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Sample records for platelet scattering geometry

  1. Grassmannian geometry of scattering amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cachazo, Freddy; Goncharov, Alexander; Postnikov, Alexander; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Outlining a revolutionary reformulation of the foundations of perturbative quantum field theory, this book is a self-contained and authoritative analysis of the application of this new formulation to the case of planar, maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory. The book begins by deriving connections between scattering amplitudes and Grassmannian geometry from first principles before introducing novel physical and mathematical ideas in a systematic manner accessible to both physicists and mathematicians. The principle players in this process are on-shell functions which are closely related to certain sub-strata of Grassmannian manifolds called positroids - in terms of which the classification of on-shell functions and their relations becomes combinatorially manifest. This is an essential introduction to the geometry and combinatorics of the positroid stratification of the Grassmannian and an ideal text for advanced students and researchers working in the areas of field theory, high energy physics, and the...

  2. Pulsed Laser Nonlinear Thomson Scattering for General Scattering Geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffrey Krafft; A. Doyuran; James Rosenzweig

    2005-05-01

    In a recent paper it has been shown that single electron Thomson backscatter calculations can be performed including the effects of pulsed high intensity lasers. In this paper we present a more detailed treatment of the problem and present results for more general scattering geometries. In particular, we present new results for 90 degree Thomson scattering. Such geometries have been increasingly studied as X-ray sources of short-pulse radiation. Also, we present a clearer physical basis for these different cases.

  3. Scattering Amplitudes via Algebraic Geometry Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Søgaard, Mads; Damgaard, Poul Henrik

    This thesis describes recent progress in the understanding of the mathematical structure of scattering amplitudes in quantum field theory. The primary purpose is to develop an enhanced analytic framework for computing multiloop scattering amplitudes in generic gauge theories including QCD without Feynman diagrams. The study of multiloop scattering amplitudes is crucial for the new era of precision phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Loop-level scattering amplitudes can be reduced to a basis of linearly independent integrals whose coefficients are extracted from generalized unitarity cuts. We take advantage of principles from algebraic geometry in order to extend the notion of maximal cuts to a large class of two- and three-loop integrals. This allows us to derive unique and surprisingly compact formulae for the coefficients of the basis integrals. Our results are expressed in terms of certain linear combinations of multivariate residues and elliptic integrals computed from products of ...

  4. SPANDY: a Monte Carlo program for gas target scattering geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarmie, N.; Jett, J.H.; Niethammer, A.C.

    1977-02-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program is presented that simulates a two-slit gas target scattering geometry. The program is useful in estimating effects due to finite geometry and multiple scattering in the target foil. Details of the program are presented and experience with a specific example is discussed.

  5. Scattering Amplitudes via Algebraic Geometry Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Mads

    This thesis describes recent progress in the understanding of the mathematical structure of scattering amplitudes in quantum field theory. The primary purpose is to develop an enhanced analytic framework for computing multiloop scattering amplitudes in generic gauge theories including QCD without...... Feynman diagrams. The study of multiloop scattering amplitudes is crucial for the new era of precision phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Loop-level scattering amplitudes can be reduced to a basis of linearly independent integrals whose coefficients are extracted from generalized...

  6. Scattering Amplitudes via Algebraic Geometry Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Mads

    unitarity cuts. We take advantage of principles from algebraic geometry in order to extend the notion of maximal cuts to a large class of two- and three-loop integrals. This allows us to derive unique and surprisingly compact formulae for the coefficients of the basis integrals. Our results are expressed...... in terms of certain linear combinations of multivariate residues and elliptic integrals computed from products of tree-level amplitudes. Several explicit examples are provided...

  7. Mesoscopic Modeling of Thrombus Formation and Growth: Platelet Deposition in Complex Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2014-11-01

    Haemodynamics and blood rheology are important contributing factors to thrombus formation at a vulnerable vessel wall, and adhesion of platelets to a vascular surface, particularly in regions of flow stagnation, recirculation and reattachment is significantly important in formation of thrombi. For example, haemodynamic micro-environment can have effects on thrombosis inside the atherosclerotic plaques and aneurysms. To study these effects, we have developed and validated a model for platelet aggregation in blood flow using Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. In this model platelets are considered as single DPD particles interacting with each other via Morse potential once activated. We assign an activation delay time to each platelet such that they remain passive during that time. We investigate the effect of different geometries on platelet aggregation by considering arterial stenosis at different levels of occlusion, and aneurysms of different shapes and sizes. The results show a marked increase in platelet aggregation within the boundaries of deceleration zone by increasing the degree of stenosis. Further, we observe enhanced platelet margination and wall deposition in the presence of red blood cells.

  8. Accurate measurement of volume and shape of resting and activated blood platelets from light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalensky, Alexander E.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Konokhova, Anastasiya I.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A.; Chikova, Elena D.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for determination of volume and shape of individual blood platelets modeled as an oblate spheroid from angle-resolved light scattering with flow-cytometric technique. The light-scattering profiles (LSPs) of individual platelets were measured with the scanning flow cytometer and the platelet characteristics were determined from the solution of the inverse light-scattering problem using the precomputed database of theoretical LSPs. We revealed a phenomenon of parameter compensation, which is partly explained in the framework of anomalous diffraction approximation. To overcome this problem, additional a priori information on the platelet refractive index was used. It allowed us to determine the size of each platelet with subdiffraction precision and independent of the particular value of the platelet aspect ratio. The shape (spheroidal aspect ratio) distributions of platelets showed substantial differences between native and activated by 10 μM adenosine diphosphate samples. We expect that the new approach may find use in hematological analyzers for accurate measurement of platelet volume distribution and for determination of the platelet activation efficiency.

  9. Accurate measurement of volume and shape of resting and activated blood platelets from light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalensky, Alexander E; Yurkin, Maxim A; Konokhova, Anastasiya I; Strokotov, Dmitry I; Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M; Chernyshev, Andrei V; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A; Chikova, Elena D; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for determination of volume and shape of individual blood platelets modeled as an oblate spheroid from angle-resolved light scattering with flow-cytometric technique. The light-scattering profiles (LSPs) of individual platelets were measured with the scanning flow cytometer and the platelet characteristics were determined from the solution of the inverse light-scattering problem using the precomputed database of theoretical LSPs. We revealed a phenomenon of parameter compensation, which is partly explained in the framework of anomalous diffraction approximation. To overcome this problem, additional a priori information on the platelet refractive index was used. It allowed us to determine the size of each platelet with subdiffraction precision and independent of the particular value of the platelet aspect ratio. The shape (spheroidal aspect ratio) distributions of platelets showed substantial differences between native and activated by 10 μM adenosine diphosphate samples. We expect that the new approach may find use in hematological analyzers for accurate measurement of platelet volume distribution and for determination of the platelet activation efficiency.

  10. A novel small-angle neutron scattering detector geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; Jackson, Andrew; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Piscitelli, Francesco; Kirstein, Oliver; Andersen, Ken H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel 2π detector geometry for small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) applications is presented and its theoretical performance evaluated. Such a novel geometry is ideally suited for a SANS instrument at the European Spallation Source (ESS). Motivated by the low availability and high price of 3He, the new concept utilizes gaseous detectors with 10B as the neutron converter. The shape of the detector is inspired by an optimization process based on the properties of the conversion material. Advantages over the detector geometry traditionally used on SANS instruments are discussed. The angular and time resolutions of the proposed detector concept are shown to satisfy the requirements of the particular SANS instrument. PMID:24046504

  11. Scattering resonances of ultracold atoms in confined geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidian, Shahpoor

    2008-06-18

    Subject of this thesis is the investigation of the quantum dynamics of ultracold atoms in confined geometries. We discuss the behavior of ground state atoms inside a 3D magnetic quadrupole field. Such atoms in enough weak magnetic fields can be approximately treated as neutral point-like particles. Complementary to the well-known positive energy resonances, we point out the existence of short-lived negative energy resonances. The latter originate from a fundamental symmetry of the underlying Hamiltonian. We drive a mapping of the two branches of the spectrum. Moreover, we analyze atomic hyperfine resonances in a magnetic quadrupole field. This corresponds to the case for which both the hyperfine and Zeeman interaction, are comparable, and should be taken into account. Finally, we develop a general grid method for multichannel scattering of two atoms in a two-dimensional harmonic confinement. With our approach we analyze transverse excitations/deexcitations in the course of the collisional process (distinguishable or identical atoms) including all important partial waves and their couplings due to the broken spherical symmetry. Special attention is paid to suggest a non-trivial extension of the CIRs theory developed so far only for the single-mode regime and zero-energy limit. (orig.)

  12. Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tiny fraction of the blood volume. The principal function of platelets is to prevent bleeding. Red blood cells are ... forming a long string. This illustrates the basic function of platelets, to stick to any foreign surface and then ...

  13. Non-line-of-sight polarized single-scatter propagation model for noncoplanar geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Hongwei; Jia, Honghui; Luo, Jianfeng; Chang, Shengli; Yang, Juncai

    2012-01-01

    The classical model of non-line-of-sight (NLOS) single-scatter propagation for coplanar geometries was recently extended to include noncoplanar geometries; the calculation processes in the extended model are partly based on the Cartesian coordinate system and are somewhat complicated. A new NLOS single-scatter propagation model for noncoplanar geometries is presented based only on the prolate spheroidal coordinate system, which can be considered as the simplified version of the extended model mentioned above. Similar to the polarization-extension of the Monte-Carlo-based multiple-scatter model, the new single-scatter model for noncoplanar geometries is also extended to take polarization into account; the polarized single-scatter model is validated by the Monte-Carlo-based polarized model, results show perfect match. The theoretical feasibility of a 2-polarization UV communication link is validated based on the polarized single-scatter model.

  14. Raman scattering on H{sub 2} in platelets in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, E.V., E-mail: edward.lavrov@physik.tu-dresden.d [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Hiller, M.; Weber, J. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    A Raman scattering study of H{sub 2} trapped within left brace111right brace oriented platelets in Si has been performed. The rotational transitions S{sub 0}(J) for J=0,1,2, and 3 are identified at 353, 587, 815, and 1034cm{sup -1}, respectively. At low temperatures, ortho-to-para conversion of H{sub 2} trapped within platelets is observed and suggested to be caused by interaction of nearby H{sub 2} molecules. The contributions of ortho- and para-H{sub 2} to the vibrational Q{sub 1}(J) broad band at 4150cm{sup -1} are identified.

  15. Validity of Particle-Counting Method Using Laser-Light Scattering for Detecting Platelet Aggregation in Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakadate, Hiromichi; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    We aimed to study the validity of a new analytical approach that reflected the phase from platelet activation to the formation of small platelet aggregates. We hoped that this new approach would enable us to use the particle-counting method with laser-light scattering to measure platelet aggregation in healthy controls and in diabetic patients without complications. We measured agonist-induced platelet aggregation for 10 min. Agonist was added to the platelet-rich plasma 1 min after measurement started. We compared the total scattered light intensity from small aggregates over a 10-min period (established analytical approach) and that over a 2-min period from 1 to 3 min after measurement started (new analytical approach). Consequently platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was significantly greater than in healthy controls by both analytical approaches. However, platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c < 6.5%, i.e. patients in the early stages of diabetes, was significantly greater than in healthy controls only by the new analytical approach, not by the established analytical approach. These results suggest that platelet aggregation as detected by the particle-counting method using laser-light scattering could be applied in clinical examinations by our new analytical approach.

  16. Simulated scatter performance of an inverse-geometry dedicated breast CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagtani, Reema; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to quantify the effects of scatter for inverse-geometry dedicated breast CT compared to cone-beam breast CT through simulations. The inverse geometry was previously proposed as an alternative to cone-beam acquisition for volumetric CT. The inverse geometry consists of a large-area scanned-source opposite a detector array that is smaller in the transverse direction. While the gantry rotates, the x-ray beam is rapidly sequenced through an array of positions, acquiring a truncated projection image at each position. Inverse-geometry CT (IGCT) is expected to detect less scatter than cone-beam methods because only a fraction of the object is irradiated at any time and the fast detector isolates the measurements from sequential x-ray beams. An additional scatter benefit is the increased air gap due to the inverted geometry. In this study, we modeled inverse-geometry and cone-beam dedicated breast CT systems of equivalent resolution, field of view, and photon fluence. Monte Carlo simulations generated scatter and primary projections of three cylindrical phantoms of diameters 10, 14, and 18 cm composed of 50% adipose/50% glandular tissue. The scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) was calculated for each breast diameter. Monte Carlo simulations were combined with analytical simulations to generate inverse-geometry and cone-beam images of breast phantoms embedded with tumors. Noise reprehenting the photon fluence of a realistic breast CT scan was added to the simulated projections. Cone-beam data were reconstructed with and without an ideal scatter correction. The CNR between breast tumor and background was compared for the inverse and cone-beam geometries for the three phantom diameters. Results demonstrated an order of magnitude reduction in SPR for the IGCT system compared to the cone-beam system. For example, the peak IGCT SPRs were 0.05 and 0.09 for the 14 and 18 cm phantoms, respectively, compared to 0.42 and 1 for the cone-beam system. For both

  17. Equivalence relations for Mueller matrix symmetries of laboratory, LIDAR and planetary scattering geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    Symmetry relationships for optical observations of matter generally fall into several common scattering geometries. The 'planetary' configuration is preferred among a group of observers of extraterrestrial planets, 'laboratory' observations are performed in the biomedical research field and the LIDAR configuration is preferred among those using lasers to probe optical properties of horizontal surfaces with mirror or axial symmetry. This paper starts with the Stokes matrix formalism and uses symmetries of Mueller matrix scattering to establishes links between the mathematical symmetries of each geometric configuration.

  18. Absorbing aerosol radiative effects in the limb-scatter viewing geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wiacek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The limb-scatter satellite viewing geometry is well suited to detecting low-concentration aerosols in the upper troposphere due to its long observation path length (~ 50–100 km, high vertical resolution (~ 1–2 km and good geographic coverage. We use the fully three-dimensional radiative transfer code SASKTRAN to simulate the sensitivity of limb-scatter viewing Odin/OSIRIS satellite measurements to absorbing mineral dust and carbonaceous aerosols (smoke and pure soot, as well as to non-absorbing sulfate aerosols and ice in the upper troposphere.

    At long wavelengths (813 nm the addition of all aerosols (except soot to an air only atmosphere produced a radiance increase as compared to air only, on account of the low Rayleigh scattering in air only at 813 nm. The radiance reduction due to soot aerosol was negligible (< 0.1% at all heights (0–100 km.

    At short wavelengths (337, 377, 452 nm, we found that the addition of any aerosol species to an air only atmosphere caused a decrease in single-scattered radiation due to an extinction of Rayleigh scattering in the direction of OSIRIS. The reduction was clearly related to particle size first, with absorption responsible for second-order effects only. Multiple-scattered radiation could either increase or decrease in the presence of an aerosol species, depending both on particle size and absorption. Large scatterers (ice, mineral dust all increased multiple-scattered radiation within, below and above the aerosol layer. Small, highly absorbing pure soot particles produced a negligible multiple-scattering response (< 0.1% at all heights, primarily confined to within and below the soot layer. Medium-sized scatterers produced a multiple-scattering response that depended on their absorbing properties. Increased radiances were simulated as compared to air only at all short wavelengths (337, 377 and 452 nm for sulfate aerosol particles (non-absorbing while decreased radiances were

  19. Positivity, Grassmannian Geometry and Simplex-like Structures of Scattering Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    This article revisits and elaborates the significant role of positive geometry of momentum twistor Grassmannian for planar N=4 SYM scattering amplitudes. First we establish the fundamentals of positive Grassmannian geometry for tree amplitudes. Then we formulate this subject around these four major facets: 1. Deriving the tree and 1-loop BCFW recursion relations solely from positivity, after introducing the simple building blocks called positive components. 2. Applying Grassmannian geometry and Plucker coordinates to determine the signs of N2MHV homological identities. Most of the signs are in fact the secret incarnation of the simple 6-term NMHV identity. 3. Deriving the stacking positivity relation, which is powerful for parameterizing the matrix representative in terms of positive variables, of a given Grassmannian geometric configuration. 4. Introducing a highly refined formalism for tree BCFW recursion relation, which reveals its two-fold simplex-like structures. First, the BCFW contour in terms of (redu...

  20. Electron Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Re. Betancourt-Riera; Ri. Betancourt-Riera; J. M. Nieto Jalil; R. Riera

    2015-01-01

    We study the electron states and the differential cross section for an electron Raman scattering process in a semi-conductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry. The electron Raman scattering developed here can be used to provide direct information about the electron band structures of these confinement systems. We assume that the system grows in a GaAs/Al0.35Ga0.65As matrix. The system is modeled by considering T =0 K and also a single parabolic con-duction band, which is split into a sub-band system due to the confinement. The emission spectra are discussed for different scattering configurations, and the selection rules for the processes are also studied. Singularities in the spectra are found and interpreted.

  1. Geometry and quadratic nonlinearity of charge transfer complexes in solution using depolarized hyper-Rayleigh scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ravindra; Ghosh, Sampa; Mukhopadhyay, S; Ramasesha, S; Das, Puspendu K

    2011-01-28

    We report large quadratic nonlinearity in a series of 1:1 molecular complexes between methyl substituted benzene donors and quinone acceptors in solution. The first hyperpolarizability, β(HRS), which is very small for the individual components, becomes large by intermolecular charge transfer (CT) interaction between the donor and the acceptor in the complex. In addition, we have investigated the geometry of these CT complexes in solution using polarization resolved hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS). Using linearly (electric field vector along X direction) and circularly polarized incident light, respectively, we have measured two macroscopic depolarization ratios D=I(2ω,X,X)/I(2ω,Z,X) and D(')=I(2ω,X,C)/I(2ω,Z,C) in the laboratory fixed XYZ frame by detecting the second harmonic scattered light in a polarization resolved fashion. The experimentally obtained first hyperpolarizability, β(HRS), and the value of macroscopic depolarization ratios, D and D('), are then matched with the theoretically deduced values from single and double configuration interaction calculations performed using the Zerner's intermediate neglect of differential overlap self-consistent reaction field technique. In solution, since several geometries are possible, we have carried out calculations by rotating the acceptor moiety around three different axes keeping the donor molecule fixed at an optimized geometry. These rotations give us the theoretical β(HRS), D and D(') values as a function of the geometry of the complex. The calculated β(HRS), D, and D(') values that closely match with the experimental values, give the dominant equilibrium geometry in solution. All the CT complexes between methyl benzenes and chloranil or 1,2-dichloro-4,5-dicyano-p-benzoquinone investigated here are found to have a slipped parallel stacking of the donors and the acceptors. Furthermore, the geometries are staggered and in some pairs, a twist angle as high as 30° is observed. Thus, we have demonstrated in

  2. Grazing incidence polarized neutron scattering in reflection geometry from nanolayered spintronic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitesh Paul

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes recent experimental investigations using neutron scattering on layered nanomagnetic systems (accentuating my contribution), which have applications in spintronics also. Polarized neutron investigations of such artificially structured materials are basically done to understand the interplay between structure and magnetism confined within the nanometer scale that can be additionally depth-resolved. Details of the identification of buried domains and their nature of lateral and vertical correlations within the systems are important. A particularly interesting aspect that has emerged over the years is the capability to measure polarized neutron scattering in directions parallel and perpendicular to the applied field direction (which is also the quantization axis for neutron polarizations). This was added with the capability of measuring in specular as well as in off-specular geometry. Distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) theory for neutrons has proved to be a remarkable development in the quantitative analysis of the scattering data measured simultaneously for specular and off-specular modes within the same framework. In particular, the depth and lateral distribution of the ferromagnetic spins relative to the interface within interlayercoupled or exchange-coupled system has been extensive. For example, twisted magnetization state at interlayer coupled interfaces or intricacies of symmetric and asymmetric magnetization reversals along with suppression of training effect in exchange coupled system was microscopically identified using neutron scattering only. The investigation on the distribution of magnetic species within dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor superlattices, with low angle neutron scattering, has played a crucial role both from practical and fundamental research points of view.

  3. Effective interaction of charged platelets in aqueous solution: investigations of colloid laponite suspensions by static light scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Harnau, L; Rosenfeldt, S; Ballauff, M

    2005-11-01

    We study dilute aqueous solutions of charged disklike mineral particles (laponite) by a combination of static light scattering (SLS) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Laponite solutions are known to form gels above a certain critical concentration that must be described as nonequilibrium states. Here we focus on the investigation by SLS and SAXS at concentrations below gelation (cLaponite platelets as well as the structure factor describing their interaction at finite concentration. A detailed analysis of the combined sets of data proves that the solutions are in a well-defined equilibrium state. Moreover, this analysis demonstrates the internal consistency and accuracy of the scattering functions obtained at finite concentrations. We find that laponite particles interact through an effective pair potential that is attractive on short range but repulsive on longer range. This finding demonstrates that Laponite solutions exhibit only a limited stability at the concentration of added salt used herein. Raising the ionic strength to 0.005M already leads to slow flocculation as is evidenced from the enhanced scattering intensity at smallest scattering angles. All data strongly suggest that the gelation occurring at higher concentration is related to aggregation.

  4. Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pedoe, Dan

    1988-01-01

    ""A lucid and masterly survey."" - Mathematics Gazette Professor Pedoe is widely known as a fine teacher and a fine geometer. His abilities in both areas are clearly evident in this self-contained, well-written, and lucid introduction to the scope and methods of elementary geometry. It covers the geometry usually included in undergraduate courses in mathematics, except for the theory of convex sets. Based on a course given by the author for several years at the University of Minnesota, the main purpose of the book is to increase geometrical, and therefore mathematical, understanding and to he

  5. Comparative study of different scattering geometries for the proposed Indian X-ray polarization measurement experiment using Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadawale, S.V., E-mail: santoshv@prl.res.i [Physical Research Laboratory, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Paul, B. [Raman Research Institute, Sadashivnagar, Bangalore 560 080 (India); Pendharkar, J.; Naik, Sachindra [Physical Research Laboratory, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India)

    2010-06-21

    Polarization is a very important property of radiation from astrophysical sources. It carries unique information regarding the emission mechanism, physical conditions as well as emission geometry at the origin. Polarization measurements in X-rays can provide unique opportunity to study the behavior of matter and radiation under extreme magnetic fields and extreme gravitational fields. Unfortunately, over past two decades, when X-ray astronomy witnessed multiple order of magnitude improvement in temporal, spatial and spectral sensitivities, there is no (or very little) progress in the field of polarization measurements of astrophysical X-rays. Recently, a proposal has been submitted to Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) for a dedicated small satellite based experiment to carry out X-ray polarization measurement, which aims to provide the first X-ray polarization measurements since 1976. This experiment will be based on the well known principle of polarization measurement by Thomson scattering and employs the baseline design of a central low Z scatterer (typically Lithium, Lithium Hydride or Beryllium) surrounded by X-ray detectors to measure the angular intensity distribution of the scattered X-rays. The sensitivity of such experiment is determined by the collecting area, scattering and detection efficiency, X-ray detector background, and the modulation factor. Therefore, it is necessary to carefully select the scattering geometry which can provide the highest modulation factor and thus highest sensitivity within the specified experimental constraints. The effective way to determine optimum scattering geometry is by studying various possible scattering geometries by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Here we present results of our detailed comparative study based on Geant4 simulations of five different scattering geometries which can be considered within the weight and size constraints of the proposed small satellite based X-ray polarization measurement

  6. A high-field pulsed magnet system for x-ray scattering studies in Voigt geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Zahirul; Ruff, Jacob P C; Das, Ritesh K; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Narumi, Yasuo; Canfield, Paul C

    2011-01-01

    We present a new pulsed-magnet system that enables x-ray single-crystal diffraction in addition to powder and spectroscopic studies in Voigt geometry. The apparatus consists of a large-bore solenoid, cooled by liquid nitrogen. A second independent closed-cycle cryostat is used for cooling samples near liquid helium temperatures. Pulsed magnetic fields up to ~30 T with a minimum of ~6 ms in total duration are generated by discharging a 40 kJ capacitor bank into the magnet coil. The unique characteristic of this instrument is the preservation of maximum scattering angle (~23.6 deg.) through the magnet bore by virtue of a novel double-funnel insert. This instrument would facilitate x-ray diffraction and spectroscopic studies that are impractical, if not impossible, to perform using conventional split-pair magnets and offers a practical solution for preserving optical access in future higher-field pulsed magnets.

  7. Nonlinear kinetic modeling of stimulated Raman scattering in a multidimensional geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benisti, D.; Morice, O.; Gremillet, L.; Friou, A.; Lefebvre, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we derive coupled envelope equations modeling the growth of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a multi-dimensional geometry and accounting for nonlinear kinetic effects. In particular, our envelope equations allow for the nonlinear reduction of the Landau damping rate, whose decrease with the plasma wave amplitude depends on the rate of side-loss. Account is also made of the variations in the extent of the plasma wave packet entailed by the collisionless dissipation due to trapping. The dephasing between the electron plasma wave (EPW) and the laser drive, as well as the self-focussing of the plasma wave, both induced by the EPW nonlinear frequency shift, are also included in our envelope equations. These equations are solved in a multi-dimensional geometry using our code dubbed BRAMA, whose predictions regarding the evolution of Raman reflectivity as a function of the laser intensity are compared against previously published particle in cell results, thus illustrating the ability of BRAMA simulations to provide the correct laser threshold intensity for SRS as well as the right order of magnitude of Raman reflectivity above threshold.

  8. Full-wave Analyses of Scattering of Electromagnetic Wave from the Weakly Ionized Plasma in Plane Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Falun; Cao Jinxiang; Wang Ge

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to present a full-wave analysis of scattering from the weakly ionized plasma in the plane geometry. We have yielded an approximate solution in an analytic form to the electromagnetic wave scattering from the weakly ionizsd plasma. In the normal and oblique incidence, the analytic solution works well, as compared with the exact solution and the solution based on the Wenzell-Kramers-Brillouin-Jeffreys (WKBJ) approximation to the uniform density profile.

  9. Determination of structural changes of dispersed clay platelets in a polymer blend during solid-state rheological property measurement by small-angle X-ray scattering

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bandyopadhyay, J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available -1 Polymer Volume 52, Issue 12, 26 May 2011, Pages 2628?2642 Determination of structural changes of dispersed clay platelets in a polymer blend during solid-state rheological property measurement by small-angle X-ray scattering ? Jayita Bandyopadhyaya... frequency and temperature sweep tests. Graphical abstract Keywords ? Blend composites; ? Small-angle X-ray scattering; ? Solid-state rheology ...

  10. Study of change in dispersion and orientation of clay platelets in a polymer nanocomposite during tensile test by variostage small-angle X-ray scattering

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bandyopadhyay, J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available To understand the change in dispersion and orientation of clay platelets in three-dimensional space during tensile test, neat polymer and its nanocomposite samples were studied by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS). The samples after...

  11. Are quantum spin Hall edge modes more resilient to disorder, sample geometry and inelastic scattering than quantum Hall edge modes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Arjun; Benjamin, Colin

    2016-04-13

    On the surface of 2D topological insulators, 1D quantum spin Hall (QSH) edge modes occur with Dirac-like dispersion. Unlike quantum Hall (QH) edge modes, which occur at high magnetic fields in 2D electron gases, the occurrence of QSH edge modes is due to spin-orbit scattering in the bulk of the material. These QSH edge modes are spin-dependent, and chiral-opposite spins move in opposing directions. Electronic spin has a larger decoherence and relaxation time than charge. In view of this, it is expected that QSH edge modes will be more robust to disorder and inelastic scattering than QH edge modes, which are charge-dependent and spin-unpolarized. However, we notice no such advantage accrues in QSH edge modes when subjected to the same degree of contact disorder and/or inelastic scattering in similar setups as QH edge modes. In fact we observe that QSH edge modes are more susceptible to inelastic scattering and contact disorder than QH edge modes. Furthermore, while a single disordered contact has no effect on QH edge modes, it leads to a finite charge Hall current in the case of QSH edge modes, and thus a vanishing of the pure QSH effect. For more than a single disordered contact while QH states continue to remain immune to disorder, QSH edge modes become more susceptible--the Hall resistance for the QSH effect changes sign with increasing disorder. In the case of many disordered contacts with inelastic scattering included, while quantization of Hall edge modes holds, for QSH edge modes a finite charge Hall current still flows. For QSH edge modes in the inelastic scattering regime we distinguish between two cases: with spin-flip and without spin-flip scattering. Finally, while asymmetry in sample geometry can have a deleterious effect in the QSH case, it has no impact in the QH case.

  12. Multiple scattering from Chebyshev particles: Monte Carlo simulations for backscattering in lidar geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoni, A; Flesia, C; Bruscaglioni, P; Ismaelli, A

    1996-12-20

    Lidar measurements are often interpreted on the basis of two fundamental assumptions: absence of multiple scattering and sphericity of the particles that make up the diffusing medium. There are situations in which neither holds true. We focus our interest on multiply-scattered returns from homogeneous layers of monodisperse, randomly oriented, axisymmetric nonspherical particles. T(2) Chebyshev particles have been chosen and their single-scattering properties have been reviewed. A Monte Carlo procedure has been employed to calculate the backscattered signal for several fields of view. Comparisons with the case of scattering from equivalent (equal-volume) spheres have been carried out (narrow polydispersions have been used to smooth the phase functions' oscillations). Our numerical effort highlights a considerable variability in the intensity of the multiply-scattered signal, which is a consequence of the strong dependence of the backscattering cross section on deformation of the particles. Even more striking effects have been noted for depolarization; peculiar behavior was observed at moderate optical depths when particles characterized by a large backscattering depolarization ratio were employed in our simulations. The sensitivity of depolarization to even small departures from sphericity, in spite of random orientation of the particles, has been confirmed. The results obtained with the Monte Carlo codes have been successfully checked with an analytical formula for double scattering.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of ruthenium eye plaques with GEANT4: influence of multiple scattering algorithms, the spectrum and the geometry on depth dose profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, H.; Ebenau, M.; Spaan, B.; Eichmann, M.

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies show remarkable differences in the simulation of electron depth dose profiles of ruthenium eye plaques. We examined the influence of the scoring and simulation geometry, the source spectrum and the multiple scattering algorithm on the depth dose profile using GEANT4. The simulated absolute dose deposition agrees with absolute dose data from the manufacturer within the measurement uncertainty. Variations in the simulation geometry as well as the source spectrum have only a small influence on the depth dose profiles. However, the multiple scattering algorithms have the largest influence on the depth dose profiles. They deposit up to 20% less dose compared to the single scattering implementation. We recommend researchers who are interested in simulating low- to medium-energy electrons to examine their simulation under the influence of different multiple scattering settings. Since the simulation and scoring geometry as well as the exact physics settings are best described by the source code of the application, we made the code publicly available.

  14. Light scattering by small feldspar particles simulated using the Gaussian random sphere geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veihelmann, B.; Nousiainen, T.; Kahnert, M.; Zande, W.J. van der

    2006-01-01

    The single-scattering properties of Gaussian random spheres are calculated using the discrete dipole approximation. The ensemble of model particles is assumed to be representative for a feldspar dust sample that is characteristic for weakly absorbing irregularly shaped mineral aerosol. The morpholog

  15. Geometry Survey of the Time-of-Flight Neutron-Elastic Scattering (Antonella) Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O. [Fermilab; Izraelevitch, Federico [Buenos Aires U.

    2016-10-17

    The Antonella experiment is a measurement of the ionization efficiency of nuclear recoils in silicon at low energies [1]. It is a neutron elastic scattering experiment motivated by the search for dark matter particles. In this experiment, a proton beam hits a lithium target and neutrons are produced. The neutron shower passes through a collimator that produces a neutron beam. The beam illuminates a silicon detector. With a certain probability, a neutron interacts with a silicon nucleus of the detector producing elastic scattering. After the interaction, a fraction of the neutron energy is transferred to the silicon nucleus which acquires kinetic energy and recoils. This kinetic energy is then dissipated in the detector producing ionization and thermal energy. The ionization produced is measured with the silicon detector electronics. On the other hand, the neutron is scattered out of the beam. A neutron-detector array (made of scintillator bars) registers the neutron arrival time and the scattering angle to reconstruct the kinematics of the neutron-nucleus interaction with the time-of-flight technique [2]. In the reconstruction equations, the energy of the nuclear recoil is a function of the scattering angle with respect to the beam direction, the time-of-flight of the neutron and the geometric distances between components of the setup (neutron-production target, silicon detector, scintillator bars). This paper summarizes the survey of the different components of the experiment that made possible the off-line analysis of the collected data. Measurements were made with the API Radian Laser Tracker and I-360 Probe Wireless. The survey was completed at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA in February 2015.

  16. Transmission-geometry electrochemical cell for in-situ scattering and spectroscopy investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupas, Peter J.; Chapman, Karena W.; Kurtz, Charles A.; Borkiewicz, Olaf J.; Wiaderek, Kamila Magdelena; Shyam, Badri

    2015-05-05

    The present invention relates to a test chamber that can be used to perform a variety of X-ray and neutron spectroscopy experiments including powder diffraction, small-angle scattering, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and pair distribution functions, such chamber comprising a first electrode with an X-ray transparent window; a second electrode with an X-ray transparent window; a plurality of insulating gaskets providing a hermetic seal around the sample and preventing contact between said first and second electrodes; and an insulating housing into which the first electrode is secured.

  17. Nonlinear kinetic modeling and simulations of Raman scattering in a two-dimensional geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénisti Didier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present our nonlinear kinetic modeling of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS by the means of envelope equations, whose coefficients have been derived using a mixture of perturbative and adiabatic calculations. First examples of the numerical resolution of these envelope equations in a two-dimensional homogeneous plasma are given, and the results are compared against those of particle-in-cell (PIC simulations. These preliminary comparisons are encouraging since our envelope code provides threshold intensities consistent with those of PIC simulations while requiring computational resources reduced by 4 to 5 orders of magnitude compared to full-kinetic codes.

  18. Impact of detector geometry for compressive fan beam snapshot coherent scatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mehadi; Holmgren, Andrew; Greenberg, Joel A.; Odinaka, Ikenna; Brady, David

    2016-05-01

    Previous realizations of coded-aperture X-ray diffraction tomography (XRDT) techniques based on pencil beams image one line through an object via a single measurement but require raster scanning the object in multiple dimensions. Fan beam approaches are able to image the spatial extent of the object while retaining the ability to do material identification. Building on these approaches we present our system concept and geometry of combining a fan beam with energy sensitive/photon counting detectors and a coded aperture to capture both spatial and spectral information about an object at each voxel. Using our system we image slices via snapshot measurements for four different detector configurations and compare their results.

  19. From finite geometry exact quantities to (elliptic) scattering amplitudes for spin chains: the 1/2-XYZ

    CERN Document Server

    Fioravanti, D; Fioravanti, Davide; Rossi, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Initially, we derive a nonlinear integral equation for the vacuum counting function of the spin 1/2-XYZ chain in the {\\it disordered regime}, thus paralleling similar results by Kl\\"umper \\cite{KLU}, achieved through a different technique in the {\\it antiferroelectric regime}. In terms of the counting function we obtain the usual physical quantities, like the energy and the transfer matrix (eigenvalues). Then, we introduce a double scaling limit which appears to describe the sine-Gordon theory on cylindrical geometry, so generalising famous results in the plane by Luther \\cite{LUT} and Johnson et al. \\cite{JKM}. Furthermore, after extending the nonlinear integral equation to excitations, we derive scattering amplitudes involving solitons/antisolitons first, and bound states later. The latter case comes out as manifestly related to the Deformed Virasoro Algebra of Shiraishi et al. \\cite{SKAO}. Although this nonlinear integral equations framework was contrived to deal with finite geometries, we prove it to be e...

  20. Influence of multiple scattering of relativistic electrons on the linewidth of Parametric X-ray Radiation produced in the extremely Bragg geometry in the absence of photoabsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    The multiple scattering effect on the linewidth of backward Parametric X-ray Radiation (PXR) produced in the extremely Bragg geometry by low energy relativistic electrons traversing a single crystal is discussed. It is shown that there are conditions when the influence of photoabsorption on the linewidth can be neglected, and only the multiple scattering process of relativistic electrons in crystals leads to the PXR lines broadening. Based on obtained theoretical and numerical results for the linewidth broadening caused by multiple scattering of 30 and 50 MeV relativistic electrons in a Si crystal of various thicknesses, an experiment could be performed to help in revealing the scattering effect on the PXR lines in the absence of photoabsorption. This leads to more accurate understanding of the influence of scattering process on the linewidth of backward PXR and helps to better construct a table-top narrow bandwidth X-ray source for both scientific and industrial applications.

  1. Design of linear anti-scatter grid geometry with optimum performance for screen-film and digital mammography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodajou-Chokami, H; Sohrabpour, M

    2015-08-01

    A detailed 3D Monte Carlo simulation of the grid geometrical parameters in screen-film mammography (SFM) and digital mammography (DM) systems has been performed. A combination of IEC 60627:2013 international standard conditions and other more clinically relevant parameters were used for this simulation. Accuracy of our results has been benchmarked with previously published data and good agreement has been obtained. Calculations in a wide range of linear anti-scatter grid geometries have been carried out. The evaluated parameters for the SFM system were the Bucky factor (BF) and contrast improvement factor (CIF) and for the DM system it was signal difference-to-noise ratio improvement factor (SIF). The CIF parameter was chosen to be nearly the same as the commercial grade, the BF and SIF were significantly improved compared to commercial grids in use today. Our optimized grid parameters for the SFM system were lead strip thickness d = 12 µm, grid ratio r = 5 and strip density N = 65 lines/cm. And for the DM system these parameters were d = 5 µm, r = 3 and N = 100 lines/cm. Both optimized grid sets have thinner d and higher N compared to the commercial grids.

  2. Investigation of platelet function and platelet disorders using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubak, Peter; Nissen, Peter H; Kristensen, Steen D; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Patients with thrombocytopenia or platelet disorders are at risk of severe bleeding. We report the development and validation of flow cytometry assays to diagnose platelet disorders and to assess platelet function independently of platelet count. The assays were developed to measure glycoprotein levels (panel 1) and platelet function (panel 2) in sodium citrated blood. Twenty healthy volunteers and five patients diagnosed with different platelet disorders were included. Glycoprotein expression levels of the receptors Ia, Ib, IIb, IIIa and IX were measured and normalised with forward scatter (FS) as a measurement of platelet size. Platelet function was assessed by CD63, P-selectin and bound fibrinogen in response to arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide, ristocetin and thrombin receptor-activation peptide-6. All patients except one with suspected δ-granule defect showed aberrant levels of glycoproteins in panel 1. Glanzmann's thrombasthenia and genetically verified Bernard-Soulier syndrome could be diagnosed using panel 1. All patients showed reduced platelet function according to at least one agonist. Using panel 2 it was possible to diagnose Bernard-Soulier syndrome, δ-granule defect and GPVI disorder. By combining the two assays, we were able to diagnose different platelet disorders and investigate platelet function independent of platelet count.

  3. Scattering phase function spectrum makes reflectance spectrum measured from Intralipid phantoms and tissue sensitive to the device detection geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Kanick (Stephen); V. Krishnaswamy (V.); U.A. Gamm; H.J.C.M. Sterenborg (Dick); D.J. Robinson (Dominic); A. Amelink (Arjen); B.W. Pogue (B.)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractReflectance spectra measured in Intralipid (IL) close to the source are sensitive to wavelength-dependent changes in reduced scattering coefficient (μs ′) and scattering phase function (PF). Experiments and simulations were performed using device designs with either single or separate

  4. Coherent X-Radiation Excited by a Beam of Multiply Scattered Relativistic Electrons in a Single Crystal in the Bragg Scattering Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazhevich, S. V.; Noskov, A. V.; Nemtsev, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    A dynamic theory of coherent x-radiation emitted by a divergent beam of relativistic electrons traversing a thin single-crystal plate is developed which takes into account multiple scattering of the electrons on the target atoms. The case is considered in which the target is quite thin, so that it is not necessary to take absorption of radiation into account, but the electron path in the target is quite long, so that it is necessary to take multiple scattering into account. Expressions are obtained which describe the spectral-angular characteristics of parametric x-radiation and diffracted transient radiation under these conditions. Conditions are described under which diffracted bremsstrahlung radiation can be neglected. The possibility of manifesting the effects of dynamic diffraction is investigated.

  5. Platelet mimicry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Hunter, Alan Christy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Here we critically examine whether coating of nanoparticles with platelet membranes can truly disguise them against recognition by elements of the innate immune system. We further assess whether the "cloaking technology" can sufficiently equip nanoparticles with platelet-mimicking functionalities...

  6. Platelet Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their spleen removed surgically Use of birth control pills (oral contraceptives) Some conditions may cause a temporary (transitory) increased ... increased platelet counts include estrogen and birth control pills (oral contraceptives). Mildly decreased platelet counts may be seen in ...

  7. Study of the in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system using polarized neutron scattering under grazing incidence geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, R., E-mail: ryuji.maruyama@j-parc.jp [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Bigault, T.; Wildes, A.R.; Dewhurst, C.D. [Institut Laue Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France); Soyama, K. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Courtois, P. [Institut Laue Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2016-05-21

    The in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system with a polycrystalline grain size less than the ferromagnetic exchange length was investigated using polarized neutron off-specular scattering and grazing incidence small angle scattering measurements to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the magnetic properties which are different from the bulk. These complementary measurements with different length scales and the data analysis based on the distorted wave Born approximation revealed the lateral correlation on a length scale of sub- μm due to the fluctuating orientation of the magnetization in the layer. The obtained in-plane magnetic structure is consistent with the random anisotropy model, i.e. competition between the exchange interactions between neighboring spins and the local magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  8. Brillouin light scattering study of magnetic-element normal modes in a square artificial spin ice geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Gubbiotti, G.; Casoli, F.; Gonçalves, F. J. T.; Morley, S. A.; Rosamond, M. C.; Linfield, E. H.; Marrows, C. H.; McVitie, S.; Stamps, R. L.

    2017-01-01

    We report the results, from experimental and micromagnetic studies, of the magnetic normal modes in artificial square spin ice systems consisting of ferromagnetic-monodomain islands. Spin-wave properties are measured by Brillouin light scattering. The mode spectra contain several branches whose frequencies are sensitive to the magnitude and in-plane orientation of an applied magnetic field. We also identify soft modes that exhibit different behaviours depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field. The obtained results are well described with micromagnetic simulations of independent magnetic elements arranged along two sublattices.

  9. Geometry from Information Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Caticha, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    We use the method of maximum entropy to model physical space as a curved statistical manifold. It is then natural to use information geometry to explain the geometry of space. We find that the resultant information metric does not describe the full geometry of space but only its conformal geometry -- the geometry up to local changes of scale. Remarkably, this is precisely what is needed to model "physical" space in general relativity.

  10. Platelet proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zufferey, Anne; Fontana, Pierre; Reny, Jean-Luc; Nolli, Severine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are small cell fragments, produced by megakaryocytes, in the bone marrow. They play an important role in hemostasis and diverse thrombotic disorders. They are therefore primary targets of antithrombotic therapies. They are implicated in several pathophysiological pathways, such as inflammation or wound repair. In blood circulation, platelets are activated by several pathways including subendothelial matrix and thrombin, triggering the formation of the platelet plug. Studying their proteome is a powerful approach to understand their biology and function. However, particular attention must be paid to different experimental parameters, such as platelet quality and purity. Several technologies are involved during the platelet proteome processing, yielding information on protein identification, characterization, localization, and quantification. Recent technical improvements in proteomics combined with inter-disciplinary strategies, such as metabolomic, transcriptomics, and bioinformatics, will help to understand platelets biological mechanisms. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the platelet proteome under different environmental conditions may contribute to elucidate complex processes relevant to platelet function regarding bleeding disorders or platelet hyperreactivity and identify new targets for antiplatelet therapy.

  11. Platelet lipidomic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolegowska, B; Lubkowska, A; De Girolamo, L

    2012-01-01

    Lipids account for 16-19 percent dry platelet matter and includes 65 percent phospholipids, 25 percent neutral lipids and about 8 percent glycosphingolipids. The cell membrane that surrounds platelets is a bilayer that contains different types phospholipids symmetrically distributed in resting platelets, such as phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin. The collapse of lipid asymmetry is exposure of phosphatidylserine in the external leaflet of the plasma bilayer, where it is known to serve at least two major functions: providing a platform for development of the blood coagulation cascade and presenting the signal that induces phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. During activation, this asymmetrical distribution becomes disrupted, and PS and PE become exposed on the cell surface. The transbilayer movement of phosphatidylserine is responsible for the platelet procoagulant activity. Exposure of phosphatidylserine is a flag for macrophage recognition and clearance from the circulation. Platelets, stored at room temperature for transfusion for more than 5 days, undergo changes collectively known as platelet storage lesions. Thus, the platelet lipid composition and its possible modifications over time are crucial for efficacy of platelet rich plasma therapy. Moreover, a number of substances derived from lipids are contained into platelets. Eicosanoids are lipid signaling mediators generated by the action of lipoxygenase and include prostaglandins, thromboxane A2, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Isoprostanes have a chemical structure similar to this of prostanoids, but are differently produced into the particle, and are ligands for prostaglandins receptors, exhibiting biological activity like thromboxane A2. Endocannabinoids are derivatives from arachidonic acid which could reduce local pain. Phospholipids growth factors (sphingolipids, lysophosphatidic acid, platelet-activating factor) are involved in tissue

  12. Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intended for a one year course, this text serves as a single source, introducing readers to the important techniques and theorems, while also containing enough background on advanced topics to appeal to those students wishing to specialize in Riemannian geometry. This is one of the few Works to combine both the geometric parts of Riemannian geometry and the analytic aspects of the theory. The book will appeal to a readership that have a basic knowledge of standard manifold theory, including tensors, forms, and Lie groups. Important revisions to the third edition include: a substantial addition of unique and enriching exercises scattered throughout the text; inclusion of an increased number of coordinate calculations of connection and curvature; addition of general formulas for curvature on Lie Groups and submersions; integration of variational calculus into the text allowing for an early treatment of the Sphere theorem using a proof by Berger; incorporation of several recent results about manifolds with posit...

  13. A High-Order Immersed Boundary Method for Acoustic Wave Scattering and Low-Mach Number Flow-Induced Sound in Complex Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Mittal, Rajat

    2011-02-20

    A new sharp-interface immersed boundary method based approach for the computation of low-Mach number flow-induced sound around complex geometries is described. The underlying approach is based on a hydrodynamic/acoustic splitting technique where the incompressible flow is first computed using a second-order accurate immersed boundary solver. This is followed by the computation of sound using the linearized perturbed compressible equations (LPCE). The primary contribution of the current work is the development of a versatile, high-order accurate immersed boundary method for solving the LPCE in complex domains. This new method applies the boundary condition on the immersed boundary to a high-order by combining the ghost-cell approach with a weighted least-squares error method based on a high-order approximating polynomial. The method is validated for canonical acoustic wave scattering and flow-induced noise problems. Applications of this technique to relatively complex cases of practical interest are also presented.

  14. Geometry of multihadron production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions.

  15. Acquired platelet function defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquired qualitative platelet disorders; Acquired disorders of platelet function ... blood clotting. Disorders that can cause problems in platelet function include: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura Chronic myelogenous leukemia Multiple ...

  16. Platelet Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of gratitude that washed over me when I saw those platelets going into my husband’s body. I ... Needles LGBTQ+ Donors Blood Donor Community SleevesUp Games Facebook Avatars and Badges Banners eCards Red Cross Information ...

  17. Bulk fluid phase behaviour of colloidal platelet-sphere and platelet-polymer mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de las Heras, Daniel; Schmidt, Matthias

    2013-04-13

    Using a geometry-based fundamental measure density functional theory, we calculate bulk fluid phase diagrams of colloidal mixtures of vanishingly thin hard circular platelets and hard spheres. We find isotropic-nematic phase separation, with strong broadening of the biphasic region, upon increasing the pressure. In mixtures with large size ratio of platelet and sphere diameters, there is also demixing between two nematic phases with differing platelet concentrations. We formulate a fundamental measure density functional for mixtures of colloidal platelets and freely overlapping spheres, which represent ideal polymers, and use it to obtain phase diagrams. We find that, for low platelet-polymer size ratio, in addition to isotropic-nematic and nematic-nematic phase coexistence, platelet-polymer mixtures also display isotropic-isotropic demixing. By contrast, we do not find isotropic-isotropic demixing in hard-core platelet-sphere mixtures for the size ratios considered.

  18. Platelet activation patterns in platelet size sub-populations: differential responses to aspirin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalpally, Kiran Kumar R; Siqueiros-Garcia, Alan; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Dong, Jing-Fei; Kleiman, Neal S; Guthikonda, Sasidhar

    2010-10-01

    Circulating platelets are heterogeneous in size and structure. Whether this translates into differences in platelet function and efficacy of antiplatelet therapy is unclear. Hence, we decided to investigate the activation patterns among different platelet populations differentiated by size, and to compare the inhibitory effects of aspirin in these populations. Circulating platelets from 9 healthy volunteers were separated by size and stratified into the largest and smallest quintiles. Platelets were stimulated with 75 μM arachidonic acid (AA), 10 μM ADP or 25 μM TRAP. Alpha-granule protein secretion and expression (P-selectin, VWF, fibrinogen), surface-protein activation (activated integrin αIIbβ3) were assessed. Platelet thromboxane B(2) (TxB(2)) synthesis following AA stimulation was measured in vitro before and after incubation with 265 μM aspirin. Reticulated (juvenile) platelets were assessed using thiazole orange staining. A greater number of large platelets in the largest quintile were reticulated compared with the smallest quintile (6.1 ± 2.8% vs. 1.2 ± 1.5% respectively, p aspirin (1029 ± 190 pg/mL vs. 851 ± 159 pg/mL, respectively, p = 0.03). After stimulation with each agonist, a greater proportion of large platelets bound fibrinogen, VWF, P-selectin and activated integrin αIIbβ3 than small platelets both in the presence and in the absence of in vitro aspirin. In an in vitro setting, large platelets appear to be more active than small platelets and continue to be more active even after in vitro aspirin. Platelets exhibit heterogeneity in size and structure. Whether this translates into platelet function and efficacy of antiplatelet therapy is unclear. We evaluated platelet functional properties and the effects of aspirin on separated platelet subpopulations in an in vitro setting. Platelets were sorted into the largest and smallest size quintiles using flow cytometry forward scatter. Alpha-granule protein release, dense granule content

  19. Platelet Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Platelet Function Tests Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... their patients by ordering one or more platelet function tests. Platelet function testing may include one or more of ...

  20. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that ... function, even though there are normal platelet numbers. Most ...

  1. Twistor geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a detailed exposition of the relation between the geometry of twistor space and the geometry of Minkowski space. The paper has a didactical purpose; no use has been made of differential geometry and cohomology.

  2. Platelet matching for alloimmunized patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S H.Hsu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Platelets play an essential role in blood coagulation,hemostasis and maintenance of vascular integrity.Platelets are utilized primarily to prevent or treat bleeding in thrombocytopenic patients and patients with impaired platelet production in the bone marrow and/or with dysfunctional platelets.In current practice,platelet transfusion begins with randomly selected platelet products:either pooled platelets prepared from whole blood derived platelets; or single donor platelets prepared by apheresis procedures.

  3. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensson, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by Obstacles is to give a theoretical treatment of the scattering phenomena, and to illustrate numerical computations of some canonical scattering problems for different geometries and materials.

  4. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Guggenheimer, Heinrich W

    1977-01-01

    This is a text of local differential geometry considered as an application of advanced calculus and linear algebra. The discussion is designed for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate study, and presumes of readers only a fair knowledge of matrix algebra and of advanced calculus of functions of several real variables. The author, who is a Professor of Mathematics at the Polytechnic Institute of New York, begins with a discussion of plane geometry and then treats the local theory of Lie groups and transformation groups, solid differential geometry, and Riemannian geometry, leading to a

  5. Molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rodger, Alison

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Geometry discusses topics relevant to the arrangement of atoms. The book is comprised of seven chapters that tackle several areas of molecular geometry. Chapter 1 reviews the definition and determination of molecular geometry, while Chapter 2 discusses the unified view of stereochemistry and stereochemical changes. Chapter 3 covers the geometry of molecules of second row atoms, and Chapter 4 deals with the main group elements beyond the second row. The book also talks about the complexes of transition metals and f-block elements, and then covers the organometallic compounds and trans

  6. Clinical application of radiolabelled platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, C. (Medical Univ. Lubeck, Lubeck (DE))

    1990-01-01

    This book presents papers on the clinical applications of radiolabelled platelets. The papers are grouped into six sections on platelet labelling techniques, radiolabelled platelets in cardiology, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy, platelet scintigraphy in stroke patients, platelet scintigraphy in angiology, and platelet scintigraphy in hematology and other clinical applications, including renal transplant rejection.

  7. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady;

    2011-01-01

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...

  8. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-11-26

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  9. Beautiful geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maor, Eli

    2014-01-01

    If you've ever thought that mathematics and art don't mix, this stunning visual history of geometry will change your mind. As much a work of art as a book about mathematics, Beautiful Geometry presents more than sixty exquisite color plates illustrating a wide range of geometric patterns and theorems, accompanied by brief accounts of the fascinating history and people behind each. With artwork by Swiss artist Eugen Jost and text by acclaimed math historian Eli Maor, this unique celebration of geometry covers numerous subjects, from straightedge-and-compass constructions to intriguing configur

  10. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Graustein, William C

    2006-01-01

    This first course in differential geometry presents the fundamentals of the metric differential geometry of curves and surfaces in a Euclidean space of three dimensions. Written by an outstanding teacher and mathematician, it explains the material in the most effective way, using vector notation and technique. It also provides an introduction to the study of Riemannian geometry.Suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students, the text presupposes a knowledge of calculus. The first nine chapters focus on the theory, treating the basic properties of curves and surfaces, the mapping of

  11. Dynamics of charged gibbsite platelets in the isotropic phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleshchanok, D.; Heinen, M.; Nägele, G.; Holmqvist, P.

    2012-01-01

    We report on depolarized and non-depolarized dynamic light scattering , static light scattering , and steady shear viscosity measurements on interacting charge-stabilized gibbsite platelets suspended in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The average collective and (long-time) translational self-diffusion co

  12. Algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lefschetz, Solomon

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to algebraic geometry and a bridge between its analytical-topological and algebraical aspects, this text for advanced undergraduate students is particularly relevant to those more familiar with analysis than algebra. 1953 edition.

  13. Information geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ay, Nihat; Lê, Hông Vân; Schwachhöfer, Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive introduction and a novel mathematical foundation of the field of information geometry with complete proofs and detailed background material on measure theory, Riemannian geometry and Banach space theory. Parametrised measure models are defined as fundamental geometric objects, which can be both finite or infinite dimensional. Based on these models, canonical tensor fields are introduced and further studied, including the Fisher metric and the Amari-Chentsov tensor, and embeddings of statistical manifolds are investigated. This novel foundation then leads to application highlights, such as generalizations and extensions of the classical uniqueness result of Chentsov or the Cramér-Rao inequality. Additionally, several new application fields of information geometry are highlighted, for instance hierarchical and graphical models, complexity theory, population genetics, or Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The book will be of interest to mathematicians who are interested in geometry, inf...

  14. Platelets and hemostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Panteleev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are anuclear cell fragments playing important role in hemostasis, termination of bleeding after damage, as well as in pathological thrombus formation. The main action of platelets is the formation of aggregates, overlapping the injury. They obtained the ability to aggregate by the transition process called activation. Despite the relatively simple and definite function platelet structure is very difficult: they have almost a full set of organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and other entities. When activated platelets secrete various granules interact with plasma proteins and red blood cells and other tissues. Their activation is controlled by multiple receptors and complex signaling cascades. In this review platelet structure, mechanisms of its functioning in health and disease, diagnostic methods of platelet function and approaches to their correction were considered. Particular attention will be given to those areas of the science of platelets, which still lay hidden mysteries.

  15. Subtracted geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Zain Hamid

    In this thesis we study a special class of black hole geometries called subtracted geometries. Subtracted geometry black holes are obtained when one omits certain terms from the warp factor of the metric of general charged rotating black holes. The omission of these terms allows one to write the wave equation of the black hole in a completely separable way and one can explicitly see that the wave equation of a massless scalar field in this slightly altered background of a general multi-charged rotating black hole acquires an SL(2, R) x SL(2, R) x SO(3) symmetry. The "subtracted limit" is considered an appropriate limit for studying the internal structure of the non-subtracted black holes because new 'subtracted' black holes have the same horizon area and periodicity of the angular and time coordinates in the near horizon regions as the original black hole geometry it was constructed from. The new geometry is asymptotically conical and is physically similar to that of a black hole in an asymptotically confining box. We use the different nice properties of these geometries to understand various classically and quantum mechanically important features of general charged rotating black holes.

  16. Morphological and functional platelet abnormalities in Berkeley sickle cell mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Arun S; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Jirouskova, Marketa; Janczak, Christin A; Stevens, Jacqueline R M; Adamson, Adewole; Mohandas, Narla; Manci, Elizabeth A; Cynober, Therese; Coller, Barry S

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley sickle cell mice are used as animal models of human sickle cell disease but there are no reports of platelet studies in this model. Since humans with sickle cell disease have platelet abnormalities, we studied platelet morphology and function in Berkeley mice (SS). We observed elevated mean platelet forward angle light scatter (FSC) values (an indirect measure of platelet volume) in SS compared to wild type (WT) (37+/-3.2 vs. 27+/-1.4, mean+/-SD; p<0.001), in association with moderate thrombocytopenia (505+/-49 x 10(3)/microl vs. 1151+/-162 x 10(3)/microl; p<0.001). Despite having marked splenomegaly, SS mice had elevated levels of Howell-Jolly bodies and "pocked" erythrocytes (p<0.001 for both) suggesting splenic dysfunction. SS mice also had elevated numbers of thiazole orange positive platelets (5+/-1% vs. 1+/-1%; p<0.001), normal to low plasma thrombopoietin levels, normal plasma glycocalicin levels, normal levels of platelet recovery, and near normal platelet life spans. Platelets from SS mice bound more fibrinogen and antibody to P-selectin following activation with a threshold concentration of a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide compared to WT mice. Enlarged platelets are associated with a predisposition to arterial thrombosis in humans and some humans with SCD have been reported to have large platelets. Thus, additional studies are needed to assess whether large platelets contribute either to pulmonary hypertension or the large vessel arterial occlusion that produces stroke in some children with sickle cell disease.

  17. Geometry Revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Both classical geometry and modern differential geometry have been active subjects of research throughout the 20th century and lie at the heart of many recent advances in mathematics and physics. The underlying motivating concept for the present book is that it offers readers the elements of a modern geometric culture by means of a whole series of visually appealing unsolved (or recently solved) problems that require the creation of concepts and tools of varying abstraction. Starting with such natural, classical objects as lines, planes, circles, spheres, polygons, polyhedra, curves, surfaces,

  18. Analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, A C

    1971-01-01

    Analytic Geometry covers several fundamental aspects of analytic geometry needed for advanced subjects, including calculus.This book is composed of 12 chapters that review the principles, concepts, and analytic proofs of geometric theorems, families of lines, the normal equation of the line, and related matters. Other chapters highlight the application of graphing, foci, directrices, eccentricity, and conic-related topics. The remaining chapters deal with the concept polar and rectangular coordinates, surfaces and curves, and planes.This book will prove useful to undergraduate trigonometric st

  19. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  20. Architectural geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottmann, Helmut; Eigensatz, Michael; Vaxman, A.; Wallner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural

  1. Architectural geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottmann, Helmut; Eigensatz, Michael; Vaxman, A.; Wallner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural

  2. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kreyszig, Erwin

    1991-01-01

    An introductory textbook on the differential geometry of curves and surfaces in three-dimensional Euclidean space, presented in its simplest, most essential form, but with many explanatory details, figures and examples, and in a manner that conveys the theoretical and practical importance of the different concepts, methods and results involved. With problems at the end of each section, and solutions listed at the end of the book. Includes 99 illustrations.

  3. Platelet alloimmunization after transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taaning, E; Simonsen, A C; Hjelms, E;

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The frequency of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions has not been reported, and in multiply transfused patients is controversial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied the frequency of alloimmunization against platelet antigens in 117 patient...

  4. Flavanols and Platelet Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A. Pearson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activity and platelet-endothelial cell interactions are important in the acute development of thrombosis, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. An increasing number of foods have been reported to have platelet-inhibitory actions, and research with a number of flavanol-rich foods, including, grape juice, cocoa and chocolate, suggests that these foods may provide some protection against thrombosis. In the present report, we review a series of in vivo studies on the effects of flavanol-rich cocoa and chocolate on platelet activation and platelet-dependent primary hemostasis. Consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa inhibited several measures of platelet activity including, epinephrine- and ADP-induced glycoprotein (GP IIb/IIIa and P-Selectin expression, platelet microparticle formation, and epinephrine-collagen and ADP-collagen induced primary hemostasis. The epinephrine-induced inhibitory effects on GP IIb/IIIa and primary hemostasis were similar to, though less robust than those associated with the use of low dose (81 mg aspirin. These data, coupled with information from other studies, support the concept that flavanols present in cocoa and chocolate can modulate platelet function through a multitude of pathways.

  5. Platelet activation and aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Sander; Larsen, O H; Christiansen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new laboratory model of whole blood platelet aggregation stimulated by endogenously generated thrombin, and explores this aspect in haemophilia A in which impaired thrombin generation is a major hallmark. The method was established to measure platelet aggregation initiated...

  6. Gasotransmitters and platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truss, Nicola J; Warner, Timothy D

    2011-11-01

    Platelets are essential to prevent blood loss and promote wound healing. Their activation comprises of several complex steps which are regulated by a range of mediators. Over the last few decades there has been intense interest in a group of gaseous mediators known as gasotransmitters; currently comprising nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S). Here we consider the action of gasotransmitters on platelet activity. NO is a well established platelet inhibitor which mediates its effects predominantly through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase leading to a decrease in intraplatelet calcium. More recently CO has been identified as a gasotransmitter with inhibitory actions on platelets; CO acts through the same mechanism as NO but is less potent. The in vivo and platelet functions of the most recently identified gasotransmitter, H(2)S, are still the subject of investigations, but they appear generally inhibitory. Whilst there is evidence for the individual action of these mediators, it is also likely that combinations of these mediators are more relevant regulators of platelets. Furthermore, current evidence suggests that these mediators in combination alter the production of each other, and so modify the circulating levels of gasotransmitters. The use of gasotransmitters as therapeutic agents is also being explored for a range of indications. In conclusion, the importance of NO in the regulation of vascular tone and platelet activity has long been understood. Other gasotransmitters are now establishing themselves as mediators of vascular tone, and recent evidence suggests that these other gasotransmitters may also modulate platelet function.

  7. Evaluation of two instruments for noninvasive platelet concentrate quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, V; Holme, S; Moroff, G

    1989-01-01

    The Platelet Monitoring System (PMS) and the Non-invasive Assessment of Platelet Shape and Concentration (NAPSAC) instruments which relate light scattering characteristics of platelet concentrates (PC) to platelet concentration and shape, were evaluated to determine their accuracy in assessing platelet quality during storage from 1 to 7 days. The results were correlated with platelet concentration, % discs and pH on 121 PC stored in PL732 containers. NAPSAC output is in the form of platelet concentration and % discs. When NAPSAC and standard method values were compared, correlation coefficients (r) did not exceed 0.76 for counts and 0.62 for % discs. PMS output is in the form of lights with red indicating poor quality and green or amber indicating acceptable quality. Sensitivity of the PMS instrument did not exceed 83% and specificity did not exceed 63%. Mean platelet number, % discs and pH were comparable for units triggering red versus green or amber lights. In a separate study, 13 PL732 PC stored 5 days and transfused autologously were evaluated on the PMS. Three red light units exhibited recovery and survival times similar to those observed with PC triggering green/amber lights. These data indicate that neither instrument adequately assesses the quality of PL732 PC.

  8. Where do the platelets go? A simulation study of fully resolved blood flow through aneurysmal vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mountrakis, L.; Lorenz, E.; Hoekstra, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of platelets in the formation of a thrombus, their transport in complex flows has not yet been studied in detail. In this paper we simulated red blood cells and platelets to explore their transport behaviour in aneurysmal geometries. We considered two aneurysms with different

  9. Alloimmune refractoriness to platelet transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, S G

    1997-11-01

    Patients who are transfused on multiple occasions with red cells or platelets may develop platelet-reactive alloantibodies and experience decreased clinical responsiveness to platelet transfusion. This situation, conventionally described as "refractoriness to platelet transfusions," is defined by an unsatisfactory low post-transfusion platelet count increment. If antibodies to HLAs are detected, improved clinical outcomes may result from transfusions of HLA-matched or donor-recipient cross-matched platelets. Because refractoriness is an expected, frequently occurring phenomenon, prevention of HLA alloimmunization is an important management strategy. Prevention strategies include efforts to decrease the number of transfusions, filtration of cellular components to reduce the number of HLA-bearing leukocytes, or pretransfusion ultraviolet B irradiation of cellular components to decrease their immunogenicity. Other investigational approaches include reducing the expression of HLAs on transfused platelets, inducing a transient reticuloendothelial system blockade by infusions of specialized immunoglobulin products, or transfusing semisynthetic platelet substitutes (thromboerythrocytes, thrombospheres) or modified platelets (infusible platelet membranes, lyophilized platelets).

  10. Platelet function in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line A.; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D.

    2007-01-01

    Cairn Terriers, 10 Boxers, and 11 Labrador Retrievers) were included in the study. Platelet function was assessed by whole-blood aggregation with ADP (1, 5, 10, and 20 µM) as agonist and by PFA-100 using collagen and epinephrine (Col + Epi) and Cpæ + ADP as agonists. Plasma thromboxane B2 concentration......Background: Clinical studies investigating platelet function in dogs have had conflicting results that may be caused by normal physiologic variation in platelet response to agonists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate platelet function in clinically healthy dogs of 4...... different breeds by whole-blood aggregometry and with a point-of-care platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on the results from both methods. Methods: Forty-five clinically healthy dogs (12 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCS], 12...

  11. Cisplatin triggers platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togna, G I; Togna, A R; Franconi, M; Caprino, L

    2000-09-01

    Clinical observations suggest that anticancer drugs could contribute to the thrombotic complications of malignancy in treated patients. Thrombotic microangiopathy, myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular thrombotic events have been reported for cisplatin, a drug widely used in the treatment of many solid tumours. The aim of this study is to explore in vitro cisplatin effect on human platelet reactivity in order to define the potentially active role of platelets in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced thrombotic complications. Our results demonstrate that cisplatin increases human platelet reactivity (onset of platelet aggregation wave and thromboxane production) to non-aggregating concentrations of the agonists involving arachidonic acid metabolism. Direct or indirect activation of platelet phospholipase A(2) appears to be implicated. This finding contributes to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thrombotic complications occurring during cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

  12. Platelet function in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line A.; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Clinical studies investigating platelet function in dogs have had conflicting results that may be caused by normal physiologic variation in platelet response to agonists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate platelet function in clinically healthy dogs of 4...... different breeds by whole-blood aggregometry and with a point-of-care platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on the results from both methods. Methods: Forty-five clinically healthy dogs (12 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCS], 12...... applied. However, the importance of these breed differences remains to be investigated. The PFA-100 method with Col + Epi as agonists, and ADP-induced platelet aggregation appear to be sensitive to ASA in dogs....

  13. General Geometry and Geometry of Electromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Shahverdiyev, Shervgi S.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that Electromagnetism creates geometry different from Riemannian geometry. General geometry including Riemannian geometry as a special case is constructed. It is proven that the most simplest special case of General Geometry is geometry underlying Electromagnetism. Action for electromagnetic field and Maxwell equations are derived from curvature function of geometry underlying Electromagnetism. And it is shown that equation of motion for a particle interacting with electromagnetic...

  14. Measurement of platelet aggregation, independently of patient platelet count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, P. J.; Frederiksen, H.; Hvas, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    platelet aggregation ruled out bleeding tendency in thrombocytopenic patients. Summary: Background: Methods for testing platelet aggregation in thrombocytopenia are lacking. Objective: To establish a flow-cytometric test of in vitro platelet aggregation independently of the patient's platelet count......, and examine the association of aggregation with a bleeding history in thrombocytopenic patients. Patients/methods: We established a flow-cytometric assay of platelet aggregation, and measured samples from healthy individuals preincubated with antiplatelet drugs, and samples from two patients with inherited...... platelets at platelet counts of > 10 × 109 L-1; otherwise, platelet isolation was required. The platelet aggregation percentage decreased with increasing antiplatelet drug concentration. Platelet aggregation in patients was reduced as compared with healthy individuals: 42% (interquartile range [IQR] 27...

  15. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA) State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA))

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  16. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlet, Philippe G

    2007-01-01

    This book gives the basic notions of differential geometry, such as the metric tensor, the Riemann curvature tensor, the fundamental forms of a surface, covariant derivatives, and the fundamental theorem of surface theory in a selfcontained and accessible manner. Although the field is often considered a classical one, it has recently been rejuvenated, thanks to the manifold applications where it plays an essential role. The book presents some important applications to shells, such as the theory of linearly and nonlinearly elastic shells, the implementation of numerical methods for shells, and

  17. Molecular motion in restricted geometries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddharth Gautam; S Mitra; R Mukhopadhyay

    2008-10-01

    Molecular dynamics in restricted geometries is known to exhibit anomalous behaviour. Diffusion, translational or rotational, of molecules is altered significantly on confinement in restricted geometries. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) offers a unique possibility of studying molecular motion in such systems. Both time scales involved in the motion and the geometry of motion can be studied using QENS. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation not only provides insight into the details of the different types of motion possible but also does not suffer limitations of the experimental set-up. Here we report the effect of confinement on molecular dynamics in various restricted geometries as studied by QENS and MD simulations: An example where the QENS technique provided direct evidence of phase transition associated with change in the dynamical behaviour of the molecules is also discussed.

  18. Stimulation of Platelet Death by Vancomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda T. Towhid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Side effects of vancomycin, a widely used antibiotic, include thrombocytopenia. The vancomycin-induced thrombocytopenia has been attributed to immune reactions. At least in theory, thrombocytopenia could result in part from the triggering of apoptosis, which results in cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with subsequent phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. The cell membrane scrambling could be initiated by a signaling involving increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity, ceramide formation, mitochondrial depolarization and/or caspase activation. Vancomycin has indeed been shown to trigger neutrophil apoptosis. An effect of vancomycin on platelet apoptosis has, however, never been tested. The present study thus explored the effect of vancomycin on platelet activation and apoptosis. Methods: Human blood platelets were exposed to vancomycin and forward scatter was utilized to estimate cell volume, annexin V-binding to quantify phosphatidylserine (PS exposure, Fluo-3 AM fluorescence to estimate cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, antibodies to quantify ceramide formation and immunofluorescence to quantify protein abundance of active caspase-3. Results: A 30 minutes exposure to vancomycin (≥1 µg/ ml decreased cell volume, triggered annexin V-binding, increased [Ca2+]i, activated caspase 3, stimulated ceramide formation, triggered release of thromboxane B2, and upregulated surface expression of CD62P (P-selectin as well as activated integrin αllbβ3. Annexin V-binding and upregulation of CD62P (P-selectin and integrin αllbβ3 was significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Annexin V-binding was not significantly blunted by pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-FMK (1 µM. In conclusion, vancomycin results in platelet activation and suicidal platelet death with increase of [Ca2+]i, caspase-3 activation, cell membrane scrambling and cell shrinkage. Activation and cell membrane scrambling required the presence of Ca2

  19. Scattering anomaly in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Silveirinha, Mario G

    2016-01-01

    In time-reversal invariant electronic systems the scattering matrix is anti-symmetric. This property enables an effect, designated here as "scattering anomaly", such that the electron transport does not suffer from back reflections, independent of the specific geometry of the propagation path or the presence of time-reversal invariant defects. In contrast, for a generic time-reversal invariant photonic system the scattering matrix is symmetric and there is no similar anomaly. Here, it is theoretically proven that despite these fundamental differences there is a wide class of photonic platforms - in some cases formed only by time-reversal invariant media - in which the scattering anomaly can occur. It is shown that an optical system invariant under the action of the composition of the time-reversal, parity and duality operators is characterized by an anti-symmetric scattering matrix. Specific examples of photonic platforms wherein the scattering anomaly occurs are given, and it is demonstrated with full wave n...

  20. Defining Platelet Function During Polytrauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    using calibrated automated thrombography ( CAT ). 3. Platelet-induced clot contraction and using viscoelastic measures such as TEG with Platelet Mapping...using calibrated automated thrombography ( CAT ) in platelet-rich plasma. 3. Platelet-induced clot contraction and effect on clot structure by platelet...if injury with stable vital signs on initial evaluation.  Pregnancy (confirmed with urine pregnancy testing)  Documented do not resuscitate order

  1. Alpha particle collective Thomson scattering in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machuzak, J.S.; Woskov, P.P.; Rhee, D.Y.; Gilmore, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center; Bretz, N.L.; Park, H.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Aamodt, R.E.; Cheung, P.Y.; Russell, D.A. [Lodestar Research Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Bindslev, H. [JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1993-11-01

    A collective Thomson scattering diagnostic is being implemented on TFTR to measure alpha particle, energetic and thermal ion densities and velocity distributions. A 60 GHz, 0.1-1 kW gyrotron will be used as the transmitter source, and the scattering geometry will be perpendicular to the magnetic field in the extraordinary mode polarization. An enhanced scattered signal is anticipated from fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range with this scattering geometry. Millimeter wave collective Thomson scattering diagnostics have the advantage of larger scattering angles to decrease the amount of stray light, and long, high power, modulated pulses to obtain improved signal to noise through synchronous detection techniques.

  2. Clinical application of radiolabelled platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, C. (Medical University Luebeck (Federal Republic of Germany). Department of Neurology); Hardeman, M.R. (Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Henningsen, H. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Neurologische Klinik); Petrovici, J.-N. (Cologne-Merheim Hospital (Federal Republic of Germany). Department of Neurology) (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    The increasing number of therapeutic modalities available for the management of patients with thromboembolic complications, such as fibrinolytic treatment or vascular surgery, require the development of new imaging techniques to provide more information on the xtent, age and activity of the thromboembolic material causing clinical symptoms. Since the introduction of radiolabelling of platelets with indium-111, platelet scintigraphy (PSC) has been used as a tool in the diagnosis of various thromboembolic diseases. During the International Symposium on Radiolabelled Platelets scientists from a variety of medical backgrounds presented their results on the clinical applictions of radiolabelled platelets. The papers presented there have been updated to take account of the latest results before publication in this volume. The papers are grouped into six sections on platelet labelling techniques, radiolabelled platelets in cardiology, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy, platelet scintigraphy in stroke patients, platelet scintigraphy in angiology, and platelet scintigraphy in hematology and other clinical applications, including renal transplant rejection. refs.; figs.; tabs.

  3. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted.

  4. Determination of volume, shape and refractive index of individual blood platelets

    CERN Document Server

    Kolesnikova, Irina V; Yurkin, Maxim A; Hoekstra, Alfons G; Maltsev, Valeri P; Semyanov, Konstantin A

    2008-01-01

    Light scattering patterns (LSP) of blood platelets were theoretically and experimentally analyzed. We used spicular spheroids as a model for the platelets with pseudopodia. The discrete dipole approximation was employed to simulate light scattering from an individual spicular spheroid constructed from a homogeneous oblate spheroid and 14 rectilinear parallelepipeds rising from the cell centre. These parallelepipeds have a weak effect on the LSP over the measured angular range. Therefore, a homogeneous oblate spheroid was taken as a simplified optical model for platelets. Using the T-matrix method, we computed the LSP over a range of volumes, aspect ratios and refractive indices. Measured LSPs of individual platelets were compared one by one with the theoretical set and the best fit was taken to characterize the measured platelets, resulting in distributions of volume, aspect ratio and refractive index.

  5. Platelets and cardiac arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas S De Jong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death remains one of the most prevalent modes of death in industrialized countries, and myocardial ischemia due to thrombotic coronary occlusion is its primary cause. The role of platelets in the occurrence of SCD extends beyond coronary flow impairment by clot formation. Here we review the substances released by platelets during clot formation and their arrhythmic properties. Platelet products are released from three types of platelet granules: dense core granules, alpha-granules, and platelet lysosomes. The physiologic properties of dense granule products are of special interest as a potential source of arrhythmic substances. They are released readily upon activation and contain high concentrations of serotonin, histamine, purines, pyrimidines, and ions such as calcium and magnesium. Potential arrhythmic mechanisms of these substances, e.g. serotonin and high energy phosphates, include induction of coronary constriction, calcium overloading, and induction of delayed after-depolarizations. Alpha-granules produce thromboxanes and other arachidonic acid products with many potential arrhythmic effects mediated by interference with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. Alpha-granules also contain hundreds of proteins that could potentially serve as ligands to receptors on cardiomyocytes. Lysosomal products probably do not have an important arrhythmic effect. Platelet products and ischemia can induce coronary permeability, thereby enhancing interaction with surrounding cardiomyocytes. Antiplatelet therapy is known to improve survival after myocardial infarction. Although an important part of this effect results from prevention of coronary clot formation, there is evidence to suggest that antiplatelet therapy also induces anti-arrhythmic effects during ischemia by preventing the release of platelet activation products.

  6. The Platelet and Platelet Function Testing in Liver Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, Greg G. C.; Porte, Robert J.; Lisman, Ton

    2009-01-01

    Patients who have liver disease commonly present with alterations in platelet number and function. Recent data have questioned the contribution of these changes to bleeding complications in these patients. Modern tests of platelet function revealed compensatory mechanisms for the decreased platelet

  7. Reproducibility of Manual Platelet Estimation Following Automated Low Platelet Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab S Al-Hosni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Manual platelet estimation is one of the methods used when automated platelet estimates are very low. However, the reproducibility of manual platelet estimation has not been adequately studied. We sought to assess the reproducibility of manual platelet estimation following automated low platelet counts and to evaluate the impact of the level of experience of the person counting on the reproducibility of manual platelet estimates. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, peripheral blood films of patients with platelet counts less than 100 × 109/L were retrieved and given to four raters to perform manual platelet estimation independently using a predefined method (average of platelet counts in 10 fields using 100× objective multiplied by 20. Data were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC as a method of reproducibility assessment. Results: The ICC across the four raters was 0.840, indicating excellent agreement. The median difference of the two most experienced raters was 0 (range: -64 to 78. The level of platelet estimate by the least-experienced rater predicted the disagreement (p = 0.037. When assessing the difference between pairs of raters, there was no significant difference in the ICC (p = 0.420. Conclusions: The agreement between different raters using manual platelet estimation was excellent. Further confirmation is necessary, with a prospective study using a gold standard method of platelet counts.

  8. Mean platelet volume and mean platelet volume/platelet count ratio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amira M. Elsayed

    2016-03-30

    Mar 30, 2016 ... Abstract The mean platelet volume (MPV) is a laboratory marker associated with platelet func- tion and activity. .... the first 24 h of presentation to the emergency department. Severity of ..... J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry.

  9. Prophylactic platelets in dengue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitehorn, James; Rodriguez Roche, Rosmari; Guzman, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    of platelets in dengue. Respondents were all physicians involved with the treatment of patients with dengue. Respondents were asked that their answers reflected what they would do if they were the treating physician. We received responses from 306 physicians from 20 different countries. The heterogeneity...

  10. Rho GTPases in platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, J E; McCarty, O J T

    2013-01-01

    The Rho family of GTP binding proteins, also commonly referred to as the Rho GTPases, are master regulators of the platelet cytoskeleton and platelet function. These low-molecular-weight or 'small' GTPases act as signaling switches in the spatial and temporal transduction, and amplification of signals from platelet cell surface receptors to the intracellular signaling pathways that drive platelet function. The Rho GTPase family members RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1 have emerged as key regulators in the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in platelets and play key roles in platelet aggregation, secretion, spreading and thrombus formation. Rho GTPase regulators, including GEFs and GAPs and downstream effectors, such as the WASPs, formins and PAKs, may also regulate platelet activation and function. In this review, we provide an overview of Rho GTPase signaling in platelet physiology. Previous studies of Rho GTPases and platelets have had a shared history, as platelets have served as an ideal, non-transformed cellular model to characterize Rho function. Likewise, recent studies of the cell biology of Rho GTPase family members have helped to build an understanding of the molecular regulation of platelet function and will continue to do so through the further characterization of Rho GTPases as well as Rho GAPs, GEFs, RhoGDIs and Rho effectors in actin reorganization and other Rho-driven cellular processes. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  11. Expansion of the neonatal platelet mass is achieved via an extension of platelet lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hoffmeister, Karin M.; Hu, Zhongbo; Mager, Donald E.; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Debrincat, Marlyse A.; Pleines, Irina; Josefsson, Emma C.; Benjamin T Kile; Italiano, Joseph; Ramsey, Haley; Grozovsky, Renata; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chavda, Chaitanya; Sola-Visner, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Rapid growth and rising platelet counts result in a significant expansion of platelet mass during neonatal life.The rise in platelet counts is mediated by a prolongation in the neonatal platelet lifespan.

  12. Effects of Antimalarial Tafenoquine on Blood Platelet Activity and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The 8-aminoquinoline tafenoquine has been shown to be effective against Plasmodia, Leishmania and Trypanosoma. The substance is at least in part effective by triggering apoptosis of the parasites. Moreover, tafenoquine has been shown to trigger eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. The effect of tafenoquine on eryptosis is in part due to stimulation of Ca2+ entry and oxidative stress. Ca2+ entry is a critical event in the activation of blood platelets by thrombin and collagen related peptide (CRP. The present study explored, whether tafenoquine influences Ca2+ entry, activation and apoptosis of blood platelets. Methods: Platelets isolated from wild-type mice were exposed for 30 minutes to tafenoquine (2.5 µg/ml without or with an additional treatment with thrombin (0.01 U/ml or CRP (2 µg/ml or 5 µg/ml. Flow cytometry was employed to estimate cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i from Fluo-3 fluorescence, platelet degranulation from P-selectin abundance, integrin activation from αIIbβ3 integrin abundance, phosphatidylserine abundance from annexin-V-binding, relative platelet volume from forward scatter, reactive oxygen species (ROS from DCF fluorescence, caspase 3 activity with an active caspase-3 Staining kit, and aggregation utilizing staining with CD9-APC and CD9-PE. Results: Both, thrombin (0.01 U/ml and CRP (2 µg/ml or 5 µg/ml, significantly increased [Ca2+]i, P-selectin abundance, active αIIbβ3 integrin, and annexin-V-binding, and both significantly decreased platelet volume, activated caspase 3 and stimulated aggregation. Administration of tafenoquine (2.5 µg/ml, 30 min significantly decreased [Ca2+]i both, in the absence and presence of thrombin and CRP. Tafenoquine significantly blunted the effect of thrombin and CRP on [Ca2+]i, P-selectin abundance, and active αIIbβ3 integrin, but

  13. PREGNANCY WITH PLATELET FUNCTION DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila K

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available latelets play a vital role in haemostasis . Antenatal patients with platelet function disorders should be managed in tertiary care centres that are well equipped to tackle any obstetric haemorrhage that can ensue during labour and delivery . Primi gravida was admitted for safe confinement . She had been evaluated earlier for complaints of multiple episodes of mucosal bleeding . On evaluation she had nor mal platelet counts and coagulation factor assay was normal . Platelet aggregometry revealed mild disorder of platelet aggregation . She was planned for induction of labour after arranging enough blood and blood products . She got into active labour and was p ut on syntocinon augmentation . She had emergency Caesarean section for foetal distress . Oxytocics were given proactively . Intraoperatively platelet transfusions and tranexamic acid infusion were given . Complete haemostasis was achieved . She had an uneventf ul postoperative period . Patients with functional platelet disorders can be successfully managed with local application of antifibrinolytic agents like tranexamic acid , in case of minor bleeds . Platelet transfusions are very effective in tackling major ble eds , especially during surgeries and for obstetric indications . If a patient has the history of clinically significant bleeding suggestive of platelet dysfunction , appropriate platelet function tests should be obtained so that the risk of bleeding can be adequately assessed and therapy chosen more rationally . . In obstetric practice the response of such patients to platelet transfusions has been excellent

  14. Effects of hormones on platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Antonio López; Modrego, Javier; Zamorano-León, José J

    2014-04-01

    Platelets and their activation/inhibition mechanisms play a central role in haemostasis. It is well known agonists and antagonists of platelet activation; however, during the last years novel evidences of hormone effects on platelet activation have been reported. Platelet functionality may be modulated by the interaction between different hormones and their platelet receptors, contributing to sex differences in platelet function and even in platelet-mediated vascular damage. It has suggested aspects that apparently are well established should be reviewed. Hormones effects on platelet activity are included among them. This article tries to review knowledge about the involvement of hormones in platelet biology and activity.

  15. Characterization of typical platelet injector flow configurations. [liquid propellant rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickox, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    A study to investigate the hydraulic atomization characteristics of several novel injector designs for use in liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. The injectors were manufactured from a series of thin stainless steel platelets through which orifices were very accurately formed by a photoetching process. These individual platelets were stacked together and the orifices aligned so as to produce flow passages of prescribed geometry. After alignment, the platelets were bonded into a single, 'platelet injector', unit by a diffusion bonding process. Because of the complex nature of the flow associated with platelet injectors, it was necessary to use experimental techniques, exclusively, throughout the study. Large scale models of the injectors were constructed from aluminum plates and the appropriate fluids were modeled using a glycerol-water solution. Stop-action photographs of test configurations, using spark-shadowgraph or stroboscopic back-lighting, are shown.

  16. Platelet aggregation following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis A; Sørensen, Anne M; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate platelet function in trauma patients, as it is pivotal for hemostasis yet remains scarcely investigated in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study of platelet aggregation capacity in 213 adult trauma patients on admission to an emergency department (ED......). Inclusion criteria were trauma team activation and arterial cannula insertion on arrival. Blood samples were analyzed by multiple electrode aggregometry initiated by thrombin receptor agonist peptide 6 (TRAP) or collagen using a Multiplate device. Blood was sampled median 65 min after injury; median injury...... severity score (ISS) was 17; 14 (7%) patients received 10 or more units of red blood cells in the ED (massive transfusion); 24 (11%) patients died within 28 days of trauma: 17 due to cerebral injuries, four due to exsanguination, and three from other causes. No significant association was found between...

  17. Global Differential Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bär, Christian; Schwarz, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains a collection of well-written surveys provided by experts in Global Differential Geometry to give an overview over recent developments in Riemannian Geometry, Geometric Analysis and Symplectic Geometry. The papers are written for graduate students and researchers with a general interest in geometry, who want to get acquainted with the current trends in these central fields of modern mathematics.

  18. Geometry in Medias Res

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  19. Essential roles for platelets during neutrophil-dependent or lymphocyte-mediated defense against bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Dongxia; Sun, Chengming; Bao, Cuixia; Yi, Maoli; Xing, Li; Luo, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence from animal models suggests that platelets may participate in a wide variety of processes including the immune response against infection. More than 200 whole blood samples from patients and healthy controls were run in the System XE-5000 analyzer, and plasma fractions were separated for the following tests by ELISA, Luminex and light scattering. We describe two mechanisms by which platelets may contribute to immune function against various bacterial pathogens based on increased mean platelet volume in gram-positive bacterial infections and increased platelet counts in gram-negative bacterial infections. Gram-negative bacteria activate platelets to recruit neutrophils, which participate in the immune response against infection. During this process, fractalkine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor-α and platelet-activating factor were higher in patients infected with Escherichia coli; additionally, giant platelets were observed under the microscope. Meanwhile, we found that platelets played a different role in gram-positive bacterial infections. Specifically, they could actively adhere to gram-positive bacteria in circulation and transfer them to immune sites to promote antibacterial lymphocyte expansion. During this process, complement C3 and factor XI were more highly expressed in patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus; additionally, we detected more small platelets under the microscope. Platelets participate in the immune response against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, although the mechanisms differ. These results will help us understand the complex roles of platelets during infections, and direct our use of antibiotics based on clinical platelet data.

  20. Platelets in inflammation and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, J M; Rossaint, J; Zarbock, A

    2014-11-01

    The paradigm of platelets as mere mediators of hemostasis has long since been replaced by a dual role: hemostasis and inflammation. Now recognized as key players in innate and adaptive immune responses, platelets have the capacity to interact with almost all known immune cells. These platelet-immune cell interactions represent a hallmark of immunity, as they can potently enhance immune cell functions and, in some cases, even constitute a prerequisite for host defense mechanisms such as NETosis. In addition, recent studies have revealed a new role for platelets in immunity: They are ubiquitous sentinels and rapid first-line immune responders, as platelet-pathogen interactions within the vasculature appear to precede all other host defense mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of platelets as inflammatory cells, and provide an exemplary review of their role in acute inflammation.

  1. Estrogen, inflammation, and platelet phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Virginia M; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Hashimoto, Kazumori; Heit, John A; Owen, Whyte G

    2008-01-01

    Although exogenous estrogenic therapies increase the risk of thrombosis, the effects of estrogen on formed elements of blood are uncertain. This article examines the genomic and nongenomic actions of estrogen on platelet phenotype that may contribute to increased thrombotic risk. To determine aggregation, secretion, protein expression, and thrombin generation, platelets were collected from experimental animals of varying hormonal status and from women enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study. Estrogen receptor beta predominates in circulating platelets. Estrogenic treatment in ovariectomized animals decreased platelet aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion. However, acute exposure to 17beta-estradiol did not reverse decreases in platelet ATP secretion invoked by lipopolysaccharide. Thrombin generation was positively correlated to the number of circulating microvesicles expressing phosphatidylserine. Assessing the effect of estrogen treatments on blood platelets may lead to new ways of identifying women at risk for adverse thrombotic events with such therapies.

  2. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: George Tsokos, M.D. CONTRACTING...Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) George Tsokos, M.D...a decreased level of disease. Further studies will expand upon these observations better outlining the function of platelets in the injury associated

  3. The Effect of Anisotropic Scatter on Atmospheric Neutron Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    slab geometry, two studies were conducted exploring the relative effect of anisotropic scatter as compared to isotropic scatter in the center of mass... anisotropic scatter. In order to address this question, first anisotropic scatter was implemented, then verified, and finally, the measurement of the... measured value. The relative error between neutron counts in isotropic and anisotropic time- integrated energy bins, isotropic anisotropicrel

  4. Platelet effects on ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ashley; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Sood, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Growing understanding of the role of thrombocytosis, high platelet turnover, and the presence of activated platelets in the circulation in cancer progression and metastasis has brought megakaryocytes into focus. Platelet biology is essential to hemostasis, vascular integrity, angiogenesis, inflammation, innate immunity, wound healing, and cancer biology. However, before megakaryocyte/platelet-directed therapies can be considered for clinical use, understanding of the mechanism and biology of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in malignancy is required. Here, we provide an overview of the clinical implications, biological significance, and mechanisms of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in the context of ovarian cancer. PMID:25023353

  5. Novel aspects of platelet aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roka-Moya Y. M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The platelet aggregation is an important process, which is critical for the hemostatic plug formation and thrombosis. Recent studies have shown that the platelet aggregation is more complex and dynamic than it was previously thought. There are several mechanisms that can initiate the platelet aggregation and each of them operates under specific conditions in vivo. At the same time, the influence of certain plasma proteins on this process should be considered. This review intends to summarize the recent data concerning the adhesive molecules and their receptors, which provide the platelet aggregation under different conditions.

  6. Overview of platelet physiology and laboratory evaluation of platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, G M

    1999-06-01

    Appropriate laboratory testing for the platelet-type bleeding disorders hinges on an adequate assessment in the history and physical examination. Patients with histories and screening laboratory results consistent with coagulation disorders (hemophilia, disseminated intravascular coagulation) are not appropriate candidates for platelet function testing. In contrast, patients with a lifelong history of platelet-type bleeding symptoms and perhaps a positive family history of bleeding would be appropriate for testing. Figure 6 depicts one strategy to evaluate these patients. Platelet morphology can easily be evaluated to screen for two uncommon qualitative platelet disorders: Bernard-Soulier syndrome (associated with giant platelets) and gray platelet syndrome, a subtype of storage pool disorder in which platelet granulation is morphologically abnormal by light microscopy. If the bleeding disorder occurred later in life (no bleeding with surgery or trauma early in life), the focus should be on acquired disorders of platelet function. For those patients thought to have an inherited disorder, testing for vWD should be done initially because approximately 1% of the population has vWD. The complete vWD panel (factor VIII coagulant activity, vWf antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity) should be performed because many patients will have abnormalities of only one particular panel component. Patients diagnosed with vWD should be classified using multimeric analysis to identify the type 1 vWD patients likely to respond to DDAVP. If vWD studies are normal, platelet aggregation testing should be performed, ensuring that no antiplatelet medications have been ingested at least 1 week before testing. If platelet aggregation tests are normal and if suspicion for an inherited disorder remains high, vWD testing should be repeated. The evaluation of thrombocytopenia may require bone marrow examination to exclude primary hematologic disorders. If future studies with thrombopoietin assays

  7. Real Algebraic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mahé, Louis; Roy, Marie-Françoise

    1992-01-01

    Ten years after the first Rennes international meeting on real algebraic geometry, the second one looked at the developments in the subject during the intervening decade - see the 6 survey papers listed below. Further contributions from the participants on recent research covered real algebra and geometry, topology of real algebraic varieties and 16thHilbert problem, classical algebraic geometry, techniques in real algebraic geometry, algorithms in real algebraic geometry, semialgebraic geometry, real analytic geometry. CONTENTS: Survey papers: M. Knebusch: Semialgebraic topology in the last ten years.- R. Parimala: Algebraic and topological invariants of real algebraic varieties.- Polotovskii, G.M.: On the classification of decomposing plane algebraic curves.- Scheiderer, C.: Real algebra and its applications to geometry in the last ten years: some major developments and results.- Shustin, E.L.: Topology of real plane algebraic curves.- Silhol, R.: Moduli problems in real algebraic geometry. Further contribu...

  8. Effect of Bexarotene on Platelet Activation and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Cao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The retinoid X receptor (RXRs stimulator Bexarotene ((4-[1-(3,5,5,8,8-pentamethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthylethynyl] benzoic acid is used for the treatment of several malignancies. Bexarotene is at least in part effective by stimulation of apoptosis of tumor cells. Moreover, Bexarotene triggers eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes. Similar to erythrocytes, blood platelets lack nuclei but are nevertheless able to enter an apoptosis-like phenotype, characterized by caspase activation, cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phospha-tidylserine translocation to the cell surface. Platelet apoptosis is triggered by increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, which further leads to degranulation and integrin activation. Platelet activation and apoptosis could be elicited by thrombin or collagen related peptide (CRP. The present study explored whether treatment of platelets with bexarotene modifies platelet activation and apoptosis following exposure to thrombin or CRP. Methods: Platelets isolated from wild-type mice were exposed for 30 minutes to bexarotene (6 µg/ml without or with an additional treatment with thrombin (0.01 U/ml or CRP (2 µg/ml or 5 µg/ml. Flow cytometry was employed to estimate cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i from Fluo-3 fluorescence, platelet degranulation from P-selectin abundance, integrin activation from αIIbβ3 integrin abundance, caspase activity utilizing an Active Caspase-3 Staining kit, phosphatidylserine abundance from annexin-V-binding, and relative platelet volume from forward scatter. Results: In the absence of thrombin or CRP, the administration of bexarotene slightly but significantly increased [Ca2+]i, but did not significantly modify P-selectin abundance, activated αIIbβ3 integrin, annexin-V-binding, cell volume, or caspase activity. Exposure of platelets to thrombin or CRP was followed by significant increase of [Ca2+]i, P-selectin abundance, active αIIbβ3 integrin

  9. Platelet Concentrates: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in hemostasis and wound healing, platelet growth factors are well known source of healing cytokines. Numerous techniques of autologous platelet concentrates have been developed and applied in oral and maxillofacial surgery. This review describes the evolution of the first and second generation of platelet concentrates (platelet rich plasma and platelet rich fibrin respectively) from their fore runner-fibrin sealants.

  10. Studies on megakaryopoiesis and platelet function

    OpenAIRE

    Meinders, M.

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are blood circulating specialized subcellular fragments, which are produced by megakaryocytes. Platelets are essential for hemostasis and wound healing but also play a role in non-hemostatic processes such as the immune response or cancer metastasis. Considering the immediate precursors of platelets, normal megakaryocyte development is essential for normal platelet function. Although much is known about platelet development, some aspects of platelet production remain poorly understo...

  11. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states.

  12. Digital Differential Geometry Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Guo Liu; Hu-Jun Bao; Qun-Sheng Peng

    2006-01-01

    The theory and methods of digital geometry processing has been a hot research area in computer graphics, as geometric models serves as the core data for 3D graphics applications. The purpose of this paper is to introduce some recent advances in digital geometry processing, particularly mesh fairing, surface parameterization and mesh editing, that heavily use differential geometry quantities. Some related concepts from differential geometry, such as normal, curvature, gradient,Laplacian and their counterparts on digital geometry are also reviewed for understanding the strength and weakness of various digital geometry processing methods.

  13. What is inverse-geometry CT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2011-01-01

    Inverse-geometry computed tomography (IGCT) systems are being developed to provide improved volumetric imaging. In conventional multislice CT systems, x-rays are emitted from a small area and irradiate a large-area detector. In an IGCT system, x-ray sources are distributed over a large area, with each beam irradiating a small-area detector. Therefore, in the inverse geometry, a series of narrow x-ray beams are switched on and off while the gantry rotates. In conventional CT geometry, cone-beam and scatter artifacts increase with the imaged volume thickness. An inverse geometry may be less susceptible to scatter effects, because only a fraction of the field of view is irradiated at one time. The distributed source in the inverse geometry potentially improves sampling, leading to reduced cone-beam artifacts. In the inverse geometry, the tube current may be adjusted separately for each source location, which potentially reduces dose. Multiple IGCT prototypes have been constructed and tested on phantoms. A gantry-based IGCT system with one-second gantry rotation was developed, and images of phantoms and small animals were successfully acquired. Clinical feasibility with acceptable noise levels and scan times has not yet been shown. Overall, results from prototype systems suggest that the inverse geometry will enable imaging of a thick volume (∼16 cm) while potentially reducing cone-beam artifacts, scatter effects, and radiation dose. The magnitude of these benefits will depend on the specific IGCT implementation and need to be quantified relative to comparable multislice scanners. Copyright © 2011 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Platelets, inflammation and tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurden, Alan T

    2011-05-01

    Blood platelets have long been recognised to bring about primary haemostasis with deficiencies in platelet production and function manifesting in bleeding while upregulated function favourises arterial thrombosis. Yet increasing evidence indicates that platelets fulfil a much wider role in health and disease. First, they store and release a wide range of biologically active substances including the panoply of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines released from a-granules. Membrane budding gives rise to microparticles (MPs), another active participant within the blood stream. Platelets are essential for the innate immune response and combat infection (viruses, bacteria, micro-organisms). They help maintain and modulate inflammation and are a major source of pro-inflammatory molecules (e.g. P-selectin, tissue factor, CD40L, metalloproteinases). As well as promoting coagulation, they are active in fibrinolysis; wound healing, angiogenesis and bone formation as well as in maternal tissue and foetal vascular remodelling. Activated platelets and MPs intervene in the propagation of major diseases. They are major players in atherosclerosis and related diseases, pathologies of the central nervous system (Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis), cancer and tumour growth. They participate in other tissue-related acquired pathologies such as skin diseases and allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, liver disease; while, paradoxically, autologous platelet-rich plasma and platelet releasate are being used as an aid to promote tissue repair and cellular growth. The above mentioned roles of platelets are now discussed.

  15. Geometry and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Walter J

    2006-01-01

    Meyer''s Geometry and Its Applications, Second Edition, combines traditional geometry with current ideas to present a modern approach that is grounded in real-world applications. It balances the deductive approach with discovery learning, and introduces axiomatic, Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, and transformational geometry. The text integrates applications and examples throughout and includes historical notes in many chapters. The Second Edition of Geometry and Its Applications is a significant text for any college or university that focuses on geometry''s usefulness in other disciplines. It is especially appropriate for engineering and science majors, as well as future mathematics teachers.* Realistic applications integrated throughout the text, including (but not limited to): - Symmetries of artistic patterns- Physics- Robotics- Computer vision- Computer graphics- Stability of architectural structures- Molecular biology- Medicine- Pattern recognition* Historical notes included in many chapters...

  16. Riemann-Finsler geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Enli; MO Xiaohuan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,a survey on Riemann-Finsler geometry is given.Non-trivial examples of Finsler metrics satisfying different curvature conditions are presented.Local and global results in Finsler geometry are analyzed.

  17. Involvement of Ca2+ Activated Cl- Channel Ano6 in Platelet Activation and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxing Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The ubiquitously expressed Ca2+ Activated Cl- Channel Ano6 participates in the stimulation of cell membrane scrambling. Defective Ano6 underlies the Scott syndrome, an inherited bleeding disorder with impaired scrambling of plasma membrane phospholipids. At least in theory, the bleeding disorder of Scott syndrome may result from impaired platelet function. Activators of platelets include thrombin and collagen related peptide (CRP, which trigger increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, degranulation, integrin activation, as well as cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the cell membrane. The present study thus explored whether Ano6 modifies activation-induced alterations of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, degranulation (P-selectin exposure, integrin activation, phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface and platelet volume. Methods: Platelets from mice lacking Ano6 (ano6-/- were compared to platelets from corresponding wild-type mice (ano6+/+. [Ca2+]i was estimated from Fluo-3 fluorescence, ROS from DCFDA fluorescence, degranulation from P-selectin abundance, integrin activation from αIIbβ3-integrin abundance, phosphatidylserine abundance from annexin-V-binding, and cell volume from forward scatter. Results: Platelet number in blood was slightly higher in ano6-/- mice than in ano6+/+ mice. Without activation [Ca2+]i and volume were similar in ano6-/- and ano6+/+ platelets as well as ROS abundance, P-selectin abundance, αIIbβ3 integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure were negligible in both genotypes. Thrombin (0.01 U/ml and CRP (2 or 5 µg/ml increased [Ca2+]i, ROS abundance, platelet degranulation, αIIbβ3 integrin activation, and triggered annexin-V-binding as well as cell shrinkage, all effects less pronounced in ano6-/- than in ano6+/+ platelets. Conclusions: Genetic knockout of Ano6 blunts thrombin- and CRP-induced activation and apoptosis

  18. Analyzing the platelet proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Angel; Zitzmann, Nicole; Watson, Steve P

    2004-08-01

    During the last 10 years, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a key tool for protein analysis and has underpinned the emerging field of proteomics. Using high-throughput tandem MS/MS following protein separation, it is potentially possible to analyze hundreds to thousands of proteins in a sample at a time. This technology can be used to analyze the protein content (i.e., the proteome) of any cell or tissue and complements the powerful field of genomics. The technology is particularly suitable for platelets because of the absence of a nucleus. Cellular proteins can be separated by either gel-based methods such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography (LC) -MS/MS or by multidimensional LC-MS/MS. Prefractionation techniques, such as subcellular fractionations or immunoprecipitations, can be used to improve the analysis. Each method has particular advantages and disadvantages. Proteomics can be used to compare the proteome of basal and diseased platelets, helping to reveal information on the molecular basis of the disease.

  19. Diffuse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostorz, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Angewandte Physik, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    While Bragg scattering is characteristic for the average structure of crystals, static local deviations from the average lattice lead to diffuse elastic scattering around and between Bragg peaks. This scattering thus contains information on the occupation of lattice sites by different atomic species and on static local displacements, even in a macroscopically homogeneous crystalline sample. The various diffuse scattering effects, including those around the incident beam (small-angle scattering), are introduced and illustrated by typical results obtained for some Ni alloys. (author) 7 figs., 41 refs.

  20. Geometry essentials for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Just the critical concepts you need to score high in geometry This practical, friendly guide focuses on critical concepts taught in a typical geometry course, from the properties of triangles, parallelograms, circles, and cylinders, to the skills and strategies you need to write geometry proofs. Geometry Essentials For Dummies is perfect for cramming or doing homework, or as a reference for parents helping kids study for exams. Get down to the basics - get a handle on the basics of geometry, from lines, segments, and angles, to vertices, altitudes, and diagonals Conque

  1. Introduction to projective geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wylie, C R

    2008-01-01

    This lucid introductory text offers both an analytic and an axiomatic approach to plane projective geometry. The analytic treatment builds and expands upon students' familiarity with elementary plane analytic geometry and provides a well-motivated approach to projective geometry. Subsequent chapters explore Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry as specializations of the projective plane, revealing the existence of an infinite number of geometries, each Euclidean in nature but characterized by a different set of distance- and angle-measurement formulas. Outstanding pedagogical features include w

  2. Affine and Projective Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, M K

    1995-01-01

    An important new perspective on AFFINE AND PROJECTIVE GEOMETRY. This innovative book treats math majors and math education students to a fresh look at affine and projective geometry from algebraic, synthetic, and lattice theoretic points of view. Affine and Projective Geometry comes complete with ninety illustrations, and numerous examples and exercises, covering material for two semesters of upper-level undergraduate mathematics. The first part of the book deals with the correlation between synthetic geometry and linear algebra. In the second part, geometry is used to introduce lattice theory

  3. Symplectic geometries on supermanifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, P M

    2007-01-01

    Extension of symplectic geometry on manifolds to the supersymmetric case is considered. In the even case it leads to the even symplectic geometry (or, equivalently, to the geometry on supermanifolds endowed with an non-degenerate Poisson bracket) or to the geometry on an even Fedosov supermanifolds. It is proven that in the odd case there are two different scalar symplectic structures (namely, an odd closed differential 2-form and the antibracket) which can be used for construction of different symplectic geometries on supermanifolds.

  4. Generalized Kahler geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Generalized Kahler geometry is the natural analogue of Kahler geometry, in the context of generalized complex geometry. Just as we may require a complex structure to be compatible with a Riemannian metric in a way which gives rise to a symplectic form, we may require a generalized complex structure to be compatible with a metric so that it defines a second generalized complex structure. We explore the fundamental aspects of this geometry, including its equivalence with the bi-Hermitian geometry on the target of a 2-dimensional sigma model with (2,2) supersymmetry, as well as the relation to holomorphic Dirac geometry and the resulting derived deformation theory. We also explore the analogy between pre-quantum line bundles and gerbes in the context of generalized Kahler geometry.

  5. Methods for euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Byer, Owen; Smeltzer, Deirdre L

    2010-01-01

    Euclidean plane geometry is one of the oldest and most beautiful topics in mathematics. Instead of carefully building geometries from axiom sets, this book uses a wealth of methods to solve problems in Euclidean geometry. Many of these methods arose where existing techniques proved inadequate. In several cases, the new ideas used in solving specific problems later developed into independent areas of mathematics. This book is primarily a geometry textbook, but studying geometry in this way will also develop students' appreciation of the subject and of mathematics as a whole. For instance, despite the fact that the analytic method has been part of mathematics for four centuries, it is rarely a tool a student considers using when faced with a geometry problem. Methods for Euclidean Geometry explores the application of a broad range of mathematical topics to the solution of Euclidean problems.

  6. Platelets in inflammation and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenne, Craig N; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Although platelets are traditionally recognized for their central role in hemostasis, many lines of research clearly demonstrate these rather ubiquitous blood components are potent immune modulators and effectors. Platelets have been shown to directly recognize, sequester and kill pathogens, to activated and recruit leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, and to modulate leukocyte behavior, enhancing their ability to phagocytose and kill pathogens and inducing unique effector functions, such as the production of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). This multifaceted response to infection and inflammation is due, in part, to the huge array of soluble mediators and cell surface molecules expressed by platelets. From their earliest origins as primordial hemocytes in invertebrates to their current form as megakaryocyte-derived cytoplasts, platelets have evolved to be one of the key regulators of host intravascular immunity and inflammation. In this review, we present the diverse roles platelets play in immunity and inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases and infection. Additionally, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of platelet behavior made possible through the use of advanced imaging techniques that allow us to visualize platelets and their interactions, in real-time, within the intact blood vessels of a living host.

  7. [Murine models of platelet diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F

    2007-05-01

    Platelet-related diseases correspond to functional defects or abnormal production (thrombopoiesis) of hereditary and immunological origins. Recent progress in the manipulation of the mouse genome (transgenesis, gene inactivation or insertion) has resulted in the generation of numerous strains exhibiting defective platelet function or production. Some strains reproduce known hereditary diseases affecting haemostasis (Glanzmann thrombasthenia, Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) or thrombopoiesis (Wiscott-Aldrich or May-Hegglin syndrome). More often the mutated strains have no human equivalent and represent useful models to study: (i) the role of adhesive or signalling receptors or of signalling proteins in platelet-dependent haemostasis and thrombosis or; (ii) to study the poorly characterized mechanisms of thrombopoiesis, which implicate transcription factors (GATA, Fli1), growth factors and receptors (TPO, cMPL), and cytoskeletal or contractile proteins (tubulin, myosin). Additional mouse strains result from the selection of spontaneous mutants many of which affect intracellular platelet granules, representing models of storage pool diseases (SPD) such as the Gray platelet syndrome (alphaSPD) or Hermansky-Pudlack syndrome (deltaSPD). More recently, a systematic chemical mutagenesis approach has also identified genes involved in thrombopoiesis and platelet survival. Finally, mouse models of auto- or allo-immune thrombocytopenia have been developed to study the mechanisms of platelet destruction or removal.

  8. Platelet scintigraphy in atherothrombotic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaka, Yoshinari (Osaka National Hospital (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    Indium-111 platelet scintigraphy for the measurement of in vivo thrombogenicity is a useful noninvasive technique with a number of applications. From 1982 to 1989, we explored clinical relevance of this method for 576 consecutive patients with atherothrombotic disease. There was a disease-related difference in the percentage of positive platelet accumulation; 85% in patients with Dacron bifurcation graft, 75% in abdominal or thoracic aneurysm, 40% in intra-cardiac thrombi, 33% in arteriosclerosis obliterans and 25% in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Labelled platelets accumulated frequently in the lesion with severe arteriographic abnormality. Aspirin clearly inhibited platelet accumulation on carotid atheroma but the effect of ticlopidine has been less conclusive. Short-term orally active PGI[sub 2] analogue had inhibitory effects on platelet accumulation in carotid atheroma and platelet aggregability, but did not cause significant reduction in plaque size. The results suggest the usefulness of platelet scintigraphy for monitoring the thrombogenicity in various atherothrombotic diseases. It will be necessary, however, to simplify the labelling procedures and to develop a new [sup 99m]Tc-labelled thrombus imaging agent, if thrombus imaging is to be considered for more generall use for patients with atherosclerosis. (author).

  9. Cyclosporine A enhances platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, A A; Barradas, M A; Mikhailidis, D P; Jeremy, J Y; Moorhead, J F; Sweny, P; Dandona, P

    1987-12-01

    In view of the reported increase in thromboembolic episodes following cyclosporine A (CyA) therapy, the effect of this drug on platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release was investigated. The addition of CyA, at therapeutic concentrations to platelet rich plasma from normal subjects in vitro was found to increase aggregation in response to adrenaline, collagen and ADP. Ingestion of CyA by healthy volunteers was also associated with enhanced platelet aggregation. The CyA-mediated enhancement of aggregation was further enhanced by the addition in vitro of therapeutic concentrations of heparin. Platelets from renal allograft recipients treated with CyA also showed hyperaggregability and increased thromboxane A2 release, which were most marked at "peak" plasma CyA concentration and less so at "trough" concentrations. Platelet hyperaggregability in renal allograft patients on long-term CyA therapy tended to revert towards normal following the replacement of CyA with azathioprine. Hypertensive patients with renal allografts on nifedipine therapy had normal platelet function and thromboxane release in spite of CyA therapy. These observations suggest that CyA-mediated platelet activation may contribute to the pathogenesis of the thromboembolic phenomena associated with the use of this drug. The increased release of thromboxane A2 (a vasoconstrictor) may also play a role in mediating CyA-related nephrotoxicity.

  10. Interaction of inorganic nanoparticles of lunar soil simulant with blood platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy; Slenzka, Klaus

    Blood platelets play a central role in the physiology of primary hemostasis and in the patholog-ical processes of arterial thrombosis. Also, blood platelets contain neuronal high-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate transporters (EAAT 1 -3) and are able to uptake glutamate, thereby playing possible physiological role in extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS as an additional powerful target for excessive neurotoxic glutamate accumulation and storage. The health effects of lunar soil exposure are almost completely unknown, whereas the observations suggest that it can be deleterious to human physiology. It is important that the components of lunar soil may be internalized with lipid fractions of the lung epithelium, which in turn may help ions to overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of JSC-1a Lunar Soil Simulant (LSS) (Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, USA) on platelets isolated from rabbit blood. We revealed that platelets were not indifferent to the expo-sure to LSS. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the incubation of platelets with LSS resulted in an upper shift of platelet spot in histograms presenting cell size (FS) and granularity (SS) as x and y coordinates, thereby demonstrating apparent increase in platelet granularity. Analysis of control platelet preparation did not reveal the alterations in platelet size and granularity during the same incubation period. LSS scatter per se did not cover area of platelet prepara-tion in histogram. Using Zetasizer Nanosystem (Malvern Instruments) with helium-neon laser for dynamic light scattering (DLS), the platelet size before and after the addition of LSS was measured. We have found the increase in the mean size of the population of platelets from 2.45 ±0.09 µm in control to 3.0 ± 0.25 µm in the presence of LSS. Thus, we report that inorganic nanoparticles of LSS bind to blood platelets and this fact may have considerable harmful conse-quences to human

  11. Platelet enzyme abnormalities in leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate platelet enzyme activity in cases of leukemia. Materials and Methods: Platelet enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, pyruvate kinase (PK and hexokinase (HK were studied in 47 patients of acute and chronic leukemia patients, 16 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML(13 relapse, three in remission, 12 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL (five in relapse, seven in remission, 19 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Results: The platelet G6PD activity was significantly low in cases of AML, ALL and also in CML. G6PD activity was normalized during AML remission. G6PD activity, although persistently low during ALL remission, increased significantly to near-normal during remission (P < 0.05 as compared with relapse (P < 0.01. Platelet PK activity was high during AML relapse (P < 0.05, which was normalized during remission. Platelet HK however was found to be decreased during all remission (P < 0.05. There was a significant positive correlation between G6PD and PK in cases of AML (P < 0.001 but not in ALL and CML. G6PD activity did not correlate with HK activity in any of the leukemic groups. A significant positive correlation was however seen between PK and HK activity in cases of ALL remission (P < 0.01 and CML (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Both red cell and platelet enzymes were studied in 36 leukemic patients and there was no statistically significant correlation between red cell and platelet enzymes. Platelet enzyme defect in leukemias suggests the inherent abnormality in megakaryopoiesis and would explain the functional platelet defects in leukemias.

  12. Platelet surface glutathione reductase-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essex, David W; Li, Mengru; Feinman, Richard D; Miller, Anna

    2004-09-01

    We previously found that reduced glutathione (GSH) or a mixture of GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) potentiated platelet aggregation. We here report that GSSG, when added to platelets alone, also potentiates platelet aggregation. Most of the GSSG was converted to GSH by a flavoprotein-dependent platelet surface mechanism. This provided an appropriate redox potential for platelet activation. The addition of GSSG to platelets generated sulfhydryls in the beta subunit of the alpha(IIb)beta(3) fibrinogen receptor, suggesting a mechanism for facilitation of agonist-induced platelet activation.

  13. Inverse acoustic problem of N homogeneous scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional inverse acoustic medium problem of N homogeneous objects with known geometry and location is considered. It is proven that one scattering experiment is sufficient for the unique determination of the complex wavenumbers of the objects. The mapping from the scattered fields...

  14. An Algebraic Approach to the Scattering Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Rijun; Feng, Bo; He, Yang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    We employ the so-called companion matrix method from computational algebraic geometry, tailored for zero-dimensional ideals, to study the scattering equations. The method renders the CHY-integrand of scattering amplitudes computable using simple linear algebra and is amenable to an algorithmic approach. Certain identities in the amplitudes as well as rationality of the final integrand become immediate in this formalism.

  15. Inverse acoustic problem of N homogeneous scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional inverse acoustic medium problem of N homogeneous objects with known geometry and location is considered. It is proven that one scattering experiment is sufficient for the unique determination of the complex wavenumbers of the objects. The mapping from the scattered fields...

  16. Mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J

    2016-08-04

    Platelets have multiple functions beyond their roles in thrombosis and hemostasis. Platelets support liver regeneration, which is required after partial hepatectomy and acute or chronic liver injury. Although it is widely assumed that platelets stimulate liver regeneration by local excretion of mitogens stored within platelet granules, definitive evidence for this is lacking, and alternative mechanisms deserve consideration. In-depth knowledge of mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration may lead to new therapeutic strategies to treat patients with failing regenerative responses.

  17. Platelets as delivery systems for disease treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Qizhen; Montgomery, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets are small, anucleate, discoid shaped blood cells that play a fundamental role in hemostasis. Platelets contain a large number of biologically active molecules within cytoplasmic granules that are critical to normal platelet function. Because platelets circulate in blood through out the body, release biological molecules and mediators on demand, and participate in hemostasis as well as many other pathophysiologic processes, targeting expression of proteins of interest to platelets an...

  18. [Protein kinase C activation induces platelet apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Li; Chen, Meng-Xing; Zhang, Ming-Yi; Dai, Ke-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Platelet apoptosis elucidated by either physical or chemical compound or platelet storage occurs wildly, which might play important roles in controlling the numbers and functions of circulated platelets, or in the development of some platelet-related diseases. However, up to now, a little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of platelet apoptosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is highly expressed in platelets and plays central roles in regulating platelet functions. Although there is evidence indicating that PKC is involved in the regulation of apoptosis of nucleated cells, it is still unclear whether PKC plays a role in platelet apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PKC in platelet apoptosis. The effects of PKC on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, and caspase-3 activation of platelets were analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot. The results showed that the ΔΨm depolarization in platelets was induced by PKC activator in time-dependent manner, and the caspase-3 activation in platelets was induced by PKC in concentration-dependent manner. However, the platelets incubated with PKC inhibitor did not results in ΔΨm depolarization and PS exposure. It is concluded that the PKC activation induces platelet apoptosis through influencing the mitochondrial functions and activating caspase 3. The finds suggest a novel mechanism for PKC in regulating platelet numbers and functions, which has important pathophysiological implications for thrombosis and hemostasis.

  19. Inherited platelet disorders and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Marie-Cécile; Kemoun, Philippe; Cousty, Sarah; Sie, Pierre; Payrastre, Bernard

    2013-02-01

    Platelets play a key role in thrombosis and hemostasis. Accumulation of platelets at the site of vascular injury is the first step in the formation of hemostatic plugs, which play a pivotal role in preventing blood loss after injury. Platelet adhesion at sites of injury results in spreading, secretion, recruitment of additional platelets, and formation of platelet aggregates. Inherited platelet disorders are rare causes of bleeding syndromes, ranging from mild bruising to severe hemorrhage. The defects can reflect deficiency or dysfunction of platelet surface glycoproteins, granule contents, cytoskeletal proteins, platelet pro-coagulant function, and signaling pathways. For instance, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and Glanzmann thrombasthenia are attributed to deficiencies of glycoprotein Ib/IX/V and GPIIb/IIIa, respectively, and are rare but severe platelet disorders. Inherited defects that impair platelet secretion and/or signal transduction are among the most common forms of mild platelet disorders and include gray platelet syndrome, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, and Chediak-Higashi syndrome. When necessary, desmopressin, antifibrinolytic agents, and transfusion of platelets remain the most common treatment of inherited platelet disorders. Alternative therapies such as recombinant activated factor VII are also available for a limited number of situations. In this review, we will discuss the management of patients with inherited platelet disorders in various clinical situations related to dental cares, including surgical intervention. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Methods to Determine the Lagrangian Shear Experienced by Platelets during Thrombus Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac P Pinar

    Full Text Available Platelets can become activated in response to changes in flow-induced shear; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not clearly understood. Here we present new techniques for experimentally measuring the flow-induced shear rate experienced by platelets prior to adhering to a thrombus. We examined the dynamics of blood flow around experimentally grown thrombus geometries using a novel combination of experimental (ex vivo and numerical (in silico methodologies. Using a microcapillary system, platelet aggregate formation was analysed at elevated shear rates in the presence of coagulation inhibitors, where thrombus formation is predominantly platelet-dependent. These approaches permit the resolution and quantification of thrombus parameters at the scale of individual platelets (2 μm in order to quantify real time thrombus development. Using our new techniques we can correlate the shear rate experienced by platelets with the extent of platelet adhesion and aggregation. The techniques presented offer the unique capacity to determine the flow properties for a temporally evolving thrombus field in real time.

  1. The Geometry Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Bárány, Imre; Vilcu, Costin

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents easy-to-understand yet surprising properties obtained using topological, geometric and graph theoretic tools in the areas covered by the Geometry Conference that took place in Mulhouse, France from September 7–11, 2014 in honour of Tudor Zamfirescu on the occasion of his 70th anniversary. The contributions address subjects in convexity and discrete geometry, in distance geometry or with geometrical flavor in combinatorics, graph theory or non-linear analysis. Written by top experts, these papers highlight the close connections between these fields, as well as ties to other domains of geometry and their reciprocal influence. They offer an overview on recent developments in geometry and its border with discrete mathematics, and provide answers to several open questions. The volume addresses a large audience in mathematics, including researchers and graduate students interested in geometry and geometrical problems.

  2. Laser-Assisted Elastic Electron Scattering from Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Qiu-Bo; SUN Jin-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The second Born approximation (SBA) theory is applied to the study of electron-atom scattering in the presence of a CO2 laser field. The absolute differential cross sections of e-At scattering are calculated with multiphoton exchange in two special scattering geometries G1 (for small-angle scattering) and G2. For geometry G1, compared with the results of two different model potentials for electron elastic scattering by atoms, it is found that electronatom polarization potential plays an important role in laser-assisted electron-atom scattering. Some calculational results in geometries G2 are given. Our results are found to be better than other theoretical results as compared with the experimental data in geometries G1 and G2.

  3. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF): a second-generation platelet concentrate. Part II: platelet-related biologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohan, David M; Choukroun, Joseph; Diss, Antoine; Dohan, Steve L; Dohan, Anthony J J; Mouhyi, Jaafar; Gogly, Bruno

    2006-03-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) belongs to a new generation of platelet concentrates, with simplified processing and without biochemical blood handling. In this second article, we investigate the platelet-associated features of this biomaterial. During PRF processing by centrifugation, platelets are activated and their massive degranulation implies a very significant cytokine release. Concentrated platelet-rich plasma platelet cytokines have already been quantified in many technologic configurations. To carry out a comparative study, we therefore undertook to quantify PDGF-BB, TGFbeta-1, and IGF-I within PPP (platelet-poor plasma) supernatant and PRF clot exudate serum. These initial analyses revealed that slow fibrin polymerization during PRF processing leads to the intrinsic incorporation of platelet cytokines and glycanic chains in the fibrin meshes. This result would imply that PRF, unlike the other platelet concentrates, would be able to progressively release cytokines during fibrin matrix remodeling; such a mechanism might explain the clinically observed healing properties of PRF.

  4. Algorithms in Algebraic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dickenstein, Alicia; Sommese, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been a burgeoning of activity in the design and implementation of algorithms for algebraic geometric computation. Some of these algorithms were originally designed for abstract algebraic geometry, but now are of interest for use in applications and some of these algorithms were originally designed for applications, but now are of interest for use in abstract algebraic geometry. The workshop on Algorithms in Algebraic Geometry that was held in the framework of the IMA Annual Program Year in Applications of Algebraic Geometry by the Institute for Mathematics and Its

  5. Fundamental concepts of geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Meserve, Bruce E

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates relationships between different types of geometry. Provides excellent overview of the foundations and historical evolution of geometrical concepts. Exercises (no solutions). Includes 98 illustrations.

  6. Revolutions of Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    O'Leary, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Guides readers through the development of geometry and basic proof writing using a historical approach to the topic. In an effort to fully appreciate the logic and structure of geometric proofs, Revolutions of Geometry places proofs into the context of geometry's history, helping readers to understand that proof writing is crucial to the job of a mathematician. Written for students and educators of mathematics alike, the book guides readers through the rich history and influential works, from ancient times to the present, behind the development of geometry. As a result, readers are successfull

  7. Euclidean geometry and transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Dodge, Clayton W

    1972-01-01

    This introduction to Euclidean geometry emphasizes transformations, particularly isometries and similarities. Suitable for undergraduate courses, it includes numerous examples, many with detailed answers. 1972 edition.

  8. Introduction to finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Kárteszi, F

    1976-01-01

    North-Holland Texts in Advanced Mathematics: Introduction to Finite Geometries focuses on the advancements in finite geometries, including mapping and combinatorics. The manuscript first offers information on the basic concepts on finite geometries and Galois geometries. Discussions focus on linear mapping of a given quadrangle onto another given quadrangle; point configurations of order 2 on a Galois plane of even order; canonical equation of curves of the second order on the Galois planes of even order; and set of collineations mapping a Galois plane onto itself. The text then ponders on geo

  9. Platelet-containing tantalum powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiele, E.K.

    1988-04-26

    A method of forming platelet tantalum powders is described comprising the steps of: (a) providing an ingot-derived precursor tantalum powder, and (b) ball-milling the precursor powder for a time sufficient to form a platelet powder having an average FSSS of less than about 2 micrometers, a Scott density not greater than about 30 g/in/sup 3/ and a BET surface area of at least about 0.7 in/sup 2//g.

  10. In vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Platelets are routinely isolated from whole blood and stored in plasma for 5 days. The present study was done to assess the in vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution at 22°C. Materials and Methods: The study sample included 30 blood donors of both sex in State Blood Bank, CSM Medical University, Lucknow. Random donor platelets were prepared by platelet rich plasma method. Whole blood (350 ml was collected in anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Dextrose Adenine triple blood bags. Random donor platelets were stored for 7 days at 22°C in platelet incubators and agitators, with and without additive solution. Results: Platelet swirling was present in all the units at 22°C on day 7, with no evidence of bacterial contamination. Comparison of the mean values of platelet count, platelet factor 3, lactate dehydrogenase, pH, glucose and platelet aggregation showed no significant difference in additive solution, whereas platelet factor 3, glucose and platelet aggregation showed significant difference (P < 0.001 on day 7 without additive solution at 22°C. Conclusion: Our study infers that platelet viability and aggregation were best maintained within normal levels on day 7 of storage in platelet additive solution at 22°C. Thus, we may conclude that in vitro storage of random donor platelets with an extended shelf life of 7 days using platelet additive solution may be advocated to improve the inventory of platelets.

  11. Evidence of platelet activation in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Steven

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective A fatality in one multiple sclerosis (MS patient due to acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP and a near fatality in another stimulated our interest in platelet function abnormalities in MS. Previously, we presented evidence of platelet activation in a small cohort of treatment-naive MS patients. Methods In this report, 92 normal controls and 33 stable, untreated MS patients were studied. Platelet counts, measures of platelet activation [plasma platelet microparticles (PMP, P-selectin expression (CD62p, circulating platelet microaggragtes (PAg], as well as platelet-associated IgG/IgM, were carried out. In addition, plasma protein S activity was measured. Results Compared to controls, PMP were significantly elevated in MS (p Conclusion Platelets are significantly activated in MS patients. The mechanisms underlying this activation and its significance to MS are unknown. Additional study of platelet activation and function in MS patients is warranted.

  12. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability and compares it to…

  13. Supersymmetric Sigma Model Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ulf Lindström

    2012-01-01

    This is a review of how sigma models formulated in Superspace have become important tools for understanding geometry. Topics included are: The (hyper)k\\"ahler reduction; projective superspace; the generalized Legendre construction; generalized K\\"ahler geometry and constructions of hyperk\\"ahler metrics on Hermitean symmetric spaces.

  14. Supersymmetric Sigma Model geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lindström, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    This is a review of how sigma models formulated in Superspace have become important tools for understanding geometry. Topics included are: The (hyper)k\\"ahler reduction; projective superspace; the generalized Legendre construction; generalized K\\"ahler geometry and constructions of hyperk\\"ahler metrics on Hermitean symmetric spaces.

  15. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  16. Foundations of algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Weil, A

    1946-01-01

    This classic is one of the cornerstones of modern algebraic geometry. At the same time, it is entirely self-contained, assuming no knowledge whatsoever of algebraic geometry, and no knowledge of modern algebra beyond the simplest facts about abstract fields and their extensions, and the bare rudiments of the theory of ideals.

  17. Dual doubled geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Riccioni, Fabio; Alvarez-Gaumé, L.

    2011-01-01

    We probe doubled geometry with dual fundamental branes. i.e. solitons. Restricting ourselves first to solitonic branes with more than two transverse directions we find that the doubled geometry requires an effective wrapping rule for the solitonic branes which is dual to the wrapping rule for fundam

  18. A Lorentzian quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotz, Andreas

    2011-10-07

    In this thesis, a formulation of a Lorentzian quantum geometry based on the framework of causal fermion systems is proposed. After giving the general definition of causal fermion systems, we deduce space-time as a topological space with an underlying causal structure. Restricting attention to systems of spin dimension two, we derive the objects of our quantum geometry: the spin space, the tangent space endowed with a Lorentzian metric, connection and curvature. In order to get the correspondence to classical differential geometry, we construct examples of causal fermion systems by regularizing Dirac sea configurations in Minkowski space and on a globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifold. When removing the regularization, the objects of our quantum geometry reduce to the common objects of spin geometry on Lorentzian manifolds, up to higher order curvature corrections.

  19. Impact of reticulated platelets on antiplatelet response to thienopyridines is independent of platelet turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratz, Christian; Nührenberg, Thomas; Amann, Michael; Cederqvist, Marco; Kleiner, Pascal; Valina, Christian M; Trenk, Dietmar; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Hochholzer, Willibald

    2016-10-28

    Reticulated platelets are associated with impaired antiplatelet response to thienopyridines. It is uncertain whether this interaction is caused by a decreased drug exposure due to high platelet turnover reflected by elevated levels of reticulated platelets or by intrinsic properties of reticulated platelets. This study sought to investigate if the impact of reticulated platelets on early antiplatelet response to thienopyridines is mainly caused by platelet turnover as previously suggested. Elective patients undergoing coronary intervention were randomised to loading with clopidogrel 600 mg or prasugrel 60 mg (n=200). Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet reactivity was determined by impedance aggregometry before, at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes and at day 1 after loading. Immature platelet count was assessed as marker of reticulated platelets by flow cytometry. Platelet reactivity increased with rising levels of immature platelet count in both groups. This effect was more distinctive in patients on clopidogrel as compared to patients on prasugrel. Overall, immature platelet count correlated well with on-treatment platelet reactivity at all time-points (p < 0.001). These correlations did not change over time in the entire cohort as well as in patients treated with clopidogrel or prasugrel indicating an effect independent of platelet turnover (comparison of correlations 120 minutes/day 1: p = 0.64). In conclusion, the association of immature platelet count with impaired antiplatelet response to thienopyridines is similar early and late after loading. This finding suggests as main underlying mechanism another effect of reticulated platelets on thienopyridines than platelet turnover.

  20. Platelets and infection — an emerging role of platelets in viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice eAssinger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are anucleate blood cells that play a crucial role in the maintenance of hemostasis. While platelet activation and elevated platelet counts (thrombocytosis are associated with increased risk of thrombotic complications, low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia and several platelet function disorders increase the risk of bleeding. Over the last years more and more evidence has emerged that platelets and their activation state can also modulate innate and adaptive immune responses and low platelet counts have been identified as a surrogate marker for poor prognosis in septic patients.Viral infections often coincide with platelet activation. Host inflammatory responses result in the release of platelet activating mediators and a pro-oxidative and pro-coagulant environment, which favours platelet activation. However, viruses can also directly interact with platelets and megakaryocytes and modulate their function. Furthermore, platelets can be activated by viral antigen-antibody complexes and in response to some viruses B-lymphocytes also generate anti-platelet antibodies.All these processes contributing to platelet activation result in increased platelet consumption and removal and often lead to thrombocytopenia, which is frequently observed during viral infection. However, virus-induced platelet activation does not only modulate platelet count, but also shapes immune responses. Platelets and their released products have been reported to directly and indirectly suppress infection and to support virus persistence in response to certain viruses, making platelets a double-edged sword during viral infections. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on platelet interaction with different types of viruses, the viral impact on platelet activation and platelet-mediated modulations of innate and adaptive immune responses.

  1. Platelets and infection - an emerging role of platelets in viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assinger, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate blood cells that play a crucial role in the maintenance of hemostasis. While platelet activation and elevated platelet counts (thrombocytosis) are associated with increased risk of thrombotic complications, low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia) and several platelet function disorders increase the risk of bleeding. Over the last years, more and more evidence has emerged that platelets and their activation state can also modulate innate and adaptive immune responses and low platelet counts have been identified as a surrogate marker for poor prognosis in septic patients. Viral infections often coincide with platelet activation. Host inflammatory responses result in the release of platelet activating mediators and a pro-oxidative and pro-coagulant environment, which favors platelet activation. However, viruses can also directly interact with platelets and megakaryocytes and modulate their function. Furthermore, platelets can be activated by viral antigen-antibody complexes and in response to some viruses B-lymphocytes also generate anti-platelet antibodies. All these processes contributing to platelet activation result in increased platelet consumption and removal and often lead to thrombocytopenia, which is frequently observed during viral infection. However, virus-induced platelet activation does not only modulate platelet count but also shape immune responses. Platelets and their released products have been reported to directly and indirectly suppress infection and to support virus persistence in response to certain viruses, making platelets a double-edged sword during viral infections. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on platelet interaction with different types of viruses, the viral impact on platelet activation, and platelet-mediated modulations of innate and adaptive immune responses.

  2. Riemann-Finsler Geometry with Applications to Information Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Information geometry is a new branch in mathematics, originated from the applications of differential geometry to statistics. In this paper we briefly introduce RiemannFinsler geometry, by which we establish Information Geometry on a much broader base,so that the potential applications of Information Geometry will be beyond statistics.

  3. Platelet satellitism in infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskaj, Renata; Sikiric, Dubravka; Skerk, Visnja

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet satellitism is a phenomenon of unknown etiology of aggregating platelets around polymorphonuclear neutrophils and other blood cells which causes pseudothrombocytopenia, visible by microscopic examination of blood smears. It has been observed so far in about a hundred cases in the world. Case subject and methods Our case involves a 73-year-old female patient with a urinary infection. Biochemical serum analysis (CRP, glucose, AST, ALT, ALP, GGT, bilirubin, sodium, potassium, chloride, urea, creatinine) and blood cell count were performed with standard methods on autoanalyzers. Serum protein fractions were examined by electrophoresis and urinalysis with standard methods on autoanalyzer together with microscopic examination of urine sediment. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, blood culture and urine culture tests were performed with standard methods. Results Due to typical pathological values for bacterial urinary infection, the patient was admitted to the hospital. Blood smear examination revealed phenomenon, which has persisted for three weeks after the disease has been cured. Blood smears with EDTA as an anticoagulant had platelet satellitism whereas the phenomenon was not observed in tubes with different anticoagulants (Na, Li-heparin) and capillary blood. Discussion We hypothesize that satellitism was induced by some immunological mechanism through formation of antibodies which have mediated platelets binding to neutrophil membranes and vice versa. Unfortunately we were unable to determine the putative trigger for this phenomenon. To our knowledge this is the second case of platelet satellitism ever described in Croatia. PMID:26110042

  4. Critical scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirling, W.G. [Liverpool Univ., Dep. of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Perry, S.C. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO{sub 3} is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs.

  5. Statistical discrete geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ariwahjoedi, Seramika; Kosasih, Jusak Sali; Rovelli, Carlo; Zen, Freddy Permana

    2016-01-01

    Following our earlier work, we construct statistical discrete geometry by applying statistical mechanics to discrete (Regge) gravity. We propose a coarse-graining method for discrete geometry under the assumptions of atomism and background independence. To maintain these assumptions, restrictions are given to the theory by introducing cut-offs, both in ultraviolet and infrared regime. Having a well-defined statistical picture of discrete Regge geometry, we take the infinite degrees of freedom (large n) limit. We argue that the correct limit consistent with the restrictions and the background independence concept is not the continuum limit of statistical mechanics, but the thermodynamical limit.

  6. Non-Euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bonola, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    This is an excellent historical and mathematical view by a renowned Italian geometer of the geometries that have risen from a rejection of Euclid's parallel postulate. Students, teachers and mathematicians will find here a ready reference source and guide to a field that has now become overwhelmingly important.Non-Euclidean Geometry first examines the various attempts to prove Euclid's parallel postulate-by the Greeks, Arabs, and mathematicians of the Renaissance. Then, ranging through the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, it considers the forerunners and founders of non-Euclidean geometry, such

  7. ALICE Geometry Database

    CERN Document Server

    Santo, J

    1999-01-01

    The ALICE Geometry Database project consists of the development of a set of data structures to store the geometrical information of the ALICE Detector. This Database will be used in Simulation, Reconstruction and Visualisation and will interface with existing CAD systems and Geometrical Modellers.At the present time, we are able to read a complete GEANT3 geometry, to store it in our database and to visualise it. On disk, we store different geometry files in hierarchical fashion, and all the nodes, materials, shapes, configurations and transformations distributed in this tree structure. The present status of the prototype and its future evolution will be presented.

  8. Discrete and computational geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Devadoss, Satyan L

    2011-01-01

    Discrete geometry is a relatively new development in pure mathematics, while computational geometry is an emerging area in applications-driven computer science. Their intermingling has yielded exciting advances in recent years, yet what has been lacking until now is an undergraduate textbook that bridges the gap between the two. Discrete and Computational Geometry offers a comprehensive yet accessible introduction to this cutting-edge frontier of mathematics and computer science. This book covers traditional topics such as convex hulls, triangulations, and Voronoi diagrams, as well a

  9. Non-Euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kulczycki, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    This accessible approach features two varieties of proofs: stereometric and planimetric, as well as elementary proofs that employ only the simplest properties of the plane. A short history of geometry precedes a systematic exposition of the principles of non-Euclidean geometry.Starting with fundamental assumptions, the author examines the theorems of Hjelmslev, mapping a plane into a circle, the angle of parallelism and area of a polygon, regular polygons, straight lines and planes in space, and the horosphere. Further development of the theory covers hyperbolic functions, the geometry of suff

  10. Evaluation of platelet aggregation in platelet concentrates: storage implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Teresinha J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of hemo-derivatives is nowadays a fundamentally important therapeutic modality in the exercise of medicine. Among the various hemo-components employed, we have the platelet concentrate (PC, indicated in cases of hemorrhagic disturbances. We previously showed that platelet function in blood donors is reduced in their screening phase and after the separation process of PCs. Currently, we are providing evidence for the existence of biochemical and functional changes in PC preparations stored for three days at temperatures of 20 ± 2 ºC. Platelet concentrates from 40 healthy donors, collected in CPD anticoagulant and PL-146 polyvinylchloride containers, were examined in order to determine the pH value, pCO2 ,pO2 and lactate concentrations. In addition, the aggregation of platelets with thrombin and collagen were examined to evaluate platelet function. A pH increase from 7.07 ± 0.04 to 7.36 ± 0.07 (p < 0.01 was observed. The pCO2 concentration decreased progressively from 69.2 ± 7.7 mmHg to 28.8 ± 6.2 mmHg (p < 0.001 during the storage period. In contrast, pO2 value increase from 103.4 ± 30.6 to 152.3 ± 24.6 mmHg (p < 0.001 was evidenced during the 48 hours of storage. The lactate concentration increased from 17.97 ± 5.2 to 57.21 ± 5.7 mg/dl (p < 0.001. Platelet aggregation using 0.25 U/ml-thrombin and 2.0 µg/ml-collagen showed significant hypofunction from 61.8 ± 2.7% to 24.8 ± 9.8% and 62.7±5.0 to 33.4± 6.2 (p < 0.001, respectively. We concluded that the evaluated biochemical parameters and the platelet function changed significantly when the platelets were kept under routine storage conditions.

  11. CD8+ T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8+ T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8+ splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8+ splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8+ splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  12. An overview of platelet indices and methods for evaluating platelet function in thrombocytopenic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, Pernille Just; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Nybo, Mads

    2014-01-01

    in thrombocytopenia. Flow cytometry, platelet aggregometry and platelet secretion tests are used to diagnose specific platelet function defects. The flow cytometric activation marker P-selectin and surface coverage by the Cone and Plate[let] analyser™ predict bleeding in selected thrombocytopenic populations...

  13. Platelet antigens and antibodies. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet antigens structure, role of platelet antibodies in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions, characteristic of modern antibodies detection methods are presented in this article.

  14. Platelet antigens and antibodies. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Platelet antigens structure, role of platelet antibodies in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions, characteristic of modern antibodies detection methods are presented in this article.

  15. Effect of photodynamic therapy on mouse platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuannong; Chi, Shunji; Deng, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hua; Liang, Junlin; Ha, Xian-wen

    1993-06-01

    Normal mice received hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) i.v. prior to red light irradiation and the platelet-rich plasma was prepared and irradiated by red light. The platelets were processed for EM examination and stereological analysis. It was shown the 16 hrs after irradiation almost all platelets were necrotized; 8 hours after irradiation about one fourth of the platelets were necrotized and the remaining were considerably damaged. Immediately after irradiation a small number of platelets became necrotic and most other platelets were swollen and deformated, showing significantly increased mean area, perimeter and short axis, and mean cell volume and cell surface area. The findings indicate that platelets are highly sensitive to PDT action and can be directly and rapidly damaged by PDT even in the absence of vascular endothelial cells. The early platelet photoactivation may play an important role in the initiation of early vascular damage and microcirculatory alterations induced by PDT in vivo.

  16. Platelet Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Article: Erythropoietin and thrombopoietin mimetics: Natural alternatives to erythrocyte and platelet... Article: Detection of CALR Mutation in Clonal and Nonclonal Hematologic Diseases... Platelet Disorders -- see more articles Thrombocytopenias -- see more ...

  17. Elementary differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pressley, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Curves and surfaces are objects that everyone can see, and many of the questions that can be asked about them are natural and easily understood Differential geometry is concerned with the precise mathematical formulation of some of these questions, and with trying to answer them using calculus techniques It is a subject that contains some of the most beautiful and profound results in mathematics yet many of these are accessible to higher-level undergraduates Elementary Differential Geometry presents the main results in the differential geometry of curves and surfaces while keeping the prerequisites to an absolute minimum Nothing more than first courses in linear algebra and multivariate calculus are required, and the most direct and straightforward approach is used at all times Numerous diagrams illustrate both the ideas in the text and the examples of curves and surfaces discussed there The book will provide an invaluable resource to all those taking a first course in differential geometry, for their lecture...

  18. What Is Geometry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  19. An expedition to geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kumaresan, S

    2005-01-01

    Including Affine and projective classification of Conics, 2 point homogeneity's of the planes, essential isometrics, non euclidean plan geometrics, in this book, the treatment of Geometry goes beyond the Kleinian views.

  20. Lectures on Symplectic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Ana Cannas

    2001-01-01

    The goal of these notes is to provide a fast introduction to symplectic geometry for graduate students with some knowledge of differential geometry, de Rham theory and classical Lie groups. This text addresses symplectomorphisms, local forms, contact manifolds, compatible almost complex structures, Kaehler manifolds, hamiltonian mechanics, moment maps, symplectic reduction and symplectic toric manifolds. It contains guided problems, called homework, designed to complement the exposition or extend the reader's understanding. There are by now excellent references on symplectic geometry, a subset of which is in the bibliography of this book. However, the most efficient introduction to a subject is often a short elementary treatment, and these notes attempt to serve that purpose. This text provides a taste of areas of current research and will prepare the reader to explore recent papers and extensive books on symplectic geometry where the pace is much faster. For this reprint numerous corrections and cl...

  1. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  2. Geometry of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Khovanskiĭ, A; Vassiliev, V

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains articles written by V. I. Arnold's colleagues on the occasion of his 60th birthday. The articles are mostly devoted to various aspects of geometry of differential equations and relations to global analysis and Hamiltonian mechanics.

  3. Facilitating Understandings of Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christine C.; Bush, Sara

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates some learning encounters for facilitating first graders' understanding of geometry. Describes some of children's approaches using Cuisenaire rods and teacher's intervening. Presents six problems involving various combinations of Cuisenaire rods and cubes. (YP)

  4. Introduction to tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maclagan, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Tropical geometry is a combinatorial shadow of algebraic geometry, offering new polyhedral tools to compute invariants of algebraic varieties. It is based on tropical algebra, where the sum of two numbers is their minimum and the product is their sum. This turns polynomials into piecewise-linear functions, and their zero sets into polyhedral complexes. These tropical varieties retain a surprising amount of information about their classical counterparts. Tropical geometry is a young subject that has undergone a rapid development since the beginning of the 21st century. While establishing itself as an area in its own right, deep connections have been made to many branches of pure and applied mathematics. This book offers a self-contained introduction to tropical geometry, suitable as a course text for beginning graduate students. Proofs are provided for the main results, such as the Fundamental Theorem and the Structure Theorem. Numerous examples and explicit computations illustrate the main concepts. Each of t...

  5. Invitation to geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Melzak, Z A

    2008-01-01

    Intended for students of many different backgrounds with only a modest knowledge of mathematics, this text features self-contained chapters that can be adapted to several types of geometry courses. 1983 edition.

  6. Complex algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kollár, János

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains the lectures presented at the third Regional Geometry Institute at Park City in 1993. The lectures provide an introduction to the subject, complex algebraic geometry, making the book suitable as a text for second- and third-year graduate students. The book deals with topics in algebraic geometry where one can reach the level of current research while starting with the basics. Topics covered include the theory of surfaces from the viewpoint of recent higher-dimensional developments, providing an excellent introduction to more advanced topics such as the minimal model program. Also included is an introduction to Hodge theory and intersection homology based on the simple topological ideas of Lefschetz and an overview of the recent interactions between algebraic geometry and theoretical physics, which involve mirror symmetry and string theory.

  7. Derived logarithmic geometry I

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Sagave; Timo, Schurg; Gabriele, Vezzosi

    2016-01-01

    In order to develop the foundations of logarithmic derived geometry, we introduce a model category of logarithmic simplicial rings and a notion of derived log \\'etale maps and use this to define derived log stacks.

  8. The geometry of geodesics

    CERN Document Server

    Busemann, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive approach to qualitative problems in intrinsic differential geometry, this text examines Desarguesian spaces, perpendiculars and parallels, covering spaces, the influence of the sign of the curvature on geodesics, more. 1955 edition. Includes 66 figures.

  9. Geometry and Combinatorics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkendorff, Simon Lyngby

    2002-01-01

    The subject of this Ph.D.-thesis is somewhere in between continuous and discrete geometry. Chapter 2 treats the geometry of finite point sets in semi-Riemannian hyperquadrics,using a matrix whose entries are a trigonometric function of relative distances in a given point set. The distance...... to the geometry of a simplex in a semi-Riemannian hyperquadric. In chapter 3 we study which finite metric spaces that are realizable in a hyperbolic space in the limit where curvature goes to -∞. We show that such spaces are the so called leaf spaces, the set of degree 1 vertices of weighted trees. We also...... establish results on the limiting geometry of such an isometrically realized leaf space simplex in hyperbolic space, when curvature goes to -∞. Chapter 4 discusses negative type of metric spaces. We give a measure theoretic treatment of this concept and related invariants. The theory developed...

  10. Observer dependent geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Hohmann, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    From general relativity we have learned the principles of general covariance and local Lorentz invariance, which follow from the fact that we consider observables as tensors on a spacetime manifold whose geometry is modeled by a Lorentzian metric. Approaches to quantum gravity, however, hint towards a breaking of these symmetries and the possible existence of more general, non-tensorial geometric structures. Possible implications of these approaches are non-tensorial transformation laws between different observers and an observer-dependent notion of geometry. In this work we review two different frameworks for observer dependent geometries, which may provide hints towards a quantization of gravity and possible explanations for so far unexplained phenomena: Finsler spacetimes and Cartan geometry on observer space. We discuss their definitions, properties and applications to observers, field theories and gravity.

  11. Effect of platelet age on adhesiveness to collagen and platelet surface charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellan, R.M.; Steiner, M.

    1976-11-30

    Adhesion to collagen was investigated as a function of platelet age in rat platelets. Platelet adherence was measured using EDTA-containing platelet- rich plasma which was added to preparations of collagen fibers clamped between magnetic stirrers by recording changes in light transmission. The plot of light transmission versus logarithm of time was linear and allowed calculation of a slope factor which related to the rate of adherence. Neither the amount of collagen nor the platelet count were limiting in the test. Young platelet populations (less than or equal to 1 day old) were obtained during the recovery phase from immune induced thrombocytopenia. Old platelet populations were prepared by blocking thrombopoiesis with cyclophosphamide. Young platelets did not differ significantly from randomly aged platelets in this function. The electrophoretic mobility of platelets was not affected by their age.

  12. Implosions and hypertoric geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dancer, A.; Kirwan, F.; Swann, A.

    2013-01-01

    The geometry of the universal hyperkahler implosion for SU (n) is explored. In particular, we show that the universal hyperkahler implosion naturally contains a hypertoric variety described in terms of quivers. Furthermore, we discuss a gauge theoretic approach to hyperkahler implosion.......The geometry of the universal hyperkahler implosion for SU (n) is explored. In particular, we show that the universal hyperkahler implosion naturally contains a hypertoric variety described in terms of quivers. Furthermore, we discuss a gauge theoretic approach to hyperkahler implosion....

  13. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  14. Higher prequantum geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiber, Urs

    2016-01-01

    This is a survey of motivations, constructions and applications of higher prequantum geometry. In section 1 we highlight the open problem of prequantizing local field theory in a local and gauge invariant way, and we survey how a solution to this problem exists in higher differential geometry. In section 2 we survey examples and problems of interest. In section 3 we survey the abstract cohesive homotopy theory that serves to make all this precise and tractable.

  15. Brans-Dicke geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Punzi, Raffaele; Wohlfarth, Mattias N R

    2008-01-01

    We reveal the non-metric geometry underlying omega-->0 Brans-Dicke theory by unifying the metric and scalar field into a single geometric structure. Taking this structure seriously as the geometry to which matter universally couples, we show that the theory is fully consistent with solar system tests. This is in striking constrast with the standard metric coupling, which grossly violates post-Newtonian experimental constraints.

  16. Brans-Dicke geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punzi, Raffaele [Zentrum fuer Mathematische Physik und II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: raffaele.punzi@desy.de; Schuller, Frederic P. [Max Planck Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert Einstein Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14467 Potsdam (Germany)], E-mail: fps@aei.mpg.de; Wohlfarth, Mattias N.R. [Zentrum fuer Mathematische Physik und II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: mattias.wohlfarth@desy.de

    2008-12-11

    We reveal the non-metric geometry underlying {omega}{yields}0 Brans-Dicke theory by unifying the metric and scalar field into a single geometric structure. Taking this structure seriously as the geometry to which matter universally couples, we show that the theory is fully consistent with solar system tests. This is in striking contrast with the standard metric coupling, which grossly violates post-Newtonian experimental constraints.

  17. Density functional theory for colloidal mixtures of hard platelets, rods, and spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esztermann, Ansgar; Reich, Hendrik; Schmidt, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    A geometry-based density-functional theory is presented for mixtures of hard spheres, hard needles, and hard platelets; both the needles and platelets are taken to be of vanishing thickness. Geometrical weight functions that are characteristic for each species are given, and it is shown how convolutions of pairs of weight functions recover each Mayer bond of the ternary mixture and hence ensure the correct second virial expansion of the excess free-energy functional. The case of sphere-platelet overlap relies on the same approximation as does Rosenfeld's functional for strictly two-dimensional hard disks. We explicitly control contributions to the excess free energy that are of third order in density. Analytic expressions relevant for the application of the theory to states with planar translational and cylindrical rotational symmetry--e.g., to describe behavior at planar smooth walls--are given. For binary sphere-platelet mixtures, in the appropriate limit of small platelet densities, the theory differs from that used in a recent treatment [L. Harnau and S. Dietrich, Phys. Rev. E 71, 011504 (2004)]. As a test case of our approach we consider the isotropic-nematic bulk transition of pure hard platelets, which we find to be weakly first order, with values for the coexistence densities and the nematic order parameter that compare well with simulation results.

  18. SOC and Fractal Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, R. T. J.

    2013-06-01

    When Mandelbrot, the father of modern fractal geometry, made this seemingly obvious statement he was trying to show that we should move out of our comfortable Euclidean space and adopt a fractal approach to geometry. The concepts and mathematical tools of fractal geometry provides insight into natural physical systems that Euclidean tools cannot do. The benet from applying fractal geometry to studies of Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) are even greater. SOC and fractal geometry share concepts of dynamic n-body interactions, apparent non-predictability, self-similarity, and an approach to global statistics in space and time that make these two areas into naturally paired research techniques. Further, the iterative generation techniques used in both SOC models and in fractals mean they share common features and common problems. This chapter explores the strong historical connections between fractal geometry and SOC from both a mathematical and conceptual understanding, explores modern day interactions between these two topics, and discusses how this is likely to evolve into an even stronger link in the near future.

  19. Dengue platelets meet Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Paul F

    2013-11-14

    In this issue of Blood, Hottz et al provide compelling evidence that dengue virus (DV) induces (1) platelet synthesis of interleukin-1b (IL-1b); (2) platelet-derived IL-1b–containing microvesicles (MVs) that increase vascular permeability; and (3) DV-triggered inflammasome activation in platelets.

  20. Molecular Basis Linking Platelet to Inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马丽萍

    2010-01-01

    @@ Introduction Blood platelets not only play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis,but increasing evidence show that they participate in the induction of inflammation.Firstly,platelets contain and release cytokines and immune mediators.And platelets are able to modulate and regulate the function of surrounding cells by adhesion molecules or by the release of various factors.

  1. Platelets Inhibit Migration of Canine Osteosarcoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, S C; Badial, P R; Silva, R C; Lunsford, K; Bulla, C

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between platelets and tumour cells is important for tumour growth and metastasis. Thrombocytopenia or antiplatelet treatment negatively impact on cancer metastasis, demonstrating potentially important roles for platelets in tumour progression. To our knowledge, there is no information regarding the role of platelets in cancer progression in dogs. This study was designed to test whether canine platelets affected the migratory behaviour of three canine osteosarcoma cell lines and to give insights of molecular mechanisms. Intact platelets, platelet lysate and platelet releasate inhibited the migration of canine osteosarcoma cell lines. Addition of blood leucocytes to the platelet samples did not alter the inhibitory effect on migration. Platelet treatment also significantly downregulated the transcriptional levels of SNAI2 and TWIST1 genes. The interaction between canine platelets or molecules released during platelet activation and these tumour cell lines inhibits their migration, which suggests that canine platelets might antagonize metastasis of canine osteosarcoma. This effect is probably due to, at least in part, downregulation of genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Platelet regulating properties of insulin revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrade Ferreira, I. (Irlando)

    2005-01-01

    Disturbances in platelet responsiveness in diabetes mellitus (DM) lead to platelet-dependent complications in the vasculature. Our studies showed that insulin inhibits platelet activation by inhibiting ADP- and thrombin-induced Ca2+ levels. Ca2+ is under control of cAMP that is a potent endogenous p

  3. Image analysis of blood platelets adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krízová, P; Rysavá, J; Vanícková, M; Cieslar, P; Dyr, J E

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion of blood platelets is one of the major events in haemostatic and thrombotic processes. We studied adhesion of blood platelets on fibrinogen and fibrin dimer sorbed on solid support material (glass, polystyrene). Adhesion was carried on under static and dynamic conditions and measured as percentage of the surface covered with platelets. Within a range of platelet counts in normal and in thrombocytopenic blood we observed a very significant decrease in platelet adhesion on fibrin dimer with bounded active thrombin with decreasing platelet count. Our results show the imperative use of platelet poor blood preparations as control samples in experiments with thrombocytopenic blood. Experiments carried on adhesive surfaces sorbed on polystyrene showed lower relative inaccuracy than on glass. Markedly different behaviour of platelets adhered on the same adhesive surface, which differed only in support material (glass or polystyrene) suggest that adhesion and mainly spreading of platelets depends on physical quality of the surface. While on polystyrene there were no significant differences between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen, adhesion measured on glass support material markedly differed between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen. We compared two methods of thresholding in image analysis of adhered platelets. Results obtained by image analysis of spreaded platelets showed higher relative inaccuracy than results obtained by image analysis of platelets centres and aggregates.

  4. Human platelet antigen genotyping of platelet donors in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzoni, J; Fagundes, I S; Lunardi, L W; Lindenau, J D-R; Gil, B C; Jobim, M; Dias, V G; Merzoni, L; Sekine, L; Onsten, T G H; Jobim, L F

    2015-10-01

    Human platelet antigens (HPA) are immunogenic structures that result from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) leading to single amino acid substitutions. This study sought to determine the allele and genotype frequencies of HPA-1, HPA-2, HPA-3, HPA-4, HPA-5 and HPA-15 in platelet donors from the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Brazil, and compare their allele frequencies to those observed in other populations. HPA genotyping was performed by PCR-SSP method. The study sample comprised 201 platelet donors (167 Caucasians and 34 non-Caucasians). Allele 'a' was that most commonly found for HPA-1 to 5 in both groups. The HPA-15ab genotype predominated over homozygous genotypes of this system. Fisher's exact test revealed statistically significant differences for the HPA-5 system, with a greater prevalence of the HPA-5b allele in non-Caucasians. The neighbour-joining method and principal components analysis revealed genetic proximity between our Caucasian group and European populations. We conclude that the allele frequencies of HPA-1 to 5 and HPA-15 found in our Caucasian sample are similar to those reported for European populations. These findings corroborate the ethnic makeup of the population of RS. The higher frequency of the HPA-5b allele found in the non-Caucasian group of our sample suggests the possibility of allosensitization in patients who receive platelet transfusions from genetically incompatible donors.

  5. Platelet count and platelet indices in women with preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlSheeha MA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Muneera A AlSheeha,1 Rafi S Alaboudi,1 Mohammad A Alghasham,1 Javed Iqbal,2 Ishag Adam1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine, Qassim University, Buriadah, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maternity and Children’s Hospital, Qassim, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Although the exact pathophysiology of preeclampsia is not completely understood, the utility of different platelets indices can be utilized to predict preeclampsia.Objective: To compare platelet indices, namely platelet count (PC, mean platelet volume (MPV, platelet distribution width (PDW, and PC to MPV ratio in women with preeclampsia compared with healthy controls.Setting: Qassim Hospital, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.Design: A case–control study. Sixty preeclamptic women were the cases and an equal number of healthy pregnant women were the controls.Results: There was no significant difference in age, parity, and body mass index between the study groups. Sixteen and 44 of the cases were severe and mild preeclampsia, respectively. There was no significant difference in PDW and MPV between the preeclamptic and control women. Both PC and PC to MPV ratios were significantly lower in the women with preeclampsia compared with the controls. There was no significant difference in the PC, PDW, MPV, and PC to MPV ratio when women with mild and severe preeclampsia were compared. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves, the PC cutoff was 248.0×103/µL for diagnosis of preeclampsia (P=0.019; the area under the ROC curve was 62.4%. Binary regression suggests that women with PC <248.010×103/µL were at higher risk of preeclampsia (odds ratio =2.2, 95% confidence interval =1.08–4.6, P=0.03. The PC/MPV cutoff was 31.2 for diagnosis of preeclampsia (P=0.035, the area under the ROC curve was 62.2%.Conclusion: PC <248.010×103/µL and PC to MPV ratio 31.2 are valid predictors of preeclampsia. Keywords: preeclampsia, platelets, PDW, mean platelet

  6. Platelet count and platelet indices in women with preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSheeha, Muneera A; Alaboudi, Rafi S; Alghasham, Mohammad A; Iqbal, Javed; Adam, Ishag

    2016-01-01

    Although the exact pathophysiology of preeclampsia is not completely understood, the utility of different platelets indices can be utilized to predict preeclampsia. To compare platelet indices, namely platelet count (PC), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and PC to MPV ratio in women with preeclampsia compared with healthy controls. Qassim Hospital, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A case-control study. Sixty preeclamptic women were the cases and an equal number of healthy pregnant women were the controls. There was no significant difference in age, parity, and body mass index between the study groups. Sixteen and 44 of the cases were severe and mild preeclampsia, respectively. There was no significant difference in PDW and MPV between the preeclamptic and control women. Both PC and PC to MPV ratios were significantly lower in the women with preeclampsia compared with the controls. There was no significant difference in the PC, PDW, MPV, and PC to MPV ratio when women with mild and severe preeclampsia were compared. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, the PC cutoff was 248.0×10(3)/µL for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia (P=0.019; the area under the ROC curve was 62.4%). Binary regression suggests that women with PC preeclampsia (odds ratio =2.2, 95% confidence interval =1.08-4.6, P=0.03). The PC/MPV cutoff was 31.2 for diagnosis of preeclampsia (P=0.035, the area under the ROC curve was 62.2%). PC preeclampsia.

  7. Pooled platelet concentrates: an alternative to single donor apheresis platelets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietersz, R N I

    2009-10-01

    Three types of platelet concentrates (PC) are compared: PC either processed with the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or the Buffy coat (BC) method from whole blood units and PC obtained by apheresis. Leuko-reduction (LR) pre-storage is advocated to improve quality of the PC during storage and reduce adverse reactions in recipients. Standardization of methods allow preparation of PC with comparable yields of approximately 400 x 10(9) platelets in pooled non-LR-PRP, approximately 370 x 10(9) in pooled LR-BC-PC and in LR apheresis PC the number of platelets can be targeted on 350 x 10(9) or more with devices of various manufacturers. While viral transmission can be prevented by outstanding laboratory tests, the risk of bacterial contamination should be reduced by improved arm disinfection, deviation of the first 20-30 ml of blood and culture or rapid detection assays of the PC pre-issue. In a large prospective multicenter trial no significant difference was observed between cultures of apheresis PC (n = 15,198): 0.09% confirmed positive units versus 0.06% in pooled BC-PC (n = 37,045), respectively. Though platelet activation as measured by CD62 expression may differ in vitro in PC obtained with various apheresis equipment, and also between PC processed with the two whole blood methods there is scarce literature about the clinical impact of these findings. In conclusion the final products of LR-PC derived from whole blood or obtained by apheresis can be comparable, provided the critical steps of the processing method are identified and covered and the process is in control.

  8. Effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalovidouris, A.E.; Papayannis, A.G. (Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece))

    1981-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function was investigated in vitro. Platelet-rich plasma (300x10/sup 9//l) was irradiated with doses of 1, 4, 10, 20 and 50 Gy. Platelet function tests were performed on both irradiated and control (non-irradiated) platelet samples. The platelet function tests were (1) platelet aggregation by ADP (1, 2, 4 ..mu..mol final concentration), adrenaline and collagen, (2) ADP-release from platelets, (3) clot retraction and (4) platelet factor-3 availability. It was found that roentgen irradiation of platelets in vitro did not affect these platelet function tests.

  9. Platelets: crossroads of immunity and hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenne, Craig N

    2014-07-31

    In this issue of Blood, Koupenova and colleagues report that platelets express functional TOLL-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and contribute to host survival during viral infection. Through a series of experiments utilizing mice deficient for TLR7 together with adoptive transfer of wild-type platelets, Koupenova et al demonstrate that platelets specifically respond to viral analogs and intact virus, leading to platelet activation and binding to various leukocyte subsets. Perhaps most importantly, this platelet activation appears absolutely essential for host survival during infection with some viral pathogens such as encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV).

  10. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzano, D; Hwang, K; Catalano, P; Aster, R H

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 = 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets = 7.57 mu3, LD platelets = 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  11. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  12. Sources of hyperbolic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Stillwell, John

    1996-01-01

    This book presents, for the first time in English, the papers of Beltrami, Klein, and Poincaré that brought hyperbolic geometry into the mainstream of mathematics. A recognition of Beltrami comparable to that given the pioneering works of Bolyai and Lobachevsky seems long overdue-not only because Beltrami rescued hyperbolic geometry from oblivion by proving it to be logically consistent, but because he gave it a concrete meaning (a model) that made hyperbolic geometry part of ordinary mathematics. The models subsequently discovered by Klein and Poincaré brought hyperbolic geometry even further down to earth and paved the way for the current explosion of activity in low-dimensional geometry and topology. By placing the works of these three mathematicians side by side and providing commentaries, this book gives the student, historian, or professional geometer a bird's-eye view of one of the great episodes in mathematics. The unified setting and historical context reveal the insights of Beltrami, Klein, and Po...

  13. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by a traversable wormhole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nasr Esfahani

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available   Replacing the wormhole geometry with an equivalent medium using the perturbation theory of scattering and the Born approximation, we have calculated the differential scattering cross section of electromagnetic waves by a traversable wormhole. It is shown that scattering at long wavelenghts can essentially distinguish wormhole from ordinary scattering object. Some of the zeros of the scattering cross section are determined which can be used for estimating the radius of the throat of wormholes. The known result that in this kind of scattering the linear polarization remains unchanged is verified here.

  14. Platelets: bridging hemostasis, inflammation, and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenne, C N; Urrutia, R; Kubes, P

    2013-06-01

    Although the function of platelets in the maintenance of hemostasis has been studied in great detail, more recent evidence has highlighted a central role for platelets in the host inflammatory and immune responses. Platelets by virtue of their large numbers and their ability to rapidly release a broad spectrum of immunomodulatory cytokines, chemokines, and other mediators act as circulating sentinels. Upon detection of a pathogen, platelets quickly activate and begin to drive the ensuing inflammatory response. Platelets have the ability to directly modulate the activity of neutrophils (phagocytosis, oxidative burst), endothelium (adhesion molecule and chemokine expression), and lymphocytes. Due to their diverse array of adhesion molecules and preformed chemokines, platelets are able to adhere to leukocytes and facilitate their recruitment to sites of tissue damage or infection. Furthermore, platelets directly participate in the capture and sequestration of pathogens within the vasculature. Platelet-neutrophil interactions are known to induce the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in response to either bacterial or viral infection, and platelets have been shown to internalize pathogens, sequestering them in engulfment vacuoles. Finally, emerging data indicate that platelets also participate in the host immune response by directly killing infected cells. This review will highlight the central role platelets play in the initiation and modulation of the host inflammatory and immune responses.

  15. Calpain Activator Dibucaine Induces Platelet Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-dependent calpains are a family of cysteine proteases that have been demonstrated to play key roles in both platelet glycoprotein Ibα shedding and platelet activation and altered calpain activity is associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Calpain activators induce apoptosis in several types of nucleated cells. However, it is not clear whether calpain activators induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that the calpain activator dibucaine induced several platelet apoptotic events including depolarization of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, up-regulation of Bax and Bak, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, caspase-3 activation and phosphatidylserine exposure. Platelet apoptosis elicited by dibucaine was not affected by the broad spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Furthermore, dibucaine did not induce platelet activation as detected by P-selectin expression and PAC-1 binding. However, platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin or α-thrombin, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor were significantly inhibited in platelets treated with dibucaine. Taken together, these data indicate that dibucaine induces platelet apoptosis and platelet dysfunction.

  16. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  17. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  18. Seismic scatterers in the mid-lower mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshima, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    Recent seismological studies have revealed that rocks with significantly different elastic properties are juxtaposed in the mid-lower mantle and often scatter seismic waves efficiently enough to be detected by seismic array analyses. Seismic networks all over the world with various aperture and geometry have been utilized for detecting scattered waves. A large number of objects that act as scatterers in the mid-lower mantle have been mapped out by analyzing several different types of scattered waves, mostly of short period: S-to-P scattering, P-to-P scattering prior to PP waves, P-to-P scattering prior to P‧P‧, P-to-P scattering in P coda waves, and P-to-P scattering prior to PKP. The scatterers have a lesser size that is smaller than the wavelengths (∼10 km), and probably extend several tens of kilometers at least. The mid-mantle scatterers are most likely to represent basaltic rocks that subducted into the lower mantle. Revealing the elastic properties relative to the surrounding rocks and the geometry of the individual scatterers, as well as the global distribution of the scatterers, should shed new light on the style of mantle convection. Relevant observations of mid-lower mantle scatterers are reviewed, and the directions of future progress are suggested.

  19. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhihao; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2014-01-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geo...

  20. Computational synthetic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bokowski, Jürgen

    1989-01-01

    Computational synthetic geometry deals with methods for realizing abstract geometric objects in concrete vector spaces. This research monograph considers a large class of problems from convexity and discrete geometry including constructing convex polytopes from simplicial complexes, vector geometries from incidence structures and hyperplane arrangements from oriented matroids. It turns out that algorithms for these constructions exist if and only if arbitrary polynomial equations are decidable with respect to the underlying field. Besides such complexity theorems a variety of symbolic algorithms are discussed, and the methods are applied to obtain new mathematical results on convex polytopes, projective configurations and the combinatorics of Grassmann varieties. Finally algebraic varieties characterizing matroids and oriented matroids are introduced providing a new basis for applying computer algebra methods in this field. The necessary background knowledge is reviewed briefly. The text is accessible to stud...

  1. Supersymmetry and noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Beenakker, Wim; Suijlekom, Walter D van

    2016-01-01

    In this work the question whether noncommutative geometry allows for supersymmetric theories is addressed. Noncommutative geometry has seen remarkable applications in high energy physics, viz. the geometrical interpretation of the Standard Model, however such a question has not been answered in a conclusive way so far. The book starts with a systematic analysis of the possibilities for so-called almost-commutative geometries on a 4-dimensional, flat background to exhibit not only a particle content that is eligible for supersymmetry, but also have a supersymmetric action. An approach is proposed in which the basic `building blocks' of potentially supersymmetric theories and the demands for their action to be supersymmetric are identified. It is then described how a novel kind of soft supersymmetry breaking Lagrangian arises naturally from the spectral action. Finally, the above formalism is applied to explore the existence of a noncommutative version of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. This book is ...

  2. Universality of geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wetterich, C

    2012-01-01

    In models of emergent gravity the metric arises as the expectation value of some collective field. Usually, many different collective fields with appropriate tensor properties are candidates for a metric. Which collective field describes the "physical geometry"? We resolve this "metric ambiguity" by an investigation of the most general form of the quantum effective action for several metrics. In the long-distance limit the physical metric is universal and accounts for a massless graviton. Other degrees of freedom contained in the various metric candidates describe very massive scalars and symmetric second rank tensors. They only play a role at microscopic distances, typically around the Planck length. The universality of geometry at long distances extends to the vierbein and the connection. On the other hand, for distances and time intervals of Planck size geometry looses its universal meaning. Time is born with the big bang.

  3. Geometry of hypersurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cecil, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    This exposition provides the state-of-the art on the differential geometry of hypersurfaces in real, complex, and quaternionic space forms. Special emphasis is placed on isoparametric and Dupin hypersurfaces in real space forms as well as Hopf hypersurfaces in complex space forms. The book is accessible to a reader who has completed a one-year graduate course in differential geometry. The text, including open problems and an extensive list of references, is an excellent resource for researchers in this area. Geometry of Hypersurfaces begins with the basic theory of submanifolds in real space forms. Topics include shape operators, principal curvatures and foliations, tubes and parallel hypersurfaces, curvature spheres and focal submanifolds. The focus then turns to the theory of isoparametric hypersurfaces in spheres. Important examples and classification results are given, including the construction of isoparametric hypersurfaces based on representations of Clifford algebras. An in-depth treatment of Dupin hy...

  4. Complex differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Fangyang

    2002-01-01

    The theory of complex manifolds overlaps with several branches of mathematics, including differential geometry, algebraic geometry, several complex variables, global analysis, topology, algebraic number theory, and mathematical physics. Complex manifolds provide a rich class of geometric objects, for example the (common) zero locus of any generic set of complex polynomials is always a complex manifold. Yet complex manifolds behave differently than generic smooth manifolds; they are more coherent and fragile. The rich yet restrictive character of complex manifolds makes them a special and interesting object of study. This book is a self-contained graduate textbook that discusses the differential geometric aspects of complex manifolds. The first part contains standard materials from general topology, differentiable manifolds, and basic Riemannian geometry. The second part discusses complex manifolds and analytic varieties, sheaves and holomorphic vector bundles, and gives a brief account of the surface classifi...

  5. Integral Geometry and Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Czech, Bartlomiej; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-01-01

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we...

  6. Lectures on discrete geometry

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Discrete geometry investigates combinatorial properties of configurations of geometric objects. To a working mathematician or computer scientist, it offers sophisticated results and techniques of great diversity and it is a foundation for fields such as computational geometry or combinatorial optimization. This book is primarily a textbook introduction to various areas of discrete geometry. In each area, it explains several key results and methods, in an accessible and concrete manner. It also contains more advanced material in separate sections and thus it can serve as a collection of surveys in several narrower subfields. The main topics include: basics on convex sets, convex polytopes, and hyperplane arrangements; combinatorial complexity of geometric configurations; intersection patterns and transversals of convex sets; geometric Ramsey-type results; polyhedral combinatorics and high-dimensional convexity; and lastly, embeddings of finite metric spaces into normed spaces. Jiri Matousek is Professor of Com...

  7. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  8. Platelet-mediated cytotoxicity and its enhancement by platelet activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykovskaya, S N; Bolvacheva, A V; Kiselevsky, M V; Khaylenko, V A; Bykovsky, A F

    1991-01-01

    Platelet cytotoxicity was assessed in 70 cancer patients with various tumor localizations and in 30 normal donors. The data presented reveal that the ACL cell line displays the highest sensitivity to platelet cytotoxicity. Using the ACL cells, we discovered that platelets from oncological patients and normal donors display comparable cytotoxicity. The level of platelet lytic activity is irrelevant to tumor localisation; however, it appears to be dependent on the stage of tumor growth. Incubation of platelets, both from donors and patients, with PAF (concentration range 10 pM to 10 nM) results in a significant rise of the killing activity of platelets. PAF induces greater cytotoxicity enhancement for platelets with lower initial activity, this pattern appearing to be the specific feature of the PAF mediated effect. Hence, platelets can be considered as effector cells relevant to antitumor immunity; PAF-mediated enhancement of platelet cytotoxicity can appear to be useful in the search for new immunotherapeutic drugs.

  9. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paniccia R

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rita Paniccia,1,2 Raffaella Priora,1,2 Agatina Alessandrello Liotta,2 Rosanna Abbate1,2 1Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Thrombosis Center, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Heart and Vessels, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy Abstract: In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]. POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well

  10. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  11. The Geometry of Conventionality

    CERN Document Server

    Weatherall, James Owen

    2013-01-01

    Hans Reichenbach famously argued that the geometry of spacetime is conventional in relativity theory, in the sense that one can freely choose the spacetime metric so long as one is willing to postulate a "universal force field". Here we make precise a sense in which the field Reichenbach defines fails to be a "force". We then argue that there is an interesting and perhaps tenable sense in which geometry is conventional in classical spacetimes. We conclude with a no-go result showing that the variety of conventionalism available in classical spacetimes does not extend to relativistic spacetimes.

  12. A programmer's geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowyer, Adrian

    1983-01-01

    A Programmer's Geometry provides a guide in programming geometric shapes. The book presents formulas and examples of computer representation and coding of geometry. Each of the nine chapters of the text deals with the representation and solution of a specific geometrical problem, such as areas, vectors, and volumes. The last chapter provides a brief discussion on generating image through a computer. The codes presented in the book are written in FORTRAN 77. The text will be of great use to programmers who are working on projects that involve geometric calculations.

  13. Geometry and symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Yale, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the geometry of Euclidean, affine, and projective spaces with special emphasis on the important groups of symmetries of these spaces. The two major objectives of the text are to introduce the main ideas of affine and projective spaces and to develop facility in handling transformations and groups of transformations. Since there are many good texts on affine and projective planes, the author has concentrated on the n-dimensional cases.Designed to be used in advanced undergraduate mathematics or physics courses, the book focuses on ""practical geometry,"" emphasi

  14. Non-Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhart, L P

    1927-01-01

    The use of the differential geometry of a Riemannian space in the mathematical formulation of physical theories led to important developments in the geometry of such spaces. The concept of parallelism of vectors, as introduced by Levi-Civita, gave rise to a theory of the affine properties of a Riemannian space. Covariant differentiation, as developed by Christoffel and Ricci, is a fundamental process in this theory. Various writers, notably Eddington, Einstein and Weyl, in their efforts to formulate a combined theory of gravitation and electromagnetism, proposed a simultaneous generalization o

  15. In vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Platelets are routinely isolated from whole blood and stored in plasma for 5 days. This study was done to assess the in vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution at 22°C. Materials and Methods: The study sample included 30 blood donors of both sex in State Blood Bank, C S M Medical University, Lucknow. Random donor platelets were prepared by the platelet-rich plasma method. Whole blood (350 ml was collected in anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Dextrose Adenine triple blood bags. Random donor platelets were stored for 7 days at 22°C in platelet incubators and agitators with and without additive solution. Results: Platelet swirling was present in all the units at 22°C on day 7 with no evidence of bacterial contamination. Comparison of the mean values of platelet count, platelet factor 3, lactate dehydrogenase, pH, glucose and platelet aggregation showed no significant difference in additive solution while platelet factor 3, glucose and platelet aggregation showed significant difference (P < 0.001 on day 7 without additive solution at 22°C. Conclusion: Our study infers that the platelet viability and aggregation were the best maintained within normal levels on day 7 of storage in platelet additive solution at 22°C. Thus, we may conclude that in vitro storage of random donor platelets with an extended shelf life of 7 days using platelet additive solution may be advocated to improve the inventory of platelets.

  16. Azimuthal effects in grazing surface scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin, A. E-mail: arobin@uos.de; Jensen, J.; Heiland, W

    2003-06-01

    We report on surface scattering experiments in the MeV regime. N{sup q+} (q=1, 2) ions with 0.7-1.4 MeV are scattered off a single-crystalline Pt(110)(1x2) surface under grazing incidence and specular reflection geometry. We investigate the energy loss dependency on the azimuthal angle under variation of the perpendicular energy.

  17. Platelet receptors and patient responses: The contributions of Professor Stan Heptinstall to platelet research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemetson, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Stan Heptinstall's contributions to platelet research covered organising meetings at the national and European level as well as starting and maintaining the journal "Platelets". The major part of his research addressed problems of inhibition of platelet receptors and the effects of this on patient health. In particular, the effects of P2Y12 inhibitors on patients with acute cardiovascular problems were a major focus. Other studies included the effects of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) extracts on platelets, of direct anti-IIb/IIIa receptor (αIIbβ3) inhibitors and of prostanoids on platelet function. Recently, methods for assessing the effectiveness of platelet inhibition were investigated.

  18. Modification of Pulsed Electric Field Conditions Results in Distinct Activation Profiles of Platelet-Rich Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelinger, Andrew L.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Garner, Allen L.; Torres, Andrew S.; Caiafa, Antonio; Morton, Christine A.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neculaes, V. Bogdan; Michelson, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) used in therapeutic wound healing applications is poorly characterized and standardized. Using pulsed electric fields (PEF) to activate platelets may reduce variability and eliminate complications associated with the use of bovine thrombin. We previously reported that exposing PRP to sub-microsecond duration, high electric field (SMHEF) pulses generates a greater number of platelet-derived microparticles, increased expression of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, and differential release of growth factors compared to thrombin. Moreover, the platelet releasate produced by SMHEF pulses induced greater cell proliferation than plasma. Aims To determine whether sub-microsecond duration, low electric field (SMLEF) bipolar pulses results in differential activation of PRP compared to SMHEF, with respect to profiles of activation markers, growth factor release, and cell proliferation capacity. Methods PRP activation by SMLEF bipolar pulses was compared to SMHEF pulses and bovine thrombin. PRP was prepared using the Harvest SmartPreP2 System from acid citrate dextrose anticoagulated healthy donor blood. PEF activation by either SMHEF or SMLEF pulses was performed using a standard electroporation cuvette preloaded with CaCl2 and a prototype instrument designed to take into account the electrical properties of PRP. Flow cytometry was used to assess platelet surface P-selectin expression, and annexin V binding. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial growth factor (EGF) and platelet factor 4 (PF4), and were measured by ELISA. The ability of supernatants to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture was also evaluated. Controls included vehicle-treated, unactivated PRP and PRP with 10 mM CaCl2 activated with 1 U/mL bovine thrombin. Results PRP activated with SMLEF bipolar pulses or thrombin had similar light scatter profiles, consistent with the

  19. Interactions of gallic acid, resveratrol, quercetin and aspirin at the platelet cyclooxygenase-1 level. Functional and modelling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescente, Marilena; Jessen, Gisela; Momi, Stefania; Höltje, Hans-Dieter; Gresele, Paolo; Cerletti, Chiara; de Gaetano, Giovanni

    2009-08-01

    While resveratrol and quercetin possess antiplatelet activity, little is known on the effect of gallic acid on platelets. We studied the interactions of these three different polyphenols among themselves and with aspirin, at the level of platelet cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1). Both functional (in vitro and in vivo) and molecular modelling approaches were used. All three polyphenols showed comparable antioxidant activity (arachidonic acid [AA]-induced intraplatelet ROS production); however, resveratrol and quercetin, but not gallic acid, inhibited AA-induced platelet aggregation. Gallic acid, similarly to salicylic acid, the major aspirin metabolite, prevented inhibition of AA-induced platelet function by aspirin but, at variance with salicylic acid, also prevented inhibition by the other two polyphenols. Molecular modelling studies, performed by in silico docking the polyphenols into the crystal structure of COX-1, suggested that all compounds form stable complexes into the COX-1 channel, with slightly different but functionally relevant interaction geometries. Experiments in mice showed that gallic acid administered before aspirin, resveratrol or quercetin fully prevented their inhibitory effect on serum TxB(2). Finally, a mixture of resveratrol, quercetin and gallic acid, at relative concentrations similar to those contained in most red wines, did not inhibit platelet aggregation, but potentiated sub-inhibitory concentrations of aspirin. Gallic acid interactions with other polyphenols or aspirin at the level of platelet COX-1 might partly explain the complex, and possibly contrasting, effects of wine and other components of the Mediterranean diet on platelets and on the pharmacologic effect of low-dose aspirin.

  20. Platelet count and platelet indices in women with preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    AlSheeha MA; Alaboudi RS; Alghasham MA; Iqbal J; Adam I

    2016-01-01

    Muneera A AlSheeha,1 Rafi S Alaboudi,1 Mohammad A Alghasham,1 Javed Iqbal,2 Ishag Adam1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine, Qassim University, Buriadah, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maternity and Children’s Hospital, Qassim, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Although the exact pathophysiology of preeclampsia is not completely understood, the utility of different platelets indices can be utilized to predict preeclampsia.Obj...

  1. Pathogen-Reduced, Platelet Additive Solution, Extended Stored Platelets (PREPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    associated sepsis remains the principal lethal risk associated with platelet transfusion. Cold storage (4°C) is known to reduce post transfusion...and no residual radiation is detectable . *P-selectin samples will be prepped on end of storage day and batch tested. **Bacterial Culture sample...temperature controlled room until such time as they have no detectable residual radiation. This is generally about 3-4 months. At that point they are

  2. Universal correlators from geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, Robbert [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Korteweg-de Vries Institute for Mathematics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Temuerhan, Mine; Sinkovics, Annamaria [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: sinkovic@science.uva.nl

    2004-11-01

    Matrix model correlators show universal behaviour at short distances. We provide a derivation for these universal correlators by inserting probe branes in the underlying effective geometry. We generalize these results to study correlators of branes and their universal behaviour in the Calabi-Yau crystals, where we find a role for a generalized brane insertion. (author)

  3. Universal Correlators from Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Sinkovics, Annamaria; Temurhan, Mine

    2004-11-01

    Matrix model correlators show universal behaviour at short distances. We provide a derivation for these universal correlators by inserting probe branes in the underlying effective geometry. We generalize these results to study correlators of branes and their universal behaviour in the Calabi-Yau crystals, where we find a role for a generalized brane insertion.

  4. Universal Correlators from Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkgraaf, R; Temurhan, M; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Sinkovics, Annamaria; Temurhan, Mine

    2004-01-01

    Matrix model correlators show universal behaviour at short distances. We provide a derivation for these universal correlators by inserting probe branes in the underlying effective geometry. We generalize these results to study correlators of branes and their universal behaviour in the Calabi-Yau crystals, where we find a role for a generalized brane insertion.

  5. Geometry and physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  6. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  7. Diophantine geometry an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Hindry, Marc

    2000-01-01

    This is an introduction to diophantine geometry at the advanced graduate level. The book contains a proof of the Mordell conjecture which will make it quite attractive to graduate students and professional mathematicians. In each part of the book, the reader will find numerous exercises.

  8. Towards relativistic quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridao, Luis Santiago [Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mar del Plata (Argentina); Bellini, Mauricio, E-mail: mbellini@mdp.edu.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, C.P. 7600, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2015-12-17

    We obtain a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum geometry by using a Weylian-like manifold with a geometric scalar field which provides a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum theory in which the algebra of the Weylian-like field depends on observers. An example for a Reissner–Nordström black-hole is studied.

  9. Advanced geometries and regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, S. S. [Univeristy of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Bulanov, S. V. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Turchetti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna, Via Irnerio, 46-I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J. [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines/HiLASE project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague, Czech Republic and Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Brehova 7, 115 19 Prague (Czech Republic); Antici, P. [Dipartimento di Energetica ed INFM, Università di Roma, La Sapienza, 00165 Roma (Italy); Margarone, D.; Korn, G. [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines/HiLASE project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-26

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project.

  10. Emergent Hyperbolic Network Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    A large variety of interacting complex systems are characterized by interactions occurring between more than two nodes. These systems are described by simplicial complexes. Simplicial complexes are formed by simplices (nodes, links, triangles, tetrahedra etc.) that have a natural geometric interpretation. As such simplicial complexes are widely used in quantum gravity approaches that involve a discretization of spacetime. Here, by extending our knowledge of growing complex networks to growing simplicial complexes we investigate the nature of the emergent geometry of complex networks and explore whether this geometry is hyperbolic. Specifically we show that an hyperbolic network geometry emerges spontaneously from models of growing simplicial complexes that are purely combinatorial. The statistical and geometrical properties of the growing simplicial complexes strongly depend on their dimensionality and display the major universal properties of real complex networks (scale-free degree distribution, small-world and communities) at the same time. Interestingly, when the network dynamics includes an heterogeneous fitness of the faces, the growing simplicial complex can undergo phase transitions that are reflected by relevant changes in the network geometry.

  11. Spacetime and Euclidean Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Brill, D R; Brill, Dieter; Jacobson, Ted

    2004-01-01

    Using only the principle of relativity and Euclidean geometry we show in this pedagogical article that the square of proper time or length in a two-dimensional spacetime diagram is proportional to the Euclidean area of the corresponding causal domain. We use this relation to derive the Minkowski line element by two geometric proofs of the "spacetime Pythagoras theorem".

  12. Spacetime and Euclidean geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Dieter; Jacobson, Ted

    2006-04-01

    Using only the principle of relativity and Euclidean geometry we show in this pedagogical article that the square of proper time or length in a two-dimensional spacetime diagram is proportional to the Euclidean area of the corresponding causal domain. We use this relation to derive the Minkowski line element by two geometric proofs of the spacetime Pythagoras theorem.

  13. Towards a Nano Geometry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booss-Bavnbek, Bernhelm

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies I.M. Gelfand's distinction between adequate and non-adequate use of mathematical language in different contexts to the newly opened window of model-based measurements of intracellular dynamics. The specifics of geometry and dynamics on the mesoscale of cell physiology are elabo...

  14. Origami, Geometry and Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Arsalan; Elstak, Iwan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the mathematics that emanates from the construction of an origami box. We first construct a simple origami box from a rectangular sheet and then discuss some of the mathematical questions that arise in the context of geometry and algebra. The activity can be used as a context for illustrating how algebra…

  15. Geometry Euclid and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Hartshorne, Robin

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, I have been teaching a junior-senior-level course on the classi­ cal geometries. This book has grown out of that teaching experience. I assume only high-school geometry and some abstract algebra. The course begins in Chapter 1 with a critical examination of Euclid's Elements. Students are expected to read concurrently Books I-IV of Euclid's text, which must be obtained sepa­ rately. The remainder of the book is an exploration of questions that arise natu­ rally from this reading, together with their modern answers. To shore up the foundations we use Hilbert's axioms. The Cartesian plane over a field provides an analytic model of the theory, and conversely, we see that one can introduce coordinates into an abstract geometry. The theory of area is analyzed by cutting figures into triangles. The algebra of field extensions provides a method for deciding which geometrical constructions are possible. The investigation of the parallel postulate leads to the various non-Euclidean geometries. And ...

  16. History of analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Carl B

    2012-01-01

    Designed as an integrated survey of the development of analytic geometry, this study presents the concepts and contributions from before the Alexandrian Age through the eras of the great French mathematicians Fermat and Descartes, and on through Newton and Euler to the "Golden Age," from 1789 to 1850.

  17. Origami, Geometry and Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Arsalan; Elstak, Iwan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the mathematics that emanates from the construction of an origami box. We first construct a simple origami box from a rectangular sheet and then discuss some of the mathematical questions that arise in the context of geometry and algebra. The activity can be used as a context for illustrating how algebra…

  18. Multiple Scattering: Dispersion, Temperature Dependence, and Annular Pistons

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, Kimball A; Parashar, Prachi; Cavero-Pelaez, Ines; Brevik, Iver; Ellingsen, Simen A

    2010-01-01

    We review various applications of the multiple scattering approach to the calculation of Casimir forces between separate bodies, including dispersion, wedge geometries, annular pistons, and temperature dependence. Exact results are obtained in many cases.

  19. X-ray diffraction with novel geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopiou, Danae [Department of Engineering and Applied Science Cranfield University, Shrivenham Campus, Swindon (United Kingdom); Rogers, Keith, E-mail: k.d.rogers@cranfield.ac.uk [Department of Engineering and Applied Science Cranfield University, Shrivenham Campus, Swindon (United Kingdom); Evans, Paul; Godber, Simon [Imaging Science Group, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University Clifton Campus, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Shackel, James [Department of Engineering and Applied Science Cranfield University, Shrivenham Campus, Swindon (United Kingdom); Dicken, Anthony [Imaging Science Group, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University Clifton Campus, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-21

    An innovative geometry for high efficiency harvesting of diffracted X-rays is explored. Further to previous work where planar samples were fixed normal to the primary axis, this work extends focal construct geometry (FCG), to samples randomly oriented with respect to the incident beam. The effect of independent sample rotation around two axes upon the scattering distributions was investigated in analytical, simulation and empirical manners. It was found that, although the profile of Bragg maxima were modified when the sample was rotated, high intensity diffraction data was still acquired. Modelling produced a good match to the empirical data and it was shown that the distortions caused by sample rotation were not severe and predictable even when sample rotations were large. The implications for this are discussed.

  20. Detection of microbial contamination in platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Tracy L.; Leparc, German; Huffman, Debra E.; Gennaccaro, Angela L.; Garcia-Lopez, Alicia; Klungness, Greta; Stephans, Christie; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2005-03-01

    In the United States, approximately 100 patients develop fatal sepsis associated with platelet transfusions every year. Current culture methods take 24-48 hours to acquire results, which in turn decrease the shelf life of platelets. Many of the microorganisms that contaminate platelets can replicate easily at room temperature, which is the necessary storage temperature to keep platelets functional. Therefore, there is a need for in-situ quality control assessment of the platelet quality. For this purpose, a real time spectrophotometric technique has been developed. The Spectral Acquisition Processing Detection (SAPD) method, comprised of a UV-vis spectrophotometer and modeling algorithms, is a rapid method that can be performed prior to platelet transfusion to decrease the risk of bacterial infection to patients. The SAPD method has been used to determine changes in cell suspensions, based on size, shape, chemical composition and internal structure. Changes in these cell characteristics can in turn be used to determine microbial contamination, platelet aging and other physiologic changes. Detection limits of this method for platelet suspensions seeded with bacterial contaminants were identified to be less than 100 cfu/ml of sample. Bacterial counts below 1000 cfu/ml are not considered clinically significant. The SAPD method can provide real-time identification of bacterial contamination of platelets affording patients an increased level of safety without causing undue strain on laboratory budgets or personnel while increasing the time frame that platelets can be used by dramatically shortening contaminant detection time.

  1. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Manasa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platelets were stored for 12 days at 22°C. OS markers such as aggregation, superoxides, reactive oxygen species, glucose, pH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes were assessed. OS increased during storage as indicated by increments in aggregation, superoxides, pH, conjugate dienes, and superoxide dismutase and decrements in glucose and catalase. Thus, platelets could endure OS till 6 days during storage, due to the antioxidant defense system. An evident increase in OS was observed from day 8 of storage, which can diminish the platelet efficacy. The present study provides an insight into the gradual changes occurring during platelet storage. This lays the foundation towards new possibilities of employing various antioxidants as additives in storage solutions.

  2. Effects of Physical (Inactivity on Platelet Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Heber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (inactivity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects’ cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality.

  3. Trehalose lyophilized platelets for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietramaggiori, Giorgio; Kaipainen, Arja; Ho, David; Orser, Cindy; Pebley, Walter; Rudolph, Alan; Orgill, Dennis P

    2007-01-01

    Fresh platelet preparations are utilized to treat a wide variety of wounds, although storage limitations and mixed results have hampered their clinical use. We hypothesized that concentrated lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations, preserved with trehalose, maintain and possibly enhance fresh platelets' ability to improve wound healing. We studied the ability of a single dose of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets to enhance wound healing when topically applied on full-thickness wounds in the genetically diabetic mouse. We compared these results with the application of multiple doses of fresh platelet preparations and trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets as well as multiple doses of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and wounds left untreated. Trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets, in single and multiple applications, multiple applications of fresh platelets and multiple applications of VEGF increased granulation tissue deposition, vascularity, and proliferation when compared with untreated wounds, as assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Wounds treated with multiple doses of VEGF and a single dose of freeze-dried platelets reached 90% closure faster than wounds left untreated. A single administration of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations enhanced diabetic wound healing, therefore representing a promising strategy for the treatment of nonhealing wounds.

  4. Small RNAs as potential platelet therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Leonard C; Bray, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 21-23 nucleotide RNAs that regulate more than 60% of mammalian protein coding genes. miRNAs play critical roles in hematopoiesis and megakaryocyte function and development. Platelets, in addition to possessing functional miRNA processing machinery, have miRNA levels that have been correlated with platelet reactivity, and these miRNAs have been shown to target mRNAs that encode proteins that alter platelet function. There are potential uses of platelet miRNA as biomarkers and therapeutic agents. Due to the ability of platelets to release miRNA-containing microparticles at sites of activation, including angiogenic regions, tumors, and atherosclerotic plaques, there is the possibility of engineering platelets to deliver miRNA-based therapies to these sites. Cellpreferential expression of miRNAs could be exploited to restrict transgene expression in hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy to the desired lineage, including megakaryocytes and platelets. Finally, manipulation of gene expression in stored platelets may allow more effective platelet storage. Although much work remains to be done, there is great potential in miRNA-based platelet therapies.

  5. Platelet MicroRNAs: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Neetu; Sarachana, Tewarit; Vu, Long; Becker, Kevin G; Wood, William H; Zhang, Yongqing; Atreya, Chintamani D

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22-nucleotide noncoding RNA that have been found to influence the expression of many genes and cellular processes by either repressing translation or degrading messenger RNA transcripts. Platelet miRNA expression has been shown to be perturbed during ex vivo storage of platelets and in platelet-associated disorders. Although bioinformatics-based miRNA target predictions have been established, direct experimental validation of the role of miRNAs in platelet biology has been rather slow. Target prediction studies are, nonetheless, valuable in directing the design of appropriate experiments to test specific miRNA:messenger RNA interactions relevant to the underlying mechanisms of platelet function in general and in disease as well as in ex vivo storage-associated "storage lesions," a collective term used to include physiologic, biochemical, and morphologic changes that occur in stored platelets. This brief review will focus on emerging human platelet miRNA studies to emphasize their potential role relevant to transfusion medicine field in terms of regulating platelet signaling pathways, markers of platelet associated disorders, and remote impactors of gene expression (intercellular biomodulators) as well as potential platelet quality markers of storage and pathogen reduction treatments.

  6. Understanding platelet function through signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Alan H; Song, Seng; Crow, Andrew R

    2003-01-01

    Platelets are activated by a number of stimuli resulting in the expression and/or activation of surface receptors, secretion of vasoactive substances, adhesion, aggregation, and finally thrombus formation. These events are propagated by a process known as transmembrane signaling, which relays the activating signal from the platelet membrane (eg, von Willebrand Factor binding to glycoprotein Ib) to the inside of the platelet which then serves to activate the platelet via a cascade of biochemical interactions. Inhibition of these transmembrane signaling molecules with a variety of available inhibitors or antagonists can in many cases prevent the platelet from becoming activated. An awareness of the mechanisms involved in platelet transmembrane signaling and the recent availability of new reagents to inhibit signaling may provide us with additional means to prevent platelet activation and perhaps even ameliorate the platelet storage lesion. This review will provide an introduction to the field of platelet transmembrane signaling and give an overview of some of the platelet signaling mechanisms that are relevant to transfusion medicine. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  7. An introduction to Minkowski geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, David L.

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental ideas of Minkowski geometries are presented. Learning about Minkowski geometries can sharpen our students' understanding of concepts such as distance measurement. Many of its ideas are important and accessible to undergraduate students. Following a brief overview, distance and orthogonality in Minkowski geometries are thoroughly discussed and many illustrative examples and applications are supplied. Suggestions for further study of these geometries are given. Indeed, Minkowski geometries are an excellent source of topics for undergraduate research and independent study.

  8. Platelet destruction in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura: kinetics and clearance of indium-111-labeled autologous platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, J.R.; Ballem, P.J.; Gernsheimer, T.; Cerqueira, M.; Slichter, S.J.

    1989-05-01

    Using autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets, platelet kinetics and the sites of platelet destruction were assessed in 16 normal subjects (13 with and three without spleens), in 17 studies of patients with primary autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP), in six studies of patients with secondary AITP, in ten studies of patients with AITP following splenectomy, and in five thrombocytopenic patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In normal subjects, the spleen accounted for 24 +/- 4% of platelet destruction and the liver for 15 +/- 2%. Untreated patients with primary AITP had increased splenic destruction (40 +/- 14%, p less than 0.001) but not hepatic destruction (13 +/- 5%). Compared with untreated patients, prednisone treated patients did not have significantly different spleen and liver platelet sequestration. Patients with secondary AITP had similar platelet counts, platelet survivals, and increases in splenic destruction of platelets as did patients with primary AITP. In contrast, patients with myelodysplastic syndromes had a normal pattern of platelet destruction. In AITP patients following splenectomy, the five nonresponders all had a marked increase (greater than 45%) in liver destruction compared to five responders (all less than 40%). Among all patients with primary or secondary AITP, there was an inverse relationship between the percent of platelets destroyed in the liver plus spleen and both the platelet count (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001) and the platelet survival (r = 0.86, p less than 0.001). In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, total liver plus spleen platelet destruction, the platelet survival and the platelet turnover were all significant independent predictors of the platelet count. Thus platelet destruction is shifted to the spleen in primary and secondary AITP. Failure of splenectomy is associated with a marked elevation in liver destruction.

  9. Scattering theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Harald [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2013-08-01

    Written by the author of the widely acclaimed textbook. Theoretical Atomic Physics Includes sections on quantum reflection, tunable Feshbach resonances and Efimov states. Useful for advanced students and researchers. This book presents a concise and modern coverage of scattering theory. It is motivated by the fact that experimental advances have shifted and broadened the scope of applications where concepts from scattering theory are used, e.g. to the field of ultracold atoms and molecules, which has been experiencing enormous growth in recent years, largely triggered by the successful realization of Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute atomic gases in 1995. In the present treatment, special attention is given to the role played by the long-range behaviour of the projectile-target interaction, and a theory is developed, which is well suited to describe near-threshold bound and continuum states in realistic binary systems such as diatomic molecules or molecular ions. The level of abstraction is kept as low as at all possible, and deeper questions related to mathematical foundations of scattering theory are passed by. The book should be understandable for anyone with a basic knowledge of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. It is intended for advanced students and researchers, and it is hoped that it will be useful for theorists and experimentalists alike.

  10. Scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    This corrected and updated second edition of "Scattering Theory" presents a concise and modern coverage of the subject. In the present treatment, special attention is given to the role played by the long-range behaviour of the projectile-target interaction, and a theory is developed, which is well suited to describe near-threshold bound and continuum states in realistic binary systems such as diatomic molecules or molecular ions. It is motivated by the fact that experimental advances have shifted and broadened the scope of applications where concepts from scattering theory are used, e.g. to the field of ultracold atoms and molecules, which has been experiencing enormous growth in recent years, largely triggered by the successful realization of Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute atomic gases in 1995. The book contains sections on special topics such as near-threshold quantization, quantum reflection, Feshbach resonances and the quantum description of scattering in two dimensions. The level of abstraction is k...

  11. Scattering Correction For Image Reconstruction In Flash Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Liangzhi; Wang, Mengqi; Wu, Hongchun; Liu, Zhouyu; Cheng, Yuxiong; Zhang, Hongbo [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an (China)

    2013-08-15

    Scattered photons cause blurring and distortions in flash radiography, reducing the accuracy of image reconstruction significantly. The effect of the scattered photons is taken into account and an iterative deduction of the scattered photons is proposed to amend the scattering effect for image restoration. In order to deduct the scattering contribution, the flux of scattered photons is estimated as the sum of two components. The single scattered component is calculated accurately together with the uncollided flux along the characteristic ray, while the multiple scattered component is evaluated using correction coefficients pre-obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.The arbitrary geometry pretreatment and ray tracing are carried out based on the customization of AutoCAD. With the above model, an Iterative Procedure for image restORation code, IPOR, is developed. Numerical results demonstrate that the IPOR code is much more accurate than the direct reconstruction solution without scattering correction and it has a very high computational efficiency.

  12. Orientation and Relaxation of Polymer-clay Solutions Studied by Rheology and Small-angle Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malwitz, M. M. [Louisiana State University; Butler, Paul D [ORNL; Porcar, L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Angelette, D. P. [Louisiana State University; Schmidt, G. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    2004-01-01

    The influence of shear on viscoelastic solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and clay [montmorillonite, i.e., Cloisite NA+ (CNA)] was investigated with rheology and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The steady-state viscosity and SANS were used to measure the shear-induced orientation and relaxation of the polymer and clay platelets. Anisotropic scattering patterns developed at much lower shear rates than in pure clay solutions. The scattering anisotropy saturated at low shear rates, and the CNA clay platelets aligned with the flow, with the surface normal parallel to the gradient direction. The cessation of shear led to partial and slow randomization of the CNA platelets, whereas extremely fast relaxation was observed for laponite (LRD) platelets. These PEO-CNA networklike solutions were compared with previously reported PEO-LRD networks, and the differences and similarities, with respect to the shear orientation, relaxation, and polymer-clay interactions, were examined.

  13. STABILIZATION OF STANDARD PLATELET CONCENTRATES AND MINIMIZATION OF THE PLATELET STORAGE LESION BY A PROSTACYCLIN ANALOG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ELIAS, M; HEETHUIS, A; BOM, [No Value; BLOM, N; MCSHINE, RL; HALIE, MR; SIBINGA, CTS

    Platelet concentrates were pretreated with a stable synthetic prostacyclin analogue (Iloprost) at two different concentrations before the second centrifugation step (pelleting step) of preparation. This resulted in loss. of platelet sensitivity to aggregating agents. To mimic the situation after

  14. Mean platelet volume in acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Ahmet; Aypar, Ebru; Odabas, Dursun

    2013-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is still an endemic disease, especially among school-aged children in developing countries. Mean platelet volume (MPV), which is commonly used as a measure of platelet size, indicates the rate of platelet production and platelet activation. We aimed to investigate MPV in children with ARF. The study population consisted of 40 children with ARF (32 patients with carditis and 8 patients without carditis) and 40 healthy control subjects. White blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts were significantly higher and MPV values were significantly lower in patients with ARF during the acute stage when compared to controls. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein values significantly decreased in patients with ARF after the treatment when compared to baseline, whereas MPV values increased. MPV values were negatively correlated with ESR and WBC, and platelet counts. In conclusion, during the acute stage of ARF, MPV values were lower when compared to controls.

  15. Therapeutic platelet reduction: Use in postsplenectomy thrombocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Negi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic platelet reduction is an effective modality for the reduction of platelet count in patients with treatment of extreme thrombocytosis resulting from a variety of primary and secondary causes of thrombocytosis, which may be associated with thrombotic or hemorrhagic complications of varying degrees. These cases when symptomatic fall into the ASFA Category II indication for therapeutic platelet apheresis procedure. Here, we report a case of postsplenectomy secondary thrombocytosis presenting with extremely high platelet counts and subsequent thrombosis in the shunt and successful treatment after therapeutic platelet reduction. The case is being presented to bring forth the fact that therapeutic platelet reduction is an easy procedure that gives quick and good results and also to bring to the attention of transfusion specialists an associated but as yet unreported procedural finding.

  16. Laboratory testing for platelet function disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israels, S J

    2015-05-01

    Platelet function testing is both complex and labor intensive. A stepwise approach to the evaluation of patients with suspected platelet disorders will optimize the use of laboratory resources, beginning with an appropriate clinical evaluation to determine whether the bleeding is consistent with a defect of primary hemostasis. Bleeding assessment tools, evaluation of platelet counts, and review of peripheral blood cell morphology can aid the initial assessment. For patients requiring further laboratory testing, platelet aggregometry, secretion assays, and von Willebrand factor assays are the most useful next steps and will direct further specialized testing including flow cytometry, electron microscopy, and molecular diagnostics. Guidelines and recommendations for standardizing platelet function testing, with a particular focus on light transmission aggregometry, are available and can provide a template for clinical laboratories in establishing procedures that will optimize diagnosis and assure quality results. This review outlines an approach to platelet function testing and reviews testing methods available to clinical laboratories.

  17. Differential effects of platelets and platelet inhibition by ticagrelor on TLR2- and TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tunjungputri, R.N.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Riksen, N.P.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Tacke, S.; Berg, T.N.A. van den; Fijnheer, R.; Gomes, M.E.; Dinarello, C.A.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Gasem, M.H.; Netea, M.G.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Groot, P.G. de; Mast, Q. de

    2015-01-01

    Platelets and platelet-monocyte interaction play an important role in inflammation. Both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects of platelet inhibition have been reported in animal models. This study aimed to investigate the effect of platelets and platelet inhibition by the new P2Y12 receptor antagonist

  18. Energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons from double layer samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tőkési, K.; Varga, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a theoretical description of the spectra of electrons elastically scattered from thin double layered Au-C samples. The analysis is based on the Monte Carlo simulation of the recoil and Doppler effects in reflection and transmission geometries of the scattering at a fixed angle of 44.3 ° and a primary energy of 40 keV. The relativistic correction is taken into account. Besides the experimentally measurable energy distributions the simulations give many partial distributions separately, depending on the number of elastic scatterings (single, and multiple scatterings of different types). Furthermore, we present detailed analytical calculations for the main parameters of the single scattering, taking into account both the ideal scattering geometry, i.e. infinitesimally small angular range, and the effect of the real, finite angular range used in the measurements. We show our results for intensity ratios, peak shifts and broadenings for four cases of measurement geometries and layer thicknesses. While in the peak intensity ratios of gold and carbon for transmission geometries were found to be in good agreement with the results of the single scattering model, especially large deviations were obtained in reflection geometries. The separation of the peaks, depending on the geometry and the thickness, generally smaller, and the peak width generally larger than it can be expected from the nominal values of the primary energy, scattering angle, and mean kinetic energy of the atoms. We also show that the peaks are asymmetric even for the case of the single scattering due to the finite solid angle. Finally, we present a qualitative comparison with the experimental data. We find our resulting energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons to be in good agreement with recent measurements.

  19. An analysis of fractal geometry of macromolecular gelation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左榘; 陈天红; 冉少峰; 何炳林; 董宝中; 生文君; 杨恒林

    1996-01-01

    With fractal geometry theory and based on experiments, an analysis of fractal geometry behavior of gelation of macromolecules was carried out. Using the cross-linking copolymerization of styrene-divinylbenzene (DVB) as an example, through the determinations of the evolution of the molecular weight, size and the dependence of scattering intensity on the angle of macromolecules by employing laser and synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering, respectively, this chemical reaction was described quantitatively, its fractal behavior was analyzed and the fractal dimension was also measured. By avoiding the complex theories on gelation, this approach is based on modern physical techniques and theories to perform the analysis of the behavior of fractal geometry of macromolecular gelation and thus is able to reveal the rules of this kind of complicated gelation more essentially and profoundly.

  20. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  1. Renyi Entropy and Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jeongseog; Safdi, Benjamin R

    2014-01-01

    Entanglement entropy in even dimensional conformal field theories (CFTs) contains well-known universal terms arising from the conformal anomaly. Renyi entropies are natural generalizations of the entanglement entropy that are much less understood. Above two spacetime dimensions, the universal terms in the Renyi entropies are unknown for general entangling geometries. We conjecture a new structure in the dependence of the four-dimensional Renyi entropies on the intrinsic and extrinsic geometry of the entangling surface. We provide evidence for this conjecture by direct numerical computations in the free scalar and fermion field theories. The computation involves relating the four-dimensional free massless Renyi entropies across cylindrical entangling surfaces to corresponding three-dimensional massive Renyi entropies across circular entangling surfaces. Our numerical technique also allows us to directly probe other interesting aspects of three-dimensional Renyi entropy, including the massless renormalized Reny...

  2. Spectral Geometry and Causality

    CERN Document Server

    Kopf, T

    1996-01-01

    For a physical interpretation of a theory of quantum gravity, it is necessary to recover classical spacetime, at least approximately. However, quantum gravity may eventually provide classical spacetimes by giving spectral data similar to those appearing in noncommutative geometry, rather than by giving directly a spacetime manifold. It is shown that a globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifold can be given by spectral data. A new phenomenon in the context of spectral geometry is observed: causal relationships. The employment of the causal relationships of spectral data is shown to lead to a highly efficient description of Lorentzian manifolds, indicating the possible usefulness of this approach. Connections to free quantum field theory are discussed for both motivation and physical interpretation. It is conjectured that the necessary spectral data can be generically obtained from an effective field theory having the fundamental structures of generalized quantum mechanics: a decoherence functional and a choice of...

  3. Multivariate calculus and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dineen, Seán

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate calculus can be understood best by combining geometric insight, intuitive arguments, detailed explanations and mathematical reasoning. This textbook has successfully followed this programme. It additionally provides a solid description of the basic concepts, via familiar examples, which are then tested in technically demanding situations. In this new edition the introductory chapter and two of the chapters on the geometry of surfaces have been revised. Some exercises have been replaced and others provided with expanded solutions. Familiarity with partial derivatives and a course in linear algebra are essential prerequisites for readers of this book. Multivariate Calculus and Geometry is aimed primarily at higher level undergraduates in the mathematical sciences. The inclusion of many practical examples involving problems of several variables will appeal to mathematics, science and engineering students.

  4. LDL oxidation by platelets propagates platelet activation via an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Roberto; Bartimoccia, Simona; Nocella, Cristina; Di Santo, Serena; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Illuminati, Giulio; Lombardi, Elisabetta; Boz, Valentina; Del Ben, Maria; De Marco, Luigi; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Violi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Platelets generate oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) via NOX2-derived oxidative stress. We investigated if once generated by activated platelets ox-LDL can propagate platelet activation. Experiments were performed in platelets from healthy subjects (HS), hyper-cholesterolemic patients and patients with NOX2 hereditary deficiency. Agonist-stimulated platelets from HS added with LDL were associated with a dose-dependent increase of reactive oxidant species and ox-LDL. Agonist-stimulated platelets from HS added with a fixed dose of LDL (57.14 μmol/L) or added with homogenized human atherosclerotic plaque showed enhanced ox-LDL formation (approximately +50% and +30% respectively), which was lowered by a NOX2 inhibitor (approximately -35% and -25% respectively). Compared to HS, ox-LDL production was more pronounced in agonist-stimulated platelet rich plasma (PRP) from hyper-cholesterolemic patients but was almost absent in PRP from NOX2-deficient patients. Platelet aggregation and 8-iso-PGF2α-ΙΙΙ formation increased in LDL-treated washed platelets (+42% and +53% respectively) and PRP (+31% and +53% respectively). Also, LDL enhanced platelet-dependent thrombosis at arterial shear rate (+33%) but did not affect platelet activation in NOX2-deficient patients. Platelet activation by LDL was significantly inhibited by CD36 or LOX1 blocking peptides, two ox-LDL receptor antagonists, or by a NOX2 inhibitor. LDL-added platelets showed increased p38MAPK (+59%) and PKC (+51%) phosphorylation, p47(phox) translocation to platelet membrane (+34%) and NOX2 activation (+30%), which were inhibited by ox-LDL receptor antagonists. Platelets oxidize LDL, which in turn amplify platelet activation via specific ox-LDL receptors; both effects are mediated by NOX2 activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Algebra, Arithmetic, and Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Tschinkel, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    The two volumes of "Algebra, Arithmetic, and Geometry: In Honor of Y.I. Manin" are composed of invited expository articles and extensions detailing Manin's contributions to the subjects, and are in celebration of his 70th birthday. The well-respected and distinguished contributors include: Behrend, Berkovich, Bost, Bressler, Calaque, Carlson, Chambert-Loir, Colombo, Connes, Consani, Dabrowski, Deninger, Dolgachev, Donaldson, Ekedahl, Elsenhans, Enriques, Etingof, Fock, Friedlander, Geemen, Getzler, Goncharov, Harris, Iskovskikh, Jahnel, Kaledin, Kapranov, Katz, Kaufmann, Kollar, Kont

  6. Geometry of Quantum States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2007-12-01

    Preface; 1. Convexity, colours and statistics; 2. Geometry of probability distributions; 3. Much ado about spheres; 4. Complex projective spaces; 5. Outline of quantum mechanics; 6. Coherent states and group actions; 7. The stellar representation; 8. The space of density matrices; 9. Purification of mixed quantum states; 10. Quantum operations; 11. Duality: maps versus states; 12. Density matrices and entropies; 13. Distinguishability measures; 14. Monotone metrics and measures; 15. Quantum entanglement; Epilogue; Appendices; References; Index.

  7. Differential geometry and thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Quevedo, H

    2003-01-01

    In this work we present the first steps of a new approach to the study of thermodynamics in the context of differential geometry. We introduce a fundamental differential 1-form and a metric on a pseudo-Euclidean manifold coordinatized by means of the extensive thermodynamic variables. The study of the connection and the curvature of these objects is initialized in this work by using Cartan structure equations. (Author)

  8. Geometry and Destiny

    CERN Document Server

    Krauss, L M; Krauss, Lawrence M.; Turner, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    The recognition that the cosmological constant may be non-zero forces us to re-evaluate standard notions about the connection between geometry and the fate of our Universe. An open Universe can recollapse, and a closed Universe can expand forever. As a corollary, we point out that there is no set of cosmological observations we can perform that will unambiguously allow us to determine what the ultimate destiny of the Universe will be.

  9. Inflation from quantum geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin

    2002-12-23

    Quantum geometry predicts that a universe evolves through an inflationary phase at small volume before exiting gracefully into a standard Friedmann phase. This does not require the introduction of additional matter fields with ad hoc potentials; rather, it occurs because of a quantum gravity modification of the kinetic part of ordinary matter Hamiltonians. An application of the same mechanism can explain why the present day cosmological acceleration is so tiny.

  10. Complex geometries in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Riiber Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The versatility of wood constructions and traditional wood joints for the production of non standard elements was in focus of a design based research. Herein we established a seamless process from digital design to fabrication. A first research phase centered on the development of a robust parame...... parametric model and a generic design language a later explored the possibilities to construct complex shaped geometries with self registering joints on modern wood crafting machines. The research was carried out as collaboration with industrial partners....

  11. Integral geometry and holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Bartłomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-01

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts — points, distances and angles — are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  12. Hilbert, completeness and geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Venturi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to show how the mathematical content of Hilbert's Axiom of Completeness consists in an attempt to solve the more general problem of the relationship between intuition and formalization. Hilbert found the accordance between these two sides of mathematical knowledge at a logical level, clarifying the necessary and sufficient conditions for a good formalization of geometry. We will tackle the problem of what is, for Hilbert, the definition of geometry. The solution of this problem will bring out how Hilbert's conception of mathematics is not as innovative as his conception of the axiomatic method. The role that the demonstrative tools play in Hilbert's foundational reflections will also drive us to deal with the problem of the purity of methods, explicitly addressed by Hilbert. In this respect Hilbert's position is very innovative and deeply linked to his modern conception of the axiomatic method. In the end we will show that the role played by the Axiom of Completeness for geometry is the same as the Axiom of Induction for arithmetic and of Church-Turing thesis for computability theory. We end this paper arguing that set theory is the right context in which applying the axiomatic method to mathematics and we postpone to a sequel of this work the attempt to offer a solution similar to Hilbert's for the completeness of set theory.

  13. Integral geometry and valuations

    CERN Document Server

    Solanes, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Valuations are finitely additive functionals on the space of convex bodies. Their study has become a central subject in convexity theory, with fundamental applications to integral geometry. In the last years there has been significant progress in the theory of valuations, which in turn has led to important achievements in integral geometry. This book originated from two courses delivered by the authors at the CRM and provides a self-contained introduction to these topics, covering most of the recent advances. The first part, by Semyon Alesker, is devoted to the theory of convex valuations, with emphasis on the latest developments. A special focus is put on the new fundamental structures of the space of valuations discovered after Alesker's irreducibility theorem. Moreover, the author describes the newly developed theory of valuations on manifolds. In the second part, Joseph H. G. Fu gives a modern introduction to integral geometry in the sense of Blaschke and Santaló, based on the notions and tools presented...

  14. Generalised Geometry and Flux Vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Larfors, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    This note discusses the connection between generalised geometry and flux compactifications of string theory. Firstly, we explain in a pedestrian manner how the supersymmetry constraints of type II ${\\mathcal{N}}=1$ flux compactifications can be restated as integrability constraints on certain generalised complex structures. This reformulation uses generalised complex geometry, a mathematical framework that geometrizes the B-field. Secondly, we discuss how exceptional generalised geometry may provide a similar geometrization of the RR fields. Thirdly, we examine the connection between generalised geometry and non-geometry, and finally we present recent developments where generalised geometry is used to construct explicit examples of flux compactifications to flat space.

  15. The effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on platelet function in whole blood and platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reikvam, Anne-Grete; Hustad, Steinar; Reikvam, Håkon; Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Nepstad, Ina; Hervig, Tor Audun

    2012-01-01

    Several studies report that patients who are treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for depression may have increased risk of bleeding, particularly from the gastrointestinal tract. This may be related to low intraplatelet serotonin concentrations. Several blood banks do not store platelets from donors using SSRIs for transfusion, although the possible effects of SSRIs on platelet storage are not documented. We conducted a case-control pilot study of apheresis platelet concentrates prepared from donors using SSRIs (n=8) and from donors without medication (n=10). The platelet concentrates were stored for 5 days. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA), thrombelastography (TEG), and flow cytometric analyses were preformed for in vitro measurements of platelet function. Platelet function and platelet serotonin content were investigated in whole blood and in platelet concentrates stored for up to 5 days. LTA, TEG, and flow cytometric analysis of glycoprotein expression did not reveal any significant differences between the two groups. All 18 platelet concentrates performed well according to the standards set for platelet quality in relation to transfusion. Blood donors using SSRIs had significantly lower platelet serotonin compared to blood donors without medication. The results from our pilot study indicate that platelets from donors using SSRIs may be suitable for transfusion after storage for 5 days, but further laboratory and clinical studies are necessary to confirm this.

  16. Platelet aggregation and quality control of platelet concentrates produced in the Amazon Blood Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Dantas Coêlho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study of platelet aggregation is essential to assess in vitro platelet function by different platelet activation pathways. OBJECTIVE: To assess aggregation and biochemical parameters of random platelet concentrates produced at the Fundação HEMOAM using the quality control tests defined by law. METHODS: Whole blood samples from 80 donors and the respective platelet concentrate units were tested. Platelet concentrates were tested (platelet count, aggregation and pH on days 1, 3 and 5 of storage. Additionally a leukocyte count was done only on day 1 and microbiological tests on day 5 of storage. Collagen and adenosine diphosphate were used as inducing agonists for platelet aggregation testing. RESULTS: Donor whole blood had normal aggregation (aggregation with adenosine diphosphate = 67% and with collagen = 78%. The median aggregation in platelet concentrates with adenosine diphosphate was low throughout storage (18% on day 1, 7% on day 3 and 6% on day 5 and the median aggregation with collagen was normal only on day 1 and low thereafter (54.4% on day 1, 20.5% on day 3 and 9% on day 5. CONCLUSION: Although the results were within the norms required by law, platelet concentrates had low aggregation rates. We suggest the inclusion of a functional assessment test for the quality control of platelet concentrates for a more effective response to platelet replacement therapy.

  17. Ultrastructural studies of the gray platelet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J G

    1979-05-01

    The gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited disorder in which peripheral blood platelets are relatively large, vacuolated, and almost devoid of cytoplasmic granulation. In the present study we have evaluated the ultrastructure and cytochemistry of platelets from 2 patients with the GPS to determine precisely which organelles are missing from their cells. The findings indicate that gray platelets contain normal numbers of mitochondria, dense bodies, peroxisomes, and lysosomes but specifically lack alpha-granules. Preliminary studies of megakaryocytes from 1 of the 2 patients suggest that the defect in granule formation may lie at the level of the Golgi zone.

  18. Identification of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Aparecida Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To identify the occurrence and the causes of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients. INTRODUCTION: Platelet refractoriness (unsatisfactory post-transfusion platelet increment is a severe problem that impairs the treatment of oncohematologic patients and is not routinely investigated in most Brazilian services. METHODS: Forty-four episodes of platelet concentrate transfusion were evaluated in 16 patients according to the following parameters: corrected count increment, clinical conditions and detection of anti-platelet antibodies by the platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT and panel reactive antibodies against human leukocyte antigen class I (PRA-HLA. RESULTS: Of the 16 patients evaluated (median age: 53 years, nine (56% were women, seven of them with a history of pregnancy. An unsatisfactory increment was observed in 43% of the transfusion events, being more frequent in transfusions of random platelet concentrates (54%. Platelet refractoriness was confirmed in three patients (19%, who presented immunologic and non-immunologic causes. Alloantibodies were identified in eight patients (50% by the PIFT and in three (19% by the PRA-HLA. Among alloimmunized patients, nine (64% had a history of transfusion, and three as a result of pregnancy (43%. Of the former, two were refractory (29%. No significant differences were observed, probably as a result of the small sample size. CONCLUSION: The high rate of unsatisfactory platelet increment, refractoriness and alloimmunization observed support the need to set up protocols for the investigation of this complication in all chronically transfused patients, a fundamental requirement for the guarantee of adequate management.

  19. Does bipolar pacemaker current activate blood platelets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesdal, Grunde; Hansen, Annebirthe Bo; Brandes, Axel

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether bipolar pacemaker current lead can activate blood platelets. The null hypothesis was that 1 minute of electrical stimulation of platelets would not influence their subsequent reactivity to adenosine diphosphate (ADP). BACKGROUND: Both...... platelets and muscle cells contain actin and myosin filaments, and both cells are activated following calcium influx. Muscle cells open their calcium channels and contract when exposed to an electric current. Current through a bipolar pacemaker lead will expose a small volume of blood, including platelets...

  20. Platelet cytoskeleton and its hemostatic role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris

    2013-12-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets adhere to the exposed extracellular matrix, which triggers the platelet activation and aggregation to form a hemostatic plug to seal the wound. All of these events involve dramatic changes in shape because of the cytoskeleton reorganization. The versatility of the cytoskeleton's main elements depends on the biochemical nature of the elements, as well as on the associated proteins that confer multiple functions within the cell. The list of these associated proteins grows actively, increasing our knowledge concerning the complexity of platelet cytoskeleton machinery. The present review evidences the recently described platelet proteins that promote characteristic modifications in their cytoskeleton organization, with special focus on the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex.

  1. Nonlinear scattering in plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear phenomena provide novel light manipulation capabilities and innovative applications. Recently, we discovered nonlinear saturation on single-particle scattering of gold nanospheres by continuous-wave laser excitation and innovatively applied to improve microscopic resolution down to λ/8. However, the nonlinearity was limited to the green-orange plasmonic band of gold nanosphere, and the underlying mechanism has not yet been fully understood. In this work, we demonstrated that nonlinear scattering exists for various material/geometry combinations, thus expanding the applicable wavelength range. For near-infrared, gold nanorod is used, while for blue-violet, silver nanospheres are adopted. In terms of mechanism, the nonlinearity may originate from interband/intraband absorption, hot electron, or hot lattice, which are spectrally mixed in the case of gold nanosphere. For gold nanorod and silver nanosphere, nonlinear scattering occurs at plasmonic resonances, which are spectrally far from interband/intraband absorptions, so they are excluded. We found that the nonlinear index is much larger than possible contributions from hot electrons in literature. Therefore, we conclude that hot lattice is the major mechanism. In addition, we propose that similar to z-scan, which is the standard method to characterize nonlinearity of a thin sample, laser scanning microscopy should be adopted as the standard method to characterize nonlinearity from a nanostructure. Our work not only provides the physical mechanism of the nonlinear scattering, but also paves the way toward multi-color superresolution imaging based on non-bleaching plasmonic scattering.

  2. Thomson scattering from laser plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J D; Alley, W E; De Groot, J S; Estabrook, K G; Glenzer, S H; Hammer, J H; Jadaud, J P; MacGowan, B J; Rozmus, W; Suter, L J; Williams, E A

    1999-01-12

    Thomson scattering has recently been introduced as a fundamental diagnostic of plasma conditions and basic physical processes in dense, inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Experiments at the Nova laser facility [E. M. Campbell et al., Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] have demonstrated accurate temporally and spatially resolved characterization of densities, electron temperatures, and average ionization levels by simultaneously observing Thomson scattered light from ion acoustic and electron plasma (Langmuir) fluctuations. In addition, observations of fast and slow ion acous- tic waves in two-ion species plasmas have also allowed an independent measurement of the ion temperature. These results have motivated the application of Thomson scattering in closed-geometry inertial confinement fusion hohlraums to benchmark integrated radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of fusion plasmas. For this purpose a high energy 4{omega} probe laser was implemented recently allowing ultraviolet Thomson scattering at various locations in high-density gas-filled hohlraum plasmas. In partic- ular, the observation of steep electron temperature gradients indicates that electron thermal transport is inhibited in these gas-filled hohlraums. Hydrodynamic calcula- tions which include an exact treatment of large-scale magnetic fields are in agreement with these findings. Moreover, the Thomson scattering data clearly indicate axial stagnation in these hohlraums by showing a fast rise of the ion temperature. Its timing is in good agreement with calculations indicating that the stagnating plasma will not deteriorate the implosion of the fusion capsules in ignition experiments.

  3. Platelet function alterations in dengue are associated with plasma leakage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, M.; Alisjahbana, B.; Groot, P.G. de; Indrati, A.R.; Fijnheer, R.; Puspita, M.; Dewi, I.M.; Wijer, L. van de; Boer, E.M. de; Roest, M.; Ven, A.J. van der; Mast, Q. de

    2014-01-01

    Severe dengue is characterised by thrombocytopenia, plasma leakage and bleeding. Platelets are important for preservation of endothelial integrity. We hypothesised that platelet activation with secondary platelet dysfunction contribute to plasma leakage. In adult Indonesian patients with acute dengu

  4. Pulsar lensing geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Siqi; Macquart, J-P; Brisken, Walter; Deller, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Our analysis of archival VLBI data of PSR 0834+06 revealed that its scintillation properties can be precisely modelled using the inclined sheet model (Pen & Levin 2014), resulting in two distinct lens planes. These data strongly favour the grazing sheet model over turbulence as the primary source of pulsar scattering. This model can reproduce the parameters of the observed diffractive scintillation with an accuracy at the percent level. Comparison with new VLBI proper motion results in a direct measure of the ionized ISM screen transverse velocity. The results are consistent with ISM velocities local to the PSR 0834+06 sight-line (through the Galaxy). The simple 1D structure of the lenses opens up the possibility of using interstellar lenses as precision probes for pulsar lens mapping, precision transverse motions in the ISM, and new opportunities for removing scattering to improve pulsar timing. We describe the parameters and observables of this double screen system. While relative screen distances can i...

  5. Controlling electromagnetic scattering with wire metamaterial resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Filonov, Dmitry S; Iorsh, Ivan; Belov, Pavel A; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of radiation is required for enabling a span of electromagnetic applications. Since properties of antennas and scatterers are very sensitive to a surrounding environment, macroscopic artificially created materials are good candidates for shaping their characteristics. In particular, metamaterials enable controlling both dispersion and density of electromagnetic states, available for scattering from an object. As the result, properly designed electromagnetic environment could govern waves' phenomena. Here electromagnetic properties of scattering dipoles, situated inside a wire medium (metamaterial) are analyzed both numerically and experimentally. Impact of the metamaterial geometry, dipole arrangement inside the medium, and frequency of the incident radiation on scattering phenomena was studied. It was shown that the resonance of the dipole hybridizes with Fabry-Perot modes of the metamaterial, giving rise to a complete reshaping of electromagnetic properties. Regimes of controlled scattering sup...

  6. Spatial bandlimitedness of scattered electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Khankhoje, Uday K

    2015-01-01

    In this tutorial paper, we consider the problem of electromagnetic scattering by a bounded dielectric object, and discuss certain interesting properties of the scattered field. Using the electric field integral equation, along with the techniques of Fourier theory and the properties of Bessel functions, we show analytically and numerically, that the scattered fields are spatially bandlimited. Further, we derive an upper bound on the number of incidence angles that are useful as constraints in an inverse problem setting (determining permittivity given measurements of the scattered field). We also show that the above results are independent of the dielectric properties of the scattering object and depend only on geometry. Though these results have previously been derived in the literature using the framework of functional analysis, our approach is conceptually far easier. Implications of these results on the inverse problem are also discussed.

  7. Superradiant Forward Scattering in Multiple Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Chabe, Julien; Bienaime, Tom; Bachelard, Romain; Piovella, Nicola; Kaiser, Robin

    2012-01-01

    We report on an interference effect in multiple scattering by resonant scatterers resulting in enhanced forward scattering, violating Ohm's law for photons. The underlying mechanism of this wave effect is superradiance, which we have investigated using cold atoms as a toy model. We present numerical and experimental evidences for this superradiant forward scattering, which is robust against disorder and configuration averaging.

  8. Gravitational scattering of zero-rest-mass plane waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Logi, W. K.; Kovacs, S. J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The Feyman-diagram technique is used to calculate the differential cross sections for the scattering of zero-rest-mass plane waves of spin 0, 1, and 2 by linearized Schwarzschild and Kerr geometries in the long-wavelength weak-field limit. It is found that the polarization of right (or left) circularly polarized electromagnetic waves is unaffected by the scattering process (i.e., helicity is conserved) and that the two helicity (polarization) states of the photon are scattered differently by the Kerr geometry. This coupling between the photon helicity and the angular momentum of the scatterer also leads to a partial polarization of unpolarized incident light. For gravitational waves, on the other hand, there is neither helicity conservation nor helicity-dependent scattering; the angular momentum of the scatterer has no polarizing effect on incident unpolarized gravitational waves.

  9. Introductory non-Euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Henry Parker

    1963-01-01

    This fine and versatile introduction begins with the theorems common to Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, and then it addresses the specific differences that constitute elliptic and hyperbolic geometry. 1901 edition.

  10. Geometry for the Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moalem, D.

    1977-01-01

    A sequential but non-axiomatic high school geometry course which includes Euclidean, transformation, and analytic geometry and vectors and matrices, and emphasizes the invariance property of transformations, is outlined. Sample problems, solutions, and comments are included. (MN)

  11. Linear connections on matrix geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Madore, J; Mourad, J; Madore, John; Masson, Thierry; Mourad, Jihad

    1994-01-01

    A general definition of a linear connection in noncommutative geometry has been recently proposed. Two examples are given of linear connections in noncommutative geometries which are based on matrix algebras. They both possess a unique metric connection.

  12. The CLAS12-RICH hybrid geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Giovanni; CLAS12-RICH Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A Ring-imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) has been designed for the CLAS12 spectrometer (JLAB, Hall B) in order to increase the particle identification. Among the approved physics program focused upon 3D imaging of the nucleon, some Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments (E12-09-007, E12-09-008, E12-09-009) demand an efficient kaon identification across the momentum range from 3 to 8 GeV/c. The detector exploits a novel elaborated hybrid geometry based on a complex focusing mirror system that will reduce the area instrumented with photon detectors. For forward scattered particles (θ planar mirrors before detection. A carefully study on reflections has been performed considering microscopic and macroscopic effects. In addition, a new feature has been introduced in the CLAS12 simulation software in order to generate the geometry of the detector by using a computer-aided design (CAD) file for an accurate geometrical description. U.S. Department of Energy, GWU Columbian College Art and Science Facilitating Fund Award (CCAS CCFF).

  13. Platelet-rich plasma preparation using three devices : Implications for platelet activation and platelet growth factor release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Peter A. M.; Mahoney, Christine Brown; Hoffmann, Johannes J. M. L.; Schonberger, Jacques P. A. M.; Box, Henk A. M.; Van Zundert, Andre; Knape, Johannes T. A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In this study, three commercial systems for the preparation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were compared and platelet growth factors release was measured. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers donated whole blood that was fractionated by a blood cell separator, and a table-top centrifuge to pre

  14. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia with associated platelet abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soslau, G; Brodsky, I

    1989-12-01

    A 62 year old male (R.H.) presented with a mild anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) and a history of multiple hemorrhagic episodes. The marrow had 40-50% sideroblasts. Marrow chromosomes were normal. His wife was hematologically normal, while one daughter, age 30 years, had a sideroblastic anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) with 40-50% sideroblasts in the marrow. Her anemia was first noted at age 15 years. Administration of vitamin B6 did not correct the anemia in either the father or daughter. Platelet abnormalities inherited jointly with this disorder are described for the first time. Both R.H. and his daughter had prolonged bleeding times, with normal PTT, PT times, fVIII:C, fVIII:Ag levels, and vWF multimers, which may rule out a von Willebrand's disease. They have normal platelet numbers but abnormally low platelet adhesiveness and greatly depressed ADP, collagen, and epinephrine responsiveness. Response to ristocetin was in the low normal range, and aggregation with thrombin was normal. While desmopressin completely normalized R.H.'s bleeding time, none of these platelet parameters were improved. No differences in the SDS PAGE protein patterns of RH platelets could be detected in comparison to normal samples. His platelets took up and released serotonin (5HT) normally, and electron micrographs defined no morphological abnormalities. However, no ATP was released from platelets activated with collagen, and when followed by thrombin about fourfold greater ATP was released by control platelets as compared to RH platelets. The dense granule fraction derived from RH platelets contained about 20% the level of ATP, 40% the level of ADP, and 50% the level of 5HT detected in a normal sample. The results indicate that the bleeding disorder is related to a non-classical heritable storage pool defect. The connection between the inherited sideroblastic anemia and platelet defects is obscure.

  15. Compton scatter tomography in TOF-PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hamidreza; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Ay, Mohammadreza; Ghafarian, Pardis

    2017-10-01

    Scatter coincidences contain hidden information about the activity distribution on the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging system. However, in conventional reconstruction, the scattered data cause the blurring of images and thus are estimated and subtracted from detected coincidences. List mode format provides a new aspect to use time of flight (TOF) and energy information of each coincidence in the reconstruction process. In this study, a novel approach is proposed to reconstruct activity distribution using the scattered data in the PET system. For each single scattering coincidence, a scattering angle can be determined by the recorded energy of the detected photons, and then possible locations of scattering can be calculated based on the scattering angle. Geometry equations show that these sites lie on two arcs in 2D mode or the surface of a prolate spheroid in 3D mode, passing through the pair of detector elements. The proposed method uses a novel and flexible technique to estimate source origin locations from the possible scattering locations, using the TOF information. Evaluations were based on a Monte-Carlo simulation of uniform and non-uniform phantoms at different resolutions of time and detector energy. The results show that although the energy uncertainties deteriorate the image spatial resolution in the proposed method, the time resolution has more impact on image quality than the energy resolution. With progress of the TOF system, the reconstruction using the scattered data can be used in a complementary manner, or to improve image quality in the next generation of PET systems.

  16. Geometry success in 20 mins

    CERN Document Server

    Editors, LearningExpress

    2010-01-01

    Whether you're new to geometry or just looking for a refresher, this completely revised and updated third edition of Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day offers a 20-step lesson plan that provides quick and thorough instruction in practical, critical skills. Stripped of unnecessary math jargon but bursting with geometry essentials, Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day is an invaluable resource for both students and adults.

  17. Multiple alterations of platelet functions dominated by increased secretion in mice lacking Cdc42 in platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleines, Irina; Eckly, Anita; Elvers, Margitta;

    2010-01-01

    formation and exocytosis in various cell types, but its exact function in platelets is not established. Here, we show that the megakaryocyte/platelet-specific loss of Cdc42 leads to mild thrombocytopenia and a small increase in platelet size in mice. Unexpectedly, Cdc42-deficient platelets were able to form...... reduced, suggesting increased clearing of the cells under physiologic conditions. These data point to novel multiple functions of Cdc42 in the regulation of platelet activation, granule organization, degranulation, and a specific role in GPIb signaling....

  18. Platelet-rich fibrin: Evolution of a second-generation platelet concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunitha Raja V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is a platelet concentrate that has been used widely to accelerate soft-tissue and hard-tissue healing. The preparation of PRP has been described by several authors. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF was first described by Choukroun et al. in France. It has been referred to as a second-generation platelet concentrate, which has been shown to have several advantages over traditionally prepared PRP. Its chief advantages include ease of preparation and lack of biochemical handling of blood, which makes this preparation strictly autologous. This article describes the evolution of this novel platelet concentrate, referred to as PRF.

  19. Human platelets antigens influence the viral load of platelets after the interaction of the platelets with HCV and HIV in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane Maria Tommasini Grotto

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: In this study, we evaluated hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV - platelet interactions in vitro as well as human platelets antigen (HPA polymorphisms. METHODS: Platelets were obtained from 100 healthy HPA-genotyped volunteer donors and incubated with HIV or HCV. The viral load after in vitro exposure was detected. RESULTS: The viral load in the platelets after exposure to the virus was higher in the HIV exposure than in the HCV exposure. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-platelet ligation could be more efficient than HCV-platelet interaction. Further, the HPA-1b allele seems to influence the interaction of platelets with HCV.

  20. Teaching of Geometry in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankov, Kiril

    2013-01-01

    Geometry plays an important role in the school mathematics curriculum all around the world. Teaching of geometry varies a lot (Hoyls, Foxman, & Kuchemann, 2001). Many countries revise the objectives, the content, and the approaches to the geometry in school. Studies of the processes show that there are not common trends of these changes…

  1. Elementary algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kendig, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Designed to make learning introductory algebraic geometry as easy as possible, this text is intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students who have taken a one-year course in algebra and are familiar with complex analysis. This newly updated second edition enhances the original treatment's extensive use of concrete examples and exercises with numerous figures that have been specially redrawn in Adobe Illustrator. An introductory chapter that focuses on examples of curves is followed by a more rigorous and careful look at plane curves. Subsequent chapters explore commutative ring th

  2. Geometry and trigonometry

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This stimulating volume offers a broad collection of the principles of geometry and trigonometry and contains colorful diagrams to bring mathematical principles to life. Subjects are enriched by references to famous mathematicians and their ideas, and the stories are presented in a very comprehensible way. Readers investigate the relationships of points, lines, surfaces, and solids. They study construction methods for drawing figures, a wealth of facts about these figures, and above all, methods to prove the facts. They learn about triangle measure for circular motion, sine and cosine, tangent

  3. Local analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Abhyankar, Shreeram Shankar

    1964-01-01

    This book provides, for use in a graduate course or for self-study by graduate students, a well-motivated treatment of several topics, especially the following: (1) algebraic treatment of several complex variables; (2) geometric approach to algebraic geometry via analytic sets; (3) survey of local algebra; (4) survey of sheaf theory. The book has been written in the spirit of Weierstrass. Power series play the dominant role. The treatment, being algebraic, is not restricted to complex numbers, but remains valid over any complete-valued field. This makes it applicable to situations arising from

  4. Kinematic geometry of gearing

    CERN Document Server

    Dooner, David B

    2012-01-01

    Building on the first edition published in 1995 this new edition of Kinematic Geometry of Gearing has been extensively revised and updated with new and original material. This includes the methodology for general tooth forms, radius of torsure', cylinder of osculation, and cylindroid of torsure; the author has also completely reworked the '3 laws of gearing', the first law re-written to better parallel the existing 'Law of Gearing" as pioneered by Leonard Euler, expanded from Euler's original law to encompass non-circular gears and hypoid gears, the 2nd law of gearing describing a unique relat

  5. From geometry to topology

    CERN Document Server

    Flegg, H Graham

    2001-01-01

    This excellent introduction to topology eases first-year math students and general readers into the subject by surveying its concepts in a descriptive and intuitive way, attempting to build a bridge from the familiar concepts of geometry to the formalized study of topology. The first three chapters focus on congruence classes defined by transformations in real Euclidean space. As the number of permitted transformations increases, these classes become larger, and their common topological properties become intuitively clear. Chapters 4-12 give a largely intuitive presentation of selected topics.

  6. Geometry of conics

    CERN Document Server

    Akopyan, A V

    2007-01-01

    The book is devoted to the properties of conics (plane curves of second degree) that can be formulated and proved using only elementary geometry. Starting with the well-known optical properties of conics, the authors move to less trivial results, both classical and contemporary. In particular, the chapter on projective properties of conics contains a detailed analysis of the polar correspondence, pencils of conics, and the Poncelet theorem. In the chapter on metric properties of conics the authors discuss, in particular, inscribed conics, normals to conics, and the Poncelet theorem for confoca

  7. Geometry I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Geometry I includes methods of proof, points, lines, planes, angles, congruent angles and line segments, triangles, parallelism, quadrilaterals, geometric inequalities, and geometric

  8. Probability density functions of instantaneous Stokes parameters on weak scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Korotkova, Olga

    2017-10-01

    The single-point probability density functions (PDF) of the instantaneous Stokes parameters of a polarized plane-wave light field scattered from a three-dimensional, statistically stationary, weak medium with Gaussian statistics and Gaussian correlation function have been studied for the first time. Apart from the scattering geometry the PDF distributions of the scattered light have been related to the illumination's polarization state and the correlation properties of the medium.

  9. Fast Scattering Code (FSC) User's Manual: Version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Dun, M. H.; Pope, D. Stuart

    2006-01-01

    The Fast Scattering Code (version 2.0) is a computer program for predicting the three-dimensional scattered acoustic field produced by the interaction of known, time-harmonic, incident sound with aerostructures in the presence of potential background flow. The FSC has been developed for use as an aeroacoustic analysis tool for assessing global effects on noise radiation and scattering caused by changes in configuration (geometry, component placement) and operating conditions (background flow, excitation frequency).

  10. Expansion of the neonatal platelet mass is achieved via an extension of platelet lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Hu, Zhongbo; Mager, Donald E; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Debrincat, Marlyse A; Pleines, Irina; Josefsson, Emma C; Kile, Benjamin T; Italiano, Joseph; Ramsey, Haley; Grozovsky, Renata; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chavda, Chaitanya; Sola-Visner, Martha

    2014-05-29

    The fetal/neonatal hematopoietic system must generate enough blood cells to meet the demands of rapid growth. This unique challenge might underlie the high incidence of thrombocytopenia among preterm neonates. In this study, neonatal platelet production and turnover were investigated in newborn mice. Based on a combination of blood volume expansion and increasing platelet counts, the platelet mass increased sevenfold during the first 2 weeks of murine life, a time during which thrombopoiesis shifted from liver to bone marrow. Studies applying in vivo biotinylation and mathematical modeling showed that newborn and adult mice had similar platelet production rates, but neonatal platelets survived 1 day longer in circulation. This prolonged lifespan fully accounted for the rise in platelet counts observed during the second week of murine postnatal life. A study of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins showed that neonatal platelets had higher levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and were more resistant to apoptosis induced by the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 than adult platelets. However, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Bcl-2 alone did not shorten neonatal platelet survival or reduce platelet counts in newborn mice, indicating the existence of redundant or alternative mechanisms mediating the prolonged lifespan of neonatal platelets. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. [Platelet allo-antibodies identification strategies for preventing and managing platelet refractoriness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basire, A; Picard, C

    2014-11-01

    Platelet refractoriness is a serious complication for patients receiving recurrent platelet transfusions, which can be explained by non-immune and immune causes. Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) allo-immunization, especially against HLA class I, is the major cause for immune platelet refractoriness. To a lesser extent, allo-antibodies against specific Human Platelet Antigen (HPA) are also involved. Pregnancy, transplantation and previous transfusions can lead to allo-immune reaction against platelet antigens. After transfusion, platelet count is decreased by accelerated platelet destruction related to antibodies fixation on incompatible platelet antigens. New laboratory tests for allo-antibodies identification were developed to improve sensibility and specificity, especially with the LUMINEX(®) technology. The good use and interpretation of these antibodies assays can improve strategies for platelet refractoriness prevention and management with a patient adapted response. Compatible platelets units can be selected according to their identity with recipient typing or immune compatibility regarding HLA or HPA antibodies or HLA epitope compatibility. Prospective studies are needed to further confirm the clinical benefit of new allo-antibodies identification methods and consensus strategies for immune platelet refractoriness management.

  12. Platelet antibodies, activated platelets and serum leptin in childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrawy, Hosny; Elsayh, Khalid I; Zahran, Asmaa M; El-Ghazali, Mohamad Hamdy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of platelet-associated antibodies (PAIgG and PAIgM), activated platelets and serum leptin in children with acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The study included 40 patients with ITP and 40 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. PAIgG, PAIgM and activated platelet levels were estimated by flow cytometry, and serum leptin levels were estimated by ELISA. Activated platelets and serum leptin were significantly higher in the ITP patients than in the controls. The percentage and mean fluorescence intensity of PAIgG and PAIgM staining were significantly higher in the patients than in the controls. Serum leptin and activated platelet levels in patients with thrombocytopenia of brief duration were significantly lower than those in patients with thrombocytopenia of prolonged duration. The levels of activated platelets, serum leptin and PAIgG were positively correlated, and the levels of serum leptin, activated platelets and platelet counts were negatively correlated. The increased levels of activated platelets, serum leptin and platelet-associated antibodies in children with acute ITP suggest that these factors could play a role in ITP pathogenesis. Additionally, activated platelets and serum leptin could have prognostic significance in paediatric acute ITP. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. IgG platelet antibodies in EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia bind to platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorin, F; Steffan, A; Pradella, P; Bizzaro, N; Potenza, R; De Angelis, V

    1998-08-01

    EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) consists of an inappropriate low platelet count caused by autoantibodies present in the serum samples reacting with platelets only in EDTA-anticoagulated blood. By using immunoprecipitation and Western blot techniques, we studied the immunochemical specificity of platelet agglutinating autoantibodies in the serum samples of 10 patients with PTCP. Furthermore, to evaluate a possible role of PTCP-associated IgG autoantibodies in increased platelet turnover, we assayed the plasma glycocalicin (GC) level and calculated the GC index for every patient. Our results provide direct evidence that an epitope located on platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb is recognized by PTCP-associated IgG antibodies; moreover GC levels in patients with EDTA-dependent PTCP were similar to control levels, thus excluding an increased platelet turnover. We conclude that antiplatelet antibodies directed against platelet cryptantigens are unlikely to have a major role in the increased removal of cells from circulation.

  14. Fractal and Euclidean descriptors of platelet shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Max-Joseph; Neeb, Heiko; Strasser, Erwin F

    2014-01-01

    Platelet shape change is a dynamic membrane surface process that exhibits remarkable morphological heterogeneity. Once the outline of an irregular shape is identified and segmented from a digital image, several mathematical descriptors can be applied to numerical characterize the irregularity of the shapes surface. 13072 platelet outlines (PLO) were segmented automatically from 1928 microscopic images using a newly developed algorithm for the software product Matlab R2012b. The fractal dimension (FD), circularity, eccentricity, area and perimeter of each PLO were determined. 972 PLO were randomly assigned for computer-assisted manual measurement of platelet diameter as well as number, width and length of filopodia per platelet. FD can be used as a surrogate parameter for determining the roughness of the PLO and circularity can be used as a surrogate to estimate the number and length of filopodia. The relationship between FD and perimeter of the PLO reveals the existence of distinct groups of platelets with significant structural differences which may be caused by platelet activation. This new method allows for the standardized continuous numerical classification of platelet shape and its dynamic change, which is useful for the analysis of altered platelet activity (e.g. inflammatory diseases, contact activation, drug testing).

  15. Clinica use of platelet additive solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhenen, Dick J

    2007-12-01

    Randomised clinical trial (RCT) to study the clinical efficacy and safety of new platelet products using platelet additive solutions are scarce. In this paper a number of recent RCT's is discussed. It can be the start of a development where new transfusion products enter a RCT before the product is applied in clinical practice.

  16. Platelets in liver transplantation : Friend or foe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereboom, Ilona T. A.; Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Apart from the well-known role of blood platelets in hemostasis, there is emerging evidence that platelets have various nonhemostatic properties that play a critical role in inflammation, angiogenesis, tissue repair and regeneration, and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. All these processes may be

  17. Studies on megakaryopoiesis and platelet function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, M.

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are blood circulating specialized subcellular fragments, which are produced by megakaryocytes. Platelets are essential for hemostasis and wound healing but also play a role in non-hemostatic processes such as the immune response or cancer metastasis. Considering the immediate precursors of

  18. Erythrocyte-platelet interaction in uncomplicated pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanepoel, Albe C; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2014-12-01

    Maternal and fetal requirements during uncomplicated pregnancy are associated with changes in the hematopoietic system. Platelets and erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs)], and especially their membranes, are involved in coagulation, and their interactions may provide reasons for the changed hematopoietic system during uncomplicated pregnancy. We review literature regarding RBC and platelet membrane structure and interactions during hypercoagulability and hormonal changes. We then study interactions between RBCs and platelets in uncomplicated pregnancy, as their interactions may be one of the reasons for increased hypercoagulability during uncomplicated pregnancy. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study whole blood smears from 90 pregnant females in different phases of pregnancy. Pregnancy-specific interaction was seen between RBCs and platelets. Typically, one or more platelets interacted through platelet spreading and pseudopodia formation with a single RBC. However, multiple interactions with RBCs were also shown for a single platelet. Specific RBC-platelet interaction seen during uncomplicated pregnancy may be caused by increased estrogen and/or increased fibrinogen concentrations. This interaction may contribute to the hypercoagulable state associated with healthy and uncomplicated pregnancy and may also play a fundamental role in gestational thrombocytopenia.

  19. BETA-ADRENOBLOCKERS AND PLATELET AGGREGATION. CARVEDILOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Zakirova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Approaches evolution to studying of beta-blockers influence on platelet aggregation is reviewed. The current view on of beta-blocker antiplatelet effects is presented on the basis of physical and chemical drug properties (water repellency, dipole moment, molecular mass. Trail results on carvedilol influence on platelet aggregation are focused.

  20. Novel agents for anti-platelet therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Xuebin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anti-platelet therapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with thrombotic diseases. The most commonly used anti-platelet drugs, namely, aspirin, ticlopidine, and clopidogrel, are effective in the prevention and treatment of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists (e.g., abciximab, eptifibatide and tirofiban have demonstrated good clinical benefits and safety profiles in decreasing ischemic events in acute coronary syndrome. However, adverse events related to thrombosis or bleeding have been reported in cases of therapy with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists. Cilostazol is an anti-platelet agent used in the treatment of patients with peripheral ischemia, such as intermittent claudication. Presently, platelet adenosine diphosphate P2Y(12 receptor antagonists (e.g., clopidogrel, prasugrel, cangrelor, and ticagrelor are being used in clinical settings for their pronounced protective effects. The new protease-activated receptor antagonists, vorapaxar and atopaxar, potentially decrease the risk of ischemic events without significantly increasing the rate of bleeding. Some other new anti-platelet drugs undergoing clinical trials have also been introduced. Indeed, the number of new anti-platelet drugs is increasing. Consequently, the efficacy of these anti-platelet agents in actual patients warrants scrutiny, especially in terms of the hemorrhagic risks. Hopefully, new selective platelet inhibitors with high anti-thrombotic efficiencies and low hemorrhagic side effects can be developed.

  1. Performance evaluation of PL-11 platelet analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张有涛

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and report the performance of PL-11 platelet analyzer. Methods Intravenous blood sam-ples anticoagulated with EDTA-K2 and sodium citrate were tested by the PL-11 platelet analyzer to evaluate the intra-assay and interassay coefficient of variation(CV),

  2. Platelet affinity for burro aorta collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.D.

    1977-10-01

    Despite ingenious concepts, there are no unequivocal clues as to what, when, and how some undefined biochemical factor(s) or constituent(s) that localizes in the arterial wall can precipitate a thromboatheromatous lesion or arterial disease. The present study focused on the extraction, partial purification, and characterization of a collagen-active platelet stimulator from the aortas of aged burros. The aggregator moiety in the aorta extracts invariably had a higher affinity for platelets in citrated platelet-rich plasma of human beings than for platelets of homologous burros. The platelet-aggregating factor(s) in the aorta extract was retained by incubation with ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. Platelet-aggregating activity was rapidly abolished after incubation with collagenase, as determined by platelet-aggregometry tests. Evidence based on light microscope and polysaccharide histochemical reactions indicates a probability that the intracellular amorphous matrix (PAS-positive) and filamentous components (PTAH-positive) expelled from smooth muscle cells disrupted during homogenization of the aorta may be a principal source of a precursor collagen species which is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation.

  3. The origin and function of platelet glycosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Rumjantseva, Viktoria; Sørensen, Anne Louise Tølbøll;

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are megakaryocyte subfragments that participate in hemostatic and host defense reactions and deliver pro- and anti-angiogenic factors throughout the vascular system. Platelets are anucleated cells and lack a complex secretory apparatus with distinct Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum compartme...

  4. Function of eltrombopag-induced platelets compared to platelets from control patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselboeck, Johanna; Kaider, Alexandra; Pabinger, Ingrid; Panzer, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Data on the in vivo function of platelets induced by the thrombopoietin receptor agonist eltrombopag are scarce. To assess a possible influence of eltrombopag we compared platelet function of eltrombopag-treated immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients (group 1; n=10) after treatment response to that from control ITP patients (group 2; n=12). We further analysed platelet function at baseline and after one, three, and four weeks of eltrombopag treatment and estimated daily changes of platelet function during the eltrombopag-induced platelet rise. The formation of platelet-monocyte aggregates (PMA), P-selectin expression [MFI], and platelet adhesion under high shear conditions (surface coverage, SC) in vivo and after in vitro addition of agonists (ADP, TRAP-6, Collagen) were similar between both groups after response to eltrombopag treatment. Only TRAP-6 induced a lower SC in the eltrombopag group (p=0.03). All platelet function parameters except for Collagen-induced P-selectin expression changed significantly during treatment with eltrombopag. PMA, naïve and after addition of ADP or TRAP-6 increased with increasing platelet counts. P-selectin expression decreased, when measured without and upon addition of ADP, increased in the presence of TRAP-6, and remained unchanged after addition of Collagen. SC increased during the eltrombopag-induced platelet rise. All significant changes of platelet function correlated to changes in platelet counts. Two patients developed venous thromboses during eltrombopag treatment, but no association with any distinct single platelet function parameter or combinations thereof was identifiable. Thus, eltrombopag-induced platelets function similar to those from control ITP patients without discernible increased hyper-reactivity.

  5. A platelet monoclonal antibody inhibition assay for detection of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa-related platelet alloantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, A P; Teramura, G; Nelson, K A; Slichter, S J

    1995-08-18

    Post-transfusion purpura (PTP) and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAT) result from formation of alloantibodies to platelet membrane glycoprotein-associated antigens. The detection and identification of platelet-specific alloantibodies in patient sera is often complicated by the presence of co-existing HLA antibodies and/or more than one platelet specificity in the same serum. We describe a solid phase assay that specifically detects antibodies to platelet membrane associated alloantigens by measuring the ability of patient antisera to inhibit the binding of glycoprotein GPIIb or GPIIIa monoclonal antibodies to intact platelets. When tested in the GPIIIa assay against a panel of random platelet donors, the reactivities of two known PLAI antisera that also contained different HLA antibodies were highly correlated (r = 0.99) and allowed PLA phenotyping of the population. A standard direct binding platelet ELISA, on the other hand, was unable to accurately PLA phenotype the same population. The reactivities of two known Baka antisera (one containing additional anti-PLA2 and the other anti-Brb specificities) were highly correlated (r = 0.95) in the GPIIb assay, and Bak phenotype determination was similarly accomplished for a random platelet panel. Furthermore, a comparison of platelet phenotype results (using the monoclonal inhibition assay) and genotype results (using DNA analysis) for the PLA and Bak systems showed a concordance of 98% for 146 alleles tested. In conclusion, the platelet monoclonal antibody inhibition assay: (1) allows determination of platelet-specific alloantibodies in the presence of contaminating HLA antibodies and/or in sera containing multiple platelet alloantibodies; (2) allows accurate platelet phenotyping for the GPIIIa-associated PLA and GPIIb-associated Bak antigen systems; and (3) may be applicable to the detection of other known or even novel platelet glycoprotein-associated antigens.

  6. Modulatory effect of coffee on platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Shobha; Rauf, Arun A

    2010-01-01

    Blood platelets play a major role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and thrombosis. Conflicting information exists regarding the effect of coffee consumption on the cardiovascular system. We have investigated whether the consumption of moderate amount of coffee affect platelet functions and primary hemostasis in vivo in normal and high fat diet fed rats. Coffee fed group showed significant (P production from membrane arachidonic acid and it was decreased in coffee treated group. Platelet aggregation studies with ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and epinephrine showed significant (P coffee fed group. Scanning electron microscopic studies revealed that platelet aggregation tendency increased in HFD group and was reduced in coffee fed group. These results indicate that coffee is active in inhibiting platelet aggregation, a critical step involved in thrombosis.

  7. Platelet mitochondrial function and dysfunction: physiological consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, D.

    2015-07-01

    There is a general trend in revisiting mitochondria using the up-to-date technologies that uncovered novel attributes of this organelle, such as the intracellular displacement to locations where an energy supply is needed, the dynamic shape changes and turnover, the initiation of signaling to the rest of the cell, and the ability to crosstalk with other cellular organelles. The in-depth scrutiny of platelet mitochondria role in health and pathology is included within this ongoing revisiting trend. The current article puts into a nutshell the most recent data on platelet mitochondria function and disease-related ion, focusing on generation of stress- and apoptosis-related signaling molecules, overproduction of reactive oxygen species during activation and disease, on the biomarker potential of platelets mitochondria, and their prospective exploitation in translational applications. These novel findings complete the physiological profile of platelets and could have potential therapeutic effectiveness in platelet-associated disorders.

  8. Platelets as immune cells in infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Cornelia; Löffler, Jürgen; Krappmann, Sven; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter

    2013-11-01

    Platelets have been shown to cover a broad range of functions. Besides their role in hemostasis, they have immunological functions and thus participate in the interaction between pathogens and host defense. Platelets have a broad repertoire of receptor molecules that enable them to sense invading pathogens and infection-induced inflammation. Consequently, platelets exert antimicrobial effector mechanisms, but also initiate an intense crosstalk with other arms of the innate and adaptive immunity, including neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, B cells and T cells. There is a fragile balance between beneficial antimicrobial effects and detrimental reactions that contribute to the pathogenesis, and many pathogens have developed mechanisms to influence these two outcomes. This review aims to highlight aspects of the interaction strategies between platelets and pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, in addition to the subsequent networking between platelets and other immune cells, and the relevance of these processes for the pathogenesis of infections.

  9. Platelet bioreactor-on-a-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazutis, Linas; Wu, Stephen; Sylman, Joanna L.; Ehrlicher, Allen; Machlus, Kellie R.; Feng, Qiang; Lu, Shijiang; Lanza, Robert; Neeves, Keith B.; Weitz, David A.; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet transfusions total >2.17 million apheresis-equivalent units per year in the United States and are derived entirely from human donors, despite clinically significant immunogenicity, associated risk of sepsis, and inventory shortages due to high demand and 5-day shelf life. To take advantage of known physiological drivers of thrombopoiesis, we have developed a microfluidic human platelet bioreactor that recapitulates bone marrow stiffness, extracellular matrix composition, micro-channel size, hemodynamic vascular shear stress, and endothelial cell contacts, and it supports high-resolution live-cell microscopy and quantification of platelet production. Physiological shear stresses triggered proplatelet initiation, reproduced ex vivo bone marrow proplatelet production, and generated functional platelets. Modeling human bone marrow composition and hemodynamics in vitro obviates risks associated with platelet procurement and storage to help meet growing transfusion needs. PMID:25606631

  10. Platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakas, M; Karkos, P D; Markou, K; Grigoriadis, N

    2016-12-01

    Platelet-rich plasma is a novel material that is being used more frequently in many surgical specialties. A literature review on the current and potential uses of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology was performed. There is limited evidence on the use of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology compared with other specialties: only 11 studies on various subspecialties (otology, rhinology and laryngology) were included in the final review. Based on the limited number of studies, we cannot draw safe conclusions about the value of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology. Nevertheless, the available literature suggests that platelet-rich plasma holds promise for future research and may have a number of clinical applications.

  11. The Cooling and Lubrication Performance of Graphene Platelets in Micro-Machining Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Bryan

    The research presented in this thesis is aimed at investigating the use of graphene platelets (GPL) to address the challenges of excessive tool wear, reduced part quality, and high specific power consumption encountered in micro-machining processes. There are two viable methods of introducing GPL into micro-machining environments, viz., the embedded delivery method, where the platelets are embedded into the part being machined, and the external delivery method, where graphene is carried into the cutting zone by jetting or atomizing a carrier fluid. The study involving the embedded delivery method is focused on the micro-machining performance of hierarchical graphene composites. The results of this study show that the presence of graphene in the epoxy matrix improves the machinability of the composite. In general, the tool wear, cutting forces, surface roughness, and extent of delamination are all seen to be lower for the hierarchical composite when compared to the conventional two-phase glass fiber composite. These improvements are attributed to the fact that graphene platelets improve the thermal conductivity of the matrix, provide lubrication at the tool-chip interface and also improve the interface strength between the glass fibers and the matrix. The benefits of graphene are seen to also carry over to the external delivery method. The platelets provide improved cooling and lubrication performance to both environmentally-benign cutting fluids as well as to semi-synthetic cutting fluids used in micro-machining. The cutting performance is seen to be a function of the geometry (i.e., lateral size and thickness) and extent of oxygen-functionalization of the platelet. Ultrasonically exfoliated platelets (with 2--3 graphene layers and lowest in-solution characteristic lateral length of 120 nm) appear to be the most favorable for micro-machining applications. Even at the lowest concentration of 0.1 wt%, they are capable of providing a 51% reduction in the cutting

  12. Platelet derivatives in regenerative medicine: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Sommese, Linda; Casamassimi, Amelia; Napoli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Prior preclinical and clinical studies support the use of platelet-derived products for the treatment of soft and hard tissue lesions. These regenerative effects are controlled by autocrine and paracrine biomolecules including growth factors and cytokines contained in platelet alpha granules. Each growth factor is involved in a phase of the healing process, such as inflammation, collagen synthesis, tissue granulation, and angiogenesis collectively promoting tissue restitution. Platelet derivatives have been prepared as platelet-rich plasma, platelet gel, platelet-rich fibrin, and platelet eye drops. These products vary in their structure, growth factors, composition, and cytokine concentrations. Here, we review the current use of platelet-derived biological products focusing on the rationale for their use and the main requirements for their preparation. Variation in the apparent therapeutic efficacy may have resulted from a lack of reproducible, standardized protocols for preparation. Despite several individual studies showing favorable treatment effects, some randomized controlled trials as well as meta-analyses have found no constant clinical benefit from the application of platelet-derived products for prevention of tissue lesions. Recently, 3 published studies in dentistry showed an improvement in bone density. Seven published studies showed positive results in joint regeneration. Five published studies demonstrated an improvement in the wound healing, and an improvement of eye epithelial healing was observed in 2 reports. Currently, at least 14 ongoing clinical trials in phase 3 or 4 have been designed with large groups of treated patients (n > 100). Because the rationale of the therapy with platelet-derived compounds is still debated, a definitive insight can be acquired only when these large randomized trials will be completed.

  13. Correlation study between platelet count, leukocyte count, nonhemorrhagic complications, and duration of hospital stay in dengue fever with thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Hari Kishan; Tulasi, Sai Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dengue is one of the common diseases presenting as fever with thrombocytopenia, also causing significant morbidity and complications. Objectives: Though the correlation between platelet count, bleeding manifestations and hemorrhagic complications has been extensively studied, less is known about the correlation between platelet count and non hemorrhagic complications. This study was done to see the correlation between platelet count and non hemorrhagic complications, duration of hospital stay and additive effect of leucopenia with thrombocytopenia on complications. Methods: Our study is prospective observational study done on 99 patients who had dengue fever with thrombocytopenia. Correlations were obtained using scatter plot and SPSS software trail version. Results: Transaminitis (12.12%) was the most common complication followed by acute renal injury (2%). In our study we found that, as the platelet count decreased the complication rate increased (P = 0.0006). In our study duration of hospital increased (P is 0.00597) with decreasing platelet count when compared to other study where there was no correlation between the two. There was no correlation between thrombocytopenia with leucopenia and complications (P is 0.292), similar to other study. Conclusion: Platelet count can be used to predict the complication and duration of hospital stay and hence better use of resources. PMID:27453855

  14. Linear geometry thyratron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, S.

    1985-03-01

    The low pressure gas-filled thyratron is scalable in the long dimension. Internally the tube is formed as a tetrode, with an auxiliary grid placed between the cathode and the control grid. A dc or pulsed power source drives the auxiliary grid both to insure uniform cathode emission and to provide a grid-cathode plasma prior to commutation. The high voltage holdoff structure consists of the anode, the control grid and its electrostatic shielding baffles, and a main quartz insulator. A small gas flow supply and exhaust system is used that eliminates the need for a hydrogen reservoir and permits other gases, such as helium, to be used. The thyratron provides a low inductance, high current, long lifetime switch configuration: useful for switch-on applications involving large scale lasers and other similar loads that are distributed in a linear geometry.

  15. Critique of information geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skilling, John, E-mail: skilling@eircom.net [Maximum Entropy Data Consultants Ltd, Kenmare (Ireland)

    2014-12-05

    As applied to probability, information geometry fails because probability distributions do not form a metric space. Probability theory rests on a compelling foundation of elementary symmetries, which also support information (aka minus entropy, Kullback-Leibler) H(p;q) as the unique measure of divergence from source probability distribution q to destination p. Because the only compatible connective H is from≠to asymmetric, H(p;q)≠H(q;p), there can be no compatible geometrical distance (which would necessarily be from=to symmetric). Hence there is no distance relationship compatible with the structure of probability theory. Metrics g and densities sqrt(det(g)) interpreted as prior probabilities follow from the definition of distance, and must fail likewise. Various metrics and corresponding priors have been proposed, Fisher's being the most popular, but all must behave unacceptably. This is illustrated with simple counter-examples.

  16. Real algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bochnak, Jacek; Roy, Marie-Françoise

    1998-01-01

    This book is a systematic treatment of real algebraic geometry, a subject that has strong interrelation with other areas of mathematics: singularity theory, differential topology, quadratic forms, commutative algebra, model theory, complexity theory etc. The careful and clearly written account covers both basic concepts and up-to-date research topics. It may be used as text for a graduate course. The present edition is a substantially revised and expanded English version of the book "Géometrie algébrique réelle" originally published in French, in 1987, as Volume 12 of ERGEBNISSE. Since the publication of the French version the theory has made advances in several directions. Many of these are included in this English version. Thus the English book may be regarded as a completely new treatment of the subject.

  17. Covariant Macroscopic Quantum Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, Craig J

    2012-01-01

    A covariant noncommutative algebra of position operators is presented, and interpreted as the macroscopic limit of a geometry that describes a collective quantum behavior of the positions of massive bodies in a flat emergent space-time. The commutator defines a quantum-geometrical relationship between world lines that depends on their separation and relative velocity, but on no other property of the bodies, and leads to a transverse uncertainty of the geometrical wave function that increases with separation. The number of geometrical degrees of freedom in a space-time volume scales holographically, as the surface area in Planck units. Ongoing branching of the wave function causes fluctuations in transverse position, shared coherently among bodies with similar trajectories. The theory can be tested using appropriately configured Michelson interferometers.

  18. Advanced geometries and regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Bulanov, S. V.; Turchetti, G.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Stockem, A.; Fiuza, F.; Silva, L. O.; Antici, P.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.

    2013-08-01

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project. At the request of the Proceedings Editors and Dr. Stepan Bulanov, University of California, Berkeley, the above article has been updated to include three additional authors: A. Stockem, F. Fiuza, and L. O. Silva. All additional authors have consented to their name being added to the paper. Furthermore, the updated article PDF contains amendments to a number of references as detailed within the pages attached to the end of the updated article PDF file. The updated article was re-published on 8 August 2013.

  19. Decreased TGF-β1 and VEGF Release in Cystic Fibrosis Platelets: Further Evidence for Platelet Defects in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, James P.; Narasimhan, Jayashree; Biller, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffer from chronic lung inflammation. This inflammation may activate platelets. There are limited data on the role of platelet-secreted cytokines in CF. Platelet cytokines with inflammatory effects include vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). As levels of these cytokines are tenfold greater in serum than plasma due to platelet release, serum levels may be one index of platelet content; but a more specific index is release during the aggregation of isolated platelets. We postulated that altered release of these platelet cytokines occurs in CF. Methods We obtained sera and plasma from CF outpatients (n=21) and from healthy controls (n=20), measured VEGF and TGF-β1, assessed for correlations with platelet number, analyzed cytokine release during platelet aggregation to collagen, and analyzed differences in maximal platelet aggregation. Results Platelet number and maximal aggregation levels were higher in CF. Plasma and serum levels of TGF-β1 and VEGF were higher in CF, but these levels were similar after adjusting for platelet number (serum cytokines correlated with platelet count). The release of VEGF and TGF-β1 during aggregation was decreased in CF platelets (by 52% and 29%, respectively). Conclusion Platelet release is not a source of the elevated blood proinflammatory cytokines TGF-β1 and VEGF in CF, as platelets from CF patients actually release less of these cytokines. These data provide further evidence for platelet defects in CF. PMID:27423781

  20. Magnetism in curved geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  1. Scatter dose calculation for anti-scatter linear grids in mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kafi, M A; Maalej, N; Naqvi, A A

    2009-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the geometry of a mammography anti-scatter linear grid to achieve minimum scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) for different X-ray tube voltages. A single optimum design of the grid with 0.9mm septa height, 12microm septa thickness and 100microm interspace thickness was found for breast phantom thicknesses between 30 and 80mm. The optimal grid has 0.153-0.330 scatter-to-primary ratio, a Bucky factor (BF) less than 2.5 and a contrast improvement factor (CIF) of 1.3.

  2. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  3. Breaking the mold: transcription factors in the anucleate platelet and platelet-derived microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Lannan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are small anucleate blood cells derived from megakaryocytes. In addition to their pivotal roles in hemostasis, platelets are the smallest, yet most abundant, immune cell and regulate inflammation, immunity, and disease progression. Although platelets lack DNA, and thus no functional transcriptional activities, they are nonetheless rich sources of RNAs, possess an intact spliceosome, and are thus capable of synthesizing proteins. Previously, it was thought that platelet RNAs and translational machinery were remnants from the megakaryocyte. We now know that the initial description of platelets as cellular fragments is an antiquated notion, as mounting evidence suggests otherwise. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that platelet transcription factors are not vestigial remnants from megakaryoctes, but have important, if only partly understood functions. Proteins play multiple cellular roles to minimize energy expenditure for maximum cellular function; thus, the same can be expected for transcription factors. In fact, numerous transcription factors have non-genomic roles, both in platelets and in nucleated cells. Our lab and others have discovered the presence and nongenomic roles of transcription factors in platelets, such as the nuclear factor kappa β (NFκB family of proteins and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. In addition to numerous roles in regulating platelet activation, functional transcription factors can be transferred to vascular and immune cells through platelet microparticles. This method of transcellular delivery of key immune molecules may be a vital mechanism by which platelet transcription factors regulate inflammation and immunity. At the very least, platelets are an ideal model cell to dissect out the nongenomic roles of transcription factors in nucleated cells. There is abundant evidence to suggest that transcription factors in platelets play key roles in regulating inflammatory and

  4. Platelet lysates produced from expired platelet concentrates support growth and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mjoll Jonsdottir-Buch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells are promising candidates in regenerative cell therapy. Conventional culture methods involve the use of animal substances, specifically fetal bovine serum as growth supplement. Since the use of animal-derived products is undesirable for human applications, platelet lysates produced from human platelets are an attractive alternative. This is especially true if platelet lysates from already approved transfusion units at blood banks can be utilized. The purpose of this study was to produce human platelet lysates from expired, blood bank-approved platelet concentrates and evaluate their use as growth supplement in the culture of mesenchymal stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured with one of three culture supplements; fetal bovine serum, lysates from freshly prepared human platelet concentrates, or lysates from expired human platelet concentrates. The effects of these platelet-derived culture supplements on basic mesenchymal stem cell characteristics were evaluated. All cultures maintained the typical mesenchymal stem cell surface marker expression, trilineage differentiation potential, and the ability to suppress in vitro immune responses. However, mesenchymal stem cells supplemented with platelet lysates proliferated faster than traditionally cultured cells and increased the expression of the osteogenic marker gene RUNX-2; yet no difference between the use of fresh and expired platelet concentrates was observed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that human platelet lysates produced from expired platelet concentrates can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum for mesenchymal stem cell culture to the same extent as lysates from fresh platelets.

  5. On velocity space interrogation regions of fast-ion collective Thomson scattering at ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Bindslev, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    The collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic proposed for ITER is designed to measure projected 1D fast-ion velocity distribution functions at several spatial locations simultaneously. The frequency shift of scattered radiation and the scattering geometry place fast ions that caused the col...

  6. Klein geometries, parabolic geometries and differential equations of finite type

    CERN Document Server

    Abadoglu, Ender

    2009-01-01

    We define the infinitesimal and geometric orders of an effective Klein geometry G/H. Using these concepts, we prove i) For any integer m>1, there exists an effective Klein geometry G/H of infinitesimal order m such that G/H is a projective variety (Corollary 9). ii) An effective Klein geometry G/H of geometric order M defines a differential equation of order M+1 on G/H whose global solution space is G (Proposition 18).

  7. Super-resolved calibration-free flow cytometric characterization of platelets and cell-derived microparticles in platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konokhova, Anastasiya I; Chernova, Darya N; Moskalensky, Alexander E; Strokotov, Dmitry I; Yurkin, Maxim A; Chernyshev, Andrei V; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2016-02-01

    Importance of microparticles (MPs), also regarded as extracellular vesicles, in many physiological processes and clinical conditions motivates one to use the most informative and precise methods for their characterization. Methods based on individual particle analysis provide statistically reliable distributions of MP population over characteristics. Although flow cytometry is one of the most powerful technologies of this type, the standard forward-versus-side-scattering plots of MPs and platelets (PLTs) overlap considerably because of similarity of their morphological characteristics. Moreover, ordinary flow cytometry is not capable of measurement of size and refractive index (RI) of MPs. In this study, we 1) employed the potential of the scanning flow cytometer (SFC) for identification and characterization of MPs from light scattering; 2) suggested the reference method to characterize MP morphology (size and RI) with high precision; and 3) determined the lowest size of a MP that can be characterized from light scattering with the SFC. We equipped the SFC with 405 and 488 nm lasers to measure the light-scattering profiles and side scattering from MPs, respectively. The developed two-stage method allowed accurate separation of PLTs and MPs in platelet-rich plasma. We used two optical models for MPs, a sphere and a bisphere, in the solution of the inverse light-scattering problem. This solution provides unprecedented precision in determination of size and RI of individual spherical MPs-median uncertainties (standard deviations) were 6 nm and 0.003, respectively. The developed method provides instrument-independent quantitative information on MPs, which can be used in studies of various factors affecting MP population.

  8. Transmission through metallic chains: Role of distortions and contact geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Thomas; Akgenc, Berna; Schuster, Cosima; Eckern, Ulrich [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, 86135 (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We present results of electronic structure and transport calculations for metallic chains, based on density functional theory and scattering theory combined with the the non-equilibrium Green's function technique. Starting from a simple model system of monovalent metallic chains we investigate the influence of distortions on the electronic structure and the transport properties of H and Li chains. Furthermore we calculate the electronic structure of Au chains which are contacted to leads via different geometries, and study the influence of the contact geometry on the transmission coefficient. In particular, we compare chains, pyramides and planes in the contact region. A comparison with analytical results is given.

  9. Higher geometry an introduction to advanced methods in analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Frederick S

    2005-01-01

    For students of mathematics with a sound background in analytic geometry and some knowledge of determinants, this volume has long been among the best available expositions of advanced work on projective and algebraic geometry. Developed from Professor Woods' lectures at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, it bridges the gap between intermediate studies in the field and highly specialized works.With exceptional thoroughness, it presents the most important general concepts and methods of advanced algebraic geometry (as distinguished from differential geometry). It offers a thorough study

  10. Platelet-TLR7 mediates host survival and platelet count during viral infection in the absence of platelet-dependent thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupenova, Milka; Vitseva, Olga; MacKay, Christopher R; Beaulieu, Lea M; Benjamin, Emelia J; Mick, Eric; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Ravid, Katya; Freedman, Jane E

    2014-07-31

    Viral infections have been associated with reduced platelet counts, the biological significance of which has remained elusive. Here, we show that infection with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) rapidly reduces platelet count, and this response is attributed to platelet Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7). Platelet-TLR7 stimulation mediates formation of large platelet-neutrophil aggregates, both in mouse and human blood. Intriguingly, this process results in internalization of platelet CD41-fragments by neutrophils, as assessed biochemically and visualized by microscopy, with no influence on platelet prothrombotic properties. The mechanism includes TLR7-mediated platelet granule release, translocation of P-selectin to the cell surface, and a consequent increase in platelet-neutrophil adhesion. Viral infection of platelet-depleted mice also led to increased mortality. Transfusion of wild-type, TLR7-expressing platelets into TLR7-deficient mice caused a drop in platelet count and increased survival post EMCV infection. Thus, this study identifies a new link between platelets and their response to single-stranded RNA viruses that involves activation of TLR7. Finally, platelet-TLR7 stimulation is independent of thrombosis and has implications to the host immune response and survival.

  11. Blood platelets in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S Gowert

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by neurotoxic amyloid-ß plaque formation in brain parenchyma and cerebral blood vessels known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA. Besides CAA, AD is strongly related to vascular diseases such as stroke and atherosclerosis. Cerebrovascular dysfunction occurs in AD patients leading to alterations in blood flow that might play an important role in AD pathology with neuronal loss and memory deficits. Platelets are the major players in hemostasis and thrombosis, but are also involved in neuroinflammatory diseases like AD. For many years, platelets were accepted as peripheral model to study the pathophysiology of AD because platelets display the enzymatic activities to generate amyloid-ß (Aß peptides. In addition, platelets are considered to be a biomarker for early diagnosis of AD. Effects of Aß peptides on platelets and the impact of platelets in the progression of AD remained, however, ill-defined. The present study explored the cellular mechanisms triggered by Aß in platelets. Treatment of platelets with Aß led to platelet activation and enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and membrane scrambling, suggesting enhanced platelet apoptosis. More important, platelets modulate soluble Aß into fibrillar structures that were absorbed by apoptotic but not vital platelets. This together with enhanced platelet adhesion under flow ex vivo and in vivo and platelet accumulation at amyloid deposits of cerebral vessels of AD transgenic mice suggested that platelets are major contributors of CAA inducing platelet thrombus formation at vascular amyloid plaques leading to vessel occlusion critical for cerebrovascular events like stroke.

  12. Brief Report: Platelet-Poor Plasma Serotonin in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George M.; Hertzig, Margaret E.; McBride, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Possible explanations for the well-replicated platelet hyperserotonemia of autism include an alteration in the platelet's handling of serotonin (5-hydroxyserotonin, 5-HT) or an increased exposure of the platelet to 5-HT. Measurement of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) levels of 5-HT appears to provide the best available index of in vivo exposure of the…

  13. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... addition of an aggregating reagent to a platelet-rich plasma. (b) Classification. Class II (performance... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700... § 864.5700 Automated platelet aggregation system. (a) Identification. An automated platelet...

  14. Quality assessment of platelet concentrates prepared by platelet rich plasma-platelet concentrate, buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC and apheresis-PC methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ravindra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platelet rich plasma-platelet concentrate (PRP-PC, buffy coat poor-platelet concentrate (BC-PC, and apheresis-PC were prepared and their quality parameters were assessed. Study Design: In this study, the following platelet products were prepared: from random donor platelets (i platelet rich plasma - platelet concentrate (PRP-PC, and (ii buffy coat poor- platelet concentrate (BC-PC and (iii single donor platelets (apheresis-PC by different methods. Their quality was assessed using the following parameters: swirling, volume of the platelet concentrate, platelet count, WBC count and pH. Results: A total of 146 platelet concentrates (64 of PRP-PC, 62 of BC-PC and 20 of apheresis-PC were enrolled in this study. The mean volume of PRP-PC, BC-PC and apheresis-PC was 62.30±22.68 ml, 68.81±22.95 ml and 214.05±9.91 ml and ranged from 22-135 ml, 32-133 ml and 200-251 ml respectively. The mean platelet count of PRP-PC, BC-PC and apheresis-PC was 7.6±2.97 x 1010/unit, 7.3±2.98 x 1010/unit and 4.13±1.32 x 1011/unit and ranged from 3.2-16.2 x 1010/unit, 0.6-16.4 x 1010/unit and 1.22-8.9 x 1011/unit respectively. The mean WBC count in PRP-PC (n = 10, BC-PC (n = 10 and apheresis-PC (n = 6 units was 4.05±0.48 x 107/unit, 2.08±0.39 x 107/unit and 4.8±0.8 x 106/unit and ranged from 3.4 -4.77 x 107/unit, 1.6-2.7 x 107/unit and 3.2 - 5.2 x 106/unit respectively. A total of 26 units were analyzed for pH changes. Out of these units, 10 each were PRP-PC and BC-PC and 6 units were apheresis-PC. Their mean pH was 6.7±0.26 (mean±SD and ranged from 6.5 - 7.0 and no difference was observed among all three types of platelet concentrate. Conclusion: PRP-PC and BC-PC units were comparable in terms of swirling, platelet count per unit and pH. As expected, we found WBC contamination to be less in BC-PC than PRP-PC units. Variation in volume was more in BC-PC than PRP-PC units and this suggests that further standardization is required for preparation of BC

  15. On scattered subword complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Kása, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Special scattered subwords, in which the gaps are of length from a given set, are defined. The scattered subword complexity, which is the number of such scattered subwords, is computed for rainbow words.

  16. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Changes in platelet parameters in leukocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Baygutalp, Nurcan Kilic; Bakan, Ebubekir; Altas, Gulsum Feyza; Polat, Harun; Dorman, Emrullah

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, platelets are known to have a large variety of functions in many pathophysiological processes and their interaction with endothelial cells and leukocytes is known to play an important role in the pathophysiology of vascular inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between white blood cell count in conditions resulting in leukocytosis and platelet count and platelet parameters including mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, and plateletcrit. White blood cell counts count and all platelet parameters were evaluated in 341 results of normal complete blood count (of which the white blood cell counts were within reference range, group 1) and 327 results of elevated white blood cell counts count (group 2). There was a significant difference between these two groups in PLT counts and PCT values, being higher in Group 2. However, there was no statistically significant difference between two groups in MPV and PDW values. On the other hand, there were statistically significant, but weak, correlations between the WBC and platelet counts in both groups (p<0.01, r=0.235 for group 1, p<0.05, r=0.116 for group 2). As a conclusion PLT count and PCT values increase in infectious conditions. This study and previous studies show that PLTs are employed in infectious conditions but the exact mechanism and the exact clinical importance of this response remains to be cleared by further studies.

  18. Analysis of aggregation of platelets in thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    Platelets are key players in thrombus formation by first rolling over collagen bound von Willebrand factor followed by formation of a stable interaction with collagen. The first adhered platelets bind additional platelets until the whole injury is sealed off by a platelet aggregate. The coagulation system stabilizes the formed platelet plug by creating a tight fibrin network, and then wound contraction takes place because of morphological changes in platelets. Coagulation takes place by platelet activation and aggregation mainly through fibrinogen polymerization into fibrin fibers. The process includes multiple factors, such as thrombin, plasmin, and local shear-rate which regulate and control the process. Coagulation can be divided into two pathways: the intrinsic pathway and the extrinsic pathway. The intrinsic pathway is initiated by the exposure of a negatively charged. It is able to activate factor XII, using a complex reaction that includes prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen as cofactors.. Thrombin is the final enzyme that is needed to convert fibrinogen into fibrin. The extrinsic pathway starts with the exposure of tissue factor to the circulating blood, which is the major initiator of coagulation. There are several feedback loops that reinforce the coagulation cascade, resulting in large amounts of thrombin. It is dependent on the presence of pro-coagulant surfaces of cells expressing negatively charged phospholipids--which include phosphatidylserine (PS)--on their outer membrane. PS-bearing surfaces are able to increase the efficiency of the reactions by concentrating and co-localizing coagulation factors.. Aggregation of platelets are analyzed and compared to adhesion of platelet to erythrocyte and to endothelial cells. This abstract is replacing MAR16-2015-020003.

  19. An introduction to incidence geometry

    CERN Document Server

    De Bruyn, Bart

    2016-01-01

    This book gives an introduction to the field of Incidence Geometry by discussing the basic families of point-line geometries and introducing some of the mathematical techniques that are essential for their study. The families of geometries covered in this book include among others the generalized polygons, near polygons, polar spaces, dual polar spaces and designs. Also the various relationships between these geometries are investigated. Ovals and ovoids of projective spaces are studied and some applications to particular geometries will be given. A separate chapter introduces the necessary mathematical tools and techniques from graph theory. This chapter itself can be regarded as a self-contained introduction to strongly regular and distance-regular graphs. This book is essentially self-contained, only assuming the knowledge of basic notions from (linear) algebra and projective and affine geometry. Almost all theorems are accompanied with proofs and a list of exercises with full solutions is given at the end...

  20. Nanostructures: Scattering beyond the Born approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, S. V.; Syromyatnikov, A. V.; Chumakov, A. P.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Roslyakov, I. V.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, A. V.; Eckerlebe, H.

    2010-03-01

    The neutron scattering on a two-dimensional ordered nanostructure with the third nonperiodic dimension can go beyond the Born approximation. In our model supported by the exact theoretical solution a well-correlated hexagonal porous structure of anodic aluminum oxide films acts as a peculiar two-dimensional grating for the coherent neutron wave. The thickness of the film L (length of pores) plays important role in the transition from the weak to the strong scattering regimes. It is shown that the coherency of the standard small-angle neutron scattering setups suits to the geometry of the studied objects and often affects the intensity of scattering. The proposed theoretical solution can be applied in the small-angle neutron diffraction experiments with flux lines in superconductors, periodic arrays of magnetic or superconducting nanowires, as well as in small-angle diffraction experiments on synchrotron radiation.

  1. Neutron detectors for scattering experiments at HANARO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Myungkook Moon; Changhee Lee; Jongkyu Cheon; Younghyun Choi; Harkrho Kim; Shraddha S Desai

    2008-11-01

    Position sensitive detectors (PSD) measure the distribution of scattered neutrons and are essential tools for neutron scattering experiments. Various types of neutron detectors used at neutron diffractometers are conventional tube detectors, 1-D and 2-D PSDs. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing various kinds of PSDs to improve the instrument performance and to develop new scattering instruments. Our development work is initiated with 1-D PSD for residual stress analysis spectrometer and finally the technology is extended to development of 2-D PSD with planar and curved geometry. All PSDs are based on multiwire grid assembly with delay line readout method for position encoding, as the response is faster than charge division method and enables higher count rate capability. Design details and operational characteristics of some of the PSDs developed, for application at neutron scattering instruments are presented.

  2. Cloaking through cancellation of diffusive wave scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2016-08-10

    A new cloaking mechanism, which makes enclosed objects invisible to diffusive photon density waves, is proposed. First, diffusive scattering from a basic core-shell geometry, which represents the cloaked structure, is studied. The conditions of scattering cancellation in a quasi-static scattering regime are derived. These allow for tailoring the diffusivity constant of the shell enclosing the object so that the fields scattered from the shell and the object cancel each other. This means that the photon flow outside the cloak behaves as if the cloaked object were not present. Diffusive light invisibility may have potential applications in hiding hot spots in infrared thermography or tissue imaging. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of platelet function using multiple electrode platelet aggregometry in dogs with septic peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronald H L; Chan, Daniel L

    2016-09-01

    To assess platelet function via multiple electrode platelet aggregometry (MEPA) in dogs with septic peritonitis and in healthy dogs. The secondary aim was to determine if there is prognostic significance to changes in platelet function observed in septic dogs. Prospective, observational cohort study conducted from January 2012 to March 2014. University teaching hospital. Twenty dogs with septic peritonitis and 23 healthy dogs. None. MEPA using arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate, and collagen (COL) as agonists was measured within 24 hours of diagnosis of sepsis. Compared to healthy dogs, platelet aggregation was reduced in dogs with septic peritonitis for all agonists (P peritonitis. Circulating platelets from dogs with septic peritonitis have diminished aggregation in response to multiple platelet agonists. MEPA may serve as an assessment tool for illness severity in this patient population. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  4. [Glycoproteins, inherited diseases of platelets, and the role of platelets in wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurden, Alan T; Nurden, Paquita

    2013-02-01

    Recognition that platelets have a glycocalyx rich in membrane glycoproteins prompted the discovery in France that inherited bleeding syndromes due to defects of platelet adhesion and aggregation were caused by deficiencies in major receptors at the platelet surface. Identification of the alpha IIb beta3 integrin prompted the development of powerful anti-thrombotic drugs that have gained worldwide use. Since these discoveries, the genetic causes of many other defects of platelet function and production have been elucidated, with the identification of an ADP receptor, P2 Y12, another widespread target for anti-thrombotic drugs. Discovery of the molecular basis of a rare disease of storage of biologically active proteins in platelet alpha-granules has been accompanied by the recognition of the roles of platelets in inflammation, the innate immune system and tissue repair, opening new avenues for therapeutic advances.

  5. Decrease in platelet activating factor stimulated phosphoinositide turnover during storage of human platelets in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.G.; Shukla, S.D. (Univ. of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia (USA))

    1987-05-01

    Human platelet concentrate from the American Red Cross Blood Center was stored at 24{degree}C in a shaker and aliquots were taken out at time intervals aseptically. Platelet activating factor (PAF) stimulated turnover of phosphoinositide (PPI) was monitored by assaying {sup 32}P incorporation into phosphoinositides using platelet rich plasma (PRP). Platelets in PRP were incubated with 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M PAF at 37{degree}C with gentle shaking and after 5 min their lipids were extracted and analysed by TLC for {sup 32}P-phosphoinositides. The percent stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation by PAF (over control) into PPI was approximately 250, 100, 60, 25 and 20 on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6, respectively. This indicated a dramatic decrease in PAF responsive turnover of platelet PPI during storage. These findings have important implications in relation to PAF receptor activity and viability of platelets at different periods of storage.

  6. Platelets: at the nexus of antimicrobial defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Platelets have traditionally been viewed as fragmentary mediators of coagulation. However, recent molecular and cellular evidence suggests that they have multiple roles in host defence against infection. From first-responders that detect pathogens and rapidly deploy host-defence peptides, to beacons that recruit and enhance leukocyte functions in the context of infection, to liaisons that facilitate the T cell-B cell crosstalk that is required in adaptive immunity, platelets represent a nexus at the intersection of haemostasis and antimicrobial host defence. In this Review, I consider recent insights into the antimicrobial roles of platelets, which are mediated both directly and indirectly to integrate innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens.

  7. Transcellular lipoxygenase metabolism between monocytes and platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigby, T.D.; Meslier, N. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-09-15

    We have examined the effects of co-culture and in vitro co-stimulation on lipoxygenase metabolism in monocytes and platelets. Monocytes were obtained from the peripheral blood of normal volunteers by discontinuous gradient centrifugation and adherence to tissue culture plastic. Platelets were obtained from the platelet-rich plasma of the same donor. When 10(9) platelets and 2.5 x 10(6) monocytes were co-stimulated with 1 microM A23187, these preparations released greater quantities of 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, 5(S),12-(S)dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, and leukotriene C4, 5(S)-hydroxy-6(R)-S-glutathionyl-7,9-trans-11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic (LTC4) when compared with monocytes alone. Release of arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, delta 6-trans-LTB4, and delta 6-trans-12-epi-LTB4 from monocytes was decreased in the presence of platelets. A dose-response curve was constructed and revealed that the above changes became evident when the platelet number exceeded 10(7). Dual radiolabeling experiments with 3H- and 14C-arachidonic acid revealed that monocytes provided arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, and LTA4 for further metabolism by the platelet. Monocytes did not metabolize platelet intermediates detectably. In addition, as much as 1.2 microM 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid and 12(S)-hydroperoxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid had no effect on monocyte lipoxygenase metabolism. Platelets were capable of converting LTA4 to LTC4, but conversion of LTA4 to LTB4 was not detected. We conclude that the monocyte and platelet lipoxygenase pathways undergo a transcellular lipoxygenase interaction that differs from the interaction of the neutrophil and platelet lipoxygenase pathways. In this interaction monocytes provide intermediate substrates for further metabolic conversion by platelets in an unidirectional manner.

  8. Bidirectional optical scattering facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Goniometric optical scatter instrument (GOSI)The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) quantifies the angular distribution of light scattered from a...

  9. Bidirectional optical scattering facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Goniometric optical scatter instrument (GOSI) The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) quantifies the angular distribution of light scattered from...

  10. Guide to Computational Geometry Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Gravesen, Jens; Anton, François;

    be processed before it is useful. This Guide to Computational Geometry Processing reviews the algorithms for processing geometric data, with a practical focus on important techniques not covered by traditional courses on computer vision and computer graphics. This is balanced with an introduction......, metric space, affine spaces, differential geometry, and finite difference methods for derivatives and differential equations Reviews geometry representations, including polygonal meshes, splines, and subdivision surfaces Examines techniques for computing curvature from polygonal meshes Describes...

  11. Linear algebra and projective geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, Reinhold

    2005-01-01

    Geared toward upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, this text establishes that projective geometry and linear algebra are essentially identical. The supporting evidence consists of theorems offering an algebraic demonstration of certain geometric concepts. These focus on the representation of projective geometries by linear manifolds, of projectivities by semilinear transformations, of collineations by linear transformations, and of dualities by semilinear forms. These theorems lead to a reconstruction of the geometry that constituted the discussion's starting point, within algebra

  12. Finding Proofs in Tarskian Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Beeson, Michael; Wos, Larry

    2016-01-01

    We report on a project to use a theorem prover to find proofs of the theorems in Tarskian geometry. These theorems start with fundamental properties of betweenness, proceed through the derivations of several famous theorems due to Gupta and end with the derivation from Tarski's axioms of Hilbert's 1899 axioms for geometry. They include the four challenge problems left unsolved by Quaife, who two decades ago found some \\Otter proofs in Tarskian geometry (solving challenges issued in Wos's 1998...

  13. Phase structures in fuzzy geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Govindarajan, T R; Gupta, K S; Martin, X

    2012-01-01

    We study phase structures of quantum field theories in fuzzy geometries. Several examples of fuzzy geometries as well as QFT's on such geometries are considered. They are fuzzy spheres and beyond as well as noncommutative deformations of BTZ blackholes. Analysis is done analytically and through simulations. Several features like novel stripe phases as well as spontaneous symmetry breaking avoiding Colemen, Mermin, Wagner theorem are brought out. Also we establish that these phases are stable due to topological obstructions.

  14. Thermodynamics of Asymptotically Conical Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Gibbons, Gary W; Saleem, Zain H

    2015-06-12

    We study the thermodynamical properties of a class of asymptotically conical geometries known as "subtracted geometries." We derive the mass and angular momentum from the regulated Komar integral and the Hawking-Horowitz prescription and show that they are equivalent. By deriving the asymptotic charges, we show that the Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics hold. We also propose an analog of Christodulou-Ruffini inequality. The analysis can be generalized to other asymptotically conical geometries.

  15. Planetary Image Geometry Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Robert C.; Pariser, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library is a multi-mission library used for projecting images (EDRs, or Experiment Data Records) and managing their geometry for in-situ missions. A collection of models describes cameras and their articulation, allowing application programs such as mosaickers, terrain generators, and pointing correction tools to be written in a multi-mission manner, without any knowledge of parameters specific to the supported missions. Camera model objects allow transformation of image coordinates to and from view vectors in XYZ space. Pointing models, specific to each mission, describe how to orient the camera models based on telemetry or other information. Surface models describe the surface in general terms. Coordinate system objects manage the various coordinate systems involved in most missions. File objects manage access to metadata (labels, including telemetry information) in the input EDRs and RDRs (Reduced Data Records). Label models manage metadata information in output files. Site objects keep track of different locations where the spacecraft might be at a given time. Radiometry models allow correction of radiometry for an image. Mission objects contain basic mission parameters. Pointing adjustment ("nav") files allow pointing to be corrected. The object-oriented structure (C++) makes it easy to subclass just the pieces of the library that are truly mission-specific. Typically, this involves just the pointing model and coordinate systems, and parts of the file model. Once the library was developed (initially for Mars Polar Lander, MPL), adding new missions ranged from two days to a few months, resulting in significant cost savings as compared to rewriting all the application programs for each mission. Currently supported missions include Mars Pathfinder (MPF), MPL, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix, and Mars Science Lab (MSL). Applications based on this library create the majority of operational image RDRs for those missions. A

  16. Flow cytometric assessment of activation of peripheral blood platelets in dogs with normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żmigrodzka, M; Guzera, M; Winnicka, A

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in hemostasis. Their activation has not yet been evaluated in healthy dogs with a normal and low platelet count. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of activators on platelet activation in dogs with a normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. 72 clinically healthy dogs were enrolled. Patients were allocated into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 30 dogs with a normal platelet count, group 2 included 22 dogs with a platelet count between 100 and 200×109/l and group 3 consisted of 20 dogs with a platelet count lower than 100×109/l. Platelet rich-plasma (PRP) was obtained from peripheral blood samples using tripotassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (K3-EDTA) as anticoagulant. Next, platelets were stimulated using phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or thrombin, stabilized using procaine or left unstimulated. The expression of CD51 and CD41/CD61 was evaluated. Co-expression of CD41/CD61 and Annexin V served as a marker of platelet activation. The expression of CD41/CD61 and CD51 did not differ between the 3 groups. Thrombin-stimulated platelets had a significantly higher activity in dogs with a normal platelet count than in dogs with asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. Procaine inhibited platelet activity in all groups. In conclusion, activation of platelets of healthy dogs in vitro varied depending on the platelet count and platelet activator.

  17. Simulation of platelets suspension flowing through a stenosis model using a dissipative particle dynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Joao S; Gao, Chao; Alemu, Yared; Slepian, Marvin; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-11-01

    Stresses on blood cellular constituents induced by blood flow can be represented by a continuum approach down to the μm level; however, the molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and platelet activation and aggregation are on the order of nm. The coupling of the disparate length and time scales between molecular and macroscopic transport phenomena represents a major computational challenge. In order to bridge the gap between macroscopic flow scales and the cellular scales with the goal of depicting and predicting flow induced thrombogenicity, multi-scale approaches based on particle methods are better suited. We present a top-scale model to describe bulk flow of platelet suspensions: we employ dissipative particle dynamics to model viscous flow dynamics and present a novel and general no-slip boundary condition that allows the description of three-dimensional viscous flows through complex geometries. Dissipative phenomena associated with boundary layers and recirculation zones are observed and favorably compared to benchmark viscous flow solutions (Poiseuille and Couette flows). Platelets in suspension, modeled as coarse-grained finite-sized ensembles of bound particles constituting an enclosed deformable membrane with flat ellipsoid shape, show self-orbiting motions in shear flows consistent with Jeffery's orbits, and are transported with the flow, flipping and colliding with the walls and interacting with other platelets.

  18. Digital geometry in image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    Exploring theories and applications developed during the last 30 years, Digital Geometry in Image Processing presents a mathematical treatment of the properties of digital metric spaces and their relevance in analyzing shapes in two and three dimensions. Unlike similar books, this one connects the two areas of image processing and digital geometry, highlighting important results of digital geometry that are currently used in image analysis and processing. The book discusses different digital geometries in multi-dimensional integral coordinate spaces. It also describes interesting properties of

  19. Initiation to global Finslerian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Akbar-Zadeh, Hassan

    2006-01-01

    After a brief description of the evolution of thinking on Finslerian geometry starting from Riemann, Finsler, Berwald and Elie Cartan, the book gives a clear and precise treatment of this geometry. The first three chapters develop the basic notions and methods, introduced by the author, to reach the global problems in Finslerian Geometry. The next five chapters are independent of each other, and deal with among others the geometry of generalized Einstein manifolds, the classification of Finslerian manifolds of constant sectional curvatures. They also give a treatment of isometric, affine, p

  20. Pathogen-Reduced, Extended Platelet Storage in Platelet Additive Solution (PAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    concentrations will be performed to ensure the desired concentration was achieved. Platelet Additive Solutions are isotonic solutions used to replace a...Sherrill J. Slichter, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Bloodworks Northwest Seattle, WA 98104 REPORT DATE: October 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pathogen-Reduced, Extended Platelet Storage in Platelet Additive Solution (PAS) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0441 5b. GRANT

  1. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Ye-Ming Lee; Kuo-Hsien Hsieh; Wan-Jung Lu; Hsiu-Chu Chou; Duen-Suey Chou; Li-Ming Lien; Joen-Rong Sheu; Kuan-Hung Lin

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation...

  2. Platelet Lysates Produced from Expired Platelet Concentrates Support Growth and Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Mjoll Jonsdottir-Buch; Ramona Lieder; Olafur Eysteinn Sigurjonsson

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells are promising candidates in regenerative cell therapy. Conventional culture methods involve the use of animal substances, specifically fetal bovine serum as growth supplement. Since the use of animal-derived products is undesirable for human applications, platelet lysates produced from human platelets are an attractive alternative. This is especially true if platelet lysates from already approved transfusion units at blood banks can be utilized. The purpose ...

  3. Revascularization of Immature Necrotic Teeth: Platelet rich Fibrin an Edge over Platelet rich Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Neelam Mittal; Isha Narang

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Revascularization is one such entity that has found its clinical application in the field of endodontics for the manage-ment of immature permanent necrotic teeth. The protocols for revascularization of such teeth focus especially on delivery of stem cells and scaffolds in a nonsurgical manner rather than concentrated growth micro molecules.The hypothesis: This article proposes the role of platelet concentrates such as platelet rich fibrin (PRF) and platelet rich plasma (PRP) in ...

  4. Platelet lipidomics: a modern day perspective on lipid discovery and characterization in platelets

    OpenAIRE

    O’Donnell, Valerie B.; Murphy, Robert C.; Watson, Steve P.

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are diverse families of biomolecules that perform essential structural and signaling roles in platelets. Their formation and metabolism is tightly controlled by enzymes and signal transduction pathways, and their dysregulation leads to significant defects in platelet function and disease. Platelet activation is associated with significant changes to membrane lipids, and formation of diverse bioactive lipids that play essential roles in hemostasis. In recent years, new generation mass s...

  5. Platelet-rich fibrin matrix for facial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Anthony P; Saman, Masoud

    2012-05-01

    Platelets are known primarily for their role in hemostasis, but there is increasing interest in the effect of platelets on wound healing. Platelet isolates such as platelet-rich plasma have been advocated to enhance and accelerate wound healing. This article describes the use of a novel preparation, platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM), for facial plastic surgery applications such as volume augmentation, fat transfer supplementation, and as an adjunct to open surgical procedures.

  6. Platelet interaction with bacterial toxins and secreted products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Oonagh

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria that enter the bloodstream will encounter components of the cellular and soluble immune response. Platelets contribute to this response and have emerged as an important target for bacterial pathogens. Bacteria produce diverse extracellular proteins and toxins that have been reported to modulate platelet function. These interactions can result in complete or incomplete platelet activation or inhibition of platelet activation, depending on the bacteria and bacterial product. The nature of the platelet response may be highly relevant to disease pathogenesis.

  7. Evaluation of platelet thromboxane radioimmunoassay method to measure platelet life-span: Comparison with /sup 111/indium-platelet method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallabhajosula, S.; Machac, J.; Badimon, L.; Lipszyc, H.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Fuster, V.

    1985-05-01

    The platelet activation during radiolabeling in vitro with Cr-51 and In-111 may affect the platelet life-span (PLS) in vivo. A new RIA method to measure PLS is being evaluated. Aspirin inhibits platelet thromboxane (TxA/sub 2/) by acetylating cyclooxygenase. The time required for the TxA/sub 2/ levels to return towards control values depends on the rate of new platelets entering circulation and is a measure of PLS. A single dose of aspirin (150mg) was given to 5 normal human subjects. Blood samples were collected for 2 days before aspirin and daily for 10 days. TxA/sub 2/ production in response to endogenous thrombin was studied by allowing 1 ml blood sample to clot at 37/sup 0/C for 90 min. Serum TxB/sub 2/ (stable breakdown product of Tx-A/sub 2/) levels determined by RIA technique. The plot of TxB/sub 2/ levels (% control) against time showed a gradual increase. The PLS calculated by linear regression analysis assuming a 2-day lag period before cyclooxygenase recovery is 9.7 +- 2.37. In the same 5 subjects, platelets from a 50ml blood sample were labeled with /sup 111/In-tropolone in 2 ml autologous plasma. Starting at 1 hr after injection of labeled platelets, 10 blood samples were obtained over a 8 day period. The PLS calculated based on a linear regression analysis is 10.2 +. 1.4. The PLS measured from the rate of platelet disappearance from circulation and the rate of platelet regeneration into circulation are quite comparable in normal subjects. TxA/sub 2/ regeneration RIA may provide a method to measure PLS without administering radioactivity to patient.

  8. Single-step separation of platelets from whole blood coupled with digital quantification by interfacial platelet cytometry (iPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basabe-Desmonts, L; Ramstrom, S; Meade, G; O'Neill, S; Riaz, A; Lee, L P; Ricco, A J; Kenny, D

    2010-09-21

    We report the efficient single-step separation of individual platelets from unprocessed whole blood, enabling digital quantification of platelet function using interfacial platelet cytometry (iPC) on a chip. iPC is accomplished by the precision micropatterning of platelet-specific protein surfaces on solid substrates. By separating platelets from whole blood using specific binding to protein spots of a defined size, iPC implements a simple incubate-and-rinse approach, without sample preparation, that enables (1) the study of platelets in the physiological situation of interaction with a protein surface, (2) the choice of the number of platelets bound on each protein spot, from one to many, (3) control of the platelet-platelet distance, including the possibility to study noninteracting single platelets, (4) digital quantification (counting) of platelet adhesion to selected protein matrices, enabling statistical characterization of platelet subpopulations from meaningfully large numbers of single platelets, (5) the study of platelet receptor expression and spatial distribution, and (6) a detailed study of the morphology of isolated single platelets at activation levels that can be manipulated. To date, we have demonstrated 1-4 of the above list. Platelets were separated from whole blood using iPC with fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor (VWF), and anti-CD42b antibody printed "spots" ranging from a fraction of one to several platelet diameters (2-24 μm). The number of platelets captured per spot depends strongly on the protein matrix and the surface area of the spot, together with the platelet volume, morphology, and activation state. Blood samples from healthy donors, a May-Hegglin-anomaly patient, and a Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia patient were analyzed via iPC to confirm the specificity of the interaction between protein matrices and platelets. For example, the results indicate that platelets interact with fibrinogen spots only through the fibrinogen receptor (

  9. Null twisted geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Speziale, Simone

    2013-01-01

    We define and investigate a quantisation of null hypersurfaces in the context of loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph. The main tool we use is the parametrisation of the theory in terms of twistors, which has already proved useful in discussing the interpretation of spin networks as the quantization of twisted geometries. The classical formalism can be extended in a natural way to null hypersurfaces, with the Euclidean polyhedra replaced by null polyhedra with space-like faces, and SU(2) by the little group ISO(2). The main difference is that the simplicity constraints present in the formalims are all first class, and the symplectic reduction selects only the helicity subgroup of the little group. As a consequence, information on the shapes of the polyhedra is lost, and the result is a much simpler, abelian geometric picture. It can be described by an Euclidean singular structure on the 2-dimensional space-like surface defined by a foliation of space-time by null hypersurfaces. This geometric structure is na...

  10. Matrix Information Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    This book is an outcome of the Indo-French Workshop on Matrix Information Geometries (MIG): Applications in Sensor and Cognitive Systems Engineering, which was held in Ecole Polytechnique and Thales Research and Technology Center, Palaiseau, France, in February 23-25, 2011. The workshop was generously funded by the Indo-French Centre for the Promotion of Advanced Research (IFCPAR).  During the event, 22 renowned invited french or indian speakers gave lectures on their areas of expertise within the field of matrix analysis or processing. From these talks, a total of 17 original contribution or state-of-the-art chapters have been assembled in this volume. All articles were thoroughly peer-reviewed and improved, according to the suggestions of the international referees. The 17 contributions presented  are organized in three parts: (1) State-of-the-art surveys & original matrix theory work, (2) Advanced matrix theory for radar processing, and (3) Matrix-based signal processing applications.  

  11. Functional integration over geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Mottola, E

    1995-01-01

    The geometric construction of the functional integral over coset spaces {\\cal M}/{\\cal G} is reviewed. The inner product on the cotangent space of infinitesimal deformations of \\cal M defines an invariant distance and volume form, or functional integration measure on the full configuration space. Then, by a simple change of coordinates parameterizing the gauge fiber \\cal G, the functional measure on the coset space {\\cal M}/{\\cal G} is deduced. This change of integration variables leads to a Jacobian which is entirely equivalent to the Faddeev-Popov determinant of the more traditional gauge fixed approach in non-abelian gauge theory. If the general construction is applied to the case where \\cal G is the group of coordinate reparametrizations of spacetime, the continuum functional integral over geometries, {\\it i.e.} metrics modulo coordinate reparameterizations may be defined. The invariant functional integration measure is used to derive the trace anomaly and effective action for the conformal part of the me...

  12. Coframe geometry and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Itin, Yakov

    2007-01-01

    The possible extensions of GR for description of fermions on a curved space, for supergravity and for loop quantum gravity require a richer set of 16 independent variables. These variables can be assembled in a coframe field, i.e., a local set of four linearly independent 1-forms. In the ordinary formulation, the coframe gravity does not have any connection to a specific geometry even being constructed from the geometrical meaningful objects. A geometrization of the coframe gravity is an aim of this paper. We construct a complete class of the coframe connections which are linear in the first order derivatives of the coframe field on an $n$ dimensional manifolds with and without a metric. The subclasses of the torsion-free, metric-compatible and flat connections are derived. We also study the behavior of the geometrical structures under local transformations of the coframe. The remarkable fact is an existence of a subclass of connections which are invariant when the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the Ma...

  13. Ostrich eggs geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Nedomová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise quantification of the profile of egg can provide a powerful tool for the analysis of egg shape for various biological problems. A new approach to the geometry of a Ostrich’s egg profile is presented here using an analysing the egg’s digital photo by edge detection techniques. The obtained points on the eggshell counter are fitted by the Fourier series. The obtained equations describing an egg profile have been used to calculate radii of curvature. The radii of the curvature at the important point of the egg profile (sharp end, blunt end and maximum thickness are independent on the egg shape index. The exact values of the egg surface and the egg volume have been obtained. These quantities are also independent on the egg shape index. These quantities can be successively estimated on the basis of simplified equations which are expressed in terms of the egg length, L¸ and its width, B. The surface area of the eggshells also exhibits good correlation with the egg long circumference length. Some limitations of the most used procedures have been also shown.

  14. Geometries from field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Sinya; Kikuchi, Kengo; Onogi, Tetsuya

    2015-10-01

    We propose a method to define a d+1-dimensional geometry from a d-dimensional quantum field theory in the 1/N expansion. We first construct a d+1-dimensional field theory from the d-dimensional one via the gradient-flow equation, whose flow time t represents the energy scale of the system such that trArr 0 corresponds to the ultraviolet and trArr infty to the infrared. We then define the induced metric from d+1-dimensional field operators. We show that the metric defined in this way becomes classical in the large-N limit, in the sense that quantum fluctuations of the metric are suppressed as 1/N due to the large-N factorization property. As a concrete example, we apply our method to the O(N) nonlinear σ model in two dimensions. We calculate the 3D induced metric, which is shown to describe an anti-de Sitter space in the massless limit. Finally, we discuss several open issues for future studies.

  15. Optimum Stirling engine geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senft, J.R. [University of Wisconsin, River Walls, WI (United States). Mathematics Dept.

    2002-07-01

    This paper combines the author's work on mechanical efficiency of reciprocating engines with the classic Schmidt thermodynamic model for Stirling engines and revisits the problem of identifying optimal engine geometry. All previous optimizations using the Schmidt theory focused on obtaining a maximal specific indicated cyclic work. This does not necessarily produce the highest shaft output. Indeed, some optima based upon indicated work would yield engines that cannot run at all due to excessive intrinsic mechanical losses. The analysis presented in this paper shows how to optimize for shaft or brake work output. Specifically, it presents solutions to the problem of finding the piston-to-displacer swept volume ratio and phase angle which will give the maximum brake output for a given total swept volume, given temperature extremes, a given mean operating pressure, and a given engine mechanism effectiveness. The paper covers the split-cylinder or gamma-type Stirling in detail, serving as a model for similar analysis of the other Stirling engine configurations. (author)

  16. Thrombopoietin induces p-selectin expression on platelets and subsequent platelet/leukocyte interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbles, Heather E; Navara, Christopher S; Hupke, Michael A; Vassilev, Alexei O; Uckun, Fatih M

    2002-04-12

    Ligation of thrombopoietin (TPO) to the platelet c-Mpl receptor induces numerous biochemical pathways in the absence of aggregation. Two forms of recombinant TPO are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of thrombocytopenia. This study focuses on the effects of the full-length recombinant human TPO (rhTPO) on platelets in a whole blood system. Platelet-leukocyte associations (PLAs) were visualized following rhTPO stimulation as CD42b/CD 45 double positive clusters by FACS analysis. Treatment of washed platelets with rhTPO induced granule release and expression of the leukocyte adhesion receptor P-selectin (CD 62P) in the absence of aggregation and calcium mobilization. RhTPO also induced platelet-leukocyte interactions in whole blood. Following stimulation, leukocytes were recruited by platelets through P-selectin in a calcium-dependent manner. rhTPO stimulates platelet-leukocyte associations in whole blood through expression of platelet P-selectin. To our knowledge, this is the first report that identifies TPO as a promoter of platelet-leukocyte interactions.

  17. Platelets and erythrocyte-bound platelets bind infectious HIV-1 in plasma of chronically infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Zoltan; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Eller, Michael A; Thelian, Doris; Matyas, Gary R; Kunz, Anjali N; Alving, Carl R

    2013-01-01

    Chronic HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent viremia in most patients, but it remains unclear how free virus may survive the potential hostile effects of plasma. We investigated whether sites might exist on the surfaces of circulating blood cells for protection of infectious HIV-1 particles. Red blood cells (RBC) either from blood of uninfected normal individuals, or from blood obtained without EDTA from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, invariably contained a small number of RBC having attached platelets as determined by flow cytometry, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy. After mixing normal RBC with platelet-rich plasma, discrete populations of RBC, platelets, and complexes of platelets attached to RBC were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Upon incubation of purified cells or platelets with HIV-1 followed by washing and co-incubation with CD4-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), platelets, and platelet-RBC complexes, but not platelet-free RBC, caused infection of PBMC. Infection was prevented by pre-treating the platelet-RBC complexes with EDTA. Plasma and RBC (comprising a RBC/platelet-RBC mixture) from chronically infected patients with low viral loads were also co-incubated with PBMC ex vivo to determine the presence of infectious HIV-1. All freshly isolated plasmas from the HIV-1-infected donors, obtained in the absence of anticoagulant, were noninfectious. Interestingly, the RBC from most of the patients caused cell-cell infection of PBMC that was prevented by stripping the RBC with EDTA. A monoclonal antibody to DC-SIGN partially inhibited cell-cell HIV-1 infection of PBMC by normal RBC pre-incubated with platelets and HIV-1. We conclude: (a) platelet-free EDTA-free plasma from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, although containing viral RNA, is an environment that lacks detectable infectious HIV-1; (b) platelets and platelet-RBC complexes, but not purified RBC, bind infectious HIV-1; (c) DC

  18. Platelets and erythrocyte-bound platelets bind infectious HIV-1 in plasma of chronically infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Beck

    Full Text Available Chronic HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent viremia in most patients, but it remains unclear how free virus may survive the potential hostile effects of plasma. We investigated whether sites might exist on the surfaces of circulating blood cells for protection of infectious HIV-1 particles. Red blood cells (RBC either from blood of uninfected normal individuals, or from blood obtained without EDTA from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, invariably contained a small number of RBC having attached platelets as determined by flow cytometry, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy. After mixing normal RBC with platelet-rich plasma, discrete populations of RBC, platelets, and complexes of platelets attached to RBC were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Upon incubation of purified cells or platelets with HIV-1 followed by washing and co-incubation with CD4-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, platelets, and platelet-RBC complexes, but not platelet-free RBC, caused infection of PBMC. Infection was prevented by pre-treating the platelet-RBC complexes with EDTA. Plasma and RBC (comprising a RBC/platelet-RBC mixture from chronically infected patients with low viral loads were also co-incubated with PBMC ex vivo to determine the presence of infectious HIV-1. All freshly isolated plasmas from the HIV-1-infected donors, obtained in the absence of anticoagulant, were noninfectious. Interestingly, the RBC from most of the patients caused cell-cell infection of PBMC that was prevented by stripping the RBC with EDTA. A monoclonal antibody to DC-SIGN partially inhibited cell-cell HIV-1 infection of PBMC by normal RBC pre-incubated with platelets and HIV-1. We conclude: (a platelet-free EDTA-free plasma from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, although containing viral RNA, is an environment that lacks detectable infectious HIV-1; (b platelets and platelet-RBC complexes, but not purified RBC, bind infectious HIV

  19. The expression levels of platelet adhesive receptors in PRP derived platelet concentrates during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Nassaji

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Major platelet adhesive receptors that contribute significantly to thrombus formation include platelet receptor glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα of the GPIb-IX-V complex and platelet glycoprotein VI (GPVI. GPIbα plays a crucial role in platelet tethering to sub-endothelial matrix, which initiates thrombus formation at arterial shear rates, whereas GPVI is critically involved in platelets firm adhesion to the site of injury regardless of shear condition. During storage, platelets experience some changes that deleteriously affect the expression levels of platelet receptors, which in turn can alter platelet functional behaviors. Considering the important roles of GPIbα and GPVI in platelet adhesion, it seems that any dramatic changes in the expression levels of these receptors can influence adhesive function of transfused platelets. Thereby examining GPIbα and GPVI expression during the storage of platelet concentrates may provide some useful information about the functional quality of these products after transfusion. Methods: In our experimental study, 5 PRP-platelet concentrates were randomly obtained from Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization (IBTO. All the platelet products met the standard quality assessment based on AABB (American Association of Blood Banks guidelines. Washed platelets were subjected to flowcytometry analysis for the evaluation of GPIbα and GPVI receptor expression in day 1, 3 and 5 after storage. Data were presented as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI and analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test with Dunn’s multiple comparison test. Results: The GPIbα expression on first day (MFI=86±5.9 was reduced three days after storage (MFI= 69±6.9. The expression levels continued to reduce until day 5 in which GPIbα expression was markedly decreased to (MFI= 61±7.7 (P= 0.0094. GPVI expression on the days 1, 3 and 5 after storage were 20.6±3.3, 24±2.5 and 14±4.9, respectively. The results showed a significant decrease of

  20. Understanding platelet generation from megakaryocytes: implications for in vitro-derived platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Xiuli; Poncz, Mortimer; Gadue, Paul; French, Deborah L

    2016-03-10

    Platelets are anucleate cytoplasmic discs derived from megakaryocytes that circulate in the blood and have major roles in hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation, and vascular biology. Platelet transfusions are required to prevent the potentially life-threatening complications of severe thrombocytopenia seen in a variety of medical settings including cancer therapy, trauma, and sepsis. Platelets used in the clinic are currently donor-derived which is associated with concerns over sufficient availability, quality, and complications due to immunologic and/or infectious issues. To overcome our dependence on donor-derived platelets for transfusion, efforts have been made to generate in vitro-based platelets. Work in this area has advanced our understanding of the complex processes that megakaryocytes must undergo to generate platelets both in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge has also defined the challenges that must be overcome to bring in vitro-based platelet manufacturing to a clinical reality. This review will focus on our understanding of committed megakaryocytes and platelet release in vivo and in vitro, and how this knowledge can guide the development of in vitro-derived platelets for clinical application.

  1. Donor demographic and laboratory predictors of single donor platelet yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platelet transfusions are essential to prevent morbidity and mortality in patients who are severely thrombocytopenic and are at risk of spontaneous bleeding. Platelets are currently obtained either by fractionation of whole blood or by platelet apheresis. The quality of single donor platelets (SDP in terms of yield influences platelet recovery in the recipient and allows prolonging intervals between transfusions. Material and Methods: Donor demographic and laboratory data were analyzed prior to performing plateletpheresis to identify donor factors that influence platelet yield. The study was conducted on 130 healthy, first-time plateletpheresis donors over a period of 4 years. The plateletpheresis procedures were performed using Fresenius Kabi COM.TEC and Hemonetics MCS plus separator. A relationship between pre-donation donor variables and yield of platelets was studied using the Pearson correlation. Results: The mean platelet yield was 3.160.62x1011 per unit. A positive correlation was observed between platelet yield and pre-donation platelet count, body mass index (BMI; Kg/m2 of the donor, while a negative correlation was observed between age and the platelet yield. Conclusion: Donor pre-donation platelet count, BMI and donor age influence platelet yield. Young healthy donors with a high platelet count and better BMI can give a better platelet yield in the SDP.

  2. Propranolol modifies platelet serotonergic mechanisms in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zółtowski, R; Pawlak, R; Matys, T; Pietraszek, M; Buczko, W

    2002-06-01

    Though the mechanisms for the vascular actions of vasodilatory beta-blockers are mostly determined, some of their interactions with monoaminergic systems are not elucidated. Because there are evidences supporting a possible involvement of serotonin (5-HT) in the actions of beta-blockers, we studied the effect of propranolol on peripheral serotonergic mechanisms in normotensive and Goldblatt two-kidney - one clip (2K1C) hypertensive rats. In both groups of animals propranolol decreased systolic blood pressure, significantly increased whole blood serotonin concentration and at the same time it decreased platelet serotonin level. The uptake of the amine by platelets from hypertensive animals was lower than that of normotensive animals and it was decreased by propranolol only in the latter. In both groups propranolol inhibited potentiation of ADP-induced platelet aggregation by serotonin. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that propranolol modifies platelet serotonergic mechanisms in normotensive and renal hypertensive rats.

  3. Activation of human platelets by misfolded proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herczenik, E.; Bouma, B.; Korporaal, J.A.; Strangi, R.; Zeng, Q.; Gros, P.; van Eck, M.; van Berkel, T.J.C.; Gebbink, M.F.B.G.; Akkerman, J.W.N.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Protein misfolding diseases result from the deposition of insoluble protein aggregates that often contain fibrils called amyloid. Amyloids are found in Alzheimer disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and systemic amyloidosis,which are diseases where platelet activation might be

  4. Mapuche herbal medicine inhibits blood platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Tarnow, Inge; Guzman, Alfonso; Mølgaard, Per; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2012-01-01

    12 plant species traditionally used by the Mapuche people in Chile to treat wounds and inflammations have been evaluated for their direct blood platelet inhibition. Seven of the 12 tested plant species showed platelet inhibitory effect in sheep blood, and four of these were also able to inhibit the ADP- (5.0 μM) and collagen- (2.0 μg/mL) induced aggregations in human blood. These four species in respective extracts (in brackets) were Blechnum chilense (MeOH), Luma apiculata (H(2)O), Amomyrtus luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1) and Cestrum parqui (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1). The platelet aggregating inhibitory effects of A. luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1), and L. apiculata (H(2)O) were substantial and confirmed by inhibition of platelet surface activation markers.

  5. Mapuche Herbal Medicine Inhibits Blood Platelet Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Skanderup Falkenberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 12 plant species traditionally used by the Mapuche people in Chile to treat wounds and inflammations have been evaluated for their direct blood platelet inhibition. Seven of the 12 tested plant species showed platelet inhibitory effect in sheep blood, and four of these were also able to inhibit the ADP- (5.0 μM and collagen- (2.0 μg/mL induced aggregations in human blood. These four species in respective extracts (in brackets were Blechnum chilense (MeOH, Luma apiculata (H2O, Amomyrtus luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1 and Cestrum parqui (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1. The platelet aggregating inhibitory effects of A. luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1, and L. apiculata (H2O were substantial and confirmed by inhibition of platelet surface activation markers.

  6. Relationship between platelet parameters and sudden ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between platelet parameters and sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a ... Data source: A PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, OVID, EMBASE and ... relationship of PDW and SSNHL but due to the limited studies on this subject more ...

  7. Effects of drugs on platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, E E

    1977-01-01

    Numerous drugs and chemicals affect the function of human blood platelets. The mechanism of action of some medications is partly understood. Aspirin is the most frequently involved drug. It appears to interfere with the platelet release reaction by acetylation of a platelet membrane protein which may be involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins. Other anti-inflammatory drugs, including indomethacin, phenylbutazone, ibuprophen (Motrin) and clonixin, also interfere with the release reaction but have a shorter acting course than aspirin. Some drugs stimulate adenylcyclase (gliclazide) or block phosphodiesterase, (dipyridamole, caffeine) both of which actions lead to an increase in adenosine cyclic 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP) and decrease aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP). These interactions should be known to clinical scientists since patients using these medicaments may manifest abnormal platelet function tests in the laboratory and mild hemorrhagic syndromes in the clinic.

  8. Physiopathology of blood platelets and development of platelet substitutes. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, M G

    1976-04-28

    Progress is reported on studies on the physiology of blood platelets in thrombocytopenic patients and rabbits. Methods for the detection of platelet antibodies and the preservation of platelets in vitro were investigated. Studies on the effect of low doses of x irradiation (up to 1000 R) on platelet function indicate that platelets exposed to ionizing radiation have increased functional activity. A list is included of publications that report the results of the studies in detail.

  9. Doppler ghosts in a hall of mirrors polarisation profiles of scattered emission lines

    CERN Document Server

    Henney, W J

    1994-01-01

    The Doppler shifts of optical emission lines which have been scattered by surrounding dust and electrons can provide useful information about the kinematics, geometry and physical conditions of astrophysical flows. In principle, the scatterers can provide views of the line-emitting gas from different directions, allowing the 3-d velocity field of the emitting gas to be determined and revealing sources which are hidden from direct view. Unfortunately, as in a Hall of Mirrors, the resultant multiple images can be confusing and hard to interpret. In general, the scattering geometry will be unknown, which makes it difficult to disentangle the effect of the motion of the scatterers from that of the motion of the emitting source. In this situation, spectropolarimetric observations can be a great help, since the scattered light will be partially polarised to a degree dependent on the angle of scattering and on the details of the scattering process. Analysis of the polarisation profiles of the scattered emission line...

  10. Platelet Glycoprotein lb-1X and Malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    patient with systemic lupus erythematosus . Am J Hematol 2001; 67:262-67. 20. Arthur JF, Dunkley S and Andrews RK. Platelet glycoprotein VI-related...Moroi M. Antibody against platelet membrane glyco- protein VI in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus . Am J Hematol 2001; 67: 262–7. 9 Arthur JF...Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the

  11. Dengue virus binding and replication by platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ayo Y; Sutherland, Michael R; Pryzdial, Edward L G

    2015-07-16

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes ∼200 million cases of severe flulike illness annually, escalating to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome in ∼500,000. Although thrombocytopenia is typical of both mild and severe diseases, the mechanism triggering platelet reduction is incompletely understood. As a probable initiating event, direct purified DENV-platelet binding was followed in the current study by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and confirmed antigenically. Approximately 800 viruses specifically bound per platelet at 37°C. Fewer sites were observed at 25°C, the blood bank storage temperature (∼350 sites), or 4°C, known to attenuate virus cell entry (∼200 sites). Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were implicated as coreceptors because only the combination of anti-DC-SIGN and low-molecular-weight heparin prevented binding. Interestingly, at 37°C and 25°C, platelets replicated the positive sense single-stranded RNA genome of DENV by up to ∼4-fold over 7 days. Further time course experiments demonstrated production of viral NS1 protein, which is known to be highly antigenic in patient serum. The infectivity of DENV intrinsically decayed in vitro, which was moderated by platelet-mediated generation of viable progeny. This was shown using a transcription inhibitor and confirmed by freeze-denatured platelets being incapable of replicating the DENV genome. For the first time, these data demonstrate that platelets directly bind DENV saturably and produce infectious virus. Thus, expression of antigen encoded by DENV is a novel consideration in the pathogen-induced thrombocytopenia mechanism. These results furthermore draw attention to the possibility that platelets may produce permissive RNA viruses in addition to DENV.

  12. Controlling electromagnetic scattering with wire metamaterial resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filonov, Dmitry S.; Shalin, Alexander S.; Iorsh, Ivan; Belov, Pavel A.; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    Manipulation of radiation is required for enabling a span of electromagnetic applications. Since properties of antennas and scatterers are very sensitive to a surrounding environment, macroscopic artificially created materials are good candidates for shaping their characteristics. In particular, metamaterials enable controlling both dispersion and density of electromagnetic states, available for scattering from an object. As the result, properly designed electromagnetic environment could govern waves' phenomena. Here electromagnetic properties of scattering dipoles, situated inside a wire medium (metamaterial) are analyzed both numerically and experimentally. Impact of the metamaterial geometry, dipole arrangement inside the medium, and frequency of the incident radiation on scattering phenomena was studied. It was shown that the resonance of the dipole hybridizes with Fabry-Perot modes of the metamaterial, giving rise to a complete reshaping of electromagnetic properties. Regimes of controlled scattering suppression and super-scattering were observed. Numerical analysis is in an agreement with experiments, performed at the GHz spectral range. The reported approach to scattering control with metamaterials could be directly mapped into optical and infrared spectral ranges by employing scalability properties of Maxwell's equations.

  13. Platelet dynamics in three-dimensional simulation of whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Diamond, Scott L; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2014-06-03

    A high-fidelity computational model using a 3D immersed boundary method is used to study platelet dynamics in whole blood. We focus on the 3D effects of the platelet-red blood cell (RBC) interaction on platelet margination and near-wall dynamics in a shear flow. We find that the RBC distribution in whole blood becomes naturally anisotropic and creates local clusters and cavities. A platelet can enter a cavity and use it as an express lane for a fast margination toward the wall. Once near the wall, the 3D nature of the platelet-RBC interaction results in a significant platelet movement in the transverse (vorticity) direction and leads to anisotropic platelet diffusion within the RBC-depleted zone or cell-free layer (CFL). We find that the anisotropy in platelet motion further leads to the formation of platelet clusters, even in the absence of any platelet-platelet adhesion. The transverse motion, and the size and number of the platelet clusters are observed to increase with decreasing CFL thickness. The 3D nature of the platelet-RBC collision also induces fluctuations in off-shear plane orientation and, hence, a rotational diffusion of the platelets. Although most marginated platelets are observed to tumble just outside the RBC-rich zone, platelets further inside the CFL are observed to flow with an intermittent dynamics that alters between sliding and tumbling, as a result of the off-shear plane rotational diffusion, bringing them even closer to the wall. To our knowledge, these new findings are based on the fundamentally 3D nature of the platelet-RBC interaction, and they underscore the importance of using cellular-scale 3D models of whole blood to understand platelet margination and near-wall platelet dynamics.

  14. Surrogate Modeling for Geometry Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas Larrazabal, Marielba de la Caridad; Abraham, Yonas; Holzwarth, Natalie;

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for optimizing the nuclear geometry of an atomic system is described. Instead of the original expensive objective function (energy functional), a small number of simpler surrogates is used.......A new approach for optimizing the nuclear geometry of an atomic system is described. Instead of the original expensive objective function (energy functional), a small number of simpler surrogates is used....

  15. Analytic Geometry, A Tentative Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helwig, G. Alfred; And Others

    This teacher's guide for a semester course in analytic geometry is based on the text "Analytic Geometry" by W. K. Morrill. Included is a daily schedule of suggested topics and homework assignments. Specific teaching hints are also given. The content of the course includes point and plane vectors, straight lines, point and space vectors, planes,…

  16. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  17. [The role of blood platelets in infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micota, Bartłomiej; Sadowska, Beata; Różalska, Barbara

    2015-05-17

    Platelets are primarily associated with their main function, hemostasis, although it is known that these cells also exhibit biological activity in cancer progression, inflammation and infectious processes. During infection platelets, due to the expression of specific receptors - Toll-like receptors (TLRs) - which recognize molecular patterns associated with pathogens - pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) - are activated by the presence of microorganism components and/or substances released from damaged cells/tissue. Further antimicrobial activity of platelets is based on their capacity for phagocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the synthesis, storage and release of proteins/peptides with antimicrobial activity. Another mechanism of platelet action is their immunomodulatory activity. It is based mainly on the ability to secrete chemotactic factors allowing the accumulation of professional immunocompetent cells at the site of infection, thus enhancing the effective eradication of an infectious agent. In chronic infections, platelets, due to release of numerous growth factors and various cytokines, support mechanisms of acquired immunity. They accelerate the maturation of dendritic cells, stimulate B cells to be immunoglobulin-producing plasma cells and potentiate the activity of T cells. Unfortunately, in certain situations (the existence of specific risk factors) the interaction of microorganisms with activated platelets may also be the cause of pathology within the cardiovascular system.

  18. Effects of irradiation on platelet function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rock, G.; Adams, G.A.; Labow, R.S.

    1988-09-01

    Current medical practice involves the irradiation of blood components, including platelet concentrates, before their administration to patients with severe immunosuppression. The authors studied the effect of irradiation on in vitro platelet function and the leaching of plasticizers from the bag, both immediately and after 5 days of storage. The platelet count, white cell count, pH, glucose, lactate, platelet aggregation and release reaction, and serotonin uptake were not altered by the irradiation of random-donor or apheresis units with 2000 rads carried out at 0 and 24 hours and 5 days after collection. The leaching of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate from the plastic bags followed by the conversion to mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was not increased by irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to irradiate platelet concentrates on the day of collection and subsequently store them for at least 5 days while maintaining in vitro function. This procedure could have considerable benefit for blood banks involved in the provision of many platelet products.

  19. Treatment of osteochondral injuries with platelet gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Danieli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Treatments for injured articular cartilage have not advanced to the point that efficient regeneration is possible. However, there has been an increase in the use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of several orthopedic disorders, including chondral injuries. Our hypothesis is that the treatment of chondral injuries with platelet gel results in higher-quality repair tissue after 180 days compared with chondral injuries not treated with gel. METHODS: A controlled experimental laboratory study was performed on 30 male rabbits to evaluate osteochondral injury repair after treatment with or without platelet gel. Osteochondral injuries were surgically induced in both knees of each rabbit at the medial femoral condyle. The left knee injury was filled with the platelet gel, and the right knee was not treated. Microscopic analysis of both knee samples was performed after 180 days using a histological grading scale. RESULTS: The only histological evaluation criterion that was not significantly different between treatments was metachromasia. The group that was treated with platelet gel exhibited superior results in all other criteria (cell morphology, surface regularity, chondral thickness and repair tissue integration and in the total score. CONCLUSION: The repair tissue was histologically superior after 180 days in the study group treated with platelet gel compared with the group of untreated injuries.

  20. Lymphocyte-platelet crosstalk in Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznik, Boris I; Vitkovsky, Yuri A; Gvozdeva, Olga V; Solpov, Alexey V; Magen, Eli

    2014-03-01

    Platelets can modulate lymphocytes' role in the pathophysiology of thyroid autoimmune diseases. The present study was performed to clarify the status of platelet-lymphocyte subpopulations aggregation in circulating blood in patients with Graves' disease (GD). One hundred and fifty patients with GD (GD group) and 45 hyperthyroid patients with toxic multinodular goiter (TMG group) were recruited in the study. Control group consisted 150 healthy subjects. Immunophenotyping of lymphocytes was performed by flow cytometry. Detection of lymphocyte-platelet aggregates (LPAs) was done using light microscope after Ficoll-gradient centrifugation. The group of GD patients exhibited reduced CD8 lymphocyte and higher CD19 cell counts compared with TMG group and healthy controls. A greater number of activated CD3, HLA-DR+ lymphocytes were observed in GD than in TMG group and control group. GD group was characterized by lower blood platelet count (232 ± 89 × 10 cells/µL) than TMG group (251 ± 97 × 10 cells/µL; P < 0.05) and control group (262 ± 95 × 10 cells/µL; P < 0.05). In GD group, more platelet-bound lymphocytes (332 ± 91 /µL) were found than that in TMG group (116 ± 67/µL, P < 0.005) and control group (104 ± 58 /µL; P < 0.001). GD is associated with higher levels of activated lymphocytes and lymphocyte-platelet aggregates.

  1. Basic algebraic geometry, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Shafarevich, Igor Rostislavovich

    1994-01-01

    Shafarevich Basic Algebraic Geometry 2 The second edition of Shafarevich's introduction to algebraic geometry is in two volumes. The second volume covers schemes and complex manifolds, generalisations in two different directions of the affine and projective varieties that form the material of the first volume. Two notable additions in this second edition are the section on moduli spaces and representable functors, motivated by a discussion of the Hilbert scheme, and the section on Kähler geometry. The book ends with a historical sketch discussing the origins of algebraic geometry. From the Zentralblatt review of this volume: "... one can only respectfully repeat what has been said about the first part of the book (...): a great textbook, written by one of the leading algebraic geometers and teachers himself, has been reworked and updated. As a result the author's standard textbook on algebraic geometry has become even more important and valuable. Students, teachers, and active researchers using methods of al...

  2. Index Theorems on Torsional Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Tetsuji

    2007-01-01

    We study various topological invariants on a differential geometry in the presence of a totally anti-symmetric torsion H under the closed condition dH=0. By using the identification between the Clifford algebra on a geometry and the canonical quantization condition of fermion in the quantum mechanics, we construct the N=1 quantum mechanical sigma model in the Hamiltonian formalism and extend this model to N=2 system, equipped with the totally anti-symmetric tensor associated with the torsion on the target space geometry. Next we construct transition elements in the Lagrangian path integral formalism and apply them to the analyses of the Witten indices in supersymmetric systems. We improve the formulation of the Dirac index on the torsional geometry which has already been studied. We also formulate the Euler characteristic and the Hirzebruch signature on the torsional geometry.

  3. A new ibuprofen derivative inhibits platelet aggregation and ROS mediated platelet apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodagahalli S Rakesh

    Full Text Available Thrombocytopenia is a serious issue connected with the pathogenesis of several human diseases including chronic inflammation, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs and other oxidative stress-associated pathologies. The indiscriminate use of antibiotics and other biological drugs are reported to result in thrombocytopenia, which is often neglected during the treatment regime. In addition, augmented oxidative stress induced by drugs and pathological conditions has also been shown to induce thrombocytopenia, which seems to be the most obvious consequence of elevated rate of platelet apoptosis. Thus, blocking oxidative stress-induced platelet apoptosis would be of prime importance in order to negotiate thrombocytopenia and associated human pathologies. The current study presents the synthesis and platelet protective nature of novel ibuprofen derivatives. The potent anti-oxidant ibuprofen derivative 4f was selected for the study and the platelet protective efficacy and platelet aggregation inhibitory property has been demonstrated. The compound 4f dose dependently mitigates the oxidative stress-induced platelet apoptosis in both platelet rich plasma and washed platelets. The platelet protective nature of compound 4f was determined by assessing various apoptotic markers such as ROS generation, cytosolic Ca2+ levels, PS externalization, cytochrome C translocation, Caspase activation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytotoxicity, LDH leakage and tyrosine phosphorylation of cytosolic proteins. Furthermore, compound 4f dose dependently ameliorated agonist induced platelet aggregation. Therefore, compound 4f can be estimated as a potential candidate in the treatment regime of pathological disorders associated with platelet activation and apoptosis. In addition, compound 4f can be used as an auxiliary therapeutic agent in pathologies associated with thrombocytopenia.

  4. Assessment of quality of platelets preserved in plasma and platelet additive solution: A Malaysian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munirah Binti Mokhtar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A use of platelet additives solution (PAS improves storage conditions so as to give increased shelf life to platelets and to maintain hemostatic function. Objective: The present study was aimed to compare in vitro quality of platelet rich plasma (PRP-derived platelet concentrate (PC during extended period of storage in plasma and in additive solution (Composol PS and Fresenius. Study Design: Randomized 19 PCs each were used in the study for plasma and PAS as the storage medium. The measurement parameters, including pH, total white blood cell (WBC count, total platelet count, and platelet activation rate, were studied on day 1, day 5, and day 8 of the storage period. The sterility test was carried out on the eighth day of storage. Results: pH of PC suspended in PAS was significantly lower as compared to that in plasma (P < 0.001 for all the three days of sampling. The WBC count, both in plasma and in PAS, showed an acceptable values of being <0.2 Χ 10 9 /unit during the storage period. Platelet count in PAS was higher as compared to that in plasma, though it was not statistically significant. While both the groups showed increased platelet activation rate during the storage, the PCs suspended in PAS showed significantly higher platelet activation rate (p0.001. Results from sterility test showed no bacterial growth in the PCs in both the groups. Conclusion: Most parameters studied on platelet storage in suspending medium of native plasma and PAS remained well within the acceptable limits. However, the pH values and platelet activation rate significantly differed in PAS as compared with plasma.

  5. Geometry of Superluminal Light-Echo Pair Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Light echoes, shadows, and ionization fronts can and do move faster than light, both in the lab and out in the cosmos. In general, though, a single observer cannot tell the speed of such echoes without distance information -- unless a very specific geometry arises: the radial component crosses c. The observer then sees this crossing location as the site where a pair of bright light echoes is created or annihilated. This pair event tells the observer that a precise speed occurs, a speed that does not scale with distance and so can potentially be leveraged to reveal geometry and distance information. A few simple scattering surface geometries are shown illuminated by a point flash, including linear and circular filaments. In practice, useful astronomical flash sources include novae and supernovae, although in theory any uniquely varying source of stellar variability could be sufficient.

  6. Studies on platelet function in bronchial asthma Part 2. Production of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid from platelets and the platelet-lymphocyte interaction in bronchial asthmatics

    OpenAIRE

    角南, 宏二

    1992-01-01

    To clarify the role of platelets in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma, the production of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid(12HETE) from platelets of asthmatics was examined by high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC). The effect of platelets on lymphocyte function was also studied by lymphocyte blastogenesis. The results were as follows : 1) The production of 12HETE from platelets of asthmatics were significantly higher than that of normal subjects(p

  7. Platelets kill intraerythrocytic malarial parasites and mediate survival to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorran, Brendan J; Marshall, Vikki M; de Graaf, Carolyn; Drysdale, Karen E; Shabbar, Meriam; Smyth, Gordon K; Corbin, Jason E; Alexander, Warren S; Foote, Simon J

    2009-02-01

    Platelets play a critical role in the pathogenesis of malarial infections by encouraging the sequestration of infected red blood cells within the cerebral vasculature. But platelets also have well-established roles in innate protection against microbial infections. We found that purified human platelets killed Plasmodium falciparum parasites cultured in red blood cells. Inhibition of platelet function by aspirin and other platelet inhibitors abrogated the lethal effect human platelets exert on P. falciparum parasites. Likewise, platelet-deficient and aspirin-treated mice were more susceptible to death during erythrocytic infection with Plasmodium chabaudi. Both mouse and human platelets bind malarial-infected red cells and kill the parasite within. These results indicate a protective function for platelets in the early stages of erythrocytic infection distinct from their role in cerebral malaria.

  8. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  9. Imaging with Scattered Neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Ballhausen, H.; Abele, H.; Gaehler, R.; Trapp, M.; Van Overberghe, A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-re...

  10. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5 d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function.

  11. Platelet inhibition by nitrite is dependent on erythrocytes and deoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirada Srihirun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated. METHODOLOGY/FINDING: Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger, suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia.

  12. Stability of lyophilized human platelets loaded with small molecule carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J X; Yang, C; Wan, W; Liu, M X; Ren, S P; Quan, G B; Han, Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-term preservation of platelets is a great challenge for blood transfusion centers, due to the required narrow storage temperature arange (22 ± 2 degree C). Short shelf life and potential bacterial growth often lead to the shortage of high-quality platelets. Freeze-dried preservation is thus believed to be a potential solution for long-term platelet storage without losing the hemostasis function. Here we report a new platelet preservation method, which uses small molecule carbohydrates to extend storage time and to maintain platelet function. The activities of lyophilized platelets that were stabilized with small molecule carbohydrate (e.g., cell viability, mean platelet volume, activation characteristics, and aggregation kinetics) were maintained after storage of 30, 60, and 90 days at room temperature, 4 degree C, and -20 degree C. The recovery of freeze-dried platelets was 87 percent in comparison to fresh platelets. The mean platelet volume of rehydrated platelets increased (from 6.8 fl to 8.0 fl). About 40 percent of rehydrated platelets was in the early-activated stage (PCA-1 positive) and 30 percent was in the terminal-activated stage (CD62P positive). The cell viability was about 60 percent as measured with CMFDA vital probes. The aggregation rate of rehydrated platelets after 90-day storage was similar to fresh platelets stored at 22 degree C ± 2 degree C.

  13. Platelet production in hypoxic and RBC-transfused mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    Platelet production rates were studied in hypoxic, red blood cell (RBC) transfused, and normal mice. In addition, platelet depletion was induced in some of the mice by injection of rabbit anti-mouse platelet serum (RAMPS) to stimulate platelet production. Hypoxia alone caused an increase in haematocrit and platelet count at 1 to 3 d, followed by a decrease in platelet counts to below normal values at 6 to 7 d. On the other hand, RBC transfusion caused increased haematocrit and decreased platelet count of mice at 1 to 4 d, with a return of platelet counts to normal by 5 to 6 d. Normal mice and mice transfused with RBC responded to platelet depletion with rebound-thrombocytosis with maximum platelet production 3 to 5 d later and elevated platelet counts on day 5 to 6. However, platelet production in platelet-depleted mice exposed to hypoxia was less marked, and platelet counts did not reach normal levels. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that hypoxia causes thrombocytopenia by stem cell competition between erythroid and megakaryocytic cell lines and/or inhibition of thrombopoietin production.

  14. Platelet activation determines the severity of thrombocytopenia in dengue infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Amrita; Nandi, Dipika; Batra, Harish; Singhal, Rashi; Annarapu, Gowtham K.; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Seth, Tulika; Dar, Lalit; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Vikram, Naval K.; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2017-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with dengue virus (DENV) infections. With a focus on understanding the possible mechanism of thrombocytopenia in DENV infections we described a direct correlation between activation and depletion of platelets in patients. Our data showed a sharp decrease in platelet counts at day 4 of fever in patients. The high DENV genome copies in platelets correlated directly with the elevated platelet activation along with increased binding of complement factor C3 and IgG on their surface at day 4. Recovery in platelet count was observed on day 10 through day 6 and 8 with simultaneous decrease in platelet activation markers. Further, our in vitro data supported the above observations describing a concentration-dependent increase in platelet activation by DENV serotype-2. The high copy number of DENV2 genome in the platelet pellet correlated directly with platelet activation, microparticle generation and clot formation. Furthermore the DENV2-activated platelets were phagocytosed in large numbers by the monocytes. The DENV2-mediated lysis and clearance of platelets were abrogated in presence of platelet activation inhibitor, prostacyclin. These observations collectively suggest that platelet activation status is an important determinant of thrombocytopenia in dengue infections. A careful strategy of inactivation of platelets may rescue them from rapid destruction during DENV infections. PMID:28139770

  15. Anti-platelet Therapy Resistance – Concept, Mechanisms and Platelet Function Tests in Intensive Care Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mărginean Alina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that critically ill patients require special attention and additional consideration during their treatment and management. The multiple systems and organ dysfunctions, typical of the critical patient, often results in different patterns of enteral absorption in these patients. Anti-platelet drugs are the cornerstone in treating patients with coronary and cerebrovascular disease. Dual anti-platelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel is the treatment of choice in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary interventions and is still widely used in patients with acute coronary syndromes. However, despite the use of dual anti-platelet therapy, some patients continue to experience cardiovascular ischemic events. Recurrence of ischemic events is partly attributed to the fact that some patients have poor inhibition of platelet reactivity despite treatment. These patients are considered low- or nonresponders to therapy. The underlying mechanisms leading to resistance are not yet fully elucidated and are probably multifactorial, cellular, genetic and clinical factors being implicated. Several methods have been developed to asses platelet function and can be used to identify patients with persistent platelet reactivity, which have an increased risk of thrombosis. In this paper, the concept of anti-platelet therapy resistance, the underlying mechanisms and the methods used to identify patients with low responsiveness to anti-platelet therapy will be highlighted with a focus on aspirin and clopidogrel therapy and addressing especially critically ill patients.

  16. The Geometry Description Markup Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RadovanChytracek

    2001-01-01

    Currently,a lot of effort is being put on designing complex detectors.A number of simulation and reconstruction frameworks and applications have been developed with the aim to make this job easier.A very important role in this activity is played by the geometry description of the detector apparatus layout and its working environment.However,no real common approach to represent geometry data is available and such data can be found in various forms starting from custom semi-structured text files,source code (C/C++/FORTRAN),to XML and database solutions.The XML(Extensible Markup Language)has proven to provide an interesting approach for describing detector geometries,with several different but incompatible XML-based solutions existing.Therefore,interoperability and geometry data exchange among different frameworks is not possible at present.This article introduces a markup language for geometry descriptions.Its aim is to define a common approach for sharing and exchanging of geometry description data.Its requirements and design have been driven by experience and user feedback from existing projects which have their geometry description in XML.

  17. Hamilton geometry: Phase space geometry from modified dispersion relations

    CERN Document Server

    Barcaroli, Leonardo; Gubitosi, Giulia; Loret, Niccoló; Pfeifer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We describe the Hamilton geometry of the phase space of particles whose motion is characterised by general dispersion relations. In this framework spacetime and momentum space are naturally curved and intertwined, allowing for a simultaneous description of both spacetime curvature and non-trivial momentum space geometry. We consider as explicit examples two models for Planck-scale modified dispersion relations, inspired from the $q$-de Sitter and $\\kappa$-Poincar\\'e quantum groups. In the first case we find the expressions for the momentum and position dependent curvature of spacetime and momentum space, while for the second case the manifold is flat and only the momentum space possesses a nonzero, momentum dependent curvature. In contrast, for a dispersion relation that is induced by a spacetime metric, as in General Relativity, the Hamilton geometry yields a flat momentum space and the usual curved spacetime geometry with only position dependent geometric objects.

  18. Nephropathy in type 1 diabetes is associated with increased circulating activated platelets and platelet hyperreactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Michelson, Alan D.; Barnard, Marc R.;

    2009-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have increased platelet activation compared to non-diabetic controls. Platelet hyperreactivity has been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in Type 2 DM, and with diabetic nephropathy. We investigated the relationship between platelet activation...... and nephropathy in Type 1 DM. Patients with Type 1 DM and diabetic nephropathy (n = 35), age- and sex-matched Type 1 DM patients with persistent normoalbuminuria (n = 51), and healthy age- and sex-matched controls (n = 30) were studied. Platelet surface P-selectin, platelet surface activated GPIIb/IIIa, monocyte...... to 0.5 or 20 microM ADP) was higher in nephropathy patients compared with normoalbuminuric patients (P = 0.027), and non-diabetic controls (P = 0.0057). NPAs were higher in nephropathy patients compared to normoalbuminuric patients (P = 0.0088). MPAs were higher in nephropathy patients compared to non-diabetic...

  19. Geometry and W-Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    The higher-spin geometries of $W_\\infty$-gravity and $W_N$-gravity are analysed and used to derive the complete non-linear structure of the coupling to matter and its symmetries. The symmetry group is a subgroup of the symplectic diffeomorphisms of the cotangent bundle of the world-sheet, and the $W_N$ geometry is obtained from a non-linear truncation of the $W_\\infty$ geometry. Quantum W-gravity is briefly discussed. (Talk given at {\\it Pathways to Fundamental Interactions}, the 16th John Ho...

  20. Linear algebra, geometry and transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Vectors, Mappings and Linearity Numeric Vectors Functions Mappings and Transformations Linearity The Matrix of a Linear Transformation Solving Linear Systems The Linear SystemThe Augmented Matrix and RRE Form Homogeneous Systems in RRE Form Inhomogeneous Systems in RRE Form The Gauss-Jordan Algorithm Two Mapping Answers Linear Geometry Geometric Vectors Geometric/Numeric Duality Dot-Product Geometry Lines, Planes, and Hyperplanes System Geometry and Row/Column Duality The Algebra of Matrices Matrix Operations Special Matrices Matrix Inversion A Logical Digression The Logic of the Inversion Alg

  1. A first course in geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Edward T

    2014-01-01

    This introductory text is designed to help undergraduate students develop a solid foundation in geometry. Early chapters progress slowly, cultivating the necessary understanding and self-confidence for the more rapid development that follows. The extensive treatment can be easily adapted to accommodate shorter courses. Starting with the language of mathematics as expressed in the algebra of logic and sets, the text covers geometric sets of points, separation and angles, triangles, parallel lines, similarity, polygons and area, circles, space geometry, and coordinate geometry. Each chapter incl

  2. Head First 2D Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Fallow), Stray

    2009-01-01

    Having trouble with geometry? Do Pi, The Pythagorean Theorem, and angle calculations just make your head spin? Relax. With Head First 2D Geometry, you'll master everything from triangles, quads and polygons to the time-saving secrets of similar and congruent angles -- and it'll be quick, painless, and fun. Through entertaining stories and practical examples from the world around you, this book takes you beyond boring problems. You'll actually use what you learn to make real-life decisions, like using angles and parallel lines to crack a mysterious CSI case. Put geometry to work for you, and

  3. A new look at geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Irving

    1967-01-01

    This richly detailed overview surveys the development and evolution of geometrical ideas and concepts from ancient times to the present. In addition to the relationship between physical and mathematical spaces, it examines the interactions of geometry, algebra, and calculus. The text proves many significant theorems and employs several important techniques. Chapters on non- Euclidean geometry and projective geometry form brief, self-contained treatments.More than 100 exercises with answers and 200 diagrams illuminate the text. Teachers, students (particularly those majoring in mathematics educa

  4. CATIA-GDML geometry builder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogurov, S.; Berchun, Yu; Chernogorov, A.; Malzacher, P.; Ovcharenko, E.; Semennikov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Due to conceptual difference between geometry descriptions in Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems and particle transport Monte Carlo (MC) codes direct conversion of detector geometry in either direction is not feasible. An original set of tools has been developed for building a GEANT4/ROOT compatible geometry in the CATIA CAD system and exchanging it with mentioned MC packages using GDML file format. A Special structure of a CATIA product tree, a wide range of primitives, different types of multiple volume instantiation, and supporting macros have been implemented.

  5. Quantum Consequences of Parameterizing Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanas, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    The marriage between geometrization and quantization is not successful, so far. It is well known that quantization of gravity , using known quantization schemes, is not satisfactory. It may be of interest to look for another approach to this problem. Recently, it is shown that geometries with torsion admit quantum paths. Such geometries should be parameterizied in order to preserve the quantum properties appeared in the paths. The present work explores the consequences of parameterizing such geometry. It is shown that quantum properties, appeared in the path equations, are transferred to other geometric entities.

  6. Geometry and W-Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hull, C M

    1993-01-01

    The higher-spin geometries of $W_\\infty$-gravity and $W_N$-gravity are analysed and used to derive the complete non-linear structure of the coupling to matter and its symmetries. The symmetry group is a subgroup of the symplectic diffeomorphisms of the cotangent bundle of the world-sheet, and the $W_N$ geometry is obtained from a non-linear truncation of the $W_\\infty$ geometry. Quantum W-gravity is briefly discussed. (Talk given at {\\it Pathways to Fundamental Interactions}, the 16th John Hopkins Workshop on Current Problems in Particle Theory, Gothenborg, 1992.)

  7. Thermal Phase in Bubbling Geometries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang-Yong

    2008-01-01

    We use matrix model to study thermal phase in bubbling half-BPS type IIB geometries with SO(4)×SO(4) symmetry.Near the horizon limit,we find that thermal vacua of bubbling geometries have disjoint parts,and each part is one kind of phase of the thermal system.We connect the thermal dynamics of bubbling geometries with one-dimensional fermions thermal system.Finally,we try to give a new possible way to resolve information loss puzzle.

  8. A General Aspect of Platelet Rich Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur ORAL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific paper is to introduce Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP cure method by people who never heard about it. People can hurt their selves, thus they can have damaged tissue; for instance broken bone, a scar or a wounded area. Furthe rmore damaged tissue can be a cartilage tissue, which takes very long time to heal. Platelets, those exist in the veins as thrombus, come up to repair those damaged tissues. However, platelets would be insufficient to cure damaged area in a short time. At this point PRP cure method give a hand to the healing process. By centrifuging people’s own blood via special kits, platelets can be separated from blood cells as plasma. That plasma’s platelet density is 3 - 5 times greater than that blood’s platelet densit y. Afterwards PRP method is implemented by injection of plasma to the damaged area or tissue. After implementation of 2 - 4 sessions per week, damaged tissue can be regenerated. It is fast healing method because densified platelet plasma is used; and it is s afe because that plasma is obtained from people’s own blood. PRP can be implemented on many areas; for instance on dentistry, sports medicine, different kind of surgeries such as plastic, vascular or orthopedic and so on. When soccer players brake their le gs, their sports life come to the end, but what if their broken legs was healed better and faster than general healing process? To sum up, PRP is very safe and the future of healing process.

  9. Calcium-binding proteins from human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogstad, G.O.; Krutnes, M.B.; Solum, N.O.

    1983-06-01

    Calcium-binding platelet proteins were examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis of solubilized platelets against antibodies to whole platelets followed by incubation of the immunoplates with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ and autoradiography. When the immunoplates had been pretreated with EDTA at pH 9.0 in order to remove divalent cations, three immunoprecipitates were markedly labelled with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. These corresponded to the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex, glycoprotein Ia and a presently unidentified antigen termed G18. These antigens were membrane-bound and surface-oriented. When an excess of EDTA was introduced in the incubation media the results revealed that the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex and antigen G18, but not glycoprotein Ia, contained sites with a stronger affinity for calcium than has EDTA at pH 7.4. Immunoprecipitates of the separate glycoproteins IIb and IIIa both bound calcium in the same manner as the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. As another approach, platelet-rich plasma was incubated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ prior to crossed immunoelectrophoresis of the solubilized platelets. A single immunoprecipitate was weakly labelled. This did not correspond to any of the immunoprecipitates which were visible after staining with Coomassie blue. The labelling of this antigen was markedly increased when the platelet-rich plasma had been preincubated with EDTA and in this case a weak labelling of the glycoprotein IIB-IIIa precipitate also became apparent. No increased incorporation of calcium occured in any of these immunoprecipitates when the platelets were aggregated with ADP in the presence of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/.

  10. Differential procoagulant activity of microparticles derived from monocytes, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells: impact of active tissue factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustova, Olga N; Antonova, Olga A; Golubeva, Nina V; Khaspekova, Svetlana G; Yakushkin, Vladimir V; Aksuk, Svetlana A; Alchinova, Irina B; Karganov, Mikhail Y; Mazurov, Alexey V

    2016-12-06

    Microparticles released by activated/apoptotic cells exhibit coagulation activity as they express phosphatidylserine and some of them - tissue factor. We compared procoagulant properties of microparticles from monocytes, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells and assessed the impact of tissue factor in observed differences. Microparticles were sedimented (20 000g, 30 min) from the supernatants of activated monocytes, monocytic THP-1 cells, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells. Coagulation activity of microparticles was examined using plasma recalcification assay. The size of microparticles was evaluated by dynamic light scattering. Tissue factor activity was measured by its ability to activate factor X. All microparticles significantly accelerated plasma coagulation with the shortest lag times for microparticles derived from monocytes, intermediate - for microparticles from THP-1 cells and endothelial cells, and the longest - for microparticles from granulocytes and platelets. Average diameters of microparticles ranged within 400-600 nm. The largest microparticles were produced by endothelial cells and granulocytes, smaller - by monocytes, and the smallest - by THP-1 cells and platelets. The highest tissue factor activity was detected in microparticles from monocytes, lower activity - in microparticles from endothelial cells and THP-1 cells, and no activity - in microparticles from platelets and granulocytes. Anti-tissue factor antibodies extended coagulation lag times for microparticles from monocytes, endothelial cells and THP-1 cells and equalized them with those for microparticles from platelets and granulocytes. Higher coagulation activity of microparticles from monocytes, THP-1 cells and endothelial cells in comparison with microparticles from platelets and granulocytes is determined mainly by the presence of active tissue factor.

  11. An improved combinatorial geometry model for arbitrary geometry in DSMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargaran, H.; Minuchehr, A.; Zolfaghari, A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper focuses on a new direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code based on combinatorial geometry (CG) for simulation of any rarefied gas flow. The developed code, called DgSMC-A, has been supplied with an improved CG modeling able to significantly optimize the particle-tracking process, resulting in a highly reduced runtime compared to the conventional codes. The improved algorithm inserts a grid over the geometry and saves those grid elements containing some part of the geometry border. Since only a small part of a grid is engaged with the geometry border, significant time can be saved using the proposed algorithm. Embedding the modified algorithm in the DgSMC-A resulted in a fast, robust and self-governing code needless to any mesh generator. The code completely handles complex geometries created with first-and second-order surfaces. In addition, we developed a new surface area calculator in the CG methodology for complex geometries based on the Monte Carlo method with acceptable accuracy. Several well-known test cases are examined to indicate the code ability to deal with a wide range of realistic problems. Results are also found to be in good agreement with references and experimental data.

  12. Platelets of patients with chronic kidney disease demonstrate deficient platelet reactivity in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bladel Esther R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with chronic kidney disease studies focusing on platelet function and properties often are non-conclusive whereas only few studies use functional platelet tests. In this study we evaluated a recently developed functional flow cytometry based assay for the analysis of platelet function in chronic kidney disease. Methods Platelet reactivity was measured using flow cytometric analysis. Platelets in whole blood were triggered with different concentrations of agonists (TRAP, ADP, CRP. Platelet activation was quantified with staining for P-selectin, measuring the mean fluorescence intensity. Area under the curve and the concentration of half-maximal response were determined. Results We studied 23 patients with chronic kidney disease (9 patients with cardiorenal failure and 14 patients with end stage renal disease and 19 healthy controls. Expression of P-selectin on the platelet surface measured as mean fluorescence intensity was significantly less in chronic kidney disease patients compared to controls after maximal stimulation with TRAP (9.7 (7.9-10.8 vs. 11.4 (9.2-12.2, P = 0.032, ADP (1.6 (1.2-2.1 vs. 2.6 (1.9-3.5, P = 0.002 and CRP (9.2 (8.5-10.8 vs. 11.5 (9.5-12.9, P = 0.004. Also the area under the curve was significantly different. There was no significant difference in half-maximal response between both groups. Conclusion In this study we found that patients with chronic kidney disease show reduced platelet reactivity in response of ADP, TRAP and CRP compared to controls. These results contribute to our understanding of the aberrant platelet function observed in patients with chronic kidney disease and emphasize the significance of using functional whole blood platelet activation assays.

  13. Platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence Staphylococcus aureus-platelet interactions or infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Shruti; Shepherd, James G; Callaghan, J Garreth S; Hung, Rachel K Y; Dawson, Dana K; Padfield, Gareth J; Hey, Shi Y; Cartwright, Robyn A; Newby, David E; Fitzgerald, J Ross

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac vegetations result from bacterium-platelet adherence, activation and aggregation, and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in infective endocarditis. The GPIIb/IIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptors play a central role in platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation induced by endocarditis pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, but the influence of known polymorphisms of these receptors on the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is unknown. We determined the GPIIIa platelet antigen Pl(A1/A2) and FcγRIIa H131R genotype of healthy volunteers (n = 160) and patients with infective endocarditis (n = 40), and investigated the influence of these polymorphisms on clinical outcome in infective endocarditis and S. aureus-platelet interactions in vitro. Platelet receptor genotype did not correlate with development of infective endocarditis, vegetation characteristics on echocardiogram or the composite clinical end-point of embolism, heart failure, need for surgery or mortality (P > 0.05 for all), even though patients with the GPIIIa Pl(A1/A1) genotype had increased in vivo platelet activation (P = 0.001). Furthermore, neither GPIIIa Pl(A1/A2) nor FcγRIIa H131R genotype influenced S. aureus-induced platelet adhesion, activation or aggregation in vitro (P > 0.05). Taken together, our data suggest that the GPIIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence S. aureus-platelet interactions in vitro or the clinical course of infective endocarditis.

  14. Platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence Staphylococcus aureus–platelet interactions or infective endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Shruti; Shepherd, James G.; Callaghan, J. Garreth S.; Hung, Rachel K.Y.; Dawson, Dana K.; Padfield, Gareth J.; Hey, Shi Y.; Cartwright, Robyn A.; Newby, David E.; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac vegetations result from bacterium–platelet adherence, activation and aggregation, and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in infective endocarditis. The GPIIb/IIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptors play a central role in platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation induced by endocarditis pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, but the influence of known polymorphisms of these receptors on the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is unknown. We determined the GPIIIa platelet antigen PlA1/A2 and FcγRIIa H131R genotype of healthy volunteers (n = 160) and patients with infective endocarditis (n = 40), and investigated the influence of these polymorphisms on clinical outcome in infective endocarditis and S. aureus–platelet interactions in vitro. Platelet receptor genotype did not correlate with development of infective endocarditis, vegetation characteristics on echocardiogram or the composite clinical end-point of embolism, heart failure, need for surgery or mortality (P > 0.05 for all), even though patients with the GPIIIa PlA1/A1 genotype had increased in vivo platelet activation (P = 0.001). Furthermore, neither GPIIIa PlA1/A2 nor FcγRIIa H131R genotype influenced S. aureus-induced platelet adhesion, activation or aggregation in vitro (P > 0.05). Taken together, our data suggest that the GPIIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence S. aureus–platelet interactions in vitro or the clinical course of infective endocarditis. PMID:21044892

  15. Scattering Suppression and Absorption Enhancement in Contour Nanoantennas

    CERN Document Server

    Onal, E Doruk

    2015-01-01

    The expanding application spectrum of plasmonic nanoantennas demand versatile design approaches to tailor the antenna properties for specific requirements. The design efforts primarily concentrate on shifting the operation wavelength or enhancing the local fields by manipulating the size and shape of the nanoantenna. Here, we propose a design path to control the absorption and scattering characteristics of a dipole nanoantenna by introducing a hollow region inside the nanostructure. The resulting contour geometry can significantly suppress the scattering of the dipole nanoantenna and enhance its absorption simultaneously. Both the dipole and the contour dipole nanoantenna couple to equivalent amount of the incident radiation. The dipole nanoantenna scatters 84% of the coupled power (absorbs the remaining 16%) whereas the contour dipole structure scatters only 28% of the coupled power (absorbs the remaining 72%). This constitutes the transformation from scatter to absorber nanoantenna. The scattering of a cont...

  16. [Four cases of pseudothrombocytopenia due to platelet cold agglutinins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Satoru; Jouzaki, Kiyoshi; Konishi, Ichirou; Kashiwagi, Hirokazu; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki

    2006-08-01

    We report 4 cases of pseudothrombocytopenia due to platelet cold agglutinins. Case 1 was a 57 y.o. female whose platelet count was 97 x 10(3)/microl. Case 2 was a 37 y.o. male with a platelet count of 96 x 10(3)/microl. Case 3 was a 74 y.o. male with a platelet count of 28 x 10(3)/microl. Case 4 was a 62 y.o. female whose platelet count was 34 x 10(3)/microl. The platelet counts in these 4 cases were decreased and blood smears showed platelet clumping in blood drawn in a tube without anticoagulant just after withdrawal, as well as in blood drawn in a tube with anticoagulant. The platelets from these patients agglutinated at a temperature below 10 degrees C (case 1 and 4) and 24 degrees C (case 2). The immunoglobulin class of the platelet cold agglutinins in cases 1, 2 and 4 was IgM. Agglutinated platelets showed no activation marker, such as CD62P, CD63 or CD40L, on the surface of the platelets. The target antigen of cold agglutinins was GPIIb-IIIa in cases 1 and 2. We considered that the detection of platelet agglutination in blood without anticoagulant is important to diagnose pseudothrombocytopenia due to platelet cold agglutinins. Although this disease is considered to be very rare, we suspect that this disease may be misdiagnosed as pseudothrombocytopenia due to the presence of an anticoagulant, and overlooked.

  17. Hyperbolic Metamaterials with Complex Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Andryieuski, Andrei; Zhukovsky, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    We investigate new geometries of hyperbolic metamaterialssuch as highly corrugated structures, nanoparticle monolayer assemblies, super-structured or vertically arranged multilayersand nanopillars. All structures retain basic propertiesof hyperbolic metamaterials, but have functionality improved...

  18. Instability of supersymmetric microstate geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Eperon, Felicity C; Santos, Jorge E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the classical stability of supersymmetric, asymptotically flat, microstate geometries with five non-compact dimensions. Such geometries admit an "evanescent ergosurface": a timelike hypersurface of infinite redshift. On such a surface, there are null geodesics with zero energy relative to infinity. These geodesics are stably trapped in the potential well near the ergosurface. We present a heuristic argument indicating that this feature is likely to lead to a nonlinear instability of these solutions. We argue that the precursor of such an instability can be seen in the behaviour of linear perturbations: nonlinear stability would require that all linear perturbations decay sufficiently rapidly but the stable trapping implies that some linear perturbation decay very slowly. We study this in detail for the most symmetric microstate geometries. By constructing quasinormal modes of these geometries we show that generic linear perturbations decay slower than any inverse power of time.

  19. Moment methods in extremal geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Laat, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we develop techniques for solving problems in extremal geometry. We give an infinite dimensional generalization of moment techniques from polynomial optimization. We use this to construct semidefinite programming hierarchies for approximating optimal packing densities and ground state

  20. An introduction to differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Willmore, T J

    2012-01-01

    This text employs vector methods to explore the classical theory of curves and surfaces. Topics include basic theory of tensor algebra, tensor calculus, calculus of differential forms, and elements of Riemannian geometry. 1959 edition.