phenomenon. The subject’s dynamics, in modern poetry, show themselves as a continuous failure in the repeated attempt to possess the object. The speaker’s affective and cognitive desire is produced and constantly renewed by the impossibility of possessing the object (above all in its representation. But it is only in such a gap that the subject can exists. In order to feel desire, there should be an illusion of possession and representation. Subject and object create each other in lyric poem, and the former comes to coincide with the desire for the latter, it does not exist outside that desire.  Since lyric poetry shows itself as the unfolding of a subject that voices itself and is always involved in an object relation, it can be a privileged field of investigation for this kind of phenomena. Two poets will be taken into consideration: Thibaut de Champagne, a late trouvère who summons up the Provençal tradition, and Charles Baudelaire, one of the modern poets that have most deeply investigated the reality lack of sense.

  18. Trans-modern AesthesiS In The Eurasian Borderlands And The Decolonial Anti-sublime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madina Tlostanova

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El artículo estudia la aesthesis transmoderna en relación con la agenda de liberar la esfera estética de los mitos de la modernidad occidental. La autora ofrece un resumen crítico de las principales corrientes estéticas occidentales frente al anti-sublime decolonial como modelo alternativo analizado en el artículo. Se presta especial atención al mecanismo de este sublime, fundado en una hermenéutica pluritópica y una “comunidad de sentido” decolonial que une a quienes fueron marcados por la “herida colonial”. El artículo se enfoca en la reformulación decolonial de problemáticas estéticas usuales, como la correlación de belleza y aesthesis, la relación de conocimiento y arte, de la esfera moral y la estética, etc. Finalmente, una larga sección se dedica a la aesthesis decolonial de la zona fronteriza euroasiática, los territorios en el Este (Asia Central y Sur (Cáucaso del continente euroasiático, que antes eran colonias rusas/soviéticas, y producen hoy instancias complejas de arte decolonial en las obras de Saule Suleymenova, Zorito Dorzhiev y otros.

  19. Sublimator Driven Coldplate Engineering Development Unit Test Results and Development of Second Generation SDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Ryan A.; Sheth, Rubik B.

    2009-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially increasing reliability and reducing complexity while saving both mass and power. Furthermore, the Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate (ISDC) concept couples a coolant loop with the previously described SDC hardware. This combination allows the SDC to be used as a traditional coldplate during long mission phases. The previously developed SDC technology cannot be used for long mission phases due to the fact that it requires a consumable feedwater for heat rejection. Adding a coolant loop also provides for dissimilar redundancy on the Altair Lander ascent module thermal control system, which is the target application for this technology. Tests were performed on an Engineering Development Unit at NASA s Johnson Space Center to quantify and assess the performance of the SDC. Correlated thermal math models were developed to help explain the test data. The paper also outlines the preliminary results of an ISDC concept being developed.

  20. Verdad sublime y madre asesina en Christine V., versión de Marguerite Duras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana González Holguín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Todo relato es ficción, versión y, así mismo, verdad, bajo una u otra concepción de la misma, es decir, desde una perspectiva que se enfoca según la intención y la subjetividad de uno o más actores, de uno o más narradores. El texto de Marguerite Duras intitulado Sublime forcément sublime Christine V. involucra, por su contenido y su contexto, varias versiones que contrastan y se interrogan entre sí. La escritora se posiciona de tal manera que, a través de recursos propios del oficio literario, desentraña una verdad que puede no ajustarse a la realidad o al saber, pero que nos enfrenta a los límites de lo pulsional y lo ominoso.

  1. Formulation and evaluation of fast dissolving tablets of cinnarizine using superdisintegrant blends and subliming material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Basu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablet of cinnarizine. A combination of super disintegrants, i.e., sodium starch glycolate (SSG and crosscarmellose sodium (CCS were used along with camphor as a subliming material. An optimized concentration of camphor was added to aid the porosity of the tablet. A 3 2 full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: Amount of SSG and CCS. Infrared (IR spectroscopy was performed to identify the physicochemical interaction between drug and polymer. IR spectroscopy showed that there is no interaction of drug with polymer. In the present study, direct compression was used to prepare the tablets. The powder mixtures were compressed into tablet using flat face multi punch tablet machine. Camphor was sublimed from the tablet by exposing the tablet to vacuum drier at 60°C for 12 hours. All the formulations were evaluated for their characteristics such as average weight, hardness, wetting time, friability, content uniformity, dispersion time (DT, and dissolution rate. An optimized tablet formulation (F 9 was found to have good hardness of 3.30 ± 0.10 kg/cm 2 , wetting time of 42.33 ± 4.04 seconds, DT of 34.67 ± 1.53 seconds, and cumulative drug release of not less than 99% in 16 minutes.

  2. Black frost. Icing of wind turbine blades endangers stability and safety; Schwarzer Frost. Wenn Eis die Stand- und Verkehrssicherheit von Windkraftanlagen gefaehrdet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucks, Christoph [Windcomp GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Sailors used to fear icing of sails and ropes from freezing mist and rain. They called it ''black frost'', and this is the same phenomenon that also endangers wind turbine safety. Weather conditions that cause rain to freeze have a characteristic temperature stratification, i.e. moist and warm air over cold ground level air. So far, icing has not caused significant damage in Germany, but this does not mean that it is not a problem. The contribution goes into the causes of icing and the prevention of ice formation. (orig.)

  3. Frost Monitoring and Forecasting Using MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data and a Numerical Weather Prediction Model Forecasts for Eastern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabuchanga, Eric; Flores, Africa; Malaso, Susan; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Shaka, Ayub; Limaye, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Frost is a major challenge across Eastern Africa, severely impacting agricultural farms. Frost damages have wide ranging economic implications on tea and coffee farms, which represent a major economic sector. Early monitoring and forecasting will enable farmers to take preventive actions to minimize the losses. Although clearly important, timely information on when to protect crops from freezing is relatively limited. MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data, derived from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, and 72-hr weather forecasts from the Kenya Meteorological Service's operational Weather Research Forecast model are enabling the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD) and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to provide timely information to farmers in the region. This presentation will highlight an ongoing collaboration among the Kenya Meteorological Service, RCMRD, and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to identify frost events and provide farmers with potential frost forecasts in Eastern Africa.

  4. Physical, rheological, functional and film properties of a novel emulsifier: Frost grape polysaccharide (FGP) from Vitis riparia Michx

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel emulsifier, Frost grape polysaccharide (FGP), isolated from natural exudate of the species Vitis riparia Michx, was physically and rheologically characterized. The determination of the physical, structural, thermodynamic, emulsification, film, and rheological properties of FGP provide essent...

  5. Use of LST images from MODIS/AQUA sensor as an indication of frost occurrence in RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora de S. Simões

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAlthough frost occurrence causes severe losses in agriculture, especially in the south of Brazil, the data of minimum air temperature (Tmin currently available for monitoring and predicting frosts show insufficient spatial distribution. This study aimed to evaluate the MDY11A1 (LST – Land Surface Temperature product, from the MODIS sensor on board the AQUA satellite as an estimator of frost occurrence in the southeast of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. LST images from the nighttime overpass of the MODIS/AQUA sensor for the months of June, July and August from 2006 to 2012, and data from three conventional weather stations of the National Institute of Meteorology (INMET were used. Consistency was observed between Tmin data measured in weather stations and LST data obtained from the MODIS sensor. According to the results, LSTs below 3 ºC recorded by the MODIS/AQUA sensor are an indication of a favorable scenario to frost occurrence.

  6. EVALUATION OF FROST HEAVE ON WASTE TRANSFER LINES WITH SHALLOW DEPTHS IN DST (DOUBLE SHELL TANK) FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAQ MA

    2009-05-12

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate the effect of frost heave on waste transfer lines with shallow depths in DST farms. Because of the insulation, well compacted sandy material around waste transfer lines, the type of sandy and gravel soil, and relatively low precipitation at Hanford site, it is concluded that waste transfer lines with one foot of soil covers (sandy cushion material and insulation) are not expected to undergo frost heave damaging effects.

  7. Development and Sensitivity Analysis of a Frost Risk model based primarily on freely distributed Earth Observation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louka, Panagiota; Petropoulos, George; Papanikolaou, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    The ability to map the spatiotemporal distribution of extreme climatic conditions, such as frost, is a significant tool in successful agricultural management and decision making. Nowadays, with the development of Earth Observation (EO) technology, it is possible to obtain accurately, timely and in a cost-effective way information on the spatiotemporal distribution of frost conditions, particularly over large and otherwise inaccessible areas. The present study aimed at developing and evaluating a frost risk prediction model, exploiting primarily EO data from MODIS and ASTER sensors and ancillary ground observation data. For the evaluation of our model, a region in north-western Greece was selected as test site and a detailed sensitivity analysis was implemented. The agreement between the model predictions and the observed (remotely sensed) frost frequency obtained by MODIS sensor was evaluated thoroughly. Also, detailed comparisons of the model predictions were performed against reference frost ground observations acquired from the Greek Agricultural Insurance Organization (ELGA) over a period of 10-years (2000-2010). Overall, results evidenced the ability of the model to produce reasonably well the frost conditions, following largely explainable patterns in respect to the study site and local weather conditions characteristics. Implementation of our proposed frost risk model is based primarily on satellite imagery analysis provided nowadays globally at no cost. It is also straightforward and computationally inexpensive, requiring much less effort in comparison for example to field surveying. Finally, the method is adjustable to be potentially integrated with other high resolution data available from both commercial and non-commercial vendors. Keywords: Sensitivity analysis, frost risk mapping, GIS, remote sensing, MODIS, Greece

  8. Frost retardation of an air-source heat pump by the hot gas bypass method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Ju-Suk [Yonsei Center for Clean Technology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Lee, Jinho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Jeon, Chang-Duk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chungju National University, Chung-Buk 380-702 (Korea)

    2008-03-15

    This study is concerned with a hot gas (refrigerant) bypass method to retard the formation and propagation of frost in an air-source heat pump. The feasibility of the hot gas bypass method was investigated experimentally and the method's performance is compared with that of a normal, 1.12 kW capacity air-source heat pump system with no defrost equipment such as an electric resistance heater. Results indicate that the hot gas bypass method is useful for retarding the formation and growth of frost at the outdoor coil. The best performance is shown under a bypass refrigerant flow rate of 0.2 kg/min (20% of the whole system refrigerant flow rate). During 210 min of heat pump operation, the hot gas bypass method improved COP and heating capacity at an average of 8.5% and 5.7%, respectively, relative to the normal system. (author)

  9. USE OF PHASE CHANGE MATERIAL (PCM FOR FROST PREVENTION IN A MODEL GREENHOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet KÜRKLÜ

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the possibility of using phase change materials to prevent occurrance of frost in greenhouses during winter was investigated. The melting and freezing temperatures of the PCM were about 8 oC and 4 oC, respectively.The air temperature difference between the PCM and the control greenhouses was about 2oC on average during the day and night time, PCM greenhouse having the higher temperature at night and lower temperature during the day. Frost was prevented on 7 out of 9 occasions, though the temperature difference between the greenhouses was small for some of these days. Solar fraction stored by the PCM store was about 30 %.

  10. Development and application of a forecasting system to avoid spring frost damage in chiana valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Zipoli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Late frost is one of the more serious adversity for Italian agriculture. Several methods have been developed to protect cultivations, but their application results particularly effective (also from an economic point of view only if supported by forecasting systems during the more susceptible period of the year. On these basis a forecasting system of late frost in Val di Chiana (an area in central Italy mainly cultivated with cereals and high quality fruits was developed. The system consists in an empirical model, based on a preventive agroclimatic analysis of the area to identify night cooling dynamics (for several meteorological conditions in the spring. A network of 10 thermohygrometric stations was installed in the area integrating the information obtained by a local agrometeorological station network. The final product was a forecasting bulletin emitted every three hours beginning from the 13:00 p.m. A validation of the system was performed for 2006 to verify the forecast skill.

  11. Development and application of a forecasting system to avoid spring frost damage in chiana valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Orlandini

    Full Text Available Late frost is one of the more serious adversity for Italian agriculture. Several methods have been developed to protect cultivations, but their application results particularly effective (also from an economic point of view only if supported by forecasting systems during the more susceptible period of the year. On these basis a forecasting system of late frost in Val di Chiana (an area in central Italy mainly cultivated with cereals and high quality fruits was developed. The system consists in an empirical model, based on a preventive agroclimatic analysis of the area to identify night cooling dynamics (for several meteorological conditions in the spring. A network of 10 thermohygrometric stations was installed in the area integrating the information obtained by a local agrometeorological station network. The final product was a forecasting bulletin emitted every three hours beginning from the 13:00 p.m. A validation of the system was performed for 2006 to verify the forecast skill.

  12. The potential importance of frost flowers, recycling on snow, and open leads for ozone depletion events

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    M. Piot

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present model studies with the one-dimensional model MISTRA to investigate the potential role of frost flowers, recycling on snow, and open leads in the depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic spring. In our model, we assumed frost flower aerosols to be the major source of bromine. We show that a major ozone depletion event can be satisfactorily reproduced only if the recycling on snow of deposited bromine into gas phase bromine is assumed. In the model, this cycling is more efficient than the bromine explosion process and maintains sufficiently high levels of bromine to deplete ozone down to few nmol mol−1 within four days. We assessed the influence of different surface combinations (open lead/frost flowers on the chemistry in the model. Results showed noticeable modifications affecting the composition of aerosols and the deposition velocities. A model run with a series of coupled frost flower fields and open leads, separated by large areas of snow, showed results comparable with field observations. In addition, we studied the effects of modified temperature of either the frost flower field or the ambient airmass. A warmer frost flower field increases the relative humidity and the aerosol deposition rate. The deposition/re-emission process gains in importance, inducing more reactive bromine in the gas phase, and a stronger ozone depletion. A decrease of 1K in airmass temperature shows in our model that the aerosol uptake capacities of all gas phase species substantially increases, leading to enhanced uptake of acids from the gas phase. Consequently, the so-called bromine explosion accelerated and O3 mixing ratios decreased. In our model representation, variations in wind speed affected the aerosol source function and influenced the amount of bromine in the atmosphere and thus the ozone depletion strength. Recent studies have suggested the important role of the precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3

  13. Comparison of heat pump performance using fin-and-tube and microchannel heat exchangers under frost conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Liang-Liang [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yang, Liang [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); China R and D Center, Carrier Corporation, 3239 Shen Jiang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 201206 (China); Zhang, Chun-Lu [China R and D Center, Carrier Corporation, 3239 Shen Jiang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 201206 (China)

    2010-04-15

    Vapor compression heat pumps are drawing more attention in energy saving applications. Microchannel heat exchangers can provide higher performance via less core volume and reduce system refrigerant charge, but little is known about their performance in heat pump systems under frosting conditions. In this study, the system performance of a commercial heat pump using microchannel heat exchangers as evaporator is compared with that using conventional finned-tube heat exchangers numerically and experimentally. The microchannel and finned-tube heat pump system models used for comparison of the microchannel and finned-tube evaporator performance under frosting conditions were developed, considering the effect of maldistribution on both refrigerant and air sides. The quasi-steady-state modeling results are in reasonable agreement with the test data under frost conditions. The refrigerant-side maldistribution is found remarkable impact on the microchannel heat pump system performance under the frost conditions. Parametric study on the fan speed and the fin density under frost conditions are conducted as well to figure out the best trade-off in the design of frost tolerant evaporators. (author)

  14. Frosted branch angiitis, neuroretinitis as initial ocular manifestation in Behçet disease

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mujaini, Abdullah; Wali, Upender K

    2011-01-01

    Behçet disease is an idiopathic, multisystem disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of orogenital ulceration and vasculitis of the veins and arteries of all calibers. Ocular involvement may affect the conjunctiva, sclera, uveal tract, vitreous, blood vessels, and retina. Many theories have pointed toward an autoimmune response behind its pathogenesis, which may be triggered by exposure to an infectious agent. Frosted branch angiitis is characterized by vascular inflammation, sheathing, ...

  15. Frost-Resistant Plants Selection Peculiarities at Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Varieties Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. П. Чебаков

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Giving regard to the main elements of Winter Wheat varieties assessment when selecting frost resistant plants and taking into account genetic potential of the parents, date of hybrids sowing and their assessment by the speed of spring vegetation, it is possible in the sense of successful breeding to derive the most steady genotypes by the specified characteristics starting from F1. hybrids.

  16. Mathematical modeling of heat transfer between the plant seedling and the environment during a radiation frost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finnikov K.A.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The power of the internal heat source sufficient to maintain a positive temperature of plants during one of the possible form of cold stress - radiation frost was determined with the help of numerical simulation.The simulation of unsteady heat transfer in the soil-plant-air system in the conditions of radiation frost showed that the the ground part of plants is cooling most rapidly, and this process is partially slowed down by the natural-convection heat transfer with warmer air. If the frost is not continuous, the radiative cooling is the main danger for plant. The necessary power of heat-production inside plant that allows it to avoid hypothermia depends both on natural conditions and the size of the plant. For plants with a typical diameter of the stem about 2 mm this heat-production should be from 50 to 100 W / kg. Within 2 hours a total amount of heat about 0.5 MJ / kg in the plant should be allocated. Larger plants will have a smaller surface to mass ratio, and the maintaining of it's temperature will require a lower cost of nutrients per unit, accordingly. Modeling of the influence of plant surface trichomes presence on the process of its cooling showed that the role of trichomes in the protection of plants from hypothermia during radiation frost usually is negative due to the fact that the presence of trichomes increases the radiative heat transfer from the plant and the impediment in air movement near the plant reduces heat flux entering the plant from a warmer air. But in cases where the intensity of heat generation within the plant is sufficient for the maintenance of the plant temperature higher than the air temperature, the presence of trichomes impairs heat transfer from plant to air, and therefore contributes to a better heating of plants.

  17. Frost formation and defrost control parameters for open multideck refrigerated food display cabinets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassou, S.A.; Datta, D. [Brunel Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Uxbridge (United Kingdom); Marriott, D. [Safeway Stores plc, Hayes (United Kingdom)

    2001-04-03

    In order to achieve the required air and product temperatures in refrigerated food display cabinets, the evaporator coils, which are normally located in the base of the cabinets, operate at temperatures below the freezing point of water. The air which is circulated over the evaporator coil is cooled below its dew point and water vapour present in the air condenses and eventually freezes on the coil surface. With continuous operation of the coil, frost will accumulate on the coil surface leading to a decrease both in the air flowrate and in the overall heat transfer coefficient. In order to maintain satisfactory performance, evaporator coils are defrosted periodically. Although different defrost control strategies can be employed, for simplicity and cost considerations, defrosting in supermarket refrigeration systems is usually controlled by a pre-set time cycle. It is widely acknowledge, however, that time-based defrost may cause a number of unnecessary defrost cycles and this reduces the energy efficiency of the refrigeration systems as well as the accuracy of temperature control of the cabinets. Implementing defrost only when it is needed or on 'demand' should reduce the number of defrost cycles and lead to savings in energy and improved product quality. This paper reports on field and experimental investigations on the processes of frosting and defrosting of medium-temperature display cabinet evaporator coils. The results show that for medium-temperature refrigeration applications where the environment temperature is kept reasonably constant, the store humidity is the primary parameter influencing the rate of frost formation. Using relative humidity as a control parameter the defrost frequency can be reduced considerably without affecting cabinet performance and product integrity. Alongside the effect of relative humidity, the paper also considers the effects of other performance parameters on the processes of frosting and defrosting such as cooling

  18. Elephants, fire, and frost can determine community structure and composition in Kalahari Woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdo, Ricardo M

    2007-03-01

    Fire, elephants, and frost are important disturbance factors in many African savannas, but the relative magnitude of their effects on vegetation and their interactions have not been quantified. Understanding how disturbance shapes savanna structure and composition is critical for predicting changes in tree cover and for formulating management and conservation policy. A simulation model was used to investigate how the disturbance regime determines vegetation structure and composition in a mixed Kalahari sand woodland savanna in western Zimbabwe. The model consisted of submodels for tree growth, tree damage caused by disturbance, mortality, and recruitment that were parameterized from field data collected over a two-year period. The model predicts that, under the current disturbance regime, tree basal area in the study area will decline by two-thirds over the next two decades and become dominated by species unpalatable to elephants. Changes in the disturbance regime are predicted to greatly modify vegetation structure and community composition. Elephants are the primary drivers of woodland change in this community at present-day population densities, and their impacts are exacerbated by the effects of fire and frost. Frost, in particular, does not play an important role when acting independently but appears to be a key secondary factor in the presence of elephants and/or fire. Unlike fire and frost, which cannot suppress the woodland phase on their own in this ecosystem, elephants can independently drive the vegetation to the scrub phase. The results suggest that elephant and fire management may be critical for the persistence of certain woodland communities within dry-season elephant habitats in the eastern Kalahari, particularly those dominated by Brachystegia spiciformis and other palatable species.

  19. Strategic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Adam; Kalai, Ehud

    2001-08-01

    In joint decision making, similarly minded people may take opposite positions. Consider the example of a marriage in which one spouse gives generously to charity while the other donates nothing. Such "polarization" may misrepresent what is, in actuality, a small discrepancy in preferences. It may be that the donating spouse would like to see 10% of their combined income go to charity each year, while the apparently frugal spouse would like to see 8% donated. A simple game-theoretic analysis suggests that the spouses will end up donating 10% and 0%, respectively. By generalizing this argument to a larger class of games, we provide strategic justification for polarization in many situations such as debates, shared living accommodations, and disciplining children. In some of these examples, an arbitrarily small disagreement in preferences leads to an arbitrarily large loss in utility for all participants. Such small disagreements may also destabilize what, from game-theoretic point of view, is a very stable equilibrium. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  20. Frost heave and northern pipelines, state of the art and status of research : three contributing studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, D.E.; Smith, S.L.; Burgess, M.M. (comps.) [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada

    2005-07-01

    Three review studies were conducted in response to the renewed interest in building a large diameter buried chilled natural gas pipeline in the Mackenzie Valley, Northwest Territories, to transport gas from the Beaufort/Mackenzie Delta to southern markets. The 3 review studies were commissioned by the Geological Survey of Canada to document the current state of knowledge about frost heave theory, testing and predictive modelling. The usefulness of this knowledge to the design, construction and operation of a buried chilled gas pipeline was also evaluated. The studies addressed one of the primary technical and engineering design issues that must be considered in the design of northern pipelines, that of the development of a frost bulb around buried chilled pipelines, and the associated heave of frost-susceptible soil and stresses imposed on the pipeline. The issue of differential heave is of particular concern. The information gathered from this study can be used to form the basis for the regulatory review process. This open file report provides a summary of the 3 studies. The 3 individual commissions reports were catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  1. Numerical heat transfer model for frost protection of citrus fruits by water from a spraying system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa Roy J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A simplified model is developed to simulate the conditions associated with the protection of fruits from frost damage using water from a spraying system. The model simulates the movement of the solidifying water front on a single fruit, and based on that determines the spray frequency needed for a water film to continuously surround the ice-coated fruit to prevent the fruit temperature from dropping below 0ºC. Simulations are presented for the frost protection of sweet oranges (citrus sinensis. The effect of environmental conditions such as air temperature, air velocity, surface radiation and water film evaporation on the development of the ice layer encasing is considered. Simulations show the effect the encasing ice sheet thickness has on the fruit temperature if water from a spraying system is turned off permanently. Experimental tests are also conducted to determine the change in the thermal properties of citrus sinensis for operating temperatures that range from above freezing to sub-freezing. The results of the experimental tests and the numerical simulations shall lead to a better understanding of fruit protection from frost damage by the application of water from a spraying system.

  2. Frosted branch angiitis, neuroretinitis as initial ocular manifestation in Behçet disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Behçet disease is an idiopathic, multisystem disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of orogenital ulceration and vasculitis of the veins and arteries of all calibers. Ocular involvement may affect the conjunctiva, sclera, uveal tract, vitreous, blood vessels, and retina. Many theories have pointed toward an autoimmune response behind its pathogenesis, which may be triggered by exposure to an infectious agent. Frosted branch angiitis is characterized by vascular inflammation, sheathing, retinal edema, and retinal hemorrhages. The disease may be idiopathic in a majority of the cases or may be associated with ocular and systemic pathology. Association between Behηet disease, Frosted branch angiitis, and neuroretinitis is not reported in literature. This uncommon combination reflects the varied systemic and ocular manifestations in Behηet disease, especially in patients who are not diagnosed and treated in time. We hereby report a case of bilateral frosted branch angiitis and neuroretinitis in a young male from Middle-east, suffering from Behçet disease.

  3. Climate Change and Crop Exposure to Adverse Weather: Changes to Frost Risk and Grapevine Flowering Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Mosedale

    Full Text Available The cultivation of grapevines in the UK and many other cool climate regions is expected to benefit from the higher growing season temperatures predicted under future climate scenarios. Yet the effects of climate change on the risk of adverse weather conditions or events at key stages of crop development are not always captured by aggregated measures of seasonal or yearly climates, or by downscaling techniques that assume climate variability will remain unchanged under future scenarios. Using fine resolution projections of future climate scenarios for south-west England and grapevine phenology models we explore how risks to cool-climate vineyard harvests vary under future climate conditions. Results indicate that the risk of adverse conditions during flowering declines under all future climate scenarios. In contrast, the risk of late spring frosts increases under many future climate projections due to advancement in the timing of budbreak. Estimates of frost risk, however, were highly sensitive to the choice of phenology model, and future frost exposure declined when budbreak was calculated using models that included a winter chill requirement for dormancy break. The lack of robust phenological models is a major source of uncertainty concerning the impacts of future climate change on the development of cool-climate viticulture in historically marginal climatic regions.

  4. Frost for the trees: Did climate increase erosion in unglaciated landscapes during the late Pleistocene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jill A; Roering, Joshua J; Bartlein, Patrick J; Gavin, Daniel G; Granger, Darryl E; Rempel, Alan W; Praskievicz, Sarah J; Hales, Tristram C

    2015-11-01

    Understanding climatic influences on the rates and mechanisms of landscape erosion is an unresolved problem in Earth science that is important for quantifying soil formation rates, sediment and solute fluxes to oceans, and atmospheric CO2 regulation by silicate weathering. Glaciated landscapes record the erosional legacy of glacial intervals through moraine deposits and U-shaped valleys, whereas more widespread unglaciated hillslopes and rivers lack obvious climate signatures, hampering mechanistic theory for how climate sets fluxes and form. Today, periglacial processes in high-elevation settings promote vigorous bedrock-to-regolith conversion and regolith transport, but the extent to which frost processes shaped vast swaths of low- to moderate-elevation terrain during past climate regimes is not well established. By combining a mechanistic frost weathering model with a regional Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climate reconstruction derived from a paleo-Earth System Model, paleovegetation data, and a paleoerosion archive, we propose that frost-driven sediment production was pervasive during the LGM in our unglaciated Pacific Northwest study site, coincident with a 2.5 times increase in erosion relative to modern rates. Our findings provide a novel framework to quantify how climate modulates sediment production over glacial-interglacial cycles in mid-latitude unglaciated terrain.

  5. The thermal structure at the topside and above of polar mesosphere summer echoes over Spitsbergen 78° N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zecha

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous measurements of temperature and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE were performed at the polar cap (78° N during summer 2001 and 2003. In summer time the mesopause region is characterized by extremely low temperatures around 120 K. It is remarkable that PMSE are practically never observed above 92 km although temperatures are low enough to allow the existence of ice particles. In this case study we compare the PMSE topside with temperatures measured by the potassium lidar and with frost point temperatures using water-vapor mixing ratios from models. We find striking discrepancies with our current understanding of ice particles and temperature in this region. In this case study we find that the temperature can be more than 20 K lower than the frost point temperature but no PMSE is observed above 92 km altitude. We show that the lack of PMSE does not necessarily imply that the temperature is too high.

  6. The Mystery of “those icy climes” (Shelley 269): Literature, Science and Early Nineteenth-century Polar Exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Lanone, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Nineteenth-century science probed into the mystery of ice, from the structure of snowflakes to glaciers to Polar exploration. Literature reflects this attempt to understand the shifting nature of ice, a transparent yet deceptive—neither liquid nor truly solid—elemental structure. While glaciers become the sublime site of Romantic poetic epiphany, Mary Shelley subverts the euphoric associations of pristine settings by choosing to locate a crucial confrontation between creature and creator in t...

  7. Thermodynamic study of alkane-α,ω-diamines - evidence of odd-even pattern of sublimation properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fulem, Michal; Růžička, K.; Červinka, C.; Bazyleva, A.; Della Gatta, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 371, Jun (2014), s. 93-105 ISSN 0378-3812 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : alkane-diamines * odd–even effect * vapor pressure * sublimation and vaporization thermodynamic properties * statistical thermodynamics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.200, year: 2014

  8. Selective catalytic reduction of NOx by hydrocarbons over Fe/ZSM5 prepared by sublimation of FeCl3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battiston, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx by Hydrocarbons over Fe/ZSM5 Prepared by Sublimation of FeCl3. Characterization and Catalysis Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are unwanted by-products of combustion. They are generated primarily from motor vehicles and stationary sources, like power stations and

  9. Synthesis of gallium nitride and related oxides via ammonobasic reactive sublimation (ARS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Aguilar-Hernández, Jorge R.; Mejía-García, Concepción; Cruz-Gandarilla, Francisco; Contreras-Puente, Gerardo [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Ciudad de México (Mexico); Moure-Flores, Francisco de [Facultad de Química, Materiales-Energía, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro (Mexico); Melo-Pereira, Osvaldo de, E-mail: schwarzerengelxv@hotmail.com [Facultad de Física, Universidad de La Habana, La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-11-15

    Ammonobasic reactive sublimation (ARS) is proposed as a novel method to synthesize GaN and related oxides. Results indicate that GaN growth occurs by a nitriding process of Ga and related oxides, establishing a direct dependence on NH{sub 4} OH amount added as a primary chemical reactive. The samples were grown on p-type Si (111) substrates inside a tube furnace, employing GaN powder and NH{sub 4} OH. The characterizations of the samples were carried out by XRD, SEM, EDS and PL techniques, revealing the influence of NH{sub 4} OH on the improvement of GaN synthesis and the enhancement of its optical and structural properties. (author)

  10. Paths of the Sublime: Alain de Botton’s The Art of Travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C.C. Mendes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bearing in mind the central place of literary, academic, and religious tourism in Cultural Studies and in Alain de Botton’s The Art of Travel (2002, the paper seeks: 1 to identify some remarkable travels of famous writers – the British Wordsworth; the French Karl-Joris Huysmans, Gustave Flaubert, and Charles Baudelaire; 2 to show that in the analysis of such authors’ itineraries (from Europe to the East, there is a search for cultural roots, a mapping of spaces and people, and a deconstruction of labels often related to the Other; 3 to point out that the tourist is also a storyteller, a protagonist, and a creator of fictional worlds; 4 to bring together literary tourism and artistic tourism, through the identification of allusions to other cultural events (painting, music, and architecture; 5 to characterize tourism as a literary and aesthetic experience of the Sublime.

  11. Optimized heat exchange in a CO2 de-sublimation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Larry; Terrien, Paul; Tessier, Pascal; Hoeger, Christopher

    2017-09-19

    The present invention is a process for removing carbon dioxide from a compressed gas stream including cooling the compressed gas in a first heat exchanger, introducing the cooled gas into a de-sublimating heat exchanger, thereby producing a first solid carbon dioxide stream and a first carbon dioxide poor gas stream, expanding the carbon dioxide poor gas stream, thereby producing a second solid carbon dioxide stream and a second carbon dioxide poor gas stream, combining the first solid carbon dioxide stream and the second solid carbon dioxide stream, thereby producing a combined solid carbon dioxide stream, and indirectly exchanging heat between the combined solid carbon dioxide stream and the compressed gas in the first heat exchanger.

  12. Uniportal VATS: A Sublimation of Micro-invasive Lung Cancer Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwu LIU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Micro-invasive thoracic surgery, especially represented by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS, has become the mainstream of lung cancer resection. Traditional multi-portal VATS techniques, including four-port, three-port, and two-port VATS, have been widely used to perform nearly all kinds of lung cancer resections. However, how to make lung cancer resection less invasive is always the subject that all thoracic surgeons never stop pursuing. Compared with multi-portal VATS, uniportal VATS causes less postoperative pain and paresthesia because only one small incision is made and one intercoastal space is involved. In recent years, good clinical results have been obtained from uniportal VATS in lung cancer resections. In this paper, we’d like to present a brief summary about the progresses made in the application of uniportal VATS in lung cancer resection. Uniportal VATS is a sublimation of micro-invasive lung cancer resection.

  13. Characteristics of Vacuum Freeze Drying with Utilization of Internal Cooling and Condenser Waste Heat for Sublimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Alhamid

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum freeze drying is an excellent drying method, but it is very energy-intensive because a relatively long drying time is required. This research investigates the utilization of condenser waste heat for sublimation as a way of accelerating the drying rate. In addition, it also investigates the effect of internal cooling combined with vacuum cooling in the pressure reduction process. Jelly fish tentacles were used as the specimen, with different configurations for condenser heat waste and internal cooling valve opening. The results show that heating with condenser heat waste can accelerate the drying rate up to 0.0035 kg/m2.s. In addition, pre-freezing by internal cooling prevents evaporation until the mass of the specimen is 0.47 g and promotes transition of the specimen into the solid phase.

  14. Mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) thin films fabricated by close spaced sublimation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannan, M.A.; Basharat, M.; Ali, A.; Shah, N.A.; Maqsood, A.

    2007-01-01

    Thin films of HgCdTe were fabricated by deposition of HgTe on the CdTe thin film substrates. Both depositions were carried out through close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. The structural investigation performed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the deposited films exhibit a polycrystalline structure with large number of sharp grain boundaries. The samples were then characterized optically to determine the refractive index. Absorption coefficient and the optical band gaps. The estimated band gap decreased, typically from 1.46 to 1.43 Ev as Hg content in the films increased from 1.41 to 3.29-wt. the deposited films showed high value of resistivity. Which decreased with increasing temperature showing the semiconducting behavior of the films. The prepared films gave response to infrared radiation. (author)

  15. Fe embedded in ice: The impacts of sublimation and energetic particle bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Icy particles containing a variety of Fe compounds are present in the upper atmospheres of planets such as the Earth and Saturn. In order to explore the role of ice sublimation and energetic ion bombardment in releasing Fe species into the gas phase, Fe-dosed ice films were prepared under UHV conditions in the laboratory. Temperature-programmed desorption studies of Fe/H2O films revealed that no Fe atoms or Fe-containing species co-desorbed along with the H2O molecules. This implies that when noctilucent ice cloud particles sublimate in the terrestrial mesosphere, the metallic species embedded in them will coalesce to form residual particles. Sputtering of the Fe-ice films by energetic Ar+ ions was shown to be an efficient mechanism for releasing Fe into the gas phase, with a yield of 0.08 (Ar+ energy=600 eV). Extrapolating with a semi-empirical sputtering model to the conditions of a proton aurora indicates that sputtering by energetic protons (>100 keV) should also be efficient. However, the proton flux in even an intense aurora will be too low for the resulting injection of Fe species into the gas phase to compete with that from meteoric ablation. In contrast, sputtering of the icy particles in the main rings of Saturn by energetic O+ ions may be the source of recently observed Fe+ in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Electron sputtering (9.5 keV) produced no detectable Fe atoms or Fe-containing species. Finally, it was observed that Fe(OH)2 was produced when Fe was dosed onto an ice film at 140 K (but not at 95 K). Electronic structure theory shows that the reaction which forms this hydroxide from adsorbed Fe has a large barrier of about 0.7 eV, from which we conclude that the reaction requires both translationally hot Fe atoms and mobile H2O molecules on the ice surface.

  16. CURVED WALLS: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, AND COMPOSITION PATTERNS IN T TAURI DISK DUST SUBLIMATION FRONTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); D' Alessio, P. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Espaillat, C. [Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sargent, B. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Watson, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Hernández, J., E-mail: melisma@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu, E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu, E-mail: p.dalessio@astrosmo.unam.mx, E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: baspci@rit.edu, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: hernandj@cida.ve [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía (CIDA), Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10{sup –8} to 10{sup –10} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ∼3 to 0.5 μm. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10{sup –4} of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 μm silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.

  17. CURVED WALLS: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, AND COMPOSITION PATTERNS IN T TAURI DISK DUST SUBLIMATION FRONTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L.; D'Alessio, P.; Espaillat, C.; Sargent, B.; Watson, D. M.; Hernández, J.

    2013-01-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10 –8 to 10 –10 M ☉ yr –1 , the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ∼3 to 0.5 μm. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10 –4 of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 μm silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system

  18. A Low Cost Inflatable CubeSat Drag Brake Utilizing Sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Adam Charles

    The United Nations Inter-Agency Debris Coordination Committee has adopted a 25-year post-mission lifetime requirement for any satellite orbiting below 2000 km in order to mitigate the growing orbital debris threat. Low-cost CubeSats have become important satellite platforms with startling capabilities, but this guideline restricts them to altitudes below 600 km because they remain in orbit too long. In order to enable CubeSat deployments at higher release altitudes, a low-cost, ultra-reliable deorbit device is needed. This thesis reports on efforts to develop a deployable and passively inflatable drag brake that can deorbit from higher orbital altitudes, thereby complying with the 25-year orbital lifetime guideline. On the basis of concepts first implemented during the NASA Echo Satellite Project, this study investigated the design of an inflatable CubeSat drag device that utilizes sublimating benzoic acid powder as the inflation propellant. Testing has focused on demonstrating the functionality of charging a Mylar drag brake bladder with appropriate quantities of benzoic acid powder, and the exposure to a controlled-temperature vacuum chamber causing the bladder to inflate. Although results show a measureable increase in internal pressure when introduced to anticipated orbital temperatures, a significant air-derived expansion prior to sublimation was encountered due to the undetectable volume of ambient residual air in the fabricated membrane bladders. These tests have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach, thereby demonstrating that this concept can create a potentially smaller and less expensive drag device, eliminating inflation gas tanks and valves. In that way, this system can provide a low-cost, miniaturized system that reduces a CubeSat's orbital lifetime to less than 25 years, when placed at higher orbital altitude.

  19. Taking a Hike and Hucking the Stout: The Troublesome Legacy of the Sublime in Outdoor Recreation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Drennig

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As Henry Thoreau noted in the 1850s, the simple act of walking can be loaded with political and spiritual meaning. Today, taking a hike as an act of engaging in outdoor recreation is equally non-trivial, and therefore subject of the following analysis. As this paper argues, outdoors recreation is still influenced by the legacy of the Sublime and its construction of wilderness. This troublesome legacy means that the cultural self-representation of outdoor sports – and the practice itself – lays claim to the environment in ways that are socially and sometimes even ethni-cally exclusive. This essay uses William Cronon’s critique of the cultural constructedness of wilderness as a point of departure to see how Western notions of sublime nature have an impact on spatial practice. The elevation of specific parts of the environ-ment into the category of wilderness prescribes certain uses and meanings as na-ture is made into an antidote against the ills of industrial civilization, and a place where the alienated individual can return to a more authentic self. This view then has become a troublesome legacy, informing the cultural self-representation of those uses of “wilderness” that are known as outdoor recreation. In its cultural production, outdoors recreation constructs “healthy” and “athlet-ic” bodies exercising in natural settings and finding refuge from the everyday al-ienation of postmodern society. Yet these bodies are conspicuously white, and the obligatory equipment and fashion expensive. Outdoor recreation is a privileged assertion of leisure, often denoting an urban, affluent, and white, background of the practitioner. These practitioners then lay exclusive claim on the landscapes they use. As trivial as taking a hike or any other form of outdoors recreation may thus seem, they put a cultural legacy into practice that is anything but trivial.

  20. Changing risk of spring frost damage in grapevines due to climate change? A case study in the Swiss Rhone Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Michael; Fuhrer, Jürg; Holzkämper, Annelie

    2018-01-01

    Late spring frost is a severe risk during early plant development. It may cause important economic damage to grapevine production. In a warming climate, late frost risk either could decline due to the reduction in frost days and an advancement of the last day of frost or increase due to a more pronounced shift forward of the start of the active growing period of the plants. These possibilities were analyzed in a case study for two locations in the lower Swiss Rhone Valley (Sion, Aigle) where viticulture is an important part of agriculture. Twelve phenology models were calibrated for the developmental stage BBCH09 (bud burst) using measured or reconstructed temperature data for two vineyards in Changins (1958 to 2012) and Leytron (1977 to 2014) together with observed phenological data. The day of year (DOY) for BBCH09 was then modelled for the years 1951 to 2050 using the best performing phenology model in combination with ten downscaled and bias-corrected climate scenarios. A 100-day period starting with BBCH09 was defined, during which daily mean and minimum temperatures were used to calculate three frost risk indices in each year. These indices were compared between the periods 1961-1990 (reference) and 2021-2050 (climate change scenario). Based on the average of the ensemble of climate model chains, BBCH09 advanced by 9 (range 7-11) (Aigle) and 7 (range 5-8) (Sion) days between the two time periods, similar to the shift in the last day of frost. The separate results of the different model chains suggest that, in the near future, late spring frost risk may increase or decrease, depending on location and climate change projections. While for the reference, the risk is larger at the warmer site (Sion) compared to that at the cooler site (Aigle), for the period 2021-2050, small shifts in both phenology and occurrence of frost (i.e., days with daily minimum temperature below 0 °C) lead to a small decrease in frost risk at the warmer but an increase at the cooler

  1. Representing the sublime in the VIMAP and empirical aesthetics: Reviving Edmund Burke's A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origins of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful. Comment on "Move me, astonish me... delight my eyes and brain: The Vienna Integrated Model of top-down and bottom-up processes in Art Perception (VIMAP) and corresponding affective, evaluative, and neurophysiological correlates" by Matthew Pelowski et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Y.-J.; McManus, I. C.

    2017-07-01

    This commentary considers the role of the sublime in the Vienna Integrated Model of Art Perception (VIMAP; Pelowski, Markey, Forster, Gerger, & Leder [17]), and suggest that it is not precisely conceptualised in the model. In part that reflects different views and usages of the sublime in the literature, and here it is recommended that Burke's [2] view of the sublime is used as a primary framework for empirical research on the sublime.

  2. The effect of watermelon frost on prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 in inflamed pulp tissue (in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Dennis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulp inflammation can be marked by the increase of prostaglandin E2(PGE2 level compared to normal pulp. The increase of PGE2 may lead to vasodilatation, increase of vascular permeability, pain and bone resorption. Watermelon frost has been well known in Chinese society for pain relief and inflammation in oral cavity and teeth. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate that watermelon frost can be used to decrease the PGE2 level. Method: 27 samples of pulp tissues used in this in-vitro study, were extirpated from the patients’ teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis referred to clinic of Conservative Dentistry, RSPGM Faculty of Dentistry, USU. Trial materials were applied to 27 samples i.e. watermelon frost as a trial material and commercial watermelon frost and eugenol to observe their effect on PGE2. PGE2 level of each material was detected through ELISA method by measuring and comparing the absorbance reading of the wells of the samples against standards with a micro plate reader at W1 = 650 nm and W2 = 490 nm. Result: The result showed the biggest effect was found in the third group (eugenol, mean 4.6933, followed by the first group (watermelon frost as a trial material, mean 18,1578 then the second group (commercial watermelon frost, mean 82,2689. OneWay ANOVA revealed that there were significant differences among all trial materials (p < 0.001 on PGE2 level. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that watermelon frost can be used to decrease the PGE2 level in inflamed pulp tissue and led to the acceptance of traditional medicine and natural products as an alternative form of dental care.

  3. Precessing deuteron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Kirillov, D.A.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the acceleration in the Nuclotron of deuterons polarized in the horizontal plane is considered. This horizontal polarization is named precessing polarization. The effects of the main magnetic field and synchrotron oscillations are included. The precessing polarization is supposed to be used in studying the polarization parameters of the elastic dp back-scattering and other experiments

  4. Exhuming South Polar Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    7 February 2004 The large, circular feature in this image is an old meteor impact crater. The crater is larger than the 3 kilometers-wide (1.9 miles-wide) Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, thus only part of the crater is seen. The bright mesas full of pits and holes--in some areas resembling swiss cheese--are composed of frozen carbon dioxide. In this summertime view, the mesa slopes and pit walls are darkened as sunlight causes some of the ice to sublime away. At one time in the past, the crater shown here may have been completely covered with carbon dioxide ice, but, over time, it has been exhumed as the ice sublimes a little bit more each summer. The crater is located near 86.8oS, 111.6oW. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the upper left.

  5. Modified solution calorimetry approach for determination of vaporization and sublimation enthalpies of branched-chain aliphatic and alkyl aromatic compounds at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Novikov, Vladimir B.; Nagrimanov, Ruslan N.; Solomonov, Boris N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Solution enthalpies of 18 branching-chain alkyl aromatic and aliphatic compounds in cyclohexane were measured. • Group contributions to the enthalpy of solvation due to branching and substitution in carbon chain were evaluated. • Modified solution calorimetry based approach for determination of vaporization/sublimation enthalpies was proposed. • This approach provides vaporization/sublimation enthalpies directly at T = 298.15 K. • Vaporization/sublimation enthalpies of 35 branched-chain alkyl aromatic and aliphatic compounds were determined. - Abstract: The enthalpies of solution, solvation and vaporization/sublimation are interrelated values combined in the simplest thermodynamic circle. Hence, experimental determination of vaporization/sublimation enthalpy can be substituted by experimentally simpler determination of solution enthalpy when solvation enthalpy is known. Previously it was found that solvation enthalpies of a wide range of unbranched aliphatic and aromatic solutes in saturated hydrocarbons are in good linear correlation with their molar refraction values. This allows to estimate the vaporization/sublimation enthalpy of any unbranched organic compound from its solution enthalpy in saturated hydrocarbon and molar refraction. In the present work this approach was modified for determination of vaporization/sublimation enthalpy of branched-chain alkyl aromatic and aliphatic compounds. Group contributions to the enthalpy of solvation due to the branching of carbon chain were evaluated. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of 18 branched-chain aliphatic and alkyl aromatic compounds were measured at T = 298.15 K. Vaporization/sublimation enthalpies for 35 branched aliphatic and alkyl aromatic compounds were determined by using modified solution calorimetry approach. These values are in good agreement with available literature data on vaporization/sublimation enthalpies obtained by conventional methods.

  6. Polare maskuliniteter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Anne Hauan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper my aim is to read and understand the journal of Gerrit de Veer from the last journey of William Barents to the Arctic Regions in 1596 and the journal of captain Junge on his hunting trip from Tromsø to Svalbard in 1834.It is nearly 240 years between this to voyages. The first journal is known as the earliest report from the arctic era. Gerrit de Veer adds instructive copper engravings to his text and give us insight in the crews meeting with this new land. Captain Junges journal is found together with his dead crew in a house in a fjord nearby Ny-Ålesund and has no drawings, but word. Both of these journals may be read as sources of the knowledge and understanding of the polar region. They might also unveil the ideas of how to deal with and survive under the challenges that is given. In addition one can ask if the sources can tell us more about how men describe their challenges. Can the way they expressed themselves in the journals give us an understanding of masculinity? And not least help us to create good questions of the change in the ideas of masculinities which is said to follow the change in understanding of the wilderness.

  7. Frost stress evolution and winter pea ideotype in the context of climate warming at a regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castel Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. is an important crop in temperate regions for its high seed protein concentration that is particularly sensitive to abiotic stresses. The abrupt temperature increase known as the “1987/1988 temperature regime shift” that occurs over Europe is questioning how winter pea will perform in the changing climate. This study assessed the winter frost damage evolution along from 1961 to 2015 in Burgundy-Franche-Comté by using: (1 daily observed and gridded regional temperature data and (2 a validated crop winter frost stress model calibrated for pea. This study shows a global decrease of the frost stress nevertheless resulting from a subtle balance between the decrease in its intensity and the increase of the number of events. The frost stress evolution patterns with warming depend on both plant frost resistance level and acclimation rate and are still sensitive to winter climate fluctuations. This study provides relevant information for breeding performant winter crop ideotypes able to moderate detrimental effects of climate change and offering new cropping opportunities in temperate regions.

  8. THE EFFECT OF CULTIVAR AND BEARING TREE ON BUD DIFFERENTIATION, FROST DAMAGE AND FRUIT SET IN APPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Pavičić

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available After severe winter frost, an examination was initiated of frost damage suffered by Idared and Golden Delicious clone B. The cultivars differed significantly in the differentiation intensity, the hare of damaged differentiated buds, but not in share of damaged undifferentiated buds. In both cultivars the bud damage was more intensive on long bearing wood than on spur, regardless differentiation grade. The interaction between the cultivar and the bearing wood was insignificant. The flower bud differentiation was better in Idared, but it also suffered more frost damage than the Golden Delicious clone B with differentiated buds, but not than that with undifferentiated buds. In both cultivars frost damage increases with increase of differentiated flower buds (R2=0.759; P≤0.001. The fruit set was within the limits of expectation only on the spurs of the Golden Delicious clone B, which showed strong tendency towards fruit set on long bearing shoots. In 2000, the yield of the cultivars was almost equal, as the result of thinning due to the frost damage on Idared.

  9. Changes of Frost Damage and Treeline Advance for Swiss Stone Pine in the Calimani Mts. (Eastern Carpathians, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KERN, Zoltán

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Checking the tree-ring structure of 39 living and 9 crossdated dead samples of Swissstone pine (Pinus cembra L. collected from the upper timberline of the CalimaniMts. we haveidentified 59 frost rings over the past 250 years. We found concentrated occurrence of frost events inthree decades: in the 1790s, 1810s and 1910s. No frost ring was observed in two bidecadal periods:1750-1770 and 1850-1870. Out of the analysed interval 1963-2004 is the longest period without frostring occurrence. After 1920 both frequency and severity of frost events seem to decrease compared tothe prior 170 years. We determined the altitude of highest growing stone pine individuals in theBradului Ciont–Pietrosu region in June, 2006. Individuals were sorted into tree-form or bush-likemorphological groups. Mean elevation data of the groups were corrected by an estimated constant biasof GPS measurements (-30 m. Comparing the corrected values to early 20th century inventory data65 m and 95 m upward migration was determined for treeline and boundary of bush-like occurence,respectively. The parallel results suggest that the 20th century advance of the upper forest limit wasdue to the decrease of frost stress at the zone of timberline.

  10. Recent changes in frost days events characteristics in Uruguay-Southeastern South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renom, Madeleine; De Mello, Santiago

    2015-04-01

    There are few studies about extreme temperature events in Southeastern South America as is it mentioned in the SREX report (2009), although these events generate human health impacts and big economical looses. Southeastern South America is one of the major agricultural production regions worldwide. Particularly in Uruguay, agricultural production represents a high percentage of the GDP and, in the last 15 years there has been a significant increase in the area used for that economic activity. Although frost is not always is considered as an extreme event it causes, in the case of Uruguay, an impact on society, energy consumption and agricultural losses. Previous studies have shown a negative trend in the occurrence of cold nights (TN10) during winter (June-July-August) and autumn (March-April-May) in Uruguay. This work try to determine if these trends affects the occurrences and characteristics of frost days (Tmin< 0°C). Based on a high-quality daily minimum temperature for 11 meteorological stations that cover the period 1950-2009, we analyzed different features of frost days. Long term trends do not present a clear spatial behaviour suggesting that there is a not clear relationship between the percentile based index (TN10) and a fixed index (FD). At monthly scale, May and September show a negative trend, although these months present a low number of cases that difficult the statistical treatment. It is noticeable that from a decadal point of view the last decade (2000-2009) was the decade with fewer occurrences comparing with the rest, while the 90's is the decade that presents more cases. We also analyzed changes in frost period (FP) which commonly extends from May to September. In general all the stations present a decrease in the FP in accordance with the negative trend detected at monthly scale, suggesting a warming in autumn and spring time. Although we detected different behaviour in two stations, one located inner land and the other located on the

  11. Investigation of Frost Tolerance of Flower in Two Iranian Cornelian Cherry Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Samiee Rad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In many areas, low temperature is an important environmental limiting factor in production and distribution of horticultural trees and plants. This study was conducted to study the frost tolerance of main local clones of cornelian cherry in Tarom Sofla region, Qazvin, Iran. Cold treatments at 5 levels (+4, +2, 0, -2 and -4 ˚C at two cooling periods (3 and 5 hours were arranged as a factorial experiment, based on completely randomized design with 4 replications, at flowering stage of Golabie Siah (black pear and Paeizi (autumn clones in 2009-2010. For each treatment, the electrical conductivity (EC and acidity (pH were measured just after shaking (t=0, every 3 hours in the first 24 hours, and once daily in the 2nd to 8th day. After a week, the samples were autoclaved at 105˚C for 4 minutes and the changes were recorded. Results showed that the range of EC in flower was 92.2-846.2 µS/cm, and the range of pH varied from 6.4 to 7.7. Based on the results, the effect of frost intensity on EC changes was ascending, and on pH was slowly ascending and sometimes fixed. The highest value of EC due to destruction of tissues, as an index of frost damage of the flower, was obtained at +4 ˚C. Therefore, tolerance range of cornelian cherry flower has been estimated to be more than +4 ˚C.

  12. Prediction of Frost Risks and Plagues using WRF model: a Port Wine region case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. A.; Rocha, A.; Monteiro, A.; Quénol, H.; de Freitas, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    In viticulture where the quality of the wine, the selection of the grapevines or even the characteristics of the farming soil, also depending from local soil features like topography, proximity of a river or water body, will act locally on the weather. Frosts are of significant concern to growers of many cultures crops such as winegrapes. Because of their high latitude and some altitude, the vineyards of the Demarcated Douro Region (DDR) are subjected to the frost, which cause serious damages. But the hazards of vineyard don't confine to the incidents of the fortuitous and meteorological character. The illnesses and plagues affect frequently the vineyards of Demarcated Douro Region due, namely to the weather, to the high power of the regional stocks, to the dense vegetation badly drained and favourable to the setting of numberless fungi, viruses and/or poisonous insects. In the case of DDR it is worth noticing the meteorological conditions due to the weather characteristics. Although there are several illnesses and plagues the most important enemies for the vine in the DDR are the mildew, oidium, grey rottenness, grape moth,. . . , if the climatic conditions favour their appearance and development. For this study, we selected some months for different periods, at the 16 weather stations of the Region of Douro. We use the Weather Research and Forecast Model (WRF) to study and possibly predict the occurrence of risk and plagues (mildew) episodes. The model is first validated with the meteorological data obtained at the weather stations. The knowledge of frost and plagues occurrence allows one to decrease its risks not only by selecting the cultural species and varieties but also the places of growth and the planting and sowing dates.

  13. Assessing Wheat Frost Risk with the Support of GIS: An Approach Coupling a Growing Season Meteorological Index and a Hybrid Fuzzy Neural Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaojie Yue

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Crop frost, one kind of agro-meteorological disaster, often causes significant loss to agriculture. Thus, evaluating the risk of wheat frost aids scientific response to such disasters, which will ultimately promote food security. Therefore, this paper aims to propose an integrated risk assessment model of wheat frost, based on meteorological data and a hybrid fuzzy neural network model, taking China as an example. With the support of a geographic information system (GIS, a comprehensive method was put forward. Firstly, threshold temperatures of wheat frost at three growth stages were proposed, referring to phenology in different wheat growing areas and the meteorological standard of Degree of Crop Frost Damage (QX/T 88-2008. Secondly, a vulnerability curve illustrating the relationship between frost hazard intensity and wheat yield loss was worked out using hybrid fuzzy neural network model. Finally, the wheat frost risk was assessed in China. Results show that our proposed threshold temperatures are more suitable than using 0 °C in revealing the spatial pattern of frost occurrence, and hybrid fuzzy neural network model can further improve the accuracy of the vulnerability curve of wheat subject to frost with limited historical hazard records. Both these advantages ensure the precision of wheat frost risk assessment. In China, frost widely distributes in 85.00% of the total winter wheat planting area, but mainly to the north of 35°N; the southern boundary of wheat frost has moved northward, potentially because of the warming climate. There is a significant trend that suggests high risk areas will enlarge and gradually expand to the south, with the risk levels increasing from a return period of 2 years to 20 years. Among all wheat frost risk levels, the regions with loss rate ranges from 35.00% to 45.00% account for the largest area proportion, ranging from 58.60% to 63.27%. We argue that for wheat and other frost-affected crops, it is

  14. Pedestal Craters in Utopia Planitia and Malea Planum: Evidence for a Past Ice-Rich Substrate from Marginal Sublimation Pits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadish, S. J.; Head, J. W.; Barlow, N. G.; Marchant, D. R.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction: Pedestal craters (Pd) are a subclass of impact craters unique to Mars [1] characterized by a crater perched near the center of a pedestal (mesa or plateau) that is surrounded by a quasi-circular, outward-facing scarp. The marginal scarp is usually several crater diameters from the crater rim (Figs. 2,4,5), and tens to over 100 meters above the surrounding plains (Fig. 2). Pd have been interpreted to form by armoring of the proximal substrate during the impact event. Hypotheses for the armoring mechanism include an ejecta covering [e.g., 3], increased ejecta mobilization caused by volatile substrates [4], distal glassy/melt-rich veneers [5], and/or an atmospheric blast/thermal effect [6]. Subsequently, a marginal scarp forms by preferential erosion of the substrate surrounding the armored region, most commonly thought to involve eolian removal of fine-grained, non-armored material [e.g., 3]. An understanding of the distribution of Pd, which form predominantly poleward of ~40°N and S latitude [7-9] (Fig. 1), and the role of redistribution of ice and dust during periods of climate change [e.g., 10-11], suggests that the substrate might have been volatile-rich [8-9, 12-14]. As such, some researchers [e.g., 8-9] have proposed a model for Pd formation that involves impact during periods of higher obliquity, when mid- to high-latitude substrates were characterized by thick deposits of snow and ice [e.g., 15]. Subsequent sublimation of the volatile units, except below the armored regions, yielded the perched Pd. Thus, this model predicts that thick deposits of snow/ice should underlie Pd. This is in contrast to the eolian model [3], which calls primarily for deflation of sand and dust. Here, we show the results of our study [8,16] that has documented and characterized 2461 Pd on Mars equatorward of ~65° N and S latitude (Fig. 1) in order to test these hypotheses for the origin of pedestal craters. In particular, we report on the detection of 50 Pd in Utopia

  15. Development of a Frost Risk Assessment Tool in Agriculture for a Mediterranean ecosystem Utilizing MODIS satellite observations Geomatics and Surface Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louka, Panagiota; Papanikolaou, Ioannis; Petropoulos, George; Migiros, George; Tsiros, Ioannis

    2014-05-01

    Frost risk in Mediterranean countries is a critical factor in agricultural planning and management. Nowadays, the rapid technological developments in Earth Observation (EO) technology have improved dramatically our ability to map the spatiotemporal distribution of frost conditions over a given area and evaluate its impacts on the environment and society. In this study, a frost risk model for agricultural crops cultivated in a Mediterranean environment has been developed, based primarily on Earth Observation (EO) data from MODIS sensor and ancillary spatial and point data. The ability of the model to predict frost conditions has been validated for selected days on which frost conditions had been observed for a region in Northwestern Greece according to ground observations obtained by the Agricultural Insurance Organization (ELGA). An extensive evaluation of the frost risk model predictions has been performed herein to evaluate objectively its ability to predict the spatio-temporal distribution of frost risk in the studied region, including comparisons against physiographical factors of the study area. The topographical characteristics that were taken under consideration were latitude, altitude, slope steepness, topographic convergence and the extend of the areas influenced by water bodies (such as lake and sea) existing in the study area. Additional data were also used concerning land use data and vegetation classification (type and density). Our results showed that the model was able to produce reasonably the spatio-temporal distribution of the frost conditions in our study area, following largely explainable patterns in respect to the study site and local weather conditions characteristics. All in all, the methodology implemented herein proved capable in obtaining rapidly and cost-effectively cartography of the frost risk in a Mediterranean environment, making it potentially a very useful tool for agricultural management and planning. The model presented here has

  16. Tolerância de frutos de pessegueiro a geadas Fruit frost tolerance in peach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Paulo Assmann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a tolerância de frutos de pessegueiro aos danos ocasionados pela geada. A geada ocorreu no dia 5 de setembro de 2006, sendo que a temperatura mínima, a 1,5 m do solo, foi de - 1,06ºC. Foram avaliados 28 genótipos de pessegueiro em diferentes estádios fenológicos. O delineamento experimental foi o inteiramente casualizado, com três repetições (plantas de pessegueiro, procedendo-se à avaliação em seis ramos por planta. No dia em que ocorreu a geada, foram mensurados o número de frutos por ramo, diâmetro sutural médio dos frutos, número total de gemas vegetativas, percentual de brotação e percentual de brindilas formadas a partir das gemas brotadas. Uma segunda avaliação foi realizada 15 dias após a primeira, para avaliar o percentual de queda de frutos e o diâmetro sutural médio dos frutos remanescentes. Genótipos bem enfolhados e cujos frutos apresentavam endocarpo endurecido, no momento da ocorrência da geada, foram tolerantes ao dano ocasionado pelo frio; frutos com diâmetro sutural inferior a 20 mm foram suscetíveis à geada, enquanto frutos com diâmetro sutural superior a 30 mm apresentaram boa tolerância, independentemente do genótipo avaliado.The aim of this work was to evaluate the fruit damage tolerance in different peach tree genotypes after natural freeze. The frost happened on September 5, 2006, and the minimum temperature, 1.5 meters over soil, was -1.06ºC. Twenty- eight peach tree genotypes, in different stages of development, were evaluated, in a completely random design, in three replication (plants and six branches by plants. Immediately after frost, we measured the number of fruits per branches, average fruit suture diameter, percentage of sprouts and percentage of twigs in formation. A second evaluation was accomplished fifteen days after the first one in order to assess the percentage of fruit drop and the average remaining fruit suture diameter. Genotypes

  17. Experiences with hoar-frost and its monitoring in Western Bohemia, Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulan, J. [Czech Hydrometeorological Inst., Pilsen (Czech Republic). Regional Branche Pilsen

    2004-07-01

    At this study data from winter season 2002/2003 were used to find basic statistics about conditions suitable for hoar-frost deposition. Simple criterion according to Norrman (2002) was applied and important role of screening and sheltering effect was confirmed. The most critical place with the longest time of suitable conditions was found on sheltered and screened site in elevation 550 m above sea level on highway D5 near the border crossing Rozvadov - Waidhause. This result confirms the judgment from thermal mapping according to which this stretch is one of the most critical places of Czech highway network at all. (orig.)

  18. Suppression of Frost Nucleation Achieved Using the Nanoengineered Integral Humidity Sink Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoda; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2017-01-24

    Inhibition of frost formation is important for increasing efficiency of refrigeration systems and heat exchangers, as well as for preventing the rapid icing over of water-repellant coatings that are designed to prevent accumulation of rime and glaze. From a thermodynamic point of view, this task can be achieved by either increasing hydrophobicity of the surface or decreasing the concentration of water vapor above it. The first approach has been studied in depth, but so far has not yielded a robust solution to the problem of frost formation. In this work, we systematically explore how frost growth can be inhibited by controlling water vapor concentration using bilayer coatings with a porous exterior covering a hygroscopic liquid-infused layer. We lay the theoretical foundation and provide experimental validation of the mass transport mechanism that governs the integral humidity sink effect based on this coating platform as well as reveal intriguing sizing effects about this system. We show that the concentration profile above periodically spaced pores is governed by the sink and source concentrations and two geometrical parameters: the nondimensional pore size and the ratio of the pore spacing to the boundary layer thickness. We demonstrate that when the ratio of the pore spacing to the boundary layer thickness vanishes, as for the nanoporous bilayer coatings, the entire surface concentration becomes uniform and equal to the concentration set by the hygroscopic liquid. In other words, the surface concentration becomes completely independent of the nanopore size. We identified the threshold geometrical parameters for this condition and show that it can lead to a 65 K decrease in the nucleation onset surface temperature below the dew point. With this fundamental insight, we use bilayer coatings to nanoengineer the integral humidity sink effect to provide extreme antifrosting performance with up to a 2 h delay in nucleation onset at 263 K. The nanoporous bilayer

  19. Prediction of frost location using machine learning and wireless sensor networks

    OpenAIRE

    Diedrichs, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The damage caused by the frost takes place when the temperatures are below than a tolerable limit for the plants. Each phenological state, e.g owering, has a variable cold hardiness, so the lethal temperature is also variable. Freezing climatic events are the most dangerous, because they affect a large land surface. Mendoza is not an exception. According to the Instituto Nacional de Vitivinicultura (INV), in 2013 the loss of the vine crop reached up to 27%. Big part of that loss of yield was ...

  20. Simulating transmission and control of Taenia solium infections using a reed-frost stochastic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyvsgaard, Niels Chr.; Johansen, Maria Vang; Carabin, Hélène

    2007-01-01

    The transmission dynamics of the human-pig zoonotic cestode Taenia solium are explored with both deterministic and stochastic versions of a modified Reed-Frost model. This model, originally developed for microparasitic infections (i.e. bacteria, viruses and protozoa), assumes that random contacts...... humans eating under-cooked pork meat harbouring T. solium metacestodes. Deterministic models of each scenario were first run, followed by stochastic versions of the models to assess the likelihood of infection elimination in the small population modelled. The effects of three groups of interventions were...

  1. Effects of fin pitch and array of the frost layer growth on extended surface of a heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong Keun; Lee, Kwan Soo [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the effects of the fin array and pitch on the frost layer growth of a heat exchanger. The numerical results are compared with experimental data of a cold plate to validate the present model, and agree well with experimental data within a maximum error of 8%. The characteristics of the frost formation on staggered fin array are somewhat different from those of in-line array. For fin pitch below 10 mm, the frost layer growth of second fin in the staggered array is affected by that of first fin. The heat transfer of single fin deteriorate with decreasing fin pitch regardless of fin array, however, the thermal performance of a heat exchanger, considering increase of heat surface area, becomes better.

  2. Remedial measures to tame the frost heaves at gas distribution stations in west-east gas pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Daoming; Gong, Jing [Beijing Key Laboratory of Urban Oil and Gas Distribution Technology, China University of Petroleum (China); Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Kai; Jiang, Yongtao [West-East Gas Pipeline Company (China)

    2010-07-01

    In China, a pipeline running 3900 kilometers from Xinjiang to the Yangtze River Delta area and with a capacity of 12 billion cubic meters of gas annually was put into operation in 2004. Due to subfreezing gas temperatures, the distribution stations have since then suffered from frost heaves. One method to address this issue could be to install gas-fueled heaters, however, that would imply important additional costs as well as problems in acquiring land. The aim of this paper is to present and compare different methods to deal with the frost heaves issue. Soil replacement with a water mitigation technique was found to be the best option based on geotechnical survey, calculations and data; this technique was successfully applied to several distribution stations with different water tables. A frost heaves mitigation method was developed herein and proved to be more cost effective than gas-fueled heaters.

  3. A poética do sublime na teoria da tragédia de Friedrich Schiller

    OpenAIRE

    Guilherme Ronan de Souza Elias Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Em sua breve carreira filosófica, o poeta e dramaturgo alemão Friedrich Schiller (1759-1805) se apropriou do conceito kantiano do sublime, identificando-o ao trágico e à tragédia, manifestação artística que seria genuinamente regulada por princípios estéticos daquela ordem. Deste modo, buscamos neste trabalho relacionar o caráter subjetivo da experiência do sublime com as suas implicações de ordem prática para a arquitetura da tragédia, em especial as que dizem respeito à estrutura ideal do d...

  4. Drought and frost tolerance in rhododendron collection of the Mlyňany Arboretum (Slovakia: a screening for future climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferus Peter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhododendrons are jewels of the Mlyňany Arboretum, Institute of Forest Ecology of the Slovak Academy of Sciences (IFE SAS. Blossoming in May, they attract thousands of visitors. But recently these woody plants have much suffered from climatic extremes such as summer droughts and winter frosts, associated with the advancing climate change. To assess the rhododendron collection’s stability, its drought and frost injury level were tested in field, in summer 2015 and winter 2017, respectively. The tested parameters were: leaf wilting and electrolyte leakage combined with shrub leaf area, insolation level and overall health state. We found that the drought effect was strong or very strong in only ca. 30% rhododendron species and ca. 10% rhododendron cultivars, and that around 60% shrubs showed no or only moderate symptoms of water deficit. The drought injury level was only associated with the genotype. The most tolerant / sensitive genotypes, commonly occurring in the park, were: R. catawbiense, R. ponticum, R. smirnowii, cv. ‘Boursault’, cv. ‘Cunningham’s White’ and cv. ‘Purpureum Elegans’ / R. fortunei and cv. ‘Tamarindos’. On the other hand, the most frequent response to frost in the observed rhododendron genotypes was moderate injury (28 and 37% for species and cultivars, respectively, nevertheless more than 18% species and almost 6% cultivars exhibited strong frost damage. Despite absence of significant differences in the factor-response between the species, we may suggest this decreasing sequence of the genotypes ordered according to their frost resistance: genotypes: cv. ‘Cunningham’s White’ > R. decorum > R. fortunei and cv. ‘Duke of York’ > R. smirnowii > cvs. ‘Purpureum Elegans’ and ‘Tamarindos’ > R. macrophyllum and cv. ‘Nova Zembla’ > R. catawbiense > R. ponticum. These results have been compared with similar works in rhododendron species/cultivars as well as suggested species drought/frost

  5. Sublimation growth of nonpolar AlN single crystals and defect characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Issei; Arakawa, Satoshi; Tanizaki, Keisuke; Miyanaga, Michimasa; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki [Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd., 1-1-1 Koyakita, Itami, Hyogo 664-0016 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    Sublimation growth of nonpolar AlN single crystals was investigated. The crystals were prepared in two methods: By slicing along the m -plane from c -plane-grown thick crystals, and by heteroepitaxial growth on m -plane SiC substrates. Defects of the crystals were observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscope. Dislocation density in AlN/SiC (0001) decreased significantly at about 1.5 {mu}m above the interface, while stacking faults initiated from the interface toward the growth surface in AlN/SiC (1-100). With increasing crystal thickness, the dislocation density decreases up to 5 x 10{sup 4}/cm{sup 2} at the thickness of 10 mm. In the AlN single crystal grown on SiC (0001), it is noteworthy that the dislocations are localized around the AlN/SiC interface and that far fewer dislocations occur near the growth surface. High-crystallinity AlN thick single crystals could be grown on SiC (0001) substrates. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Applying laboratory thermal desorption data in an interstellar context: sublimation of methanol thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Simon D.; Bolina, Amandeep S.; Chen, Rui; Collings, Mark P.; Brown, Wendy A.; McCoustra, Martin R. S.

    2009-09-01

    Methods by which experimental measurements of thermal desorption can be applied in astrophysical environments have been developed, using the sublimation of solid methanol as an example. The temperature programmed desorption of methanol from graphitic, amorphous silica and polycrystalline gold substrates was compared, with the kinetic parameters of desorption extracted by either a leading edge analysis or by fitting using a stochastic integration method. At low coverages, the desorption shows a substrate-dependent fractional order. However, at higher coverages methanol desorption is zeroth order with kinetic parameters independent of substrate. Using a kinetic model based on the stochastic integration analyses, desorption under astrophysically relevant conditions can be simulated. We find that the chemical and morphological nature of the substrate has relatively little impact on the desorption temperature of solid methanol, and that the substrate independent zeroth-order kinetics can provide a satisfactory model for desorption in astrophysical environments. Uncertainties in the heating rate and the distribution of grain sizes will have the largest influence on the range of desorption temperature. These conclusions are likely to be generally applicable to all species in dust grain ice mantles. In memory of Rui Chen. E-mail: m.p.collings@hw.ac.uk

  7. There is no direct relationship between N-status and frost hardiness in needles of NH3-exposed Scots pine seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clement, JMAM; Venema, JH; Van Hasselt, PR

    2000-01-01

    The effect of short-term atmospheric ammonia deposition on frost hardening of needles of three-month-old seedlings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was studied. Plants were frost hardened under short day and moderate temperature conditions in the laboratory during exposure to gaseous NH3

  8. Robert Frost's Chicken Feathers and Other Lectures from the 1968 Augustana College NDEA English Institute. Augustana College Press Monograph Series No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseboe, Arthur R., Ed.

    The four lectures in this publication were composed with the common concern for making the study of high school English more effective and more delightful. Papers are (1) "Robert Frost's Chicken Feathers" by C. W. Geyer (discusses the influence of oral folklore and humor on Frost's poetry); (2) "Nature in Literature" by Gerhard T. Alexis; (3)…

  9. Coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation and condensation with application to freeze-drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Arnab

    Freeze-drying is a low-pressure, low-temperature condensation pumping process widely used in the manufacture of bio-pharmaceuticals for removal of solvents by sublimation. The goal of the process is to provide a stable dosage form by removing the solvent in such a way that the sensitive molecular structure of the active substance is least disturbed. The vacuum environment presents unique challenges for understanding and controlling heat and mass transfer in the process. As a result, the design of equipment and associated processes has been largely empirical, slow and inefficient. A comprehensive simulation framework to predict both, process and equipment performance is critical to improve current practice. A part of the dissertation is aimed at performing coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation-condensation processes typical of freeze-drying technologies. Both, experimental and computational models are used to first understand the key heat transfer modes during the process. A modeling and computational framework, validated with experiments for analysis of sublimation, water-vapor flow and condensation in application to pharmaceutical freeze-drying is developed. Augmented with computational fluid dynamics modeling, the simulation framework presented here allows to predict for the first time, dynamic product/process conditions taking into consideration specifics of equipment design. Moreover, by applying the modeling framework to process design based on a design-space approach, it has demonstrated that there is a viable alternative to empiricism.

  10. Winter frost resistance of Pinus cembra measured in situ at the alpine timberline as affected by temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Othmar; Neuner, Gilbert

    2011-11-01

    Winter frost resistance (WFR), midwinter frost hardening and frost dehardening potential of Pinus cembra L. were determined in situ by means of a novel low-temperature freezing system at the alpine timberline ecotone (1950 m a.s.l., Mt Patscherkofel, Innsbruck, Austria). In situ liquid nitrogen (LN₂)-quenching experiments should check whether maximum WFR of P. cembra belonging to the frost hardiest conifer group, being classified in US Department of Agriculture climatic zone 1, suffices to survive dipping into LN₂ (-196 °C). Viability was assessed in a field re-growth test. Maximum in situ WFR (LT₅₀) of leaves was cembra was higher than that obtained on detached twigs, as reported earlier. In situ LN₂-quenching experiments were lethal in all cases even when twigs of P. cembra were exposed to an in situ frost hardening treatment (12 days at -20 °C followed by 3 days at -50 °C) to induce maximum WFR. Temperature treatments applied in the field significantly affected the actual WFR. In January a frost hardening treatment (21 days at -20 °C) led to a significant increase of WFR (buds: -62 °C to cembra was not at its specific maximum WFR. In contrast, simulated warm spells in late winter led to premature frost dehardening (buds: -32.6 °C to -10.2 °C; leaves: -32.7 to -16.4 °C) followed by significantly earlier bud swelling and burst in late winter. Strikingly, both temperature treatments, either increased air temperature (+10.1 °C) or increased soil temperature (+6.5 °C), were similarly effective. This high readiness to frost harden and deharden in winter in the field must be considered to be of great significance for future winter survival of P. cembra. Determination of WFR in field re-growth tests appears to be a valuable tool for critically judging estimates of WFR obtained on detached twigs in an ecological context.

  11. Material and fin pitch effect on frosting CO2 in a fin-and-tube heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassila, Joseph; Toubassy, Joseph; Danlos, Amélie; Descombes, Georges; Clodic, Denis

    2017-02-01

    Cryo Pur technology uses cryogenic separation to remove water vapor and carbon dioxide from biogas, in order to obtain bio-methane. To cool down the biogas at a very low temperature, a fin-and-tube heat exchanger is designed. In order to improve the fin-and-tube heat exchanger performance, a model is developed to investigate the material and fin pitch on frosting carbon dioxide. This paper will study the effect of the tubes and the fins material, and the fin pitch effect. The purpose is to extend the duration of a frosting cycle.

  12. Frost Growth and Densification on a Flat Surface in Laminar Flow with Variable Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, M.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments are performed concerning frost growth and densification in laminar flow over a flat surface under conditions of constant and variable humidity. The flat plate test specimen is made of aluminum-6031, and has dimensions of 0.3 mx0.3 mx6.35 mm. Results for the first variable humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 1.77 m/s, air temperature of 295.1 K, and a relative humidity continuously ranging from 81 to 54%. The second variable humidity test case corresponds to plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 2.44 m/s, air temperature of 291.8 K, and a relative humidity ranging from 66 to 59%. Results for the constant humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 263.7 K, air velocity of 1.7 m/s, air temperature of 295 K, and a relative humidity of 71.6 %. Comparisons of the data with the author's frost model extended to accommodate variable humidity suggest satisfactory agreement between the theory and the data for both constant and variable humidity.

  13. Model prediction of frost tolerance as related to winter survival of wheat in Finnish field trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. BERGJORD

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The model FROSTOL simulates course of frost tolerance in winter wheat on a daily basis from sowing on as affected by soil temperature (2 cm, snow cover, phenological development, and a genotypic maximum level of frost tolerance (LT50. A series of cultivar trials in Finland was used to evaluate the model's ability to estimate plant survival in natural field environments during winters with differing weather conditions. Recorded survival was compared with number of intersections between the curves of simulated LT50 and the soil temperature curve for each field. A cumulative stress level (CSL was calculated based both on number of intersections and FROSTOL simulated stress levels. The correlation between CSL and field recordings was quite low. While the field trials characterize a general ability to stand various types of winter stress, FROSTOL estimates damage caused by the soil temperature regime only. However, FROSTOL simulations seemed to correspond reasonably well to field observations when low temperature was the eventual cause of damage.

  14. Effect of Postsowing Compaction on Cold and Frost Tolerance of North China Plain Winter Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiyun Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improper postsowing compaction negatively affects soil temperature and thereby cold and frost tolerance, particularly in extreme cold weather. In North China Plain, the temperature falls to 5 degrees below zero, even lower in winter, which is period for winter wheat growing. Thus improving temperature to promote wheat growth is important in this area. A field experiment from 2013 to 2016 was conducted to evaluate effects of postsowing compaction on soil temperature and plant population of wheat at different stages during wintering period. The effect of three postsowing compaction methods—(1 compacting wheel (CW, (2 crosskill roller (CR, and (3 V-shaped compacting roller after crosskill roller (VCRCR—on winter soil temperatures and relation to wheat shoot growth parameters were measured. Results showed that the highest soil midwinter temperature was in the CW treatment. In the 20 cm and 40 cm soil layer, soil temperatures were ranked in the following order of CW > VCRCR > CR. Shoot numbers under CW, CR, and VCRCR treatments were statistically 12.40% and 8.18% higher under CW treatment compared to CR or VCRCR treatments at the end of wintering period. The higher soil temperature under CW treatment resulted in higher shoot number at the end of wintering period, apparently due to reduced shoot death by cold and frost damage.

  15. Frost related dieback in Estonian energy plantations of willows in relation to fertilisation and pathogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambours, M.A.; Nejad, P. [Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7026, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Heinsoo, K. [Institute of Zoology and Botany, Estonian Agricultural University, Riia 181, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Granhall, U. [Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7025, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    Two 9-year old Estonian Salix plantations suffering from dieback were studied: one situated on poor mineral soil and divided into fertilised and unfertilised plots (Saare plantation) and another growing on a well-decomposed and nitrogen-rich organic soil, without fertiliser application (Kambja plantation). Bacteria from internal tissues of visually damaged shoots from seven clones were isolated in spring and autumn. The strains were subsequently biochemically characterised and tested for ice nucleation activity and pathogenicity on Salix. Some strains were also analysed with 16S rRNA. High numbers of culturable bacteria were found, belonging mainly to Erwinia, Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas spp. Fertilised plots were significantly more colonised by bacteria than unfertilised plots and also more extensively damaged, showing a lower density of living plants after 7 years of culture. More ice nucleation active (INA) strains were found in Saare fertilised plots and at Kambja than in Saare unfertilised plots. Likewise, most pathogenic strains were isolated from Saare fertilised plots and from Kambja. For some of the willow clones studied, dieback appeared to be related to both clonal frost sensitivity and abundance of INA and pathogenic bacteria. The plantations probably suffered from the presence of high amounts of pathogens and from frost related injuries aggravated by INA bacteria. Most probably the fertilisation at Saare and the nitrogen-rich soil at Kambja created a favourable environment for bacterial development and led to high dieback levels after the first harvest. (author)

  16. ASSESSMENT OF CERAMIC TILE FROST RESISTANCE BY MEANS OF THE FREQUENCY INSPECTION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICHAL MATYSÍK

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results of our experimental analysis of ceramic cladding element frost resistance, particular attention being paid to the application of the frequency inspection method. Three different sets of ceramic tiles of the Ia class to EN 14 411 B standard made by various manufacturers have been analyzed. The ceramic tiles under investigation have been subjected to freeze-thaw-cycle-based degradation in compliance with the relevant ČSN EN ISO 10545-12 standard. Furthermore, accelerated degradation procedure has been applied to selected test specimens, consisting in reducing the temperature of water soaked ceramic tiles in the course of the degradation cycles down –70°C. To verify the correctness of the frequency inspection results, additional physical properties of the ceramic tiles under test have been measured, such as, the ceramic tile strength limit, modulus of elasticity and modulus of deformability, resulting from the flexural tensile strength tests, integrity defect and surface micro-geometry tracking. It has been proved that the acoustic method of frequency inspection is a sensitive indicator of the structure condition and can be applied to the ceramic cladding element frost resistance and service life prediction assessment.

  17. Screening of plant resources with anti-ice nucleation activity for frost damage prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shingo; Fukuda, Satoshi; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Arakawa, Keita

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that some polyphenols have anti-ice nucleation activity (anti-INA) against ice-nucleating bacteria that contribute to frost damage. In the present study, leaf disk freezing assay, a test of in vitro application to plant leaves, was performed for the screening of anti-INA, which inhibits the ice nucleation activity of an ice-nucleating bacterium Erwinia ananas in water droplets on the leaf surfaces. The application of polyphenols with anti-INA, kaempferol 7-O-β-glucoside and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, to the leaf disk freezing assay by cooling at -4--6 °C for 3 h, revealed that both the compounds showed anti-INAs against E. ananas in water droplets on the leaf surfaces. Further, this assay also revealed that the extracts of five plant leaves showed high anti-INA against E. ananas in water droplets on leaf surfaces, indicating that they are the candidate resources to protect crops from frost damage.

  18. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  19. The 1997 Spring Regression of the Martian South Polar Cap: Mars Orbiter Camera Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P.B.; Cantor, B.A.; Malin, M.C.; Edgett, K.; Carr, M.H.; Danielson, G.E.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Davies, M.E.; Hartmann, W.K.; McEwen, A.S.; Soderblom, L.A.; Thomas, P.C.; Veverka, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter cameras (MOC) on Mars Global Surveyor observed the south polar cap of Mars during its spring recession in 1997. The images acquired by the wide angle cameras reveal a pattern of recession that is qualitatively similar to that observed by Viking in 1977 but that does differ in at least two respects. The 1977 recession in the 0o to 120o longitude sector was accelerated relative to the 1997 observations after LS = 240o; the Mountains of Mitchel also detached from the main cap earlier in 1997. Comparison of the MOC images with Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter data shows that the Mountains of Mitchel feature is controlled by local topography. Relatively dark, low albedo regions well within the boundaries of the seasonal cap were observed to have red-to-violet ratios that characterize them as frost units rather than unfrosted or partially frosted ground; this suggests the possibility of regions covered by CO2 frost having different grain sizes.

  20. Final Report for “Simulating the Arctic Winter Longwave Indirect Effects. A New Parameterization for Frost Flower Aerosol Salt Emissions” (DESC0006679) for 9/15/2011 through 9/14/2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Lynn M. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Somerville, Richard C.J. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Burrows, Susannah [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rasch, Phil [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-12

    Description of the Project: This project has improved the aerosol formulation in a global climate model by using innovative new field and laboratory observations to develop and implement a novel wind-driven sea ice aerosol flux parameterization. This work fills a critical gap in the understanding of clouds, aerosol, and radiation in polar regions by addressing one of the largest missing particle sources in aerosol-climate modeling. Recent measurements of Arctic organic and inorganic aerosol indicate that the largest source of natural aerosol during the Arctic winter is emitted from crystal structures, known as frost flowers, formed on a newly frozen sea ice surface [Shaw et al., 2010]. We have implemented the new parameterization in an updated climate model making it the first capable of investigating how polar natural aerosol-cloud indirect effects relate to this important and previously unrecognized sea ice source. The parameterization is constrained by Arctic ARM in situ cloud and radiation data. The modified climate model has been used to quantify the potential pan-Arctic radiative forcing and aerosol indirect effects due to this missing source. This research supported the work of one postdoc (Li Xu) for two years and contributed to the training and research of an undergraduate student. This research allowed us to establish a collaboration between SIO and PNNL in order to contribute the frost flower parameterization to the new ACME model. One peer-reviewed publications has already resulted from this work, and a manuscript for a second publication has been completed. Additional publications from the PNNL collaboration are expected to follow.

  1. Meteorological conditions associated to high sublimation amounts in semiarid high-elevation Andes decrease the performance of empirical melt models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James; Burlando, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Empirical melt (EM) models are often preferred to surface energy balance (SEB) models to calculate melt amounts of snow and ice in hydrological modelling of high-elevation catchments. The most common reasons to support this decision are that, in comparison to SEB models, EM models require lower levels of meteorological data, complexity and computational costs. However, EM models assume that melt can be characterized by means of a few index variables only, and their results strongly depend on the transferability in space and time of the calibrated empirical parameters. In addition, they are intrinsically limited in accounting for specific process components, the complexity of which cannot be easily reconciled with the empirical nature of the model. As an example of an EM model, in this study we use the Enhanced Temperature Index (ETI) model, which calculates melt amounts using air temperature and the shortwave radiation balance as index variables. We evaluate the performance of the ETI model on dry high-elevation sites where sublimation amounts - that are not explicitly accounted for the EM model - represent a relevant percentage of total ablation (1.1 to 8.7%). We analyse a data set of four Automatic Weather Stations (AWS), which were collected during the ablation season 2013-14, at elevations between 3466 and 4775 m asl, on the glaciers El Tapado, San Francisco, Bello and El Yeso, which are located in the semiarid Andes of central Chile. We complement our analysis using data from past studies in Juncal Norte Glacier (Chile) and Haut Glacier d'Arolla (Switzerland), during the ablation seasons 2008-09 and 2006, respectively. We use the results of a SEB model, applied to each study site, along the entire season, to calibrate the ETI model. The ETI model was not designed to calculate sublimation amounts, however, results show that their ability is low also to simulate melt amounts at sites where sublimation represents larger percentages of total ablation. In fact, we

  2. Experimental study of no-frost refrigerator. Part 1: heat transfer through the walls; Estudo experimental de um refrigerador no-frost. Parte 1: transferencia de calor atraves das paredes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Joaquim Manoel [Escola Tecnica Federal de Santa Catarina, Sao Jose, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: joaquim@nrva.ufsc.br; Melo, Claudio; Vieira, Luis Antonio Torquato [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2000-07-01

    This paper approaches the heat transfer in permanent regimen trough the walls of a no-frost refrigerator with two compartments with forced internal ventilation. The presented methodology allows the determination of thermal resistances of the walls externally. Also, the heating effect due to the compressor, the condenser and the air distribution between the compartments are investigated.

  3. IR SPECTRAL MAPPING OF THE MARTIAN SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP USING CRISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Campbell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are considered to be important in theories of abiogenesis (Allamandola, 2011 . There is evidence that PAHs have been detected on two icy Saturnian satellites using the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS on the Cassini spacecraft (Cruikshank et al., 2007. The hypothesised presence of PAHs in Mars south polar cap has not been systematically examined even though the Mars south polar cap may allow the preservation of organic molecules that are typically destroyed at the Martian surface by UV radiation (Dartnell et al. 2012. This hypothesis is supported by recent analyses of South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC structural evolution (Thomas et al., 2009 that suggest the possibility that seasonal and long term sublimation may excavate dust particles from within the polar ice. Periodic sublimation is believed to be responsible for the formation of so-called “Swiss Cheese Terrain”, a unique surface feature found only in the Martian south polar residual cap consisting of flat floored, circular depressions (Byrne, 2009. We show the first examples of work towards the detection of PAHs in Swiss Cheese Terrain, using data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM, on board NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO. CRISM is designed to search for mineralogical indications of past and present water, thus providing extensive coverage of the south polar cap. In this work, we discuss whether CRISM infrared spectra can be used to detect PAHs in Swiss Cheese Terrain and demonstrate a number of maps showing shifts in spectral profiles over the SPRC.

  4. Mass removal by oxidation and sublimation of porous graphite during fiber laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Grady T.; Bauer, William A.; Fox, Charles D.; Gonzales, Ashley E.; Herr, Nicholas C.; Gosse, Ryan C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2017-01-01

    The various effects of laser heating of carbon materials are key to assessing laser weapon effectiveness. Porous graphite plates, cylinders, and cones with densities of 1.55 to 1.82 g/cm3 were irradiated by a 10-kW fiber laser at 0.075 to 3.525 kW/cm2 for 120 s to study mass removal and crater formation. Surface temperatures reached steady state values as high as 3767 K. The total decrease in sample mass ranged from 0.06 to 6.29 g, with crater volumes of 0.52 to 838 mm3, and penetration times for 12.7-mm-thick plates as short as 38 s. Minor contaminants in the graphite samples produced calcium and iron oxide to be redeposited on the graphite surface. Dramatic graphite crystalline structures are also produced at higher laser irradiances. Significantly increased porosity of the sample is observed even outside the laser-irradiated region. Total mass removed increases with deposited laser energy at a rate of 4.83 g/MJ for medium extruded graphite with an apparent threshold of 0.15 MJ. At ˜3.5 kW/cm2, the fractions of the mass removed from the cylindrical samples in the crater, surrounding trench, and outer region of decreased porosity are 38%, 47%, and 15%, respectively. Graphite is particularly resistant to damage by high power lasers. The new understanding of graphite combustion and sublimation during laser irradiation is vital to the more complex behavior of carbon composites.

  5. Spectroscopic, microscopic, and internal stress analysis in cadmium telluride grown by close-space sublimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manciu, Felicia S.; Salazar, Jessica G.; Diaz, Aryzbe; Quinones, Stella A.

    2015-01-01

    High quality materials with excellent ordered structure are needed for developing photovoltaic and infrared devices. With this end in mind, the results of our research prove the importance of a detailed, comprehensive spectroscopic and microscopic analysis in assessing cadmium telluride (CdTe) characteristics. The goal of this work is to examine not only material crystallinity and morphology, but also induced stress in the deposit material. A uniform, selective growth of polycrystalline CdTe by close-space sublimation on patterned Si(111) and Si(211) substrates is demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy images. Besides good crystallinity of the samples, as revealed by both Raman scattering and Fourier transform infrared absorption investigations, the far-infrared transmission data also show the presence of surface optical phonon modes, which is direct evidence of confinement in such a material. The qualitative identification of the induced stress was achieved by performing confocal Raman mapping microscopy on sample surfaces and by monitoring the existence of the rock-salt and zinc-blende structural phases of CdTe, which were associated with strained and unstrained morphologies, respectively. Although the induced stress in the material is still largely due to the high lattice mismatch between CdTe and the Si substrate, the current results provide a direct visualization of its partial release through the relaxation effect at crystallite boundaries and of preferential growth directions of less strain. Our study, thus offers significant value for improvement of material properties, by targeting the needed adjustments in the growth processes. - Highlights: • Assessing the characteristics of CdTe deposited on patterned Si substrates • Proving the utility of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring the induced stress • Confirming the partial stress release through the grain boundary relaxation effect • Demonstrating the phonon confinement effect in low

  6. AdS/QCD, Light-Front Holography, and Sublimated Gluons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    The gauge/gravity duality leads to a simple analytical and phenomenologically compelling nonperturbative approximation to the full light-front QCD Hamiltonian - 'Light-Front Holography', which provides a Lorentz-invariant first-approximation to QCD, and successfully describes the spectroscopy of light-quark meson and baryons, their elastic and transition form factors, and other hadronic properties. The bound-state Schroedinger and Dirac equations of the soft-wall AdS/QCD model predict linear Regge trajectories which have the same slope in orbital angular momentum L and radial quantum number n for both mesons and baryons. Light-front holography connects the fifth-dimensional coordinate of AdS space z to an invariant impact separation variable {zeta} in 3+1 space at fixed light-front time. A key feature is the determination of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons - the relativistic analogs of the Schroedinger wavefunctions of atomic physics which allow one to compute form factors, transversity distributions, spin properties of the valence quarks, jet hadronization, and other hadronic observables. One thus obtains a one-parameter color-confining model for hadron physics at the amplitude level. AdS/QCD also predicts the form of the non-perturbative effective coupling {alpha}{sub s}{sup AdS} (Q) and its {beta}-function with an infrared fixed point which agrees with the effective coupling a{sub g1} (Q{sup 2}) extracted from measurements of the Bjorken sum rule below Q{sup 2} < 1 GeV{sup 2}. This is consistent with a flux-tube interpretation of QCD where soft gluons with virtualities Q{sup 2} < 1 GeV{sup 2} are sublimated into a color-confining potential for quarks. We discuss a number of phenomenological hadronic properties which support this picture.

  7. The interplay between inner and outer frost damage and its implication for accelerated freeze-thaw testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2014-01-01

    In the present project salt frost scaling was registered during an accelerated freeze-thaw test (CEN/TS 12390-9). After the test, inner damage was evaluated by observing the crack patterns on fluorescence impregnated plane sections. The results indicate that the developments of inner and outer...

  8. Bacterial blight (Pseudomonas pisi Sackett) of peas in South Africa, with special reference to frost as a predisposing factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelema, B.H.

    1972-01-01

    In the beginning of the nineteen fifties bacterial blight caused much damage to pea crops in South Africa, particularly to those grown for seed production. A study has been made of the causal organism and the conditioning factors of the disease, special attention being paid to frost as a

  9. Influence of frost damage and sample preconditioning on the porosity characterization of cement based materials using low temperature calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Fridh, Katja; Johannesson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature calorimetry (LTC) can be used to study the meso-porosity of cement based materials. The influence of frost damage on the meso-porosity determination by LTC was explored on a model material MCM-41 and two cement pastes by conducting repeated cycles of freezing and melting measureme...

  10. Experimental investigation of the effect of air velocity on a unit cooler under frosting condition: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, Ergin; Çağlayan, Akın; Konukman, Alp Er S.

    2017-10-01

    Finned tube evaporators are used in a wide range of applications such as commercial and industrial cold/freezed storage rooms with high traffic loading under frosting conditions. In this case study, an evaporator with an integrated fan was manufactured and tested under frosting conditions by only changing the air flow rate in an ambient balanced type test laboratory compared to testing in a wind tunnel with a more uniform flow distribution in order to detect the effect of air flow rate on frosting. During the test, operation was performed separately based on three different air flow rates. The parameters concerning test operation such as the changes of air temperature, air relative humidity, surface temperature, air-side pressure drop and refrigerant side capacity etc. were followed in detail for each air flow rate. At the same time, digital images were captured in front of the evaporator; thus, frost thicknesses and blockage ratios at the course of fan stall were determined by using an image-processing technique. Consequently, the test and visual results showed that the trendline of air-side pressure drop increased slowly at the first stage of test operations, then increased linearly up to a top point and then the linearity was disrupted instantly. This point speculated the beginning of defrost operation for each case. In addition, despite detecting a velocity that needs to be avoided, a test applied at minimum air velocity is superior to providing minimum capacity in terms of loss of capacity during test operations.

  11. Increasing the frost resistance of ‘Golden Delicious’, ‘Gala’ and ‘Šampion’ apple cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łysiak Grzegorz P.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was the evaluation of whether the application of 5-ALA, which has potential as a plant growth stimulating agent with indirect anti-stress activity, can limit the damage caused by low temperatures in winter. The research was conducted on frost-sensitive apple cultivars for three years in an orchard and in a laboratory. During the vegetative seasons of each year, the trees of three apple cultivars (‘Golden Delicious’, ‘Gala’ and ‘Šampion’ were subject to 5-ALA foliar application. Three times during each winter following the field application, apple shoots were taken to the laboratory and frozen at −20°C, −25°C and −30°C. After incubation, the damage to the sensitive parts of the shoots was evaluated. The application had a positive effect on the frost resistance of all cultivars, most often at the end of dormancy, which is especially noteworthy because frost damage occurs most frequently during this period. Positive effects of the application were found in most of the experiment combinations of cultivar, year, freezing date and shoot part. Additionally, the positive influence of 5-ALA application on frost resistance was found to increase with each year of the research.

  12. Promoting sustainable potato agriculture in the Andean region by supplemental calcium nutrition and breeding for frost tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaborative research in Peru sought to promote sustainable potato production and, mitigate adverse impacts of climate change through two approaches: first calcium amendments to increase crop yield and, second to enhance frost tolerance in native potatoes. All the multi-year, multi-location experim...

  13. Frost drought in conifers at the alpine timberline: xylem dysfunction and adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Stefan; Hacke, Uwe; Schmid, Peter; Schwienbacher, Franziska; Gruber, Andreas

    2006-12-01

    Drought stress can cause xylem embolism in trees when the water potential (psi) in the xylem falls below specific vulnerability thresholds. At the alpine timberline, frost drought is known to cause excessive winter embolism unless xylem vulnerability or transpiration is sufficiently reduced to avoid critical psi. We compared annual courses of psi and embolism in Picea abies, Pinus cembra, Pinus mugo, Larix decidua, and Juniperus communis growing at the timberline vs. low altitude. In addition, vulnerability properties and related anatomical parameters as well as wood density (D(t)) and wall reinforcement (wall thickness related to conduit diameter) were studied. This allowed an estimate of stress intensities as well as a detection of adaptations that reduce embolism formation. At the alpine timberline, psi was lowest during winter with corresponding embolism rates of up to 100% in three of the conifers studied. Only Pinus cembra and Larix decidua avoided winter embolism due to moderate psi. Minor embolism was observed at low altitude where the water potentials of all species remained within a narrow range throughout the year. Within species, differences in psi50 (psi at 50% loss of conductivity) at high vs. low altitude were less than 1 MPa. In Picea abies and Pinus cembra, psi50 was more negative at the timberline while, in the other conifer species, psi50 was more negative at low altitude. Juniperus communis exhibited the lowest (-6.4 +/- 0.04 MPa; mean +/- SE) and Pinus mugo the highest psi50 (-3.34 +/- 0.03 MPa). In some cases, D(t) and tracheid wall reinforcement were higher than in previously established relationships of these parameters with psi50, possibly because of mechanical demands associated with the specific growing conditions. Conifers growing at the alpine timberline were exposed to higher drought stress intensities than individuals at low altitude. Frost drought during winter caused high embolism rates which were probably amplified by freeze

  14. Borehole Heat Exchanger Systems: Hydraulic Conductivity and Frost-Resistance of Backfill Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbergen, Hauke; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    constant radial stress boundary conditions (sigma 2 = sigma 3 = constant) • radial freezing from inside out, following the in-situ freezing direction The results differ substantially from prior test procedures (such as standardized frost tests for concrete or soft soils). Concentric frost-induced cracking was observed. The cracking pattern is in good agreement with cryostatic suction processes and frost heave in fine grained soils. The hydraulic conductivity of the system depends on the composition of the grout. With the developed testing device (and procedure) a unified and independent assessment and quality control becomes feasible. Adequate materials for advanced shallow geothermal systems can be clearly identified.

  15. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live......In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  16. Applying Fibre-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing to Near-surface Temperature Dynamics of Broadacre Cereals During Radiant Frost Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutsel, B.; Callow, J. N.

    2017-12-01

    Radiant frost events, particularly those during the reproductive stage of winter cereal growth, cost growers millions of dollars in lost yield. Whilst synoptic drivers of frost and factors influencing temperature variation at the landscape scale are relatively well understood, there is a lack of knowledge surrounding small-scale temperature dynamics within paddocks and plot trials. Other work has also suggested a potential significant temperature gradient (several degrees) vertically from ground to canopy, but this is poorly constrained experimentally. Subtle changes in temperature are important as frost damage generally occurs in a very narrow temperature range (-2 to -5°C). Once a variety's damage threshold is reached, a 1°C difference in minimum temperature can increase damage from 10 to 90%. This study applies Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) using fibre optics to understand how minimum temperature evolves during a radiant frost. DTS assesses the difference in attenuation of Raman scattering of a light pulse travelling along a fibre optic cable to measure temperature. A bend insensitive multimode fibre was deployed in a double ended duplex configuration as a "fence" run through four times of sowing at a trial site in the Western Australian Wheatbelt. The fibre optic fence was 160m long and 800mm tall with the fibre optic cable spaced 100mm apart vertically, and calibrated in ambient water ( 10 to 15oC) and a chilled glycol ( -8 to-10 oC) baths. The temperature measurements had a spatial resolution of 0.65m and temporal resolution of 60s, providing 2,215 measurements every minute. The results of this study inform our understanding of the subtle temperature changes from the soil to canopy, providing new insight into how to place traditional temperature loggers to monitor frost damage. It also addresses questions of within-trial temperature variability, and provides an example of how novel techniques such as DTS can be used to improve the way temperature

  17. The role of the observed tropical convection in the generation of frost events in the southern cone of South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Müller

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on previous results obtained from observations and linear wave theory analysis, the hypothesis that large-scale patterns can generate extreme cold events in southeast South America through the propagation of remotely excited Rossby waves was already suggested. This work will confirm these findings and extend their analysis through a series of numerical experiments using a primitive equation model where waves are excited by a thermal forcing situated in positions chosen according to observed convection anomalies over the equatorial region. The basic state used for these experiments is a composite of austral winters with maximum and minimum frequency of occurrence of generalized frosts that can affect a large area known as the Wet Pampas located in the central and eastern part of Argentina. The results suggest that stationary Rossby waves may be one important mechanism linking anomalous tropical convection with the extreme cold events in the Wet Pampas. The combination of tropical convection and a specific basic state can generate the right environment to guide the Rossby waves trigged by the tropical forcing towards South America. Depending on the phase of the waves entering the South American continent, they can favour the advection of anomalous wind at low levels from the south carrying cold and dry air over the whole southern extreme of the continent, producing a generalized frost in the Wet Pampa region. On the other hand, when a basic state based on the composites of minimum frosts is used, an anomalous anticyclone over the southern part of the continent generates a circulation with a south-southeast wind which brings maritime air and therefore humidity over the Wet Pampas region, creating negative temperature anomalies only over the northeastern part of the region. Under these conditions even if frosts occur they would not be generalized, as observed for the other basic state with maximum frequency of occurrence of generalized frosts.

  18. Spatial and temporal variation in weather events critical for boreal agriculture: III Frost and winter time fluctuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirjo Peltonen-Sainio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the boreal zone of Europe, differences between the four seasons are considerable. Also, the within-season variation in climatic conditions is substantial. This has many impacts on agriculture that are exceptional when compared to any other environmental zone in Europe. All the meteorological data were based on weather observations made by the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Likelihood (% for soil frost (≤ 0 °C at 20 cm soil depth at nine weather stations, and late snow cover (> 1 cm (10 km × 10 km grid were estimated for late spring. Probabilities (% of night frost at the ground surface (March-September were calculated at nine weather stations by frequencies of the lowest observed night-time temperature: a between –2 and –5 °C (mild, b ≤ –5 °C (moderate and c ≤ –9 °C (severe. Also, the probabilities (% of night frost in mid-summer were estimated (≤ –1 °C for at least five hours. Furthermore, a significant shift from mild to below-freezing conditions was measured in winter as a period of at least ten days with daily maximum temperatures above 0°C followed by at least a 10-day period with daily mean temperatures below –5°C in order to characterize high fluctuating winter conditions. All these except late snow cover constitute high risks to crop production. Deep soil frost may postpone sowings, while in advanced springs, night frost may cause damage. For winter crops and perennials, shifts from mild to cold spells outside the growing season are particularly detrimental. Again the data may have many other applications beyond the assessments highlighted in this paper.

  19. The role of the observed tropical convection in the generation of frost events in the southern cone of South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, G.V. [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Transferencia Tecnologica a la Produccion (CICYTTP/CONICET), Diamante (Argentina); Ambrizzi, T. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Atmosfericas; Ferraz, S.E. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria/CRSPE-INPE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2008-07-01

    Based on previous results obtained from observations and linear wave theory analysis, the hypothesis that large-scale patterns can generate extreme cold events in southeast South America through the propagation of remotely excited Rossby waves was already suggested. This work will confirm these findings and extend their analysis through a series of numerical experiments using a primitive equation model where waves are excited by a thermal forcing situated in positions chosen according to observed convection anomalies over the equatorial region. The basic state used for these experiments is a composite of austral winters with maximum and minimum frequency of occurrence of generalized frosts that can affect a large area known as the Wet Pampas located in the central and eastern part of Argentina. The results suggest that stationary Rossby waves may be one important mechanism linking anomalous tropical convection with the extreme cold events in the Wet Pampas. The combination of tropical convection and a specific basic state can generate the right environment to guide the Rossby waves trigged by the tropical forcing towards South America. Depending on the phase of the waves entering the South American continent, they can favour the advection of anomalous wind at low levels from the south carrying cold and dry air over the whole southern extreme of the continent, producing a generalized frost in the Wet Pampa region. On the other hand, when a basic state based on the composites of minimum frosts is used, an anomalous anticyclone over the southern part of the continent generates a circulation with a south-southeast wind which brings maritime air and therefore humidity over the Wet Pampas region, creating negative temperature anomalies only over the northeastern part of the region. Under these conditions even if frosts occur they would not be generalized, as observed for the other basic state with maximum frequency of occurrence of generalized frosts. (orig.)

  20. Electrical heating tapes for hot water piping and frost protection; Elektrische Heizbaender fuer Warmwasserleitungen und Frostschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nipkow, J.

    2003-07-01

    This leaflet issued by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy and professional plumbing and installation associations presents information and recommendations on the use of electrical heating tapes in sanitary installations and rainwater piping. The considerable amount of electrical power needed for the operation of these heating tapes is discussed and methods of reducing consumption by the use efficient controllers are described. It is further mentioned that the correct design and planning of sanitary installations can help reduce the necessity for the use of heating tapes. Cost comparisons are made between heat-tape and circulation-based solutions for different heat sources. Tips are provided on installation details. Frost protection for piping in unheated rooms and for rainwater down-pipes is also discussed.

  1. Performance analysis of a no-frost hybrid air conditioning system with integrated liquid desiccant dehumidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li; Dang, Chaobin; Hihara, Eiji [Department of Human and Engineered Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-Shi, Chiba 277-8563 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    This paper reports a performance analysis for a hybrid air conditioning system. In this system, the sensible heat load is primarily treated by a vapor compression heat hump; the latent heat load is treated by a liquid dehumidification system that uses a lithium chloride solution as a desiccant. In addition, by decreasing the humidity ratio of air flowing through the outdoor heat exchanger of the vapor compression heat pump, frosting can be retarded. The overall system performance was evaluated by a cycle simulation conducted both in summer and winter modes. Compared to a traditional air conditioning system, the hybrid air conditioning system improves the coefficient of performance (COP) by approximately 20% and 100% in summer and winter, respectively. (author)

  2. Frost protection for wind energy installations; Frostschutz fuer Windenergieanlagen. Eisfreie Oberflaechen der Natur abgeschaut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegmann, K.; Meola, G.; Hirayama, M.

    2009-07-01

    This article discusses how naidered intural materials can be used to prevent wind energy installations in exposed alpine locations from icing up. The problems encountered with wind turbines in Scandinavia and in the Swiss Alps due to icing-up are discussed. The mechanisms involved in the formation of hoar frost and clear ice on the rotors of the wind turbines are discussed. Techniques and materials for fighting the icing-up of the rotors are examined. Various special 'ice-phobic' coatings for the rotor blades are listed and discussed. These must adhere to the rotor blades but be repellent to ice. Teflon is quoted as being the most tested material. So-called 'anti-freeze' proteins that can be found in fish and insects are also being examined as a possible coating for the rotors.

  3. Vineyards sheltered against frost; Des vignes a l'abri du gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagot, F.

    2004-05-01

    Vine growers of the Chablis region (northern Bourgogne area, France) have used fire-baskets and paraffin candles during decades to protect their vineyards against spring frosts. An innovative solution based on heating cables has been proposed by Electricite de France (EdF) to replace these old systems. The Ni-Cu resistive wire of these cables is covered by a first PVC sheath and by a second UV-resistant high density polyethylene sheath. A control wire is also included in the cable to detect any accidental cut. The operating cost of the system is comprised between 50 and 70 euros/h for a 10000 m{sup 2} parcel and reaches a greater efficiency than classical systems with 95% of buds protected. Short article. (J.S.)

  4. Jet impingement heat transfer in a frost-free refrigerator: The influence of confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imraan, M.; Sharma, R.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2009-05-15

    Heat transfer characteristics of a slot air jet (width w) impinging on a circular cylinder (diameter d = w) located 5d from the jet exit in a confined space have been studied for Reynolds number (based on cylinder diameter and mean jet velocity) in the range of 1000-12,000. This situation is found in a frost-free refrigerator, amongst other rapid food refrigeration applications. The results reveal that the slot jet impinging on a circular cylinder in a confined space yields heat transfer rates that are between those for the corresponding uniform cross-flow (lower limit) and slot jet impingement on a non-confined cylinder (upper limit) cases. A dimensionless confinement spacing H/d = 10 was found at which the heat transfer rate was a minimum. CFD analysis revealed that this was due to periodic jet flapping and generation of large flow structures between the cylinder and the confining wall. (author)

  5. Monuments to Academic Carelessness: The Self-fulfilling Prophecy of Katherine Frost Bruner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekdal, Ole Bjørn

    2014-09-01

    In 1942, Katherine Frost Bruner published an article titled "Of psychological writing: Being some valedictory remarks on style." It was published in Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology , the journal for which she served as editorial assistant between 1937 and 1941. Her collection of advice to writing scholars has been widely quoted, including by several editions of The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association . The most frequently quoted message in Bruner's article deals with the importance of making sure that references in academic texts are complete and accurate. Exploring the citation history of this particular message reveals an ironic point: the great majority of those who have quoted Bruner's words on reference accuracy have not done so accurately. The case may serve as a reminder of the importance of the basic academic principle of striving to use primary sources. The most startling finding in this study is how frequently this principle is violated, even by authors who advise and educate academic writers.

  6. Characterization of sound emitted by wind machines used for frost control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambino, V.; Gambino, T. [Aercoustics Engineering Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Fraser, H.W. [Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, Vineland, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Wind machines are used in Niagara-on-the-Lake to protect cold-sensitive crops against cold injury during winter's extreme cold temperatures,spring's late frosts and autumn's early frosts. The number of wind machines in Ontario has about doubled annually from only a few in the late 1990's, to more than 425 in 2006. They are not used for generating power. Noise complaints have multiplied as the number of wind machines has increased. The objective of this study was to characterize the sound produced by wind machines; learn why residents are annoyed by wind machine noise; and suggest ways to possibly reduce sound emissions. One part of the study explored acoustic emission characteristics, the sonic differences of units made by different manufacturers, sound propagation properties under typical use atmospheric conditions and low frequency noise impact potential. Tests were conducted with a calibrated Larson Davis 2900B portable spectrum analyzer. Sound was measured with a microphone whose frequency response covered the range 4 Hz to 20 kHz. The study examined and found several unique acoustic properties that are characteristic of wind machines. It was determined that noise from wind machines is due to both aerodynamic and mechanical effects, but aerodynamic sounds were found to be the most significant. It was concluded that full range or broadband sounds manifest themselves as noise components that extend throughout the audible frequency range from the bladepass frequency to upwards of 1000 Hz. The sound spectrum of a wind machine is full natural tones and impulses that give it a readily identifiable acoustic character. Atmospheric conditions including temperature, lapse rate, relative humidity, mild winds, gradients and atmospheric turbulence all play a significant role in the long range outdoor propagation of sound from wind machines. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Pharmacological evaluation for anticancer and immune activities of a novel polysaccharide isolated from Boletus speciosus Frost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yiling; Ding, Xiang; Hou, Wanru; Song, Bo; Wang, Ting; Wang, Fang; Li, Jian; Zeng, Yichun; Zhong, Jie; Xu, Ting; Zhu, Hongqing

    2014-04-01

    The fungal polysaccharides have been revealed to exhibit a variety of biological activities, including antitumor, immune-stimulation and antioxidation activities. In the present study, the immune and anticancer activities of a novel polysaccharide, BSF-A, isolated from Boletus speciosus Frost was investigated. The inhibitory rate of S180 tumors in mice treated with 40 mg/kg BSF-A reached 62.449%, which was the highest rate from the three doses administered; this may be comparable to mannatide. The antitumor activity of BSF-A is commonly considered to be a consequence of the stimulation of the cell-mediated immune response, as it may significantly promote the macrophage cells in the dose range of 100-400 µg/ml in vitro. The levels of the cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α, and nitric oxide, induced by BSF-A treatment at varying concentrations in the macrophage cells were similar to the levels in the cells treated with lipopolysaccharide. There was weak expression of the TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA in the untreated macrophages, but this increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in the BSF-A-treated cells. BSF-A also had a time- and dose-dependent effect on the growth inhibition of the Hep-2 cells, with the concentration of 400 µg/ml having the highest inhibitory rate. A quantitative PCR array analysis of the gene expression profiles indicated that BSF-A had anticancer activities that affected cell apoptosis in the Hep-2 cells. The results obtained in the present study indicated that the purified polysaccharide of Boletus speciosus Frost is a potential source of natural anticancer substances.

  8. Effects of Spring Late Frost on Black Seed (Nigella sativa L. under Controlled Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Khorsandi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In many years plant growth strongly affected by late spring frost. In order to evaluate the effects of late frost on Black Seed plants, a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replications was carried out in college of agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad and five Black Seed ecotypes (Birjsnd, Sabzewar, Ferdows, Gonabad and Neyshabour after two months growth and hardening in natural environment, were exposed to seven temperatures (0, -1.5, -3, -4.5, -6, -7.5 and -9°C in termogradient freezer. For determining cold stress damages, Lethal Temperature (LT for 50% of plants according to the Electrolyte Leakage percentage (LT50el, LT for 50% of plants according to the Survival percentage (LT50su, LT for 50% of plants according to the plant necrose in Test Tube (LT50tt and Reduced Dry Matter Temperature 50 (RDMT50 were measured. Ability of plants for recovery was recorded based on leaf number and leaf area, plant dry weight and cold damage percentage of leaves. According to the LT50tt, LT50su and RDMT50 Black Seed plants can tolerated cold stress in range between -5.7 to -9.0 °C and Sabzewar and Ferdows ecotypes had the most and the least cold tolerance, respectively. At the point of ability of plants for recovery, Ferdows ecotype had the least and Sabzewar and Neyshabour ecotypes had the best plant recovery. Moreover there were high correlations between LT50tt and LT50 based on electrolyte leakage, survival and RDMT50. Electrolyte leakage and visual scoring of cold damage in test tube are rapid methods, so for assessing cold tolerance in plants LT50el and LT50tt indeces may be useful.

  9. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  10. Temporal and Spatial Variations of the First and Last Frost Date During 1961-2013 in Henan Prouince and Their Responses to Climate Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Jun-hui

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the annual first and last frost date for each station was defined on the basis of daily minimum ground temperature at 17 meteorological stations over the period from 1961 to 2013 in Henan Province. The spatial and temporal changes of first and last frost date, as well as their responses to seasonal temperature variations, were analyzed. The results showed that: The regional mean first frost date showed a significantly delaying trend, with a linear trend of 2.2 d·10 a-1 during the most recent 53 years. The strongest delaying regions occurred in western mountain areas, with the maximum value in Lushi(4.0 d·10 a-1. However, the regional mean last frost date indicated a notably advancing trend, with a linear trend of 2.3 d·10 a-1 over the period from 1961 to 2013. The greatest advancing regions were detected in central and southern Henan, with the maximum value in Zhumadian(4.9 d·10 a-1. The regional mean first and last frost dates were significantly correlated with seasonal mean temperatures. The regression coefficient between first (last frost date and seasonal mean temperature was 6.5 d·℃-1(-3.5 d·℃-1, representing that the first(last frost day was delayed(advanced by 6.5(3.5 days if spring temperature (mean temperature of February, March, and April increased by 1.0 ℃, suggesting that the first frost date was more sensitive to climate change than last frost date in the context of global warming background.

  11. Single Nanoparticle Mass Spectrometry as a High Temperature Kinetics Tool: Sublimation, Oxidation, and Emission Spectra of Hot Carbon Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howder, Collin R; Long, Bryan A; Gerlich, Dieter; Alley, Rex N; Anderson, Scott L

    2015-12-17

    In single nanoparticle mass spectrometry, individual charged nanoparticles (NPs) are trapped in a quadrupole ion trap and detected optically, allowing their mass, charge, and optical properties to be monitored continuously. Previous experiments of this type probed NPs that were either fluorescent or large enough to detect by light scattering. Alternatively, small NPs can be heated to temperatures where thermally excited emission is strong enough to allow detection, and this approach should provide a new tool for measurements of sublimation and surface reaction kinetics of materials at high temperatures. As an initial test, we report a study of carbon NPs in the 20-50 nm range, heated by 10.6 μm, 532 nm, or 445 nm lasers. The kinetics for sublimation and oxidation of individual carbon NPs were studied, and a model is presented for the factors that control the NP temperature, including laser heating, and cooling by sublimation, buffer gas collisions, and radiation. The estimated NP temperatures were in the 1700-2000 K range, and the NP absorption cross sections ranged from ∼0.8 to 0.2% of the geometric cross sections for 532 nm and 10.6 μm excitation, respectively. Emission spectra of single NPs and small NP ensembles show a feature in the IR that appears to be the high energy tail of the thermal (blackbody-like) emission expected from hot particles but also a discrete feature peaking around 750 nm. Both the IR tail and 750 nm peak are observed for all particles and for both IR and visible laser excitation. No significant difference was observed between graphite and amorphous carbon NPs.

  12. The effect of oxalic acid applied by sublimation on honey bee colony fitness: a comparison with amitraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Papežíková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxalic acid is one of the organic acids used for controlling Varroa destructor, a mite parasitizing the honey bee (Apis mellifera. The aim of this work was to examine the effect of oxalic acid applied by sublimation on honey bee colony fitness, and to compare it with the effect of amitraz, a routinely used synthetic acaricide. Bee colonies of equal strength were randomly divided into two groups. In December 2014, one group was treated with amitraz in the form of aerosol, and the second group was treated with oxalic acid applied by sublimation. The colonies were monitored over winter. Dead bees found at the bottom of the hive were counted regularly and examined microscopically for infection with Nosema sp. (Microsporidia. At the end of March 2015, living foragers from each hive were sampled and individually examined for Nosema sp. infection. Colony strength was evaluated at the beginning of April. No adverse effect of oxalic acid on colony strength was observed despite the fact that the total number of dead bees was non-significantly higher in the oxalic acid-treated group. Examination of dead bees for Nosema infection did not reveal significant differences in spore numbers between the experimental groups. There was a substantial difference in living individuals, however, with a significantly higher amount of spores per bee found in the amitraz-treated colonies compared to the oxalic acid-treated colonies. Compared to amitraz, oxalic acid applied by sublimation showed no adverse effects on bee colony fitness or on successful overwintering.

  13. Polarized Moessbauer transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barb, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical aspects of the emission, absorption and scattering of polarized gamma rays are reviewed for a general case of combined magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions; various possibilities of obtaining polarized gamma sources are described and examples are given of the applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy with polarized gamma rays in solving problems of solid state physics. (A.K.)

  14. Determination of molar enthalpy of sublimation in case of orotic acid as obtained from experimental and computational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marochkin, Ilya I.; Altova, Ekaterina P.; Chilingarov, Norbert S.; Vilkova, Anna L.; Shishkov, Igor F.

    2018-03-01

    Saturated vapor pressure, ln(p/Pa) = (-21316 ± 511)/(T/K)+(41.64 ± 0.11), and enthalpy of sublimation of orotic acid, Δsub Hm0 (Tm) = 177 ± 4 kJ/mol, were determined by means of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry in the temperature range of 423÷493 K. The computational approaches supported the experimental results reported. The theoretical estimation of the gas-phase enthalpy of formation for orotic acid was done with different working reactions used.

  15. Characterization of Cu-doped CdTe thin films prepared by closed space sublimation (css) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, N.; Shah, N.; Ali, A.; Maqsood, A.

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films of different thickness are deposited on the microscopic slides of water-white glass substrates using the close spaced sublimation (CSS) method. The films are doped with Cu by immersion in Cu (NO/sub 3/)2-H/sub 2/O solution for different times and the effect of immersion time and subsequent heating in vacuum on the electrical, structural and optical properties are presented. The XRD and SEM results show that appropriate Cu doping would be favorable to the growth of CdTe crystallite. The Hall Effect measurements indicate that the conductivity of the films could be improved by Cu doping. (author)

  16. Airborne lidar observations of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, L. R.; Kent, G. S.

    1986-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) have been detected repeatedly during Arctic and Antarctic winters since 1978/1979 by the SAM II (Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement II) instrument aboard the NIMBUS-7 satellite. PSC's are believed to form when supercooled sulfuric acid droplets freeze, and subsequently grow by deposition of ambient water vapor as the local stratospheric temperature falls below the frost point. In order to study the characteristics of PSC's at higher spatial and temporal resolution than that possible from the satellite observations, aircraft missions were conducted within the Arctic polar night vortex in Jan. 1984 and Jan. 1986 using the NASA Langley Research Center airborne dual polarization ruby lidar system. A synopsis of the 1984 and 1986 PSC observations is presented illustrating short range spatial changes in cloud structure, the variation of backscatter ratio with temperature, and the depolarization characterics of cloud layers. Implications are noted with regard to PSC particle characteristics and the physical process by which the clouds are thougth to form.

  17. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  18. Seasonal Changes in the Martian North Polar Region from CRISM, MARCI and CTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, W. M.; Pocock, J. M.; Seelos, F. P.; Lee, S. W.; James, P. B.; Thomas, P. C.; Murchie, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    Significant mobility and spatial variation in high albedo patches are noted in the summer northern ice cap. These patches are shown to be fine-grained water frost and their motions may provide information on winds or local accumulation and ablation occurring both on seasonal and inter-annual timeframes in the permanent ice deposits. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter instruments provide complementary views of the processes involved. MARCI covers the entire northern residual ice and surrounding Polar Layered Deposits (PLD) multiple times per day at spatial resolutions of a few kilometers. CTX has been targeted on one of the largest bright deposits with repeated coverage in the first northern summer. The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) observes the polar deposits in the wavelength range where multiple, diagnostic features can separate H2O and CO2 ices and allow the determination of effective grain size of ice and level of dust contamination. Several full-resolution and approximately 80 multi-spectral observations were targeted during the first northern summer on a known sustained bright anomaly. Previous work by the OMEGA team has demonstrated the evolution of water frost grain size over the summer season and suggests that the late northern seasonal frost is dominated by water rather than CO2 ice. This late water ice lag in the seasonal cap may also drive the appearance and mobility of residual fine grained ice patches. Spectral properties in exposed layers are more complicated, and even dark lanes within the reentrant troughs still show features associated with water ice. However, within the larger PLD areas that appear as transparent ice to MARSIS and SHARAD have no infrared spectral absorption features of ice. The modern view shows that both seasonal and permanent ice deposits are highly active with complex temporal patterns and understanding these dynamic phenomena are critical to understanding martian climate history. We will report the

  19. Helicity Asymmetry Measurement for pi0 Photoproduction with FROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Hideko [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-08-15

    This thesis reports on the first helicity asymmetry measurement for single neutral pion photoproduction using the CLAS detector in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). This measurement used longitudinally polarized protons and circularly polarized photons at energies between 350 MeV and 2400 MeV. The experimental results are compared to three available model calculations.

  20. Helicity Asymmetry Measurement for π0 Photoproduction with FROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Hideko [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-08-15

    This thesis reports on the first helicity asymmetry measurement for single neutral pion photoproduction using the CLAS detector in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). This measurement used longitudinally polarized protons and circularly polarized photons at energies between 350 MeV and 2400 MeV. The experimental results are compared to three available model calculations.

  1. Scanning proximal microscopy study of the thin layers of silicon carbide-aluminum nitride solid solution manufactured by fast sublimation epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tománek P.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is a growth of SiC/(SiC1−x(AlNx structures by fast sublimation epitaxy of the polycrystalline source of (SiC1−x(AlNx and their characterisation by proximal scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. For that purpose optimal conditions of sublimation process have been defined. Manufactured structures could be used as substrates for wide-band-gap semiconductor devices on the basis of nitrides, including gallium nitride, aluminum nitride and their alloys, as well as for the production of transistors with high mobility of electrons and also for creation of blue and ultraviolet light emitters (light-emitted diodes and laser diodes. The result of analysis shows that increasing of the growth temperature up to 2300 K allows carry out sublimation epitaxy of thin layers of aluminum nitride and its solid solution.

  2. IA method for measuring the amount of hoar frost formation in the recuperation channels of ventilation systems using the adjustable mathematical model of this process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilin Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method for measuring the amount of hoar frost formation in the recuperation channels of ventilation systems using the adjustable mathematical model of the hoar frost process. The principle is based on the fact that the contour of the adjustment of the hoar frost model is included in the measurement in accordance with the measured pressure drop, which is proportional to the amount of hoar frost. Unlike the known measurement methods, it is proposed to use the state variables of the mathematical model as the measured value. These state variables are not subject to non-deterministic interferences and random influences. The paper presents simulation results confirming the adequacy of the dynamic model. In conclusion, an example of the use of a recuperation channel in the defrost management system is given.

  3. Simulated Frosts At Different Phenological Stages of the Potato Crop and Their Impact On Yields Cv Ccompis: Preliminary Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairlie, T. E.; Ortega, A

    1994-01-01

    The frost damages on the potato crop were simulated through an experiment in the Jiscuani community, in Southern Peru, Puno. Five levels of foliar damage (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100%) in different phenological stages were evaluated for their impact on tuber yield. The most significant phenological damages resulted at plant germination and at the early stolon formation, when foliar damage was higher than 50%. Moreover, the greatest effect on yield was caused at flowering stage (100 days after planting), recording reductions from 15 to 55 % at the different damage levels. The methodology for the frost simulation, cutting foliar sections according damage levels and making further rubbing on foliar area was apparently adequate. (author) [es

  4. Frost damage of bricks composing a railway tunnel monument in Central Japan: field monitoring and laboratory simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Thomachot

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bricks of tunnels and bridges of Usui Pass railway (Japan exposed to north are subject to frost damage. Average depth of erosion due to detachment of angular blocks is around 1-1.5 cm. In order to assess this weathering and to understand its mechanism, an experimental study was carried out in the field and laboratory. Field monitoring showed the combination of seasonal and diurnal freezing with a maximum of heave when the freezing front reached 5 cm depth. Bricks taken from the site were submitted to unidirectional freezing at capillary and vacuum saturation in the laboratory. Results showed that frost damage of bricks was favoured by high saturation level and repetition of freeze-thaw cycles.

  5. The effects of frost thickness on the heat transfer of finned tube heat exchanger subject to the combined influence of fan types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jeng-Min; Hsieh, Wen-Chien; Ke, Xin-Ji [Department of Refrigeration, Air Conditioning National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung County, Taiping City 411 (China); Wang, Chi-Chuan [Energy and Environment Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 310 (China)

    2008-05-15

    This study conducts a numerical study concerning the effect of frost thickness on the heat transfer performance of a four rows plate finned tube heat exchanger. Calculations are made under constant air volume and variable air volume conditions. It is found that the initial surge of heat transfer rate in the frosted finned tube heat exchanger is mainly associated with the critical radius effect rather than the surface roughness. The frost thermal conductivity plays an important role in the surge phenomenon. There is hardly any initial surge when frost thermal conductivity is below 0.1 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}. It is also recommended that a refrigerator should defrost when half of a single flow channel area is blocked by frost. The calculations also reveal that a centrifugal fan is recommended with a small fin-pitch heat exchanger. However, if a long term operation at a thick frost situation is unavoidable, an axial fan should be selected. There is no great difference between selection of an axial fan or centrifugal fan for a larger fin pitch heat exchanger. (author)

  6. An Experimental Investigation On Minimum Compressive Strength Of Early Age Concrete To Prevent Frost Damage For Nuclear Power Plant Structures In Cold Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kyungtaek; Kim, Dogyeum; Park, Chunjin; Ryu, Gumsung; Park, Jungjun; Lee, Janghwa [Korea Institute Construction Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Concrete undergoing early frost damage in cold weather will experience significant loss of not only strength, but also of permeability and durability. Accordingly, concrete codes like ACI-306R prescribe a minimum compressive strength and duration of curing to prevent frost damage at an early age and secure the quality of concrete. Such minimum compressive strength and duration of curing are mostly defined based on the strength development of concrete. However, concrete subjected to frost damage at early age may not show a consistent relationship between its strength and durability. Especially, since durability of concrete is of utmost importance in nuclear power plant structures, this relationship should be imperatively clarified. Therefore, this study verifies the feasibility of the minimum compressive strength specified in the codes like ACI-306R by evaluating the strength development and the durability preventing the frost damage of early age concrete for nuclear power plant. The results indicate that the value of 5 MPa specified by the concrete standards like ACI-306R as the minimum compressive strength to prevent the early frost damage is reasonable in terms of the strength development, but seems to be inappropriate in the viewpoint of the resistance to chloride ion penetration and freeze-thaw. Consequently, it is recommended to propose a minimum compressive strength preventing early frost damage in terms of not only the strength development, but also in terms of the durability to secure the quality of concrete for nuclear power plants in cold climates.

  7. An Experimental Investigation On Minimum Compressive Strength Of Early Age Concrete To Prevent Frost Damage For Nuclear Power Plant Structures In Cold Climates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kyungtaek; Kim, Dogyeum; Park, Chunjin; Ryu, Gumsung; Park, Jungjun; Lee, Janghwa

    2013-01-01

    Concrete undergoing early frost damage in cold weather will experience significant loss of not only strength, but also of permeability and durability. Accordingly, concrete codes like ACI-306R prescribe a minimum compressive strength and duration of curing to prevent frost damage at an early age and secure the quality of concrete. Such minimum compressive strength and duration of curing are mostly defined based on the strength development of concrete. However, concrete subjected to frost damage at early age may not show a consistent relationship between its strength and durability. Especially, since durability of concrete is of utmost importance in nuclear power plant structures, this relationship should be imperatively clarified. Therefore, this study verifies the feasibility of the minimum compressive strength specified in the codes like ACI-306R by evaluating the strength development and the durability preventing the frost damage of early age concrete for nuclear power plant. The results indicate that the value of 5 MPa specified by the concrete standards like ACI-306R as the minimum compressive strength to prevent the early frost damage is reasonable in terms of the strength development, but seems to be inappropriate in the viewpoint of the resistance to chloride ion penetration and freeze-thaw. Consequently, it is recommended to propose a minimum compressive strength preventing early frost damage in terms of not only the strength development, but also in terms of the durability to secure the quality of concrete for nuclear power plants in cold climates

  8. Frost-related dieback of Swedish and Estonian Salix plantations due to pathogenic and ice nucleation-active bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambours, M.A.

    2004-07-01

    During the past decade, important dieback has been observed in short-rotation forestry plantations of Salix viminalis and S. dasyclados in Sweden and Estonia, plantations from which the isolation of ice nucleation-active (INA) and pathogenic bacteria has also been reported. This thesis investigates the connection between bacterial infection and frost as a possible cause for such damage, and the role played by internal and external factors (e.g. plant frost sensitivity, fertilisation) in the dieback observed. Bacterial floras isolated from ten Salix clones growing on fertilised/unfertilised mineral soil or nitrogen-rich organic soil, were studied. Culturable bacterial communities present both in internal necrotic tissues and on the plant surface (i.e. epiphytes) were isolated on two occasions (spring and autumn). The strains were biochemically characterised (with gram, oxidase and fluorescence tests), and tested for ice nucleation-activity. Their pathogenic properties were studied with and without association to a freezing stress. Certain strains were eventually identified with BIOLOG plates and 16S rRNA analysis. A high number of culturable bacterial strains was found in the plant samplings, belonging mainly to Erwinia and Sphingomonas spp.; pathogenic and INA communities being mostly Erwinia-, Sphingomonas- and Xanthomonas-like. The generally higher plant dieback noted in the field on nutrient-rich soils and for frost sensitive clones was found connected to higher numbers of pathogenic and INA bacteria in the plants. We thus confirm Salix dieback to be related to a synergistic effect of frost and bacterial infection, possibly aggravated by fertilisation.

  9. Frost stress evolution and winter pea ideotype in the context of climate warming at a regional scale

    OpenAIRE

    Castel Thierry; Lecomte Christophe; Richard Yves; Lejeune-Hénaut Isabelle; Larmure Annabelle

    2017-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important crop in temperate regions for its high seed protein concentration that is particularly sensitive to abiotic stresses. The abrupt temperature increase known as the “1987/1988 temperature regime shift” that occurs over Europe is questioning how winter pea will perform in the changing climate. This study assessed the winter frost damage evolution along from 1961 to 2015 in Burgundy-Franche-Comté by using: (1) daily observed and gridded regional temperature ...

  10. Digital Image Sensor-Based Assessment of the Status of Oat (Avena sativa L.) Crops after Frost Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Isidro Villegas-Romero; Matilde Santos; Antonia Macedo-Cruz; Gonzalo Pajares

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to classify the land covered with oat crops, and the quantification of frost damage on oats, while plants are still in the flowering stage. The images are taken by a digital colour camera CCD-based sensor. Unsupervised classification methods are applied because the plants present different spectral signatures, depending on two main factors: illumination and the affected state. The colour space used in this application is CIELab, based on the decomposition of the colou...

  11. Thermal inertia and radar reflectivity of the Martian north polar ERG: Low-density aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    The north polar layered deposits on Mars appear to be the source of the dark material that comprises the north polar erg. The physical properties and chemical composition of the erg material therefore have important implications for the origin and evolution of the Martian layered deposits. Viking bistatic radar and infrared thermal mapping (IRTM) data indicate that the bulk density of the erg material is lower than that of the average Martian surface. These data are consistent with hypotheses involving formation of filamentary sublimation residue (FSR) particles from erosion of the layered deposits. The color and albedo of the erg and of the layered deposits, and the presence of magnetic material on Mars, suggest that the dark material is composed of low-density aggregates of magnetic dust grains, perhaps similar to FSR particles created in laboratory experiments.

  12. Water on Mars: Inventory, distribution, and possible sources of polar ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical considerations and various lines of morphologic evidence suggest that, in addition to the normal seasonal and climatic exchange of H2O that occurs between the Martian polar caps, atmosphere, and mid to high latitude regolith, large volumes of water have been introduced into the planet's long term hydrologic cycle by the sublimation of equatorial ground ice, impacts, catastrophic flooding, and volcanism. Under the climatic conditions that are thought to have prevailed on Mars throughout the past 3 to 4 b.y., much of this water is expected to have been cold trapped at the poles. The amount of polar ice contributed by each of the planet's potential crustal sources is discussed and estimated. The final analysis suggests that only 5 to 15 pct. of this potential inventory is now in residence at the poles.

  13. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  14. Water relation response to soil chilling of six olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivars with different frost resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lopez, D.; Gijon, M. C.; Marino, J.; Moriana, A.

    2010-07-01

    The relationship between the water relations of six olive cultivars exposed to different soil temperatures (14 0.1, 9.9 0.1 and 5.8 0.2 degree centigrade) and their inherent frost resistance (as determined by two different methods) was investigated. Soil chilling was achieved by introducing pots of olive plants into water baths. The water relations of these plants were compared to those of plants kept under conditions of room temperature. The cultivars Frantoio, Picual and Changlot Real began to show significant dehydration below 14 degree centigrade, while Cornicabra, Arbequina and Ascolana Tenera showed this below 10 degree centigrade. This response is probably due to delayed stomatal closure. Only Cornicabra and Picual showed a significant reduction in leaf conductance (below 10 degree centigrade and 6 degree centigrade respectively). This absence of stomatal control led to a significantly greater dehydration in Ascolana Tenera. These variations in response to the soil chilling temperature suggest that different mechanisms may be at work, and indicate that would be necessary to study the influence of rootstock in the frost resistance of olive plants. The variations recorded grouped the cultivars as either resistant (Cornicabra), tolerant (Picual, Ascolana Tenera and Arbequina), or sensitive (Frantoio and Changlot Real). This classification is in line with the frost resistance reported for these cultivars in the literature, and with the results obtained in the present work using the stomatal density and ion leakage methods of determining such resistance. (Author) 40 refs.

  15. Significance of frost action and surface soil characteristics to wind erosion at Rocky Flats, Colorado. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, N.

    1978-09-01

    This study of the potential links between soil freezing and wind erosion was conducted at Rocky Flats during 4 winters. Most of the study has involved the conditions leading to the growth of segregation ice in the surface soil and the ground heave which that produces. This occurs about 15 times in the average winter at Rocky Flats, always on a diurnal cycle. Such frost action is preferentially distributed in time and space and cannot be estimated from air temperatures alone. November and March are the months of most frequent frost heave, and then only in the days following precipitation or snowmelt. The most marked frost effects are found on exposed interfluve and hillcrest situations, where there are patches of bare soil. Almost no effects are found on the valley floors. Soil disturbance by segregation ice leads to a marked decrease in soil bulk density, and presumably in soil strength though this change has not been quantitatively defined. However, this does not lead to wind erosion of the soil at the study site because that surface is more influenced by the vegetation cover than by the soil characteristics.

  16. Physical and eco-physiological aspects in forecasting and crop protection of fruit trees from late frost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinoni, Franco; Antolini, Gabriele; Palara, Ugo; Rossi, Federica; Reggidori, Giampiero

    2005-01-01

    Late frosts represent for fruit production one of the most relevant natural hazards worldwide, considering severity and extent of damage, whose occurrence is constantly increasing, concomitantly to the increase of climate variability. Therefore, impacts on affected farms and local economy are often devastating, but information about how to protect plants from freezing is relatively limited. The research in the field of forecast, risk hazard assessment and protection is directed towards the reduction of the risk level, acting together with new trends in selection of resistant cvs. Crop vulnerability is jointly determined by genetic peculiarities of the various species and cvs, but a determinant role is played by phenology and agronomic practices. The orchard structural features, tree canopy characteristics and tree arrangement in rows are determinant in conditioning energy and radiation exchanges between soil and the surrounding atmosphere, thus on the exchange processes that are responsible of radiation frosts, mainly occurring in Spring, when plant sensibility is at its maximum. The knowledge of local meteorology, together with the weather reports, which can forecast risk situations, should support the acquisition of passive protection systems and to improve the active ones. The correct evaluation of frost risk holds a great importance in fruit orchard programming and in the choice of protection systems and, therefore, the drawing up of risk maps which correlate the topographical characteristics of soil with the tolerance level of the different fruit tree species [it

  17. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  18. Polarization in Sagittarius A*

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the current state of polarization observations of Sagittarius A*, the compact radio source and supermassive black hole candidate in the Galactic Center. These observations are providing new tools for understanding accretion disks, jets and their environments. Linear polarization observations have shown that Sgr A* is unpolarized at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. However, recent single-dish observations indicate that Sgr A* may have strong linear polarization at frequencies higher...

  19. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, James, Jr.; Dabney, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Instrument measures polarization characteristics of Earth at three wavelengths. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor (ALPS) measures optical polarization characteristics of land surface. Designed to be flown at altitudes of approximately 300 m to minimize any polarizing or depolarizing effects of intervening atmosphere and to look along nadir to minimize any effects depending on look angle. Data from measurements used in conjunction with data from ground surveys and aircraft-mounted video recorders to refine mathematical models used in interpretation of higher-altitude polarimetric measurements of reflected sunlight.

  20. Polarization at SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs

  1. Penetration of chlorides in hardened concrete during frost salt scaling cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moral N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sixty samples from three concrete mixes (same components were prepared and subjected to frost salt scaling cycles. A set of 20 samples from the same mix was tested according to the French standard XP P18-420. Another set was exposed to different chloride concentrations. Different numbers of freeze/thaw cycles were applied to the last set. The mass of scaled-off particles follows a lognormal distribution. Despite high standard deviation, this scaling test enables to separate high resistant from very low resistant concrete. A combined analysis reveals that the scaling and the chloride penetration front are independent from a phenomenological point of view and that the chloride concentration on the exposed surface directly influences the amount of scaled mass according to the typical pessimum effect. These results raise two main questions: is the amount of chloride on the surface solution a direct or indirect parameter and what happens to this pessimum effect if we take into account the scaling test dispersion?

  2. Advances in control of frost on evaporator coils with an applied electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudor, V. [Advanced Thermal Research Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); Ohadi, M. [Smart and Small Thermal Systems Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Maryland, College park, MD 20742 (United States); Salehi, M.A.; Lawler, J.V. [ATEC Inc., College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    This paper introduces an innovative technique on use of an applied electric field for control of frost over evaporator coils with fin density and geometric configuration of interest to freezer/refrigerator applications. The technique discussed in this paper, referred to as the 'dielectric barrier discharge' (DBD) method, may be particularly suitable for application in evaporator coils with high fin density. Experiments conducted with a small-scale laboratory test-module, as well as a full-scale supermarket evaporator are presented. The DBD technique is based on generating localized non-resistive heating within fins of an evaporator coil via application of a high-voltage, alternating current through electrodes. Our experiments demonstrate that the defrosting time using DBD is substantially shorter than conventional techniques, while the energy consumption associated with the process is less than one half of the corresponding energy of the electrical resistance heating methods. Basic operational principles of the technique, its advantages and limitations when compared to conventional electrical defrosting techniques are discussed and presented for the first time in this paper. (author)

  3. Early spring, severe frost events, and drought induce rapid carbon loss in high elevation meadows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Arnold

    Full Text Available By the end of the 20th century, the onset of spring in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California has been occurring on average three weeks earlier than historic records. Superimposed on this trend is an increase in the presence of highly anomalous "extreme" years, where spring arrives either significantly late or early. The timing of the onset of continuous snowpack coupled to the date at which the snowmelt season is initiated play an important role in the development and sustainability of mountain ecosystems. In this study, we assess the impact of extreme winter precipitation variation on aboveground net primary productivity and soil respiration over three years (2011 to 2013. We found that the duration of snow cover, particularly the timing of the onset of a continuous snowpack and presence of early spring frost events contributed to a dramatic change in ecosystem processes. We found an average 100% increase in soil respiration in 2012 and 2103, compared to 2011, and an average 39% decline in aboveground net primary productivity observed over the same time period. The overall growing season length increased by 57 days in 2012 and 61 days in 2013. These results demonstrate the dependency of these keystone ecosystems on a stable climate and indicate that even small changes in climate can potentially alter their resiliency.

  4. Electro-thermal protection system design against atmospheric frost on turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noui, M.A.; Perron, J.; Fortin, G. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada). Anti-Icing Materials International Laboratory

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed a research program developed to adapt de-icing thermal heating systems for use in wind turbines. The presence of ice on turbine blades can significantly deteriorate rotor performance. Accumulations of ice can increase the radial load on the turbine blades. The uneven formations of ice can lead to vibrations and the expulsion of pieces of ice into surrounding areas. Ice can also reduce the accuracy of various wind measuring devices. A recent study in Finland showed that turbine heating systems consume 3.6 per cent of annual wind production energy. De-icing systems include protective covers; air inlets; sealing systems; inflation tubes; elastomeric ply; and bond ply. The systems also include blade trailing and loading edges, and blade roots. The energy dissipated by the system's heating element is lost by conduction to the interior of the profile. The research program is now developing a system to improve electrothermal protection against frost that is suitable for turbine blades, as well as a thermal model for simulating its operation in a wind turbine. tabs., figs.

  5. Study of polydiethylsiloxane-based ferrofluid with excellent frost resistance property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Y.X. [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Zhuang, L. [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)], E-mail: stszhl@mail.sysu.edu.cn; Shen, H. [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Zhang, W. [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Shao, Z.J. [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2009-03-15

    The polydiethylsiloxane-based ferrofluid was prepared by dispersing finely divided magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles which are modified with oleoyl sarcosine and lauroyl sarcosine. The optimized experiment parameters including molar ratio of surfactant to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (1:5), temperature (80 deg. C), stirring rate (300 RPM), the surfactant content of lauroyl sarcosine (0 to 33 mol%) and the modification time (25 min) were obtained by the orthogonal test. The magnetic liquid was characterized by a transmission electron microscope (TEM), infrared (IR) spectrometer, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It is indicated that the surfactant is mainly bonded to the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles through covalent bond between carboxylate (COO{sup -}) and Fe atom. The modified magnetic particles are equally dispersed into the carrier and remain stable below -12 deg. C over 4 months. The ferrofluids exhibit excellent frost resistance property and distinctly reduced temperature coefficient of viscosity compared with polydimethylsiloxane-based ferrofluids and hydrocarbon-based ferrofluids, respectively. The saturation magnetization could reach up to 27.7 emu/g.

  6. Cryosorption of helium on argon frost TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Cropper, M.B.; Dylla, H.F.

    1989-11-01

    Helium pumping on argon frost has been investigated on TFTR neutral beam injectors and shown to be viable for limited helium beam operation. Maximum pumping speeds are ∼ 25% less than those measured for pumping of deuterium. Helium pumping efficiency is low, > 20 argon atoms are required to pump each helium atom. Adsorption isotherms are exponential and exhibit a two-fold increase in adsorption capacity as the cryopanel temperature is reduced from 4.3 K to 3.7 K. Pumping speed was found to be independent of cryopanel temperature over the temperature range studied. After pumping a total of 2000 torr-l of helium, the beamline base pressure rose to 2x10 -5 torr from an initial value of 10 -8 torr. Accompanying this three order of magnitude increase in pressure was a modest 40% decrease in pumping speed. The introduction of 168 torr-l of deuterium prior to helium injection reduced the pumping speed by a factor of two with no decrease in adsorption capacity. 29 refs., 7 figs

  7. Cryosorption of helium on argon frost in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Cropper, M.B.; Dylla, H.F.; Garzotto, V.; Dudek, L.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Martin, G.D.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.; Kim, J.

    1990-01-01

    Helium pumping on argon frost has been investigated on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam injectors and shown to be viable for limited helium beam operation. Maximum pumping speeds are ∼25% less than those measured for pumping of deuterium. Helium pumping efficiency is low, >20 argon atoms are required to pump each helium atom. Adsorption isotherms are exponential and exhibit a twofold increase in adsorption capacity as the cryopanel temperature is reduced from 4.3 K to 3.7 K. Pumping speed was found to be independent of cryopanel temperature over the temperature range studied. After pumping a total of 2000 Torr l of helium, the beamline base pressure rose to 2x10 -5 Torr from an initial value of 10 -8 Torr. Accompanying this three order of magnitude increase in pressure was a modest 40% decrease in pumping speed. The introduction of 168 Torr l of deuterium prior to helium injection reduced the pumping speed by a factor of two with no decrease in adsorption capacity

  8. Psychometric proprieties of the portuguese version of the frost multidimensional perfectionism scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Estêvão Coreia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfectionism is defined as the desire to achieve the highest standards of performance, in combination with unduly critical evaluations of one’s performance. This study was designed to analyse the psychometric proprieties of the Portuguese version of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale through confirmatory factor analysis in two different samples (calibration with 350 adolescent athletes and validation with 206 adolescent athletes. The confirmatory factor analysis suggested that after dropping items with low factor loadings, the six-factor model showed good fit (χ 2 = 292.83, B-S p < 0.001; χ 2/d f = 1.693, PCFI = 0.79, PGFI = 0.70, CFI = 0.96, GFI = 0.93, RMSEA = 0.045. All constructs presented good internal consistency, convergent and discriminant validity. A multi-group analysis exposed the cross validity of the model. The correlations between perfectionism, fear of failure and sport anxiety measures revealed evidence of its concurrent validity, providing evidence for the proposed model. Overall, the results of the present study provided evidence for these instruments’ validity and reliability, however further investigations are required.

  9. Investigation the Frost Resistance of Vegetative and Reproductive Buds of Pear Cultivars in Mashhad Climate Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shadan khorshidi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most deciduous trees need low temperature to break flower bud dormancy. One of the most important abiotic stresses is low temperature which limits production of temperate fruits. Pear production has been considerably reduced in recent years. Important pear cultivars show different levels of resistance to cold. Cold compatibility followed by resistance increase is controlled genetically and contains several mechanisms which lead to production of different metabolites such as: polypeptides, amino acids and sugars. The object of this research was to evaluate the frost resistance of different ‘Dare Gazi’ genotypes and other pear cultivars in Mashhad climate condition. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted to investigate the frost resistance of 23 ‘Dare Gazi’ pear genotypes and nine other cultivars include: ‘William’s’, ‘Bell de june’, ‘Spadona’, ‘Koshia’, ‘Domkaj’, ‘Torsh’, ‘Sebri’ and ‘Tabrizi’. Plant material contained vegetative and reproductive buds of one-year-old shoot samples which were collected from 25-year old trees on March 2014, four days after winter cold (-6.6 °C in three directions of trees and sent to the laboratory. Frost damages of vegetative and reproductive buds were investigated based on visual observations (%, electrolyte leakage (EC and proline content. EC was measured with a Metrohm 644 digital conductivity meter and proline content was measured based on Bates et al. (1973 method, using acid ninhydrin. The experiment was performed on completely randomized experimental design with three replications. Statistical analysis was carried out using MSTAT-C and Excel software. Mean values were compared using the least significance difference test (LSD at 1% levels. Cluster analysis was conducted by SPSS 16 program. Results and Discussion: Highest EC of reproductive buds was observed in ‘Dare Gazi’ 10, 19, ‘Tabrizi’ and ‘Torsh’ whereas ‘Dare Gazi’ 8, 18

  10. Freezing pattern and frost killing temperature of apple (Malus domestica) wood under controlled conditions and in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramsohler, Manuel; Hacker, Jürgen; Neuner, Gilbert

    2012-07-01

    The freezing pattern and frost killing temperatures of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) xylem were determined by differential thermal analysis and infrared differential thermal analysis (IDTA). Results from detached or attached twigs in controlled freezing experiments and during natural field freezing of trees were compared. Non-lethal freezing of apoplastic water in apple xylem as monitored during natural winter frosts in the field occurred at -1.9 ± 0.4 °C and did not change seasonally. The pattern of whole tree freezing was variable and specific to the environmental conditions. On detached twigs high-temperature freezing exotherms (HTEs) occurred 2.8 K below the temperature observed under natural frosts in the field with a seasonal mean of -4.7 ± 0.5 °C. Microporous apple xylem showed freezing without a specific pattern within a few seconds in IDTA images during HTEs, which is in contrast to macroporous xylem where a 2D freezing pattern mirrors anatomical structures. The pith tissue always remained unfrozen. Increasing twig length increased ice nucleation temperature; for increased twig diameter the effect was not significant. In attached twigs frozen in field portable freezing chambers, HTEs were recorded at a similar mean temperature (-4.6 ± 1.0 °C) to those for detached twigs. Upon lethal intracellular freezing of apple xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) low-temperature freezing exotherms (LTEs) can be recorded. Low-temperature freezing exotherms determined on detached twigs varied significantly between a winter minimum of -36.9 °C and a summer maximum -12.7 °C. Within the temperature range wherein LTEs were recorded by IDTA in summer (-12.7 ± 0.5 to -20.3 ± 1.1 °C) various tiny clearly separated discontinuous freezing events could be detected similar to that in other species with contrasting XPC anatomy. These freezing events appeared to be initially located in the primary and only later in the secondary xylem. During the LTE no

  11. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP 4 . A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  12. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  13. Discovery of araneiforms outside of the South Polar Layered Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Aye, K.-Michael; Portyankina, Ganna; Hansen, Candice; Lintott, Chris J.; Allen, Campbell; Allen, Sarah; Calef, Fred J.; Duca, Simone; McMaster, Adam; R. M Miller, Grant

    2017-10-01

    Mars' south polar region is sculpted by the seasonal cycle of freezing and thawing of exposed carbon dioxide (CO2) ice. In the Southern Spring, CO2 jets loft dust and dirt through cracks in the sublimating CO2 ice sheet to the surface where winds blow the material into the hundreds of thousands of dark fans observed from orbit. During this seasonal process, it is thought that the CO2 gas also exploits weaknesses in the surface below the ice sheet to carve dendritic channels known as araneiforms. Planet Four: Terrains (http://terrains.planetfour.org) is a citizen science project enlisting the general public to review ~6 m/pixel resolution Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) subimages to identify: (1) araneiforms (including features with a central pit and radiating channels known as ‘spiders’) (2) erosional depressions, troughs, mesas, ridges, and quasi-circular pits characteristic of the South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) which we collectively refer to as ‘Swiss cheese terrain’, and (3) craters.We provide an overview of Planet Four: Terrains and discuss the distributions of our high confidence classic spider araneiforms and Swiss cheese terrain identifications in CTX images covering 11% of the South polar regions at latitudes ≤ -75 degrees N. Previously spiders were reported as being confined to the South Polar Layered Deposits (SPLD). We present the first identification of araneiforms at locations outside of the SPLD and discuss the implications for the CO2 jet hypothesis.Acknowledgements: This work uses data generated via the Zooniverse.org platform, development of which was supported by a Global Impact Award from Google, and by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. We also thank the HIRSE and MRO Teams for their help in scheduling and acquiring our requested observations.

  14. Our Polar Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  15. Terahertz polarization imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Valk, N.C.J.; Van der Marel, W.A.M.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the polarization state of a terahertz pulse by using a modified electrooptic sampling setup. To illustrate the power of this method, we show two examples in which the knowledge of the polarization of the terahertz pulse is essential for interpreting the results:

  16. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  17. Polar Science Is Cool!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  18. First measurement of the polarization observable E in the p→(γ→,π+n reaction up to 2.25 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Strauch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available First results from the longitudinally polarized frozen-spin target (FROST program are reported. The double-polarization observable E, for the reaction γ→p→→π+n, has been measured using a circularly polarized tagged-photon beam, with energies from 0.35 to 2.37 GeV. The final-state pions were detected with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. These polarization data agree fairly well with previous partial-wave analyses at low photon energies. Over much of the covered energy range, however, significant deviations are observed, particularly in the high-energy region where high-L multipoles contribute. The data have been included in new multipole analyses resulting in updated nucleon resonance parameters. We report updated fits from the Bonn–Gatchina, Jülich–Bonn, and SAID groups.

  19. GaN epitaxial layers grown on 6H-SiC by the sublimation sandwich technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, C.; Volm, D.; Meyer, B. K.; Pressel, K.; Nilsson, S.; Mokhov, E. N.; Baranov, P. G.

    1994-08-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of GaN epitaxial layers grown on 6H-SiC. We employed the sublimation sandwich method to grow single crystal layers at high growth rates with free carrier concentrations of 2×1017 cm-3. Very narrow x-ray diffraction peaks of the GaN (0002) plane are obtained indicating the high quality of this system. These findings are directly reflected in the optical properties. The photoluminescence shows a single sharp exciton line with a half width of 4 meV. Impurity related donor acceptor transitions are seen with very weak intensities. However, at lower energies the internal luminescence transitions of the 3d transition metal ions Fe and V are observed.

  20. Precision Polarization of Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elise; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Couture, Aaron; Crawford, Christopher; Chupp, Tim; Danagoulian, Areg; Estes, Mary; Hona, Binita; Jones, Gordon; Klein, Andi; Penttila, Seppo; Sharma, Monisha; Wilburn, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Determining polarization of a cold neutron beam to high precision is required for the next generation neutron decay correlation experiments at the SNS, such as the proposed abBA and PANDA experiments. Precision polarimetry measurements were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goal of determining the beam polarization to the level of 10-3 or better. The cold neutrons from FP12 were polarized using optically polarized ^3He gas as a spin filter, which has a highly spin-dependent absorption cross section. A second ^ 3He spin filter was used to analyze the neutron polarization after passing through a resonant RF spin rotator. A discussion of the experiment and results will be given.