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Sample records for platelet membrane proteins

  1. Effect of membrane protein concentration on binding of /sup 3/H-imipramine in human platelets

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    Barkai, A.I.; Kowalik, S.; Baron, M.

    1985-02-01

    Binding of /sup 3/H-imipramine to platelet membranes has been implicated as a marker for depression. Comparing /sup 3/H-IMI binding between depressed patients and normal subjects we observed an increase in the dissociation constant Kd with increasing membrane protein. This phenomenon was studied more rigorously in five normal subjects. Platelet membranes were prepared and adjusted to four concentrations of protein ranging from 100 to 800 micrograms/ml. The /sup 3/H-IMI binding parameters of maximum binding sites number (Bmax) and Kd were obtained by Scatchard analysis at each membrane concentration. A positive linear relationship was found between K/sub d/ values and the concentration of membrane protein in the assay, but no change was observed in Bmax. The variability in Kd values reported in the literature may be accounted for in part by the different concentrations of membrane protein used in various studies.

  2. Thrombus imaging in a primate model with antibodies specific for an external membrane protein of activated platelets

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    Palabrica, T.M.; Furie, B.C.; Konstam, M.A.; Aronovitz, M.J.; Connolly, R.; Brockway, B.A.; Ramberg, K.L.; Furie, B.

    1989-02-01

    The activated platelet is a potential target for the localization of thrombi in vivo since, after stimulation and secretion of granule contents, activated platelets are concentrated at sites of blood clot formation. In this study, we used antibodies specific for a membrane protein of activated platelets to detect experimental thrombi in an animal model. PADGEM (platelet activation-dependent granule-external membrane protein), a platelet alpha-granule membrane protein, is translocated to the plasma membrane during platelet activation and granule secretion. Since PADGEM is internal in unstimulated platelets, polyclonal anti-PADGEM and monoclonal KC4 antibodies do not bind to circulating resting platelets but do interact with activated platelets. Dacron graft material incubated with radiolabeled KC4 or anti-PADGEM antibodies in the presence of thrombin-activated platelet-rich plasma bound most of the antibody. Imaging experiments with 123I-labeled anti-PADGEM in baboons with an external arterial-venous Dacron shunt revealed rapid uptake in the thrombus induced by the Dacron graft; control experiments with 123I-labeled nonimmune IgG exhibited minimal uptake. Deep venous thrombi, formed by using percutaneous balloon catheters to stop blood flow in the femoral vein of baboons, were visualized with 123I-labeled anti-PADGEM. Thrombi were discernible against blood pool background activity without subtraction techniques within 1 hr. No target enhancement was seen with 123I-labeled nonimmune IgG. 123I-labeled anti-PADGEM cleared the blood pool with an initial half-disappearance time of 6 min and did not interfere with hemostasis. These results indicate that radioimmunoscintigraphy with anti-PADGEM antibodies can visualize thrombi in baboon models and is a promising technique for clinical thrombus detection in humans.

  3. Physical proximity and functional association of glycoprotein 1balpha and protein-disulfide isomerase on the platelet plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, J K; Hotchkiss, K A; Suter, C; Dudman, N P; Szöllösi, J; Chesterman, C N; Chong, B H; Hogg, P J

    2000-01-01

    Platelet function is influenced by the platelet thiol-disulfide balance. Platelet activation resulted in 440% increase in surface protein thiol groups. Two proteins that presented free thiol(s) on the activated platelet surface were protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) and glycoprotein 1balpha (GP1balp

  4. Cyclic AMP-insensitive activation of c-Src and Syk protein-tyrosine kinases through platelet membrane glycoprotein VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinohe, T; Takayama, H; Ezumi, Y; Yanagi, S; Yamamura, H; Okuma, M

    1995-11-24

    Platelet glycoprotein (GP) VI is a so-far uncharacterized 62-kDa membrane protein, whose deficiency results in selective impairment in collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Our group previously reported a human polyclonal antibody (anti-p62 IgG) that induces activation of normal, but not of GPVI-deficient, platelets in an Fc-independent manner. The F(ab')2 fragments of this antibody (F(ab')2-anti-p62) stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous proteins, which was not prevented even in the presence of cAMP-increasing agents such as prostacyclin. Pretreatment of platelets with the protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor tyrphostin A47 completely abolished F(ab')2-anti-p62-induced platelet aggregation in parallel with dose-dependent inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating an essential requirement of PTK activity for generating GPVI-mediated signaling. We found that two cytosolic PTKs, c-Src and Syk, became rapidly activated in response to F(ab')2-anti-p62 in a way insensitive to elevation of cAMP. In contrast, in the presence of prostacyclin, F(ab')2-anti-p62 did not stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase. cAMP-insensitive activation of c-Src and Syk was also observed in collagen but not thrombin-stimulated platelets. Moreover, either F(ab')2-anti-p62 or collagen stimulated cAMP-insensitive tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 2. These results indicate that the receptor-mediated activation of several PTKs in platelets is regulated through a cAMP-sensitive or -insensitive mechanism depending on the nature of each stimulus, and also suggest that GPVI engagement is coupled to cAMP-insensitive activation of c-Src and Syk accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous substrates including phospholipase C-gamma 2 in a manner similar to collagen stimulation.

  5. Effect of intracoronary tirofiban on platelet alpha-granule membrane protein and myocardial perfusion level during emergency percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H P; Liu, C M; Zhang, W W

    2014-11-14

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of intracoronary application of tirofiban on platelet alpha-granule membrane protein (GMP-140) and myocardial perfusion levels during emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A total of 70 patients who accepted emergency PCI treatment were randomly divided into tirofiban and control groups. We determined GMP-140 and troponin I (cTnI) levels before and 12 h after surgery, as well as N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels 1 and 7 days after surgery in the two groups. The results showed that GMP-140 and cTnI levels were significantly (P emergency PCI clearly reduced the GMP-140 level, inhibited the activation function of platelets, improved myocardial perfusion, and helped recover cardiac function in patients.

  6. [Protein kinase C activation induces platelet apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Li; Chen, Meng-Xing; Zhang, Ming-Yi; Dai, Ke-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Platelet apoptosis elucidated by either physical or chemical compound or platelet storage occurs wildly, which might play important roles in controlling the numbers and functions of circulated platelets, or in the development of some platelet-related diseases. However, up to now, a little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of platelet apoptosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is highly expressed in platelets and plays central roles in regulating platelet functions. Although there is evidence indicating that PKC is involved in the regulation of apoptosis of nucleated cells, it is still unclear whether PKC plays a role in platelet apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PKC in platelet apoptosis. The effects of PKC on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, and caspase-3 activation of platelets were analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot. The results showed that the ΔΨm depolarization in platelets was induced by PKC activator in time-dependent manner, and the caspase-3 activation in platelets was induced by PKC in concentration-dependent manner. However, the platelets incubated with PKC inhibitor did not results in ΔΨm depolarization and PS exposure. It is concluded that the PKC activation induces platelet apoptosis through influencing the mitochondrial functions and activating caspase 3. The finds suggest a novel mechanism for PKC in regulating platelet numbers and functions, which has important pathophysiological implications for thrombosis and hemostasis.

  7. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP-3) and VAMP-8 are present in human platelets and are required for granule secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, János; Chung, Sul-Hee; Reed, Guy L

    2002-08-01

    Secretion of platelet granules is necessary for normal hemostasis. Platelet secretion requires soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptor (SNARE) complex formation between different members of the syntaxin, SNAP-25, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) gene families. Using microcapillary reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we identified VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 as VAMP isoforms coimmunoprecipitated from platelets with syntaxin 4. Immunoblotting experiments confirmed the presence of VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 but not VAMP-1 or VAMP-2 in platelets. To examine the effect of VAMP proteins on platelet secretion, soluble recombinant (r) VAMP-2, rVAMP-3, and rVAMP-8 were incubated with streptolysin O-permeabilized platelets. Secretion of alpha granules (monitored by flow cytometric measurement of P-selectin) was blocked, and dense-granule secretion (assessed by release of carbon 14-serotonin) was almost completely inhibited by rVAMP-3, whereas rVAMP-8 inhibited secretion of dense granules but not alpha granules. In contrast, rVAMP-2, which formed SNARE complexes in vitro, had no effect on platelet exocytosis. We conclude that VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 form SNARE complexes with platelet syntaxin 4 and are required for platelet granule secretion.

  8. Protein kinase A regulates 3-phosphatidylinositide dynamics during platelet-derived growth factor-induced membrane ruffling and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Paula B; Campbell, Shirley L; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K

    2008-12-12

    Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is required for chemotaxis in fibroblasts; however, the mechanism(s) by which PKA regulates the cell migration machinery remain largely unknown. Here we report that one function of PKA during platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced chemotaxis was to promote membrane ruffling by regulating phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)) dynamics. Inhibition of PKA activity dramatically altered membrane dynamics and attenuated formation of peripheral membrane ruffles in response to PDGF. PKA inhibition also significantly decreased the number and size of PIP(3)-rich membrane ruffles in response to uniform stimulation and to gradients of PDGF. This ruffling defect was quantified using a newly developed method, based on computer vision edge-detection algorithms. PKA inhibition caused a marked attenuation in the bulk accumulation of PIP(3) following PDGF stimulation, without effects on PI3-kinase (PI3K) activity. The deficits in PIP(3) dynamics correlated with a significant inhibition of growth factor-induced membrane recruitment of endogenous Akt and Rac activation in PKA-inhibited cells. Simultaneous inhibition of PKA and Rac had an additive inhibitory effect on growth factor-induced ruffling dynamics. Conversely, the expression of a constitutively active Rac allele was able to rescue the defect in membrane ruffling and restore the localization of a fluorescent PIP(3) marker to membrane ruffles in PKA-inhibited cells, even in the absence of PI3K activity. These data demonstrate that, like Rac, PKA contributes to PIP(3) and membrane dynamics independently of direct regulation of PI3K activity and suggest that modulation of PIP(3)/3-phosphatidylinositol (3-PI) lipids represents a major target for PKA in the regulation of PDGF-induced chemotactic events.

  9. The detection of platelet isoantibodies by membrane immunofluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schans, G S; Veenhoven, W A; Snijder, J A; Nieweg, H O

    1977-07-01

    A membrane ummunofluorescence test for the detection of platelet isoantibodies is described. Gel filtration of the incubation mixture was incorporated in the procedure and proved effective for the removal of serum proteins from the platelet suspension. With this technique isoantibodies were found in the serum of 13 out of a group of 16 patients who had received multiple transfusions. The results were checked by measuring the uptake of 125I-labeled anti-IgG fraction by gel-filtered platelets. Subsequently the membrane immunofluorescence method was also compared with established techniques described for the detection of isoantibodies such as the microtest for lymphocytotoxicity and a complement-fixation method and the procedures based on the release of labeled serotonin, the phagocytosis of chromium-tagged platelets, the increase of platelet factor 3 activity, and on platelet aggregation. We had the opportunity to investigate the serum of one patient for the presence of isoantibodies against platelets from HLA identical siblings both before and after the administration of their platelets. On the basis of this experience it is concluded that the membrane immunofluorescence test for platelet isoantibodies is a relatively simple method with a high degree of specificity and adequate sensitivity.

  10. Activated changes of platelet ultra microstructure and plasma granule membrane protein 140 in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUGE Yi; ZHOU Jian-ying; YANG Guang-die; ZU De-ling; XU Xiao-liang; TIAN Ming-qing; LU Guo-hua

    2009-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Platelet activation may play an important role in pathologic progress in lung cancer. In this study, we aimed to clarify the influence of activated platelets on lung cancer generation and growth, and the relationship among these functional and ultrastructural changes of platelets and the severity of pathogenetic condition in these patients with NSCLC.Methods One hundred and thirty-six cases of patients with pathologically confirmed NSCLC were included in this study. Fifty-four healthy people were enrolled as controls. The change of ultra microstructure and activity of blood platelets were observed under the transmission and scanning electron microscope. Simultaneous determination of plasma granule membrane protein 140 (GMP-140) was made.Results Transmission electron microscopy showed remarkable changes of ultra microstructure of platelets in patients with NSCLC, including swelling, increase of o-granules, vesicles, and glycogenosome. Scanning electron microscopy showed many more surface processes and wrinkles on platelets in patients with NSCLC. The reference plasma levels of GMP-140 of healthy controls were (18.2±2.7) μg/L. The plasma levels of GMP-140 in patients with NSCLC were (47.8±12.3) μg/L, which were much higher than those of the controls. There was a medium positive correlation between plasma levels of GMP-140 and amount of o-granules (r=0.514, P<0.01) and a high positive correlation between plasma levels of GMP-140 and area of platelet (r=0.84, P<0.01) in patients with NSCLC. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis showed significant shift to the left in patients with NSCLC whose α-granules per platelet were 19 or more compared to those 18 or less (Log rank statistic, X2=17.38, P <0.01).Conclusions There are significant activated changes of ultra microstructure and increased activity of blood platelets in patients with NSCLC. These activated platelets

  11. Platelet membrane glycoproteins and their function: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunicki, T J

    1989-07-01

    The membrane glycoproteins (GP) of human platelets act as receptors that mediate two important functions, adhesion to the subendothelial matrix and platelet-platelet cohesion, or aggregation. Many of these glycoprotein receptors exist as noncovalently linked heterodimers, including those that belong to the supergene family of adhesion receptors called the integrins. Human platelets contain at least five members of this integrin family, including a collagen receptor (GP Ia-IIa; alpha 2, beta 1), a fibronectin receptor (GP Ic-IIa; alpha 5, beta 1), a laminin receptor (GP Ic'-IIa; alpha 6, beta 1), a vitronectin receptor (VnR; alpha v, beta 3), and a promiscuous, activation-dependent receptor that is thought to be the receptor most responsible for fibrinogen-dependent, platelet-platelet cohesion (GP IIb-IIIa; alpha IIb, beta 3). Some, but not all, of the integrins bind to a tripeptide sequence, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD), on the adhesive proteins. In addition to the integrins, platelets contain other membrane glyco-proteins: GP Ib-IX, a receptor for von Willebrand factor, which is thought to be the receptor most responsible for platelet adhesion to the subendothelial matrix in a flowing system; GP V, which may be associated with GP Ib-IX and whose function remains unknown; and GP IV (GP IIIb), which functions as a receptor for thrombospondin and collagen.

  12. Protein Kinase A Regulates 3-Phosphatidylinositide Dynamics during Platelet-derived Growth Factor-induced Membrane Ruffling and Chemotaxis*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Paula B.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Baldor, Linda C.; Howe, Alan K.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is required for chemotaxis in fibroblasts; however, the mechanism(s) by which PKA regulates the cell migration machinery remain largely unknown. Here we report that one function of PKA during platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced chemotaxis was to promote membrane ruffling by regulating phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) dynamics. Inhibition of PKA activity dramatically altered membrane dynamics and attenuated formation of peripheral membrane ruffles in response to PDGF. PKA inhibition also significantly decreased the number and size of PIP3-rich membrane ruffles in response to uniform stimulation and to gradients of PDGF. This ruffling defect was quantified using a newly developed method, based on computer vision edge-detection algorithms. PKA inhibition caused a marked attenuation in the bulk accumulation of PIP3 following PDGF stimulation, without effects on PI3-kinase (PI3K) activity. The deficits in PIP3 dynamics correlated with a significant inhibition of growth factor-induced membrane recruitment of endogenous Akt and Rac activation in PKA-inhibited cells. Simultaneous inhibition of PKA and Rac had an additive inhibitory effect on growth factor-induced ruffling dynamics. Conversely, the expression of a constitutively active Rac allele was able to rescue the defect in membrane ruffling and restore the localization of a fluorescent PIP3 marker to membrane ruffles in PKA-inhibited cells, even in the absence of PI3K activity. These data demonstrate that, like Rac, PKA contributes to PIP3 and membrane dynamics independently of direct regulation of PI3K activity and suggest that modulation of PIP3/3-phosphatidylinositol (3-PI) lipids represents a major target for PKA in the regulation of PDGF-induced chemotactic events. PMID:18936099

  13. Calcium-binding proteins from human platelets

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    Gogstad, G.O.; Krutnes, M.B.; Solum, N.O.

    1983-06-01

    Calcium-binding platelet proteins were examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis of solubilized platelets against antibodies to whole platelets followed by incubation of the immunoplates with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ and autoradiography. When the immunoplates had been pretreated with EDTA at pH 9.0 in order to remove divalent cations, three immunoprecipitates were markedly labelled with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. These corresponded to the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex, glycoprotein Ia and a presently unidentified antigen termed G18. These antigens were membrane-bound and surface-oriented. When an excess of EDTA was introduced in the incubation media the results revealed that the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex and antigen G18, but not glycoprotein Ia, contained sites with a stronger affinity for calcium than has EDTA at pH 7.4. Immunoprecipitates of the separate glycoproteins IIb and IIIa both bound calcium in the same manner as the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. As another approach, platelet-rich plasma was incubated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ prior to crossed immunoelectrophoresis of the solubilized platelets. A single immunoprecipitate was weakly labelled. This did not correspond to any of the immunoprecipitates which were visible after staining with Coomassie blue. The labelling of this antigen was markedly increased when the platelet-rich plasma had been preincubated with EDTA and in this case a weak labelling of the glycoprotein IIB-IIIa precipitate also became apparent. No increased incorporation of calcium occured in any of these immunoprecipitates when the platelets were aggregated with ADP in the presence of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/.

  14. Activation of human platelets by misfolded proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herczenik, E.; Bouma, B.; Korporaal, J.A.; Strangi, R.; Zeng, Q.; Gros, P.; van Eck, M.; van Berkel, T.J.C.; Gebbink, M.F.B.G.; Akkerman, J.W.N.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Protein misfolding diseases result from the deposition of insoluble protein aggregates that often contain fibrils called amyloid. Amyloids are found in Alzheimer disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and systemic amyloidosis,which are diseases where platelet activation might be

  15. IgG platelet antibodies in EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia bind to platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorin, F; Steffan, A; Pradella, P; Bizzaro, N; Potenza, R; De Angelis, V

    1998-08-01

    EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) consists of an inappropriate low platelet count caused by autoantibodies present in the serum samples reacting with platelets only in EDTA-anticoagulated blood. By using immunoprecipitation and Western blot techniques, we studied the immunochemical specificity of platelet agglutinating autoantibodies in the serum samples of 10 patients with PTCP. Furthermore, to evaluate a possible role of PTCP-associated IgG autoantibodies in increased platelet turnover, we assayed the plasma glycocalicin (GC) level and calculated the GC index for every patient. Our results provide direct evidence that an epitope located on platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb is recognized by PTCP-associated IgG antibodies; moreover GC levels in patients with EDTA-dependent PTCP were similar to control levels, thus excluding an increased platelet turnover. We conclude that antiplatelet antibodies directed against platelet cryptantigens are unlikely to have a major role in the increased removal of cells from circulation.

  16. Platelet-Rich Gel Supernatants Stimulate the Release of Anti-Inflammatory Proteins on Culture Media of Normal Equine Synovial Membrane Explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Diana L; López, Catalina; Carmona, Jorge U

    2015-01-01

    The aims were as follows: (1) to evaluate the effects at 48 and 96 h of two concentrations (25 and 50%) of leukocyte and platelet-rich gel (L-PRG) and pure PRG (P-PRG) supernatants on the production/degradation in normal equine synovial membrane explants (SME) of platelet derived growth factor isoform BB, transforming growth factor beta-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL-) 4 (IL-4), IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), and hyaluronan (HA) synthesis and (2) to correlate these molecules with their respective PRG supernatant treatments. SME from 6 horses were cultured for 96 h with L-PRG and P-PRG supernatants at 25 and 50% concentrations, respectively. SME culture media were changed each 48 h and used for determination by ELISA of the molecules, which were also determined in synovial fluid. 25% L-PRG supernatant produced a sustained release over time of IL-1ra and a gradual release of HA, whereas 50% L-PRG supernatant produced a sustained increase over time of IL-4 and HA. 50% P-PRG supernatant produced an increased and sustained production of IL-1ra and IL-4. The cellular composition and the articular concentration (volume) of a platelet-rich plasma preparation could affect the anti-inflammatory and anabolic joint responses in horses with osteoarthritis.

  17. Gq-mediated Akt translocation to the membrane: a novel PIP3-independent mechanism in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badolia, Rachit; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Dangelmaier, Carol; Chernoff, Jonathan; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2015-01-01

    Akt is an important signaling molecule regulating platelet aggregation. Akt is phosphorylated after translocation to the membrane through Gi signaling pathways by a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent mechanism. However, Akt is more robustly phosphorylated by thrombin compared with adenosine 5'-diphosphate in platelets. This study investigated the mechanisms of Akt translocation as a possible explanation for this difference. Stimulation of washed human platelets with protease-activated receptor agonists caused translocation of Akt to the membrane rapidly, whereas phosphorylation occurred later. The translocation of Akt was abolished in the presence of a Gq-selective inhibitor or in Gq-deficient murine platelets, indicating that Akt translocation is regulated downstream of Gq pathways. Interestingly, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors or P2Y12 antagonist abolished Akt phosphorylation without affecting Akt translocation to the membrane, suggesting that Akt translocation occurs through a PI3K/PIP3/Gi-independent mechanism. An Akt scaffolding protein, p21-activated kinase (PAK), translocates to the membrane after stimulation with protease-activated receptor agonists in a Gq-dependent manner, with the kinetics of translocation similar to that of Akt. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed constitutive association of PAK and Akt, suggesting a possible role of PAK in Akt translocation. These results show, for the first time, an important role of the Gq pathway in mediating Akt translocation to the membrane in a novel Gi/PI3K/PIP3-independent mechanism.

  18. [The synthesis of proteins in unnucleated blood platelets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijak, Michał; Saluk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michał Błażej Ponczek; Nowak, Paweł; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2013-07-23

    Platelets are the smallest, unnucleated blood cells that play a key role in maintaining normal hemostasis. In the human body about 1x1011 platelets are formed every day, as a the result of complex processes of differentiation, maturation and fragmentation of megakaryocytes. Studies done over 4 decades ago demonstrated that circulating in blood mature platelets can synthesize proteins. Recent discoveries confirm protein synthesis by unnucleated platelets in response to activation. Moreover, protein synthesis alters the phenotype and function of platelets. Platelets synthesize several proteins involved in hemostasis (COX, αIIbβ3, TF PAI-1, Factor XI, protein C inhibitor) and in inflammatory process (IL-1β, CCL5/RANTES). In spite of lack of transcription platelets have a stable mRNA transcripts with a long life correlated with platelet life span. Platelets also show expression of two important key regulators of translation eIF4E and EIF-2α and have a variety of miRNA molecules responsible for translational regulation. This article describes the historical overview of research on protein synthesis by platelets and presents the molecular mechanisms of protein synthesis in activated platelets (and synthesis of the most important platelet proteins).

  19. Alterations in plasma membrane promote overexpression and increase of sodium influx through epithelial sodium channel in hypertensive platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, D; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Cornejo-Garrido, Jorge; Ordaz-Pichardo, Cynthia; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Platelets are small, anucleated cell fragments that activate in response to a wide variety of stimuli, triggering a complex series of intracellular pathways leading to a hemostatic thrombus formation at vascular injury sites. However, in essential hypertension, platelet activation contributes to causing myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Reported abnormalities in platelet functions, such as platelet hyperactivity and hyperaggregability to several agonists, contribute to the pathogenesis and complications of thrombotic events associated with hypertension. Platelet membrane lipid composition and fluidity are determining for protein site accessibility, structural arrangement of platelet surface, and response to appropriate stimuli. The present study aimed to demonstrate whether structural and biochemical abnormalities in lipid membrane composition and fluidity characteristic of platelets from hypertensive patients influence the expression of the Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC), fundamental for sodium influx during collagen activation. Wb, cytometry and quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) assays demonstrated ENaC overexpression in platelets from hypertensive subjects and in relation to control subjects. Additionally, our results strongly suggest a key role of β-dystroglycan as a scaffold for the organization of ENaC and associated proteins. Understanding of the mechanisms of platelet alterations in hypertension should provide valuable information for the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  20. The synthesis of proteins in unnucleated blood platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Michał Bijak; Joanna Saluk; Michał Błażej Ponczek Ponczek; Paweł Nowak; Barbara Wachowicz

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are the smallest, unnucleated blood cells that play a key role in maintaining normal hemostasis. In the human body about 1x1011 platelets are formed every day, as a the result of complex processes of differentiation, maturation and fragmentation of megakaryocytes. Studies done over 4 decades ago demonstrated that circulating in blood mature platelets can synthesize proteins. Recent discoveries confirm protein synthesis by unnucleated platelets in response to activation. Moreover, pr...

  1. Effect of the platelet membrane GP Ⅰ a gene polymorphism in the pathogenesis of unstable angina pectoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonghui Zhao; Changcong Cui; Yanni Wang; Jiaqing Zhu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of platelet membrane glycoprotein(GP) Ⅰ a gene polymorphism in the pathogenesis of unstable angina pectoris (UAP) in Chinese people. Methods: Collagen type Ⅰ -induced platelet aggregation was measured in 33healthy subjects in vitro. Plasma level of α-granule membrane protein (GMP-140) was measured in both the above 33 healthy subjects during fasting and 35 patients with recent onset effort anina during rest onset within 24 h after hospitalization. Furthermore, the platelet membrane GP Ⅰ a gene 807C/T polymorphism was checked in all subjects with polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers(PCR-SSP)technique. Results: The lag time before 30% platelet aggregation was significantly longer in healthy subjects with CC genotype than with TC genotype ( P <0.01). However, there was no significant difference in the maximal platelet aggregation between healthy subjects with the above two genotypes. Plasma level of GMP-140 was significantly higher in TC genotypic patients with recent onset effort angina than in CC genotypic patients with the same type of UAP( P < 0.05) and healthy subjects ( P < 0.01), furthermore, there was also significant difference between the latter two groups( P < 0.05). Conclusion: The rapid initiation of collagen-induced platelet aggregation may be associated with platelet membrane GP Ⅰ a T807 allele, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of UAP.

  2. Association of membrane/lipid rafts with the platelet cytoskeleton and the caveolin PY14: participation in the adhesion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Maldonado-García, Deneb; Hernández-González, Enrique; Winder, Steve J

    2015-11-01

    Platelets are the most prominent elements of blood tissue involved in hemostasis at sites of blood vessel injury. Platelet cytoskeleton is responsible for their shape modifications observed during activation and adhesion to the substratum; therefore the interactions between cytoskeleton and plasma membrane are critical to modulate blood platelet functions. Several cytoskeletal components and binding partners, as well as enzymes that regulate the cytoskeleton, localize to membrane/lipid rafts (MLR) and regulate lateral diffusion of membrane proteins and lipids. Resting, thrombin-activated, and adherent human platelets were processed for biochemical studies including western-blot and immunprecipitation assays and confocal analysis were performed to characterize the interaction of MLR with the main cytoskeleton elements and β-dystroglycan as well as with the association of caveolin-1 PY14 with focal adhesion proteins. We transfected a megakaryoblast cell line (Meg-01) to deplete β-dystroglycan, subsequent to their differentiation to the platelet progenitors. Our data showed a direct interaction of the MLR with cytoskeleton to regulate platelet shape, while an association of caveolin-1 PY14 with vinculin is needed to establish focal adhesions, which are modulated for β-dystroglycan. In conclusion, caveolin-1 PY14 in association with platelet cytoskeleton participate in focal adhesions dynamics.

  3. Modifications of blood platelet proteins of patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich-Muszalska, Anna; Olas, Beata

    2009-03-01

    Oxidative damage to lipids in plasma, blood platelets and neurons in patients with schizophrenia was described. The aim of our present study was to evaluate oxidative/nitrative modifications of blood platelets proteins by measurement the level of biomarkers of oxidative stress such as carbonyl groups, thiol groups and 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins in patients with schizophrenia and compare with a control group. Levels of carbonyl groups and 3-nitrotyrosine residues in platelet proteins were measured by ELISA and competition ELISA, respectively. The method with 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitro-benzoic acid) has been used to analyse thiol groups in platelet proteins. We demonstrated for the first time in platelet proteins from patients with schizophrenia a statistically significant increase of the level of biomarkers of oxidative/nitrative stress such as carbonyl groups or 3-nitrotyrosine; in schizophrenic patients the amount of thiol groups in platelet proteins was lower than in platelets from healthy subjects. Our results strongly indicate that in patients with schizophrenia reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species induce not only peroxidation of lipids, but also may stimulate oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins. The consequence of these modifications may be the alteration of platelet protein structure and function.

  4. Characterization of procoagulant extracellular vesicles and platelet membrane disintegration in DMSO-cryopreserved platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseday Z. Tegegn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Freezing is promising for extended platelet (PLT storage for transfusion. 6% DMSO cryopreserved PLTs (CPPs are currently in clinical development. CPPs contain significant amount of platelet membrane vesicles (PMVs. PLT-membrane changes and PMV release in CPP are poorly understood, and haemostatic effects of CPP PMVs are not fully elucidated. This study aims to investigate PLT-membrane alterations in CPPs and provide comprehensive characterization of CPP PMVs, and their contribution to procoagulant activity (PCA of CPPs. Methods: CPPs and corresponding liquid-stored PLTs (LSPs were characterized by flow cytometry (FC, fluorescence polarization (FP, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA, electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and thrombin-generation (TG test. Results: SEM and TEM revealed disintegration and vesiculation of the PLT-plasma membrane and loss of intracellular organization in 60% PLTs in CPPs. FP demonstrated that 6% DMSO alone and with freezing–thawing caused marked increase in PLT-membrane fluidity. The FC counts of annexin V-binding PMVs and CD41a+ PMVs were 68- and 56-folds higher, respectively, in CPPs than in LSPs. The AFM and NTA size distribution of PMVs in CPPs indicated a peak diameter of 100 nm, corresponding to exosome-size vesicles. TG-based PCA of CPPs was 2- and 9-folds higher per PLT and per volume, respectively, compared to LSPs. Differential centrifugation showed that CPP supernatant contributed 26% to CPP TG-PCA, mostly by the exosome-size PMVs and their TG-PCA was phosphatidylserine dependent. Conclusions: Major portion of CPPs does not show activation phenotype but exhibits grape-like membrane disintegration with significant increase of membrane fluidity induced by 6% DMSO alone and further aggravated by freezing–thawing process. DMSO cryopreservation of PLTs is associated with the release of PMVs and marked increase of TG-PCA, as compared to LSPs. Exosome-size PMVs have

  5. Spacial isolation of protein kinase C activation in thrombin stimulated human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, M F; Lapetina, E G

    1988-10-14

    Thrombin stimulation of human platelets is associated with turnover of inositol phospholipids, mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores, and activation of protein kinase C. However, within 5 minutes, the thrombin receptor desensitizes, but can be re-coupled to its effectors by stimulation of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors (Crouch and Lapetina, J. Biol. Chem. 263, 3363-3371, 1988). This effect of epinephrine was found to be inhibited by preincubation of platelets with phorbol ester, suggesting that protein kinase C was inhibitory. However, since thrombin also activated protein kinase C and epinephrine was active following thrombin stimulation of platelets, this implied that thrombin activation of protein kinase C may have been spacially isolated near the thrombin receptor and could not inactivate alpha 2-receptor activity. In the present paper, we have tested this possibility, and we present evidence which strongly favours the possibility that protein kinase C activation by receptors induces its local translocation to the cell membrane.

  6. Protein and glycoprotein abnormalities in platelets from human Chediak-Higashi syndrome: polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic study of platelets from five patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, E; Apitz-Castro, R

    1985-10-01

    Polyacrylamide electrophoretic analysis of proteins and Tritium-labelled glycoproteins of the platelets from five patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome shows the existence of marked quantitative differences when compared to normal platelets. While the glycoprotein abnormalities are solely related to the plasma membrane, some of the abnormalities detected in the Coomasie blue pattern are probably representative of defects related to the dense bodies and the alpha-granules. Some of the abnormalities found may, in part, explain the variability of aggregatory responses described in these patients, as well as the marked tendency towards desaggregation exhibited by platelets from humans with the Chediak-Higashi Syndrome.

  7. Erythrocyte membrane proteins and membrane skeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yiqin; LIU Junfan

    2007-01-01

    Considerable advances in the research field of erythrocyte membrane were achieved in the recent two decades.New findings in the structure-function correlation and interactions of erythrocyte membrane proteins have attracted extensive attention.Interesting progress was also made in the molecular pathogenesis of erythrocyte membrane disorders.Advances in the composition,function and interaction of erythrocyte membrane proteins,erythrocyte membrane skeleton,and relevant diseases are briefly described and summarized here on the basis of domestic and world literatures.

  8. Inhibition of glutamate receptors reduces the homocysteine-induced whole blood platelet aggregation but does not affect superoxide anion generation or platelet membrane fluidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolczak, Kamil; Pieniazek, Anna; Watala, Cezary

    2017-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an excitotoxic amino acid. It is potentially possible to prevent Hcy-induced toxicity, including haemostatic impairments, by antagonizing glutaminergic receptors. Using impedance aggregometry with arachidonate and collagen as platelet agonists, we tested whether the blockade of platelet NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate), AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) and kainate receptors with their inhibitors: MK-801 (dizocilpine hydrogen maleate, [5R,10S]-[+]-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine), CNQX (7-nitro-2,3-dioxo-1,4-dihydroquinoxaline-6-carbonitrile) and UBP-302 (2-{[3-[(2S)-2-amino-2-carboxyethyl]-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydropyrimidin 1(2H)-yl]methyl}benzoic acid) may hamper Hcy-dependent platelet aggregation. All the tested compounds significantly inhibited Hcy-augmented aggregation of blood platelets stimulated either with arachidonate or collagen. Hcy stimulated the generation of superoxide anion in whole blood samples in a concentration-dependent manner; however, this process appeared as independent on ionotropic glutamate receptors, as well as on NADPH oxidase and protein kinase C, and was not apparently associated with the extent of either arachidonate- or collagen-dependent platelet aggregation. Moreover, Hcy acted as a significant fluidizer of surface (more hydrophilic) and inner (more hydrophobic) regions of platelet membrane lipid bilayer, when used at the concentration range from 10 to 50 µmol/l. However, this effect was independent on the Hcy action through glutamate ionotropic receptors, since there was no effects of MK-801, CNQX or UBP-302 on Hcy-mediated membrane fluidization. In conclusion, Hcy-induced changes in whole blood platelet aggregation are mediated through the ionotopic excitotoxic receptors, although the detailed mechanisms underlying such interactions remain to be elucidated.

  9. Macroscopic domain formation in the platelet plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bali, Rachna; Savino, Laura; Ramirez, Diego A.;

    2009-01-01

    There has been ample debate on whether cell membranes can present macroscopic lipid domains as predicted by three-component phase diagrams obtained by fluorescence microscopy. Several groups have argued that membrane proteins and interactions with the cytoskeleton inhibit the formation of large d...

  10. Characterization of canine platelet adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelagalli, Alessandra; Pero, Maria Elena; Mastellone, Vincenzo; Cestaro, Anna; Signoriello, Simona; Lombardi, Pietro; Avallone, Luigi

    2011-07-01

    Canine platelets have been extensively studied but little is known about specific aspects such as adhesion. Platelet adhesion is a critical step during haemostasis and thrombosis as well as during inflammatory and immunopathogenic responses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesive properties of canine platelets using fibrinogen and collagen as substrates immobilized on plates. Adhesion was monitored for 120 min and the effect of adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) was assayed. The results showed that canine platelets displayed good adhesion activity that was significantly time-dependent. Moreover, ADP was able to enhance platelet adhesion in a dose-dependent manner. The findings aid knowledge of the adhesion process and suggest a specific role of surface platelet receptors in mediating the interaction with extracellular matrix proteins.

  11. Rapid Upregulation of Orai1 Abundance in the Plasma Membrane of Platelets Following Activation with Thrombin and Collagen Related Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilai Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood platelets accomplish primary hemostasis following vascular injury and contribute to the orchestration of occlusive vascular disease. Platelets are activated by an increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, which is accomplished by Ca2+-release from intracellular stores and subsequent store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE through Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channel moiety Orai1. Powerful activators of platelets include thrombin and collagen related peptide (CRP, which are in part effective by activation of small G- protein Rac1. The present study explored the influence of thrombin and CRP on Orai1 protein abundance and cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i in platelets drawn from wild type mice. Methods: Orai1 protein surface abundance was quantified utilizing CF™488A conjugated antibodies, and [Ca2+]i was determined with Fluo3-fluorescence. Results: In resting platelets, Orai1 protein abundance and [Ca2+]i were low. Thrombin (0.02 U/ml and CRP (5ug/ml within 2 min increased [Ca2+]i and Orai1 protein abundance at the platelet surface. [Ca2+]i was further increased by Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM and by store depletion with the sarcoendoplasmatic Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (1 µM. However, Orai1 protein abundance at the platelet surface was not significantly affected by ionomycin and only slightly increased by thapsigargin. The effect of thrombin and CRP on Orai1 abundance and [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted by Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 (50 µM. Conclusion: The increase of [Ca2+]i following stimulation of platelets with thrombin and collagen related peptide is potentiated by ultrarapid Rac1 sensitive translocation of Orai1 into the cell membrane.

  12. Evolutionary origins of membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.; Galperin, Michael Y.

    Although the genes that encode membrane proteins make about 30% of the sequenced genomes, the evolution of membrane proteins and their origins are still poorly understood. Here we address this topic by taking a closer look at those membrane proteins the ancestors of which were present in the Last Universal Common Ancestor, and in particular, the F/V-type rotating ATPases. Reconstruction of their evolutionary history provides hints for understanding not only the origin of membrane proteins, but also of membranes themselves. We argue that the evolution of biological membranes could occur as a process of coevolution of lipid bilayers and membrane proteins, where the increase in the ion-tightness of the membrane bilayer may have been accompanied by a transition from amphiphilic, pore-forming membrane proteins to highly hydrophobic integral membrane complexes.

  13. Platelet adhesion, contact phase coagulation activation, and C5a generation of polyethylene glycol acid-grafted high flux cellulosic membrane with varieties of grafting amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushimi, F; Nakayama, M; Nishimura, K; Hiyoshi, T

    1998-10-01

    Grafting of polyethylene glycol chains onto cellulosic membrane can be expected to reduce the interaction between blood (plasma protein and cells) and the membrane surface. Alkylether carboxylic acid (PEG acid) grafted high flux cellulosic membranes for hemodialysis, in which the polyethylene glycol chain bears an alkyl group at one side and a carboxyl group at the other side, have been developed and evaluated. PEG acid-grafted high flux cellulosic membranes with various grafting amounts have been compared with respect to platelet adhesion, the contact phase of blood coagulation, and complement activation in vitro. A new method of quantitating platelet adhesion on hollow-fiber membrane surfaces has been developed, which is based on the determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity after lysis of the adhered platelets. PEG acid-grafted high flux cellulosic membranes showed reduced platelet adhesion and complement activation effects in grafting amounts of 200 ppm or higher without detecting adverse effects up to grafting amounts of 850 ppm. The platelet adhesion of a PEG acid-grafted cellulosic membrane depends on both the flux and grafting amounts of the membrane. It is concluded that the grafting of PEG acid onto a cellulosic membrane improves its biocompatibility as evaluated in terms of platelet adhesion, complement activation, and thrombogenicity.

  14. Activation of tumour cell ECM degradation by thrombin-activated platelet membranes: potentially a P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, J H; Coupland, L A; Freeman, C; Chong, B H; Parish, Christopher R

    2015-06-01

    The promotion of tumour metastasis by platelets may occur through several mechanisms including the induction of a more metastatic phenotype in tumour cells and assisted extravasation of circulating tumour cells. Whilst the mechanisms underlying platelet-assisted extravasation have been extensively studied, much less attention has been paid to the mechanisms underlying platelet promotion of an aggressive phenotype within a tumour cell population. Herein, we demonstrate in vitro that MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells incubated with washed thrombin-activated platelet membranes adopt a Matrigel-degrading phenotype in a dose- and contact time-dependent manner. The same phenotypic change was observed with three other human tumour cell lines of diverse anatomical origin. Moreover, tumour cell lines that had been cultured with washed thrombin-activated platelet membranes had a greater metastatic capacity when injected into mice. This in vivo effect was reliant upon a co-incubation period of >2 h implying a mechanism involving more than platelet membrane binding that occurred within 5 min. Upon further investigation it was found that simultaneous blocking of the platelet-membrane proteins P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa prevented interactions between platelet membranes and MDA-MB-231 cells but also significantly reduced the ability of tumour cells to degrade Matrigel. These results confirm that platelets induce a more aggressive phenotype in tumour cells but also identify the platelet proteins involved in this effect. P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa also play a role in assisting tumour cell extravasation and, thus, are ideal targets for the therapeutic intervention of both stages of platelet-assisted metastasis.

  15. Tracking membrane protein association in model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Reffay

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue.We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well.After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 A, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the

  16. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... affected by the lipid environment. Theoretical predictions are pointed out, and compared to experimental findings, if available. Among others, the following phenomena are discussed: interactions of interfacially adsorbed peptides, pore-forming amphipathic peptides, adsorption of charged proteins onto...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  17. Proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Nagai, Yuhei; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kimura, Katsuki; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the details of proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating real municipal wastewater were investigated. Two separate pilot-scale MBRs were continuously operated under significantly different operating conditions; one MBR was a submerged type whereas the other was a side-stream type. The submerged and side-stream MBRs were operated for 20 and 10 days, respectively. At the end of continuous operation, the foulants were extracted from the fouled membranes. The proteins contained in the extracted foulants were enriched by using the combination of crude concentration with an ultrafiltration membrane and trichloroacetic acid precipitation, and then separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The N-terminal amino acid sequencing analysis of the proteins which formed intensive spots on the 2D-PAGE gels allowed us to partially identify one protein (OmpA family protein originated from genus Brevundimonas or Riemerella anatipestifer) from the foulant obtained from the submerged MBR, and two proteins (OprD and OprF originated from genus Pseudomonas) from that obtained from the side-stream MBR. Despite the significant difference in operating conditions of the two MBRs, all proteins identified in this study belong to β-barrel protein. These findings strongly suggest the importance of β-barrel proteins in developing membrane fouling in MBRs.

  18. Role of platelet plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase in health and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William; L; Dean

    2010-01-01

    Platelets have essential roles in both health and disease. Normal platelet function is required for hemostasis.Inhibition of platelet function in disease or by pharmacological treatment results in bleeding disorders.On the other hand,hyperactive platelets lead to heart attack and stroke.Calcium is a major second messenger in platelet activation,and elevated intracellular calcium leads to hyperactive platelets.Elevated platelet calcium has been documented in hypertension and diabetes;both conditions increase the likelihood of heart attack and stroke. Thus,proper regulation of calcium metabolism in the platelet is extremely important.Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase(PMCA)is a major player in platelet calcium metabolism since it provides the only significant route for calcium efflux.In keeping with the important role of calcium in platelet function,PMCA is a highly regulated transporter.In human platelets,PMCA is activated by Ca2+/calmodulin,by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation and by calpain-dependent removal of the inhibitory peptide.It is inhibited by tyrosine phosphorylation and calpain-dependent proteolysis.In addition,the cellular location of PMCA is regulated by a PDZ-domain-dependent interaction with the cytoskeleton during platelet activation.Rapid regulation by phosphorylation results in changes in the rate of platelet activation,whereas calpain-dependent proteolysis and interaction with the cytoskeleton appears to regulate later events such as clot retraction.In hypertension and diabetes,PMCA expression is upregulated while activity is decreased, presumably due to tyrosine phosphorylation.Clearly,a more complete understanding of PMCA function in human platelets could result in the identification of new ways to control platelet function in disease states.

  19. The inflammatory and tumor-promoting sesquiterpene lactone, thapsigargin, activates platelets by selective mobilization of calcium as shown by protein phosphorylations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastrup, Ole; Linnebjerg, H; Bjerrum, P J

    1987-01-01

    , raised cytoplasmic free calcium level and phosphorylation of platelet proteins was examined in platelet-rich plasma and washed platelet suspension. In contrast to A23187 and thrombin, the platelet activation induced by thapsigargin developed slowly, with maximal response obtained after 2-3 min. Both...... obtained by stimulation of the passive calcium transport through specific channels. These thapsigargin-sensitive channels should predominantly be located in the membranes of intracellular calcium stores rather than in the plasma membrane, because removal of extracellular calcium by EGTA had only...

  20. Bryostatins activate protein kinase C in intact human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.B.; Tallant, E.A.; Pettit, G.R.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    Bryostatins, macrocyclic lactones isolated from a marine bryozoan, have antineoplastic activity in the P388 lymphocytic leukemia system. These compounds also stimulate growth in Swiss 3T3 cells, induce secretion in leukocytes, inhibit phorbol dibutyrate binding to a high affinity receptor, and activate the C-kinase in vitro. In human platelets, phorbol esters induce aggregation and activate protein kinase C, resulting in phosphorylation of a 47K protein and the 20K myosin light chain. The authors now show that bryostatin 7 (B-7) triggers platelet aggregation to the same rate and extent as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). B-7 also causes the in vivo activation of the C-kinase, resulting in phosphorylation of both the 47K and the 20K proteins; the time courses and dose-responses of these B-7-induced phosphorylations were similar to those found with PMA. In addition, B-7 increases the level of /sup 32/P-incorporation into the platelet polyphosphoinositides, which also occurs in response to PMA. Bryostatin 3 (B-3), which has been shown to be much less potent than B-7 in mimicking other PMA effects, was much less effective than PMA or B-7 in inducing platelet aggregation and in stimulating /sup 32/P-incorporation into both proteins and the phosphoinositides. These results demonstrate that, intact human platelets, bryostatins mimic the phorbol esters tumor promoters and directly activate protein kinase C.

  1. Cholesterol:phospholipid ratio is elevated in platelet plasma membrane in patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, N; Robinson, B F; Graham, J G; Wilson, R B

    1990-06-01

    The cholesterol:phospholipid ratio was measured in platelet plasma membrane, red blood cell (RBC) membranes, low density lipoprotein (LDL) and whole plasma in patients with primary hypertension and in matched normal controls. The cholesterol:phospholipid ratio was raised in the platelet membrane from hypertensive patients compared with that from normal controls (0.65 +/- 0.03 vs 0.53 +/- 0.02: mean +/- SEM; P less than 0.01). The ratio observed in RBC membranes, LDL and whole blood was similar in the two groups. If this abnormality in the lipid composition of platelet plasma membrane is present in other cells it could account for some of the changes in cell membrane function that have been described in hypertension.

  2. Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tiny fraction of the blood volume. The principal function of platelets is to prevent bleeding. Red blood cells are ... forming a long string. This illustrates the basic function of platelets, to stick to any foreign surface and then ...

  3. Identification of potential platelet alloantigens in the Equidae family by comparison of gene sequences encoding major platelet membrane glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Mary K; Humphries, Drew M

    2013-12-01

    Platelet alloantigens in horses may play an important role in the development of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). The objective of this study was to evaluate genes encoding major platelet glycoproteins within the Equidae family in an effort to identify potential alloantigens. DNA was isolated from blood samples obtained from Equidae family members, including a Holsteiner-Oldenburg cross, a Quarter horse, a donkey, and a Plains zebra (Equus burchelli). Gene sequences encoding equine platelet membrane glycoproteins IIb, IIIa (integrin subunits αIIb and β3), Ia (integrin subunit α2), and Ibα were determined using PCR. Gene sequences were compared to the equine genome available on GenBank. Polymorphisms that would be predicted to result in amino acid changes on platelet surfaces were documented and compared with known alloantigenic sites documented on human platelets. Amino acid differences were predicted based on nucleotide sequences for all 4 genes. Nine differences were documented for αIIb, 5 differences were documented for β3, 7 differences were documented for α2, and 16 differences were documented for Ibα outside the macroglycopeptide region. This study represents the first effort at identifying potential platelet alloantigens in members of the Equidae Family based on evaluation of gene sequences. The data obtained form the groundwork for identifying potential platelet alloantigens involved in transfusion reactions and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). More work is required to determine whether the predicted amino acid differences documented in this study play a role in alloimmunity, and whether other polymorphisms not detected in this study are present that may result in alloimmunity. © 2013 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  4. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly ...

  5. C-reactive protein, platelets, and patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinarde, Leonardo; Hillman, Macarena; Rizzotti, Alina; Basquiera, Ana Lisa; Tabares, Aldo; Cuestas, Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    The association between inflammation, platelets, and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) has not been studied so far. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether C-reactive protein (CRP) is related to low platelet count and PDA. This was a retrospective study of 88 infants with a birth weight ≤1500 g and a gestational age ≤30 weeks. Platelet count, CRP, and an echocardiogram were assessed in all infants. The subjects were matched by sex, gestational age, and birth weight. Differences were compared using the χ(2), t-test, or Mann-Whitney U-test, as appropriate. Significant variables were entered into a logistic regression model. The association between CRP and platelets was evaluated by correlation and regression analysis. Platelet count (167 000 vs. 213 000 µl(-1), p = 0.015) was lower and the CRP (0.45 vs. 0.20 mg/dl, p = 0.002) was higher, and the platelet count correlated inversely with CRP (r = -0.145, p = 0.049) in the infants with vs. without PDA. Only CRP was independently associated with PDA in a logistic regression model (OR 64.1, 95% confidence interval 1.4-2941, p = 0.033).

  6. A comprehensive proteomics and genomics analysis reveals novel transmembrane proteins in human platelets and mouse megakaryocytes including G6b-B, a novel immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senis, Yotis A; Tomlinson, Michael G; García, Angel; Dumon, Stephanie; Heath, Victoria L; Herbert, John; Cobbold, Stephen P; Spalton, Jennifer C; Ayman, Sinem; Antrobus, Robin; Zitzmann, Nicole; Bicknell, Roy; Frampton, Jon; Authi, Kalwant S; Martin, Ashley; Wakelam, Michael J O; Watson, Stephen P

    2007-03-01

    The platelet surface is poorly characterized due to the low abundance of many membrane proteins and the lack of specialist tools for their investigation. In this study we identified novel human platelet and mouse megakaryocyte membrane proteins using specialist proteomics and genomics approaches. Three separate methods were used to enrich platelet surface proteins prior to identification by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry: lectin affinity chromatography, biotin/NeutrAvidin affinity chromatography, and free flow electrophoresis. Many known, abundant platelet surface transmembrane proteins and several novel proteins were identified using each receptor enrichment strategy. In total, two or more unique peptides were identified for 46, 68, and 22 surface membrane, intracellular membrane, and membrane proteins of unknown subcellular localization, respectively. The majority of these were single transmembrane proteins. To complement the proteomics studies, we analyzed the transcriptome of a highly purified preparation of mature primary mouse megakaryocytes using serial analysis of gene expression in view of the increasing importance of mutant mouse models in establishing protein function in platelets. This approach identified all of the major classes of platelet transmembrane receptors, including multitransmembrane proteins. Strikingly 17 of the 25 most megakaryocyte-specific genes (relative to 30 other serial analysis of gene expression libraries) were transmembrane proteins, illustrating the unique nature of the megakaryocyte/platelet surface. The list of novel plasma membrane proteins identified using proteomics includes the immunoglobulin superfamily member G6b, which undergoes extensive alternate splicing. Specific antibodies were used to demonstrate expression of the G6b-B isoform, which contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif. G6b-B undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation and association with the SH2 domain-containing phosphatase

  7. Lipid rafts are essential for the regulation of SOCE by plasma membrane resident STIM1 in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Natalia; Galán, Carmen; Jardín, Isaac; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A

    2011-03-01

    STIM1 is a transmembrane protein essential for the activation of store-operated Ca²+ entry (SOCE), a major Ca²+ influx mechanism. STIM1 is either located in the endoplasmic reticulum, communicating the Ca²+ concentration in the stores to plasma membrane channels or in the plasma membrane, where it might sense the extracellular Ca²+ concentration. Plasma membrane-located STIM1 has been reported to mediate the SOCE sensitivity to extracellular Ca²+ through its interaction with Orai1. Here we show that plasma membrane lipid raft domains are essential for the regulation of SOCE by extracellular Ca²+. Treatment of platelets with the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) induced Mn²+ entry, which was inhibited by increasing concentrations of extracellular Ca²+. Platelet treatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which removes cholesterol and disrupts the lipid raft domains, impaired the inactivation of Ca²+ entry induced by extracellular Ca²+. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin also abolished translocation of STIM1 to the plasma membrane stimulated by treatment with TG and prevented TG-evoked co-immunoprecipitation between plasma membrane-located STIM1 and the Ca²+ permeable channel Orai1. These findings suggest that lipid raft domains are essential for the inactivation of SOCE by extracellular Ca²+ mediated by the interaction between plasma membrane-located STIM1 and Orai1. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative Effects of α-, β-, and γ-Carbolines on Platelet Aggregation and Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Tsuchiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption possibly affect platelet functions. To verify the hypothesis that some α-, β-, and γ-carboline components in cigarette smoke and alcoholic beverages may change platelet aggregability, their effects on human platelets were determined by aggregometry together with investigating their membrane effects by turbidimetry. Carbolines inhibited platelet aggregation induced by five agents with the potency being 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole > 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole > 1-methyl-9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole. The most potent 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole showed 50% aggregation-inhibitory concentrations of 6–172 μM. Both γ-carbolines interacted with phosphatidylcholine membranes to lower the lipid phase transition temperature with the potency correlating to the antiplatelet activity, suggesting that the interaction with platelet membranes to increase their fluidity underlies antiplatelet effects. Given their possible concentration and accumulation in platelets, γ- and β-carbolines would provide cigarette smokers and alcohol drinkers with reduced platelet aggregability, and they may be responsible for the occurrence of hemorrhagic diseases associated with heavy smoking and alcoholics.

  9. Inhibition of platelet (/sup 3/H)- imipramine binding by human plasma protein fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strijewski, A.; Chudzik, J.; Tang, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding to platelet membranes by human plasma fractions and isolated plasma proteins was investigated. Several plasma proteins were found to contribute to the observed apparent inhibition and this contribution was assessed in terms of inhibitor units. Alpha/sub 1/ acid glycoprotein, high density and low density lipoprotein, IgG and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin were identified as effective non-specific inhibitors. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein was confirmed to be the most potent plasma protein inhibitor. Cohn fractions were evaluated for the presence of the postulated endocoid of (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding site.

  10. Interactive protein network of FXIII-A1 in lipid rafts of activated and non-activated platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabani, Vahideh; Montange, Damien; Davani, Siamak

    2016-09-01

    Lipid-rafts are defined as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids within platelet plasma membrane. Lipid raft-mediated clot retraction requires factor XIII and other interacting proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteins that interact with factor XIII in raft and non-raft domains of activated and non-activated platelet plasma membrane. By lipidomics analysis, we identified cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched areas as lipid rafts. Platelets were activated by thrombin. Proteomics analysis provided an overview of the pathways in which proteins of rafts and non-rafts participated in the interaction network of FXIII-A1, a catalytic subunit of FXIII. "Platelet activation" was the principal pathway among KEGG pathways for proteins of rafts, both before and after activation. Network analysis showed four types of interactions (activation, binding, reaction, and catalysis) in raft and non-raft domains in interactive network of FXIII-A1. FXIII-A1 interactions with other proteins in raft domains and their role in homeostasis highlight the specialization of the raft domain in clot retraction via the Factor XIII protein network.

  11. Comparative Activities of Cattle and Swine Platelet Microbicidal Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Iuri B; Gritsenko, Viktor A

    2009-12-01

    The bactericidal activities of cattle and swine platelet microbicidal proteins (PMPs) with their comparison with human PMP were studied. Activities of PMP were tested against Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Escherichia coli. B. subtilis and B. cereus were high susceptible to PMP at very low concentrations. Of the gram-positive cocci studied, M. lysodeikticus and S. aureus were the most, and S. epidermidis the least, susceptible. E. coli was found to be relatively resistant to the lethal action of all PMP. The findings of this study confirm that the existence of antimicrobial peptides is conserved among mammalian platelets.

  12. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD); Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  13. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Enhanced stimulation of platelets by the terminal complement components is related to the lack of C8bp in the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaas, P; Berger, B; Weber, S; Peter, H H; Hänsch, G M

    1988-05-01

    Recently, a protein isolated from the membrane of human E, the so-called C8 binding protein (C8bp), has been described. C8bp is characterized as a 65-kDa protein that binds to C8 and inhibits the C5b-9-mediated lysis in a homologous system. In the present study, membranes of peripheral blood cells were tested for the presence of C8bp by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. In all cells a protein band reacting with anti-C8bp was seen, the Mr, however, was only about 50 kDa. To further analyze the 50-kDa protein, we isolated the protein by phenol-water extraction and isoelectric focusing from papain-treated platelets. The isolated protein behaved similar to the E-derived C8bp: it inhibited the lysis of model target cells by C5b-9. To examine the function of C8bp in platelets, we tested platelets from patients suffering from paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). These platelets were deficient in C8bp, being in accordance with their higher lytic susceptibility in vitro. In response to sublytic C5b-9 doses, the PNH platelets released considerably more serotonin and thromboxane B2 than normal platelets. By addition of purified C8bp, the thromboxane B2 release was suppressed, indicating that C8bp not only restricts the lytic complement attack, but also regulates the C5b-9-mediated stimulation of target cells. Thus, lack of C8bp might not only result in enhanced hemolysis, but also in enhanced stimulation of platelets, which in turn might contribute to the thrombotic complications seen in some PNH-type III patients.

  14. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation during platelet storage: consequences for platelet recovery and hemostatic function in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canault, Matthias; Duerschmied, Daniel; Brill, Alexander; Stefanini, Lucia; Schatzberg, Daphne; Cifuni, Stephen M; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Wagner, Denisa D

    2010-03-01

    Platelets undergo several modifications during storage that reduce their posttransfusion survival and functionality. One important feature of these changes, which are known as platelet storage lesion, is the shedding of the surface glycoproteins GPIb-alpha and GPV. We recently demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17) mediates mitochondrial injury-induced shedding of adhesion receptors and that TACE activity correlates with reduced posttransfusion survival of these cells. We now confirm that TACE mediates receptor shedding and clearance of platelets stored for 16 hours at 37 degrees C or 22 degrees C. We further demonstrate that both storage and mitochondrial injury lead to the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) in platelets and that TACE-mediated receptor shedding from mouse and human platelets requires p38 MAP kinase signaling. Protein kinase C, extracellular regulated-signal kinase MAPK, and caspases were not involved in TACE activation. Both inhibition of p38 MAPK and inactivation of TACE during platelet storage led to a markedly improved posttransfusion recovery and hemostatic function of platelets in mice. p38 MAPK inhibitors had only minor effects on the aggregation of fresh platelets under static or flow conditions in vitro. In summary, our data suggest that inhibition of p38 MAPK or TACE during storage may significantly improve the quality of stored platelets.

  15. Collagen-stimulated activation of Syk but not c-Src is severely compromised in human platelets lacking membrane glycoprotein VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinohe, T; Takayama, H; Ezumi, Y; Arai, M; Yamamoto, N; Takahashi, H; Okuma, M

    1997-01-03

    Activation of circulating platelets by subendothelial collagen is an essential event in vascular hemostasis. In human platelets, two membrane glycoprotein (GP) abnormalities, integrin alpha2 beta1 deficiency and GPVI deficiency, have been reported to result in severe hyporesponsiveness to fibrillar collagen. Although it has been well established that integrin alpha2 beta1, also known as the GPIa-IIa complex, functions as a primary platelet adhesion receptor for collagen, the mechanism by which GPVI contributes to collagen-platelet interaction has been ill defined to date. However, our recent observation that GPVI cross-linking couples to cyclic AMP-insensitive activation of c-Src and Syk tyrosine kinases suggested a potential role for GPVI in regulating protein-tyrosine phosphorylation by collagen (Ichinohe, T., Takayama, H., Ezumi, Y., Yanagi, S., Yamamura, H., and Okuma, M. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 28029-28036). To further investigate this hypothesis, here we examined the collagen-induced protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in GPVI-deficient platelets expressing normal amounts of alpha2 beta1. In response to collagen, these platelets exhibited alpha2 beta1-dependent c-Src activation accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of several substrates including cortactin. In contrast, severe defects were observed in collagen-stimulated Syk activation and tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma2, Vav, and focal adhesion kinase, implicating a specific requirement of GPVI for recruiting these molecules to signaling cascades evoked by collagen-platelet interaction.

  16. Platelet activation by extracellular matrix proteins in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of excessive blood loss to avoid fatal haemorrhage is a pivotal process for all organisms possessing a circulatory system. Increased circulating blood volume and pressure, as required in larger animals, make this process all the more important and challenging. It is essential to have a powerful and rapid system to detect damage and generate an effective seal, and which is also exquisitely regulated to prevent unwanted, excessive or systemic activation so as to avoid blockage of vessels. Thus, a highly specialised and efficient haemostatic system has evolved that consists of cellular (platelets) and protein (coagulation factors) components. Importantly, this is able to support haemostasis in both the low shear environment of the venous system and the high shear environment of the arterial system. Endothelial cells, lining the entire circulation system, play a crucial role in the delicate balance between activation and inhibition of the haemostatic system. An intact and healthy endothelium supports blood flow by preventing attachment of cells and proteins which is required for initiation of coagulation and platelet activation. Endothelial cells produce and release the two powerful soluble inhibitors of platelet activation, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, and express high levels of CD39 which rapidly metabolises the major platelet feedback agonist, ADP. This antithrombotic environment however can rapidly change following activation or removal of endothelial cells through injury or rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Loss of endothelial cells exposes the subendothelial extracellular matrix which creates strong signals for activation of the haemostatic system including powerful platelet adhesion and activation. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the subendothelial extracellular matrix influence these prothrombotic characteristics with life threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications, as illustrated by formation of

  17. Pharmacological Characterization of Inositol 1,4,5-tris Phosphate Receptors in Human Platelet Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Dwivedi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The phosphatidylinositol (PI hydrolysis signaling system has been shown to be altered in platelets of depressed and schizophrenic subjects. Inositol (1,4,5 trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5P3, an integral component of the PI signaling system, mobilizes Ca2+ by activating Ins(1,4,5P3 receptors. To eventually investigate the role of Ins(1,4,5P3 receptors in depression and other mental disorders, we characterized [H3]Ins(1,4,5P3 binding sites in crude platelet membranes prepared from small amounts of blood obtained from healthy human control subjects. We found a single, saturable binding site for [H3]Ins(1,4,5P3 to crude platelet membranes, which is time dependent and modulated by pH, inositol phosphates, and heparin. Since cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and Ca2+ have been shown to be important modulators in Ins(1,4,5P3 receptors, in the present study we also determined the effects of various concentrations of CaCI2 and forskolin on Ins(1,4,5P3 binding to platelet membranes. CaCI2 modulated [3H]Ins(1,4,5P3 binding sites in a biphasic manner: at lower concentrations it inhibited [3H]Ins(1,4,5P3 binding, whereas at higher concentrations, it stimulated [3H]Ins(1,4,5P3 binding. On the other hand, forskolin inhibited [3H]Ins(1,4,5P3 binding. Our results thus suggest that the pharmacological characteristics of [3H]Ins(1,4,5P3 binding to crude platelet membranes are similar to that of Ins(1,4,5P3 receptors; and that both Ca2+ and cAMP modulate [3H]Ins(1,4,5P3 binding in crude platelet membranes.

  18. Thermodynamic competition between membrane protein oligomeric states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Self-assembly of protein monomers into distinct membrane protein oligomers provides a general mechanism for diversity in the molecular architectures, and resulting biological functions, of membrane proteins. We develop a general physical framework describing the thermodynamic competition between different oligomeric states of membrane proteins. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance as a model system, we show how the dominant oligomeric states of membrane proteins emerge from the interplay of protein concentration in the cell membrane, protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations, and direct monomer-monomer interactions. Our results suggest general physical mechanisms and principles underlying regulation of protein function via control of membrane protein oligomeric state.

  19. Thermodynamic competition between membrane protein oligomeric states

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of protein monomers into distinct membrane protein oligomers provides a general mechanism for diversity in the molecular architectures, and resulting biological functions, of membrane proteins. We develop a general physical framework describing the thermodynamic competition between different oligomeric states of membrane proteins. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance as a model system, we show how the dominant oligomeric states of membrane proteins emerge from the interplay of protein concentration in the cell membrane, protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations, and direct monomer-monomer interactions. Our results suggest general physical mechanisms and principles underlying regulation of protein function via control of membrane protein oligomeric state.

  20. Dialyzer membranes: effect of surface area and chemical modification of cellulose on complement and platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiout, A; Meinhold, H; Kessel, M; Schulze, H; Baurmeister, U

    1987-04-01

    Using an ex vivo model, the effects of membrane composition and surface area on both the complement system (as reflected by plasma C3a levels) and platelets [as indicated by plasma concentrations of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and platelet factor 4 (PF4)] were studied. In this model, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was associated with less complement activation than cuprammonium cellulose (CC). A new "modified cellulose" (MC) membrane, in which a small number of the free hydroxyl groups on cellulose are substituted with a tertiary amino compound, was also associated with a low degree of complement activation, similar to that with PAN. However, the extent of hydroxyl group substitution in four MC membrane subtypes did not correlate with the reduction in complement activation. In studies using CC, the amount of generated C3a correlated with the membrane surface area, although the relationship was curvilinear. Plasma concentrations at the "dialyzer" outlet of TXB2 and PF4 were similar with CC, PAN, and MC. In studies with the MC subtypes, increasing the extent of hydroxyl group substitution paradoxically increased, albeit slightly, the amount of TXB2 generation. In studies with CC, a linear relationship between membrane surface area and TXB2 generation was found. The results suggest a dissociation between platelet and complement effects among different dialyzer membranes, and underline the importance of membrane surface area.

  1. Haemostatic role of intermediate filaments in adhered platelets: importance of the membranous system stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Mondragón, Ricardo; Mondragón, Mónica; González, Sirenia; Galván, Iván J

    2013-09-01

    The role of platelets in coagulation and the haemostatic process was initially suggested two centuries ago, and under appropriate physiological stimuli, these undergo abrupt morphological changes, attaching and spreading on damaged endothelium, preventing bleeding. During the adhesion process, platelet cytoskeleton reorganizes generating compartments in which actin filaments, microtubules, and associated proteins are arranged in characteristic patterns mediating crucial events, such as centralization of their organelles, secretion of granule contents, aggregation with one another to form a haemostatic plug, and retraction of these aggregates. However, the role of Intermediate filaments during the platelet adhesion process has not been explored. J. Cell. Biochem. 114: 2050-2060, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Platelet-rich fibrin membranes as scaffolds for periosteal tissue engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gassling, V.; Douglas, T.E.L.; Warnke, P.H.; Acil, Y.; Wiltfang, J.; Becker, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF)-based membranes have been used for covering alveolar ridge augmentation side in several in vivo studies. Few in vitro studies on PRF and no studies using human periosteal cells for tissue engineering have been published. The aim is a comparison of PRF with the

  3. Platelet-rich fibrin membranes as scaffolds for periosteal tissue engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gassling, V.; Douglas, T.E.L.; Warnke, P.H.; Acil, Y.; Wiltfang, J.; Becker, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF)-based membranes have been used for covering alveolar ridge augmentation side in several in vivo studies. Few in vitro studies on PRF and no studies using human periosteal cells for tissue engineering have been published. The aim is a comparison of PRF with the

  4. Activated platelets release two types of membrane vesicles: microvesicles by surface shedding and exosomes derived from exocytosis of multivesicular bodies and alpha-granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijnen, H F; Schiel, A E; Fijnheer, R; Geuze, H J; Sixma, J J

    1999-12-01

    Platelet activation leads to secretion of granule contents and to the formation of microvesicles by shedding of membranes from the cell surface. Recently, we have described small internal vesicles in multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and alpha-granules, and suggested that these vesicles are secreted during platelet activation, analogous to the secretion of vesicles termed exosomes by other cell types. In the present study we report that two different types of membrane vesicles are released after stimulation of platelets with thrombin receptor agonist peptide SFLLRN (TRAP) or alpha-thrombin: microvesicles of 100 nm to 1 microm, and exosomes measuring 40 to 100 nm in diameter, similar in size as the internal vesicles in MVBs and alpha-granules. Microvesicles could be detected by flow cytometry but not the exosomes, probably because of the small size of the latter. Western blot analysis showed that isolated exosomes were selectively enriched in the tetraspan protein CD63. Whole-mount immuno-electron microscopy (IEM) confirmed this observation. Membrane proteins such as the integrin chains alpha(IIb)-beta(3) and beta(1), GPIbalpha, and P-selectin were predominantly present on the microvesicles. IEM of platelet aggregates showed CD63(+) internal vesicles in fusion profiles of MVBs, and in the extracellular space between platelet extensions. Annexin-V binding was mainly restricted to the microvesicles and to a low extent to exosomes. Binding of factor X and prothrombin was observed to the microvesicles but not to exosomes. These observations and the selective presence of CD63 suggest that released platelet exosomes may have an extracellular function other than the procoagulant activity, attributed to platelet microvesicles.

  5. Effect of membrane curvature on lateral distribution of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Several membrane proteins exhibit interesting shapes that increases their preference for certain membrane curvatures. Both peripheral and transmembrane proteins are tested with respect to their affinity for a spectrum of high membrane curvatures. We generate high membrane curvatures by pulling...... membrane tubes out of Giant Unilamellar lipid Vesicles (GUVs). The tube diameter can be tuned by aspirating the GUV into a micropipette for controlling the membrane tension. By using fluorescently labled proteins we have shown that sorting of proteins like e.g. FBAR onto tubes is significantly increased...

  6. Structure Prediction of Membrane Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunlong Zhou; Yao Zheng; Yan Zhou

    2004-01-01

    There is a large gap between the number of membrane protein (MP) sequences and that of their decoded 3D structures, especially high-resolution structures, due to difficulties in crystal preparation of MPs. However, detailed knowledge of the 3D structure is required for the fundamental understanding of the function of an MP and the interactions between the protein and its inhibitors or activators. In this paper, some computational approaches that have been used to predict MP structures are discussed and compared.

  7. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  8. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  9. Investigation of interaction of human platelet membrane components with anticoagulant drugs Abciximab and Eptifibatide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sankiewicz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abciximab (Abci and eptifibatide (Epti are antiaggregate drugs which may reduce thrombotic complications in acute coronary syndromes. The aim of this work was the investigation of the interaction between the phospholipid-GPIIb/IIIa glycoprotein complex and Abci or Epti, and the influence of these drugs on the phospholipid ratio in the platelet membrane. The interaction between the phospholipid-GPIIb/IIIa glycoprotein complex and antiaggregate drugs were investigated using the Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging technique (SPRI. Phospholipids phosphatidylinositol (PI, phosphatidylserine (PS, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, phosphatidylcholine (PC and sphingomyelin (SM were first immobilized onto the gold chip surface. The phospholipid ratio in the platelet membrane was determined by the HPLC. Only PI, PS, PE and PC were determined. Human platelets treated 'in vitro' with Abci or Epti exhibit changes in the phospholipid ratio in the platelet membrane. The ratio of PS decreases and PC rises. The SPRI distinctly shows interactions between phospholipids and glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa, and between the phospholipid-glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa complex and Abci or Epti. The interaction between phospholipids and glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa is growing in the sequence: PI

  10. Heat shock protein 70 regulates platelet integrin activation, granule secretion and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigg, Rachel A; Healy, Laura D; Nowak, Marie S; Mallet, Jérémy; Thierheimer, Marisa L D; Pang, Jiaqing; McCarty, Owen J T; Aslan, Joseph E

    2016-04-01

    Molecular chaperones that support protein quality control, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), participate in diverse aspects of cellular and physiological function. Recent studies have reported roles for specific chaperone activities in blood platelets in maintaining hemostasis; however, the functions of Hsp70 in platelet physiology remain uninvestigated. Here we characterize roles for Hsp70 activity in platelet activation and function. In vitro biochemical, microscopy, flow cytometry, and aggregometry assays of platelet function, as well as ex vivo analyses of platelet aggregate formation in whole blood under shear, were carried out under Hsp70-inhibited conditions. Inhibition of platelet Hsp70 blocked platelet aggregation and granule secretion in response to collagen-related peptide (CRP), which engages the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor-γ chain complex. Hsp70 inhibition also reduced platelet integrin-αIIbβ3 activation downstream of GPVI, as Hsp70-inhibited platelets showed reduced PAC-1 and fibrinogen binding. Ex vivo, pharmacological inhibition of Hsp70 in human whole blood prevented the formation of platelet aggregates on collagen under shear. Biochemical studies supported a role for Hsp70 in maintaining the assembly of the linker for activation of T cells signalosome, which couples GPVI-initiated signaling to integrin activation, secretion, and platelet function. Together, our results suggest that Hsp70 regulates platelet activation and function by supporting linker for activation of T cells-associated signaling events downstream of platelet GPVI engagement, suggesting a role for Hsp70 in the intracellular organization of signaling systems that mediate platelet secretion, "inside-out" activation of platelet integrin-αIIbβ3, platelet-platelet aggregation, and, ultimately, hemostatic plug and thrombus formation.

  11. Expression and structural analysis of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Eifler, Nora

    2006-01-01

    1.1 Membrane Proteins Between one quarter and one third of all genes in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms code for integral membrane proteins (IMPs) (Essen, 2002). These proteins are essential parts of biological membranes and confer various functions, such as energy conversion, transport, biosynthesis of lipids, signal transduction, or cell recognition. The enormous economical potential of membrane proteins is highlighted by the family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPC...

  12. The effect of protein corona composition on the interaction of carbon nanotubes with human blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, Silvia H; Diduch, Lukas L; Tegegn, Tseday Z; Orecna, Martina; Strader, Michael B; Karnaukhova, Elena; Bonevich, John E; Holada, Karel; Simak, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are one of the most promising nanomaterials for use in medicine. The blood biocompatibility of CNT is a critical safety issue. In the bloodstream, proteins bind to CNT through non-covalent interactions to form a protein corona, thereby largely defining the biological properties of the CNT. Here, we characterize the interactions of carboxylated-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTCOOH) with common human proteins and investigate the effect of the different protein coronas on the interaction of CNTCOOH with human blood platelets (PLT). Molecular modeling and different photophysical techniques were employed to characterize the binding of albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG), γ-globulins (IgG) and histone H1 (H1) on CNTCOOH. We found that the identity of protein forming the corona greatly affects the outcome of CNTCOOH's interaction with blood PLT. Bare CNTCOOH-induced PLT aggregation and the release of platelet membrane microparticles (PMP). HSA corona attenuated the PLT aggregating activity of CNTCOOH, while FBG caused the agglomeration of CNTCOOH nanomaterial, thereby diminishing the effect of CNTCOOH on PLT. In contrast, the IgG corona caused PLT fragmentation, and the H1 corona induced a strong PLT aggregation, thus potentiating the release of PMP.

  13. Evaluation of platelets and hemostasis during hemodialysis with six different membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeelen, D; Jochmans, K; Herman, A G; Van der Niepen, P; Sennesael, J; De Waele, M

    1991-01-01

    Hemodialysis induces thrombocytopenia and activation of coagulation. The severity of this reaction depends on the kind of membrane. In this study, we present the results of determination of platelet count, and of different factors of coagulation in 10 stable dialysis patients. Measurements were performed at the start and after 15 and 45 min of dialysis. Samples were taken before and after the dialyzer. All 10 patients were treated consecutively and in a random order during 14 days with the following membranes: polyacrylonitrile (Filtral 12, Hospal), hemophan (GFS 120 Plus, Gambro, and Bio-Nephros HF Andante, Organon), polysulfone (F6, Fresenius), cuprammonium (AM50-BIO, Asahi) and cellulose acetate (Duo-Flux, Cordis-Dow). The cellulose acetate membrane induced a small but significant drop of mean platelet count [results are mean (SEM)]: from 245,000 (17,000) to 224,000 (16,000)/microliters after 15 min. With the same membrane a dramatic increase after 15 min was noted of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha from 56.3 (9) to 146.7 (35.7) pg/ml. The other membranes did not influence significantly prostanoid levels and platelet count. During dialysis no significant changes of fibrinopeptide A (FPA) and von Willebrand factor (VWF) were observed. Nevertheless, predialysis FPA and beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG) concentrations were lowest after 14 days of treatment with cellulose acetate and polyacrylonitrile membranes. It is concluded that the activation of coagulation depends on the membrane used. The activation may be dominated by one single system (e.g. prostanoids). The different predialysis concentration of some of the factors suggests interference of the dialysis membrane with the activation of coagulation during the interdialytic period.

  14. A Novel Technique for Conjunctivoplasty in a Rabbit Model: Platelet-Rich Fibrin Membrane Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakmak, Hasan Basri; Dereli Can, Gamze; Ünverdi, Hatice; Toklu, Yasin; Hücemenoğlu, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effect of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) membrane on wound healing. Methods. Twenty-four right eyes of 24 New Zealand rabbits equally divided into 2 groups for the study design. After the creation of 5 × 5 mm conjunctival damage, it was secured with PRF membrane, which was generated from the rabbit's whole blood samples in PRF membrane group, whereas damage was left unsutured in the control group. Three animals were sacrificed in each group on the 1st, 3rd, 7th, and 28th postoperative days. Immunohistochemical (IHC) stainings and biomicroscopic evaluation were performed and compared between groups. Results. PRF membrane generated significant expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in the early postoperative period. However, the IHC evaluation allowed showing the excessive staining at day 28, in control group. Biomicroscopic evaluation revealed complete epithelialization in PRF membrane group, but none of the cases showed complete healing in the control group. Conclusions. This experimental study showed us the beneficial effects of the PRF membrane on conjunctival healing. Besides its chemical effects, it provides mechanical support as a scaffold for the migrating cells that are important for ocular surface regeneration. These overall results encourage us to apply autologous PRF membrane as a growth factor-enriched endogenous scaffold for ocular surface reconstruction. PMID:27747098

  15. A Novel Technique for Conjunctivoplasty in a Rabbit Model: Platelet-Rich Fibrin Membrane Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Erol Can

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effect of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF membrane on wound healing. Methods. Twenty-four right eyes of 24 New Zealand rabbits equally divided into 2 groups for the study design. After the creation of 5 × 5 mm conjunctival damage, it was secured with PRF membrane, which was generated from the rabbit’s whole blood samples in PRF membrane group, whereas damage was left unsutured in the control group. Three animals were sacrificed in each group on the 1st, 3rd, 7th, and 28th postoperative days. Immunohistochemical (IHC stainings and biomicroscopic evaluation were performed and compared between groups. Results. PRF membrane generated significant expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF in the early postoperative period. However, the IHC evaluation allowed showing the excessive staining at day 28, in control group. Biomicroscopic evaluation revealed complete epithelialization in PRF membrane group, but none of the cases showed complete healing in the control group. Conclusions. This experimental study showed us the beneficial effects of the PRF membrane on conjunctival healing. Besides its chemical effects, it provides mechanical support as a scaffold for the migrating cells that are important for ocular surface regeneration. These overall results encourage us to apply autologous PRF membrane as a growth factor-enriched endogenous scaffold for ocular surface reconstruction.

  16. Platelet mimicry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Hunter, Alan Christy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Here we critically examine whether coating of nanoparticles with platelet membranes can truly disguise them against recognition by elements of the innate immune system. We further assess whether the "cloaking technology" can sufficiently equip nanoparticles with platelet-mimicking functionalities...

  17. Analysis of Protein-Membrane Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemmer, Gerdi Christine

    Cellular membranes are complex structures, consisting of hundreds of different lipids and proteins. These membranes act as barriers between distinct environments, constituting hot spots for many essential functions of the cell, including signaling, energy conversion, and transport. These functions...... are implemented by soluble proteins reversibly binding to, as well as by integral membrane proteins embedded in, cellular membranes. The activity and interaction of these proteins is furthermore modulated by the lipids of the membrane. Here, liposomes were used as model membrane systems to investigate...... interactions between proteins and lipids. First, interactions of soluble proteins with membranes and specific lipids were studied, using two proteins: Annexin V and Tma1. The protein was first subjected to a lipid/protein overlay assay to identify candidate interaction partners in a fast and efficient way...

  18. Computational modeling of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler Leman, Julia; Ulmschneider, Martin B; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    The determination of membrane protein (MP) structures has always trailed that of soluble proteins due to difficulties in their overexpression, reconstitution into membrane mimetics, and subsequent structure determination. The percentage of MP structures in the protein databank (PDB) has been at a constant 1-2% for the last decade. In contrast, over half of all drugs target MPs, only highlighting how little we understand about drug-specific effects in the human body. To reduce this gap, researchers have attempted to predict structural features of MPs even before the first structure was experimentally elucidated. In this review, we present current computational methods to predict MP structure, starting with secondary structure prediction, prediction of trans-membrane spans, and topology. Even though these methods generate reliable predictions, challenges such as predicting kinks or precise beginnings and ends of secondary structure elements are still waiting to be addressed. We describe recent developments in the prediction of 3D structures of both α-helical MPs as well as β-barrels using comparative modeling techniques, de novo methods, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The increase of MP structures has (1) facilitated comparative modeling due to availability of more and better templates, and (2) improved the statistics for knowledge-based scoring functions. Moreover, de novo methods have benefited from the use of correlated mutations as restraints. Finally, we outline current advances that will likely shape the field in the forthcoming decade.

  19. Novel Tripod Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Kruse, Andrew C; Gotfryd, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins play central roles in controlling the flow of information and molecules across membranes. Our understanding of membrane protein structures and functions, however, is seriously limited, mainly due to difficulties in handling and analysing these proteins in aqueous solution...

  20. Fluorescent probes sensitive to changes in the cholesterol-to-phospholipids molar ratio in human platelet membranes during atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posokhov, Yevgen

    2016-09-01

    Environment-sensitive fluorescent probes were used for the spectroscopic visualization of pathological changes in human platelet membranes during cerebral atherosclerosis. It has been estimated that the ratiometric probes 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole and 2-phenyl-phenanthr[9,10]oxazole can detect changes in the cholesterol-to-phospholipids molar ratio in human platelet membranes during the disease.

  1. Cell-free system for synthesizing membrane proteins cell free method for synthesizing membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides an in vitro method for producing proteins, membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that interact with membrane-associated proteins for assembly into an oligomeric complex or that require association with a membrane for proper folding. The method comprises, supplying intracytoplasmic membranes from organisms; modifying protein composition of intracytoplasmic membranes from organism by modifying DNA to delete genes encoding functions of the organism not associated with the formation of the intracytoplasmic membranes; generating appropriate DNA or RNA templates that encode the target protein; and mixing the intracytoplasmic membranes with the template and a transcription/translation-competent cellular extract to cause simultaneous production of the membrane proteins and encapsulation of the membrane proteins within the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  2. Platelets possess functional TGF-beta receptors and Smad2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, P R; Salim, J P; Marta, R F; Osorio, M J Mela; Goette, N P; Molinas, F C

    2007-02-01

    TGF-beta1 plays a main role in tissue repair by regulating extracellular matrix production and tissue granulation. Platelets are one of the main sources of this cytokine in the circulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of the TGF-beta receptors on platelets, the effect of TGF-beta1 on platelet aggregation and the underlying intracellular mechanisms. TGF-beta receptors on platelets were studied by flow cytometry and their mRNA by PCR. Platelet aggregation was assessed by turbidimetric methods and intracellular pathways by Western blot. TGF-beta receptor type II and mRNA codifying for TbetaRI and TbetaRII were found in platelets. We demonstrated that TGF-beta1 did not trigger platelet aggregation by itself but had a modulating effect on ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Either inhibition or increase in platelet aggregation, depending on the exposure time to TGF-beta1 and the ADP concentration used, were shown. We found that platelets possess Smad2 protein and that its phosphorylation state is increased after exposure to TGF-beta1. Besides, TGF-beta1 modified the pattern of ADP-induced tyrosine phosphorylation. Increased phosphorylation levels of 64-, 80- and 125-kDa proteins during short time incubation with TGF-beta1 and increased phosphorylation of 64- and 125-kDa proteins after longer incubation were observed. The modulating effect of TGF-beta1 on platelet aggregation could play a role during pathological states in which circulating TGF-beta1 levels are increased and intravascular platelet activation is present, such as myeloproliferative disorders. In vascular injury, in which platelet activation followed by granule release generates high local ADP concentrations, it could function as a physiological mechanism of platelet activation control.

  3. Snake venom proteins and platelet thrombus formation%蛇毒蛋白与血小板血栓形成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李灵欣; 刘欣; 宁淑香; 李庆伟; 王继红

    2012-01-01

    多种蛇毒蛋白具有与血小板表面整合素、膜糖蛋白I b(GP I b)或血管性血友病因子(VWF)相互作用而影响血栓形成的功能.影响血小板血栓形成的蛇毒蛋白目前分为3类:去整合素、VWF调节蛇毒蛋白及GPI b结合蛋白.其中,去整合素具有高效抑制血小板聚集的功能;VWF调节蛇毒蛋白具有体外介导VWF依赖型血小板聚集的功能;而GPI b结合蛇毒蛋白又分为2组:GPI b激动剂和GPI b拮抗剂,分别起诱导血小板聚集与抑制VWF介导的血小板聚集的功能.本文将对上述影响血小板血栓形成的蛇毒蛋白的结构、功能及其在临床上的研究与应用进行综述.%Various snake venom proteins interact with platelet surface integrins, membrane glycoprotein GP I b or von Willebrand factor (VWF) to affect thrombus formation. These snake venom proteins affecting platelet thrombus formation have been classified as: disintegrins, VWF-modulating venom proteins and GP I b-binding proteins. Among them, disintegrins are strong inhibitors of platelet aggregation. VWF-modulating venom proteins can induce VWF-dependent platelet aggregation in vitro, and GP I b-binding proteins include GP I b-agonists and GP I b-antagonists, which can induce platelet aggregation and inhibit VWF-in-duced platelet aggregation, respectively. This review will focus on the structure and function of snake venom proteins that affect platelet thrombus formation in order to find value of which in sub-diagnosis of platelet disorder or von Willebrand disease, as well as for clinical and basic research of thrombosis and hemostasis.

  4. Platelet amyloid precursor protein isoform expression in Alzheimer's disease: evidence for peripheral marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignini, A; Sartini, D; Morganti, S; Nanetti, L; Luzzi, S; Provinciali, L; Mazzanti, L; Emanuelli, M

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive cognitive and memory decline. Among peripheral markers of AD, great interest has been focused on the amyloid precursor protein (APP). In this regard, platelets represent an important peripheral source of APP since it has been demonstrated that the three major isoforms, that are constituted of 770, 751 and 695 aa residues, are inserted in the membrane of resting platelets. APP 751 and APP 770 contain a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (APP KPI) and APP 695 lacks this domain. To address this issue, we first examined the platelet APP isoform mRNAs prospectively as biomarker for the diagnosis of AD by means of real-time quantitative PCR, and then evaluated the correlation between APP mRNA expression levels and cognitive impairment of enrolled subjects. Differential gene expression measurements in the AD patient group (n=18) revealed a significant up-regulation of APP TOT (1.52-fold), APP KPI (1.32-fold), APP 770 (1.33-fold) and APP 751 (1.26-fold) compared to controls (n=22). Moreover, a statistically significant positive correlation was found between APP mRNA levels (TOT, KPI, 770 and 751) and cognitive impairment. Since AD definitive diagnosis still relies on pathological evaluation at autopsy, the present results are consistent with the hypothesis that platelet APP could be considered a potential reliable peripheral marker for studying AD and could contribute to define a signature for the presence of AD pathology.

  5. The critical roles of cyclic AMP/cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in platelet physiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong YAN; Suping LI; Kesheng DAI

    2009-01-01

    Platelets are the primary players in both thrombosis and hemostasis.Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are important signaling molecules in the regulation of platelet function,such as adhesion,aggregation,and secretion.Elevation of intracellular cAMP,which induces the activation of PKA,results in the inhibition of platelet function.Thus,tight control of the intracellular cAMP/PKA signaling pathway has great implications for platelet-dependent hemostasis and effective cardiovascular therapy.In this review,we summarize the PKA substrates and their contributions to platelet function,especially the advancing understanding of the cAMP/PKA-dependent signaling pathway in platelet physiology.In addition,we suggest the possibility that cAMP/PKA is involved in the platelet procoagulant process and receptor ectodomain shedding.

  6. Bone neoformation in defects treated with platelet-rich fibrin membrane versus collagen membrane: a histomorphometric study in rabbit femurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Meza

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to compare bone neoformation in bone defects treated with platelet-rich fibrin (PRF and collagen membrane (CM at 3 and 5 weeks. For this purpose, two bone defects with a width of 4 mm and depth of 6 mm were created in the left distal femur diaphysis of New Zealand rabbits (n=12. The subjects were randomly allocated into two groups. One of the defects was covered with a platelet-rich fibrin membrane (Centrifuged resorbable autologous blood biopolymer without biochemical modification or a collagen membrane (gold standard - Neo Mem. The second defect was left uncovered (NC. The rabbits were sacrificed after 3 and 5 weeks (3 rabbits per period. The femur was completely removed and processed histomophometrically. The bone neformation analysis was performed using a differential point-counting method. Data was statistically analyzed (ANOVA, Tukey. The histomorphometric results showed that bone neformation in the defects treated with PRF at 3 weeks was equivalent to the CM (p<0.05. After 5 weeks, bone neformation obtained with PRF was higher than the control group and lower compared with the CM (p<0.05. The conclusion of the present study is that bone neformation in defects treated with PRF showed lower histomorphometric results compared with the one obtained with the collagen membrane and higher when compared with the control defects.

  7. Analysis of Protein-Membrane Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemmer, Gerdi Christine

    Cellular membranes are complex structures, consisting of hundreds of different lipids and proteins. These membranes act as barriers between distinct environments, constituting hot spots for many essential functions of the cell, including signaling, energy conversion, and transport. These functions....... Discovered interactions were then probed on the level of the membrane using liposome-based assays. In the second part, a transmembrane protein was investigated. Assays to probe activity of the plasma membrane ATPase (Arabidopsis thaliana H+ -ATPase isoform 2 (AHA2)) in single liposomes using both giant...... are implemented by soluble proteins reversibly binding to, as well as by integral membrane proteins embedded in, cellular membranes. The activity and interaction of these proteins is furthermore modulated by the lipids of the membrane. Here, liposomes were used as model membrane systems to investigate...

  8. An inhibition of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase delays the platelet storage lesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Skripchenko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Platelets during storage undergo diverse alterations collectively known as the platelet storage lesion, including metabolic, morphological, functional and structural changes. Some changes correlate with activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK. Another MAPK, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK, is involved in PLT activation. The aim of this study was to compare the properties of platelets stored in plasma in the presence or absence of p38 and ERK MAPK inhibitors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A single Trima apheresis platelet unit (n = 12 was aliquoted into five CLX storage bags. Two aliquots were continuously agitated with or without MAPK inhibitors. Two aliquots were subjected to 48 hours of interruption of agitation with or without MAPK inhibitors. One aliquot contained the same amount of solvent vehicle used to deliver the inhibitor. Platelets were stored at 20-24°C for 7 days and sampled on Days 1, 4, and 7 for 18 in vitro parameters. RESULTS: Inhibition of p38 MAPK by VX-702 leads to better maintenance of all platelet in vitro storage parameters including platelet mitochondrial function. Accelerated by interruption of agitation, the platelet storage lesion of units stored with VX-702 was diminished to that of platelets stored with continuous agitation. Inhibition of ERK MAPK did not ameliorate decrements in any in vitro platelet properties. CONCLUSION: Signaling through p38 MAPK, but not ERK, is associated with platelet deterioration during storage.

  9. Effect of Clopidogrel on Platelet Membrane CD40 Ligand in Coronary Artery Disease Patients Undertaking Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the change and clinical significance of clopidogrel on platelet membrane CD40L in coronary artery disease patients before and after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods 30 cases who were diagnosis coronary artery diseases(CAD) by coronary angiography, mean age 56 ± 9 years old. All the patients who had no antiplatelet aggregation contraindication, were treated with standard anti angina pectoris drugs. Before PCI, all the patients took clopidogrel 75 mg per day. Activated platelet membrane CD40L express rate was measured by flow cytometry before and after PCI 6 hours. Results Activated platelet membrane CD40L express rate were 3.73 ± 2.15and 2.46 ± 0.90, respectively in 30 patients before and after PCI 6 hours. Activated platelet membrane CD40L express rate was significantly decrease after PCI 6 hours than that before PCI ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusions Clopidogrel has significance effect on platelet membrane CD40L in coronary artery disease patients undergoing PCI. Clopidogrel can suppression platelet activation and prevent thromboembolism event occurrence.

  10. DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO CRYSTALLIZATION OF MEMBRANE PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash G. Doiphode

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystallography is more like an art than science. Crystallizing membrane proteins are a big challenge; membrane proteins are present in the cell membrane and serve as cell support. The most important feature of membrane protein is that it contains both hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions on its surface. They are generally much more difficult to study than soluble proteins. The problem becomes more difficult when trying to obtain crystals to determine the high resolution structures of membrane proteins. We want to utilize this opportunity to briefly examine various approaches for crystallization of membrane proteins. The important factors for determining the success of crystallization experiments for membrane proteins lies in the purification, preparation of membrane samples, the environment in which the crystals are grown and the technique used to grow the crystals. All the X-ray structures of membrane protein are grown from preparations of detergents by different methods developed to crystallize. In this review different techniques for the crystallization of membrane proteins are being described. The cubic phase method also known as in meso method is discussed along with other methods to understand about the crystallization of membrane proteins, its general applicability, salt, detergent and screening effects on crystallization. Low volumes as nano-liter of samples can be used for crystallization. The effects of different detergents on the crystallization of membrane protein, as well as the use of surfactants like polyoxyethylene. Approach based on the detergent complexation to prove the ability of cyclodextrins to remove detergent from ternary mixtures in order to get 2D crystals. Crystallization of membrane proteins using non-ionic surfactants as well as Lipidic sponge phase and with swollen lipidic mesophases is discussed to better understand the crystallization of membrane proteins.

  11. Proteins and Peptides in Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Alfredo Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses recent advances and the main advantages of block copolymers for functional membrane protein reconstitution in biomimetic polymeric membranes. A rational approach to the reconstitution of membrane proteins in a functional form can be addressed by a more holistic view by usin...

  12. Proteins and Peptides in Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Alfredo Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses recent advances and the main advantages of block copolymers for functional membrane protein reconstitution in biomimetic polymeric membranes. A rational approach to the reconstitution of membrane proteins in a functional form can be addressed by a more holistic view by using...

  13. Lipid nanotechnologies for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Grushin, Kirill; Dalm, Daniela; Miller, Jaimy

    2014-11-01

    We present a methodology of lipid nanotubes (LNT) and nanodisks technologies optimized in our laboratory for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins at close to physiological conditions. The application of these lipid nanotechnologies for structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is fundamental for understanding and modulating their function. The LNTs in our studies are single bilayer galactosylceramide based nanotubes of ∼20 nm inner diameter and a few microns in length, that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. The lipid nanodisks (NDs) are self-assembled discoid lipid bilayers of ∼10 nm diameter, which are stabilized in aqueous solutions by a belt of amphipathic helical scaffold proteins. By combining LNT and ND technologies, we can examine structurally how the membrane curvature and lipid composition modulates the function of the membrane-associated proteins. As proof of principle, we have engineered these lipid nanotechnologies to mimic the activated platelet's phosphtaidylserine rich membrane and have successfully assembled functional membrane-bound coagulation factor VIII in vitro for structure determination by cryo-EM. The macromolecular organization of the proteins bound to ND and LNT are further defined by fitting the known atomic structures within the calculated three-dimensional maps. The combination of LNT and ND technologies offers a means to control the design and assembly of a wide range of functional membrane-associated proteins and complexes for structural studies by cryo-EM. The presented results confirm the suitability of the developed methodology for studying the functional structure of membrane-associated proteins, such as the coagulation factors, at a close to physiological environment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes with compensation for saturable binding to filters and its implication for binding studies with brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, O.M.; Wood, K.M.; Williams, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Apparent specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes at high concentrations of imipramine showed deviation from that expected of a single binding site, a result consistent with a low-affinity binding site. The deviation was due to displaceable, saturable binding to the glass fibre filters used in the assays. Imipramine, chloripramine, desipramine, and fluoxetine inhibited binding to filters whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine and ethanol were ineffective. Experimental conditions were developed that eliminated filter binding, allowing assay of high- and low-affinity binding to membranes. Failure to correct for filter binding may lead to overestimation of binding parameters, Bmax and KD for high-affinity binding to membranes, and may also be misinterpreted as indicating a low-affinity binding component in both platelet and brain membranes. Low-affinity binding (KD less than 2 microM) of imipramine to human platelet membranes was demonstrated and its significance discussed.

  15. Investigation of interaction of human platelet membrane components with anticoagulant drugs Abciximab and Eptifibatide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Gorodkiewicz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abciximab (Abci and eptifibatide (Epti are antiaggregate drugs which may reduce thrombotic complications inacute coronary syndromes. The aim of this work was the investigation of the interaction between the phospholipid-GPIIb/IIIa glycoprotein complex and Abci or Epti, and the influence of these drugs on the phospholipid ratio in the plateletmembrane. The interaction between the phospholipid-GPIIb/IIIa glycoprotein complex and antiaggregate drugs were investigatedusing the Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging technique (SPRI. Phospholipids phosphatidylinositol (PI, phosphatidylserine(PS, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, phosphatidylcholine (PC and sphingomyelin (SM were first immobilizedonto the gold chip surface. The phospholipid ratio in the platelet membrane was determined by the HPLC. Only PI,PS, PE and PC were determined. Human platelets treated 'in vitro' with Abci or Epti exhibit changes in the phospholipidratio in the platelet membrane. The ratio of PS decreases and PC rises. The SPRI distinctly shows interactions between phospholipidsand glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa, and between the phospholipid-glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa complex and Abci or Epti.The interaction between phospholipids and glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa is growing in the sequence: PI<

  16. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Membrane Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto A. Roman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding protein folding has been one of the great challenges in biochemistry and molecular biophysics. Over the past 50 years, many thermodynamic and kinetic studies have been performed addressing the stability of globular proteins. In comparison, advances in the membrane protein folding field lag far behind. Although membrane proteins constitute about a third of the proteins encoded in known genomes, stability studies on membrane proteins have been impaired due to experimental limitations. Furthermore, no systematic experimental strategies are available for folding these biomolecules in vitro. Common denaturing agents such as chaotropes usually do not work on helical membrane proteins, and ionic detergents have been successful denaturants only in few cases. Refolding a membrane protein seems to be a craftsman work, which is relatively straightforward for transmembrane β-barrel proteins but challenging for α-helical membrane proteins. Additional complexities emerge in multidomain membrane proteins, data interpretation being one of the most critical. In this review, we will describe some recent efforts in understanding the folding mechanism of membrane proteins that have been reversibly refolded allowing both thermodynamic and kinetic analysis. This information will be discussed in the context of current paradigms in the protein folding field.

  17. Eukaryotic membrane protein overproduction in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, Edmund R.S.; Chan, Ka Wai; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; Floyd, Suzanne; O’Connor, Rosemary; Monné, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    Eukaryotic membrane proteins play many vital roles in the cell and are important drug targets. Approximately 25% of all genes identified in the genome are known to encode membrane proteins, but the vast majority have no assigned function. Although the generation of structures of soluble proteins has

  18. Proteomics meets blood banking: identification of protein targets for the improvement of platelet quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Peter; Devine, Dana V

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has brought new perspectives to the fields of hematology and transfusion medicine in the last decade. The steady improvement of proteomic technology is propelling novel discoveries of molecular mechanisms by studying protein expression, post-translational modifications and protein interactions. This review article focuses on the application of proteomics to the identification of molecular mechanisms leading to the deterioration of blood platelets during storage - a critical aspect in the provision of platelet transfusion products. Several proteomic approaches have been employed to analyse changes in the platelet protein profile during storage and the obtained data now need to be translated into platelet biochemistry in order to connect the results to platelet function. Targeted biochemical applications then allow the identification of points for intervention in signal transduction pathways. Once validated and placed in a transfusion context, these data will provide further understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to platelet storage lesion. Future aspects of proteomics in blood banking will aim to make use of protein markers identified for platelet storage lesion development to monitor proteome changes when alterations such as the use of additive solutions or pathogen reduction strategies are put in place in order to improve platelet quality for patients.

  19. Cyclic nucleotides and mitogen-activated protein kinases: regulation of simvastatin in platelet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Ssu-Yu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins have been widely used to reduce cardiovascular risk. These statins (i.e., simvastatin may exert other effects besides from their cholesterol-lowering actions, including inhibition of platelet activation. Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Although the inhibitory effect of simvastatin in platelet activation has been studied; the detailed signal transductions by which simvastatin inhibit platelet activation has not yet been completely resolved. Methods The aim of this study was to systematically examine the detailed mechanisms of simvastatin in preventing platelet activation. Platelet aggregation, flow cytometric analysis, immunoblotting, and electron spin resonance studies were used to assess the antiplatelet activity of simvastatin. Results Simvastatin (20-50 μM exhibited more-potent activity of inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen than other agonists (i.e., thrombin. Simvastatin inhibited collagen-stimulated platelet activation accompanied by [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 (TxA2 formation, and phospholipase C (PLCγ2, protein kinase C (PKC, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (i.e., p38 MAPK, JNKs phosphorylation in washed platelets. Simvastatin obviously increased both cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP levels. Simvastatin markedly increased NO release, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP phosphorylation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression. SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, markedly reversed the simvastatin-mediated inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation, PLCγ2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and simvastatin-mediated stimulatory effects on VASP and eNOS phosphorylation. Conclusion The most important findings of this study demonstrate for the first time that inhibitory effect of simvastatin in platelet activation may involve activation of the cyclic AMP

  20. Platelet adhesion onto wettability gradient surfaces in the absence and presence of plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Lee, H B

    1998-08-01

    A wettability gradient was prepared on lowdensity polyethylene (PE) sheets by treating them in air with a corona from a knife-type electrode the power of which increased gradually along the sample length. The PE surfaces oxidized gradually with the increasing corona power and a wettability gradient was created on the surfaces, as evidenced by the measurement of water contact angles, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the attenuated total reflectance mode, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. The wettability gradient surfaces prepared were used to investigate the adhesion behavior of platelets in the absence and presence of plasma proteins in terms of the surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of polymeric materials. The platelets adhered to the wettability gradient surfaces along the sample length were counted and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was observed that the platelet adhesion in the absence of plasma proteins increased gradually as the surface wettability increased along the sample length. The platelets adhered to the hydrophilic positions of the gradient surface also were more activated (possessed more pseudo pods as examined by SEM) than on the more hydrophobic ones. However, platelet adhesion in the presence of plasma proteins decreased gradually with the increasing surface wettability; the platelets adhered to the surface also were more activated on the hydrophobic positions of the gradient surface. This result is closely related to plasma protein adsorption on the surface. Plasma protein adsorption on the wettability gradient surface increased with the increasing surface wettability. More plasma protein adsorption on the hydrophilic positions of the gradient surface caused less platelet adhesion, probably due to platelet adhesion inhibiting proteins, such as high-molecular-weight kininogen, which preferably adsorbs onto the surface by the so-called Vroman effect. It seems that both the presence of plasma proteins

  1. Detection of Membrane Fluidity in Submitochondrial Particles of Platelets and Erythrocyte Membranes from Mexican Patients with Alzheimer Disease by Intramolecular Excimer Formation of 1,3 Dipyrenylpropane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction and defects in membrane structure could be implied in AD pathogenesis. The aim of the present work was the study of membrane fluidity in submitochondrial platelet particles and erythrocyte membranes from Mexican patients. Blood samples were obtained from 30 patients with Alzheimer disease and 30 aged-matched control subjects. Membrane fluidity determinations were done using a very low concentration of the fluorescent dipyrenylpropane probe incorporated in both types of membranes. This probe is able to give excimer and monomer fluorescence, therefore it can be used to monitor fluidity changes in biological membranes.

  2. Isomeric Detergent Comparison for Membrane Protein Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Kyung Ho; Hariharan, Parameswaran; Mortensen, Jonas S.;

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins encapsulated by detergent micelles are widely used for structural study. Because of their amphipathic property, detergents have the ability to maintain protein solubility and stability in an aqueous medium. However, conventional detergents have serious limitations in their scope...... and utility, particularly for eukaryotic membrane proteins and membrane protein complexes. Thus, a number of new agents have been devised; some have made significant contributions to membrane protein structural studies. However, few detergent design principles are available. In this study, we prepared meta...... and ortho isomers of the previously reported para-substituted xylene-linked maltoside amphiphiles (XMAs), along with alkyl chain-length variation. The isomeric XMAs were assessed with three membrane proteins, and the meta isomer with a C12 alkyl chain was most effective at maintaining solubility/stability...

  3. Membrane topology of transmembrane proteins: determinants and experimental tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hunsang; Kim, Hyun

    2014-10-17

    Membrane topology refers to the two-dimensional structural information of a membrane protein that indicates the number of transmembrane (TM) segments and the orientation of soluble domains relative to the plane of the membrane. Since membrane proteins are co-translationally translocated across and inserted into the membrane, the TM segments orient themselves properly in an early stage of membrane protein biogenesis. Each membrane protein must contain some topogenic signals, but the translocation components and the membrane environment also influence the membrane topology of proteins. We discuss the factors that affect membrane protein orientation and have listed available experimental tools that can be used in determining membrane protein topology.

  4. Membrane protein structure determination in membrana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M

    2013-09-17

    The two principal components of biological membranes, the lipid bilayer and the proteins integrated within it, have coevolved for specific functions that mediate the interactions of cells with their environment. Molecular structures can provide very significant insights about protein function. In the case of membrane proteins, the physical and chemical properties of lipids and proteins are highly interdependent; therefore structure determination should include the membrane environment. Considering the membrane alongside the protein eliminates the possibility that crystal contacts or detergent molecules could distort protein structure, dynamics, and function and enables ligand binding studies to be performed in a natural setting. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is compatible with three-dimensional structure determination of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayer membranes under physiological conditions and has played an important role in elucidating the physical and chemical properties of biological membranes, providing key information about the structure and dynamics of the phospholipid components. Recently, developments in the recombinant expression of membrane proteins, sample preparation, pulse sequences for high-resolution spectroscopy, radio frequency probes, high-field magnets, and computational methods have enabled a number of membrane protein structures to be determined in lipid bilayer membranes. In this Account, we illustrate solid-state NMR methods with examples from two bacterial outer membrane proteins (OmpX and Ail) that form integral membrane β-barrels. The ability to measure orientation-dependent frequencies in the solid-state NMR spectra of membrane-embedded proteins provides the foundation for a powerful approach to structure determination based primarily on orientation restraints. Orientation restraints are particularly useful for NMR structural studies of membrane proteins because they provide information about both three-dimensional structure

  5. Tandem Facial Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Gotfryd, Kamil; Pacyna, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new type of synthetic amphiphile that is intended to support biochemical characterization of intrinsic membrane proteins. Members of this new family displayed favorable behavior with four of five membrane proteins tested, and these amphiphiles formed relatively small micelles....

  6. Contractile proteins of endothelial cells, platelets and smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C G; Nachman, R L

    1973-04-01

    In experiments described herein it was observed, by direct and indirect immunofluorescence technics, that rabbit antisera to human platelet actomyosin (thrombosthenin) stained mature megakaryocytes, blood platelets, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of arteries and veins, endothelial cells of liver sinusoids and certain capillaries, uterine smooth muscle cells, myoepithelial cells, perineurial cells of peripheral nerves and "fibroblastic" cells of granulation tissue. The specificity of immunohistologic staining was confirmed by appropriate absorption and blocking studies and immunodiffusional analysis in agarose gel. It was also observed by immunodiffusional analysis in agarose gel, electrophoresis of actomyosin fragments in polyacrylamide gels, immune inhibition of actomyosin ATPase activity and immune aggregation of platelets that uterine and platelet actomyosin are partially, but not completely, identical.

  7. Activity assay of membrane transport proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Xie

    2008-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are integral membrane proteins and considered as potential drug targets. Activity assay of transport proteins is essential for developing drugs to target these proteins. Major issues related to activity assessment of transport proteins include availability of transporters,transport activity of transporters, and interactions between ligands and transporters. Researchers need to consider the physiological status of proteins (bound in lipid membranes or purified), availability and specificity of substrates, and the purpose of the activity assay (screening, identifying, or comparing substrates and inhibitors) before choosing appropriate assay strategies and techniques. Transport proteins bound in vesicular membranes can be assayed for transporting substrate across membranes by means of uptake assay or entrance counterflow assay. Alternatively, transport proteins can be assayed for interactions with ligands by using techniques such as isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or surface plasmon resonance. Other methods and techniques such as fluorometry, scintillation proximity assay, electrophysiological assay, or stopped-flow assay could also be used for activity assay of transport proteins. In this paper the major strategies and techniques for activity assessment of membrane transport proteins are reviewed.

  8. The use of platelet-rich fibrin membrane in gingival recession treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksić Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Fibrin, fibronectin, platelet derived growth factor, and transforming growth factors from platelet concetrate are crucial for tissue reparation and regeneration. Objective. This study was designed to evaluate clinical effectiveness of activated platelet-rich fibrin (PRF membrane in treatment of gingival recession. Methods. 19 gingival recessions Miller class I or II were treated with a coronally advanced flap and the PRF membrane (PRF group. Following the elevation of the flap, bone and root surfaces were covered with the PRF membrane. After suturing, the PRF membrane was covered with a coronally advanced flap. In the same patients, 19 other gingival recessions were treated with CTG in combination with the coronally advanced flap (the CTG group. Clinical recordings were made of vertical recession depth (VRD, probing depth (PD, clinical attachment level (CAL and keratinized tissue width (KTW before and 12 months after mucogingival surgical treatment. Clinical evaluation of healing events was estimated with recordings of the healing index (HI. Recordings of HI were performed in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd week post-surgically. Results. Mean root coverage was significant in both groups (the PRF group 79.94% and the CTG group 88.56% %; p<0.01. The difference between the two tested groups was not statistically significant. Results of the keratinized tissue width showed significant increase (p<0.05 12 months after the surgery in both, the PRF and CTG groups. Results of KTW showed statistical significance of recorded differences obtained in the two evaluated groups (p<0.05. There was no statistical significance in reduction of PD and CAL recorded in the PRF and CTG groups. The values of HI recorded in the 1st and 2nd week postoperatively were significantly enhanced in the PRF group (p<0.05. Conclusion. Results of this study confirm both procedures as effective with equivalence of clinical results in solving gingival recession problems. The

  9. Lateral proton transfer between the membrane and a membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojemyr, Linda; Sandén, Tor; Widengren, Jerker; Brzezinski, Peter

    2009-03-17

    Proton transport across biological membranes is a key step of the energy conservation machinery in living organisms, and it has been proposed that the membrane itself plays an important role in this process. In the present study we have investigated the effect of incorporation of a proton transporter, cytochrome c oxidase, into a membrane on the protonation kinetics of a fluorescent pH-sensitive probe attached at the surface of the protein. The results show that proton transfer to the probe was slightly accelerated upon attachment at the protein surface (approximately 7 x 1010 s(-1) M(-1), compared to the expected value of (1-2) x 10(10) s(-1) M(-1)), which is presumably due to the presence of acidic/His groups in the vicinity. Upon incorporation of the protein into small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles the rate increased by more than a factor of 400 to approximately 3 x 10(13) s(-1) M(-1), which indicates that the protein-attached probe is in rapid protonic contact with the membrane surface. The results indicate that the membrane acts to accelerate proton uptake by the membrane-bound proton transporter.

  10. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. (Burroughs Wellcome Co., Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  11. Membrane protein architects: the role of the BAM complex in outer membrane protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Timothy J; Scott-Tucker, Anthony; Overduin, Michael; Henderson, Ian R

    2009-03-01

    The folding of transmembrane proteins into the outer membrane presents formidable challenges to Gram-negative bacteria. These proteins must migrate from the cytoplasm, through the inner membrane and into the periplasm, before being recognized by the beta-barrel assembly machinery, which mediates efficient insertion of folded beta-barrels into the outer membrane. Recent discoveries of component structures and accessory interactions of this complex are yielding insights into how cells fold membrane proteins. Here, we discuss how these structures illuminate the mechanisms responsible for the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins.

  12. Thermostabilisation of membrane proteins for structural studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Francesca; Serrano-Vega, Maria J.; Shibata, Yoko; Abdul-Hussein, Saba; Lebon, Guillaume; Miller-Gallacher, Jennifer; Singhal, Ankita; Strege, Annette; Thomas, Jennifer A.; Tate, Christopher G.

    2017-01-01

    The thermostability of an integral membrane protein in detergent solution is a key parameter that dictates the likelihood of obtaining well-diffracting crystals suitable for structure determination. However, many mammalian membrane proteins are too unstable for crystallisation. We developed a thermostabilisation strategy based on systematic mutagenesis coupled to a radioligand-binding thermostability assay that can be applied to receptors, ion channels and transporters. It takes approximately 6-12 months to thermostabilise a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) containing 300 amino acid residues. The resulting thermostabilised membrane proteins are more easily crystallised and result in high-quality structures. This methodology has facilitated structure-based drug design applied to GPCRs, because it is possible to determine multiple structures of the thermostabilised receptors bound to low affinity ligands. Protocols and advice are given on how to develop thermostability assays for membrane proteins and how to combine mutations to make an optimally stable mutant suitable for structural studies. PMID:27466713

  13. Solid-state NMR and Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The native environment for a membrane protein is a phospholipid bilayer. Because the protein is immobilized on NMR timescales by the interactions within a bilayer membrane, solid-state NMR methods are essential to obtain high-resolution spectra. Approaches have been developed for both unoriented and oriented samples, however, they all rest on the foundation of the most fundamental aspects solid-state NMR, and the chemical shift and homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Solid-state NMR has advanced sufficiently to enable the structures of membrane proteins to be determined under near-native conditions in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:25681966

  14. Combination of platelet rich fibrin, hydroxyapatite and PRF membrane in the management of large inflammatory periapical lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivashankar, Vasundara Yayathi; Johns, Dexton Antony; Vidyanath, S; Sam, George

    2013-05-01

    Periapical inflammatory lesion is the local response of bone around the apex of tooth that develops after the necrosis of the pulp tissue or extensive periodontal disease. The final outcome of the nature of wound healing after endodontic surgery can be repair or regeneration depending on the nature of the wound; the availability of progenitor cells; signaling molecules; and micro-environmental cues such as adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix, and associated non-collagenous protein molecules. The purpose of this case report is to add knowledge to the existing literature about the combined use of graft material [platelet rich fibrin (PRF) and hydroxyapatite (HA)] and barrier membrane in the treatment of large periapical lesion. A periapical endodontic surgery was performed on a 45 year old male patient with a swelling in the upper front teeth region and a large bony defect radiologically. The surgical defect was filled with a combination of PRF and HA bone graft crystals. The defect was covered by PRF membrane and sutured. Clinical examination revealed uneventful wound healing. Radiologically the HA crystals have been completely replaced by new bone at the end of 2 years. On the basis of the results obtained in our case report, we hypothesize that the use of PRF in conjunction with HA crystals might have accelerated the resorption of the graft crystals and would have induced the rapid rate of bone formation.

  15. Major Intrinsic Proteins in Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Biological membranes define the structural and functional boundaries in living cells and their organelles. The integrity of the cell depends on its ability to separate inside from outside and yet at the same time allow massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met...... this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor....../separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells...

  16. Flagellar membrane proteins in kinetoplastid parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfear, Scott M; Tran, Khoa D; Sanchez, Marco A

    2015-09-01

    All kinetoplastid parasites, including protozoa such as Leishmania species, Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi that cause devastating diseases in humans and animals, are flagellated throughout their life cycles. Although flagella were originally thought of primarily as motility organelles, flagellar functions in other critical processes, especially in sensing and signal transduction, have become more fully appreciated in the recent past. The flagellar membrane is a highly specialized subdomain of the surface membrane, and flagellar membrane proteins are likely to be critical components for all the biologically important roles of flagella. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries relevant to flagellar membrane proteins in these parasites, including the identification of such proteins, investigation of their biological functions, and mechanisms of selective trafficking to the flagellar membrane. Prospects for future investigations and current unsolved problems are highlighted.

  17. Protein Expression of BACE1 is Downregulated by Donepezil in Alzheimer's Disease Platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Tamires Alves; Talib, Leda Leme; Joaquim, Helena Passarelli Giroud; Bram, Jessyka Maria de França; Gattaz, Wagner Farid; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) metabolism is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Platelets contain most of the enzymatic machinery required for AβPP processing, and correlates of intracerebral abnormalities have been demonstrated in platelets of patients with AD. Thus, AβPP-related molecules in platelets may be regarded as peripheral markers of AD. We sought to determine the protein expression of the AβPP secretases (ADAM10, BACE1, and PSEN1) and AβPP ratio in platelets of patients with mild or moderate AD compared to healthy controls. We further determined whether the protein expression of these markers might be modified by chronic treatment with donepezil. Platelet samples were obtained from patients and controls at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of continuous treatment with therapeutic doses of donepezil. The protein expression of platelet markers was determined by western blotting. AD patients had a significant decrease in AβPP ratio, ADAM10, and PSEN1 compared to controls at baseline, but these differences were not modified by the treatment. Nonetheless, a significant reduction in the protein expression of BACE1 was observed in patients treated with donepezil for 6 months. Our results corroborate previous findings from our group and others of decreased AβPP ratio and protein expression of ADAM10 in AD. We further show that PSEN1 is decreased in AD platelets, and that the protein expression of BACE1 is downregulated by chronic treatment with donepezil. This effect may be interpreted as evidence of disease modification.

  18. Targeted drug delivery to circulating tumor cells via platelet membrane-functionalized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahe; Ai, Yiwei; Wang, Lihua; Bu, Pengcheng; Sharkey, Charles C; Wu, Qianhui; Wun, Brittany; Roy, Sweta; Shen, Xiling; King, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastases in distant organs via hematogenous dissemination. Fundamental studies in the past decade have suggested that neutralization of CTCs in circulation could represent an effective strategy to prevent metastasis. Current paradigms of targeted drug delivery into a solid tumor largely fall into two main categories: unique cancer markers (e.g. overexpression of surface receptors) and tumor-specific microenvironment (e.g. low pH, hypoxia, etc.). While relying on a surface receptor to target CTCs can be greatly challenged by cancer heterogeneity, targeting of tumor microenvironments has the advantage of recognizing a broader spectrum of cancer cells regardless of genetic differences or tumor types. The blood circulation, however, where CTCs transit through, lacks the same tumor microenvironment as that found in a solid tumor. In this study, a unique "microenvironment" was confirmed upon introduction of cancer cells of different types into circulation where activated platelets and fibrin were physically associated with blood-borne cancer cells. Inspired by this observation, synthetic silica particles were functionalized with activated platelet membrane along with surface conjugation of tumor-specific apoptosis-inducing ligand cytokine, TRAIL. Biomimetic synthetic particles incorporated into CTC-associated micro-thrombi in lung vasculature and dramatically decreased lung metastases in a mouse breast cancer metastasis model. Our results demonstrate a "Trojan Horse" strategy of neutralizing CTCs to attenuate metastasis.

  19. Targeted drug delivery to circulating tumor cells via platelet membrane-functionalized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahe; Ai, Yiwei; Wang, Lihua; Bu, Pengcheng; Sharkey, Charles C.; Wu, Qianhui; Wun, Brittany; Roy, Sweta; Shen, Xiling; King, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastases in distant organs via hematogenous dissemination. Fundamental studies in the past decade have suggested that neutralization of CTCs in circulation could represent an effective strategy to prevent metastasis. Current paradigms of targeted drug delivery into a solid tumor largely fall into two main categories: unique cancer markers (e.g. overexpression of surface receptors) and tumor-specific microenvironment (e.g. low pH, hypoxia, etc.). While relying on a surface receptor to target CTCs can be greatly challenged by cancer heterogeneity, targeting of tumor microenvironments has the advantage of recognizing a broader spectrum of cancer cells regardless of genetic differences or tumor types. The blood circulation, however, where CTCs transit through, lacks the same tumor microenvironment as that found in a solid tumor. In this study, a unique “microenvironment” was confirmed upon introduction of cancer cells of different types into circulation where activated platelets and fibrin were physically associated with blood-borne cancer cells. Inspired by this observation, synthetic silica particles were functionalized with activated platelet membrane along with surface conjugation of tumor-specific apoptosis-inducing ligand cytokine, TRAIL. Biomimetic synthetic particles incorporated into CTC-associated micro-thrombi in lung vasculature and dramatically decreased lung metastases in a mouse breast cancer metastasis model. Our results demonstrate a “Trojan Horse” strategy of neutralizing CTCs to attenuate metastasis. PMID:26519648

  20. Protein transfer to membranes upon shape deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.; Bijl, E.; Antono, L.; Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells, milk fat droplets, or liposomes all have interfaces consisting of lipid membranes. These particles show significant shape deformations as a result of flow. Here we show that these shape deformations can induce adsorption of proteins to the membrane. Red blood cell deformability is a

  1. Protein profiles of hatchery egg shell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Eggshells, which consist largely of calcareous outer shell and shell membranes, constitute a significant part of poultry hatchery waste. The shell membranes (ESM) not only contain proteins that originate from egg whites but also from the developing embryos and different contaminants of m...

  2. The modulation of platelet adhesion and activation by chitosan through plasma and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Megan S; Cheng, Bill; McCarthy, Simon J; Jung, MoonSun; Whitelock, John M

    2011-10-01

    Chitosan has been shown to promote initial wound closure events to prevent blood loss. Platelet adhesion and activation are crucial early events in these processes after traumatic bleeding leading to thrombus formation. Platelet adhesion to chitosan was found to be enhanced in the presence of adsorbed plasma and extracellular matrix proteins and was found to be primarily mediated by α(IIb)β(3) integrins, while α(2)β(1) integrins were found to be involved in platelet adhesion to collagen and perlecan. Platelets were found to be activated by chitosan, as shown by an increase in the expression of α(IIb)β(3) integrins and P-selectin, while the extent of activation was modulated by the presence of proteins including perlecan and fibrinogen. Collagen-coated chitosan was found to activate platelets to the same extent as either chitosan or collagen alone. These data support the role of plasma and extracellular matrix proteins in promoting chitosan mediated platelet adhesion and activation supporting the hypothesis that chitosan promotes wound healing via these interactions.

  3. The change of serum leptin and its relationship with platelet membrane glycoprotein Ib in patients with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Dasheng; SONG Yanqiu; LI Chao; ZHANG Feng; WEI Minxin

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the change of serum leptin and its relationship with platelet membrane glycoprotein lb(GP Ib)in patients with coronary heart disease(CHD).The enrolled included 50 patients with CHD (CHD group)and 30 patients without CHD(control group)who were diagnosed by coronary angiography.The positive percentage and the average fluorescence intensity of platelet membrane GP Ib were detected by full-blood flow cytometry.Serum leptin was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.The positive percentage and the average fluorescence intensity of platetet membrane GP Ib in the CHD group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05).After correcting the differences of systolic blood pressure,body mass index(BMI),low-density lipoprotein cholesterol(LDL-C),high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C),fasting glucose,PPBS,fasting insulin and quantita tive insulin sensitive index,serum leptin level in the CHD group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05).Single factor correlative analysis revealed that serum leptin in CHD patients was negatively correlated with the average fluorescence intensity of platelet membrane GP Ib(P<0.05).Multifactorial stepwise regression analysis showed that serum leptin in CHD patients was independently negatively correlated with the average fluorescence intensity of platelet membrane GP Ib(P<0.05).Logistic analysis demonstrated that serum leptin was independently correlated with the risk of CHD(P<0.05).Hyperleptinemia was veri fied in CHD patients.The increase of serum leptin could affect blood platelet activation.Hyperleptinemia may play an important role in the pathogenesis of CHD.

  4. Association of the Platelet Membrane Glycoprotein Ⅰa C807T Gene Polymorphism with Aspirin Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Guanhua; WANG Zhaohui; DING Yanping; LIU Xiaoqian; WANG Jue

    2007-01-01

    To explore the correlation between the C807T polymorphism of platelet membrane gly- coprotein Ⅰa (GPⅠa) gene and aspirin resistance in Chinese people, 200 patients with high-risk of atherosclerosis took aspirin (100 mg/d) for 7 days. Platelet aggregation function was detected using adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and arachidonic acid (AA) before and after the administration of aspi- fin. Then the subjects were divided into three groups according to the results of platelet aggregation function: an aspirin resistant (AR) group, an aspirin semi-responder (ASR) group and an aspi- fin-sensitive (AS) group. Platelet GPⅠa gene 807CT polymorphism was examined by means of po- lymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP). The results showed that T allelic fre- quency in AR group and ASR group were higher that of AS group (P<0.005), and the prevalence of genotypes (TT+TC) of these two groups was significantly higher than that in AS group (P<0.05). Platelet GPⅠa T allele was significantly associated with aspirin resistance as revealed by multiple logistic regression (OR=3.76, 95% CI: 2.87-9.58). The results suggest that inherited platelet GPⅠa variations may have an important impact on aspirin resistance and the presence of GPⅠa T allele may be a marker of genetic susceptibility to aspirin resistance.

  5. Role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability to protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, S.K.; Burhop, K.E.; Kaplan, J.E.; Malik, A.B. (Albany Medical College of Union Univ., NY (USA))

    1988-04-01

    The authors examined the role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular integrity by inducing thrombocytopenia in sheep using antiplatelet serum (APS). A causal relationship between thrombocytopenia and increase in pulmonary vascular permeability was established by platelet repletion using platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Sheep were chronically instrumented and lung lymph fistulas prepared to monitor pulmonary lymph flow (Q{sub lym}). A balloon catheter was positioned in the left atrium to assess pulmonary vascular permeability to protein after raising the left atrial pressure (P{sub la}). Thrombocytopenia was maintained for 3 days by daily intramuscular APS injections. In studies using cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial monolayers, transendothelia permeability of {sup 125}I-labeled albumin was reduced 50 and 95%, respectively, when 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} or 5 {times} 10{sup 7} platelets were added onto endothelial monolayers. However, addition of 5 {times} 10{sup 6} platelets or 5 {times} 10{sup 7} red blood cells did not reduce endothelial monolayer albumin permeability. Results indicate that platelets are required for the maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability. Reduction in permeability appears to involve an interaction of platelets with the endothelium.

  6. Stimulation of Leishmania tropica protein kinase CK2 activities by platelet-activating factor (PAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Patricia M L; Vieira, Danielle P; Meyer-Fernandes, Jose R; Silva-Neto, Mario A C; Lopes, Angela H

    2009-09-01

    Leishmania tropica is one of the causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid mediator in diverse biological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that PAF promoted a three-fold increase on ecto-protein kinase and a three-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity of L. tropica live promastigotes. When casein was added to the reaction medium, along with PAF, there was a four-fold increase on the ecto-kinase activity. When live L. tropica promastigotes were pre-incubated for 30 min in the presence of PAF-plus casein, a six-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity was observed. Also, a protein released from L. tropica promastigotes reacted with polyclonal antibodies for the mammalian CK2 alpha catalytic subunit. Furthermore, in vitro mouse macrophage infection by L. tropica was doubled when promastigotes were pre-treated for 2 h with PAF. Similar results were obtained when the interaction was performed in the presence of purified CK2 or casein. TBB and DRB, CK2 inhibitors, reversed PAF enhancement of macrophage infection by L. tropica. WEB 2086, a competitive PAF antagonist, reversed all PAF effects here described. This study shows for the first time that PAF promotes the activation of two isoforms of CK2, secreted and membrane-bound, correlating these activities to infection of mouse macrophages.

  7. Helix-packing motifs in membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, R F S; DeGrado, W F

    2006-09-12

    The fold of a helical membrane protein is largely determined by interactions between membrane-imbedded helices. To elucidate recurring helix-helix interaction motifs, we dissected the crystallographic structures of membrane proteins into a library of interacting helical pairs. The pairs were clustered according to their three-dimensional similarity (rmsd universe of common transmembrane helix-pairing motifs is relatively simple. The largest cluster, which comprises 29% of the library members, consists of an antiparallel motif with left-handed packing angles, and it is frequently stabilized by packing of small side chains occurring every seven residues in the sequence. Right-handed parallel and antiparallel structures show a similar tendency to segregate small residues to the helix-helix interface but spaced at four-residue intervals. Position-specific sequence propensities were derived for the most populated motifs. These structural and sequential motifs should be quite useful for the design and structural prediction of membrane proteins.

  8. Effect of Xiaoyu Zhixue Tablet (消瘀止血片) on Expression of Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins in Patients with Hemorrhagic Thrombopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈霖; 沈迪; 高兰; 刘仲萍; 杨艳萍; 谢晶; 周丕琪

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of Xiaoyu Zhixue tablet (消瘀止血片,XYZXT) on the expression of platelet membrane glycoproteins in patients with hemorrhagic thrombopathy, and to explore its possible mechanism. Methods: The total of 148 patients with hemorrhagic thrornbopathy were randomly divided into two groups, the traditional Chinese medicicne (TCM) group (n=98) treated with XYZXT and the Western medicine (WM) group (n = 50) treated with adrenosin, vitamins C, K and P, both for 6 months.The therapeutic effect and the recovery rate of platelet aggregation in the two groups were observed. And platelet membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ⅰ b/Ⅸ, GP Ⅱ b/Ⅲ a complexes, GP Ⅰ b, GP Ⅱ b, GPⅢ a and P-selectin were analyzed by flow cytometry in both groups before and after treatment and also in 34 normal healthy subjects. Results: The total effective rate of hemostasis was 89.8% in TCM group and 54.0% in the WM group (X2 =45.83, P<0.01), and the recovery rate of platelet aggregation was 72.4% and 4.0% respectively (X2 = 62.06, P<0.01). The fluorescence intensity of GP Ⅰ b/Ⅸ, GP Ⅱ b/Ⅲ a complexes, GP Ⅰ b, GP Ⅲ a and P-selectin were lower in both groups before treatment than those in the healthy subjects. Expression of above-mentioned marks was elevated in TCM group after 6 months' therapy, which was insignificantly different as compared with the healthy subjects (P>0.05) and higher than those in the WM group (P<0.05).Conclusion: One of the mechanisms in treating hemorrhagic thrombopathy with XYZXT is that it could regulate the expression of GP Ⅰ b/Ⅸ, GP Ⅱ b/Ⅲ a complexes, GP Ⅰ b, GPⅢ a and P-selectin at the level of receptor protein.

  9. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-07-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  10. Lipid Directed Intrinsic Membrane Protein Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Thompson, James R.; Helix Nielsen, Claus;

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach for direct reconstitution of membrane proteins during giant vesicle formation. We show that it is straightforward to create a tissue-like giant vesicle film swelled with membrane protein using aquaporin SoPIP2;1 as an illustration. These vesicles can also be easily h...... harvested for individual study. By controlling the lipid composition we are able to direct the aquaporin into specific immiscible liquid domains in giant vesicles. The oligomeric α-helical protein cosegregates with the cholesterol-poor domains in phase separating ternary mixtures....

  11. Proteomics strategy for identifying candidate bioactive proteins in complex mixtures: application to the platelet releasate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Roisin

    2010-01-01

    Proteomic approaches have proven powerful at identifying large numbers of proteins, but there are fewer reports of functional characterization of proteins in biological tissues. Here, we describe an experimental approach that fractionates proteins released from human platelets, linking bioassay activity to identity. We used consecutive orthogonal separation platforms to ensure sensitive detection: (a) ion-exchange of intact proteins, (b) SDS-PAGE separation of ion-exchange fractions and (c) HPLC separation of tryptic digests coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Migration of THP-1 monocytes in response to complete or fractionated platelet releasate was assessed and located to just one of the forty-nine ion-exchange fractions. Over 300 proteins were identified in the releasate, with a wide range of annotated biophysical and biochemical properties, in particular platelet activation, adhesion, and wound healing. The presence of PEDF and involucrin, two proteins not previously reported in platelet releasate, was confirmed by western blotting. Proteins identified within the fraction with monocyte promigratory activity and not in other inactive fractions included vimentin, PEDF, and TIMP-1. We conclude that this analytical platform is effective for the characterization of complex bioactive samples.

  12. Expression of Angiogenesis Regulatory Proteins and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Factors in Platelets of the Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets play a role in tumor angiogenesis and growth and are the main transporters of several angiogenesis regulators. Here, we aimed to determine the levels of angiogenesis regulators and epithelial-mesenchymal transition factors sequestered by circulating platelets in breast cancer patients and age-matched healthy controls. Platelet pellets (PP and platelet-poor plasma (PPP were collected by routine protocols. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, platelet factor 4 (PF4, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Angiogenesis-associated expression of VEGF (2.1 pg/106 platelets versus 0.9 pg/106 platelets, P < 0.001, PF4 (21.2 ng/106 platelets versus 10.2 ng/106 platelets, P < 0.001, PDGF-BB (42.9 pg/106 platelets versus 19.1 pg/106 platelets, P < 0.001, and TGF-β1 (15.3 ng/106 platelets versus 4.3 ng/106 platelets, P < 0.001 differed in the PP samples of cancer and control subjects. In addition, protein concentrations were associated with clinical characteristics (P<0.05. Circulating platelets in breast cancer sequester higher levels of PF4, VEGF, PDGF-BB, and TGF-β1, suggesting a possible target for early diagnosis. VEGF, PDGF, and TGF-β1 concentrations in platelets may be associated with prognosis.

  13. Crystallization of Membrane Proteins by Vapor Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmar, Jared A.; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the most robust method to determine protein structure at the atomic level. However, the bottlenecks of protein expression and purification often discourage further study. In this chapter, we address the most common problems encountered at these stages. Based on our experiences in expressing and purifying antimicrobial efflux proteins, we explain how a pure and homogenous protein sample can be successfully crystallized by the vapor diffusion method. We present our current protocols and methodologies for this technique. Case studies show step-by-step how we have overcome problems related to expression and diffraction, eventually producing high quality membrane protein crystals for structural determinations. It is our hope that a rational approach can be made of the often anecdotal process of membrane protein crystallization. PMID:25950974

  14. Major Intrinsic Proteins in Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor...... or as sensor devices based on e.g., the selective permeation of metalloids. In principle a MIP based membrane sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually impermeable to anything but water or the solute in question. In practice, however, a biomimetic support matrix...... will generally have finite permeabilities to both electrolytes and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic MIP device thus depends on the relative transport contribution from both protein and biomimetic support matrix. Also the biomimetic matrix must be encapsulated in order to protect it and make...

  15. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2009-02-27

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  16. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2012-02-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  17. Model-building codes for membrane proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley, David Noyes; Hunt, Thomas W.; Brown, W. Michael; Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Slepoy, Alexander; Sale, Kenneth L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Young, Malin M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Gray, Genetha Anne (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach to modeling the transmembrane spanning helical bundles of integral membrane proteins using only a sparse set of distance constraints, such as those derived from MS3-D, dipolar-EPR and FRET experiments. Algorithms have been written for searching the conformational space of membrane protein folds matching the set of distance constraints, which provides initial structures for local conformational searches. Local conformation search is achieved by optimizing these candidates against a custom penalty function that incorporates both measures derived from statistical analysis of solved membrane protein structures and distance constraints obtained from experiments. This results in refined helical bundles to which the interhelical loops and amino acid side-chains are added. Using a set of only 27 distance constraints extracted from the literature, our methods successfully recover the structure of dark-adapted rhodopsin to within 3.2 {angstrom} of the crystal structure.

  18. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  19. L-amino acid oxidase from Naja atra venom activates and binds to human platelets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Li; Shaowen Zhu; Jianbo Wu; Wanyu Wang; Qiumin Lu; Kenneth J.Clemetson

    2008-01-01

    An L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO),NA-LAAO,was purified from the venom of Naja atra.Its N-terminal sequence shows great similarity with LAAOs from other snake venoms.NALAAO dose-dependently induced aggregation of washed human platelets.However,it had no activity on platelets in platelet-rich plasma.A low concentration of NA-LAAO greatly promoted the effect of hydrogen peroxide,whereas hydrogen peroxide itself had little activation effect on platelets.NA-LAAO induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of platelet proteins including Src kinase,spleen tyrosine kinase,and phospholipase C γ2.Unlike convulxin,Fc receptor γ chain and T lymphocyte adapter protein are not phosphorylated in NA-LAAO activated platelets,suggesting an activation mechanism different from the glycoprotein VI pathway.Catalase inhibited the platelet aggregation and platelet protein phosphorylation induced by NA-LAAO.NA-LAAO bound to fixed platelets as well as to platelet lysates of Western blots.Furthermore,affinity chromatography of platelet proteins on an NA-LAAO Sepharose 4B column isolated a few platelet membrane proteins,suggesting that binding of NA-LAAO to the platelet membrane might play a role in its action on platelets.

  20. Contribution of chondroitin sulfate A to the binding of complement proteins to activated platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama A Hamad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure of chondroitin sulfate A (CS-A on the surface of activated platelets is well established. The aim of the present study was to investigate to what extent CS-A contributes to the binding of the complement recognition molecule C1q and the complement regulators C1 inhibitor (C1INH, C4b-binding protein (C4BP, and factor H to platelets. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human blood serum was passed over Sepharose conjugated with CS-A, and CS-A-specific binding proteins were identified by Western blotting and mass spectrometric analysis. C1q was shown to be the main protein that specifically bound to CS-A, but C4BP and factor H were also shown to interact. Binding of C1INH was dependent of the presence of C1q and then not bound to CS-A from C1q-depleted serum. The specific interactions observed of these proteins with CS-A were subsequently confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis using purified proteins. Importantly, C1q, C4BP, and factor H were also shown to bind to activated platelets and this interaction was inhibited by a CS-A-specific monoclonal antibody, thereby linking the binding of C1q, C4BP, and factor H to exposure of CS-A on activated platelets. CS-A-bound C1q was also shown to amplify the binding of model immune complexes to both microtiter plate-bound CS-A and to activated platelets. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the concept that CS-A contributes to the binding of C1q, C4BP, and factor H to platelets, thereby adding CS-A to the previously reported binding sites for these proteins on the platelet surface. CS-A-bound C1q also seems to amplify the binding of immune complexes to activated platelets, suggesting a role for this molecule in immune complex diseases.

  1. Proteomics characterization of abundant Golgi membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A W; Ward, M A; Blackstock, W P; Freeman, H N; Choudhary, J S; Lewis, A P; Chotai, D; Fazel, A; Gushue, J N; Paiement, J; Palcy, S; Chevet, E; Lafrenière-Roula, M; Solari, R; Thomas, D Y; Rowley, A; Bergeron, J J

    2001-02-16

    A mass spectrometric analysis of proteins partitioning into Triton X-114 from purified hepatic Golgi apparatus (84% purity by morphometry, 122-fold enrichment over the homogenate for the Golgi marker galactosyl transferase) led to the unambiguous identification of 81 proteins including a novel Golgi-associated protein of 34 kDa (GPP34). The membrane protein complement was resolved by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to a hierarchical approach using delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry characterization by peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry to generate sequence tags, and Edman sequencing of proteins. Major membrane proteins corresponded to known Golgi residents, a Golgi lectin, anterograde cargo, and an abundance of trafficking proteins including KDEL receptors, p24 family members, SNAREs, Rabs, a single ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor, and two SCAMPs. Analytical fractionation and gold immunolabeling of proteins in the purified Golgi fraction were used to assess the intra-Golgi and total cellular distribution of GPP34, two SNAREs, SCAMPs, and the trafficking proteins GBF1, BAP31, and alpha(2)P24 identified by the proteomics approach as well as the endoplasmic reticulum contaminant calnexin. Although GPP34 has never previously been identified as a protein, the localization of GPP34 to the Golgi complex, the conservation of GPP34 from yeast to humans, and the cytosolically exposed location of GPP34 predict a role for a novel coat protein in Golgi trafficking.

  2. Platelet adhesion and plasma protein adsorption control of collagen surfaces by He{sup +} ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurotobi, K. E-mail: kurotobi@postman.riken.go.jp; Suzuki, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Suzuki, H.; Iwaki, M

    2003-05-01

    He{sup +} ion implanted collagen-coated tubes with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} were exhibited antithrombogenicity. To investigate the mechanisms of antithrombogenicity of these samples, plasma protein adsorption assay and platelet adhesion experiments were performed. The adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and von Willebrand factor (vWf) was minimum on the He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. Platelet adhesion (using platelet rich plasma) was inhibited on the He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and was accelerated on the untreated collagen and ion implanted collagen with fluences of 1 x 10{sup 13}, 1 x 10{sup 15} and 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Platelet activation with washed platelets was observed on untreated collagen and He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and was inhibited with fluences of 1 x 10{sup 13}, 1 x 10{sup 15} and 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Generally, platelets can react with a specific ligand inside the collagen (GFOGER sequence). The results of platelets adhesion experiments using washed platelets indicated that there were no ligands such as GFOGER on the He{sup +} ion implanted collagen over a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. On the 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} implanted collagen, no platelet activation was observed due to the influence of plasma proteins. >From the above, it is concluded that the decrease of adsorbed Fg and vWf caused the antithrombogenicity of He{sup +} ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and that plasma protein adsorption took an important role repairing the graft surface.

  3. An innovative approach in the management of palatogingival groove using Biodentine™ and platelet-rich fibrin membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Dexton Antony Johns; Vasundhara Yayathi Shivashankar; Shobha, K; Manu Johns

    2014-01-01

    Palatogingival groove is an anatomical malformation that often causes severe periodontal defects. Treatments of such an anomaly present a clinical challenge to the operator. Careful endodontic and periodontal procedures may restore the form and function. In the present case; root canal therapy, apicectomy, and sealing of the groove with Biodentine TM were done. Bone graft was placed followed by platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) membrane. This treatment modality resulted in gain in attachment, reduct...

  4. Protein permeation through an electrically tunable membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Ining A.; Melnikov, Dmitriy V.; Gracheva, Maria E.

    2016-05-01

    Protein filtration is important in many fields of science and technology such as medicine, biology, chemistry, and engineering. Recently, protein separation and filtering with nanoporous membranes has attracted interest due to the possibility of fast separation and high throughput volume. This, however, requires understanding of the protein’s dynamics inside and in the vicinity of the nanopore. In this work, we utilize a Brownian dynamics approach to study the motion of the model protein insulin in the membrane-electrolyte electrostatic potential. We compare the results of the atomic model of the protein with the results of a coarse-grained and a single-bead model, and find that the coarse-grained representation of protein strikes the best balance between the accuracy of the results and the computational effort required. Contrary to common belief, we find that to adequately describe the protein, a single-bead model cannot be utilized without a significant effort to tabulate the simulation parameters. Similar to results for nanoparticle dynamics, our findings also indicate that the electric field and the electro-osmotic flow due to the applied membrane and electrolyte biases affect the capture and translocation of the biomolecule by either attracting or repelling it to or from the nanopore. Our computational model can also be applied to other types of proteins and separation conditions.

  5. Electrophoretic separation method for membrane pore-forming proteins in multilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tsujimoto, Yusuke; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a novel electrophoretic separation and analysis method for membrane pore-forming proteins in multilayer lipid membranes (MLMs) in order to overcome the problems related to current separation and analysis methods of membrane proteins, and to obtain a high-performance separation method on the basis of specific properties of the lipid membranes. We constructed MLMs, and subsequently characterized membrane pore-forming protein behavior in MLMs. Through the use of these MLMs, we were able to successfully separate and analyze membrane pore-forming proteins in MLMs. To the best of our knowledge, this research is the first example of membrane pore-forming protein separation in lipid membranes. Our method can be expected to be applied for the separation and analysis of other membrane proteins including intrinsic membrane proteins and to result in high-performance by utilizing the specific properties of lipid membranes.

  6. Assessment of a microplate method for detection of staphylococcal secretory inhibitor of platelet microbicidal protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Iuri B; Gritsenko, Viktor A

    2009-01-01

    We developed a novel microplate spectrophotometric assay for the detection of staphylococcal secretory inhibitor of platelet microbicidal protein (SIPMP) in

  7. Extraction methods of red blood cell membrane proteins for Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Antonella; Roveri, Antonella; Zaccarin, Mattia; Benazzi, Louise; Daminelli, Simone; Pantano, Giorgia; Buttarello, Mauro; Ursini, Fulvio; Gion, Massimo; Mauri, Pier Luigi

    2010-08-13

    Since red blood cells (RBCs) lack nuclei and organelles, cell membrane is their main load-bearing component and, according to a dynamic interaction with the cytoskeleton compartment, plays a pivotal role in their functioning. Even if erythrocyte membranes are available in large quantities, the low abundance and the hydrophobic nature of cell membrane proteins complicate their purification and detection by conventional 2D gel-based proteomic approaches. So, in order to increase the efficiency of RBC membrane proteome identification, here we took advantage of a simple and reproducible membrane sub-fractionation method coupled to Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT). In addition, the adoption of a stringent RBC filtration strategy from the whole blood, permitted to remove exhaustively contaminants, such as platelets and white blood cells, and to identify a total of 275 proteins in the three RBC membrane fractions collected and analysed. Finally, by means of software for the elaboration of the great quantity of data obtained and programs for statistical analysis and protein classification, it was possible to determine the validity of the entire system workflow and to assign the proper sub-cellular localization and function for the greatest number of the identified proteins.

  8. Hemostatic Function, Survival, and Membrane Glycoprotein Changes in Young versus Old Rabbit Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Blajchman, Morris A; Senyi, Andrew F.; Hirsh, Jack; Genton, Edward; George, James N.

    1981-01-01

    Although in vitro studies have demonstrated functional differences between young and old platelets, in vivo differences have not been precisely established. Therefore the in vivo hemostatic function of young and old platelets and the survival time have been examined in rabbits. The hemostatic function was measured by performing serial ear bleeding times in irradiation-induced thrombocytopenic rabbits. After irradiation with 930 rad the platelet count gradually diminished reaching a nadir (∼20...

  9. Protein disulfide isomerase inhibition blocks thrombin generation in humans by interfering with platelet factor V activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, Jack D.; Neuberg, Donna; Puligandla, Maneka; Furie, Bruce; Zwicker, Jeffrey I.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is required for thrombus formation. We previously demonstrated that glycosylated quercetin flavonoids such as isoquercetin inhibit PDI activity and thrombus formation in animal models, but whether extracellular PDI represents a viable anticoagulant target in humans and how its inhibition affects blood coagulation remain unknown. METHODS: We evaluated effects of oral administration of isoquercetin on platelet-dependent thrombin generation in healthy subjects and patients with persistently elevated anti-phospholipid antibodies. RESULTS: Following oral administration of 1,000 mg isoquercetin to healthy adults, the measured peak plasma quercetin concentration (9.2 μM) exceeded its IC50 for inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin in vitro (2.5 ± 0.4 μM). Platelet-dependent thrombin generation decreased by 51% in the healthy volunteers compared with baseline (P = 0.0004) and by 64% in the anti-phospholipid antibody cohort (P = 0.015) following isoquercetin ingestion. To understand how PDI affects thrombin generation, we evaluated substrates of PDI identified using an unbiased mechanistic-based substrate trapping approach. These studies identified platelet factor V as a PDI substrate. Isoquercetin blocked both platelet factor Va and thrombin generation with an IC50 of ~5 μM. Inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin ingestion resulted in a 53% decrease in the generation of platelet factor Va (P = 0.001). Isoquercetin-mediated inhibition was reversed with addition of exogenous factor Va. CONCLUSION: These studies show that oral administration of isoquercetin inhibits PDI activity in plasma and diminishes platelet-dependent thrombin generation predominantly by blocking the generation of platelet factor Va. These pharmacodynamic and mechanistic observations represent an important step in the development of a novel class of antithrombotic agents targeting PDI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01722669) FUNDING: National Heart

  10. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, M.L.; Norman, J E; Morgan, N. V.; Mundell, S J; Lordkipanidze, M.; Lowe, G. C.; Daly, M E; Simpson, M.A.; Drake, S.; Watson, S P; Mumford, A D; UKGAPPS,

    2016-01-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common\\ud population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)\\ud genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR\\ud gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants\\ud (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in\\ud 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing\\ud Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders\\ud (I...

  11. Engineering Lipid Bilayer Membranes for Protein Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shuja Khan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid membranes regulate the flow of nutrients and communication signaling between cells and protect the sub-cellular structures. Recent attempts to fabricate artificial systems using nanostructures that mimic the physiological properties of natural lipid bilayer membranes (LBM fused with transmembrane proteins have helped demonstrate the importance of temperature, pH, ionic strength, adsorption behavior, conformational reorientation and surface density in cellular membranes which all affect the incorporation of proteins on solid surfaces. Much of this work is performed on artificial templates made of polymer sponges or porous materials based on alumina, mica, and porous silicon (PSi surfaces. For example, porous silicon materials have high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and photoluminescence, which allow them to be used both as a support structure for lipid bilayers or a template to measure the electrochemical functionality of living cells grown over the surface as in vivo. The variety of these media, coupled with the complex physiological conditions present in living systems, warrant a summary and prospectus detailing which artificial systems provide the most promise for different biological conditions. This study summarizes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS data on artificial biological membranes that are closely matched with previously published biological systems using both black lipid membrane and patch clamp techniques.

  12. A framework for protein and membrane interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bacci, Giorgio; Miculan, Marino; 10.4204/EPTCS.11.2

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the BioBeta Framework, a meta-model for both protein-level and membrane-level interactions of living cells. This formalism aims to provide a formal setting where to encode, compare and merge models at different abstraction levels; in particular, higher-level (e.g. membrane) activities can be given a formal biological justification in terms of low-level (i.e., protein) interactions. A BioBeta specification provides a protein signature together a set of protein reactions, in the spirit of the kappa-calculus. Moreover, the specification describes when a protein configuration triggers one of the only two membrane interaction allowed, that is "pinch" and "fuse". In this paper we define the syntax and semantics of BioBeta, analyse its properties, give it an interpretation as biobigraphical reactive systems, and discuss its expressivity by comparing with kappa-calculus and modelling significant examples. Notably, BioBeta has been designed after a bigraphical metamodel for the same purposes. Hence, each ...

  13. Effects of ethanol on aggregation, serotonin release, and amyloid precursor protein processing in rat and human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Daniela; Humpel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    It is known that oxidative stress leads to amyloid precursor protein (APP) dysregulation in platelets. Ethanol (EtOH) is a vascular risk factor and induces oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was thus to investigate whether EtOH affects APP processing in rat and human platelets. Platelets were exposed to 50 mM EtOH with and without 2 mM calcium-chloride (CaCl₂) for 20 or 180 minutes at 37°C. Platelet aggregation, serotonin release and APP isoforms 130 and 106/110 kDa were analyzed. As a control, 100 mM H₂O₂ was tested in rat platelets. Our data show that EtOH alone did not affect any of the analyzed parameters, whereas CaCl₂ significantly increased aggregation of rat and human platelets. In addition, CaCl₂ alone enhanced serotonin release in rat platelets. EtOH counteracted CaCl₂-induced aggregation and serotonin release. In the presence of CaCl₂, EtOH reduced the 130 kDa APP isoform in rat and human platelets. In conclusion, this study shows that in the presence of CaCl₂, EtOH affects the platelet function and APP processing in rat and human platelets.

  14. Subdiffusion of proteins and oligomers on membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepzelter, David; Zaman, Muhammad

    2012-11-01

    Diffusion of proteins on lipid membranes plays a central role in cell signaling processes. From a mathematical perspective, most membrane diffusion processes are explained by the Saffman-Delbrück theory. However, recent studies have suggested a major limitation in the theoretical framework, the lack of complexity in the modeled lipid membrane. Lipid domains (sometimes termed membrane rafts) are known to slow protein diffusion, but there have been no quantitative theoretical examinations of how much diffusion is slowed in a general case. We provide an overall theoretical framework for confined-domain ("corralled") diffusion. Further, there have been multiple apparent contradictions of the basic conclusions of Saffman and Delbrück, each involving cases in which a single protein or an oligomer has multiple transmembrane regions passing through a lipid phase barrier. We present a set of corrections to the Saffman-Delbrück theory to account for these experimental observations. Our corrections are able to provide a quantitative explanation of numerous cellular signaling processes that have been considered beyond the scope of the Saffman-Delbrück theory, and may be extendable to other forms of subdiffusion.

  15. Chemically Stable Lipids for Membrane Protein Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishchenko, Andrii; Peng, Lingling; Zinovev, Egor; Vlasov, Alexey; Lee, Sung Chang; Kuklin, Alexander; Mishin, Alexey; Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Zhang, Qinghai; Cherezov, Vadim (MIPT); (USC); (Scripps)

    2017-05-01

    The lipidic cubic phase (LCP) has been widely recognized as a promising membrane-mimicking matrix for biophysical studies of membrane proteins and their crystallization in a lipidic environment. Application of this material to a wide variety of membrane proteins, however, is hindered due to a limited number of available host lipids, mostly monoacylglycerols (MAGs). Here, we designed, synthesized, and characterized a series of chemically stable lipids resistant to hydrolysis, with properties complementary to the widely used MAGs. In order to assess their potential to serve as host lipids for crystallization, we characterized the phase properties and lattice parameters of mesophases made of two most promising lipids at a variety of different conditions by polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. Both lipids showed remarkable chemical stability and an extended LCP region in the phase diagram covering a wide range of temperatures down to 4 °C. One of these lipids has been used for crystallization and structure determination of a prototypical membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin at 4 and 20 °C.

  16. Combinatorial method for overexpression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Shani; Sawada, Keisuke; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nelson, Nathan

    2010-07-30

    Membrane proteins constitute 20-30% of all proteins encoded by the genome of various organisms. Large amounts of purified proteins are required for activity and crystallization attempts. Thus, there is an unmet need for a heterologous membrane protein overexpression system for purification, crystallization, and activity determination. We developed a combinatorial method for overexpressing and purifying membrane proteins using Escherichia coli. This method utilizes short hydrophilic bacterial proteins, YaiN and YbeL, fused to the ends of the membrane proteins to serve as facilitating factors for expression and purification. Fourteen prokaryotic and mammalian membrane proteins were expressed using this system. Moderate to high expression was obtained for most proteins, and detergent solubilization combined with a short purification process produced stable, monodispersed membrane proteins. Five of the mammalian membrane proteins, overexpressed using our system, were reconstituted into liposomes and exhibited transport activity comparable with the native transporters.

  17. Combinatorial Method for Overexpression of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Shani; Sawada, Keisuke; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nelson, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins constitute 20–30% of all proteins encoded by the genome of various organisms. Large amounts of purified proteins are required for activity and crystallization attempts. Thus, there is an unmet need for a heterologous membrane protein overexpression system for purification, crystallization, and activity determination. We developed a combinatorial method for overexpressing and purifying membrane proteins using Escherichia coli. This method utilizes short hydrophilic bacterial proteins, YaiN and YbeL, fused to the ends of the membrane proteins to serve as facilitating factors for expression and purification. Fourteen prokaryotic and mammalian membrane proteins were expressed using this system. Moderate to high expression was obtained for most proteins, and detergent solubilization combined with a short purification process produced stable, monodispersed membrane proteins. Five of the mammalian membrane proteins, overexpressed using our system, were reconstituted into liposomes and exhibited transport activity comparable with the native transporters. PMID:20525689

  18. Involvement of platelet-tumor cell interaction in immune evasion. Potential role of podocalyxin-like protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAmo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Besides their essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are involved in the onset of cancer metastasis by interacting with tumor cells. Platelets release secretory factors that promote tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Furthermore, the formation of platelet-tumor cell aggregates in the bloodstream provides cancer cells with an immune escape mechanism by protecting circulating malignant cells from immune-mediated lysis by natural killer (NK cells. Platelet-tumor cell interaction is accomplished by specific adhesion molecules, including integrins, selectins, and their ligands. Podocalyxin-like protein 1 (PCLP1 is a selectin ligand protein which overexpression has been associated with several aggressive cancers. PCLP1 expression enhances cell adherence to platelets in an integrin-dependent process and through the interaction with P-selectin expressed on activated platelets. However, the involvement of PCLP1-induced tumor-platelet interaction in tumor immune evasion still remains unexplored. The identification of selectin ligands involved in the interaction of platelets with tumor cells may provide help for the development of effective therapies to restrain cancer cell dissemination. This article summarizes the current knowledge on molecules that participate in platelet-tumor cell interaction as well as discusses the potential role of PCLP1 as a molecule implicated in tumor immune evasion.

  19. Inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation by anopheline antiplatelet protein, a saliva protein from a malaria vector mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shigeto; Sudo, Toshiki; Niimi, Masashi; Tao, Lian; Sun, Bing; Kambayashi, Junichi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Luo, Enjie; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki

    2008-02-15

    During blood feeding, mosquitoes inject saliva containing a mixture of molecules that inactivate or inhibit various components of the hemostatic response to the bite injury as well as the inflammatory reactions produced by the bite, to facilitate the ingestion of blood. However, the molecular functions of the individual saliva components remain largely unknown. Here, we describe anopheline antiplatelet protein (AAPP) isolated from the saliva of Anopheles stephensi, a human malaria vector mosquito. AAPP exhibited a strong and specific inhibitory activity toward collagen-induced platelet aggregation. The inhibitory mechanism involves direct binding of AAPP to collagen, which blocks platelet adhesion to collagen and inhibits the subsequent increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). The binding of AAPP to collagen effectively blocked platelet adhesion via glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and integrin alpha(2)beta(1). Cell adhesion assay showed that AAPP inhibited the binding of GPVI to collagen type I and III without direct effect on GPVI. Moreover, intravenously administered recombinant AAPP strongly inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo in rats. In summary, AAPP is a malaria vector mosquito-derived specific antagonist of receptors that mediate the adhesion of platelets to collagen. Our study may provide important insights for elucidating the effects of mosquito blood feeding against host hemostasis.

  20. Membrane topology and insertion of membrane proteins : Search for topogenic signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Marleen van; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2000-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins are found in all cellular membranes and carry out many of the functions that are essential to life. The membrane-embedded domains of integral membrane proteins are structurally quite simple, allowing the use of various prediction methods and biochemical methods to obtain s

  1. Suppressing membrane height fluctuations leads to a membrane-mediated interaction among proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Kayla; Maibaum, Lutz

    2016-11-01

    Membrane-induced interactions can play a significant role in the spatial distribution of membrane-bound proteins. We develop a model that combines a continuum description of lipid bilayers with a discrete particle model of proteins to probe the emerging structure of the combined membrane-protein system. Our model takes into account the membrane's elastic behavior, the steric repulsion between proteins, and the quenching of membrane shape fluctuations due to the presence of the proteins. We employ coupled Langevin equations to describe the dynamics of the system. We show that coupling to the membrane induces an attractive interaction among proteins, which may contribute to the clustering of proteins in biological membranes. We investigate the lateral protein diffusion and find that it is reduced due to transient fluctuations in membrane shape.

  2. Suppressing membrane height fluctuations leads to a membrane-mediated interaction among proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Kayla; Maibaum, Lutz

    2016-11-01

    Membrane-induced interactions can play a significant role in the spatial distribution of membrane-bound proteins. We develop a model that combines a continuum description of lipid bilayers with a discrete particle model of proteins to probe the emerging structure of the combined membrane-protein system. Our model takes into account the membrane's elastic behavior, the steric repulsion between proteins, and the quenching of membrane shape fluctuations due to the presence of the proteins. We employ coupled Langevin equations to describe the dynamics of the system. We show that coupling to the membrane induces an attractive interaction among proteins, which may contribute to the clustering of proteins in biological membranes. We investigate the lateral protein diffusion and find that it is reduced due to transient fluctuations in membrane shape.

  3. Membrane Compartmentalization Reducing the Mobility of Lipids and Proteins within a Model Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Reddy, Tyler; Fowler, Philip W; Duncan, Anna L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-01

    The cytoskeleton underlying cell membranes may influence the dynamic organization of proteins and lipids within the bilayer by immobilizing certain transmembrane (TM) proteins and forming corrals within the membrane. Here, we present coarse-grained resolution simulations of a biologically realistic membrane model of asymmetrically organized lipids and TM proteins. We determine the effects of a model of cytoskeletal immobilization of selected membrane proteins using long time scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing compartments with varying degrees of restraints within the membrane models, we are able to reveal how compartmentalization caused by cytoskeletal immobilization leads to reduced and anomalous diffusional mobility of both proteins and lipids. This in turn results in a reduced rate of protein dimerization within the membrane and of hopping of membrane proteins between compartments. These simulations provide a molecular realization of hierarchical models often invoked to explain single-molecule imaging studies of membrane proteins.

  4. Integral Membrane Protein Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Stroud, Robert M; Hays, Franklin A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic integral membrane proteins are challenging targets for crystallography or functional characterization in a purified state. Since expression is often a limiting factor when studying this difficult class of biological macromolecules, the intent of this chapter is to focus on the expression of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins (IMPs) using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae is a prime candidate for the expression of eukaryotic IMPs because it offers the convenience of using episomal expression plasmids, selection of positive transformants, posttranslational modifications, and it can properly fold and target IMPs. Here we present a generalized protocol and insights based on our collective knowledge as an aid to overcoming the challenges faced when expressing eukaryotic IMPs in S. cerevisiae.

  5. Identification of canine platelet proteins separated by differential detergent fractionation for nonelectrophoretic proteomics analyzed by Gene Ontology and pathways analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trichler SA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shauna A Trichler,1,* Sandra C Bulla,1,* Nandita Mahajan,1 Kari V Lunsford,2 Ken Pendarvis,3 Bindu Nanduri,4,5 Fiona M McCarthy,3 Camilo Bulla1 1Department of Pathobiology and Population Medicine, 2Department of Clinical Sciences and Animal Health Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, 3Department of Veterinary Science and Microbiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 4Department of Biological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, 5Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing and Biotechnology, Starkville, MS, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: During platelet development, proteins necessary for the many functional roles of the platelet are stored within cytoplasmic granules. Platelets have also been shown to take up and store many plasma proteins into granules. This makes the platelet a potential novel source of biomarkers for many disease states. Approaches to sample preparation for proteomic studies for biomarkers search vary. Compared with traditional two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems, nonelectrophoretic proteomics methods that employ offline protein fractionation methods such as the differential detergent fractionation method have clear advantages. Here we report a proteomic survey of the canine platelet proteome using differential detergent fractionation coupled with mass spectrometry and functional modeling of the canine platelet proteins identified. A total of 5,974 unique proteins were identified from platelets, of which only 298 (5% had previous experimental evidence of in vivo expression. The use of offline prefractionation of canine proteins by differential detergent fractionation resulted in greater proteome coverage as compared with previous reports. This initial study contributes to a broader understanding of canine platelet biology and aids functional research

  6. Platelet lipidomic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolegowska, B; Lubkowska, A; De Girolamo, L

    2012-01-01

    Lipids account for 16-19 percent dry platelet matter and includes 65 percent phospholipids, 25 percent neutral lipids and about 8 percent glycosphingolipids. The cell membrane that surrounds platelets is a bilayer that contains different types phospholipids symmetrically distributed in resting platelets, such as phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin. The collapse of lipid asymmetry is exposure of phosphatidylserine in the external leaflet of the plasma bilayer, where it is known to serve at least two major functions: providing a platform for development of the blood coagulation cascade and presenting the signal that induces phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. During activation, this asymmetrical distribution becomes disrupted, and PS and PE become exposed on the cell surface. The transbilayer movement of phosphatidylserine is responsible for the platelet procoagulant activity. Exposure of phosphatidylserine is a flag for macrophage recognition and clearance from the circulation. Platelets, stored at room temperature for transfusion for more than 5 days, undergo changes collectively known as platelet storage lesions. Thus, the platelet lipid composition and its possible modifications over time are crucial for efficacy of platelet rich plasma therapy. Moreover, a number of substances derived from lipids are contained into platelets. Eicosanoids are lipid signaling mediators generated by the action of lipoxygenase and include prostaglandins, thromboxane A2, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Isoprostanes have a chemical structure similar to this of prostanoids, but are differently produced into the particle, and are ligands for prostaglandins receptors, exhibiting biological activity like thromboxane A2. Endocannabinoids are derivatives from arachidonic acid which could reduce local pain. Phospholipids growth factors (sphingolipids, lysophosphatidic acid, platelet-activating factor) are involved in tissue

  7. Stochastic single-molecule dynamics of synaptic membrane protein domains

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by single-molecule experiments on synaptic membrane protein domains, we use a stochastic lattice model to study protein reaction and diffusion processes in crowded membranes. We find that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic proteins provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the single-molecule trajectories observed for synaptic proteins, and spatially inhomogeneous protein lifetimes at the cell membrane. Our results suggest that central aspects of the single-molecule and collective dynamics observed for membrane protein domains can be understood in terms of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes at the cell membrane.

  8. Organization and Dynamics of Receptor Proteins in a Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-11-25

    The interactions of membrane proteins are influenced by their lipid environment, with key lipid species able to regulate membrane protein function. Advances in high-resolution microscopy can reveal the organization and dynamics of proteins and lipids within living cells at resolutions membranes of in vivo-like complexity. We explore the dynamics of proteins and lipids in crowded and complex plasma membrane models, thereby closing the gap in length and complexity between computations and experiments. Our simulations provide insights into the mutual interplay between lipids and proteins in determining mesoscale (20-100 nm) fluctuations of the bilayer, and in enabling oligomerization and clustering of membrane proteins.

  9. Xanthophylls as modulators of membrane protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, Alexander V; Johnson, Matthew P

    2010-12-01

    This review discusses the structural aspect of the role of photosynthetic antenna xanthophylls. It argues that xanthophyll hydrophobicity/polarity could explain the reason for xanthophyll variety and help to understand their recently emerging function--control of membrane organization and the work of membrane proteins. The structure of a xanthophyll molecule is discussed in relation to other amphiphilic compounds like lipids, detergents, etc. Xanthophyll composition of membrane proteins, the role of their variety in protein function are discussed using as an example for the major light harvesting antenna complex of photosystem II, LHCII, from higher plants. A new empirical parameter, hydrophobicity parameter (H-parameter), has been introduced as an effective measure of the hydrophobicity of the xanthophyll complement of LHCII from different xanthophyll biosynthesis mutants of Arabidopsis. Photosystem II quantum efficiency was found to correlate well with the H-parameter of LHCII xanthophylls. PSII down-regulation by non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, NPQ, had optimum corresponding to the wild-type xanthophyll composition, where lutein occupies intrinsic sites, L1 and L2. Xanthophyll polarity/hydrophobicity alteration by the activity of the xanthophyll cycle explains the allosteric character of NPQ regulation, memory of illumination history and the hysteretic nature of the relationship between the triggering factor, ΔpH, and the energy dissipation process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cyclic nucleotide dependent dephosphorylation of regulator of G-protein signaling 18 in human platelets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gegenbauer, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 18 (RGS18) is a GTPase-activating protein that turns off Gq signaling in platelets. RGS18 is regulated by binding to the adaptor protein 14-3-3 via phosphorylated serine residues S49 and S218 on RGS18. In this study we confirm that thrombin, thromboxane A2, or ADP stimulate the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by increasing the phosphorylation of S49. Cyclic AMP- and cyclic GMP-dependent kinases (PKA, PKG) inhibit the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by phosphorylating S216. To understand the effect of S216 phosphorylation we studied the phosphorylation kinetics of S49, S216, and S218 using Phos-tag gels and phosphorylation site-specific antibodies in transfected cells and in platelets. Cyclic nucleotide-induced detachment of 14-3-3 from RGS18 coincides initially with double phosphorylation of S216 and S218. This is followed by dephosphorylation of S49 and S218. Dephosphorylation of S49 and S218 might be mediated by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) which is linked to RGS18 by the regulatory subunit PPP1R9B (spinophilin). We conclude that PKA and PKG induced S216 phosphorylation triggers the dephosphorylation of the 14-3-3 binding sites of RGS18 in platelets.

  11. Platelet proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zufferey, Anne; Fontana, Pierre; Reny, Jean-Luc; Nolli, Severine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are small cell fragments, produced by megakaryocytes, in the bone marrow. They play an important role in hemostasis and diverse thrombotic disorders. They are therefore primary targets of antithrombotic therapies. They are implicated in several pathophysiological pathways, such as inflammation or wound repair. In blood circulation, platelets are activated by several pathways including subendothelial matrix and thrombin, triggering the formation of the platelet plug. Studying their proteome is a powerful approach to understand their biology and function. However, particular attention must be paid to different experimental parameters, such as platelet quality and purity. Several technologies are involved during the platelet proteome processing, yielding information on protein identification, characterization, localization, and quantification. Recent technical improvements in proteomics combined with inter-disciplinary strategies, such as metabolomic, transcriptomics, and bioinformatics, will help to understand platelets biological mechanisms. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the platelet proteome under different environmental conditions may contribute to elucidate complex processes relevant to platelet function regarding bleeding disorders or platelet hyperreactivity and identify new targets for antiplatelet therapy.

  12. An innovative approach in the management of palatogingival groove using Biodentine™ and platelet-rich fibrin membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Dexton Antony; Shivashankar, Vasundhara Yayathi; Shobha, K; Johns, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Palatogingival groove is an anatomical malformation that often causes severe periodontal defects. Treatments of such an anomaly present a clinical challenge to the operator. Careful endodontic and periodontal procedures may restore the form and function. In the present case; root canal therapy, apicectomy, and sealing of the groove with Biodentine™ were done. Bone graft was placed followed by platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) membrane. This treatment modality resulted in gain in attachment, reduction in pocket depth, and deposition of bone in the osseous defect. A 24 month follow-up is included. PMID:24554867

  13. An innovative approach in the management of palatogingival groove using Biodentine™ and platelet-rich fibrin membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Dexton Antony; Shivashankar, Vasundhara Yayathi; Shobha, K; Johns, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Palatogingival groove is an anatomical malformation that often causes severe periodontal defects. Treatments of such an anomaly present a clinical challenge to the operator. Careful endodontic and periodontal procedures may restore the form and function. In the present case; root canal therapy, apicectomy, and sealing of the groove with Biodentine™ were done. Bone graft was placed followed by platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) membrane. This treatment modality resulted in gain in attachment, reduction in pocket depth, and deposition of bone in the osseous defect. A 24 month follow-up is included.

  14. Evaluation of Microcrystalline Chitosan and Fibrin Membranes as Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB Carriers with Amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimiera H. Bodek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the mechanical and sorption features of homogeneous and composite membranes which consist of microcrystalline chitosan (MCCh and fibrin (Fb in various proportions as well as the in vitro kinetics of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB released from ten types of membranes in the presence or absence of amoxicillin (Am. The films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, mechanical tests: breaking strength (Bs and elongation at break (Eb, as well as SEM images, and swelling study. The influence of the form of samples (dry or wet on Young’s modulus (E was also examined. The homogeneous MCCh (M1 and composite M3 and M4 (MCCh : Fb = 2 : 1 and 1 : 1 membranes were characterized by good sorption properties and higher mechanical strength, when compared with Fb (M2 membrane. Connecting MCCh with Fb decreases release of PDGF-BB and increases release of Am. The most efficient release of PDGF-BB was observed in the case of M4 (the optimum MCCh : Fb ratio was 1 : 1 membrane. It was found that the degree of PDGF-BB release from the membrane is influenced by the physicochemical and mechanical characteristics of the films and by its affinity to growth factor PDGF-BB.

  15. 血小板GPⅡb基因多态性与PCI术后血小板功能变化%Possible relationship between platelet membrane glycoprotein Ⅱ b gene polymorphism and change of platelet function after PCI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚德清; 许康世

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the possible relationship between platelet membrane glyco-protein (GP) IIb HPA-3gene polymorphism and changes of platelet function and the fibrinolytic activi-ty in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS ) ,undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) .Methods 120 patients ,who were definitely diagnosed with ACS in the Affiliated Hospital of Guiyang Medical College ,were chosen to check platelet GP IIb HPA-3 gene polymorphism by polymer-ase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP ) .Before and after PCI immediately ,and 24 hours after PCI ,the plasma GMP-140 ,vWF and PAI-1 levels were determined to analysis the change of platelet function indicators in patients with different genotype .Results The Logistic regression analysis found that GP Ⅱ bHPA -3 bb genotype is a independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after correction factors .The plasma GMP-140 level in the bb genotype group was remarkably increased immediately and 24 hours after PCI among the three genotypes (P< 0 .01) .The plasma vWF level no statistical difference appeared among the three genotypes .The plasma PAI-1 level imme-diately after PCI ,there were statistical significantly differences between the bb genotype and the others (P<0 .01) .Conclusion The HPA-3 polymorphism of GP IIb is the risk factor of AMI .There is re-markable platelet activation and the fibrinolytic activity changes in patients with GP HPA-3bb geno-type than in those without it after PCI .The results are suggested that the bb genotype of platelet GP IIb HPA-3 maybe a dangerous factor in acute and sub-acute coronary thrombosis after PCI .%目的:探讨血小板膜糖蛋白(GP)Ⅱb HPA-3基因多态性与急性冠脉综合征(ACS)经皮冠状动脉介入治疗(PCI)前后血小板功能变化的关系。方法选择行 PCI的ACS患者120例测定GPⅡb HPA-3基因型,测定各基因型 PCI术前、术后即刻、术后24 h三个时间段血浆GMP-140

  16. Protective effect of membrane cofactor protein against complement-dependent injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Huang, Shou-jian; Wang, Jin-qun; Wu, Chu-kun

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate the protective role of membrane cofactor protein (MCP, CD46) on complement-dependent injury. MCP was separated by ion exchange chromatography on a DEAE sephadex A-50 column from pig erythrocyte ghosts. Its protective effect was tested in models such as cobra venom factor (CVF)-induced platelet metamorphosis and aggregation, human serum-induced injury in isolated working guinea pig heart and reverse passive Arthus reaction. MCP inhibited CVF-induced platelet metamorphosis with an IC50 of 56.7 mg/L+/-2.6 mg/L, and prevented injury induced by activated complement in isolated working guinea pig hearts. In the rat model of reverse Arthus reaction, MCP relieved the skin lesions induced by immune complexes. MCP has a protective effect against complement-dependent injury.

  17. Protective effect of membrane cofactor protein against complement-dependent injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong XU; Shou-jian HUANG; Jin-qun WANG; Chu-kun WU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the protective role of membrane cofactor protein (MCP, CD46)on complement-dependent injury. Methods: MCP was separated by ion exchange chromatography on a DEAE sephadex A-50 column from pig erythrocyte ghosts.Its protective effect was tested in models such as cobra venom factor (CVF)induced platelet metamorphosis and aggregation, human serum-induced injury in isolated working guinea pig heart and reverse passive Arthus reaction. Results:MCP inhibited CVF-induced platelet metamorphosis with an IC50 of 56.7 mg/L+2.6mg/L, and prevented injury induced by activated complement in isolated working guinea pig hearts. In the rat model of reverse Arthus reaction, MCP relieved the skin lesions induced by immune complexes. Conclusion: MCP has a protective effect against complement-dependent injury.

  18. Effect of carbon black nanomaterial on biological membranes revealed by shape of human erythrocytes, platelets and phospholipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajnič, Manca; Drašler, Barbara; Šuštar, Vid; Krek, Judita Lea; Štukelj, Roman; Šimundić, Metka; Kononenko, Veno; Makovec, Darko; Hägerstrand, Henry; Drobne, Damjana; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika

    2015-03-28

    We studied the effect of carbon black (CB) agglomerated nanomaterial on biological membranes as revealed by shapes of human erythrocytes, platelets and giant phospholipid vesicles. Diluted human blood was incubated with CB nanomaterial and observed by different microscopic techniques. Giant unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (GUVs) created by electroformation were incubated with CB nanomaterial and observed by optical microscopy. Populations of erythrocytes and GUVs were analyzed: the effect of CB nanomaterial was assessed by the average number and distribution of erythrocyte shape types (discocytes, echinocytes, stomatocytes) and of vesicles in test suspensions, with respect to control suspensions. Ensembles of representative images were created and analyzed using computer aided image processing and statistical methods. In a population study, blood of 14 healthy human donors was incubated with CB nanomaterial. Blood cell parameters (concentration of different cell types, their volumes and distributions) were assessed. We found that CB nanomaterial formed micrometer-sized agglomerates in citrated and phosphate buffered saline, in diluted blood and in blood plasma. These agglomerates interacted with erythrocyte membranes but did not affect erythrocyte shape locally or globally. CB nanomaterial agglomerates were found to mediate attractive interaction between blood cells and to present seeds for formation of agglomerate - blood cells complexes. Distortion of disc shape of resting platelets due to incubation with CB nanomaterial was not observed. CB nanomaterial induced bursting of GUVs while the shape of the remaining vesicles was on the average more elongated than in control suspension, indicating indirect osmotic effects of CB nanomaterial. CB nanomaterial interacts with membranes of blood cells but does not have a direct effect on local or global membrane shape in physiological in vitro conditions. Blood cells and GUVs are convenient and ethically acceptable

  19. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer–phospholipid hybrid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness. PMID:27547605

  20. Shuttling of G protein subunits between the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisari, Mariangela; Saini, Deepak Kumar; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, Narasimhan

    2007-08-17

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (alphabetagamma) mediate the majority of signaling pathways in mammalian cells. It is long held that G protein function is localized to the plasma membrane. Here we examined the spatiotemporal dynamics of G protein localization using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, fluorescence loss in photobleaching, and a photoswitchable fluorescent protein, Dronpa. Unexpectedly, G protein subunits shuttle rapidly (t1/2 bromopalmitate. Thus, contrary to present thought, G proteins do not reside permanently on the plasma membrane but are constantly testing the cytoplasmic surfaces of the plasma membrane and endomembranes to maintain G protein pools in intracellular membranes to establish direct communication between receptors and endomembranes.

  1. [Glycoproteins, inherited diseases of platelets, and the role of platelets in wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurden, Alan T; Nurden, Paquita

    2013-02-01

    Recognition that platelets have a glycocalyx rich in membrane glycoproteins prompted the discovery in France that inherited bleeding syndromes due to defects of platelet adhesion and aggregation were caused by deficiencies in major receptors at the platelet surface. Identification of the alpha IIb beta3 integrin prompted the development of powerful anti-thrombotic drugs that have gained worldwide use. Since these discoveries, the genetic causes of many other defects of platelet function and production have been elucidated, with the identification of an ADP receptor, P2 Y12, another widespread target for anti-thrombotic drugs. Discovery of the molecular basis of a rare disease of storage of biologically active proteins in platelet alpha-granules has been accompanied by the recognition of the roles of platelets in inflammation, the innate immune system and tissue repair, opening new avenues for therapeutic advances.

  2. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  3. Thrombopoietin potentiates agonist-stimulated activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Y; Nishida, E; Uchiyama, T; Takayama, H

    1999-07-22

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) plays a crucial role in megakaryocyte differentiation and platelet production. c-Mpl, a receptor for TPO, is also expressed in terminally differentiated platelets. We investigated the effects of TPO on activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in human platelets. Thrombin, a thrombin receptor agonist peptide, a thromboxane A(2) analogue, collagen, crosslinking the glycoprotein VI, ADP, and epinephrine, but not phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate activated p38. TPO did not activate p38 by itself, whereas TPO pretreatment potentiated the agonist-induced activation of p38. TPO did not promote phosphorylation of Hsp27 and cytosolic phospholipase A(2) by itself, but enhanced thrombin-induced phosphorylation of them. The specific p38 inhibitor SB203580 strongly inhibited such phosphorylation. Thus, TPO possesses the priming effect on p38 activation in human platelets and could affect platelet functions through the p38 pathway. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Designing mimics of membrane active proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgolastra, Federica; Deronde, Brittany M; Sarapas, Joel M; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N

    2013-12-17

    As a semipermeable barrier that controls the flux of biomolecules in and out the cell, the plasma membrane is critical in cell function and survival. Many proteins interact with the plasma membrane and modulate its physiology. Within this large landscape of membrane-active molecules, researchers have focused significant attention on two specific classes of peptides, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), because of their unique properties. In this Account, we describe our efforts over the last decade to build and understand synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs). These endeavors represent one specific example of a much larger effort to understand how synthetic molecules interact with and manipulate the plasma membrane. Using both defined molecular weight oligomers and easier to produce, but heterogeneous, polymers, we have generated scaffolds with biological potency exceeding that of the natural analogues. One of these compounds has progressed through a phase II clinical trial for pan-staph infections. Modern biophysical assays have highlighted the interplay between the synthetic scaffold and lipid composition: a negative Gaussian curvature is required both for pore formation and for the initiation of endosome creation. Although work remains to better resolve the complexity of this interplay between lipids, other bilayer components, and the scaffolds, significant new insights have been discovered. These results point to the importance of considering the various aspects of permeation and how these are related to "pore formation". More recently, our efforts have expanded toward protein transduction domains, or mimics of cell penetrating peptides. Using a combination of unique molecular scaffolds and guanidinium-rich side chains, we have produced an array of polymers with robust membrane (and delivery) activity. In this new area, researchers are just beginning to understand the fundamental interactions between these new

  5. Platelet Glycoprotein lb-1X and Malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    patient with systemic lupus erythematosus . Am J Hematol 2001; 67:262-67. 20. Arthur JF, Dunkley S and Andrews RK. Platelet glycoprotein VI-related...Moroi M. Antibody against platelet membrane glyco- protein VI in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus . Am J Hematol 2001; 67: 262–7. 9 Arthur JF...Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the

  6. Platelet adhesion and protein adsorption on silicone rubber surface by ozone-induced grafted polymerization with carboxybetaine monomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Yuan, Jiang; Zang, Xiaopeng; Shen, Jian; Lin, Sicong

    2005-03-10

    Platelet adhesion and protein adsorption on the silicone rubber film grafted with N,N'-dimethyl-N-methacryloyloxyethyl-N-(2-carboxyethyl) ammonium (DMMCA) was studied. The grafting was carried out by means of ozone-induced method and was confirmed by ATR-FTIR and XPS investigations. The grafted films possessed relatively hydrophilic surface revealed by contact angle measurement. The blood compatibility of the grafted film was evaluated in vitro by platelet adhesion in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and protein absorption in bovine fibrinogen (BFG) using silicone film as the reference. No substantial platelet adhesion was observed for the grafted films incubated in PRP for 60 and 180 min. The protein absorption was also significantly reduced after incubated in bovine fibrinogen for 60 min. Both the results indicated that the blood compatibility of silicone rubber was greatly improved by ozone-induced grafting of carboxybetaine zwitterionic polymer onto its surface.

  7. Extracellular Fibrinogen-binding Protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus Inhibits the Formation of Platelet-Leukocyte Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Mareike G; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Abubaker, Aisha Alsheikh; Fortunato, Tiago M; Vara, Dina; Canobbio, Ilaria; Bagby, Stefan; Pula, Giordano

    2016-02-05

    Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus inhibits platelet activation, although its mechanism of action has not been established. In this study, we discovered that the N-terminal region of Efb (Efb-N) promotes platelet binding of fibrinogen and that Efb-N binding to platelets proceeds via two independent mechanisms: fibrinogen-mediated and fibrinogen-independent. By proteomic analysis of Efb-interacting proteins within platelets and confirmation by pulldown assays followed by immunoblotting, we identified P-selectin and multimerin-1 as novel Efb interaction partners. The interaction of both P-selectin and multimerin-1 with Efb is independent of fibrinogen. We focused on Efb interaction with P-selectin. Excess of P-selectin extracellular domain significantly impaired Efb binding by activated platelets, suggesting that P-selectin is the main receptor for Efb on the surface of activated platelets. Efb-N interaction with P-selectin inhibited P-selectin binding to its physiological ligand, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), both in cell lysates and in cell-free assays. Because of the importance of P-selectin-PSGL-1 binding in the interaction between platelets and leukocytes, we tested human whole blood and found that Efb abolishes the formation of platelet-monocyte and platelet-granulocyte complexes. In summary, we present evidence that in addition to its documented antithrombotic activity, Efb can play an immunoregulatory role via inhibition of P-selectin-PSGL-1-dependent formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes.

  8. Membrane shape instabilities induced by BAR domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    Membrane curvature has developed into a forefront of membrane biophysics. Numerous proteins involved in membrane curvature sensing and membrane curvature generation have recently been discovered, including proteins containing the crescent-shaped BAR domain as membrane binding and shaping module. Accordingly, the structure determination of these proteins and their multimeric complexes is increasingly well-understood. Substantially less understood, however, are thermodynamic and kinetic aspects and the detailed mechanisms of how these proteins interact with membranes in a curvature-dependent manner. New experimental approaches need to be combined with established techniques to be able to fill in these missing details. Here we use model membrane systems in combination with a variety of biophysical techniques to characterize mechanistic aspects of BAR domain protein function. This includes a characterization of membrane curvature sensing and membrane generation. We also establish kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of BAR protein dimerization in solution, and investigate kinetic aspects of membrane binding. We present two new approaches to investigate membrane shape instabilities and demonstrate that membrane shape instabilities can be controlled by protein binding and lateral membrane tension. This work is supported through NIH grant GM-097552 and NSF grant CBET-1053857.

  9. Research progress on Helicobacter pyloriouter membrane protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-He Shao; Hua Wang; Shun-Gen Chai; Li-Mei Liu

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori), one of the most common bacterial pathogens on human beings, colonizes the gastric mucosa. In its 95 paralogous gene families, there is a large outer membrane protein (OMP) family. It includes 32 members. These OMP are important for the diagnosis, protective immunity, pathogenicity of H pylori and so on. They are significantly associated with high H pylori density,the damage of gastric mucosa, high mucosal IL-8 levels and severe neutrophil infiltration. We introduce their research progress on pathogenicity.

  10. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology al...

  11. Proteopolymersomes: in vitro production of a membrane protein in polymersome membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallani, Madhavan; Andreasson-Ochsner, Mirjam; Tan, Cherng-Wen Darren; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Wisantoso, Yudi; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Hunziker, Walter

    2011-12-01

    Polymersomes are stable self-assembled architectures which mimic cell membranes. For characterization, membrane proteins can be incorporated into such bio-mimetic membranes by reconstitution methods, leading to so-called proteopolymersomes. In this work, we demonstrate the direct incorporation of a membrane protein into polymersome membranes by a cell-free expression system. Firstly, we demonstrate pore formation in the preformed polymersome membrane using α-hemolysin. Secondly, we use claudin-2, a protein involved in cell-cell interactions, to demonstrate the in vitro expression of a membrane protein into these polymersomes. Surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) binding studies with the claudin-2 proteopolymersomes and claudin-2 specific antibodies are performed to show the presence of the in vitro expressed protein in polymersome membranes.

  12. Management of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw with a platelet-rich fibrin membrane: technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydan, Sıdıka Sinem; Uckan, Sina

    2014-02-01

    Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a challenging complication resulting from the long-term application of bisphosphonates. In most cases, BRONJ occurs after a surgical procedure involving the jawbone. Currently, the management of BRONJ remains controversial, and there is no definitive treatment other than palliative methods. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) represents a relatively new biotechnology for the stimulation and acceleration of tissue healing and bone regeneration. This technical note describes the total closure of moderate bone exposure in persistent BRONJ in 2 weeks with a double-layer PRF membrane. PRF may stimulate gingival healing and act as a barrier membrane between the alveolar bone and the oral cavity. PRF may offer a fast, easy, and effective alternative method for the closure of bone exposure in BRONJ.

  13. Membrane Proteins : The Key Players of a Cancer Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, Kim R.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are involved in the prognosis of the most common forms of cancer. Membrane proteins are the hallmark of a cancer cell. The overexpressed membrane receptors are becoming increasingly important in cancer cell therapy. Current renewing therapy approaches based on receptor overexpressi

  14. Membrane Proteins : The Key Players of a Cancer Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, Kim R.

    Membrane proteins are involved in the prognosis of the most common forms of cancer. Membrane proteins are the hallmark of a cancer cell. The overexpressed membrane receptors are becoming increasingly important in cancer cell therapy. Current renewing therapy approaches based on receptor

  15. Diversity and Impact of Rare Variants in Genes Encoding the Platelet G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew L.; Norman, Jane E.; Morgan, Neil V.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Daly, Martina E.; Simpson, Michael A.; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70% had global minor allele frequency (MAF) low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  16. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew L; Norman, Jane E; Morgan, Neil V; Mundell, Stuart J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Daly, Martina E; Simpson, Michael A; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70 % had global minor allele frequency (MAF) low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes.

  17. Biogenesis of inner membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luirink, Joen; Yu, Zhong; Wagner, Samuel; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2012-06-01

    The inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli is composed of inner membrane proteins, lipoproteins and peripherally attached soluble proteins. Our knowledge of the biogenesis of inner membrane proteins is rapidly increasing. This is in particular true for the early steps of biogenesis - protein targeting to and insertion into the membrane. However, our knowledge of inner membrane protein folding and quality control is still fragmentary. Furthering our knowledge in these areas will bring us closer to understand the biogenesis of individual inner membrane proteins in the context of the biogenesis of the inner membrane proteome of Escherichia coli as a whole. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes.

  18. Durable vesicles for reconstitution of membrane proteins in biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sanobar; Muench, Stephen P.; Jeuken, Lars J.C.

    2017-01-01

    The application of membrane proteins in biotechnology requires robust, durable reconstitution systems that enhance their stability and support their functionality in a range of working environments. Vesicular architectures are highly desirable to provide the compartmentalisation to utilise the functional transmembrane transport and signalling properties of membrane proteins. Proteoliposomes provide a native-like membrane environment to support membrane protein function, but can lack the required chemical and physical stability. Amphiphilic block copolymers can also self-assemble into polymersomes: tough vesicles with improved stability compared with liposomes. This review discusses the reconstitution of membrane proteins into polymersomes and the more recent development of hybrid vesicles, which blend the robust nature of block copolymers with the biofunctionality of lipids. These novel synthetic vesicles hold great promise for enabling membrane proteins within biotechnologies by supporting their enhanced in vitro performance and could also contribute to fundamental biochemical and biophysical research by improving the stability of membrane proteins that are challenging to work with. PMID:28202656

  19. VAMP-7 links granule exocytosis to actin reorganization during platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseoglu, Secil; Peters, Christian G; Fitch-Tewfik, Jennifer L; Aisiku, Omozuanvbo; Danglot, Lydia; Galli, Thierry; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2015-07-30

    Platelet activation results in profound morphologic changes accompanied by release of granule contents. Recent evidence indicates that fusion of granules with the plasma membrane during activation provides auxiliary membrane to cover growing actin structures. Yet little is known about how membrane fusion is coupled with actin reorganization. Vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-7 is found on platelet vesicles and possesses an N-terminal longin domain capable of linking exocytosis to cytoskeletal remodeling. We have evaluated platelets from VAMP-7(-/-) mice to determine whether this VAMP isoform contributes to granule release and platelet spreading. VAMP-7(-/-) platelets demonstrated a partial defect in dense granule exocytosis and impaired aggregation. α Granule exocytosis from VAMP-7(-/-) platelets was diminished both in vitro and in vivo during thrombus formation. Consistent with a role of VAMP-7 in cytoskeletal remodeling, spreading on matrices was decreased in VAMP-7(-/-) platelets compared to wild-type controls. Immunoprecipitation of VAMP-7 revealed an association with VPS9-domain ankyrin repeat protein (VARP), an adaptor protein that interacts with both membrane-bound and cytoskeleton proteins and with Arp2/3. VAMP-7, VARP, and Arp2/3 localized to the platelet periphery during spreading. These studies demonstrate that VAMP-7 participates in both platelet granule secretion and spreading and suggest a mechanism whereby VAMP-7 links granule exocytosis with actin reorganization.

  20. G protein-membrane interactions II: Effect of G protein-linked lipids on membrane structure and G protein-membrane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Jesús; Ibarguren, Maitane; Álvarez, Rafael; Terés, Silvia; Lladó, Victoria; Piotto, Stefano P; Concilio, Simona; Busquets, Xavier; López, David J; Escribá, Pablo V

    2017-09-01

    G proteins often bear myristoyl, palmitoyl and isoprenyl moieties, which favor their association with the membrane and their accumulation in G Protein Coupled Receptor-rich microdomains. These lipids influence the biophysical properties of membranes and thereby modulate G protein binding to bilayers. In this context, we showed here that geranylgeraniol, but neither myristate nor palmitate, increased the inverted hexagonal (HII) phase propensity of phosphatidylethanolamine-containing membranes. While myristate and palmitate preferentially associated with phosphatidylcholine membranes, geranylgeraniol favored nonlamellar-prone membranes. In addition, Gαi1 monomers had a higher affinity for lamellar phases, while Gβγ and Gαβγ showed a marked preference for nonlamellar prone membranes. Moreover, geranylgeraniol enhanced the binding of G protein dimers and trimers to phosphatidylethanolamine-containing membranes, yet it decreased that of monomers. By contrast, both myristate and palmitate increased the Gαi1 preference for lamellar membranes. Palmitoylation reinforced the binding of the monomer to PC membranes and myristoylation decreased its binding to PE-enriched bilayer. Finally, binding of dimers and trimers to lamellar-prone membranes was decreased by palmitate and myristate, but it was increased in nonlamellar-prone bilayers. These results demonstrate that co/post-translational G protein lipid modifications regulate the membrane lipid structure and that they influence the physico-chemical properties of membranes, which in part explains why G protein subunits sort to different plasma membrane domains. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 gamma regulates thrombin-induced murine platelet alpha(IIbbeta(3 function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca C Gushiken

    Full Text Available Hemostasis and thrombosis are regulated by agonist-induced activation of platelet integrin alpha(IIbbeta(3. Integrin activation, in turn is mediated by cellular signaling via protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Although the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c interacts with alpha(IIbbeta(3, the role of PP1c in platelet reactivity is unclear.Using gamma isoform of PP1c deficient mice (PP1cgamma(-/-, we show that the platelets have moderately decreased soluble fibrinogen binding and aggregation to low concentrations of thrombin or protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4-activating peptide but not to adenosine diphosphate (ADP, collagen or collagen-related peptide (CRP. Thrombin-stimulated PP1cgamma(-/- platelets showed decreased alpha(IIbbeta(3 activation despite comparable levels of alpha(IIbbeta(3, PAR3, PAR4 expression and normal granule secretion. Functions regulated by outside-in integrin alpha(IIbbeta(3 signaling like adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen and clot retraction were not altered in PP1cgamma(-/- platelets. Thrombus formation induced by a light/dye injury in the cremaster muscle venules was significantly delayed in PP1cgamma(-/- mice. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3beta-serine 9 that promotes platelet function, was reduced in thrombin-stimulated PP1cgamma(-/- platelets by an AKT independent mechanism. Inhibition of GSK3beta partially abolished the difference in fibrinogen binding between thrombin-stimulated wild type and PP1cgamma(-/- platelets.These studies illustrate a role for PP1cgamma in maintaining GSK3beta-serine9 phosphorylation downstream of thrombin signaling and promoting thrombus formation via fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation.

  2. Directional interactions and cooperativity between mechanosensitive membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2013-01-01

    While modern structural biology has provided us with a rich and diverse picture of membrane proteins, the biological function of membrane proteins is often influenced by the mechanical properties of the surrounding lipid bilayer. Here we explore the relation between the shape of membrane proteins and the cooperative function of membrane proteins induced by membrane-mediated elastic interactions. For the experimental model system of mechanosensitive ion channels we find that the sign and strength of elastic interactions depend on the protein shape, yielding distinct cooperative gating curves for distinct protein orientations. Our approach predicts how directional elastic interactions affect the molecular structure, organization, and biological function of proteins in crowded membranes. PMID:25309021

  3. Determination of membrane protein glycation in diabetic tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Eric Y.; Swaan, Peter W.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes-associated hyperglycemia causes glycation of proteins at reactive amino groups, which can adversely affect protein function Although the effects of glycation on soluble proteins are well characterized, there is no information regarding membrane-associated proteins, mainly because of the lack of reproducible methods to determine protein glycation in vivo. The current study was conducted to establish such a method and to compare the glycation levels of membrane-associated proteins deri...

  4. Testing protein permeability of dialysis membranes using SDS-PAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, H; Melzer, H; Al-Bashir, A; Xu, X Q; Stiller, S

    2002-05-01

    Permeability of dialysis membranes for high molecular weight compounds should be similar to that of the glomerular membrane in order to remove uremic toxins like the human kidney does. In order to evaluate permeability of high-flux dialysis membranes SDS-PAGE is applied for examination of filtrate of dialysers during routine dialysis with different membranes. SDS-PAGE analysis is performed with silver staining method according to the modification of Melzer (5) and consecutive laser densitometry. The protein pattern of filtrate from dialysis membranes is similar to that of the glomerular membrane containing IgG, transferrin, albumin, alpha-1-microglobulin, retinol binding protein and beta-2-microglobulin. Comparing different membranes there are considerable differences depending on cut-off, charge and adsorption capacity of the particular membrane. In all membranes tested permeability of proteins decreases during one treatment session. Protein permeability of high-flux dialysis membranes is similar to the gloemerular membrane but modified according to pore-size, surface charge, adsorption and time on dialysis. In contrast to the glomerular membrane in each of the investigated membranes protein permeability decreases during function.

  5. Hysteresis-like binding of coagulation factors X/Xa to procoagulant activated platelets and phospholipids results from multistep association and membrane-dependent multimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Kurasawa, James H; Sarafanov, Andrey G; Chambost, Herve; Vasil'ev, Sergey A; Demina, Irina A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-06-01

    Binding of coagulation factors X (fX) and Xa (fXa) to activated platelets is required for the formation of membrane-dependent enzymatic complexes of intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase. We carried out an in-depth characterization of fX/fXa binding to phospholipids and gel-filtered, thrombin-activated platelets. Flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and computational modeling were used to investigate interactions of fX/fXa with the membranes. Confocal microscopy was employed to study fXa binding to platelet thrombi formed in flowing whole blood under arterial conditions. Binding of fX/fXa to either vesicles or procoagulant platelets did not follow a traditional one-step reversible binding model. Their dissociation was a two-step process resulting in a plateau that was up to 10-fold greater than the saturation value observed in the association experiments. Computational modeling and experimental evidence suggested that this was caused by a combination of two-step association (mainly for fX) and multimerization on the membrane (mainly for fXa). Importantly, fX formed multimers with fXa, thereby improving its retention. The same binding/dissociation hysteresis was observed for annexin V known to form trimers on the membranes. Experiments with platelets from gray syndrome patients showed that alpha-granular factor Va provided an additional high-affinity binding site for fXa that did not affect the hysteresis. Confocal microscopy observation of fXa binding to platelet thrombi in a flow chamber and its wash-out confirmed that this phenomenon persisted under physiologically relevant conditions. This suggests its possible role of "locking" coagulation factors on the membrane and preventing their inhibition in plasma and removal from thrombi by flow.

  6. Zein synthesis and processing on zein protein body membranes. [Maize proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, F A

    1978-01-01

    The storage protein of maize, zein, is translated from messenger RNA on ribosomes bound to the outer membrane of the zein protein bodies. No other proteins appear to be made on this membrane. Before zein is transported through the protein body membrane it undergoes at least two post-translational modifications, which are discussed.

  7. Expression, Solubilization, and Purification of Bacterial Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Constance J

    2016-02-02

    Bacterial integral membrane proteins play many important roles, including sensing changes in the environment, transporting molecules into and out of the cell, and in the case of commensal or pathogenic bacteria, interacting with the host organism. Working with membrane proteins in the lab can be more challenging than working with soluble proteins because of difficulties in their recombinant expression and purification. This protocol describes a standard method to express, solubilize, and purify bacterial integral membrane proteins. The recombinant protein of interest with a 6His affinity tag is expressed in E. coli. After harvesting the cultures and isolating cellular membranes, mild detergents are used to solubilize the membrane proteins. Protein-detergent complexes are then purified using IMAC column chromatography. Support protocols are included to help select a detergent for protein solubilization and for use of gel filtration chromatography for further purification.

  8. The response of Lactococcus lactis to membrane protein production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Coelho Pinto, Joao; Wolters, Justina C.; Geertsma, Eric R.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Permentier, Hjalmar P.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Background: The biogenesis of membrane proteins is more complex than that of water-soluble proteins, and recombinant expression of membrane proteins in functional form and in amounts high enough for structural and functional studies is often problematic. To better engineer cells towards efficient

  9. Self-assembling peptides form nanodiscs that stabilize membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Kirkensgaard, Jacob Judas Kain;

    2014-01-01

    New methods to handle membrane bound proteins, e.g. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), are highly desirable. Recently, apoliprotein A1 (ApoA1) based lipoprotein particles have emerged as a new platform for studying membrane proteins, and it has been shown that they can self-assemble in combinat...

  10. High-throughput production of prokaryotic membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovetsky, Elena; Lu, Ming Liang; Andorn-Broza, Ronit; Khutoreskaya, Galina; Bray, James E; Savchenko, Alexei; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Edwards, Aled M; Koth, Christopher M

    2005-01-01

    Membrane proteins constitute ~30% of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes but comprise a small fraction of the entries in protein structural databases. A number of features of membrane proteins render them challenging targets for the structural biologist, among which the most important is the difficulty in obtaining sufficient quantities of purified protein. We are exploring procedures to express and purify large numbers of prokaryotic membrane proteins. A set of 280 membrane proteins from Escherichia coli and Thermotoga maritima, a thermophile, was cloned and tested for expression in Escherichia coli. Under a set of standard conditions, expression could be detected in the membrane fraction for approximately 30% of the cloned targets. About 22 of the highest expressing membrane proteins were purified, typically in just two chromatographic steps. There was a clear correlation between the number of predicted transmembrane domains in a given target and its propensity to express and purify. Accordingly, the vast majority of successfully expressed and purified proteins had six or fewer transmembrane domains. We did not observe any clear advantage to the use of thermophilic targets. Two of the purified membrane proteins formed crystals. By comparison with protein production efforts for soluble proteins, where approximately 70% of cloned targets express and approximately 25% can be readily purified for structural studies [Christendat et al. (2000) Nat. Struct. Biol., 7, 903], our results demonstrate that a similar approach will succeed for membrane proteins, albeit with an expected higher attrition rate.

  11. NMR-based screening of membrane protein ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yanamala, Naveena; Dutta, Arpana; Beck, Barbara; Van Fleet, Bart; Hay, Kelly; Yazbak, Ahmad; Ishima, Rieko; Doemling, Alexander; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins pose problems for the application of NMR-based ligand-screening methods because of the need to maintain the proteins in a membrane mimetic environment such as detergent micelles: they add to the molecular weight of the protein, increase the viscosity of the solution, interact with

  12. The response of Lactococcus lactis to membrane protein production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Coelho Pinto, Joao; Wolters, Justina C.; Geertsma, Eric R.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Permentier, Hjalmar P.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Background: The biogenesis of membrane proteins is more complex than that of water-soluble proteins, and recombinant expression of membrane proteins in functional form and in amounts high enough for structural and functional studies is often problematic. To better engineer cells towards efficient pr

  13. Studying Membrane Protein Structure and Function Using Nanodiscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, Pie

    The structure and dynamic of membrane proteins can provide valuable information about general functions, diseases and effects of various drugs. Studying membrane proteins are a challenge as an amphiphilic environment is necessary to stabilise the protein in a functionally and structurally relevan...

  14. An investigation of hierachical protein recruitment to the inhibitory platelet receptor, G6B-b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, Carmen H; Sadler, Amanda J; Huo, Jiandong; Campbell, R Duncan

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation is regulated by both positive and negative signals. G6B-b is an inhibitory platelet receptor with an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) and an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif (ITSM). The molecular basis of inhibition by G6B-b is currently unknown but thought to involve the SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. Here we show that G6B-b also associates with SHP-2, as well as SHP-1, in human platelets. Using a number of biochemical approaches, we found these interactions to be direct and that the tandem SH2 domains of SHP-2 demonstrated a binding affinity for G6B-b 100-fold higher than that of SHP-1. It was also observed that while SHP-1 has an absolute requirement for phosphorylation at both motifs to bind, SHP-2 can associate with G6B-b when only one motif is phosphorylated, with the N-terminal SH2 domain and the ITIM being most important for the interaction. A number of other previously unreported SH2 domain-containing proteins, including Syk and PLCγ2, also demonstrated specificity for G6B-b phosphomotifs and may serve to explain the observation that G6B-b remains inhibitory in the absence of both SHP-1 and SHP-2. In addition, the presence of dual phosphorylated G6B-b in washed human platelets can reduce the EC(50) for both CRP and collagen.

  15. An investigation of hierachical protein recruitment to the inhibitory platelet receptor, G6B-b.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen H Coxon

    Full Text Available Platelet activation is regulated by both positive and negative signals. G6B-b is an inhibitory platelet receptor with an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM and an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif (ITSM. The molecular basis of inhibition by G6B-b is currently unknown but thought to involve the SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. Here we show that G6B-b also associates with SHP-2, as well as SHP-1, in human platelets. Using a number of biochemical approaches, we found these interactions to be direct and that the tandem SH2 domains of SHP-2 demonstrated a binding affinity for G6B-b 100-fold higher than that of SHP-1. It was also observed that while SHP-1 has an absolute requirement for phosphorylation at both motifs to bind, SHP-2 can associate with G6B-b when only one motif is phosphorylated, with the N-terminal SH2 domain and the ITIM being most important for the interaction. A number of other previously unreported SH2 domain-containing proteins, including Syk and PLCγ2, also demonstrated specificity for G6B-b phosphomotifs and may serve to explain the observation that G6B-b remains inhibitory in the absence of both SHP-1 and SHP-2. In addition, the presence of dual phosphorylated G6B-b in washed human platelets can reduce the EC(50 for both CRP and collagen.

  16. Imaging of membrane proteins using antenna-based optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeppener, Christiane; Novotny, Lukas [Institute of Optics and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States)], E-mail: novotny@optics.rochester.edu

    2008-09-24

    The localization and identification of individual proteins is of key importance for the understanding of biological processes on the molecular scale. Here, we demonstrate near-field fluorescence imaging of single proteins in their native cell membrane. Incident laser radiation is localized and enhanced with an optical antenna in the form of a spherical gold particle attached to a pointed dielectric tip. Individual proteins can be identified with a diffraction-unlimited spatial resolution of {approx}50 nm. Besides determining the concentration and distribution of specific membrane proteins, this approach makes it possible to study the colocalization of different membrane proteins. Moreover, it enables a simultaneous recording of the membrane topology. Protein distributions can be correlated with the local membrane topology, thereby providing important information on the chemical and structural organization of cellular membranes.

  17. A novel lipoprotein nanoparticle system for membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfeld, Jens; Löving, Robin; Armache, Jean-Paul; Sonnen, Andreas; Guettou, Fatma; Moberg, Per; Zhu, Lin; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Flayhan, Ali; Briggs, John A.G.; Garoff, Henrik; Löw, Christian; Cheng, Yifan; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are of outstanding importance in biology, drug discovery and vaccination. A common limiting factor in research and applications involving membrane proteins is the ability to solubilize and stabilize membrane proteins. Although detergents represent the major means for solubilizing membrane proteins, they are often associated with protein instability and poor applicability in structural and biophysical studies. Here, we present a novel lipoprotein nanoparticle system that allows for the reconstitution of membrane proteins into a lipid environment that is stabilized by a scaffold of Saposin proteins. We showcase the applicability of the method on two purified membrane protein complexes as well as the direct solubilization and nanoparticle-incorporation of a viral membrane protein complex from the virus membrane. We also demonstrate that this lipid nanoparticle methodology facilitates high-resolution structural studies of membrane proteins in a lipid environment by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and allows for the stabilization of the HIV-envelope glycoprotein in a functional state. PMID:26950744

  18. Membrane-mediated interaction between strongly anisotropic protein scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Schweitzer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Specialized proteins serve as scaffolds sculpting strongly curved membranes of intracellular organelles. Effective membrane shaping requires segregation of these proteins into domains and is, therefore, critically dependent on the protein-protein interaction. Interactions mediated by membrane elastic deformations have been extensively analyzed within approximations of large inter-protein distances, small extents of the protein-mediated membrane bending and small deviations of the protein shapes from isotropic spherical segments. At the same time, important classes of the realistic membrane-shaping proteins have strongly elongated shapes with large and highly anisotropic curvature. Here we investigated, computationally, the membrane mediated interaction between proteins or protein oligomers representing membrane scaffolds with strongly anisotropic curvature, and addressed, quantitatively, a specific case of the scaffold geometrical parameters characterizing BAR domains, which are crucial for membrane shaping in endocytosis. In addition to the previously analyzed contributions to the interaction, we considered a repulsive force stemming from the entropy of the scaffold orientation. We computed this interaction to be of the same order of magnitude as the well-known attractive force related to the entropy of membrane undulations. We demonstrated the scaffold shape anisotropy to cause a mutual aligning of the scaffolds and to generate a strong attractive interaction bringing the scaffolds close to each other to equilibrium distances much smaller than the scaffold size. We computed the energy of interaction between scaffolds of a realistic geometry to constitute tens of kBT, which guarantees a robust segregation of the scaffolds into domains.

  19. [Erythrocytes infected by Plasmodium falciparum activate human platelets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, B; Peyron, F; Sheick Zadiuddin, I; Kolodié, L; Ambroise-Thomas, P

    1990-01-01

    Blood platelets are involved in Plasmodium falciparum malaria pathology as shown by thrombocytopenia and increased plasma level of two alpha granule proteins: beta thromboglobulin (beta TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF4). In this study we demonstrate that Plasmodium falciparum parasitized erythrocytes activate directly the secretion of beta TG and PF4 by human platelets. This secretion is related to parasitemia and occurs immediately after contact. Treatment of parasited erythrocytes by trypsin and diffusion chamber experiments suggest that platelet activation is triggered by parasitic substances shed on erythrocyte membrane and released in the culture medium.

  20. Detergent-resistant membrane subfractions containing proteins of plasma membrane, mitochondrial, and internal membrane origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellgren, Ronald L

    2008-04-24

    HEK293 cell detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) isolated by the standard homogenization protocol employing a Teflon pestle homogenizer yielded a prominent opaque band at approximately 16% sucrose upon density gradient ultracentrifugation. In contrast, cell disruption using a ground glass tissue homogenizer generated three distinct DRM populations migrating at approximately 10%, 14%, and 20% sucrose, named DRM subfractions A, B, and C, respectively. Separation of the DRM subfractions by mechanical disruption suggested that they are physically associated within the cellular environment, but can be dissociated by shear forces generated during vigorous homogenization. All three DRM subfractions possessed cholesterol and ganglioside GM1, but differed in protein composition. Subfraction A was enriched in flotillin-1 and contained little caveolin-1. In contrast, subfractions B and C were enriched in caveolin-1. Subfraction C contained several mitochondrial membrane proteins, including mitofilin and porins. Only subfraction B appeared to contain significant amounts of plasma membrane-associated proteins, as revealed by cell surface labeling studies. A similar distribution of DRM subfractions, as assessed by separation of flotillin-1 and caveolin-1 immunoreactivities, was observed in CHO cells, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and in HEK293 cells lysed in detergent-free carbonate. Teflon pestle homogenization of HEK293 cells in the presence of the actin-disrupting agent latrunculin B generated DRM subfractions A-C. The microtubule-disrupting agent vinblastine did not facilitate DRM subfraction separation, and DRMs prepared from fibroblasts of vimentin-null mice were present as a single major band on sucrose gradients, unless pre-treated with latrunculin B. These results suggest that the DRM subfractions are interconnected by the actin cytoskeleton, and not by microtubes or vimentin intermediate filaments. The subfractions described may prove useful in studying discrete protein

  1. Signaling mechanisms mediated by G-protein coupled receptors in human platelets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheikh Arshad SAEED; Huma RASHEED; Faisal A Wahed FECTO; Mohammad Ilyas ACHAKZAI; Rahmat ALI; John Dennis CONNOR; Anwar-ul-Hassan GILANI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The present study deals with the investigation of mechanisms involved in the synergistic interaction between epinephrine and arachidonic acid (AA). METHODS: Venous blood was taken from healthy human volunteers reported to be free of medications for one week. Platelet aggregation was monitored at 37 ℃ using Dual-channel Lumi-aggregometer. The resulting aggregation was recorded for 5 min by the measurement of light transmission as a function of time. RESULTS: The data show that a synergism in platelet aggregation mediated by subthreshold concentrations of epinephrine (1μmol/L) and AA (0.2μmol/L) was inhibited by the α2-receptor antagonist (yohimbine, IC50=0.6 μmol/L) and an inhibitor of AA-cyclooxygenase (COX), indomethacin (IC50=0.25 μmol/L).In examining receptor influence on intraplatelet signalling pathways, it was found that the synergistic effect was inhibited by calcium channel blockers, verapamil (IC50=0.4 μtmol/L) and diltiazem (IC50=2.5 μmol/L), as well as by low concentrations of inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) (U73122; IC50=0.2 μmol/L) and mitogens activated protein kinase (MAPK) (PD 98059; IC50=3.8 μmol/L). Herbimycin A, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine light chain kinase (TLCK), showed inhibition at IC50 value of 15 μmol/L, whereas chelerythrine, a protein kinase C (PKC)inhibitor, had no effect up to 20 μmol/L. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that synergism between epinephrine and AA in platelet aggregation is triggered through receptors coupled to G-protein, which in turn, activate PLC,COX, and MAP kinase-signaling pathways.

  2. Chitosan-based membrane chromatography for protein adsorption and separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yezhuo; Feng, Zhicheng; Shao, Zhengzhong; Chen, Xin

    2012-08-01

    A chitosan-based membrane chromatography was set up by using natural chitosan/carboxymethylchitosan (CS/CMCS) blend membrane as the matrix. The dynamic adsorption property for protein (lysozyme as model protein) was detailed discussed with the change in pore size of the membrane, the flow rate and the initial concentration of the feed solution, and the layer of membrane in membrane stack. The best dynamic adsorption capacity of lysozyme on the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography was found to be 15.3mg/mL under the optimal flow conditions. Moreover, the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography exhibited good repeatability and reusability with the desorption efficiency of ~90%. As an application, lysozyme and ovalbumin were successfully separated from their binary mixture through the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography. This implies that such a natural chitosan-based membrane chromatography may have great potential on the bioseparation field in the future.

  3. Structural Requirements for Membrane Assembly of Proteins Spanning the Membrane Several Times

    OpenAIRE

    Lipp, Joachim; Flint, Nicholas; Haeuptle, Marie-Theres; Dobberstein, Bernhard

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the structural requirements for the biogenesis of proteins spanning the membrane several times. Proteins containing various combinations of topological signals (signal anchor and stop transfer sequences) were synthesized in a cell-free translation system and their membrane topology was determined. Proteins spanning the membrane twice were obtained when a signal anchor sequence was followed by either a stop transfer sequence or a second signal anchor sequence. Thus, a sig...

  4. Challenges in the Development of Functional Assays of Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Demarche

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipid bilayers are natural barriers of biological cells and cellular compartments. Membrane proteins integrated in biological membranes enable vital cell functions such as signal transduction and the transport of ions or small molecules. In order to determine the activity of a protein of interest at defined conditions, the membrane protein has to be integrated into artificial lipid bilayers immobilized on a surface. For the fabrication of such biosensors expertise is required in material science, surface and analytical chemistry, molecular biology and biotechnology. Specifically, techniques are needed for structuring surfaces in the micro- and nanometer scale, chemical modification and analysis, lipid bilayer formation, protein expression, purification and solubilization, and most importantly, protein integration into engineered lipid bilayers. Electrochemical and optical methods are suitable to detect membrane activity-related signals. The importance of structural knowledge to understand membrane protein function is obvious. Presently only a few structures of membrane proteins are solved at atomic resolution. Functional assays together with known structures of individual membrane proteins will contribute to a better understanding of vital biological processes occurring at biological membranes. Such assays will be utilized in the discovery of drugs, since membrane proteins are major drug targets.

  5. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca F Alford

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1 prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2 high-resolution structural refinement; (3 protein-protein docking; and (4 assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design.

  6. Membrane interacting regions of Dengue virus NS2A protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemésio, Henrique; Villalaín, José

    2014-08-28

    The Dengue virus (DENV) NS2A protein, essential for viral replication, is a poorly characterized membrane protein. NS2A displays both protein/protein and membrane/protein interactions, yet neither its functions in the viral cycle nor its active regions are known with certainty. To highlight the different membrane-active regions of NS2A, we characterized the effects of peptides derived from a peptide library encompassing this protein's full length on different membranes by measuring their membrane leakage induction and modulation of lipid phase behavior. Following this initial screening, one region, peptide dens25, had interesting effects on membranes; therefore, we sought to thoroughly characterize this region's interaction with membranes. This peptide presents an interfacial/hydrophobic pattern characteristic of a membrane-proximal segment. We show that dens25 strongly interacts with membranes that contain a large proportion of lipid molecules with a formal negative charge, and that this effect has a major electrostatic contribution. Considering its membrane modulating capabilities, this region might be involved in membrane rearrangements and thus be important for the viral cycle.

  7. Detergent-Specific Membrane Protein Crystallization Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A suite of reagents has been developed for three-dimensional crystallization of integral membranes present in solution as protein-detergent complexes (PDCs). The compositions of these reagents have been determined in part by proximity to the phase boundaries (lower consolute boundaries) of the detergents present in the PDCs. The acquisition of some of the requisite phase-boundary data and the preliminary design of several of the detergent- specific screens was supported by a NASA contract. At the time of expiration of the contract, a partial set of preliminary screens had been developed. This work has since been extended under non-NASA sponsorship, leading to near completion of a set of 20 to 30 different and unique detergent- specific 96-condition screens.

  8. Constitutive and functional association of the platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI-Fc receptor gamma-chain complex with membrane rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Yasuharu; Kodama, Kumi; Uchiyama, Takashi; Takayama, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    The platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein (GP) VI-Fc receptor gamma-chain (FcRgamma) complex transduces signals in an immunoreceptorlike manner. We examined a role for the Triton X-100-insoluble membrane rafts in GPVI-FcRgamma complex signaling. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD)-induced disruption of the membrane rafts inhibited not only platelet aggregation and secretion but also tyrosine phosphorylation of signaling molecules on stimulation through the GPVI-FcRgamma complex. The GPVI-FcRgamma complex was constitutively associated with membrane rafts wherein the Src family kinases and LAT were also present. Their association was not affected by the complex engagement but was highly sensitive to MbetaCD treatment. Thus, we provide the first evidence that the GPVI-FcRgamma complex is constitutively and functionally associated with membrane rafts.

  9. Transporters in human platelets: physiologic function and impact for pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Greinacher, Andreas; Kroemer, Heyo K

    2012-04-12

    Platelets store signaling molecules (eg, serotonin and ADP) within their granules. Transporters mediate accumulation of these molecules in platelet granules and, on platelet activation, their translocation across the plasma membrane. The balance between transporter-mediated uptake and elimination of signaling molecules and drugs in platelets determines their intracellular concentrations and effects. Several members of the 2 major transporter families, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and solute carriers (SLCs), have been identified in platelets. An example of an ABC transporter is MRP4 (ABCC4), which facilitates ADP accumulation in dense granules. MRP4 is a versatile transporter, and various additional functions have been proposed, notably lipid mediator release and a role in aspirin resistance. Several other ABC proteins have been detected in platelets with functions in glutathione and lipid homeostasis. The serotonin transporter (SERT, SLC6A4) in the platelet plasma membrane represents a well-characterized example of the SLC family. Moreover, recent experiments indicate expression of OATP2B1 (SLCO2B1), a high affinity transporter for certain statins, in platelets. Changes in transporter localization and expression can affect platelet function and drug sensitivity. This review summarizes available data on the physiologic and pharmacologic role of transporters in platelets.

  10. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  11. Discriminating lysosomal membrane protein types using dynamic neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vijay; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a dynamic artificial neural network methodology, which classifies the proteins into their classes from their sequences alone: the lysosomal membrane protein classes and the various other membranes protein classes. In this paper, neural networks-based lysosomal-associated membrane protein type prediction system is proposed. Different protein sequence representations are fused to extract the features of a protein sequence, which includes seven feature sets; amino acid (AA) composition, sequence length, hydrophobic group, electronic group, sum of hydrophobicity, R-group, and dipeptide composition. To reduce the dimensionality of the large feature vector, we applied the principal component analysis. The probabilistic neural network, generalized regression neural network, and Elman regression neural network (RNN) are used as classifiers and compared with layer recurrent network (LRN), a dynamic network. The dynamic networks have memory, i.e. its output depends not only on the input but the previous outputs also. Thus, the accuracy of LRN classifier among all other artificial neural networks comes out to be the highest. The overall accuracy of jackknife cross-validation is 93.2% for the data-set. These predicted results suggest that the method can be effectively applied to discriminate lysosomal associated membrane proteins from other membrane proteins (Type-I, Outer membrane proteins, GPI-Anchored) and Globular proteins, and it also indicates that the protein sequence representation can better reflect the core feature of membrane proteins than the classical AA composition.

  12. Label-free aptasensor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degefa, Tesfaye Hailu [Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Juhyoun [Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: Juhyoun_Kwak@kaist.ac.kr

    2008-04-21

    A label-free aptasensor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) protein is reported. The aptasensor uses mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) composed of a thiol-modified PDGF binding aptamer and 6-mercaptohexanol (MCH) on a gold electrode. The SAMs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) before and after binding of the protein using [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-/4-}, a redox marker ion as an indicator for the formation of a protein-aptamer complex. The CVs at the PDGF modified electrode showed significant differences, such as changes in the peak currents and peak-to-peak separation, before and after binding of the target protein. The EIS spectra, in the form of Nyquist plots, were analyzed with a Randles circuit while the electron transfer resistance R{sub ct} was used to monitor the binding of the target protein. The results showed that, without any modification to the aptamer, the target protein can be recognized effectively at the PDGF binding aptamer SAMs at the electrode surface. Control experiments using non-binding oligonucleotides assembled at the electrode surfaces also confirmed the results and showed that there was no formation of an aptamer-protein complex. The DPV signal at the aptamer functionalized electrode showed a linearly decreased marker ion peak current in a protein concentrations range of 1-40 nM. Thus, label-free detection of PDGF protein at an aptamer modified electrode has been demonstrated.

  13. Hematopoietic lineage cell specific protein 1 (HS1) is a functionally important signaling molecule in platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahner, Bryan N; Dorsam, Robert T; Mada, Sripal R; Kim, Soochong; Stalker, Timothy J; Brass, Lawrence F; Daniel, James L; Kitamura, Daisuke; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2007-10-01

    Collagen activates platelets through an intracellular signaling cascade downstream of glycoprotein VI (GPVI). We have investigated the contribution of hematopoietic lineage cell-specific protein 1 (HS1) downstream of GPVI in platelet activation. Stimulation of GPVI leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of HS1, which is blocked by Src-family kinase inhibitors. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that HS1 associates with Syk and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases. HS1-null mice displayed increased bleeding times and increased time to occlusion in the FeCl(3) in vivo thrombosis model compared with their wild-type littermates. In addition, aggregation and secretion responses were diminished in HS1-null mouse platelets after stimulation of GPVI and protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR-4) agonists compared with wild-type littermate mouse platelets. Finally, Akt phosphorylation was diminished after GPVI or PAR-4 stimulation in platelets from HS1-null mice compared with their wild-type littermates. These results demonstrate that phosphorylation of the HS1 protein occurs downstream of GPVI stimulation and that HS1 plays a significant functional role in platelet activation downstream of GPVI and PARs.

  14. Microdomains of SNARE proteins in the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, G. van den; Lang, T.; Jahn, R.

    2013-01-01

    Exocytosis is catalyzed by the engagement of SNARE proteins embedded in the plasma membrane with complementary SNAREs in the membrane of trafficking vesicles undergoing exocytosis. In most cells studied so far, SNAREs are not randomly distributed across the plasma membrane but are clustered and

  15. Membrane interaction of retroviral Gag proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Alfred Dick

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of an infectious retroviral particle relies on multimerization of the Gag polyprotein at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The three domains of Gag common to all retroviruses-- MA, CA, and NC-- provide the signals for membrane binding, assembly, and viral RNA packaging, respectively. These signals do not function independently of one another. For example, Gag multimerization enhances membrane binding and is more efficient when NC is interacting with RNA. MA binding to the plasma membrane is governed by several principles, including electrostatics, recognition of specific lipid head groups, hydrophobic interactions, and membrane order. HIV-1 uses many of these principles while Rous sarcoma virus (RSV appears to use fewer. This review describes the principles that govern Gag interactions with membranes, focusing on RSV and HIV-1 Gag. The review also defines lipid and membrane behavior, and discusses the complexities in determining how lipid and membrane behavior impact Gag membrane binding.

  16. Engineering Escherichia coli for Functional Expression of Membrane Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Franz Y; Poolman, Bert

    2015-01-01

    A major bottleneck in the characterization of membrane proteins is low yield of functional protein in recombinant expression. Microorganisms are widely used for recombinant protein production, because of ease of cultivation and high protein yield. However, the target proteins do not always obtain th

  17. Phage-Derived Protein Induces Increased Platelet Activation and Is Associated with Mortality in Patients with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahajeng N. Tunjungputri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve our understanding about the severity of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, we investigated the association between the genotype of Streptococcus pneumoniae and disease outcomes for 349 bacteremic patients. A pneumococcal genome-wide association study (GWAS demonstrated a strong correlation between 30-day mortality and the presence of the phage-derived gene pblB, encoding a platelet-binding protein whose effects on platelet activation were previously unknown. Platelets are increasingly recognized as key players of the innate immune system, and in sepsis, excessive platelet activation contributes to microvascular obstruction, tissue hypoperfusion, and finally multiorgan failure, leading to mortality. Our in vitro studies revealed that pblB expression was induced by fluoroquinolones but not by the beta-lactam antibiotic penicillin G. Subsequently, we determined pblB induction and platelet activation by incubating whole blood with the wild type or a pblB knockout mutant in the presence or absence of antibiotics commonly administered to our patient cohort. pblB-dependent enhancement of platelet activation, as measured by increased expression of the α-granule protein P-selectin, the binding of fibrinogen to the activated αIIbβ3 receptor, and the formation of platelet-monocyte complex occurred irrespective of antibiotic exposure. In conclusion, the presence of pblB on the pneumococcal chromosome potentially leads to increased mortality in patients with an invasive S. pneumoniae infection, which may be explained by enhanced platelet activation. This study highlights the clinical utility of a bacterial GWAS, followed by functional characterization, to identify bacterial factors involved in disease severity.

  18. Phage-Derived Protein Induces Increased Platelet Activation and Is Associated with Mortality in Patients with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Amelieke J.; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E.; Ferwerda, Gerben; Meis, Jacques F.; Roeleveld, Nel; Bentley, Stephen D.; Pastura, Alexander S.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; van der Ven, Andre J.; de Mast, Quirijn; Zomer, Aldert

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To improve our understanding about the severity of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), we investigated the association between the genotype of Streptococcus pneumoniae and disease outcomes for 349 bacteremic patients. A pneumococcal genome-wide association study (GWAS) demonstrated a strong correlation between 30-day mortality and the presence of the phage-derived gene pblB, encoding a platelet-binding protein whose effects on platelet activation were previously unknown. Platelets are increasingly recognized as key players of the innate immune system, and in sepsis, excessive platelet activation contributes to microvascular obstruction, tissue hypoperfusion, and finally multiorgan failure, leading to mortality. Our in vitro studies revealed that pblB expression was induced by fluoroquinolones but not by the beta-lactam antibiotic penicillin G. Subsequently, we determined pblB induction and platelet activation by incubating whole blood with the wild type or a pblB knockout mutant in the presence or absence of antibiotics commonly administered to our patient cohort. pblB-dependent enhancement of platelet activation, as measured by increased expression of the α-granule protein P-selectin, the binding of fibrinogen to the activated αIIbβ3 receptor, and the formation of platelet-monocyte complex occurred irrespective of antibiotic exposure. In conclusion, the presence of pblB on the pneumococcal chromosome potentially leads to increased mortality in patients with an invasive S. pneumoniae infection, which may be explained by enhanced platelet activation. This study highlights the clinical utility of a bacterial GWAS, followed by functional characterization, to identify bacterial factors involved in disease severity. PMID:28096486

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates the insulin-induced activation of the nitric oxide synthase in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Ingrid; Schulz, Christian; Fichtlscherer, Birgit; Kemp, Bruce E; Fisslthaler, Beate; Busse, Rudi

    2003-11-01

    Little is known about the signaling cascades that eventually regulate the activity of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in platelets. Here, we investigated the effects of insulin on the phosphorylation and activation of eNOS in washed human platelets and in endothelial cells. Insulin activated the protein kinase Akt in cultured endothelial cells and increased the phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser(1177) but failed to increase endothelial cyclic GMP levels or to elicit the relaxation of endothelium-intact porcine coronary arteries. In platelets, insulin also elicited the activation of Akt as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS and initiated NO production which was associated with increased cyclic GMP levels and the inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation. The insulin-induced inhibition of aggregation was accompanied by a decreased Ca(2+) response to thrombin and was also prevented by N(omega) nitro-L-arginine. In platelets, but not in endothelial cells, insulin induced the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic stress-sensing kinase which was sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor wortmannin and the AMPK inhibitor iodotubercidin. Moreover, the insulin-mediated inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation was prevented by iodotubercidin. Insulin-independent activation of the AMPK using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, increased platelet eNOS phosphorylation, increased cyclic GMP levels and attenuated platelet aggregation. These results highlight the differences in the signal transduction cascade activated by insulin in endothelial cells and platelets, and demonstrate that insulin stimulates the formation of NO in human platelets, in the absence of an increase in Ca(2+), by acti-vating PI3-K and AMPK which phosphorylates eNOS on Ser(1177).

  20. Leukocyte-Reduced Platelet-Rich Plasma Alters Protein Expression of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Markus; Lang, Siegmund; Hanke, Alexander; Herrmann, Marietta; Huber, Michaela; Brockhoff, Gero; Klein, Silvan; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter; Prantl, Lukas; Gehmert, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Application of platelet-rich plasma and stem cells has become important in regenerative medicine. Recent literature supports the use of platelet-rich plasma as a cell culture media supplement to stimulate proliferation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The underlying mechanism of proliferation stimulation by platelet-rich plasma has not been investigated so far. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in α-minimal essential medium supplemented with platelet-rich plasma or fetal calf serum. Cell proliferation was assessed with cell cycle kinetics using flow cytometric analyses after 48 hours. Differences in proteome expression of the adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells were analyzed using a reverse-phase protein array to quantify 214 proteins. Complementary Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis were performed using protein data, and confirmed by Western blot analysis. A higher percentage of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the S phase in the presence of platelet-rich plasma advocates the proliferation stimulation. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis confirm the involvement of the selected proteins in the process of cell growth and proliferation. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed a participation in the top-ranked canonical pathways PI3K/AKT, PTEN, ILK, and IGF-1. Gene set enrichment analysis identified the authors' protein set as being part of significantly regulated protein sets with the focus on cell cycle, metabolism, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway. The present study provides evidence that platelet-rich plasma stimulates proliferation and induces a unique change in the proteomic profile of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The interpretation of altered expression of regulatory proteins represents a step forward toward achieving good manufacturing practice-compliant criteria

  1. Abnormal erythrocyte membrane protein pattern in severe megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballas, S K

    1978-01-01

    The erythrocyte membrane protein pattern of patients with megaloblastic anemia was determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. In severe megaloblastic anemia, secondary either to folic acid or vitamin B12 deficiency, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern was grossly abnormal, lacking bands 1, 2 (spectrin), and 3 and having several diffuse, faster migrating bands. After adequate vitamin replacement therapy, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern returned to normal. In mild megaloblastic anemia, secondary either to folic acid of vitamin B12 deficiency, and in severe iron deficiency anemia, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern was normal. Erythrocyte membrane protein pattern of normal membranes did not change after mixing with abnormal membranes before polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. Protease activity extracted from membranes of megalocytes was not different from normal. These findings indicate that the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern is abnormal in severe megaloblastic anemia and that this abnormality is not secondary to increased activity of the endogenous erythrocyte membrane proteinase. Images PMID:659579

  2. Anomalous diffusion of proteins in sheared lipid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Khoshnood, Atefeh

    2013-01-01

    We use coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate diffusion properties of sheared lipid membranes with embedded transmembrane proteins. In membranes without proteins, we find normal in-plane diffusion of lipids in all flow conditions. Protein embedded membranes behave quite differently: by imposing a simple shear flow and sliding the monolayers of the membrane over each other, the motion of protein clusters becomes strongly superdiffusive in the shear direction. In such a circumstance, subdiffusion regime is predominant perpendicular to the flow. We show that superdiffusion is a result of accelerated chaotic motions of protein--lipid complexes within the membrane voids, which are generated by hydrophobic mismatch or the transport of lipids by proteins.

  3. Size-dependent protein segregation at membrane interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Eva M.; Bakalar, Matthew H.; Choudhuri, Kaushik; Weichsel, Julian; Ann, Hyoung Sook; Geissler, Phillip L.; Dustin, Michael L.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2016-07-01

    Membrane interfaces formed at cell-cell junctions are associated with characteristic patterns of membrane proteins whose organization is critical for intracellular signalling. To isolate the role of membrane protein size in pattern formation, we reconstituted model membrane interfaces in vitro using giant unilamellar vesicles decorated with synthetic binding and non-binding proteins. We show that size differences between membrane proteins can drastically alter their organization at membrane interfaces, with as little as a ~5 nm increase in non-binding protein size driving its exclusion from the interface. Combining in vitro measurements with Monte Carlo simulations, we find that non-binding protein exclusion is also influenced by lateral crowding, binding protein affinity, and thermally driven membrane height fluctuations that transiently limit access to the interface. This sensitive and highly effective means of physically segregating proteins has implications for cell-cell contacts such as T-cell immunological synapses (for example, CD45 exclusion) and epithelial cell junctions (for example, E-cadherin enrichment), as well as for protein sorting at intracellular contact points between membrane-bound organelles.

  4. Assembly of outer-membrane proteins in bacteria and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommassen, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria consists of two membranes separated by the periplasm. In contrast with most integral membrane proteins, which span the membrane in the form of hydrophobic alpha-helices, integral outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) form beta-barrels. Similar beta-barrel proteins are found in the outer membranes of mitochondria and chloroplasts, probably reflecting the endosymbiont origin of these eukaryotic cell organelles. How these beta-barrel proteins are assembled into the outer membrane has remained enigmatic for a long time. In recent years, much progress has been reached in this field by the identification of the components of the OMP assembly machinery. The central component of this machinery, called Omp85 or BamA, is an essential and highly conserved bacterial protein that recognizes a signature sequence at the C terminus of its substrate OMPs. A homologue of this protein is also found in mitochondria, where it is required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins into the outer membrane as well. Although accessory components of the machineries are different between bacteria and mitochondria, a mitochondrial beta-barrel OMP can be assembled into the bacterial outer membrane and, vice versa, bacterial OMPs expressed in yeast are assembled into the mitochondrial outer membrane. These observations indicate that the basic mechanism of OMP assembly is evolutionarily highly conserved.

  5. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  6. Staphylococcal secretory inhibitor of platelet microbicidal protein is associated with prostatitis source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Iuri B; Gritsenko, Viktor A; Kuzmin, Michael D

    2006-12-01

    This study reports the detection of an extracellular staphylococcal product, designated secretory inhibitor of platelet microbicidal protein (SIPMP), that causes local inhibition of the bactericidal action of platelet microbicidal protein (PMP) in the fluid phase. Urethral isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (n=24) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) (n=47) from patients with or without chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) were tested. SIPMP production was tested by inhibition of PMP bioactivity against Bacillus subtilis and was expressed as percentage inhibition of PMP bactericidal activity. The PMP susceptibility of staphylococcal strains was determined by exposing bacterial cells to serial dilutions of PMP. Staphylococci from patients without CBP produced SIPMP at levels of 10.3+/-1.2 and 13.25+/-1.72 % for S. aureus and CNS, respectively. Strains isolated from men with CBP inhibited PMP-induced killing of B. subtilis by 23.38+/-4.2 % (P<0.05) and 23.69+/-1.87 % (P<0.01) for S. aureus and CNS, respectively. SIPMP production correlated with staphylococcal resistance to PMP (r2=0.6082 and 0.7264 for S. aureus and CNS, respectively). SIPMP represents a hitherto unrecognized determinant of staphylococcal pathogenicity. These results suggest that SIPMP production is associated with the CBP source. Data from this study may have significant implications for the understanding of the pathogenesis of CBP.

  7. Distribution of secretory inhibitor of platelet microbicidal protein among urethral isolates with its correlation with prostatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iuri B.Ivanov; Viktor A.Gritsenko; Michael D.Kuzmin

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To report the detection in vitro of secretory inhibitor of platelet microbicidal protein (SIPMP) phenotypes of urethral isolates along with a comparison with isolates from patients with or without chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP). Methods: Urethral isolates of Staphylococcus spp. (n = 64), diphtheroids (n = 28), micrococci (n = 15),streptococci (n = 21), Enterobacteriaceae (n = 9) and Enterococcusfaecalis (n = 19) from patients with or without CBP were tested. SIPMP production was tested by inhibition of platelet microbicidal protein (PMP) bioactivity against Bacillus subtilis and was expressed as percentage of inhibition of PMP bactericidal activity. Results: A significantly higher proportion of CBP-strains (57.78% vs. 16.67%) reduced PMP-induced killing of Bacillus subtilis than non-CBP strains did (P < 0.01), SIPMP levels of staphylococci and Enterococcusfaecalis from the CBP group were significantly higher than those of the control group. Conclusion: These results suggest that SIPMP production is associated with the CBP source. Data from the present study might have significant implications for the understanding of the pathogenesis of CBP.

  8. Membrane protein crystallization in lipidic mesophases: detergent effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Ai, X.; Caffrey, M.

    2000-01-01

    The "cubic phase method" for growing crystals of membrane proteins uses a complex mixture of water, lipid, protein, and other components. The current view is that the cubic phase is integral to the process. Thus additives from whatever source introduce the possibility of destabilizing the phase, thereby compromising the crystallization process. Detergents are used to solubilize membrane proteins and are likely to be ported into the cubic medium with the target protein. Depending on the identi...

  9. Patient and Mouse Antibodies against Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Cross-React with Platelets and Cause Their Dysfunction or Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou-Feng Lin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombocytopenia is a clinical manifestation in dengue virus (DV infection, yet its pathogenic mechanisms are unresolved. We previously showed that dengue patient sera contained antibodies cross-reactive with platelets. In this study, we demonstrated that the anti-platelet activity of dengue patient sera was due to the antibodies against DV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1. Studies using DV-infected or recombinant NS1-immunized mouse sera showed that anti-NS1 antibodies cross-reacted with human platelets. The platelet-binding activity of dengue patient sera or anti-NS1 antibodies was inhibited by treatment of platelets with anti-NS1 or patient sera. Further investigation showed that anti-NS1 antibodies were able to inhibit platelet aggregation and cause platelet lysis in the presence of complement. The platelet-binding activity and the induction of platelet lysis mediated by dengue patient sera or anti-NS1 antibodies were increased when platelets were activated by ADP or thrombin. Taken together, anti-NS1 antibodies account for the cross-reactivity with platelets and cause platelet dysfunction or depletion, which may be involved in the pathogenesis of dengue diseases.

  10. GPVI and GPIbα mediate staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 5 (SSL5 induced platelet activation and direct toward glycans as potential inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houyuan Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is a common pathogen capable of causing life-threatening infections. Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 5 (SSL5 has recently been shown to bind to platelet glycoproteins and induce platelet activation. This study investigates further the interaction between SSL5 and platelet glycoproteins. Moreover, using a glycan discovery approach, we aim to identify potential glycans to therapeutically target this interaction and prevent SSL5-induced effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In addition to platelet activation experiments, flow cytometry, immunoprecipitation, surface plasmon resonance and a glycan binding array, were used to identify specific SSL5 binding regions and mediators. We independently confirm SSL5 to interact with platelets via GPIbα and identify the sulphated-tyrosine residues as an important region for SSL5 binding. We also identify the novel direct interaction between SSL5 and the platelet collagen receptor GPVI. Together, these receptors offer one mechanistic explanation for the unique functional influences SSL5 exerts on platelets. A role for specific families of platelet glycans in mediating SSL5-platelet interactions was also discovered and used to identify and demonstrate effectiveness of potential glycan based inhibitors in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings further elucidate the functional interactions between SSL5 and platelets, including the novel finding of a role for the GPVI receptor. We demonstrate efficacy of possible glycan-based approaches to inhibit the SSL5-induced platelet activation. Our data warrant further work to prove SSL5-platelet effects in vivo.

  11. Tandem neopentyl glycol maltosides (TNMs) for membrane protein stabilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bae, Hyoung Eun; Mortensen, Jonas S; Ribeiro, Orquidea

    2016-01-01

    A novel class of detergents, designated tandem neopentyl glycol maltosides (TNMs), were evaluated with four target membrane proteins. The best detergent varied depending on the target, but TNM-C12L and TNM-C11S were notable for their ability to confer increased membrane protein stability compared...

  12. Optimization of membrane protein overexpression and purification using GFP fusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drew, David; Lerch, Mirjam; Kunji, Edmund; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2006-01-01

    Optimizing conditions for the overexpression and purification of membrane proteins for functional and structural studies is usually a Laborious and time-consuming process. This process can be accelerated using membrane protein-GFP fusions(1-3), which allows direct monitoring and visualization of mem

  13. Scaffolding proteins in membrane trafficking : the role of ELKS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular membrane trafficking is an essential cellular process that involves cooperation of many factors such as scaffolding proteins, GTPases and SNAREs. These proteins work together to ensure proper delivery of different membrane-enclosed cargoes to specific cellular destinations. In this the

  14. Study and prediction of secondary structure for membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirova, Svetlana R.; Milchevsky, Juri V.; Filatov, Ivan V.; Esipova, Natalia G.; Tumanyan, Vladimir G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach to membrane protein secondary structure prediction based on the statistical stepwise discriminant analysis method. A new aspect of our approach is the possibility to derive physical -chemical properties that may affect the formation of membrane protein secon

  15. Proteomic analysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elortza, Felix; Nühse, Thomas S; Foster, Leonard J

    2003-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are a functionally and structurally diverse family of post-translationally modified membrane proteins found mostly in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane in a variety of eukaryotic cells. Although the general role of GPI-APs remains un...

  16. Separation of the outer membrane and identification of major outer membrane proteins from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yukitaka; Imai, Masashi; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2002-04-01

    The outer membrane of Porphyromonas gingivalis, an oral strict anaerobe, was isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The outer membrane obtained by the differential detergent extraction method, previously reported, showed an essentially similar protein pattern on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), confirming that the latter method is suitable for the study of outer membrane proteins in this organism. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis revealed that major outer membrane proteins in this organism included Arg-gingipain, Lys-gingipain, RagA (a TonB-linked receptor), and putative porins that were homologous to Escherichia coli OmpA.

  17. Recombinant Dengue virus protein NS2B alters membrane permeability in different membrane models

    OpenAIRE

    León-Juárez, Moisés; Martínez-Castillo, Macario; Shrivastava, Gaurav; García-Cordero, Julio; Villegas-Sepulveda, Nicolás; Mondragón-Castelán, Mónica; Mondragón-Flores, Ricardo; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the main phenomena occurring in cellular membranes during virus infection is a change in membrane permeability. It has been observed that numerous viral proteins can oligomerize and form structures known as viroporins that alter the permeability of membranes. Previous findings have identified such proteins in cells infected with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a member of the same family that Dengue virus (DENV) belongs to (Flaviviridae). In the present work, we investiga...

  18. Association of coatomer proteins with the beta-receptor for platelet-derived growth factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus; Rönnstrand, L; Rorsman, C

    1997-01-01

    of intracellular vesicle transport. In order to explore the functional significance of the interaction between alpha- and beta'-COP and the PDGF receptor, a receptor mutant was made in which the conserved histidine residue 928 was mutated to an alanine residue. The mutant receptor, which was unable to bind alpha......The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src binds to and is activated by the beta-receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). The interaction leads to Src phosphorylation of Tyr934 in the kinase domain of the receptor. In the course of the functional characterization of this phosphorylation, we...... noticed that components of 136 and 97 kDa bound to a peptide from this region of the receptor in a phosphorylation-independent manner. These components have now been purified and identified as alpha- and beta'-coatomer proteins (COPs), respectively. COPs are a family of proteins involved in the regulation...

  19. Integral and peripheral association of proteins and protein complexes with Yersinia pestis inner and outer membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunai Christine L

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Yersinia pestis proteins were sequentially extracted from crude membranes with a high salt buffer (2.5 M NaBr, an alkaline solution (180 mM Na2CO3, pH 11.3 and membrane denaturants (8 M urea, 2 M thiourea and 1% amidosulfobetaine-14. Separation of proteins by 2D gel electrophoresis was followed by identification of more than 600 gene products by MS. Data from differential 2D gel display experiments, comparing protein abundances in cytoplasmic, periplasmic and all three membrane fractions, were used to assign proteins found in the membrane fractions to three protein categories: (i integral membrane proteins and peripheral membrane proteins with low solubility in aqueous solutions (220 entries; (ii peripheral membrane proteins with moderate to high solubility in aqueous solutions (127 entries; (iii cytoplasmic or ribosomal membrane-contaminating proteins (80 entries. Thirty-one proteins were experimentally associated with the outer membrane (OM. Circa 50 proteins thought to be part of membrane-localized, multi-subunit complexes were identified in high Mr fractions of membrane extracts via size exclusion chromatography. This data supported biologically meaningful assignments of many proteins to the membrane periphery. Since only 32 inner membrane (IM proteins with two or more predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs were profiled in 2D gels, we resorted to a proteomic analysis by 2D-LC-MS/MS. Ninety-four additional IM proteins with two or more TMDs were identified. The total number of proteins associated with Y. pestis membranes increased to 456 and included representatives of all six β-barrel OM protein families and 25 distinct IM transporter families.

  20. Effect of Antrodia camphorata on Inflammatory Arterial Thrombosis-Mediated Platelet Activation: The Pivotal Role of Protein Kinase C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Jung Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antrodia camphorata is a rare Taiwanese medicinal mushroom. Antrodia camphorata extract has been reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammation, antimetastasis, and anticancer activities and plays a role in liver fibrosis, vasorelaxation, and immunomodulation. Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Platelet activation plays a crucial role in intravascular thrombosis, which is involved in a wide variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of Antrodia camphorata on platelet activation remains unclear. We examined the effects of Antrodia camphorata on platelet activation. In the present study, Antrodia camphorata treatment (56–224 μg/mL inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but not U46619, an analogue of thromboxane A2, thrombin, and arachidonic acid. Antrodia camphorata inhibited collagen-induced calcium (Ca2+ mobilization and phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC and Akt. In addition, Antrodia camphorata significantly reduced the aggregation and phosphorylation of PKC in phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu activated platelets. In conclusion, Antrodia camphorata may inhibit platelet activation by inhibiting of Ca2+ and PKC cascade and the Akt pathway. Our study suggests that Antrodia camphorata may be a potential therapeutic agent for preventing or treating thromboembolic disorders.

  1. Alloimmune refractoriness to platelet transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, S G

    1997-11-01

    Patients who are transfused on multiple occasions with red cells or platelets may develop platelet-reactive alloantibodies and experience decreased clinical responsiveness to platelet transfusion. This situation, conventionally described as "refractoriness to platelet transfusions," is defined by an unsatisfactory low post-transfusion platelet count increment. If antibodies to HLAs are detected, improved clinical outcomes may result from transfusions of HLA-matched or donor-recipient cross-matched platelets. Because refractoriness is an expected, frequently occurring phenomenon, prevention of HLA alloimmunization is an important management strategy. Prevention strategies include efforts to decrease the number of transfusions, filtration of cellular components to reduce the number of HLA-bearing leukocytes, or pretransfusion ultraviolet B irradiation of cellular components to decrease their immunogenicity. Other investigational approaches include reducing the expression of HLAs on transfused platelets, inducing a transient reticuloendothelial system blockade by infusions of specialized immunoglobulin products, or transfusing semisynthetic platelet substitutes (thromboerythrocytes, thrombospheres) or modified platelets (infusible platelet membranes, lyophilized platelets).

  2. Membrane-Protein Crystallography and Potentiality for Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Atsuko

    Structure-based drug design for membrane proteins is far behind that for soluble proteins due to difficulty in crystallographic structure determination, despite the fact that about 60% of FDA-approved drugs target membrane proteins located at the cell surface. Stable homologs for a membrane protein of interest, such as prokaryotic neurotransmitter transporter homolog LeuT, might enable cooperative analyses by crystallography and functional assays, provide useful information for functional mechanisms, and thus serve as important probes for drug design based on mechanisms as well as structures.

  3. Folding membrane proteins by deep transfer learning

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Sheng

    2017-08-29

    Computational elucidation of membrane protein (MP) structures is challenging partially due to lack of sufficient solved structures for homology modeling. Here, we describe a high-throughput deep transfer learning method that first predicts MP contacts by learning from non-MPs and then predicts 3D structure models using the predicted contacts as distance restraints. Tested on 510 non-redundant MPs, our method has contact prediction accuracy at least 0.18 better than existing methods, predicts correct folds for 218 MPs, and generates 3D models with root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) less than 4 and 5 Å for 57 and 108 MPs, respectively. A rigorous blind test in the continuous automated model evaluation project shows that our method predicted high-resolution 3D models for two recent test MPs of 210 residues with RMSD ∼2 Å. We estimated that our method could predict correct folds for 1,345-1,871 reviewed human multi-pass MPs including a few hundred new folds, which shall facilitate the discovery of drugs targeting at MPs.

  4. Selective Sorting of Cargo Proteins into Bacterial Membrane Vesicles*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haurat, M. Florencia; Aduse-Opoku, Joseph; Rangarajan, Minnie; Dorobantu, Loredana; Gray, Murray R.; Curtis, Michael A.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the well established multiple cellular roles of membrane vesicles in eukaryotic cell biology, outer membrane vesicles (OMV) produced via blebbing of prokaryotic membranes have frequently been regarded as cell debris or microscopy artifacts. Increasingly, however, bacterial membrane vesicles are thought to play a role in microbial virulence, although it remains to be determined whether OMV result from a directed process or from passive disintegration of the outer membrane. Here we establish that the human oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has a mechanism to selectively sort proteins into OMV, resulting in the preferential packaging of virulence factors into OMV and the exclusion of abundant outer membrane proteins from the protein cargo. Furthermore, we show a critical role for lipopolysaccharide in directing this sorting mechanism. The existence of a process to package specific virulence factors into OMV may significantly alter our current understanding of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:21056982

  5. TOF-SIMS imaging of protein adsorption on dialysis membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Satoka; Hayama, Msayo; Hasegawa, Urara; Sakai, Kiyotaka; Hoshi, Takahiro; Kudo, Masahiro

    2004-06-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is capable of chemical imaging of proteins on insulated samples such as hollow-fiber dialysis membranes. Albumin loss and a lowering of diffusive permeability caused by protein adsorption on dialysis membranes should be reduced in order to enhance dialysis adequacy of the patients. Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-adsorbed hollow-fiber dialysis membranes were tested in the present study. TOF-SIMS images and spectra of both native membranes and BSA-adsorbed membranes were compared in order to identify secondary ions related to BSA and membranes. Peaks of secondary ions related to BSA and each membrane were selected by means of information theory, and they are characterized by principal component analysis (PCA). Chemical images of BSA adsorption on both native and treated membranes were obtained to find that BSA permeability and interaction between the membranes and BSA definitely depend on the properties of a membrane. TOF-SIMS imaging obtained with information theory is a powerful tool to estimate protein adsorption on the dialysis membranes.

  6. Applications of solid-state NMR to membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2017-07-12

    Membrane proteins mediate flow of molecules, signals, and energy between cells and intracellular compartments. Understanding membrane protein function requires a detailed understanding of the structural and dynamic properties involved. Lipid bilayers provide a native-like environment for structure-function investigations of membrane proteins. In this review we give a general discourse on the recent progress in the field of solid-state NMR of membrane proteins. Solid-state NMR is a variation of NMR spectroscopy that is applicable to molecular systems with restricted mobility, such as high molecular weight proteins and protein complexes, supramolecular assemblies, or membrane proteins in a phospholipid environment. We highlight recent advances in applications of solid-state NMR to membrane proteins, specifically focusing on the recent developments in the field of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, proton detection, and solid-state NMR applications in situ (in cell membranes). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biophysics in Canada, edited by Lewis Kay, John Baenziger, Albert Berghuis and Peter Tieleman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lipids, membrane proteins and natural membranes studied by neutron scattering and diffraction: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccai, Giuseppe

    1986-02-01

    Diffraction first observed from myelin 50 years ago was correctly attributed to a fluid crystal of lipids, because similar patterns were observed from extracted lipid preparations. Following on more recent X-ray work which characterized a variety of lipid-water structures, neutron diffraction experiments have provided detailed descriptions of the molecular conformations in lipid bilayers. For a long time, however, the molecular structure of membrane proteins remained elusive and the development of detergents for the extraction of active membrane proteins, and the discovery of naturally crystalline purple membrane were important breakthroughs in this field. Structural parameters of membrane proteins solubilised in detergent have been measured by neutron scattering with contrast variation techniques. Purple membrane has been studied extensively by neutron diffraction. It is an excellent illustration of the use of deuterium labeling by different approaches to address specific questions of molecular structure. These studies are reviewed with a special emphasis on aspects which are applicable to membranes in general.

  8. Label-free Detection of Protein Released during Platelet Activation by CNT-Enhanced Love Mode SAW Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiyan; Zu, Hongfei; Wang, Qing-Ming; Zhao, Gangyi; Wang, Jamesu H-C

    2014-09-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been applied in a series of clinical treatments. PRP contains high-concentrated platelets, which, when activated, could secret a variety of growth factors and cytokines, to promote and/or enhance healing of injured tissues. Non-activated platelets suspension could be prepared by an isolation method of centrifugation and washing currently. However, it is not clear whether platelets, if any, are already activated during this process and there is no simple method to monitor their activation accordingly. Shear-Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave sensors (SH-SAW, Love Mode) are promising in fundamental biology as well as biomedical engineering, detecting cell behaviors in liquid in a non-invasive, simple and quantitative manner. In this study, Love mode sensors are adopted for the label-free detection of protein secreted by platelets. Carbon nanotube (CNT) is reported as an advisable platform of both non-specific protein adsorption and specific protein binding. For further improvement of Love mode sensor performance, novel CNT -coated parylene-C film is prepared on its surface as both the acoustic-wave-guiding layer and bio-interface layer. The S21 loss curves of Love mode sensors were recorded and the corresponding resonance frequencies were extracted. The results showed that the CNT-enhanced sensor possessed an increased resonance frequency shift when compared to normal sensor with single parylene-C film under identical collagen concentrations. Then, the modified sensor is used for label-free detection of protein released by various concentrations of platelets. The results revealed high sensitivity and consistency, indicating the potential of CNT-enhanced Love mode sensors in cell-based applications.

  9. Identification of a Platelet Membrane Glycoprotein as a Falciparum Malaria Sequestration Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Tandon, Narendra N.; Magowan, Cathleen; Jamieson, G. A.; Chulay, Jeffrey D.

    1989-03-01

    Infections with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are characterized by sequestration of erythrocytes infected with mature forms of the parasite. Sequestration of infected erythrocytes appears to be critical for survival of the parasite and to mediate immunopathological abnormalities in severe malaria. A leukocyte differentiation antigen (CD36) was previously suggested to have a role in sequestration of malaria-infected erythrocytes. CD36 was purified from platelets, where it is known as GPIV, and was shown to be a receptor for binding of infected erythrocytes. Infected erythrocytes adhered to CD36 immobilized on plastic; purified CD36 exhibited saturable, specific binding to infected erythrocytes; and purified CD36 or antibodies to CD36 inhibited and reversed binding of infected erythrocytes to cultured endothelial cells and melanoma cells in vitro. The portion of the CD36 molecule that reverses cytoadherence may be useful therapeutically for rapid reversal of sequestration in cerebral malaria.

  10. The Origin and Early Evolution of Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Schweighofer, Karl; Wilson, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Membrane proteins mediate functions that are essential to all cells. These functions include transport of ions, nutrients and waste products across cell walls, capture of energy and its transduction into the form usable in chemical reactions, transmission of environmental signals to the interior of the cell, cellular growth and cell volume regulation. In the absence of membrane proteins, ancestors of cell (protocells), would have had only very limited capabilities to communicate with their environment. Thus, it is not surprising that membrane proteins are quite common even in simplest prokaryotic cells. Considering that contemporary membrane channels are large and complex, both structurally and functionally, a question arises how their presumably much simpler ancestors could have emerged, perform functions and diversify in early protobiological evolution. Remarkably, despite their overall complexity, structural motifs in membrane proteins are quite simple, with a-helices being most common. This suggests that these proteins might have evolved from simple building blocks. To explain how these blocks could have organized into functional structures, we performed large-scale, accurate computer simulations of folding peptides at a water-membrane interface, their insertion into the membrane, self-assembly into higher-order structures and function. The results of these simulations, combined with analysis of structural and functional experimental data led to the first integrated view of the origin and early evolution of membrane proteins.

  11. Protein-membrane interactions: blood clotting on nanoscale bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, J H; Pureza, V; Davis-Harrison, R L; Sligar, S G; Rienstra, C M; Kijac, A Z; Ohkubo, Y Z; Tajkhorshid, E

    2009-07-01

    The clotting cascade requires the assembly of protease-cofactor complexes on membranes with exposed anionic phospholipids. Despite their importance, protein-membrane interactions in clotting remain relatively poorly understood. Calcium ions are known to induce anionic phospholipids to cluster, and we propose that clotting proteins assemble preferentially on such anionic lipid-rich microdomains. Until recently, there was no way to control the partitioning of clotting proteins into or out of specific membrane microdomains, so experimenters only knew the average contributions of phospholipids to blood clotting. The development of nanoscale membrane bilayers (Nanodiscs) has now allowed us to probe, with nanometer resolution, how local variations in phospholipid composition regulate the activity of key protease-cofactor complexes in blood clotting. Furthermore, exciting new progress in solid-state NMR and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations allow structural insights into interactions between proteins and membrane surfaces with atomic resolution.

  12. Membrane protein insertion: mixing eukaryotic and prokaryotic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleiff, Enrico; Soll, Jürgen

    2005-11-01

    Proteins are translocated across or inserted into membranes by machines that are composed of soluble and membrane-anchored subunits. The molecular action of these machines and their evolutionary origin are at present the focus of intense research. For instance, our understanding of the mode of insertion of beta-barrel membrane proteins into the outer membrane of endosymbiotically derived organelles has increased rapidly during the past few years. In particular, the identification of the Omp85/YaeT-involving pathways in Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli and cyanobacteria, and homologues of Omp85/YaeT in chloroplasts and mitochondria, has provided new clues about the ancestral beta-barrel protein insertion pathway. This review focuses on recent advances in the elucidation of the evolutionarily conserved concepts that underlie the translocation and insertion of beta-barrel membrane proteins.

  13. Polyclonal Antibody Production for Membrane Proteins via Genetic Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Debra T; Robida, Mark D; Craciunescu, Felicia M; Loskutov, Andrey V; Dörner, Katerina; Rodenberry, John-Charles; Wang, Xiao; Olson, Tien L; Patel, Hetal; Fromme, Petra; Sykes, Kathryn F

    2016-02-24

    Antibodies are essential for structural determinations and functional studies of membrane proteins, but antibody generation is limited by the availability of properly-folded and purified antigen. We describe the first application of genetic immunization to a structurally diverse set of membrane proteins to show that immunization of mice with DNA alone produced antibodies against 71% (n = 17) of the bacterial and viral targets. Antibody production correlated with prior reports of target immunogenicity in host organisms, underscoring the efficiency of this DNA-gold micronanoplex approach. To generate each antigen for antibody characterization, we also developed a simple in vitro membrane protein expression and capture method. Antibody specificity was demonstrated upon identifying, for the first time, membrane-directed heterologous expression of the native sequences of the FopA and FTT1525 virulence determinants from the select agent Francisella tularensis SCHU S4. These approaches will accelerate future structural and functional investigations of therapeutically-relevant membrane proteins.

  14. Protein adsorption and separation on amphoteric chitosan/carboxymethylcellulose membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhicheng; Shao, Zhengzhong; Yao, Jinrong; Chen, Xin

    2008-09-01

    This article reported the preparation of an amphoteric natural polymeric membrane-macroporous chitosan (CS)/carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) blend membrane and the utilization of such a membrane on the membrane chromatography for bioseparation. The membranes were prepared by solution blending of CS and CMC solution, and using silica particles as porogen. Both glutaraldehyde and epichlorohydrin were used as crosslinking agent to increase its chemical stability in aqueous solution. Such a natural polymeric membrane can be served as an amphoteric membrane because of the amino group on CS and the carboxymethyl group on CMC, in which the surface charge can be changed with the environmental pH. Ovalbumin (pI = 4.6) and lysozyme (pI = 11) were selected as model proteins. These two proteins adsorption on different CS/CMC blend membranes with different initial protein concentrations at different pH values were investigated in batch systems. The results indicated that the maximum adsorption for lysozyme and ovalbumin was at pH 9.2 and 4.8 respectively, and the adsorption capacity on the membrane both increased with the increase of initial protein concentration. Though the adsorption mechanism of lysozyme and ovalbumin was found not the same, the maximum adsorption capacity of two proteins on the membranes was quite similar (about 250 mg/g). Moreover, the desorption ratio of both proteins was found to be more than 90% that implied CS/CMC blend membrane could separate proteins by adsorption-desorption process. Finally, both lysozyme and ovalbumin were successfully separated from their binary mixture only by adjusting the pH of the feed and the desorption solution.

  15. Plasma membrane domains enriched in cortical endoplasmic reticulum function as membrane protein trafficking hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Philip D; Haberkorn, Christopher J; Weigel, Aubrey V; Higgins, Jenny L; Akin, Elizabeth J; Kennedy, Matthew J; Krapf, Diego; Tamkun, Michael M

    2013-09-01

    In mammalian cells, the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) is a network of tubules and cisterns that lie in close apposition to the plasma membrane (PM). We provide evidence that PM domains enriched in underlying cER function as trafficking hubs for insertion and removal of PM proteins in HEK 293 cells. By simultaneously visualizing cER and various transmembrane protein cargoes with total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that the majority of exocytotic delivery events for a recycled membrane protein or for a membrane protein being delivered to the PM for the first time occur at regions enriched in cER. Likewise, we observed recurring clathrin clusters and functional endocytosis of PM proteins preferentially at the cER-enriched regions. Thus the cER network serves to organize the molecular machinery for both insertion and removal of cell surface proteins, highlighting a novel role for these unique cellular microdomains in membrane trafficking.

  16. Lipidic cubic phase injector facilitates membrane protein serial femtosecond crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weierstall, Uwe; James, Daniel; Wang, Chong; White, Thomas A; Wang, Dingjie; Liu, Wei; Spence, John C H; Bruce Doak, R; Nelson, Garrett; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Kupitz, Christopher; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Liu, Haiguang; Basu, Shibom; Wacker, Daniel; Han, Gye Won; Katritch, Vsevolod; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Koglin, Jason E; Marvin Seibert, M; Klinker, Markus; Gati, Cornelius; Shoeman, Robert L; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N; Kirian, Richard A; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Stevens, Raymond C; Li, Dianfan; Shah, Syed T A; Howe, Nicole; Caffrey, Martin; Cherezov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Lipidic cubic phase (LCP) crystallization has proven successful for high-resolution structure determination of challenging membrane proteins. Here we present a technique for extruding gel-like LCP with embedded membrane protein microcrystals, providing a continuously renewed source of material for serial femtosecond crystallography. Data collected from sub-10-μm-sized crystals produced with less than 0.5 mg of purified protein yield structural insights regarding cyclopamine binding to the Smoothened receptor.

  17. SURVEY REGARDING THE ULTRAFILTRATION OF PROTEINES THROUGH MEMBRANE BASED PROCEDURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAMELIA HODOSAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is based on examples that emphasize the complexity of the proteins ultrafiltration process, pointing out the first 10-15 minutes of ultrafiltration. The knowledgement of the factors that influence the separation through ultrafiltration of proteins will allow to choose the right type of membrane, the frequent use of the same membrane and the operation in mechanical and chemical conditions adequate to the ultrafiltration system, when it is separated a protein with certain molecular weight.

  18. Role of zinc in plasma membrane function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Dell, B L

    2000-01-01

    ... with a posttranslational change in plasma membrane proteins. Among the signs of zinc deficiency in rats is a bleeding tendency associated with failure of platelet aggregation, a phenomenon that correlates with impaired uptake of Ca(2+) when stimulated...

  19. Quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by hypocrellin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, J; Pang, S

    1997-04-01

    The hypocrellin B (HB) was used as a fluorescence quencher to study the basic physical charactcristics of HB in membrane systems, including the diffusion speed of quencher from aqueous phase into membrane phase, the partition coefficient (P) of quenchtr between membrane and water, and the fluorescence quenching constant of protein (K(sv); K(q),). The experimental results show that the quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by HB can be determined by the principle of dynamic quenching. The experimental process of fluorescence quenching was observed in detail by using the ESR technique. The signal of HB- was found to arise from an electron transfer from excited trytophan to HB.

  20. Quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by hypocrellin B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乐加昌; 庞素珍

    1997-01-01

    The hypocrellin B (HB) was used as a fluorescence quencher to study the basic physical characteris-tics of HB in membrane systems, including the diffusion speed of quencher from aqueous phase into membrane phase, the partition coefficient (P) of quencher between membrane and water, and the fluorescence quenching constant of protein (Ksv; Kq). The experimental results show that the quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by HB can be determined by the principle of dynamic quenching. The experimental process of fluorescence quenching was ob-served in detail by using the ESR technique. The signal of HB" was found to arise from an electron transfer from ex-cited trytophan to HB.

  1. 3D pressure field in lipid membranes and membrane-protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Risselada, H Jelger; Louhivuori, Martti

    2009-01-01

    We calculate full 3D pressure fields for inhomogeneous nanoscale systems using molecular dynamics simulation data. The fields represent systems with increasing level of complexity, ranging from semivesicles and vesicles to membranes characterized by coexistence of two phases, including also...... a protein-membrane complex. We show that the 3D pressure field is distinctly different for curved and planar bilayers, the pressure field depends strongly on the phase of the membrane, and that an integral protein modulates the tension and elastic properties of the membrane....

  2. Influence of dietary partially hydrogenated vegetable and marine oils on membrane composition and function of liver microsomes and platelets in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomstrand, R; Diczfalusy, U; Sisfontes, L; Svensson, L

    1985-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of partially hydrogenated vegetable and marine oils on membrane composition and function of liver microsomes and platelets with particular reference to the metabolism of linoleic acid and the production of arachidonic acid metabolites. Four groups of male weanling rats were fed linoleic acid supplemented diets containing 20% (w/w) of partially hydrogenated low erucic acid rapeseed oil (HLRSO), partially hydrogenated herring oil (HHO), olive oil (OO) and trierucin + triolein (TE) for 10 weeks. An additional two groups were fed partially hydrogenated low erucic acid rapeseed oil and partially hydrogenated herring oil without linoleic acid supplementation (HLRSO- and HHO-, respectively). Substantial amounts of trans fatty acids were incorporated into liver microsomes (12.6% in group HLRSO) and platelets (7.0% in group HLRSO-). This incorporation was not dependent on the dietary linoleic acid level. Hepatic microsomal delta5 -desaturase activity was significantly increased after HLRSO feeding compared to 00 feeding. Delta6 -Desaturase activity did not vary in the linoleic acid supplemented groups. Both delta5 -and delta6 -desaturase activities were significantly increased in groups without linoleic acid supplementation. Docosenoic acid was incorporated into platelet phospholipids in contrast to liver microsomes. In the platelet, docosenoic acid seemed to have a special preference for phosphatidylserine. Very small amounts were incorporated into platelet phosphatidylinositol. Feeding diets HLRSO, HHO and 00 did not influence rat platelet cyclooxygenase or 12-lipoxygenase activity. Platelets from rats fed TE, however, produced significantly less 12-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) than platelets from rats fed OO. Feeding of HLRSO- and HHO- resulted in a significantly diminished production of the arachidonic acid metabolites 12-HETE, 12-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) and 6-keto

  3. Nanodisc-Tm: Rapid functional assessment of nanodisc reconstituted membrane proteins by CPM assay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ashok, Yashwanth; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are generally unstable in detergents. Therefore, biochemical and biophysical studies of membrane proteins in lipidic environments provides a near native-like environment suitable for membrane proteins...

  4. Integral membrane protein structure determination using pseudocontact shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crick, Duncan J.; Wang, Jue X. [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Graham, Bim; Swarbrick, James D. [Monash University, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Australia); Mott, Helen R.; Nietlispach, Daniel, E-mail: dn206@cam.ac.uk [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    Obtaining enough experimental restraints can be a limiting factor in the NMR structure determination of larger proteins. This is particularly the case for large assemblies such as membrane proteins that have been solubilized in a membrane-mimicking environment. Whilst in such cases extensive deuteration strategies are regularly utilised with the aim to improve the spectral quality, these schemes often limit the number of NOEs obtainable, making complementary strategies highly beneficial for successful structure elucidation. Recently, lanthanide-induced pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) have been established as a structural tool for globular proteins. Here, we demonstrate that a PCS-based approach can be successfully applied for the structure determination of integral membrane proteins. Using the 7TM α-helical microbial receptor pSRII, we show that PCS-derived restraints from lanthanide binding tags attached to four different positions of the protein facilitate the backbone structure determination when combined with a limited set of NOEs. In contrast, the same set of NOEs fails to determine the correct 3D fold. The latter situation is frequently encountered in polytopical α-helical membrane proteins and a PCS approach is thus suitable even for this particularly challenging class of membrane proteins. The ease of measuring PCSs makes this an attractive route for structure determination of large membrane proteins in general.

  5. Stabilization of membranes upon interaction of amphipathic polymers with membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; Duval-Terrié, Caroline; Dé, Emmanuelle; Champeil, Philippe

    2004-11-01

    Amphipathic polymers derived from polysaccharides, namely hydrophobically modified pullulans, were previously suggested to be useful as polymeric substitutes of ordinary surfactants for efficient and structure-conserving solubilization of membrane proteins, and one such polymer, 18C(10), was optimized for solubilization of proteins derived from bacterial outer membranes (Duval-Terrie et al. 2003). We asked whether a similar ability to solubilize proteins could also be demonstrated in eukaryotic membranes, namely sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) fragments, the major protein of which is SERCA1a, an integral membrane protein with Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase and Ca(2+)-pumping activity. We found that 18C(10)-mediated solubilization of these SR membranes did not occur. Simultaneously, however, we found that low amounts of this hydrophobically modified pullulan were very efficient at preventing long-term aggregation of these SR membranes. This presumably occurred because the negatively charged polymer coated the membranous vesicles with a hydrophilic corona (a property shared by many other amphipathic polymers), and thus minimized their flocculation. Reminiscent of the old Arabic gum, which stabilizes Indian ink by coating charcoal particles, the newly designed amphipathic polymers might therefore unintentionally prove useful also for stabilization of membrane suspensions.

  6. Effects of drugs on platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, E E

    1977-01-01

    Numerous drugs and chemicals affect the function of human blood platelets. The mechanism of action of some medications is partly understood. Aspirin is the most frequently involved drug. It appears to interfere with the platelet release reaction by acetylation of a platelet membrane protein which may be involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins. Other anti-inflammatory drugs, including indomethacin, phenylbutazone, ibuprophen (Motrin) and clonixin, also interfere with the release reaction but have a shorter acting course than aspirin. Some drugs stimulate adenylcyclase (gliclazide) or block phosphodiesterase, (dipyridamole, caffeine) both of which actions lead to an increase in adenosine cyclic 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP) and decrease aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP). These interactions should be known to clinical scientists since patients using these medicaments may manifest abnormal platelet function tests in the laboratory and mild hemorrhagic syndromes in the clinic.

  7. Platelet-derived HMGB1 is a critical mediator of thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Sebastian; Bodenstein, Rebecca; Chen, Qiwei; Feil, Susanne; Feil, Robert; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E; Bohn, Erwin; Frick, Julia-Stefanie; Borst, Oliver; Münzer, Patrick; Walker, Britta; Markel, Justin; Csanyi, Gabor; Pagano, Patrick J; Loughran, Patricia; Jessup, Morgan E; Watkins, Simon C; Bullock, Grant C; Sperry, Jason L; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Billiar, Timothy R; Lotze, Michael T; Gawaz, Meinrad; Neal, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    Thrombosis and inflammation are intricately linked in several major clinical disorders, including disseminated intravascular coagulation and acute ischemic events. The damage-associated molecular pattern molecule high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is upregulated by activated platelets in multiple inflammatory diseases; however, the contribution of platelet-derived HMGB1 in thrombosis remains unexplored. Here, we generated transgenic mice with platelet-specific ablation of HMGB1 and determined that platelet-derived HMGB1 is a critical mediator of thrombosis. Mice lacking HMGB1 in platelets exhibited increased bleeding times as well as reduced thrombus formation, platelet aggregation, inflammation, and organ damage during experimental trauma/hemorrhagic shock. Platelets were the major source of HMGB1 within thrombi. In trauma patients, HMGB1 expression on the surface of circulating platelets was markedly upregulated. Moreover, evaluation of isolated platelets revealed that HMGB1 is critical for regulating platelet activation, granule secretion, adhesion, and spreading. These effects were mediated via TLR4- and MyD88-dependent recruitment of platelet guanylyl cyclase (GC) toward the plasma membrane, followed by MyD88/GC complex formation and activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (cGKI). Thus, we establish platelet-derived HMGB1 as an important mediator of thrombosis and identify a HMGB1-driven link between MyD88 and GC/cGKI in platelets. Additionally, these findings suggest a potential therapeutic target for patients sustaining trauma and other inflammatory disorders associated with abnormal coagulation.

  8. In vivo incisional wound healing augmented by platelet-derived growth factor and recombinant c-sis gene homodimeric proteins

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Human platelet-derived growth factor (hPDGF) is likely to be important in stimulating tissue repair, based upon its in vivo chemotactic and stimulatory activities for inflammatory cells and fibroblasts and upon the presence of PDGF and related proteins in platelets, macrophages, and activated fibroblasts, cell types that make up the milieu of the healing wound. Recombinant human c-sis (rPDGF-B), homodimers of the B chain of PDGF, were compared with hPDGF in vitro. rPDGF-B was immunologically ...

  9. Durable vesicles for reconstitution of membrane proteins in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beales, Paul A; Khan, Sanobar; Muench, Stephen P; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2017-02-08

    The application of membrane proteins in biotechnology requires robust, durable reconstitution systems that enhance their stability and support their functionality in a range of working environments. Vesicular architectures are highly desirable to provide the compartmentalisation to utilise the functional transmembrane transport and signalling properties of membrane proteins. Proteoliposomes provide a native-like membrane environment to support membrane protein function, but can lack the required chemical and physical stability. Amphiphilic block copolymers can also self-assemble into polymersomes: tough vesicles with improved stability compared with liposomes. This review discusses the reconstitution of membrane proteins into polymersomes and the more recent development of hybrid vesicles, which blend the robust nature of block copolymers with the biofunctionality of lipids. These novel synthetic vesicles hold great promise for enabling membrane proteins within biotechnologies by supporting their enhanced in vitro performance and could also contribute to fundamental biochemical and biophysical research by improving the stability of membrane proteins that are challenging to work with. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Electron crystallography for structural and functional studies of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are important research targets for basic biological sciences and drug design, but studies of their structure and function are considered difficult to perform. Studies of membrane structures have been greatly facilitated by technological and instrumental advancements in electron microscopy together with methodological advancements in biology. Electron crystallography is especially useful in studying the structure and function of membrane proteins. Electron crystallography is now an established method of analyzing the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which resembles their natural biological environment. To better understand the neural system function from a structural point of view, we developed the cryo-electron microscope with a helium-cooled specimen stage, which allows for analysis of the structures of membrane proteins at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review introduces recent instrumental advances in cryo-electron microscopy and presents some examples of structure analyses of membrane proteins, such as bacteriorhodopsin, water channels and gap junction channels. This review has two objectives: first, to provide a personal historical background to describe how we came to develop the cryo-electron microscope and second, to discuss some of the technology required for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy.

  11. Membrane Proteins Are Dramatically Less Conserved than Water-Soluble Proteins across the Tree of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo, Victor; Dessimoz, Christophe; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Lane, Nick

    2016-11-01

    Membrane proteins are crucial in transport, signaling, bioenergetics, catalysis, and as drug targets. Here, we show that membrane proteins have dramatically fewer detectable orthologs than water-soluble proteins, less than half in most species analyzed. This sparse distribution could reflect rapid divergence or gene loss. We find that both mechanisms operate. First, membrane proteins evolve faster than water-soluble proteins, particularly in their exterior-facing portions. Second, we demonstrate that predicted ancestral membrane proteins are preferentially lost compared with water-soluble proteins in closely related species of archaea and bacteria. These patterns are consistent across the whole tree of life, and in each of the three domains of archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Our findings point to a fundamental evolutionary principle: membrane proteins evolve faster due to stronger adaptive selection in changing environments, whereas cytosolic proteins are under more stringent purifying selection in the homeostatic interior of the cell. This effect should be strongest in prokaryotes, weaker in unicellular eukaryotes (with intracellular membranes), and weakest in multicellular eukaryotes (with extracellular homeostasis). We demonstrate that this is indeed the case. Similarly, we show that extracellular water-soluble proteins exhibit an even stronger pattern of low homology than membrane proteins. These striking differences in conservation of membrane proteins versus water-soluble proteins have important implications for evolution and medicine. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. Solid-State NMR-Restrained Ensemble Dynamics of a Membrane Protein in Explicit Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xi; Jo, Sunhwan; Qi, Yifei; Marassi, Francesca M; Im, Wonpil

    2015-04-21

    Solid-state NMR has been used to determine the structures of membrane proteins in native-like lipid bilayer environments. Most structure calculations based on solid-state NMR observables are performed using simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics and an energy function, where all nonbonded interactions are represented by a single, purely repulsive term with no contributions from van der Waals attractive, electrostatic, or solvation energy. To our knowledge, this is the first application of an ensemble dynamics technique performed in explicit membranes that uses experimental solid-state NMR observables to obtain the refined structure of a membrane protein together with information about its dynamics and its interactions with lipids. Using the membrane-bound form of the fd coat protein as a model membrane protein and its experimental solid-state NMR data, we performed restrained ensemble dynamics simulations with different ensemble sizes in explicit membranes. For comparison, a molecular dynamics simulation of fd coat protein was also performed without any restraints. The average orientation of each protein helix is similar to a structure determined by traditional single-conformer approaches. However, their variations are limited in the resulting ensemble of structures with one or two replicas, as they are under the strong influence of solid-state NMR restraints. Although highly consistent with all solid-state NMR observables, the ensembles of more than two replicas show larger orientational variations similar to those observed in the molecular dynamics simulation without restraints. In particular, in these explicit membrane simulations, Lys(40), residing at the C-terminal side of the transmembrane helix, is observed to cause local membrane curvature. Therefore, compared to traditional single-conformer approaches in implicit environments, solid-state NMR restrained ensemble simulations in explicit membranes readily characterize not only protein

  13. Platelet satellitism in infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskaj, Renata; Sikiric, Dubravka; Skerk, Visnja

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet satellitism is a phenomenon of unknown etiology of aggregating platelets around polymorphonuclear neutrophils and other blood cells which causes pseudothrombocytopenia, visible by microscopic examination of blood smears. It has been observed so far in about a hundred cases in the world. Case subject and methods Our case involves a 73-year-old female patient with a urinary infection. Biochemical serum analysis (CRP, glucose, AST, ALT, ALP, GGT, bilirubin, sodium, potassium, chloride, urea, creatinine) and blood cell count were performed with standard methods on autoanalyzers. Serum protein fractions were examined by electrophoresis and urinalysis with standard methods on autoanalyzer together with microscopic examination of urine sediment. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, blood culture and urine culture tests were performed with standard methods. Results Due to typical pathological values for bacterial urinary infection, the patient was admitted to the hospital. Blood smear examination revealed phenomenon, which has persisted for three weeks after the disease has been cured. Blood smears with EDTA as an anticoagulant had platelet satellitism whereas the phenomenon was not observed in tubes with different anticoagulants (Na, Li-heparin) and capillary blood. Discussion We hypothesize that satellitism was induced by some immunological mechanism through formation of antibodies which have mediated platelets binding to neutrophil membranes and vice versa. Unfortunately we were unable to determine the putative trigger for this phenomenon. To our knowledge this is the second case of platelet satellitism ever described in Croatia. PMID:26110042

  14. Analysis of protein interactions at native chloroplast membranes by ellipsometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Kriechbaumer

    Full Text Available Membrane bound receptors play vital roles in cell signaling, and are the target for many drugs, yet their interactions with ligands are difficult to study by conventional techniques due to the technical difficulty of monitoring these interactions in lipid environments. In particular, the ability to analyse the behaviour of membrane proteins in their native membrane environment is limited. Here, we have developed a quantitative approach to detect specific interactions between low-abundance chaperone receptors within native chloroplast membranes and their soluble chaperone partners. Langmuir-Schaefer film deposition was used to deposit native chloroplasts onto gold-coated glass slides, and interactions between the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 and their receptors in the chloroplast membranes were detected and quantified by total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE. We show that native chloroplast membranes deposited on gold-coated glass slides using Langmuir-Schaefer films retain functional receptors capable of binding chaperones with high specificity and affinity. Taking into account the low chaperone receptor abundance in native membranes, these binding properties are consistent with data generated using soluble forms of the chloroplast chaperone receptors, OEP61 and Toc64. Therefore, we conclude that chloroplasts have the capacity to selectively bind chaperones, consistent with the notion that chaperones play an important role in protein targeting to chloroplasts. Importantly, this method of monitoring by TIRE does not require any protein labelling. This novel combination of techniques should be applicable to a wide variety of membranes and membrane protein receptors, thus presenting the opportunity to quantify protein interactions involved in fundamental cellular processes, and to screen for drugs that target membrane proteins.

  15. Biomimetic triblock copolymer membrane arrays: a stable template for functional membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Perez, A.; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius; Vissing, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    , we avoid low molecular weight solvents such as chloroform and toluene, which are strong protein denaturants. The membranes show a low ionic conductance and a long lifetime at room temperature. Contrast phase microscopy shows the presence of a polymer region delimited by a Plateau-Gibbs border similar...... to what is observed in black lipid membranes. The ion-channel gramicidin A was successfully incorporated into the membrane in a functional form....

  16. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  17. Peroxisome Fission is Associated with Reorganization of Specific Membrane Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krygowska, Malgorzata; Veenhuis, Marten; Klei, Ida J. van der; Nagotu, Shirisha

    2011-01-01

    Membrane remodeling is an important aspect in organelle biogenesis. We show that different peroxisome membrane proteins that play a role in organelle biogenesis and proliferation (Pex8, Pex10, Pex14, Pex25 and Pex11) are subject to spatiotemporal behavior during organelle development. Using fluoresc

  18. Lactococcus lactis as host for overproduction of functional membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, ERS; Slotboom, DJ; Poolman, B

    2003-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. The organism is easy and inexpensive to culture, has a single membrane and relatively mild proteolytic activity. Methods for genetic manipulation are fully established and a tightly controlled

  19. Membrane tube formation by motor proteins : forces and dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Gerbrand

    2005-01-01

    Membrane tubes are ubiquitous within cells. They have a diameter of approximately 50 nanometers, and are formed when a sufficiently large localized force is exerted on a membrane. Important generators of this force are the motor proteins that can move along cytoskeletal filaments. We studied

  20. Mixed-matrix membrane adsorbers for protein separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avramescu, Maria-Elena; Borneman, Zandrie; Wessling, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    The separation of two similarly sized proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine hemoglobin (Hb) was carried out using a new type of ion-exchange mixed-matrix adsorber membranes. The adsorber membranes were prepared by incorporation of various types of Lewatit ion-exchange resins into an ethyle

  1. Lactococcus lactis as host for overproduction of functional membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, ERS; Slotboom, DJ; Poolman, B

    2003-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. The organism is easy and inexpensive to culture, has a single membrane and relatively mild proteolytic activity. Methods for genetic manipulation are fully established and a tightly controlled promote

  2. Biochemical characterization of PECAM-1 (CD31 antigen) on human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzelaar, M J; Korteweg, J; Sixma, J J; Nieuwenhuis, H K

    1991-12-02

    The platelet plasma membrane expresses several membrane glycoproteins with a high molecular weight. In this study we have investigated the properties of the CD31 antigen on platelets and endothelial cells using the monoclonal antibody (MoAb) RUU-PL 7E8. Comparative studies revealed that the CD31 antigen, PECAM-1 and endoCAM are the same protein. The CD31 antigen was immunoprecipitated with a molecular mass of 125 kDa nonreduced and 135 kDa reduced from Nonidet-P40 lysates of surface labeled human platelets. The relative position in two-dimensional nonreduced/reduced SDS-PAGE and IEF-PAGE, compared to other glycoproteins of similar molecular weight, was elucidated. The position of the CD31 antigen was clearly distinct from the position of the platelet membrane glycoproteins Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa and the granule membrane protein GMP-140. Native resting platelets bound 7,760 +/- 1,670 molecules/platelet, whereas thrombin-stimulated platelets bound 14,500 +/- 3,790 molecules/platelet. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed the presence of the CD31 antigen on the membrane of both resting and thrombin-activated platelets. Immunofluorescence studies showed the presence of the CD31 antigen in the membrane of endothelial cells on sites of cell-cell contact, suggesting that the CD31 antigen might be involved in cell-cell interaction. In functional studies, MoAb RUU-PL 7E8 did not inhibit platelet aggregation, platelet adherence to the extracellular matrix of endothelial cells and purified collagen fibrils under flow conditions, nor was any influence found on endothelial cell detachment and growth.

  3. Influence of platelet-activating factor, lyso-platelet-activating factor and edelfosine on Langmuir monolayers imitating plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to anti-cancer treatment: the effect of plasmalogen level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasiński, Michał; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Wydro, Paweł; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2014-06-01

    Three structurally related but differing in biological activities single-chained ether phospholipids (PAF (platelet-activating factor) and lyso-PAF) and an anti-cancer drug (edelfosine (ED)) were investigated in Langmuir monolayers imitating natural membranes. The aim of the undertaken experiments was to study the influence of these lipids on monolayers mimicking plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to the anti-cancer activity of ED, i.e. promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) and promyeloblastic leukaemia cells (K-562). As these cells differ essentially in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and plasmalogen concentration in the membrane, we have carried out systematic investigations in artificial systems of various compositions. The results for model leukaemia cell membrane were compared with data acquired for systems imitating normal leucocytes. Our results show that the level of plasmalogens significantly modulates the influence of the single-chained phospholipids on the investigated systems. The experiments confirmed also that the interactions of ether lipids with a model membrane of HL-60 cells (in biological tests sensitive to ED) have opposite character when compared with K-562, being resistant to ED. Moreover, the values of the parameters characterizing monolayers serving as membrane models (strength of interactions, monolayers fluidity and morphology) proved both sensitivity of these cells to ED and lack of their susceptibility towards PAF. Interestingly, it has been found that lyso-PAF, which is usually described as an inactive precursor of PAF, displays a stronger effect on HL-60 model membranes than ED.

  4. Organization and dynamics of SNARE proteins in the presynaptic membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragomir eMilovanovic

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Our view of the lateral organization of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane has evolved substantially in the last few decades. It is widely accepted that many, if not all, plasma membrane proteins and lipids are organized in specific domains. These domains vary widely in size, composition, and stability, and they represent platforms governing diverse cell functions. The presynaptic plasma membrane is a well-studied example of a membrane which undergoes rearrangements, especially during exo- and endocytosis. Many proteins and lipids involved in presynaptic function are known, and major efforts have been made to understand their spatial organization and dynamics. Here, we focus on the mechanisms underlying the organization of SNAREs, the key proteins of the fusion machinery, in distinct domains, and we discuss the functional significance of these clusters.

  5. Architecture and Function of Mechanosensitive Membrane Protein Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have revealed that membrane proteins can form two-dimensional clusters with regular translational and orientational protein arrangements, which may allow cells to modulate protein function. However, the physical mechanisms yielding supramolecular organization and collective function of membrane proteins remain largely unknown. Here we show that bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between membrane proteins can yield regular and distinctive lattice architectures of protein clusters, and may provide a link between lattice architecture and lattice function. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) as a model system, we obtain relations between the shape of MscL and the supramolecular architecture of MscL lattices. We predict that the tetrameric and pentameric MscL symmetries observed in previous structural studies yield distinct lattice architectures of MscL clusters and that, in turn, these distinct MscL lattice architectures yield distinct lattice activation barriers. Our res...

  6. Single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins from membranes freely spanning across nanoscopic pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Rafayel; Bippes, Christian A; Walheim, Stefan; Harder, Daniel; Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Schimmel, Thomas; Alsteens, David; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-05-13

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) provides detailed insight into the mechanical (un)folding pathways and structural stability of membrane proteins. So far, SMFS could only be applied to membrane proteins embedded in native or synthetic membranes adsorbed to solid supports. This adsorption causes experimental limitations and raises the question to what extent the support influences the results obtained by SMFS. Therefore, we introduce here SMFS from native purple membrane freely spanning across nanopores. We show that correct analysis of the SMFS data requires extending the worm-like chain model, which describes the mechanical stretching of a polypeptide, by the cubic extension model, which describes the bending of a purple membrane exposed to mechanical stress. This new experimental and theoretical approach allows to characterize the stepwise (un)folding of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin and to assign the stability of single and grouped secondary structures. The (un)folding and stability of bacteriorhodopsin shows no significant difference between freely spanning and directly supported purple membranes. Importantly, the novel experimental SMFS setup opens an avenue to characterize any protein from freely spanning cellular or synthetic membranes.

  7. Efficient cellular solid-state NMR of membrane proteins by targeted protein labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Lindsay A. [University of Oxford, Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Division of Structural Biology, Nuffield Department of Medicine (United Kingdom); Daniëls, Mark; Cruijsen, Elwin A. W. van der; Folkers, Gert E.; Baldus, Marc, E-mail: m.baldus@uu.nl [Utrecht University, NMR Spectroscopy, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) has made significant progress towards the study of membrane proteins in their native cellular membranes. However, reduced spectroscopic sensitivity and high background signal levels can complicate these experiments. Here, we describe a method for ssNMR to specifically label a single protein by repressing endogenous protein expression with rifampicin. Our results demonstrate that treatment of E. coli with rifampicin during induction of recombinant membrane protein expression reduces background signals for different expression levels and improves sensitivity in cellular membrane samples. Further, the method reduces the amount of time and resources needed to produce membrane protein samples, enabling new strategies for studying challenging membrane proteins by ssNMR.

  8. Membrane potential governs lateral segregation of plasma membrane proteins and lipids in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Guido; Opekarová, Miroslava; Malinsky, Jan; Weig-Meckl, Ina; Tanner, Widmar

    2007-01-10

    The plasma membrane potential is mainly considered as the driving force for ion and nutrient translocation. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, we have discovered a novel role of the membrane potential in the organization of the plasma membrane. Within the yeast plasma membrane, two non-overlapping sub-compartments can be visualized. The first one, represented by a network-like structure, is occupied by the proton ATPase, Pma1, and the second one, forming 300-nm patches, houses a number of proton symporters (Can1, Fur4, Tat2 and HUP1) and Sur7, a component of the recently described eisosomes. Evidence is presented that sterols, the main lipid constituent of the plasma membrane, also accumulate within the patchy compartment. It is documented that this compartmentation is highly dependent on the energization of the membrane. Plasma membrane depolarization causes reversible dispersion of the H(+)-symporters, not however of the Sur7 protein. Mitochondrial mutants, affected in plasma membrane energization, show a significantly lower degree of membrane protein segregation. In accordance with these observations, depolarized membranes also considerably change their physical properties (detergent sensitivity).

  9. Structuring detergents for extracting and stabilizing functional membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Matar-Merheb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Membrane proteins are privileged pharmaceutical targets for which the development of structure-based drug design is challenging. One underlying reason is the fact that detergents do not stabilize membrane domains as efficiently as natural lipids in membranes, often leading to a partial to complete loss of activity/stability during protein extraction and purification and preventing crystallization in an active conformation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anionic calix[4]arene based detergents (C4Cn, n=1-12 were designed to structure the membrane domains through hydrophobic interactions and a network of salt bridges with the basic residues found at the cytosol-membrane interface of membrane proteins. These compounds behave as surfactants, forming micelles of 5-24 nm, with the critical micellar concentration (CMC being as expected sensitive to pH ranging from 0.05 to 1.5 mM. Both by 1H NMR titration and Surface Tension titration experiments, the interaction of these molecules with the basic amino acids was confirmed. They extract membrane proteins from different origins behaving as mild detergents, leading to partial extraction in some cases. They also retain protein functionality, as shown for BmrA (Bacillus multidrug resistance ATP protein, a membrane multidrug-transporting ATPase, which is particularly sensitive to detergent extraction. These new detergents allow BmrA to bind daunorubicin with a Kd of 12 µM, a value similar to that observed after purification using dodecyl maltoside (DDM. They preserve the ATPase activity of BmrA (which resets the protein to its initial state after drug efflux much more efficiently than SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate, FC12 (Foscholine 12 or DDM. They also maintain in a functional state the C4Cn-extracted protein upon detergent exchange with FC12. Finally, they promote 3D-crystallization of the membrane protein. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These compounds seem promising to extract in a functional state

  10. A new ibuprofen derivative inhibits platelet aggregation and ROS mediated platelet apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodagahalli S Rakesh

    Full Text Available Thrombocytopenia is a serious issue connected with the pathogenesis of several human diseases including chronic inflammation, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs and other oxidative stress-associated pathologies. The indiscriminate use of antibiotics and other biological drugs are reported to result in thrombocytopenia, which is often neglected during the treatment regime. In addition, augmented oxidative stress induced by drugs and pathological conditions has also been shown to induce thrombocytopenia, which seems to be the most obvious consequence of elevated rate of platelet apoptosis. Thus, blocking oxidative stress-induced platelet apoptosis would be of prime importance in order to negotiate thrombocytopenia and associated human pathologies. The current study presents the synthesis and platelet protective nature of novel ibuprofen derivatives. The potent anti-oxidant ibuprofen derivative 4f was selected for the study and the platelet protective efficacy and platelet aggregation inhibitory property has been demonstrated. The compound 4f dose dependently mitigates the oxidative stress-induced platelet apoptosis in both platelet rich plasma and washed platelets. The platelet protective nature of compound 4f was determined by assessing various apoptotic markers such as ROS generation, cytosolic Ca2+ levels, PS externalization, cytochrome C translocation, Caspase activation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytotoxicity, LDH leakage and tyrosine phosphorylation of cytosolic proteins. Furthermore, compound 4f dose dependently ameliorated agonist induced platelet aggregation. Therefore, compound 4f can be estimated as a potential candidate in the treatment regime of pathological disorders associated with platelet activation and apoptosis. In addition, compound 4f can be used as an auxiliary therapeutic agent in pathologies associated with thrombocytopenia.

  11. Detergent selection for enhanced extraction of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachea, Buenafe T; Sun, Zhen; Potente, Nina; Malik, Radhika; Isailovic, Dragan; Viola, Ronald E

    2012-11-01

    Generating stable conditions for membrane proteins after extraction from their lipid bilayer environment is essential for subsequent characterization. Detergents are the most widely used means to obtain this stable environment; however, different types of membrane proteins have been found to require detergents with varying properties for optimal extraction efficiency and stability after extraction. The extraction profiles of several detergent types have been examined for membranes isolated from bacteria and yeast, and for a set of recombinant target proteins. The extraction efficiencies of these detergents increase at higher concentrations, and were shown to correlate with their respective CMC values. Two alkyl sugar detergents, octyl-β-d-glucoside (OG) and 5-cyclohexyl-1-pentyl-β-d-maltoside (Cymal-5), and a zwitterionic surfactant, N-decylphosphocholine (Fos-choline-10), were generally effective in the extraction of a broad range of membrane proteins. However, certain detergents were more effective than others in the extraction of specific classes of integral membrane proteins, offering guidelines for initial detergent selection. The differences in extraction efficiencies among this small set of detergents supports the value of detergent screening and optimization to increase the yields of targeted membrane proteins.

  12. Optimal separation of jojoba protein using membrane processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabetani, Hiroshi; Abbott, T.P.; Kleiman, R. [National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Peoria, IL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The efficiency of a pilot-scale membrane system for purifying and concentrating jojoba protein was estimated. In this system, a jojoba extract was first clarified with a microfiltration membrane. The clarified extract was diafiltrated and the protein was purified with an ultrafiltration membrane. Then the protein solution was concentrated with the ultrafiltration membrane. Permeate flux during microfiltration was essentially independent of solids concentration in the feed, in contrast with the permeate flux during ultrafiltration which was a function of protein concentration. Based on these results, a mathematical model which describes the batchwise concentration process with ultrafiltration membranes was developed. Using this model, the combination of batchwise concentration with diafiltration was optimized, and an industrial-scale process was designed. The effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the performance of the membrane system was also investigated. The addition of EDTA increased the concentration of protein in the extract and improved the recovery of protein in the final products. The quality of the final product (color and solubility) was also improved. However, EDTA decreased permeate flux during ultrafiltration.

  13. Amphiphilic biopolymers (amphibiopols) as new surfactants for membrane protein solubilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval-Terrié, Caroline; Cosette, Pascal; Molle, Gérard; Muller, Guy; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new surfactants for membrane protein solubilization, from a natural, biodegradable polymer: the polysaccharide pullulan. A set of amphiphilic pullulans (HMCMPs), differing in hydrophobic modification ratio, charge ratio, and the nature of the hydrophobic chains introduced, were synthesized and tested in solubilization experiments with outer membranes of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The membrane proteins were precipitated, and then resolubilized with various HMCMPs. The decyl alkyl chain (C10) was the hydrophobic graft that gave the highest level of solubilization. Decyl alkyl chain-bearing HMCMPs were also able to extract integral membrane proteins from their lipid environment. The best results were obtained with an amphiphilic pullulan bearing 18% decyl groups (18C10). Circular dichroism spectroscopy and membrane reconstitution experiments were used to test the structural and functional integrity of 18C10-solubilized proteins (OmpF from Escherichia coli and bacteriorhodopsin from Halobacterium halobium). Whatever their structure type (α or β), 18C10 did not alter either the structure or the function of the proteins analyzed. Thus, HMCMPs appear to constitute a promising new class of polymeric surfactants for membrane protein studies. PMID:12649425

  14. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry of Membrane Proteins – Progress and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarathnam, Krishna; Rösgen, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Summary Integral membrane proteins, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and ion channels, mediate diverse biological functions that are crucial to all aspects of life. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms, and in particular, the thermodynamic basis of the binding interactions of the extracellular ligands and intracellular effector proteins is essential to understand the workings of these remarkable nanomachines. In this review, we describe how isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) can be effectively used to gain valuable insights into the thermodynamic signatures (enthalpy, entropy, affinity, and stoichiometry), which would be most useful for drug discovery studies, considering that more than 30% of the current drugs target membrane proteins. PMID:23747362

  15. Determining the Topology of Membrane-Bound Proteins Using PEGylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Vicky; Brown, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical methods can help elucidate the membrane topology of hydrophobic membrane proteins where X-ray crystallography is difficult or impractical, providing important structural data. Here, we describe the method of PEGylation, which uses a cysteine-reactive molecule, maleimide polyethylene glycol (mPEG), to determine the cytosolic accessibility of introduced cysteine residues. This accessibility is visualized using Western blotting to detect a band shift that indicates cysteine labeling by mPEG. Using scanning cysteine mutagenesis, followed by PEGylation, one can map the accessibility of the introduced cysteines, hence inferring the membrane topology of the protein.We used PEGylation to determine the membrane topology of the sterol regulatory domain of a cholesterol synthesis enzyme, squalene monooxygenase, identifying that it is anchored to the membrane via a re-entrant loop.

  16. Transcription Factor RUNX1 Regulates Platelet PCTP (Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein): Implications for Cardiovascular Events: Differential Effects of RUNX1 Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Guangfen; Songdej, Natthapol; Voora, Deepak; Goldfinger, Lawrence E; Del Carpio-Cano, Fabiola E; Myers, Rachel A; Rao, A Koneti

    2017-09-05

    PCTP (phosphatidylcholine transfer protein) regulates the intermembrane transfer of phosphatidylcholine. Higher platelet PCTP expression is associated with increased platelet responses on activation of protease-activated receptor 4 thrombin receptors noted in black subjects compared with white subjects. Little is known about the regulation of platelet PCTP. Haplodeficiency of RUNX1, a major hematopoietic transcription factor, is associated with thrombocytopenia and impaired platelet responses on activation. Platelet expression profiling of a patient with a RUNX1 loss-of-function mutation revealed a 10-fold downregulation of the PCTP gene compared with healthy controls. We pursued the hypothesis that PCTP is regulated by RUNX1 and that PCTP expression is correlated with cardiovascular events. We studied RUNX1 binding to the PCTP promoter using DNA-protein binding studies and human erythroleukemia cells and promoter activity using luciferase reporter studies. We assessed the relationship between RUNX1 and PCTP in peripheral blood RNA and PCTP and death or myocardial infarction in 2 separate patient cohorts (587 total patients) with cardiovascular disease. Platelet PCTP protein in the patient was reduced by ≈50%. DNA-protein binding studies showed RUNX1 binding to consensus sites in ≈1 kB of PCTP promoter. PCTP expression was increased with RUNX1 overexpression and reduced with RUNX1 knockdown in human erythroleukemia cells, indicating that PCTP is regulated by RUNX1. Studies in 2 cohorts of patients showed that RUNX1 expression in blood correlated with PCTP gene expression; PCTP expression was higher in black compared with white subjects and was associated with future death/myocardial infarction after adjustment for age, sex, and race (odds ratio, 2.05; 95% confidence interval 1.6-2.7; P<0.0001). RUNX1 expression is known to initiate at 2 alternative promoters, a distal P1 and a proximal P2 promoter. In patient cohorts, there were differential effects of RUNX1

  17. Predictive energy landscapes for folding membrane protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Ha H.; Kim, Bobby L.; Schafer, Nicholas P.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2015-12-01

    We study the energy landscapes for membrane protein oligomerization using the Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure and Energy Model with an implicit membrane potential (AWSEM-membrane), a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model previously optimized under the assumption that the energy landscapes for folding α-helical membrane protein monomers are funneled once their native topology within the membrane is established. In this study we show that the AWSEM-membrane force field is able to sample near native binding interfaces of several oligomeric systems. By predicting candidate structures using simulated annealing, we further show that degeneracies in predicting structures of membrane protein monomers are generally resolved in the folding of the higher order assemblies as is the case in the assemblies of both nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and V-type Na+-ATPase dimers. The physics of the phenomenon resembles domain swapping, which is consistent with the landscape following the principle of minimal frustration. We revisit also the classic Khorana study of the reconstitution of bacteriorhodopsin from its fragments, which is the close analogue of the early Anfinsen experiment on globular proteins. Here, we show the retinal cofactor likely plays a major role in selecting the final functional assembly.

  18. Membrane Protein Properties Revealed through Data-Rich Electrostatics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoline, Frank V; Bethel, Neville; Guerriero, Christopher J; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Grabe, Michael

    2015-08-04

    The electrostatic properties of membrane proteins often reveal many of their key biophysical characteristics, such as ion channel selectivity and the stability of charged membrane-spanning segments. The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is the gold standard for calculating protein electrostatics, and the software APBSmem enables the solution of the PB equation in the presence of a membrane. Here, we describe significant advances to APBSmem, including full automation of system setup, per-residue energy decomposition, incorporation of PDB2PQR, calculation of membrane-induced pKa shifts, calculation of non-polar energies, and command-line scripting for large-scale calculations. We highlight these new features with calculations carried out on a number of membrane proteins, including the recently solved structure of the ion channel TRPV1 and a large survey of 1,614 membrane proteins of known structure. This survey provides a comprehensive list of residues with large electrostatic penalties for being embedded in the membrane, potentially revealing interesting functional information.

  19. Isothermal titration calorimetry of membrane proteins - progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarathnam, Krishna; Rösgen, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and ion channels, mediate diverse biological functions that are crucial to all aspects of life. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms, and in particular, the thermodynamic basis of the binding interactions of the extracellular ligands and intracellular effector proteins is essential to understand the workings of these remarkable nanomachines. In this review, we describe how isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) can be effectively used to gain valuable insights into the thermodynamic signatures (enthalpy, entropy, affinity, and stoichiometry), which would be most useful for drug discovery studies, considering that more than 30% of the current drugs target membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Structural and biophysical characterisation of membrane protein-ligand binding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel J; Engel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Membrane proteins comprise 30% of the proteome of higher organisms. They mediate energy conversion, signal transduction, solute transport and secretion. Their native environment is a bilayer in a physiological buffer solution, hence their structure and function are preferably assessed in this environment. The surface structure of single membrane proteins can be determined in buffer solutions by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at a lateral resolution of less than 1 nm and a vertical resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm. Moreover, single proteins can be directly addressed, stuck to the AFM stylus and subsequently unfolded, revealing the molecular interactions of the protein studied. The examples discussed here illustrate the power of AFM in the structural analysis of membrane proteins in a native environment.

  1. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range...... of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a "receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET...... accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. Finally, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features...

  2. The dynamics of plant plasma membrane proteins: PINs and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luschnig, Christian; Vert, Grégory

    2014-08-01

    Plants are permanently situated in a fixed location and thus are well adapted to sense and respond to environmental stimuli and developmental cues. At the cellular level, several of these responses require delicate adjustments that affect the activity and steady-state levels of plasma membrane proteins. These adjustments involve both vesicular transport to the plasma membrane and protein internalization via endocytic sorting. A substantial part of our current knowledge of plant plasma membrane protein sorting is based on studies of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transport proteins, which are found at distinct plasma membrane domains and have been implicated in directional efflux of the plant hormone auxin. Here, we discuss the mechanisms involved in establishing such polar protein distributions, focusing on PINs and other key plant plasma membrane proteins, and we highlight the pathways that allow for dynamic adjustments in protein distribution and turnover, which together constitute a versatile framework that underlies the remarkable capabilities of plants to adjust growth and development in their ever-changing environment.

  3. An overview of membrane transport proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, B

    1995-12-01

    All eukaryotic cells contain a wide variety of proteins embedded in the plasma and internal membranes, which ensure transmembrane solute transport. It is now established that a large proportion of these transport proteins can be grouped into families apparently conserved throughout organisms. This article presents the data of an in silicio analysis aimed at establishing a preliminary classification of membrane transport proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis was conducted at a time when about 65% of all yeast genes were available in public databases. In addition to approximately 60 transport proteins whose function was at least partially known, approximately 100 deduced protein sequences of unknown function display significant sequence similarity to membrane transport proteins characterized in yeast and/or other organisms. While some protein families have been well characterized by classical genetic experimental approaches, others have largely if not totally escaped characterization. The proteins revealed by this in silicio analysis also include a putative K+ channel, proteins similar to aquaporins of plant and animal origin, proteins similar to Na+-solute symporters, a protein very similar to electroneural cation-chloride cotransporters, and a putative Na+-H+ antiporter. A new research area is anticipated: the functional analysis of many transport proteins whose existence was revealed by genome sequencing.

  4. Polyene antibiotic that inhibits membrane transport proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Te Welscher, Y.M.; van Leeuwen, M.R.; de Kruijff, B.; Dijksterhuis, J.; Breukink, E.

    2012-01-01

    The limited therapeutic arsenal and the increase in reports of fungal resistance to multiple antifungal agents have made fungal infections a major therapeutic challenge. The polyene antibiotics are the only group of antifungal antibiotics that directly target the plasma membrane via a specific inter

  5. Codon optimizing for increased membrane protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzadeh, K.; Toddo, S.; Nørholm, Morten

    2016-01-01

    . As demonstrated with two membrane-embedded transporters in Escherichia coli, the method was more effective than optimizing the entire coding sequence. The method we present is PCR based and requires three simple steps: (1) the design of two PCR primers, one of which is degenerate; (2) the amplification...

  6. MreB-Dependent Organization of the E. coli Cytoplasmic Membrane Controls Membrane Protein Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Felix; Varadarajan, Aravindan; Lill, Holger; Peterman, Erwin J G; Bollen, Yves J M

    2016-03-08

    The functional organization of prokaryotic cell membranes, which is essential for many cellular processes, has been challenging to analyze due to the small size and nonflat geometry of bacterial cells. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and three-dimensional quantitative analyses in live Escherichia coli to demonstrate that its cytoplasmic membrane contains microdomains with distinct physical properties. We show that the stability of these microdomains depends on the integrity of the MreB cytoskeletal network underneath the membrane. We explore how the interplay between cytoskeleton and membrane affects trans-membrane protein (TMP) diffusion and reveal that the mobility of the TMPs tested is subdiffusive, most likely caused by confinement of TMP mobility by the submembranous MreB network. Our findings demonstrate that the dynamic architecture of prokaryotic cell membranes is controlled by the MreB cytoskeleton and regulates the mobility of TMPs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Isolation of bovine platelet cationic proteins which inhibit the surface-mediated activation of factor XII and prekallikrein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, K; Kato, H; Iwanaga, S

    1985-01-01

    A possible role of bovine platelets in the surface-mediated activation of Factor XII and prekallikrein was studied, using the contact system reconstituted with the purified proteins from bovine plasma. The washed platelets before and after aggregation by ADP, thrombin or collagen did not show any ability to trigger or accelerate the activation of Factor XII and prekallikrein. On the contrary, these aggregates showed a potent inhibitory activity on the activation of those zymogens triggered by kaolin, amylose sulfate and sulfatide. The inhibitory substances from the supernatant of the thrombin-induced aggregates were separated into two major fractions, a low affinity fraction and a high affinity fraction, on a heparin-Sepharose column. The high affinity protein was identified as platelet factor 4, based on the amino acid composition. From the low affinity fraction, a beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG)-like substance and three kinds of unknown proteins, named LA1, LA2, and LA3, were isolated by gel-filtration on a column of Sephadex G-100 or Sephadex G-75 followed by chromatography on a column of Mono S. The molecular weights of LA1, LA2, and LA3 were estimated to be 35,000, 26,000, and 11,000, respectively, on SDS-PAGE. LA2 was identified as a carbohydrate-less LA1, as judged from the amino acid composition and carbohydrate content. The inhibitory activities of these five cationic proteins on the activation of Factor XII and prekallikrein mediated with amylose sulfate, sulfatide and kaolin were different from each other. In the case of kaolin-mediated activation, LA3 was the most potent inhibitor, while platelet factor 4 and beta-TG-like substance did not show any significant inhibitory activity. Moreover, the inhibitory activities of all the cationic proteins were not correlated with their anti-heparin activities. Since these proteins were rapidly liberated from platelets by the action of the stimulants, the present results demonstrate a negative role of platelets in

  8. Thrombin Receptor-Activating Protein (TRAP-Activated Akt Is Involved in the Release of Phosphorylated-HSP27 (HSPB1 from Platelets in DM Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiko Tokuda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is generally known that heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 is phosphorylated through p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase. We have previously reported that HSP27 is released from human platelets associated with collagen-induced phosphorylation. In the present study, we conducted an investigation into the effect of thrombin receptor-activating protein (TRAP on the release of HSP27 in platelets in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM patients. The phosphorylated-HSP27 levels induced by TRAP were directly proportional to the aggregation of platelets. The levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 (Ser-78 were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylated-Akt in the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP but not with those of phosphorylated-p44/p42 MAP kinase. The levels of HSP27 released from the TRAP (10 µM-stimulated platelets were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 in the platelets. The released platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB levels were in parallel with the HSP27 levels released from the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP. Although the area under the curve (AUC of small aggregates (9–25 µm induced by 10 µM TRAP showed no significant correlation with the released HSP27 levels, AUC of medium aggregates (25–50 µm, large aggregates (50–70 µm and light transmittance were significantly correlated with the released HSP27 levels. TRAP-induced phosphorylation of HSP27 was truly suppressed by deguelin, an inhibitor of Akt, in the platelets from a healthy subject. These results strongly suggest that TRAP-induced activation of Akt in addition to p38 MAP kinase positively regulates the release of phosphorylated-HSP27 from human platelets, which is closely related to the platelet hyper-aggregation in type 2 DM patients.

  9. Vaccinia virus virion membrane biogenesis protein A11 associates with viral membranes in a manner that requires the expression of another membrane biogenesis protein, A6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang; Meng, Xiangzhi; Yan, Bo; Rose, Lloyd; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2012-10-01

    A group of vaccinia virus (VACV) proteins, including A11, L2, and A6, are required for biogenesis of the primary envelope of VACV, specifically, for the acquisition of viral membrane precursors. However, the interconnection among these proteins is unknown and, with the exception of L2, the connection of these proteins with membranes is also unknown. In this study, prompted by the findings that A6 coprecipitated A11 and that the cellular distribution of A11 was dramatically altered by repression of A6 expression, we studied the localization of A11 in cells by using immunofluorescence and cell fractionation analysis. A11 was found to associate with membranes and colocalize with virion membrane proteins in viral replication factories during normal VACV replication. A11 partitioned almost equally between the detergent and aqueous phases upon Triton X-114 phase separation, demonstrating an intrinsic affinity with lipids. However, in the absence of infection or VACV late protein synthesis, A11 did not associate with cellular membranes. Furthermore, when A6 expression was repressed, A11 did not colocalize with any viral membrane proteins or associate with membranes. In contrast, when virion envelope formation was blocked at a later step by repression of A14 expression or by rifampin treatment, A11 colocalized with virion membrane proteins in the factories. Altogether, our data showed that A11 associates with viral membranes during VACV replication, and this association requires A6 expression. This study provides a physical connection between A11 and viral membranes and suggests that A6 regulates A11 membrane association.

  10. Quantification of functional dynamics of membrane proteins reconstituted in nanodiscs membranes by single turnover functional readout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moses, Matias Emil; Hedegård, Per; Hatzakis, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    and quantification of the activity, abundance, and lifetime of multiple states and transient intermediates in the energy landscape that are typically averaged out in nonsynchronized ensemble measurements. Studying the function of membrane proteins at the single-molecule level remains a formidable challenge......, and to date there is limited number of available functional assays. In this chapter, we describe in detail our recently developed methodology to reconstitute membrane proteins such as the integral membrane protein cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase on membrane systems such as Nanodiscs and study their functional...... dynamics by recordings at the fundamental resolution of individual catalytic turnovers using prefluorescent substrate analogues. We initially describe the methodology for reconstitution, surface immobilization, and data acquisition of individual enzyme catalytic turnovers. We then explain in detail...

  11. Membrane Binding of HIV-1 Matrix Protein: Dependence on Bilayer Composition and Protein Lipidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Marilia; Nanda, Hirsh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By assembling in a protein lattice on the host's plasma membrane, the retroviral Gag polyprotein triggers formation of the viral protein/membrane shell. The MA domain of Gag employs multiple signals—electrostatic, hydrophobic, and lipid-specific—to bring the protein to the plasma membrane, thereby complementing protein-protein interactions, located in full-length Gag, in lattice formation. We report the interaction of myristoylated and unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag MA domains with bilayers composed of purified lipid components to dissect these complex membrane signals and quantify their contributions to the overall interaction. Surface plasmon resonance on well-defined planar membrane models is used to quantify binding affinities and amounts of protein and yields free binding energy contributions, ΔG, of the various signals. Charge-charge interactions in the absence of the phosphatidylinositide PI(4,5)P2 attract the protein to acidic membrane surfaces, and myristoylation increases the affinity by a factor of 10; thus, our data do not provide evidence for a PI(4,5)P2 trigger of myristate exposure. Lipid-specific interactions with PI(4,5)P2, the major signal lipid in the inner plasma membrane, increase membrane attraction at a level similar to that of protein lipidation. While cholesterol does not directly engage in interactions, it augments protein affinity strongly by facilitating efficient myristate insertion and PI(4,5)P2 binding. We thus observe that the isolated MA protein, in the absence of protein-protein interaction conferred by the full-length Gag, binds the membrane with submicromolar affinities. IMPORTANCE Like other retroviral species, the Gag polyprotein of HIV-1 contains three major domains: the N-terminal, myristoylated MA domain that targets the protein to the plasma membrane of the host; a central capsid-forming domain; and the C-terminal, genome-binding nucleocapsid domain. These domains act in concert to condense Gag into a membrane

  12. Effect of Adsorbed Protein on the Hydraulic Permeability, Membrane and Streaming Potential Values Measured across a Microporous Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, Juana; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1998-01-01

    different experimental conditions may be attributed to different mechanisms for the adsorption of proteins in the membrane: (i) a protein deposition on the membrane pores; () an adsorbed layer of protein on the membrane surface. In this latter case, the whole membrane system can be considered......The effect of the adsorption of a protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), on the membrane potential, flux reduction and streaming potential measured across a microporous polysulphone membrane with different NaCl solutions and pH values is studied. From electrokinetic phenomena, information about...

  13. The Multifaceted Role of SNARE Proteins in Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2017-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a key process in all living organisms that contributes to a variety of biological processes including viral infection, cell fertilization, as well as intracellular transport, and neurotransmitter release. In particular, the various membrane-enclosed compartments in eukaryotic cells need to exchange their contents and communicate across membranes. Efficient and controllable fusion of biological membranes is known to be driven by cooperative action of SNARE proteins, which constitute the central components of the eukaryotic fusion machinery responsible for fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane. During exocytosis, vesicle-associated v-SNARE (synaptobrevin) and target cell-associated t-SNAREs (syntaxin and SNAP-25) assemble into a core trans-SNARE complex. This complex plays a versatile role at various stages of exocytosis ranging from the priming to fusion pore formation and expansion, finally resulting in the release or exchange of the vesicle content. This review summarizes current knowledge on the intricate molecular mechanisms underlying exocytosis triggered and catalyzed by SNARE proteins. Particular attention is given to the function of the peptidic SNARE membrane anchors and the role of SNARE-lipid interactions in fusion. Moreover, the regulatory mechanisms by synaptic auxiliary proteins in SNARE-driven membrane fusion are briefly outlined.

  14. Role of rab proteins in epithelial membrane traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ijzendoorn, SCD; Mostov, KE; Hoekstra, D

    2003-01-01

    Small GTPase rab proteins play an important role in various aspects of membrane traffic, including cargo selection, vesicle budding, vesicle motility, tethering, docking, and fusion. Recent data suggest also that rabs, and their divalent effector proteins, organize organelle subdomains and as such m

  15. ARAMEMNON, a novel database for Arabidopsis integral membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwacke, Rainer; Schneider, Anja; van der Graaff, Eric

    2003-01-01

    A specialized database (DB) for Arabidopsis membrane proteins, ARAMEMNON, was designed that facilitates the interpretation of gene and protein sequence data by integrating features that are presently only available from individual sources. Using several publicly available prediction programs, put...... is accessible at the URL http://aramemnon.botanik.uni-koeln.de....

  16. Denaturation of membrane proteins and hyperthermic cell killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgman, Paulus Wilhelmus Johannes Jozef

    1993-01-01

    Summarizing: heat induced denaturation of membrane proteins is probably related to hyperthermic cell killing. Induced resistance of heat sensitive proteins seems to be involved in the development of thermotolerance. Although many questions remain still to be answered, it appears that HSP72, when

  17. Identification of outer membrane proteins of Yersinia pestis through biotinylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smither, S.J.; Hill, J.; Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Titball, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria contains proteins that might be good targets for vaccines, antimicrobials or detection systems. The identification of surface located proteins using traditional methods is often difficult. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, was labelled with

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of a membrane protein/amphipol complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, Jason D; Popot, Jean-Luc; Sachs, Jonathan N

    2014-10-01

    Amphipathic polymers known as "amphipols" provide a highly stabilizing environment for handling membrane proteins in aqueous solutions. A8-35, an amphipol with a polyacrylate backbone and hydrophobic grafts, has been extensively characterized and widely employed for structural and functional studies of membrane proteins using biochemical and biophysical approaches. Given the sensitivity of membrane proteins to their environment, it is important to examine what effects amphipols may have on the structure and dynamics of the proteins they complex. Here we present the first molecular dynamics study of an amphipol-stabilized membrane protein, using Escherichia coli OmpX as a model. We begin by describing the structure of the complexes formed by supplementing OmpX with increasing amounts of A8-35, in order to determine how the amphipol interacts with the transmembrane and extramembrane surfaces of the protein. We then compare the dynamics of the protein in either A8-35, a detergent, or a lipid bilayer. We find that protein dynamics on all accessible length scales is restrained by A8-35, which provides a basis to understanding some of the stabilizing and functional effects of amphipols that have been experimentally observed.

  19. Identification of outer membrane proteins of Yersinia pestis through biotinylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smither, S.J.; Hill, J.; Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Titball, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria contains proteins that might be good targets for vaccines, antimicrobials or detection systems. The identification of surface located proteins using traditional methods is often difficult. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, was labelled with

  20. Electrostatics and N-glycan-mediated membrane tethering of SCUBE1 is critical for promoting bone morphogenetic protein signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Ju; Tsao, Ku-Chi; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2016-03-01

    SCUBE1 (S1), a secreted and membrane-bound glycoprotein, has a modular protein structure composed of an N-terminal signal peptide sequence followed by nine epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats, a spacer region and three cysteine-rich (CR) motifs with multiple potential N-linked glycosylation sites, and one CUB domain at the C-terminus. Soluble S1 is a biomarker of platelet activation but an active participant of thrombosis via its adhesive EGF-like repeats, whereas its membrane-associated form acts as a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) co-receptor in promoting BMP signal activity. However, the mechanism responsible for the membrane tethering and the biological importance of N-glycosylation of S1 remain largely unknown. In the present study, molecular mapping analysis identified a polycationic segment (amino acids 501-550) in the spacer region required for its membrane tethering via electrostatic interactions possibly with the anionic heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Furthermore, deglycosylation by peptide N-glycosidase F treatment revealed that N-glycans within the CR motif are essential for membrane recruitment through lectin-mediated surface retention. Injection of mRNA encoding zebrafish wild-type but not N-glycan-deficient scube1 restores the expression of haematopoietic and erythroid markers (scl and gata1) in scube1-knockdown embryos. We describe novel mechanisms in targeting S1 to the plasma membrane and demonstrate that N-glycans are required for S1 functions during primitive haematopoiesis in zebrafish.

  1. VAMP-1: a synaptic vesicle-associated integral membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, W S; Cowan, D M; Scheller, R H

    1988-01-01

    Several proteins are associated with, or are integral components of, the lipid bilayer that forms the delineating membrane of neuronal synaptic vesicles. To characterize these molecules, we used a polyclonal antiserum raised against purified cholinergic synaptic vesicles from Torpedo to screen a cDNA expression library constructed from mRNA of the electromotor nucleus. One clone encodes VAMP-1 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 1), a nervous-system-specific protein of 120 amino acids whose primary sequence can be divided into three domains: a proline-rich amino terminus, a highly charged internal region, and a hydrophobic carboxyl-terminal domain that is predicted to comprise a membrane anchor. Tryptic digestion of intact and lysed vesicles suggests that the protein faces the cytoplasm, where it may play a role in packaging, transport, or release of neurotransmitters. Images PMID:3380805

  2. Amyloid protein unfolding and insertion kinetics on neuronal membrane mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kwan

    2010-03-01

    Atomistic details of beta-amyloid (Aβ ) protein unfolding and lipid interaction kinetics mediated by the neuronal membrane surface are important for developing new therapeutic strategies to prevent and cure Alzheimer's disease. Using all-atom MD simulations, we explored the early unfolding and insertion kinetics of 40 and 42 residue long Aβ in binary lipid mixtures with and without cholesterol that mimic the cholesterol-depleted and cholesterol-enriched lipid nanodomains of neurons. The protein conformational transition kinetics was evaluated from the secondary structure profile versus simulation time plot. The extent of membrane disruption was examined by the calculated order parameters of lipid acyl chains and cholesterol fused rings as well as the density profiles of water and lipid headgroups at defined regions across the lipid bilayer from our simulations. Our results revealed that both the cholesterol content and the length of the protein affect the protein-insertion and membrane stability in our model lipid bilayer systems.

  3. IκB kinase phosphorylation of SNAP-23 controls platelet secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Zubair A; Zhang, Jinchao; Banerjee, Meenakshi; Chicka, Michael C; Al Hawas, Rania; Hamilton, Tara R; Roche, Paul A; Whiteheart, Sidney W

    2013-05-30

    Platelet secretion plays a key role in thrombosis, thus the platelet secretory machinery offers a unique target to modulate hemostasis. We report the regulation of platelet secretion via phosphorylation of SNAP-23 at Ser95. Phosphorylation of this t-soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) occurs upon activation of known elements of the platelet signaling cascades (ie, phospholipase C, [Ca(2+)]i, protein kinase C) and requires IκB kinase (IKK)-β. Other elements of the nuclear factor κB/IκB cascade (ie, IKK-α,-β,-γ/NEMO and CARMA/MALT1/Bcl10 complex) are present in anucleate platelets and IκB is phosphorylated upon activation, suggesting that this pathway is active in platelets and implying a nongenomic role for IKK. Inhibition of IKK-β, either pharmacologically (with BMS-345541, BAY11-7082, or TPCA-1) or by genetic manipulation (platelet factor 4 Cre:IKK-β(flox/flox)), blocked SNAP-23 phosphorylation, platelet secretion, and SNARE complex formation; but, had no effect on platelet morphology or other metrics of platelet activation. Consistently, SNAP-23 phosphorylation enhanced membrane fusion of SNARE-containing proteoliposomes. In vivo studies with IKK inhibitors or platelet-specific IKK-β knockout mice showed that blocking IKK-β activity significantly prolonged tail bleeding times, suggesting that currently available IKK inhibitors may affect hemostasis.

  4. Novel silk protein barrier membranes for guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ralf; Knabe, Christine; Kolk, Andreas; Rheinnecker, Michael; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Zehbe, Rolf; Sachse, Manuela; Große-Siestrup, Christian; Wöltje, Michael; Hanken, Henning

    2016-10-12

    This study assesses the biocompatibility of novel silk protein membranes with and without modification, and evaluates their effect on facilitating bone formation and defect repair in guided bone regeneration. Two calvarian bone defects 12 mm in diameter were created in each of a total of 38 rabbits. Four different types of membranes, (silk-, hydroxyapatite-modified silk-, β-TCP-modified silk- and commonly clinically used collagen-membranes) were implanted to cover one of the two defects in each animal. Histologic analysis did not show any adverse tissue reactions in any of the defect sites indicating good biocompatibility of all silk protein membranes. Histomorphometric and histologic evaluation revealed that collagen and β-TCP modified silk membranes supported bone formation (collagen: bone area fraction p = 0.025; significant; β-TCP modified silk membranes bone area fraction: p = 0.24, not significant), guided bone regeneration and defect bridging. The bone, which had formed in defects covered by β-TCP modified silk membranes, displayed a more advanced stage of bone tissue maturation with restoration of the original calvarial bone microarchitecture when compared to the bone which had formed in defects, for which any of the other test membranes were used. Micro-CT analysis did not reveal any differences in the amount of bone formation between defects with and without membranes. In contrast to the collagen membranes, β-TCP modified silk membranes were visible in all cases and may therefore be advantageous for further supporting bone formation beyond 10 weeks and preventing soft tissue ingrowth from the periphery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  5. Characterization of the major integral protein of vacuolar membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, M

    1992-04-01

    The vacuolar membrane of radish (Raphanus sativus) taproot contained a large quantity of a protein of 23 kilodaltons that accounted for more than 25% of the total membrane proteins. The protein, tentatively named VM 23, was purified and characterized. VM 23 tends to aggregate at high temperature even in the presence of 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate. The apparent molecular size of VM 23 was estimated to be about 400 kilodaltons by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of 0.1% Triton X-100. VM 23 was partially extracted from the vacuolar membranes with chloroform:methanol, indicating its high hydrophobicity. The hydrophobic carboxyl modifier N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide bound covalently to VM 23. The results suggest that VM 23 may act as a secondary transport system coupled with the proton transport. The antibody against radish VM 23 reacted with the major proteins in the vacuolar membranes of mung bean (Vigna radiata) and castor bean (Ricinus communis) hypocotyls and pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) epicotyl, but not with that of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) taproot. VM 23 comigrated with vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase on sucrose density gradient centrifugation after sonication of membranes, indicating that it is associated with the vacuolar membrane.

  6. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  7. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  8. Membrane protein synthesis in cell-free systems: from bio-mimetic systems to bio-membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Rita; Dondapati, Srujan K; Fenz, Susanne F; Schmidt, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-08-25

    When taking up the gauntlet of studying membrane protein functionality, scientists are provided with a plethora of advantages, which can be exploited for the synthesis of these difficult-to-express proteins by utilizing cell-free protein synthesis systems. Due to their hydrophobicity, membrane proteins have exceptional demands regarding their environment to ensure correct functionality. Thus, the challenge is to find the appropriate hydrophobic support that facilitates proper membrane protein folding. So far, various modes of membrane protein synthesis have been presented. Here, we summarize current state-of-the-art methodologies of membrane protein synthesis in biomimetic-supported systems. The correct folding and functionality of membrane proteins depend in many cases on their integration into a lipid bilayer and subsequent posttranslational modification. We highlight cell-free systems utilizing the advantages of biological membranes.

  9. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions.

  10. ARAMEMNON, a Novel Database for Arabidopsis Integral Membrane Proteins1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwacke, Rainer; Schneider, Anja; van der Graaff, Eric; Fischer, Karsten; Catoni, Elisabetta; Desimone, Marcelo; Frommer, Wolf B.; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Kunze, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    A specialized database (DB) for Arabidopsis membrane proteins, ARAMEMNON, was designed that facilitates the interpretation of gene and protein sequence data by integrating features that are presently only available from individual sources. Using several publicly available prediction programs, putative integral membrane proteins were identified among the approximately 25,500 proteins in the Arabidopsis genome DBs. By averaging the predictions from seven programs, approximately 6,500 proteins were classified as transmembrane (TM) candidate proteins. Some 1,800 of these contain at least four TM spans and are possibly linked to transport functions. The ARAMEMNON DB enables direct comparison of the predictions of seven different TM span computation programs and the predictions of subcellular localization by eight signal peptide recognition programs. A special function displays the proteins related to the query and dynamically generates a protein family structure. As a first set of proteins from other organisms, all of the approximately 700 putative membrane proteins were extracted from the genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. and incorporated in the ARAMEMNON DB. The ARAMEMNON DB is accessible at the URL http://aramemnon.botanik.uni-koeln.de. PMID:12529511

  11. Platelets and hemostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Panteleev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are anuclear cell fragments playing important role in hemostasis, termination of bleeding after damage, as well as in pathological thrombus formation. The main action of platelets is the formation of aggregates, overlapping the injury. They obtained the ability to aggregate by the transition process called activation. Despite the relatively simple and definite function platelet structure is very difficult: they have almost a full set of organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and other entities. When activated platelets secrete various granules interact with plasma proteins and red blood cells and other tissues. Their activation is controlled by multiple receptors and complex signaling cascades. In this review platelet structure, mechanisms of its functioning in health and disease, diagnostic methods of platelet function and approaches to their correction were considered. Particular attention will be given to those areas of the science of platelets, which still lay hidden mysteries.

  12. A unifying mechanism accounts for sensing of membrane curvature by BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Hatzakis, Nikos; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    unrelated motifs: BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins. We discuss the conclusion that the curvature of the BAR dimer is not responsible for sensing and that the sensing properties of all three motifs can be rationalized by the physicochemical properties of the curved membrane......The discovery of proteins that recognize membrane curvature created a paradigm shift by suggesting that membrane shape may act as a cue for protein localization that is independent of lipid or protein composition. Here we review recent data on membrane curvature sensing by three structurally...... itself. We thus anticipate that membrane curvature will promote the redistribution of proteins that are anchored in membranes through any type of hydrophobic moiety, a thesis that broadens tremendously the implications of membrane curvature for protein sorting, trafficking and signaling in cell biology....

  13. Symmetry and size of membrane protein polyhedral nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Di; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    In recent experiments [T. Basta et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 670 (2014)] lipids and membrane proteins were observed to self-assemble into membrane protein polyhedral nanoparticles (MPPNs) with a well-defined polyhedral protein arrangement and characteristic size. We develop a model of MPPN self-assembly in which the preferred symmetry and size of MPPNs emerge from the interplay of protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations, topological defects in protein packing, and thermal effects. With all model parameters determined directly from experiments, our model correctly predicts the observed symmetry and size of MPPNs. Our model suggests how key lipid and protein properties can be modified to produce a range of MPPN symmetries and sizes in experiments.

  14. Membrane proteins structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Sergey; Lorigan, Gary A

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins represent a challenging class of biological systems to study. They are extremely difficult to crystallize and in most cases they retain their structure and functions only in membrane environments. Therefore, commonly used diffraction methods fail to give detailed molecular structure and other approaches have to be utilized to obtain biologically relevant information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, however, can provide powerful structural and dynamical constraints on these complicated systems. Solution- and solid-state NMR are powerful methods for investigating membrane proteins studies. In this work, we briefly review both solution and solid-state NMR techniques for membrane protein studies and illustrate the applications of these methods to elucidate proteins structure, conformation, topology, dynamics, and function. Recent advances in electronics, biological sample preparation, and spectral processing provided opportunities for complex biological systems, such as membrane proteins inside lipid vesicles, to be studied faster and with outstanding quality. New analysis methods therefore have emerged, that benefit from the combination of sample preparation and corresponding specific high-end NMR techniques, which give access to more structural and dynamic information.

  15. Assembly of β-barrel proteins into bacterial outer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkrig, Joel; Leyton, Denisse L; Webb, Chaille T; Lithgow, Trevor

    2014-08-01

    Membrane proteins with a β-barrel topology are found in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and in the plastids and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. The assembly of these membrane proteins depends on a protein folding reaction (to create the barrel) and an insertion reaction (to integrate the barrel within the outer membrane). Experimental approaches using biophysics and biochemistry are detailing the steps in the assembly pathway, while genetics and bioinformatics have revealed a sophisticated production line of cellular components that catalyze the assembly pathway in vivo. This includes the modular BAM complex, several molecular chaperones and the translocation and assembly module (the TAM). Recent screens also suggest that further components of the pathway might remain to be discovered. We review what is known about the process of β-barrel protein assembly into membranes, and the components of the β-barrel assembly machinery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey.

  16. The heat-compression technique for the conversion of platelet-rich fibrin preparation to a barrier membrane with a reduced rate of biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Tomoyuki; Kamiya, Mana; Kobayashi, Mito; Tanaka, Takaaki; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Wolff, Larry F; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2015-05-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) was developed as an advanced form of platelet-rich plasma to eliminate xenofactors, such as bovine thrombin, and it is mainly used as a source of growth factor for tissue regeneration. Furthermore, although a minor application, PRF in a compressed membrane-like form has also been used as a substitute for commercially available barrier membranes in guided-tissue regeneration (GTR) treatment. However, the PRF membrane is resorbed within 2 weeks or less at implantation sites; therefore, it can barely maintain sufficient space for bone regeneration. In this study, we developed and optimized a heat-compression technique and tested the feasibility of the resulting PRF membrane. Freshly prepared human PRF was first compressed with dry gauze and subsequently with a hot iron. Biodegradability was microscopically examined in vitro by treatment with plasmin at 37°C or in vivo by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Compared with the control gauze-compressed PRF, the heat-compressed PRF appeared plasmin-resistant and remained stable for longer than 10 days in vitro. Additionally, in animal implantation studies, the heat-compressed PRF was observed at least for 3 weeks postimplantation in vivo whereas the control PRF was completely resorbed within 2 weeks. Therefore, these findings suggest that the heat-compression technique reduces the rate of biodegradation of the PRF membrane without sacrificing its biocompatibility and that the heat-compressed PRF membrane easily could be prepared at chair-side and applied as a barrier membrane in the GTR treatment.

  17. Identification of a tsetse fly salivary protein with dual inhibitory action on human platelet aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Caljon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tsetse flies (Glossina sp., the African trypanosome vectors, rely on anti-hemostatic compounds for efficient blood feeding. Despite their medical importance, very few salivary proteins have been characterized and functionally annotated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report on the functional characterisation of a 5'nucleotidase-related (5'Nuc saliva protein of the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans morsitans. This protein is encoded by a 1668 bp cDNA corresponding at the genomic level with a single-copy 4 kb gene that is exclusively transcribed in the tsetse salivary gland tissue. The encoded 5'Nuc protein is a soluble 65 kDa glycosylated compound of tsetse saliva with a dual anti-hemostatic action that relies on its combined apyrase activity and fibrinogen receptor (GPIIb/IIIa antagonistic properties. Experimental evidence is based on the biochemical and functional characterization of recombinant protein and on the successful silencing of the 5'nuc translation in the salivary gland by RNA interference (RNAi. Refolding of a 5'Nuc/SUMO-fusion protein yielded an active apyrase enzyme with K(m and V(max values of 43+/-4 microM and 684+/-49 nmol Pi/min xmg for ATPase and 49+/-11 microM and 177+/-37 nmol Pi/min xmg for the ADPase activity. In addition, recombinant 5'Nuc was found to bind to GPIIb/IIIa with an apparent K(D of 92+/-25 nM. Consistent with these features, 5'Nuc potently inhibited ADP-induced thrombocyte aggregation and even caused disaggregation of ADP-triggered human platelets. The importance of 5'Nuc for the tsetse fly hematophagy was further illustrated by specific RNAi that reduced the anti-thrombotic activities in saliva by approximately 50% resulting in a disturbed blood feeding process. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data show that this 5'nucleotidase-related apyrase exhibits GPIIb/IIIa antagonistic properties and represents a key thromboregulatory compound of tsetse fly saliva.

  18. Prediction of transmembrane helix orientation in polytopic membrane proteins

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    Liang Jie

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane proteins compose up to 30% of coding sequences within genomes. However, their structure determination is lagging behind compared with soluble proteins due to the experimental difficulties. Therefore, it is important to develop reliable computational methods to predict structures of membrane proteins. Results We present a method for prediction of the TM helix orientation, which is an essential step in ab initio modeling of membrane proteins. Our method is based on a canonical model of the heptad repeat originally developed for coiled coils. We identify the helical surface patches that interface with lipid molecules at an accuracy of about 88% from the sequence information alone, using an empirical scoring function LIPS (LIPid-facing Surface, which combines lipophilicity and conservation of residues in the helix. We test and discuss results of prediction of helix-lipid interfaces on 162 transmembrane helices from 18 polytopic membrane proteins and present predicted orientations of TM helices in TRPV1 channel. We also apply our method to two structures of homologous cytochrome b6f complexes and find discrepancy in the assignment of TM helices from subunits PetG, PetN and PetL. The results of LIPS calculations and analysis of packing and H-bonding interactions support the helix assignment found in the cytochrome b6f structure from green alga but not the assignment of TM helices in the cyanobacterium b6f structure. Conclusion LIPS calculations can be used for the prediction of helix orientation in ab initio modeling of polytopic membrane proteins. We also show with the example of two cytochrome b6f structures that our method can identify questionable helix assignments in membrane proteins. The LIPS server is available online at http://gila.bioengr.uic.edu/lab/larisa/lips.html.

  19. Protein adsorption through Chitosan–Alginate membranes for potential applications

    OpenAIRE

    Murguía Flores, Dennise A.; Bonilla Ríos, Jaime; Canales Fiscal, Martha R.; Sánchez Fernández, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Chitosan and Alginate were used as biopolymers to prepare membranes for protein adsorption. The network requires a cross-linker able to form bridges between polymeric chains. Viscopearl-mini® (VM) was used as a support to synthesize them. Six different types of membranes were prepared using the main compounds of the matrix: VM, Chitosan of low and medium molecular weight, and Alginate. Results Experiments were carried out to analyze the interactions within the matrix a...

  20. The role of interfacial lipids in stabilizing membrane protein oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kallol; Donlan, Joseph A C; Hopper, Jonathan T S; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Landreh, Michael; Struwe, Weston B; Drew, David; Baldwin, Andrew J; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Robinson, Carol V

    2017-01-19

    Oligomerization of membrane proteins in response to lipid binding has a critical role in many cell-signalling pathways but is often difficult to define or predict. Here we report the development of a mass spectrometry platform to determine simultaneously the presence of interfacial lipids and oligomeric stability and to uncover how lipids act as key regulators of membrane-protein association. Evaluation of oligomeric strength for a dataset of 125 α-helical oligomeric membrane proteins reveals an absence of interfacial lipids in the mass spectra of 12 membrane proteins with high oligomeric stability. For the bacterial homologue of the eukaryotic biogenic transporters (LeuT, one of the proteins with the lowest oligomeric stability), we found a precise cohort of lipids within the dimer interface. Delipidation, mutation of lipid-binding sites or expression in cardiolipin-deficient Escherichia coli abrogated dimer formation. Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that cardiolipin acts as a bidentate ligand, bridging across subunits. Subsequently, we show that for the Vibrio splendidus sugar transporter SemiSWEET, another protein with low oligomeric stability, cardiolipin shifts the equilibrium from monomer to functional dimer. We hypothesized that lipids are essential for dimerization of the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter NhaA from E. coli, which has the lowest oligomeric strength, but not for the substantially more stable homologous Thermus thermophilus protein NapA. We found that lipid binding is obligatory for dimerization of NhaA, whereas NapA has adapted to form an interface that is stable without lipids. Overall, by correlating interfacial strength with the presence of interfacial lipids, we provide a rationale for understanding the role of lipids in both transient and stable interactions within a range of α-helical membrane proteins, including G-protein-coupled receptors.

  1. Stimulation of Platelet Death by Vancomycin

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    Syeda T. Towhid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Side effects of vancomycin, a widely used antibiotic, include thrombocytopenia. The vancomycin-induced thrombocytopenia has been attributed to immune reactions. At least in theory, thrombocytopenia could result in part from the triggering of apoptosis, which results in cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with subsequent phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. The cell membrane scrambling could be initiated by a signaling involving increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity, ceramide formation, mitochondrial depolarization and/or caspase activation. Vancomycin has indeed been shown to trigger neutrophil apoptosis. An effect of vancomycin on platelet apoptosis has, however, never been tested. The present study thus explored the effect of vancomycin on platelet activation and apoptosis. Methods: Human blood platelets were exposed to vancomycin and forward scatter was utilized to estimate cell volume, annexin V-binding to quantify phosphatidylserine (PS exposure, Fluo-3 AM fluorescence to estimate cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, antibodies to quantify ceramide formation and immunofluorescence to quantify protein abundance of active caspase-3. Results: A 30 minutes exposure to vancomycin (≥1 µg/ ml decreased cell volume, triggered annexin V-binding, increased [Ca2+]i, activated caspase 3, stimulated ceramide formation, triggered release of thromboxane B2, and upregulated surface expression of CD62P (P-selectin as well as activated integrin αllbβ3. Annexin V-binding and upregulation of CD62P (P-selectin and integrin αllbβ3 was significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Annexin V-binding was not significantly blunted by pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-FMK (1 µM. In conclusion, vancomycin results in platelet activation and suicidal platelet death with increase of [Ca2+]i, caspase-3 activation, cell membrane scrambling and cell shrinkage. Activation and cell membrane scrambling required the presence of Ca2

  2. Plasma membrane microdomains regulate turnover of transport proteins in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Guido; Malinsky, Jan; Stahlschmidt, Wiebke; Loibl, Martin; Weig-Meckl, Ina; Frommer, Wolf B.; Opekarová, Miroslava; Tanner, Widmar

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate whether the stable segregation of proteins and lipids within the yeast plasma membrane serves a particular biological function. We show that 21 proteins cluster within or associate with the ergosterol-rich membrane compartment of Can1 (MCC). However, proteins of the endocytic machinery are excluded from MCC. In a screen, we identified 28 genes affecting MCC appearance and found that genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and vesicle transport are significantly overrepresented. Deletion of Pil1, a component of eisosomes, or of Nce102, an integral membrane protein of MCC, results in the dissipation of all MCC markers. These deletion mutants also show accelerated endocytosis of MCC-resident permeases Can1 and Fur4. Our data suggest that release from MCC makes these proteins accessible to the endocytic machinery. Addition of arginine to wild-type cells leads to a similar redistribution and increased turnover of Can1. Thus, MCC represents a protective area within the plasma membrane to control turnover of transport proteins. PMID:19064668

  3. Major integral membrane protein immunogens of Treponema pallidum are proteolipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, N.R.; Brandt, M.E.; Erwin, A.L.; Radolf, J.D.; Norgard, M.V. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA))

    1989-09-01

    A number of the major pathogen-specific immunogens of Treponema pallidum were characterized recently as amphiphilic, integral membrane proteins by phase partitioning with Triton X-114. In the present study, we demonstrated that the same membrane immunogens (designated as detergent phase proteins (DPPs)) become radiolabeled upon in vitro incubation of T. pallidum with various {sup 3}H-labeled fatty acids. Radioimmunoprecipitation with a monoclonal antibody confirmed that the {sup 3}H-labeled 47-kilodalton protein corresponded to the well-characterized treponemal antigen with the identical apparent molecular mass. Failure to detect {sup 3}H-labeled DPPs following incubation with erythromycin confirmed that protein acylation required de novo protein synthesis by the bacteria. When treponemes were incubated with ({sup 3}H)myristate, ({sup 3}H)palmitate, or ({sup 3}H)oleate, radiolabeled proteins corresponding to the DPPs were detected upon autoradiography. Demonstration that a number of the abundant membrane immunogens of T. pallidum are proteolipids provides information to help clarify their membrane association(s) and may serve to explain their extraordinary immunogenicity.

  4. Data on diverse roles of helix perturbations in membrane proteins

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    Ashish Shelar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The various structural variations observed in TM helices of membrane proteins have been deconstructed into 9 distinct types of helix perturbations. These perturbations are defined by the deviation of TM helices from the predominantly observed linear α-helical conformation, to form 310- and π-helices, as well as adopting curved and kinked geometries. The data presented here supplements the article ‘Helix perturbations in Membrane Proteins Assist in Inter-helical Interactions and Optimal Helix Positioning in the Bilayer’ (A. Shelar, M. Bansal, 2016 [1]. This data provides strong evidence for the role of various helix perturbations in influencing backbone torsion angles of helices, mediating inter-helical interactions, oligomer formation and accommodation of hydrophobic residues within the bilayer. The methodology used for creation of various datasets of membrane protein families (Sodium/Calcium exchanger and Heme Copper Oxidase has also been mentioned.

  5. The Single-Molecule Approach to Membrane Protein Stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Michael G; Hallworth, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The advent of techniques for imaging solitary fluorescent molecules has made possible many new kinds of biological experiments. Here, we describe the application of single-molecule imaging to the problem of subunit stoichiometry in membrane proteins. A membrane protein of unknown stoichiometry, prestin, is coupled to the fluorescent enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and synthesized in the human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell line. We prepare adherent membrane fragments containing prestin-eGFP by osmotic lysis. The molecules are then exposed to continuous low-level excitation until their fluorescence reaches background levels. Their fluorescence decreases in discrete equal-amplitude steps, consistent with the photobleaching of single fluorophores. We count the number of steps required to photobleach each molecule. The molecular stoichiometry is then deduced using a binomial model.

  6. Pathogen receptor discovery with a microfluidic human membrane protein array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Yair; Ben-Ari, Ya’ara; Drayman, Nir; Pellach, Michal; Neveu, Gregory; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Avrahami, Dorit; Einav, Shirit; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of how a pathogen invades a cell requires one to determine which host cell receptors are exploited. This determination is a challenging problem because the receptor is invariably a membrane protein, which represents an Achilles heel in proteomics. We have developed a universal platform for high-throughput expression and interaction studies of membrane proteins by creating a microfluidic-based comprehensive human membrane protein array (MPA). The MPA is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind and offers a powerful alternative to conventional proteomics by enabling the simultaneous study of 2,100 membrane proteins. We characterized direct interactions of a whole nonenveloped virus (simian virus 40), as well as those of the hepatitis delta enveloped virus large form antigen, with candidate host receptors expressed on the MPA. Selected newly discovered membrane protein–pathogen interactions were validated by conventional methods, demonstrating that the MPA is an important tool for cellular receptor discovery and for understanding pathogen tropism. PMID:27044079

  7. Helix kinks are equally prevalent in soluble and membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilman, Henry R; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M

    2014-09-01

    Helix kinks are a common feature of α-helical membrane proteins, but are thought to be rare in soluble proteins. In this study we find that kinks are a feature of long α-helices in both soluble and membrane proteins, rather than just transmembrane α-helices. The apparent rarity of kinks in soluble proteins is due to the relative infrequency of long helices (≥20 residues) in these proteins. We compare length-matched sets of soluble and membrane helices, and find that the frequency of kinks, the role of Proline, the patterns of other amino acid around kinks (allowing for the expected differences in amino acid distributions between the two types of protein), and the effects of hydrogen bonds are the same for the two types of helices. In both types of protein, helices that contain Proline in the second and subsequent turns are very frequently kinked. However, there are a sizeable proportion of kinked helices that do not contain a Proline in either their sequence or sequence homolog. Moreover, we observe that in soluble proteins, kinked helices have a structural preference in that they typically point into the solvent.

  8. Antiplatelet activities of anthrax lethal toxin are associated with suppressed p42/44 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in the platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kau, Jyh-Hwa; Sun, Der-Shan; Tsai, Wei-Jern; Shyu, Huey-Fen; Huang, Hsin-Hsien; Lin, Hung-Chi; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2005-10-15

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) is the major virulence factor produced by Bacillus anthracis, but the mechanism by which it induces high mortality remains unclear. We found that LT treatment could induce severe hemorrhage in mice and significantly suppress human whole-blood clotting and platelet aggregation in vitro. In addition, LT could inhibit agonist-induced platelet surface P-selectin expression, resulting in the inhibition of platelet-endothelial cell engagements. Data from Western blot analysis indicated that LT treatment resulted in the suppression of p42/44 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in platelets. Combined treatments with LT and antiplatelet agents such as aspirin and the RGD-containing disintegrin rhodostomin significantly increased mortality in mice. Our data suggest that platelets are a pathogenic target for anthrax LT.

  9. Solubilization of lipids and membrane proteins into nanodiscs : Mode of action and applications of SMA copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheidelaar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cell membranes separate the inside and outside of cells. Membrane proteins in the cell membrane control the traffic of molecules across the membrane and are therefore targets for a lot of drugs: about 50 % of all approved drugs target a membrane protein! Unfortunately, scientists only know little

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of biological membranes and membrane proteins using enhanced conformational sampling algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takaharu; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Im, Wonpil; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews various enhanced conformational sampling methods and explicit/implicit solvent/membrane models, as well as their recent applications to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have become an essential tool to investigate biological problems, and their success relies on proper molecular models together with efficient conformational sampling methods. The implicit representation of solvent/membrane environments is reasonable approximation to the explicit all-atom models, considering the balance between computational cost and simulation accuracy. Implicit models can be easily combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics methods to explore a wider conformational space of a protein. Other molecular models and enhanced conformational sampling methods are also briefly discussed. As application examples, we introduce recent simulation studies of glycophorin A, phospholamban, amyloid precursor protein, and mixed lipid bilayers and discuss the accuracy and efficiency of each simulation model and method. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  11. Proteomic analysis of GPI-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Hye Ryung; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    Glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) represent a subset of post-translationally modified proteins that are tethered to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane via a C-terminal GPI anchor. GPI-APs are found in a variety of eukaryote species, from pathogenic microorganisms...... to humans. GPI-APs confer important cellular functions as receptors, enzymes and scaffolding molecules. Specific enzymes and detergent extraction methods combined with separation technologies and mass spectrometry permit proteomic analysis of GPI-APs from plasma membrane preparations to reveal cell...

  12. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic integral membrane proteins have similar architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Rajneesh Kumar; Natekar, Girija Arun

    2010-03-01

    Integral membrane proteins constitute a major constituent of lipid bilayer both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The statistical analysis was carried out to determine the bias in amino acid distribution between prokaryotic and eukaryotic integral membrane proteins (pIntMPs and eIntMPs). Our results indicate that both pIntMPs and eIntMPs demonstrate the striking similarity in amino acid distribution in their transmembrane and extramembranous region. pIntMPs have relatively greater functional importance for Gly and Asn in comparison to eIntMPs.

  13. Proteomic analysis of GPI-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Hye Ryung; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    to humans. GPI-APs confer important cellular functions as receptors, enzymes and scaffolding molecules. Specific enzymes and detergent extraction methods combined with separation technologies and mass spectrometry permit proteomic analysis of GPI-APs from plasma membrane preparations to reveal cell......Glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) represent a subset of post-translationally modified proteins that are tethered to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane via a C-terminal GPI anchor. GPI-APs are found in a variety of eukaryote species, from pathogenic microorganisms...

  14. Distribution of Flagella Secreted Protein and Integral Membrane Protein Among Campylobacter jejuni Isolated from Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    secreted protein and integral membrane protein among Campylobacter jejuni isolated from Thailand Piyarat Pootong 1·, Oralak Serichantalergs...Ladaporn Bodhidatta \\ Frederic Poly2, Patricia Guerry2 and Carl J Mason 1 Abstract Background: Campylobacter jejuni, a gram-negative bacterium, is a...groups of integral membrane protein. The significance of these different FspA variants to virulence requires further study. Background Campylobacter

  15. Thrombopoietin potentiates the protein-kinase-C-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinases and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Y; Uchiyama, T; Takayama, H

    1998-12-15

    The thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor is expressed in the megakaryocytic lineage from late progenitors to platelets. We investigated the effect of TPO on the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation pathway in human platelets. TPO by itself did not activate ERK1, ERK2 and protein kinase C (PKC), whereas TPO directly enhanced the PKC-dependent activation of ERKs induced by other agonists including thrombin and phorbol esters, without affecting the PKC activation by those agonists. TPO did not activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinases, MEK1 and MEK2, but activated Raf-1 and directly augmented the PKC-mediated MEK activation, suggesting that TPO primarily potentiates the ERK pathway through regulating MEKs or upstream steps of MEKs including Raf-1. The MEK inhibitor PD098059 failed to affect not only thrombin-induced or phorbol ester-induced aggregation, but also potentiation of aggregation by TPO, denying the primary involvement of ERKs and MEKs in those events. ERKs and MEKs were located mainly in the detergent-soluble/non-cytoskeletal fractions. ERKs but not MEKs were relocated to the cytoskeleton following platelet aggregation and actin polymerization. These data indicate that TPO synergizes with other agonists in the ERK activation pathway of platelets and that this synergy might affect functions of the cytoskeleton possibly regulated by ERKs.

  16. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; Solana González, B.; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show

  17. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; Solana González, B.; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show th

  18. Pb2+ as modulator of protein-membrane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Krystal A; Lasagna, Mauricio; Gribenko, Alexey V; Yoon, Youngdae; Reinhart, Gregory D; Lee, James C; Cho, Wonhwa; Li, Pingwei; Igumenova, Tatyana I

    2011-07-13

    Lead is a potent environmental toxin that mimics the effects of divalent metal ions, such as zinc and calcium, in the context of specific molecular targets and signaling processes. The molecular mechanism of lead toxicity remains poorly understood. The objective of this work was to characterize the effect of Pb(2+) on the structure and membrane-binding properties of C2α. C2α is a peripheral membrane-binding domain of Protein Kinase Cα (PKCα), which is a well-documented molecular target of lead. Using NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) techniques, we established that C2α binds Pb(2+) with higher affinity than its natural cofactor, Ca(2+). To gain insight into the coordination geometry of protein-bound Pb(2+), we determined the crystal structures of apo and Pb(2+)-bound C2α at 1.9 and 1.5 Å resolution, respectively. A comparison of these structures revealed that the metal-binding site is not preorganized and that rotation of the oxygen-donating side chains is required for the metal coordination to occur. Remarkably, we found that holodirected and hemidirected coordination geometries for the two Pb(2+) ions coexist within a single protein molecule. Using protein-to-membrane Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy, we demonstrated that Pb(2+) displaces Ca(2+) from C2α in the presence of lipid membranes through the high-affinity interaction with the membrane-unbound C2α. In addition, Pb(2+) associates with phosphatidylserine-containing membranes and thereby competes with C2α for the membrane-binding sites. This process can contribute to the inhibitory effect of Pb(2+) on the PKCα activity.

  19. Effective high-throughput overproduction of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, E.; Horsefield, R.; Swarts, H.G.P.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de; Neutze, R.; Snijder, A.

    2008-01-01

    Structural biology is increasingly reliant on elevated throughput methods for protein production. In particular, development of efficient methods of heterologous production of membrane proteins is essential. Here, we describe the heterologous overproduction of 24 membrane proteins from the human pat

  20. Detergent interaction with tethered bilayer lipid membranes for protein reconstitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccio, Matteo; Zan Goh, Haw; Loesche, Mathias

    2009-03-01

    Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are self-assembled biomimetic structures in which the membrane is separated from a solid substrate by a nm-thick hydrated submembrane space. These model systems are being used in binding studies of peripheral proteins and exotoxins. Here we aim at their application for the reconstitution of water-insoluble integral membrane proteins. As an alternative to fusion of preformed proteoliposomes we study the direct reconstitution of such proteins for applications in biosensing and pharmaceutical screening. For reconstitution, highly insulating tBLMs (R˜10^5-10^6 φ) were temporarily incubated with a detergent to screen for conditions that keep the detergent-saturated membranestable and ready to incorporate detergent-solubilized proteins. We assess the electrical characteristics, i.e. specific resistance and capacitance, by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) under timed incubation with decylmaltoside and dodecylmaltoside detergents in a regime around their critical micelle concentration, 1.8 mM and 0.17 mM respectively and demonstrate the restoration of the tBLM upon detergent removal. Thereby a range of concentration and incubation times was identified, that represents optimal conditions for the subsequent membrane protein reconstitution.

  1. Capture-stabilize approach for membrane protein SPR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ruiyin; Reczek, David; Brondyk, William

    2014-12-08

    Measuring the binding kinetics of antibodies to intact membrane proteins by surface plasmon resonance has been challenging largely because of the inherent difficulties in capturing membrane proteins on chip surfaces while retaining their native conformation. Here we describe a method in which His-tagged CXCR5, a GPCR, was purified and captured on a Biacore chip surface via the affinity tag. The captured receptor protein was then stabilized on the chip surface by limited cross-linking. The resulting chip surface retained ligand binding activity and was used for monoclonal antibody kinetics assays by a standard Biacore kinetics assay method with a simple low pH regeneration step. We demonstrate the advantages of this whole receptor assay when compared to available peptide-based binding assays. We further extended the application of the capture-stabilize approach to virus-like particles and demonstrated its utility analyzing antibodies against CD52, a GPI-anchored protein, in its native membrane environment. The results are the first demonstration of chemically stabilized chip surfaces for membrane protein SPR assays.

  2. Differential synthesis and release of IL-18 and IL-18 Binding Protein from human platelets and their implications for HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Ossama; Samarani, Suzanne; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Tremblay, Cecile; Amre, Devendra; Ahmad, Ali

    2017-02-01

    IL-18 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine belonging to the IL-1 family and is produced in the body from macrophages, epithelial and dendritic cells, keratinocytes, adrenal cortex etc. The cytokine is produced as an inactive precursor that is cleaved inside cells into its mature form by activated caspase 1, which exists as an inactive precursor in human cells and requires assembly of an inflammasomes for its activation. We show here for the first time that human platelets contain transcripts for the IL-18 gene. They synthesize the cytokine de novo, process and release it upon activation. The activation also results in the assembly of an inflammasome and activation of caspase-1. Platelets also contain the IL-18 antagonist, the IL-18-Binding Protein (IL-18BP); however, it is not synthesized in them de novo, is present in pre-made form and is released irrespective of platelet activation. IL-18 and IL-18BP co-localize to α granules inside platelets and are secreted out with different kinetics. Platelet activation contributes to plasma concentrations in healthy individuals, as their plasma samples contain abundant IL-18, while their platelet-poor plasma samples contain very little amounts of the cytokine. The plasma and PPP samples from these donors, however, contain comparable amounts of IL-18BP. Unlike healthy individuals, the platelet-poor plasma from HIV-infected individuals contains significant amounts of IL-18. Our findings have important implications for viral infections and other human diseases that are accompanied by platelet activation.

  3. An automated pipeline to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changki; Vink, Martin; Hu, Minghui; Love, James; Stokes, David L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban

    2010-06-01

    Electron crystallography relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals and is particularly well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. To obtain 2D crystals from purified membrane proteins, the detergent in a protein-lipid-detergent ternary mixture must be removed, generally by dialysis, under conditions favoring reconstitution into proteoliposomes and formation of well-ordered lattices. To identify these conditions a wide range of parameters such as pH, lipid composition, lipid-to-protein ratio, ionic strength and ligands must be screened in a procedure involving four steps: crystallization, specimen preparation for electron microscopy, image acquisition, and evaluation. Traditionally, these steps have been carried out manually and, as a result, the scope of 2D crystallization trials has been limited. We have therefore developed an automated pipeline to screen the formation of 2D crystals. We employed a 96-well dialysis block for reconstitution of the target protein over a wide range of conditions designed to promote crystallization. A 96-position magnetic platform and a liquid handling robot were used to prepare negatively stained specimens in parallel. Robotic grid insertion into the electron microscope and computerized image acquisition ensures rapid evaluation of the crystallization screen. To date, 38 2D crystallization screens have been conducted for 15 different membrane proteins, totaling over 3000 individual crystallization experiments. Three of these proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals. Our automated pipeline outperforms traditional 2D crystallization methods in terms of throughput and reproducibility.

  4. Granule stores from cellubrevin/VAMP-3 null mouse platelets exhibit normal stimulus-induced release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraw, Todd D; Rutledge, Tara W; Crawford, Garland L; Bernstein, Audrey M; Kalen, Amanda L; Pessin, Jeffery E; Whiteheart, Sidney W

    2003-09-01

    It is widely accepted that the platelet release reaction is mediated by heterotrimeric complexes of integral membrane proteins known as SNAREs (SNAP receptors). In an effort to define the precise molecular machinery required for platelet exocytosis, we have analyzed platelets from cellubrevin/VAMP-3 knockout mice. Cellubrevin/VAMP-3 has been proposed to be a critical v-SNARE for human platelet exocytosis; however, data reported here suggest that it is not required for platelet function. Upon stimulation with increasing concentrations of thrombin, collagen, or with thrombin for increasing time there were no differences in secretion of [3H]-5HT (dense core granules), platelet factor IV (alpha granules), or hexosaminidase (lysosomes) between null and wild-type platelets. There were no gross differences in bleeding times nor in agonist-induced aggregation measured in platelet-rich plasma or with washed platelets. Western blotting of wild-type, heterozygous, and null platelets confirmed the lack of cellubrevin/VAMP-3 in nulls and showed that most elements of the secretion machinery are expressed at similar levels. While the secretory machinery in mice was similar to humans, mice did express apparently higher levels of synaptobrevin/VAMP-2. These data show that the v-SNARE, cellubrevin/VAMP-3 is not a requirement for the platelet release reaction in mice.

  5. Identification of calcium-binding proteins associated with the human sperm plasma membrane

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naaby-Hansen, Soren; Diekman, Alan; Shetty, Jagathpala; Flickinger, Charles J; Westbrook, Anne; Herr, John C

    2010-01-01

    The precise composition of the human sperm plasma membrane, the molecular interactions that define domain specific functions, and the regulation of membrane associated proteins during the capacitation...

  6. Secretins: dynamic channels for protein transport across membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkov, Konstantin V.; Gonen, Tamir; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Secretins form mega-Dalton bacterial membrane channels in at least four sophisticated multi-protein systems that are crucial for translocation of proteins and assembled fibers across the outer membrane of many species of bacteria. Secretin subunits contain multiple domains, which interact with numerous other proteins, including pilotins, secretion system partner proteins and exoproteins. Our understanding of the structure of secretins is rapidly progressing, and we now recognize that features common to all secretins include a cylindrical arrangement of 12–15 subunits, a large periplasmic vestibule with a wide opening on one end and a periplasmic gate at the other end. Secretins might also play a key role in the biogenesis of their cognate secretion systems. PMID:21565514

  7. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L.;

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This "protein-centric" view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains...... in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range...... of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a "receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET...

  8. A contemporary approach for treatment planning of horizontally resorbed alveolar ridge: Ridge split technique with simultaneous implant placement using platelet rich fibrin membrane application in mandibular anterior region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthiban, Prathahini S; Lakshmi, R Vijaya; Mahendra, Jaideep; Sreekumar, K; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of edentulous sites with horizontal atrophy represents a clinical situation in which the positioning of endosseous implants might be complex or sometimes impossible without a staged regenerative approach. This case report presents management of horizontally deficient mandibular anterior ridge with a contemporary approach to treatment planning and application of platelet-rich fibrin membrane for ridge split technique and simultaneous implant placement. Implants in anterior mandibular area are considered to be most predictable, stable, with high success rate and patients' satisfaction with implant esthetics. In contrast to traditional ridge augmentation techniques, ridge splitting allows for immediate implant placement following surgery and eradicates the possible morbidity from a second surgical site.

  9. [ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID RELATIVE CONTENT CHANGES IN ERYTHROCYTES AND PLATELETS PHOSPHOLIPIDS MEMBRANES FEATURES IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION PATIENTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizogub, V G; Zavalska, T V; Merkulova, I O; Bryuzgina, T S

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes and platelets phospholipid membranes fatty acid spectrum was detected in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients and in patients with coronary heart disease without atrial fibrillation. 87 patients were investigated. Significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease patients compared with healthy individuals was related. As well as a significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients compared with coronary heart disease patients without atrial fibrillation was related too. These dates may indicate that decreasing relative content arachidonic acid can be possible pathogenetic link in the development of arrhythmias.

  10. Heterologous expression of membrane proteins: choosing the appropriate host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Bernaudat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Membrane proteins are the targets of 50% of drugs, although they only represent 1% of total cellular proteins. The first major bottleneck on the route to their functional and structural characterisation is their overexpression; and simply choosing the right system can involve many months of trial and error. This work is intended as a guide to where to start when faced with heterologous expression of a membrane protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of 20 membrane proteins, both peripheral and integral, in three prokaryotic (E. coli, L. lactis, R. sphaeroides and three eukaryotic (A. thaliana, N. benthamiana, Sf9 insect cells hosts was tested. The proteins tested were of various origins (bacteria, plants and mammals, functions (transporters, receptors, enzymes and topologies (between 0 and 13 transmembrane segments. The Gateway system was used to clone all 20 genes into appropriate vectors for the hosts to be tested. Culture conditions were optimised for each host, and specific strategies were tested, such as the use of Mistic fusions in E. coli. 17 of the 20 proteins were produced at adequate yields for functional and, in some cases, structural studies. We have formulated general recommendations to assist with choosing an appropriate system based on our observations of protein behaviour in the different hosts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Most of the methods presented here can be quite easily implemented in other laboratories. The results highlight certain factors that should be considered when selecting an expression host. The decision aide provided should help both newcomers and old-hands to select the best system for their favourite membrane protein.

  11. Heterologous expression of membrane proteins: choosing the appropriate host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaudat, Florent; Frelet-Barrand, Annie; Pochon, Nathalie; Dementin, Sébastien; Hivin, Patrick; Boutigny, Sylvain; Rioux, Jean-Baptiste; Salvi, Daniel; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Richaud, Pierre; Joyard, Jacques; Pignol, David; Sabaty, Monique; Desnos, Thierry; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Darrouzet, Elisabeth; Vernet, Thierry; Rolland, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are the targets of 50% of drugs, although they only represent 1% of total cellular proteins. The first major bottleneck on the route to their functional and structural characterisation is their overexpression; and simply choosing the right system can involve many months of trial and error. This work is intended as a guide to where to start when faced with heterologous expression of a membrane protein. The expression of 20 membrane proteins, both peripheral and integral, in three prokaryotic (E. coli, L. lactis, R. sphaeroides) and three eukaryotic (A. thaliana, N. benthamiana, Sf9 insect cells) hosts was tested. The proteins tested were of various origins (bacteria, plants and mammals), functions (transporters, receptors, enzymes) and topologies (between 0 and 13 transmembrane segments). The Gateway system was used to clone all 20 genes into appropriate vectors for the hosts to be tested. Culture conditions were optimised for each host, and specific strategies were tested, such as the use of Mistic fusions in E. coli. 17 of the 20 proteins were produced at adequate yields for functional and, in some cases, structural studies. We have formulated general recommendations to assist with choosing an appropriate system based on our observations of protein behaviour in the different hosts. Most of the methods presented here can be quite easily implemented in other laboratories. The results highlight certain factors that should be considered when selecting an expression host. The decision aide provided should help both newcomers and old-hands to select the best system for their favourite membrane protein. © 2011 Bernaudat et al.

  12. A role for the membrane Golgi protein Ema in autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungsu; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2012-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular homeostatic response that involves degradation of self-components by the double-membraned autophagosome. The biogenesis of autophagosomes has been well described, but the ensuing processes after autophagosome formation are not clear. In our recent study, we proposed a model in which the Golgi complex contributes to the growth of autophagic structures, and that the Drosophila melanogaster membrane protein Ema promotes this process. In fat body cells of the D. melanogaster ema mutant, the recruitment of the Golgi complex protein Lava lamp (Lva) to autophagic structures is impaired and autophagic structures are very small. In addition, in the ema mutant autophagic turnover of SQSTM1/p62 and mitophagy are impaired. Our study not only identifies a role for Ema in autophagy, but also supports the hypothesis that the Golgi complex may be a potential membrane source for the biogenesis and development of autophagic structures.

  13. Early targeting events during membrane protein biogenesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Eitan

    2011-03-01

    All living cells have co-translational pathways for targeting membrane proteins. Co-translation pathways for secretory proteins also exist but mostly in eukaryotes. Unlike secretory proteins, the biosynthetic pathway of most membrane proteins is conserved through evolution and these proteins are usually synthesized by membrane-bound ribosomes. Translation on the membrane requires that both the ribosomes and the mRNAs be properly localized. Theoretically, this can be achieved by several means. (i) The current view is that the targeting of cytosolic mRNA-ribosome-nascent chain complexes (RNCs) to the membrane is initiated by information in the emerging hydrophobic nascent polypeptides. (ii) The alternative model suggests that ribosomes may be targeted to the membrane also constitutively, whereas the appropriate mRNAs may be carried on small ribosomal subunits or targeted by other cellular factors to the membrane-bound ribosomes. Importantly, the available experimental data do not rule out the possibility that cells may also utilize both pathways in parallel. In any case, it is well documented that a major player in the targeting pathway is the signal recognition particle (SRP) system composed of the SRP and its receptor (SR). Although the functional core of the SRP system is evolutionarily conserved, its composition and biological practice come with different flavors in various organisms. This review is dedicated mainly to the Escherichia (E.) coli SRP, where the biochemical and structural properties of components of the SRP system have been relatively characterized, yielding essential information about various aspects of the pathway. In addition, several cellular interactions of the SRP and its receptor have been described in E. coli, providing insights into their spatial function. Collectively, these in vitro studies have led to the current view of the targeting pathway [see (i) above]. Interestingly, however, in vivo studies of the role of the SRP and its receptor

  14. Self-assembling peptide and protein nanodiscs for studies of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi

    of proteins encoded by the human genome. G-protein coupled receptors mediate the majority of hormone and neurotransmitter signals as well as being responsible for perception of light, smell and taste in the human body, and a number of Nobel prizes has been awarded based on their study. Structural...... membrane proteins. A minimalistic approach was tested where the ApoA1 protein was mimicked my small amphipathic helical peptides. The resulting discs were very similar to ApoA1 based discs in size and in their ability to stabilize incorporated membrane proteins. Furthermore, due to their enhanced dynamical...

  15. Decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyama, Hiroyuki; Kono, Nozomu; Matsuda, Shinji; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-16

    Various kinds of fatty acids are distributed in membrane phospholipids in mammalian cells and tissues. The degree of fatty acid unsaturation in membrane phospholipids affects many membrane-associated functions and can be influenced by diet and by altered activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes such as fatty acid desaturases. However, little is known about how mammalian cells respond to changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition. In this study we showed that stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) knockdown increased the amount of saturated fatty acids and decreased that of monounsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids without affecting the amount or the composition of free fatty acid and induced unfolded protein response (UPR), evidenced by increased expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) mRNAs and splicing of Xbox-binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA. SCD1 knockdown-induced UPR was rescued by various unsaturated fatty acids and was enhanced by saturated fatty acid. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3), which incorporates preferentially polyunsaturated fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine, was up-regulated in SCD1 knockdown cells. Knockdown of LPCAT3 synergistically enhanced UPR with SCD1 knockdown. Finally we showed that palmitic acid-induced UPR was significantly enhanced by LPCAT3 knockdown as well as SCD1 knockdown. These results suggest that a decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces UPR.

  16. How curved membranes recruit amphipathic helices and protein anchoring motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Larsen, Jannik;

    2009-01-01

    Lipids and several specialized proteins are thought to be able to sense the curvature of membranes (MC). Here we used quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure curvature-selective binding of amphipathic motifs on single liposomes 50-700 nm in diameter. Our results revealed that sensing...

  17. Structure and Dynamic Properties of Membrane Proteins using NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösner, Heike; Kragelund, Birthe

    2012-01-01

    , a large variety of developments of well-established techniques are available providing insight into membrane protein flexibility, dynamics, and interactions. Inspired by the speed of development in the application of new strategies, by invention of methods to measure solvent accessibility and describe low...

  18. Expression of Prokaryotic Integral Membrane Proteins in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, James D

    2017-01-01

    Production of prokaryotic membrane proteins for structural and functional studies in E. coli can be parallelized and miniaturized. All stages from cloning, expression, purification to detergent selection can be investigated using high-throughput techniques to rapidly and economically find tractable targets.

  19. Structural investigation of membrane proteins by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moscicka, Katarzyna Beata

    2009-01-01

    Biological membranes are vital components of all living systems, forming the boundaries of cells and their organelles. They consist of a lipid bilayer and embedded proteins, which are nanomachines that fulfill key functions such as energy conversion, solute transport, secretion, and signal transduct

  20. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  1. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM.

  2. Repair of Nerve Cell Membrane Damage by Calcium-Dependent, Membrane-Binding Proteins (Revised)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Alzheimer disease amyloid beta protein forms calcium channels in bilayer membranes: blockade by tromethamine and aluminum , Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A...Calcium signaling and amyloid toxicity in Alzheimer disease, J Biol Chem 285 (2010) 12463-12468. [14] H.A. Lashuel, P.T. Lansbury, Are amyloid

  3. Increased expression of lysosome membrane protein 2 in glomeruli of patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rood, I.M.; Merchant, M.L.; Wilkey, D.W.; Zhang, T.; Zabrouskov, V.; Vlag, J. van der; Dijkman, H.B.P.M.; Willemsen, B.K.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Klein, J.B.; Deegens, J.K.J.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary microvesicles constitute a rich source of membrane-bound and intracellular proteins that may provide important clues of pathophysiological mechanisms in renal disease. In the current study, we analyzed and compared the proteome of urinary microvesicles from patients with idiopathic

  4. Membrane composition influences the topology bias of bacterial integral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Denice C; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-02-01

    Small multidrug resistance (SMR) protein family members confer bacterial resistance to toxic antiseptics and are believed to function as dual topology oligomers. If dual topology is essential for SMR activity, then the topology bias should change as bacterial membrane lipid compositions alter to maintain a "neutral" topology bias. To test this hypothesis, a bioinformatic analysis of bacterial SMR protein sequences was performed to determine a membrane protein topology based on charged amino acid residues within loops, and termini regions according to the positive inside rule. Three bacterial lipid membrane parameters were examined, providing the proportion of polar lipid head group charges at the membrane surface (PLH), the relative hydrophobic fatty acid length (FAL), and the proportion of fatty acid unsaturation (FAU). Our analysis indicates that individual SMR pairs, and to a lesser extent SMR singleton topology biases, are significantly correlated to increasing PLH, FAL and FAU differences validating the hypothesis. Correlations between the topology biases of SMR proteins identified in Gram+ compared to Gram- species and each lipid parameter demonstrated a linear inverse relationship.

  5. Application of split-green fluorescent protein for topology mapping membrane proteins in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toddo, Stephen; Soderstrom, Bill; Palombo, Isolde;

    2012-01-01

    A topology map of a membrane protein defines the location of transmembrane helices and the orientation of soluble domains relative to the membrane. In the absence of a high-resolution structure, a topology map is an essential guide for studying structurefunction relationships. Although these maps...

  6. Chicken Egg Shell Membrane Associated Proteins and Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkar, Sarbjeet; Liyanage, Rohana; Kannan, Lakshmi; Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Lay, Jack O; Rath, Narayan C

    2015-11-11

    Egg shells are poultry industry byproducts with potential for use in various biological and agricultural applications. We have been interested in the membranes underlying the calcareous shell as a feed supplement, which showed potential to improve immunity and performance of post hatch poultry. Therefore, to determine their protein and peptide profiles, we extracted the egg shell membranes (ESM) from fresh unfertilized eggs with methanol and guanidine hydrochloride (GdHCl) to obtain soluble proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. The methanol extract was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), high-performance reverse phase liquid chromatographic separation (HPLC), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to determine its peptide and protein profiles. The GdHCl extract was subjected to ESI-HPLC-MS/MS following trypsin digestion of reduced/alkylated proteins. Nine proteins from the methanol extract and >275 proteins from the GdHCl extract were tentatively identified. The results suggested the presence of several abundant proteins from egg whites, such as ovoalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme as well as many others associated with antimicrobial, biomechanical, cytoskeletal organizational, cell signaling, and enzyme activities. Collagens, keratin, agrin, and laminin were some of the structural proteins present in the ESM. The methanol-soluble fraction contained several clusterin peptides and defensins, particularly, two isoforms of gallin. The ratios of the two isoforms of gallin differed between the membranes obtained from brown and white eggs. The high abundance of several antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and other bioactive proteins in the ESM along with its potential to entrap various microbes and antigens may make it a suitable vehicle for oral immunization of post hatch poultry and improve their disease resistance.

  7. [Platelet cytochrome c-oxidase and glutamine synthetase-like protein in patients with mild cognitive impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Savushkina, O K; Turishcheva, M S; Tereshkina, E B; Starodubtseva, L I; Gavrilova, S I; Fedorova, Ia B; Zhuravin, I A

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to develop pre-clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and - in future - preventive therapy in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The MCI group (n=44) and AD group (n=42, including 18 patients with soft dementia and 24 patients with mild dementia) were studied. The groups were matched for age (median 70 and 69 years for MCI and AD groups, respectively). The control group comprised 24 mentally healthy relatives of the patients. Correlations between the activity/amounts of platelet enzymes: cytochrome c-oxidase (COX), glutamine synthetase-like protein (GSLP) and the extent of cognitive impairment were studied. The COX activity in MCI and AD groups was significantly lower than in the control group (Kruskal-Wallis test p=0.0001, χ²=11.6, p=0.003). These tests showed significant differences in GSLP amount between three groups (p=0.04 and χ²=9.38, p=0.01, respectively). Significant reverse correlation (Spearman R= -0.43, p=0.007) was found between GSLP amount and MMSE scores for MCI+AD group, i.e., the lower MMSE scores, the higher platelet GSLP level. Platelet COX and GSLP may be considered as early markers of cognitive impairment.

  8. The membrane-water interface region of membrane proteins: structural bias and the anti-snorkeling effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Adamian, Larisa; Jackups, Ronald

    2005-07-01

    Membrane proteins have important roles in many cellular processes. Computational analysis of their sequences and structures has provided much insight into the organizing principles of transmembrane helices. In a recent study, the membrane-water interface region was examined in detail for the first time. The results have revealed that this interface region has an important role in constraining protein secondary structure. This study raises new questions and opens up new directions for studying membrane proteins.

  9. Highly Branched Pentasaccharide-Bearing Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehsan, Muhammad; Du, Yang; Scull, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    structural and functional analysis feasible. Although a number of novel agents have been developed to overcome the limitations of conventional detergents, most have traditional head groups such as glucoside or maltoside. In this study, we introduce a class of amphiphiles, the PSA/Es with a novel highly...... branched pentasaccharide hydrophilic group. The PSA/Es conferred markedly increased stability to a diverse range of membrane proteins compared to conventional detergents, indicating a positive role for the new hydrophilic group in maintaining the native protein integrity. In addition, PDCs formed by PSA....../Es were smaller and more suitable for electron microscopic analysis than those formed by DDM, indicating that the new agents have significant potential for the structure-function studies of membrane proteins....

  10. Interaction of Serum Proteins with Surface of Hemodialysis Fiber Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rehana; Shirako, Yuji; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2012-08-01

    The poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-covered hydrophilic surface of hollow-fiber membranes (fiber membrane, hereafter) for hemodialysis was mechanically probed using modified tips on an atomic force microscope (AFM) with covalent crosslinkers and several types of serum protein. The retraction part of many of the force extension (F-E) curves obtained with AFM tips coated with serum albumin had a long and smooth extension up to 200-300 nm indicating forced elongation of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) chains. When fibrinogen-coated tips were used, long extension F-E curves up to 500 nm with multiple peaks were obtained in addition to smooth curves most likely reflecting the unfolding of fibrinogen molecules. The results indicated that individual polymer chains had a significant affinity toward serum proteins. The adhesion frequency of tips coated with serum proteins was lower on the poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) surface than on the uncoated hydrophobic polysulfone surface.

  11. Bcl-2 apoptosis proteins, mitochondrial membrane curvature, and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Schmidt, Nathan; Sanders, Lori; Mishra, Abhijit; Wong, Gerard; Ivashyna, Olena; Christenson, Eric; Schlesinger, Paul; Akabori, Kiyotaka; Santangelo, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Critical interactions between Bcl-2 family proteins permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane, a common decision point early in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway that irreversibly commits the cell to death. However, a unified picture integrating the essential non-passive role of lipid membranes with the contested dynamics of Bcl-2 regulation remains unresolved. Correlating results between synchrotron x-ray diffraction and microscopy in cell-free assays, we report activation of pro-apoptotic Bax induces strong pure negative Gaussian membrane curvature topologically necessary for pore formation and membrane remodeling events. Strikingly, Bcl-xL suppresses not only Bax-induced pore formation, but also membrane remodeling by disparate systems including cell penetrating, antimicrobial or viral fusion peptides, and bacterial toxin, none of which have BH3 allosteric domains to mediate direct binding. We propose a parallel mode of Bcl-2 pore regulation in which Bax and Bcl-xL induce antagonistic and mutually interacting Gaussian membrane curvatures. The universal nature of curvature-mediated interactions allows synergy with direct binding mechanisms, and potentially accounts for the Bcl-2 family modulation of mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics.

  12. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Koyano, Yuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous 2D fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it has been shown [Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015)] that such active proteins should in- duce non-thermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxis-like drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them.

  13. Identification of membrane proteins by tandem mass spectrometry of protein ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Joe; Altman, Matthew C; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2007-09-04

    The most common way of identifying proteins in proteomic analyses is to use short segments of sequence ("tags") determined by mass spectrometric analysis of proteolytic fragments. The approach is effective with globular proteins and with membrane proteins with significant polar segments between membrane-spanning alpha-helices, but it is ineffective with other hydrophobic proteins where protease cleavage sites are either infrequent or absent. By developing methods to purify hydrophobic proteins in organic solvents and by fragmenting ions of these proteins by collision induced dissociation with argon, we have shown that partial sequences of many membrane proteins can be deduced easily by manual inspection. The spectra from small proteolipids (1-4 transmembrane alpha-helices) are dominated usually by fragment ions arising from internal amide cleavages, from which internal sequences can be obtained, whereas the spectra from larger membrane proteins (5-18 transmembrane alpha-helices) often contain fragment ions from N- and/or C-terminal parts yielding sequences in those regions. With these techniques, we have, for example, identified an abundant protein of unknown function from inner membranes of mitochondria that to our knowledge has escaped detection in proteomic studies, and we have produced sequences from 10 of 13 proteins encoded in mitochondrial DNA. They include the ND6 subunit of complex I, the last of its 45 subunits to be analyzed. The procedures have the potential to be developed further, for example by using newly introduced methods for protein ion dissociation to induce fragmentation of internal regions of large membrane proteins, which may remain partially folded in the gas phase.

  14. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E; Purvine, Samuel O; Moore, Ronald J; Gritsenko, Marina A; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2010-05-07

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope (18)O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a Gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level (16)O and (18)O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in Delta gspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-type cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with a previous report that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system.

  15. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Weijun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-05-03

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and environmental electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 79% membrane proteins among all proteins identified from the enriched sample. To illustrate the quantification of membrane proteome changes, enriched membrane protein samples from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) were further labeled with 16O and 18O at the peptide level prior to LC-MS analysis. A chemical-probe-labeled pure protein has also been used as an internal standard for normalization purpose. The quantitative data revealed reduced abundances of many outer membrane proteins such as OmcA and MtrC in ΔgspD mutant cells, which agreed well with previously published studies.

  16. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level 16O and 18O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in ΔgspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-cype cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with previously investigation demonstrating that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system. PMID:20380418

  17. Membrane proteins PmpG and PmpH are major constituents of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 outer membrane complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Per H; Christiansen, Gunna; Roepstorff, P;

    2000-01-01

    The outer membrane complex of Chlamydia is involved in the initial adherence and ingestion of Chlamydia by the host cell. In order to identify novel proteins in the outer membrane of Chlamydia trachomatis L2, proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis....... By silver staining of the protein profile, a major protein doublet of 100-110 kDa was detected. In-gel tryptic digestion and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry identified these proteins as the putative outer membrane proteins PmpG and PmpH....

  18. Adaptation of the Bradford protein assay to membrane-bound proteins by solubilizing in glucopyranoside detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, B O

    1987-04-01

    A procedure was developed for the quantitation of solubilized proteins using the Bradford assay in the presence of glucopyranoside detergents. These detergents solubilized membrane-bound proteins with minimal background absorbance at 595 nm. Absorbance at 650 nm was also low, indicating that these detergents do not significantly stabilize the neutral species of Coomassie brilliant blue G-250 that produces interference in the presence of other detergents. Hexyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside produced less absorbance than did larger glucopyranosides, and the increase in its absorbance at 595 nm in the presence of dye reagent was related linearly to its concentration from 0 to 2%. Absorbance produced by membrane-bound protein was increased by the presence of up to 0.2% hexyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (final concentration in dye reagent) and then remained stable up to 1%, indicating that these concentrations of this detergent allowed membrane-bound proteins to react completely with the dye reagent. Standard curves of several proteins were similar in the absence or presence of 0.1-0.5% hexyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside. The quantitation of both soluble and membrane-bound proteins by the Bradford assay was similar in the presence of 0.2% hexyl-, heptyl-, and octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside. Estimates of membrane-bound protein by this assay agreed with estimates obtained with the Lowry assay and with quantitative amino acid analysis. This procedure requires no extra steps; thus, it is as rapid and convenient as the original Bradford protein assay.

  19. Protein-detergent interactions in single crystals of membrane proteins studied by neutron crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmins, P.A. [ILL, Grenoble (France); Pebay-Peyroula, E. [IBS-UJF Grenoble (France)

    1994-12-31

    The detergent micelles surrounding membrane protein molecules in single crystals can be investigated using neutron crystallography combined with H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O contrast variation. If the protein structure is known then the contrast variation method allows phases to be determined at a contrast where the detergent dominates the scattering. The application of various constraints allows the resulting scattering length density map to be realistically modeled. The method has been applied to two different forms of the membrane protein porin. In one case both hydrogenated and partially deuterated protein were used, allowing the head group and tail to be distinguished.

  20. Retreatment of endodontically failed tooth with wide-open apex using platelet rich fibrin membrane as matrix and an apical plug of Biodentine™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajinkya Mansing Pawar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary reason for an endodontic failure is the persistence or regrowth of bacteria within the root canal system, and such cases require retreatment. The tooth root development and closure of its apex occurs till 3 years after the eruption. Traumatic injuries during this development period result in endodontic complications. While dealing with a tooth, with an open apex the prime objective was eliminating bacteria from the root canal system with minimum irritation to the periapical tissues and induction of apical closure to produce favorable conditions and to confine the root canal filling within the canal space. Traditionally as supported by literature multiple dressings of calcium hydroxide medicament were advocated to induce apical barrier formation followed by an evolution of the apical artificial barrier technique where the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was used. Recently introduced Biodentine™ is similar to MTA with its basic composition, which can be used as its substitute. The main difficulty associated while treating teeth with wide-open apices are preventing the overfilling of the restorative materials that serve as an artificial barrier. Use of a matrix overcomes this challenge. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF a matrix of autologous fibrin, embedded with a large quantity of platelet and leukocyte cytokines during centrifugation can be successfully used as an apical membrane. The present case, reports a novel procedure of apexification of endodontically failed central incisor with open apex using PRF as apical membrane and Biodentine™.

  1. Purification and characterization of Band 3, the major intrinsic membrane protein of the bovine erythrocyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, H; Makino, S

    1980-03-01

    Band 3 from bovine erythrocyte membranes was isolated in a state of high purity by the following steps in the presence of a nonionic detergent, nonaethyleneglycol n-dodecyl ether (C12E9): (1) selective removal of Band 2.6 from ghosts by solubilization with 2% C12E9 (2) extraction of Band 3-rich fraction with 4% C12E9 from 2% C12E9-treated membrane residues, and (3) purification of Band 3 by aminoethyl-conjugated Sepharose 4B column chromatography. Human Band 3 was also purified in good yield by aminoethyl-conjugated Sepharose 4B column chromatography of erythrocyte membrane proteins solubilized with 1% C12E9 and treated with 2,3-dimethymaleic anhydride. There were no significant differences in CD spectra in C12E9, amino acid compositions, and migration mobilities in sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis between bovine and human Band 3. Calculations of average hydrophobicity and discriminant function demonstrated that bovine Band 3 could be categorized as a typical integral membrane protein. Bovine Band 3 showed a tendency to form a dimer and higher aggregates in 0.1% C12E9; these were resistant to dissociation into monomers in sodium dodecyl sulfate solution and, further, the protein retained residual secondary structure in highly concentrated guanidine hydrochloride solution, indicating the possible presence of an extended sequence of hydrophobic amino acid residues.

  2. Self-assembling peptide and protein nanodiscs for studies of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi

    Particles containing both lipids and proteins (so-called lipoproteins) are vital to study. They are selfassembling particles that, in the human body, are responsible for the transport of lipids and cholesterol. Due to the increasing problems of obesity and related illnesses in the world, obtaining...... more knowledge about the cholesterol and lipid metabolism is paramount. As an example, in 2012, cardiovascular disease was still the main cause of death in the U.S. This means that the study of lipoproteins is not only of pure academic interest but vital to current world problems. Another reason...... for working with lipoprotein particles are their potential in the study membrane proteins. Membrane proteins are responsible for most of the transport in and out of cells and signaling between cells. As an example G-protein coupled receptors, a class of membrane proteins, are the third largest class...

  3. Pattern Formation by Electrostatic Self-Organization of Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedec, G.; Jaeger, M.; Homble, F.; Leonetti, M.

    2012-07-01

    The electric activity of biological cells and organs such as heart for example is at the origin of various phenomena of pattern formation. The electric membrane potential appears as the order parameter to characterize these spatiotemporal dynamics. A kind of patterns is characterized by a stationary spatial modulation of membrane potential along the cell, breaking a symmetry of the system. They are associated to transcellular currents. A mechanism proposed in literature is based on the coupling of the electric current produced by membrane proteins and their electrophoretic mobilities. Beyond its classical linear stability analysis, the numerical and theoretical analysis of this model offers a variety of spatiotemporal dynamics. Firstly, the background in the modelization of electric phenomena is recalled. Secondly, the analysis is focused on two nonlinear dynamics.

  4. Super-resolution microscopy reveals compartmentalization of peroxisomal membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present...... the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins....... Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5...

  5. Analysis of membrane proteins in metagenomics: networks of correlated environmental features and protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Prianka V; Gianoulis, Tara A; Bjornson, Robert D; Yip, Kevin Y; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark B

    2010-07-01

    Recent metagenomics studies have begun to sample the genomic diversity among disparate habitats and relate this variation to features of the environment. Membrane proteins are an intuitive, but thus far overlooked, choice in this type of analysis as they directly interact with the environment, receiving signals from the outside and transporting nutrients. Using global ocean sampling (GOS) data, we found nearly approximately 900,000 membrane proteins in large-scale metagenomic sequence, approximately a fifth of which are completely novel, suggesting a large space of hitherto unexplored protein diversity. Using GPS coordinates for the GOS sites, we extracted additional environmental features via interpolation from the World Ocean Database, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, and empirical models of dust occurrence. This allowed us to study membrane protein variation in terms of natural features, such as phosphate and nitrate concentrations, and also in terms of human impacts, such as pollution and climate change. We show that there is widespread variation in membrane protein content across marine sites, which is correlated with changes in both oceanographic variables and human factors. Furthermore, using these data, we developed an approach, protein families and environment features network (PEN), to quantify and visualize the correlations. PEN identifies small groups of covarying environmental features and membrane protein families, which we call "bimodules." Using this approach, we find that the affinity of phosphate transporters is related to the concentration of phosphate and that the occurrence of iron transporters is connected to the amount of shipping, pollution, and iron-containing dust.

  6. Influence of nonequilibrium lipid transport, membrane compartmentalization, and membrane proteins on the lateral organization of the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jun; Sammalkorpi, Maria; Haataja, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    Compositional lipid domains (lipid rafts) in plasma membranes are believed to be important components of many cellular processes. The mechanisms by which cells regulate the sizes, lifetimes, and spatial localization of these domains are rather poorly understood at the moment. We propose a robust mechanism for the formation of finite-sized lipid raft domains in plasma membranes, the competition between phase separation in an immiscible lipid system and active cellular lipid transport processes naturally leads to the formation of such domains. Simulations of a continuum model reveal that the raft size distribution is broad and the average raft size is strongly dependent on the rates of cellular and interlayer lipid transport processes. We demonstrate that spatiotemporal variations in the recycling may enable the cell to localize larger raft aggregates at specific parts along the membrane. Moreover, we show that membrane compartmentalization may further facilitate spatial localization of the raft domains. Finally, we demonstrate that local interactions with immobile membrane proteins can spatially localize the rafts and lead to further clustering.

  7. Ionic protein-lipid interaction at the plasma membrane: what can the charge do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lunyi; Shi, Xiaoshan; Guo, Xingdong; Li, Hua; Xu, Chenqi

    2014-03-01

    Phospholipids are the major components of cell membranes, but they have functional roles beyond forming lipid bilayers. In particular, acidic phospholipids form microdomains in the plasma membrane and can ionically interact with proteins via polybasic sequences, which can have functional consequences for the protein. The list of proteins regulated by ionic protein-lipid interaction has been quickly expanding, and now includes membrane proteins, cytoplasmic soluble proteins, and viral proteins. Here we review how acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane regulate protein structure and function via ionic interactions, and how Ca(2+) regulates ionic protein-lipid interactions via direct and indirect mechanisms.

  8. Immunohistochemical study of the membrane skeletal protein, membrane protein palmitoylated 6 (MPP6), in the mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamijo, Akio; Saitoh, Yurika; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Ohno, Shinichi; Terada, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    The membrane protein palmitoylated (MPP) family belongs to the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family. MPP1 interacts with the protein 4.1 family member, 4.1R, as a membrane skeletal protein complex in erythrocytes. We previously described the interaction of another MPP family, MPP6, with 4.1G in the mouse peripheral nervous system. In the present study, the immunolocalization of MPP6 in the mouse small intestine was examined and compared with that of E-cadherin, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, and 4.1B, which we previously investigated in intestinal epithelial cells. The immunolocalization of MPP6 was also assessed in the small intestines of 4.1B-deficient (-/-) mice. In the small intestine, Western blotting revealed that the molecular weight of MPP6 was approximately 55-kDa, and MPP6 was immunostained under the cell membranes in the basolateral portions of almost all epithelial cells from the crypts to the villi. The immunostaining pattern of MPP6 in epithelial cells was similar to that of E-cadherin, but differed from that of ZO-1. In intestinal epithelial cells, the immunostained area of MPP6 was slightly different from that of 4.1B, which was restricted to the intestinal villi. The immunolocalization of MPP6 in small intestinal epithelial cells was similar between 4.1B(-/-) mice and 4.1B(+/+) mice. In the immunoprecipitation study, another MAGUK family protein, calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK), was shown to molecularly interact with MPP6. Thus, we herein showed the immunolocalization and interaction proteins of MPP6 in the mouse small intestine, and also that 4.1B in epithelial cells was not essential for the sorting of MPP6.

  9. Accessible Mannitol-Based Amphiphiles (MNAs) for Membrane Protein Solubilisation and Stabilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Hazrat; Du, Yang; Scull, Nicola J.;

    2016-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins are amphipathic molecules crucial for all cellular life. The structural study of these macromolecules starts with protein extraction from the native membranes, followed by purification and crystallisation. Detergents are essential tools for these processes, but detergent...

  10. Artificial membranes with selective nanochannels for protein transport

    KAUST Repository

    Sutisna, B.

    2016-09-05

    A poly(styrene-b-tert-butoxystyrene-b-styrene) copolymer was synthesized by anionic polymerization and hydrolyzed to poly(styrene-b-4-hydroxystyrene-b-styrene). Lamellar morphology was confirmed in the bulk after annealing. Membranes were fabricated by self-assembly of the hydrolyzed copolymer in solution, followed by water induced phase separation. A high density of pores of 4 to 5 nm diameter led to a water permeance of 40 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 and molecular weight cut-off around 8 kg mol−1. The morphology was controlled by tuning the polymer concentration, evaporation time, and the addition of imidazole and pyridine to stabilize the terpolymer micelles in the casting solution via hydrogen bond complexes. Transmission electron microscopy of the membrane cross-sections confirmed the formation of channels with hydroxyl groups beneficial for hydrogen-bond forming sites. The morphology evolution was investigated by time-resolved grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering experiments. The membrane channels reject polyethylene glycol with a molecular size of 10 kg mol−1, but are permeable to proteins, such as lysozyme (14.3 kg mol−1) and cytochrome c (12.4 kg mol−1), due to the right balance of hydrogen bond interactions along the channels, electrostatic attraction, as well as the right pore sizes. Our results demonstrate that artificial channels can be designed for protein transport via block copolymer self-assembly using classical methods of membrane preparation.

  11. Small cationic antimicrobial peptides delocalize peripheral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Michaela; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Otto, Andreas; Zweytick, Dagmar; May, Caroline; Schumacher, Catherine; Gust, Ronald; Albada, H Bauke; Penkova, Maya; Krämer, Ute; Erdmann, Ralf; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Straus, Suzana K; Bremer, Erhard; Becher, Dörte; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth

    2014-04-08

    Short antimicrobial peptides rich in arginine (R) and tryptophan (W) interact with membranes. To learn how this interaction leads to bacterial death, we characterized the effects of the minimal pharmacophore RWRWRW-NH2. A ruthenium-substituted derivative of this peptide localized to the membrane in vivo, and the peptide also integrated readily into mixed phospholipid bilayers that resemble Gram-positive membranes. Proteome and Western blot analyses showed that integration of the peptide caused delocalization of peripheral membrane proteins essential for respiration and cell-wall biosynthesis, limiting cellular energy and undermining cell-wall integrity. This delocalization phenomenon also was observed with the cyclic peptide gramicidin S, indicating the generality of the mechanism. Exogenous glutamate increases tolerance to the peptide, indicating that osmotic destabilization also contributes to antibacterial efficacy. Bacillus subtilis responds to peptide stress by releasing osmoprotective amino acids, in part via mechanosensitive channels. This response is triggered by membrane-targeting bacteriolytic peptides of different structural classes as well as by hypoosmotic conditions.

  12. ASP-56, a new actin sequestering protein from pig platelets with homology to CAP, an adenylate cyclase-associated protein from yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieselmann, R; Mann, K

    1992-02-24

    A new 56 kDa actin-binding protein (ASP-56) was isolated from pig platelet lysate. In falling ball viscosimetry it caused a reduction in viscosity that could be attributed to a decrease in the concentration of polymeric actin. Fluorescence measurements with NBD-labelled actin showed reduction of polymeric actin, too. These results could be explained by sequestering of actin in a non-polymerizable 1:1 ASP-56/actin complex. Sequencing of about 20 tryptic peptides of ASP-56 and comparison with known sequences revealed about 60% homology to the adenylate cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from yeast.

  13. Role of cardiolipin in stability of integral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musatov, Andrej; Sedlák, Erik

    2017-08-23

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a unique phospholipid with a dimeric structure having four acyl chains and two phosphate groups found almost exclusively in certain membranes of bacteria and of mitochondria of eukaryotes. CL interacts with numerous proteins and has been implicated in function and stabilization of several integral membrane proteins (IMPs). While both functional and stabilization roles of CL in IMPs has been generally acknowledged, there are, in fact, only limited number of quantitative analysis that support this function of CL. This is likely caused by relatively complex determination of parameters characterizing stability of IMPs and particularly intricate assessment of role of specific PLs such as CL in IMPs stability. This review aims to summarize quantitative findings regarding stabilization role of CL in IMPs reported up to now. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Societe Francaise de Biochimie et Biologie Moleculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  14. High-efficiency screening of monoclonal antibodies for membrane protein crystallography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Ho Lim

    Full Text Available Determination of crystal structures of membrane proteins is often limited by difficulties obtaining crystals diffracting to high resolution. Co-crystallization with Fab fragments of monoclonal antibodies has been reported to improve diffraction of membrane proteins crystals. However, it is not simple to generate useful monoclonal antibodies for membrane protein crystallography. In this report, we present an optimized process for efficient screening from immunization to final validation of monoclonal antibody for membrane protein crystallography.

  15. Platelet adhesion: structural and functional diversity of short dystrophin and utrophins in the formation of dystrophin-associated-protein complexes related to actin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Chávez, Oscar; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; García-Sierra, Francisco; Rendon, Alvaro; Mornet, Dominique; Mondragón, Ricardo

    2005-12-01

    Platelets are dynamic cell fragments that modify their shape during activation. Utrophin and dystrophins are minor actin-binding proteins present in muscle and non-muscle cytoskeleton. In the present study, we characterised the pattern of Dp71 isoforms and utrophin gene products by immunoblot in human platelets. Two new dystrophin isoforms were found, Dp71f and Dp71 d, as well as the Up71 isoform and the dystrophin-associated proteins, alpha and beta -dystrobrevins. Distribution of Dp71d/Dp71delta110m, Up400/Up71 and dystrophin-associated proteins in relation to the actin cytoskeleton was evaluated by confocal microscopy in both resting and platelets adhered on glass. Formation of two dystrophin-associated protein complexes (Dp71d/Dp71delta110m approximately DAPC and Up400/Up71 approximately DAPC) was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and their distribution in relation to the actin cytoskeleton was characterised during platelet adhesion. The Dp71d/Dp71delta100m approximately DAPC is maintained mainly at the granulomere and is associated with dynamic structures during activation by adhesion to thrombin-coated surfaces. Participation of both Dp71d/Dp71delta110m approximately DAPC and Up400/Up71 approximately DAPC in the biological roles of the platelets is discussed.

  16. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET: a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L; James, Ho C S; Rydström, Anna; Ngassam, Viviane N; Klausen, Thomas Kjær; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Lam, Matti; Parikh, Atul N; Svanborg, Catharina

    2015-11-12

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This ''protein-centric" view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. We identify a ''receptor independent" transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. Finally, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features suggest that HAMLET-induced curvature-dependent membrane conformations serve as surrogate receptors for initiating signal transduction cascades, ultimately leading to cell death.

  17. Similar Energetic Contributions of Packing in the Core of Membrane and Water-Soluble Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joh, Nathan H.; Oberai, Amit; Yang, Duan; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Bowie, James U.; (UCLA)

    2009-09-15

    A major driving force for water-soluble protein folding is the hydrophobic effect, but membrane proteins cannot make use of this stabilizing contribution in the apolar core of the bilayer. It has been proposed that membrane proteins compensate by packing more efficiently. We therefore investigated packing contributions experimentally by observing the energetic and structural consequences of cavity creating mutations in the core of a membrane protein. We observed little difference in the packing energetics of water and membrane soluble proteins. Our results imply that other mechanisms are employed to stabilize the structure of membrane proteins.

  18. Nanodisc-Tm: Rapid functional assessment of nanodisc reconstituted membrane proteins by CPM assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Yashwanth; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are generally unstable in detergents. Therefore, biochemical and biophysical studies of membrane proteins in lipidic environments provides a near native-like environment suitable for membrane proteins. However, manipulation of proteins embedded in lipid bilayer has remained difficult. Methods such as nanodiscs and lipid cubic phase have been developed for easy manipulation of membrane proteins and have yielded significant insights into membrane proteins. Traditionally functional reconstitution of receptors in nanodiscs has been studied with radioligands. We present a simple and faster method for studying the functionality of reconstituted membrane proteins for routine characterization of protein batches after initial optimization of suitable conditions using radioligands. The benefits of the method are •Faster and generic method to assess functional reconstitution of membrane proteins.•Adaptable in high throughput format (≥96 well format).•Stability measurement in near-native lipid environment and lipid dependent melting temperatures.

  19. Characterization of membrane protein interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situ, Alan J; Schmidt, Thomas; Mazumder, Parichita; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2014-10-23

    Understanding the structure, folding, and interaction of membrane proteins requires experimental tools to quantify the association of transmembrane (TM) helices. Here, we introduce isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure integrin αIIbβ3 TM complex affinity, to study the consequences of helix-helix preorientation in lipid bilayers, and to examine protein-induced lipid reorganization. Phospholipid bicelles served as membrane mimics. The association of αIIbβ3 proceeded with a free energy change of -4.61±0.04kcal/mol at bicelle conditions where the sampling of random helix-helix orientations leads to complex formation. At bicelle conditions that approach a true bilayer structure in effect, an entropy saving of >1kcal/mol was obtained from helix-helix preorientation. The magnitudes of enthalpy and entropy changes increased distinctly with bicelle dimensions, indicating long-range changes in bicelle lipid properties upon αIIbβ3 TM association. NMR spectroscopy confirmed ITC affinity measurements and revealed αIIbβ3 association and dissociation rates of 4500±100s(-1) and 2.1±0.1s(-1), respectively. Thus, ITC is able to provide comprehensive insight into the interaction of membrane proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteomic analysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elortza, Felix; Nühse, Thomas S; Foster, Leonard J; Stensballe, Allan; Peck, Scott C; Jensen, Ole N

    2003-12-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are a functionally and structurally diverse family of post-translationally modified membrane proteins found mostly in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane in a variety of eukaryotic cells. Although the general role of GPI-APs remains unclear, they have attracted attention because they act as enzymes and receptors in cell adhesion, differentiation, and host-pathogen interactions. GPI-APs may represent potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets in humans and are interesting in plant biotechnology because of their key role in root development. We here present a general mass spectrometry-based proteomic "shave-and-conquer" strategy that specifically targets GPI-APs. Using a combination of biochemical methods, mass spectrometry, and computational sequence analysis we identified six GPI-APs in a Homo sapiens lipid raft-enriched fraction and 44 GPI-APs in an Arabidopsis thaliana membrane preparation, representing the largest experimental dataset of GPI-anchored proteins to date.

  1. Simulation and analysis of FRET in the study of membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazarov, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Membrane proteins play an important role in almost all cell activities. However, the characterization of the structure of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers is still at the frontier of structural biology. While 30-40% of all proteins are situated at or in membranes, yet less than 1% of the known

  2. Simulation and analysis of FRET in the study of membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazarov, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Membrane proteins play an important role in almost all cell activities. However, the characterization of the structure of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers is still at the frontier of structural biology. While 30-40% of all proteins are situated at or in membranes, yet less than 1% of the known pr

  3. Biomimetic Membranes for Multi-Redox Center Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate L. C. Naumann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available His-tag technology was applied for biosensing purposes involving multi-redox center proteins (MRPs. An overview is presented on various surfaces ranging from flat to spherical and modified with linker molecules with nitrile-tri-acetic acid (NTA terminal groups to bind his-tagged proteins in a strict orientation. The bound proteins are submitted to in situ dialysis in the presence of lipid micelles to form a so-called protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM. MRPs, such as the cytochrome c oxidase (CcO from R. sphaeroides and P. denitrificans, as well as photosynthetic reactions centers (RCs from R. sphaeroides, were thus investigated. Electrochemical and surface-sensitive optical techniques, such as surface plasmon resonance, surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence, surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS, were employed in the case of the ptBLM structure on flat surfaces. Spherical particles ranging from µm size agarose gel beads to nm size nanoparticles modified in a similar fashion were called proteo-lipobeads (PLBs. The particles were investigated by laser-scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy (LSM and UV/Vis spectroscopy. Electron and proton transfer through the proteins were demonstrated to take place, which was strongly affected by the membrane potential. MRPs can thus be used for biosensing purposes under quasi-physiological conditions.

  4. Targeting proteins to liquid-ordered domains in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Hayden, Carl C; Sanchez, Mari Angelica A; Wang, Julia; Bunker, Bruce C; Voigt, James A; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2011-02-15

    We demonstrate the construction of novel protein-lipid assemblies through the design of a lipid-like molecule, DPIDA, endowed with tail-driven affinity for specific lipid membrane phases and head-driven affinity for specific proteins. In studies performed on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) with varying mole fractions of dipalymitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol, and diphytanoylphosphatidyl choline (DPhPC), DPIDA selectively partitioned into the more ordered phases, either solid or liquid-ordered (L(o)) depending on membrane composition. Fluorescence imaging established the phase behavior of the resulting quaternary lipid system. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy confirmed the fluidity of the L(o) phase containing DPIDA. In the presence of CuCl(2), the iminodiacetic acid (IDA) headgroup of DPIDA forms the Cu(II)-IDA complex that exhibits a high affinity for histidine residues. His-tagged proteins were bound specifically to domains enriched in DPIDA, demonstrating the capacity to target protein binding selectively to both solid and L(o) phases. Steric pressure from the crowding of surface-bound proteins transformed the domains into tubules with persistence lengths that depended on the phase state of the lipid domains.

  5. Rigid proteins and softening of biological membranes-with application to HIV-induced cell membrane softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Himani; Zelisko, Matthew; Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-05-06

    A key step in the HIV-infection process is the fusion of the virion membrane with the target cell membrane and the concomitant transfer of the viral RNA. Experimental evidence suggests that the fusion is preceded by considerable elastic softening of the cell membranes due to the insertion of fusion peptide in the membrane. What are the mechanisms underpinning the elastic softening of the membrane upon peptide insertion? A broader question may be posed: insertion of rigid proteins in soft membranes ought to stiffen the membranes not soften them. However, experimental observations perplexingly appear to show that rigid proteins may either soften or harden membranes even though conventional wisdom only suggests stiffening. In this work, we argue that regarding proteins as merely non-specific rigid inclusions is flawed, and each protein has a unique mechanical signature dictated by its specific interfacial coupling to the surrounding membrane. Predicated on this hypothesis, we have carried out atomistic simulations to investigate peptide-membrane interactions. Together with a continuum model, we reconcile contrasting experimental data in the literature including the case of HIV-fusion peptide induced softening. We conclude that the structural rearrangements of the lipids around the inclusions cause the softening or stiffening of the biological membranes.

  6. Therapeutic design of peptide modulators of protein-protein interactions in membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Tracy A; Deber, Charles M

    2017-04-01

    Membrane proteins play the central roles in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from nutrient uptake and signalling, to cell-cell communication. Their biological functions are directly related to how they fold and assemble; defects often lead to disease. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) within the membrane are therefore of great interest as therapeutic targets. Here we review the progress in the application of membrane-insertable peptides for the disruption or stabilization of membrane-based PPIs. We describe the design and preparation of transmembrane peptide mimics; and of several categories of peptidomimetics used for study, including d-enantiomers, non-natural amino acids, peptoids, and β-peptides. Further aspects of the review describe modifications to membrane-insertable peptides, including lipidation and cyclization via hydrocarbon stapling. These approaches provide a pathway toward the development of metabolically stable, non-toxic, and efficacious peptide modulators of membrane-based PPIs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  7. Acinetobacter baumannii outer membrane vesicles elicit a potent innate immune response via membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Hyun Jun

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is increasingly becoming a major nosocomial pathogen. This opportunistic pathogen secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs that interact with host cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of A. baumannii OMVs to elicit a pro-inflammatory response in vitro and the immunopathology in response to A. baumannii OMVs in vivo. OMVs derived from A. baumannii ATCC 19606(T induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6, and chemokine genes, IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, in epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Disintegration of OMV membrane with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid resulted in low expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, as compared with the response to intact OMVs. In addition, proteinase K-treated A. baumannii OMVs did not induce significant increase in expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes above the basal level, suggesting that the surface-exposed membrane proteins in intact OMVs are responsible for pro-inflammatory response. Early inflammatory processes, such as vacuolization and detachment of epithelial cells and neutrophilic infiltration, were clearly observed in lungs of mice injected with A. baumannii OMVs. Our data demonstrate that OMVs produced by A. baumannii elicit a potent innate immune response, which may contribute to immunopathology of the infected host.

  8. GRIFFIN: A versatile methodology for optimization of protein-lipid interfaces for membrane protein simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staritzbichler, René; Anselmi, Claudio; Forrest, Lucy R; Faraldo-Gómez, José D

    2011-04-12

    As new atomic structures of membrane proteins are resolved, they reveal increasingly complex transmembrane topologies, and highly irregular surfaces with crevices and pores. In many cases, specific interactions formed with the lipid membrane are functionally crucial, as is the overall lipid composition. Compounded with increasing protein size, these characteristics pose a challenge for the construction of simulation models of membrane proteins in lipid environments; clearly, that these models are sufficiently realistic bears upon the reliability of simulation-based studies of these systems. Here, we introduce GRIFFIN, which uses a versatile framework to automate and improve a widely-used membrane-embedding protocol. Initially, GRIFFIN carves out lipid and water molecules from a volume equivalent to that of the protein, so as to conserve the system density. In the subsequent optimization phase GRIFFIN adds an implicit grid-based protein force-field to a molecular dynamics simulation of the pre-carved membrane. In this force-field, atoms inside the implicit protein volume experience an outward force that will expel them from that volume, whereas those outside are subject to electrostatic and van-der-Waals interactions with the implicit protein. At each step of the simulation, these forces are updated by GRIFFIN and combined with the intermolecular forces of the explicit lipid-water system. This procedure enables the construction of realistic and reproducible starting configurations of the protein-membrane interface within a reasonable timeframe and with minimal intervention. GRIFFIN is a standalone tool designed to work alongside any existing molecular dynamics package, such as NAMD or GROMACS.

  9. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: a lattice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, D A; Chapman, D

    1979-04-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure-area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T(0), which locates the gel-fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a "smooth" homogeneous surface ("cholesterol-like") and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T(0) can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken "annulus" of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T(0) does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10(-7) sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed.

  10. Membrane recruitment of scaffold proteins drives specific signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Pincet

    Full Text Available Cells must give the right response to each stimulus they receive. Scaffolding, a signaling process mediated by scaffold proteins, participates in the decoding of the cues by specifically directing signal transduction. The aim of this paper is to describe the molecular mechanisms of scaffolding, i.e. the principles by which scaffold proteins drive a specific response of the cell. Since similar scaffold proteins are found in many species, they evolved according to the purpose of each organism. This means they require adaptability. In the usual description of the mechanisms of scaffolding, scaffold proteins are considered as reactors where molecules involved in a cascade of reactions are simultaneously bound with the right orientation to meet and interact. This description is not realistic: (i it is not verified by experiments and (ii timing and orientation constraints make it complex which seems to contradict the required adaptability. A scaffold protein, Ste5, is used in the MAPK pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the cell to provide a specific response to stimuli. The massive amount of data available for this pathway makes it ideal to investigate the actual mechanisms of scaffolding. Here, a complete treatment of the chemical reactions allows the computation of the distributions of all the proteins involved in the MAPK pathway when the cell receives various cues. These distributions are compared to several experimental results. It turns out that the molecular mechanisms of scaffolding are much simpler and more adaptable than previously thought in the reactor model. Scaffold proteins bind only one molecule at a time. Then, their membrane recruitment automatically drives specific, amplified and localized signal transductions. The mechanisms presented here, which explain how the membrane recruitment of a protein can produce a drastic change in the activity of cells, are generic and may be commonly used in many biological processes.

  11. Protein C inhibitor (PCI) binds to phosphatidylserine exposing cells with implications in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and activated platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Daniela; Assinger, Alice; Einfinger, Katrin; Sokolikova, Barbora; Geiger, Margarethe

    2014-01-01

    Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS) is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marker. We hypothesized that PCI might bind to PS exposed on apoptotic cells and thereby influence their removal by phagocytosis. Using Jurkat T-lymphocytes and U937 myeloid cells, we show here that PCI binds to apoptotic cells to a similar extent at the same sites as Annexin V, but in a different manner as compared to live cells (defined spots on ∼10-30% of cells). PCI dose dependently decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by U937 macrophages. Moreover, the phagocytosis of PS exposing, activated platelets by human blood derived monocytes declined in the presence of PCI. In U937 cells the expression of PCI as well as the surface binding of PCI increased with time of phorbol ester treatment/macrophage differentiation. The results of this study suggest a role of PCI not only for the function and/or maturation of macrophages, but also as a negative regulator of apoptotic cell and activated platelets removal.

  12. Protein C inhibitor (PCI binds to phosphatidylserine exposing cells with implications in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and activated platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Rieger

    Full Text Available Protein C Inhibitor (PCI is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marker. We hypothesized that PCI might bind to PS exposed on apoptotic cells and thereby influence their removal by phagocytosis. Using Jurkat T-lymphocytes and U937 myeloid cells, we show here that PCI binds to apoptotic cells to a similar extent at the same sites as Annexin V, but in a different manner as compared to live cells (defined spots on ∼10-30% of cells. PCI dose dependently decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by U937 macrophages. Moreover, the phagocytosis of PS exposing, activated platelets by human blood derived monocytes declined in the presence of PCI. In U937 cells the expression of PCI as well as the surface binding of PCI increased with time of phorbol ester treatment/macrophage differentiation. The results of this study suggest a role of PCI not only for the function and/or maturation of macrophages, but also as a negative regulator of apoptotic cell and activated platelets removal.

  13. Distribution of secretory inhibitor of platelet microbiddal protein among anaerobic bacteria isolated from stool of children with diarrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iuri B Ivanov; Viktor A Gritsenko

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the secretory inhibitor of platelet microbicidal protein (SIPHP) phenotypes of faecal anaerobic isolates from patients with diarrhea.METHODS: Faecal isolates of anaerobic bacteria(B.fragiliS,n=42; B.longum,n=70;A.israelii,n=21;E.lentum,n=12) from children with diarrhea were tested.SlPHP production was tested by inhibition of platelet microbicidal protein (PHP) bioactivity against B.subtilis and was expressed as percentage of inhibition of PMP bactericidal activity.RESULTS: Among anaerobic isolates 80% of B.Iongum strains,85.7% of A.israelii strains,50%of E.lentum strains and 92.86% of B.fragilis strains were SIPMP-positive.The isolated anaerobic organisms demonstrated SIPHP production at a mean level of 13.8%±0.7%,14.7%±1.8%,3.9%±0.9% (P<0.05) and 26.8%±7.5% (P<0.05) for bifidobacteria,A.israelii,E.lentum and B.fragilis,respectively.CONCLUSION: Data from the present study may have significant implications in understanding the pathogenesis of microecological disorders in the intestine,as well as for future improvement in the prevention and therapy of anaerobe-associated infections.

  14. Improved Recovery and Identification of Membrane Proteins from Rat Hepatic Cells using a Centrifugal Proteomic Reactor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hu; Wang, Fangjun; Wang, Yuwei; Ning, Zhibin; Hou, Weimin; Wright, Theodore G.; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Zhong, Shumei; Yao, Zemin; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance in many biological processes, membrane proteins are underrepresented in proteomic analysis because of their poor solubility (hydrophobicity) and often low abundance. We describe a novel approach for the identification of plasma membrane proteins and intracellular microsomal proteins that combines membrane fractionation, a centrifugal proteomic reactor for streamlined protein extraction, protein digestion and fractionation by centrifugation, and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem MS. The performance of this approach was illustrated for the study of the proteome of ER and Golgi microsomal membranes in rat hepatic cells. The centrifugal proteomic reactor identified 945 plasma membrane proteins and 955 microsomal membrane proteins, of which 63 and 47% were predicted as bona fide membrane proteins, respectively. Among these proteins, >800 proteins were undetectable by the conventional in-gel digestion approach. The majority of the membrane proteins only identified by the centrifugal proteomic reactor were proteins with ≥2 transmembrane segments or proteins with high molecular mass (e.g. >150 kDa) and hydrophobicity. The improved proteomic reactor allowed the detection of a group of endocytic and/or signaling receptor proteins on the plasma membrane, as well as apolipoproteins and glycerolipid synthesis enzymes that play a role in the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins. Thus, the centrifugal proteomic reactor offers a new analytical tool for structure and function studies of membrane proteins involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:21749988

  15. Improved recovery and identification of membrane proteins from rat hepatic cells using a centrifugal proteomic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hu; Wang, Fangjun; Wang, Yuwei; Ning, Zhibin; Hou, Weimin; Wright, Theodore G; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Zhong, Shumei; Yao, Zemin; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    Despite their importance in many biological processes, membrane proteins are underrepresented in proteomic analysis because of their poor solubility (hydrophobicity) and often low abundance. We describe a novel approach for the identification of plasma membrane proteins and intracellular microsomal proteins that combines membrane fractionation, a centrifugal proteomic reactor for streamlined protein extraction, protein digestion and fractionation by centrifugation, and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem MS. The performance of this approach was illustrated for the study of the proteome of ER and Golgi microsomal membranes in rat hepatic cells. The centrifugal proteomic reactor identified 945 plasma membrane proteins and 955 microsomal membrane proteins, of which 63 and 47% were predicted as bona fide membrane proteins, respectively. Among these proteins, >800 proteins were undetectable by the conventional in-gel digestion approach. The majority of the membrane proteins only identified by the centrifugal proteomic reactor were proteins with ≥ 2 transmembrane segments or proteins with high molecular mass (e.g. >150 kDa) and hydrophobicity. The improved proteomic reactor allowed the detection of a group of endocytic and/or signaling receptor proteins on the plasma membrane, as well as apolipoproteins and glycerolipid synthesis enzymes that play a role in the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins. Thus, the centrifugal proteomic reactor offers a new analytical tool for structure and function studies of membrane proteins involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism.

  16. Combination of hydroxyapatite, platelet rich fibrin and amnion membrane as a novel therapeutic option in regenerative periapical endodontic surgery: Case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppada, Uday Kiran; Kalakonda, Butchibabu; Koppolu, Pradeep; Varma, Narendra; Palakurthy, Kiran; Manchikanti, Venkatesh; Prasad, Shilpa; Samar, Shereen; Swapna, Lingam Amara

    2017-01-01

    Periapical surgery is the last resort in the arsenal of an endodontist to effectively deal with periapical lesions that result from necrosis of the pulp. Bone grafts, growth factors and membranes form an array of regenerative materials that influence the healing outcome of periapical surgery. The main purpose of the two cases reported here was to assess the potential benefits of a combination of bone graft, platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and amnion membrane in terms of reduced post-operative discomfort, radiographic evidence of accelerated periapical bone healing and present a novel therapeutic option in the management of large periapical lesions. Two cases of radicular cysts were treated through a combined regenerative approachof Bio-Gen mix(®), PRF and amnion membrane. The patients were assessed for discomfort immediate post-operatively and after a week. The patients were recalled every month for the next 6 months for radiographic assessment of the periapical healing. Literature is replete with articles that have substantiated the role of demineralized bone matrix comprising a mixture of cancellous and cortical bone graft particles in enhancing regeneration. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no evidence related to the application of a human placental membrane in periapical surgery. Hence, the rationale of using a combined approach of Bio-Gen mix(®), PRF and amnion membrane was to combine the individual advantages of these materials to enhance clinical and radiographic healing outcomes. Our present case reports provide an insight into this novel therapeutic option. The results of this case seriessubstantiatesthe credibility of using a combination ofamnion membrane with a bone graft and PRF to enhance radiographic healing outcome with decreased post-operative discomfort and present a viable regenerative treatment modality in periapical surgery. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Immunoproteomic analysis of outer membrane proteins and extracellular proteins of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae JL03 serotype 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Yong

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious respiratory infection in pigs, and all the 15 serotypes are able to cause disease. Current vaccines including subunit vaccines could not provide satisfactory protection against A. pleuropneumoniae. In this study, the immunoproteomic approach was applied to the analysis of extracellular and outer membrane proteins of A. pleuropneumoniae JL03 serotype 3 for the identification of novel immunogenic proteins for A. pleuropneumoniae. Results A total of 30 immunogenic proteins were identified from outer membrane and extracellular proteins of JL03 serotype 3, of which 6 were known antigens and 24 were novel immunogenic proteins for A. pleuropneumoniae. Conclusion These data provide information about novel immunogenic proteins for A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 3, and are expected to aid in development of novel vaccines against A. pleuropneumoniae.

  18. Isolation of a unique membrane protein from Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réveiller, F L; Suh, S J; Sullivan, K; Cabanes, P A; Marciano-Cabral, F

    2001-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri, an amoeboflagellate, is the causative agent of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis, a fulminating disease of the central nervous system. In order to elucidate the mechanisms of pathogenicity of this amoeba, a cDNA expression library was prepared from N. fowleri RNA. A specific protein was found to be expressed from a cDNA clone designated Mp2CL5. Northern blot analysis showed that the Mp2CL5 mRNA was expressed in pathogenic N. fowleri but was not expressed in non-pathogenic Naegleria species nor in Acanthamoeba. Western blot analysis using anti-N. fowleri antiserum demonstrated that IPTG-induced Escherichia coli Mp2CL5 expressed a 23-kDa recombinant protein. The Mp2CL5 recombinant protein was histidine-tagged and purified to homogeneity from E. coli. A polyclonal rabbit antiserum was prepared against the purified Mp2CL5 recombinant protein. This antibody was used to further characterize the Mp2CL5 native protein expressed by N. fowleri. Western blot analysis in conjunction with immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated the presence of a native protein of 17 kDa on the plasma membrane of N. fowleri trophozoites. The native N. fowleri protein was expressed in the logarithmic phase of trophozoite growth and the production of this protein increased through the stationary phase of growth. Studies are in progress to examine further its role as a virulence factor.

  19. Fatty acids, membrane viscosity, serotonin and ischemic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cocchi Massimo; Tonello Lucio; Lercker Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Novel markers for ischemic heart disease are under investigation by the scientific community at international level. This work focuses on a specific platelet membrane fatty acid condition of viscosity which is linked to molecular aspects such as serotonin and G proteins, factors involved in vascular biology. A suggestive hypothesis is considered about the possibility to use platelet membrane viscosity, in relation to serotonin or, indirectly, the fatty acid profile, as indicator of i...

  20. Human platelets repurposed as vehicles for in vivo imaging of myeloma xenotransplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lu; Gu, Ning; Chen, Bao-An; Marriott, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Human platelets were identified in tumors by Trousseau in 1865, although their roles in tumor microenvironments have only recently attracted the attention of cancer researchers. In this study we exploit and enhance platelet interactions in tumor microenvironments by introducing tumor-targeting and imaging functions. The first step in repurposing human platelets as vehicles for tumor-targeting was to inhibit platelet-aggregation by cytoplasmic-loading of kabiramide (KabC), a potent inhibitor of actin polymerization and membrane protrusion. KabC-Platelets can accumulate high levels of other membrane-permeable cytoxins and probes, including epidoxorubicin, carboxyfluorescein di-ester and chlorin-e6. Finally, mild reaction conditions were developed to couple tumor-targeting proteins and antibodies to KabC-platelets. Fluorescence microscopy studies showed KabC-platelets, surface-coupled with transferrin and Cy5, bind specifically to RPMI8226 and K562 cells, both of which over-express the transferrin receptor. Repurposed platelets circulate for upto 9-days a feature that increases their chance of interacting with target cells. KabC-platelets, surface-coupled with transferrin and Cy7, or chlorin-e6, and injected in immuno-compromised mice were shown to accumulate specifically in sub-cutaneous and intra-cranial myeloma xenotransplants. The high-contrast, in vivo fluorescence images recorded from repurposed platelets within early-stage myeloma is a consequence in part of their large size (φ∼2μm), which allows them to transport 100 to 1000-times more targeting-protein and probe molecules respectively. Human platelets can be configured with a plurality of therapeutic and targeting antibodies to help stage tumor environments for an immunotherapy, or with combinations of therapeutic antibodies and therapeutic agents to target and treat cardiovascular and neurologic diseases. PMID:27049725

  1. Human platelets repurposed as vehicles for in vivo imaging of myeloma xenotransplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lu; Gu, Ning; Chen, Bao-An; Marriott, Gerard

    2016-04-19

    Human platelets were identified in tumors by Trousseau in 1865, although their roles in tumor microenvironments have only recently attracted the attention of cancer researchers. In this study we exploit and enhance platelet interactions in tumor microenvironments by introducing tumor-targeting and imaging functions. The first step in repurposing human platelets as vehicles for tumor-targeting was to inhibit platelet-aggregation by cytoplasmic-loading of kabiramide (KabC), a potent inhibitor of actin polymerization and membrane protrusion. KabC-Platelets can accumulate high levels of other membrane-permeable cytoxins and probes, including epidoxorubicin, carboxyfluorescein di-ester and chlorin-e6. Finally, mild reaction conditions were developed to couple tumor-targeting proteins and antibodies to KabC-platelets. Fluorescence microscopy studies showed KabC-platelets, surface-coupled with transferrin and Cy5, bind specifically to RPMI8226 and K562 cells, both of which over-express the transferrin receptor. Repurposed platelets circulate for upto 9-days a feature that increases their chance of interacting with target cells. KabC-platelets, surface-coupled with transferrin and Cy7, or chlorin-e6, and injected in immuno-compromised mice were shown to accumulate specifically in sub-cutaneous and intra-cranial myeloma xenotransplants. The high-contrast, in vivo fluorescence images recorded from repurposed platelets within early-stage myeloma is a consequence in part of their large size (φ~2µm), which allows them to transport 100 to 1000-times more targeting-protein and probe molecules respectively. Human platelets can be configured with a plurality of therapeutic and targeting antibodies to help stage tumor environments for an immunotherapy, or with combinations of therapeutic antibodies and therapeutic agents to target and treat cardiovascular and neurologic diseases.

  2. The influence of cholesterol on membrane protein structure, function, and dynamics studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouleff, Julie; Irudayam, Sheeba Jem; Skeby, Katrine K; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-09-01

    The plasma membrane, which encapsulates human cells, is composed of a complex mixture of lipids and embedded proteins. Emerging knowledge points towards the lipids as having a regulating role in protein function. Furthermore, insight from protein crystallography has revealed several different types of lipids intimately bound to membrane proteins and peptides, hereby possibly pointing to a site of action for the observed regulation. Cholesterol is among the lipid membrane constituents most often observed to be co-crystallized with membrane proteins, and the cholesterol levels in cell membranes have been found to play an essential role in health and disease. Remarkably little is known about the mechanism of lipid regulation of membrane protein function in health as well as in disease. Herein, we review molecular dynamics simulation studies aimed at investigating the effect of cholesterol on membrane protein and peptide properties. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Intramembrane particles and the organization of lymphocyte membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, J M; Wofsy, L

    1981-03-01

    An experimental system was developed in which the majority of all lymphocyte cell-surface proteins, regardless of antigenic specificity, could be cross-linked and redistributed in the membrane to determine whether this would induce a corresponding redistribution of intramembrane particles (IMP). Mouse spleen cells were treated with P-diazoniumphenyl- beta-D-lactoside (lac) to modify all exposed cell-surface proteins. Extensive azo- coupling was achieved without significantly reducing cell viability or compromising cellular function in mitogen- or antigen-stimulated cultures. When the lac-modified cell- surface proteins were capped with a sandwich of rabbit antilactoside antibody and fluorescein-goat anti-rabbit Ig, freeze-fracture preparations obtained from these cells revealed no obvious redistribution of IMP on the majority of fracture faces. However, detailed analysis showed a statistically significant 35 percent decrease (P less than 0.01) in average IMP density in the E face of the lac-capped spleen cells compared with control cells, whereas a few E-face micrographs showed intense IMP aggregation. In contrast, there was no significant alteration of P-face IMP densities or distribution. Apparently, the majority of E-face IMP and virtually all P-face IMP densities or distribution. Apparently, the majority of E-face IMP and virtually all P-face IMP do not present accessible antigenic sites on the lymphocyte surface and do not associate in a stable manner with surface protein antigens. This finding suggests that IMP, as observed in freeze-fracture analysis, may not comprise a representative reflection of lymphocyte transmembrane protein molecules and complexes because other evidence establishes: (a) that at least some common lymphocyte surface antigens are indeed exposed portions of transmembrane proteins and (b) that the aggregation of molecules of any surface antigen results in altered organization of contractile proteins at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane.

  4. Identification of frog photoreceptor plasma and disk membrane proteins by radioiodination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, P.L.; Bownds, M.D.

    1987-03-24

    Several functions have been identified for the plasma membrane of the rod outer segment, including control of light-dependent changes in sodium conductance and a sodium-calcium exchange mechanism. However, little is known about its constituent proteins. Intact rod outer segments substantially free of contaminants were prepared in the dark and purified on a density gradient of Percoll. Surface proteins were then labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination, and intact rod outer segments were reisolated. Membrane proteins were identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. The surface proteins labeled included rhodopsin, the major membrane protein, and 12 other proteins. To compare the protein composition of plasma membrane with that of the internal disk membrane, purified rod outer segments were lysed by hypotonic disruption or freeze-thawing, and plasma plus disk membranes were radioiodinated. In these membrane preparations, rhodopsin was the major iodinated constituent, with 12 other proteins also labeled. Autoradiographic evidence indicated some differences in protein composition between disk and plasma membranes. A quantitative comparison of the two samples showed that labeling of two proteins, 24 kilodaltons (kDa) and 13 kDa, was enriched in the plasma membrane, while labeling of a 220-kDa protein was enriched in the disk membrane. These plasma membrane proteins may be associated with important functions such as the light-sensitive conductance and the sodium-calcium exchanger.

  5. Mapping membrane protein interactions in cell signaling systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, Yooli Kim; Hadi, Masood Z.; Lane, Pamela; Jacobsen, Richard B.; Hong, Joohee; Ayson, Marites J.; Wood, Nichole L.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2003-12-01

    We proposed to apply a chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry and modeling method called MS3D to the structure determination of the rhodopsin-transducin membrane protein complex (RTC). Herein we describe experimental progress made to adapt the MS3D approach for characterizing membrane protein systems, and computational progress in experimental design, data analysis and protein structure modeling. Over the past three years, we have developed tailored experimental methods for all steps in the MS3D method for rhodopsin, including protein purification, a functional assay, cross-linking, proteolysis and mass spectrometry. In support of the experimental effort. we have out a data analysis pipeline in place that automatically selects the monoisotopic peaks in a mass spectrometric spectrum, assigns them and stores the results in a database. Theoretical calculations using 24 experimentally-derived distance constraints have resulted in a backbone-level model of the activated form of rhodopsin, which is a critical first step towards building a model of the RTC. Cross-linked rhodopsin-transducin complexes have been isolated via gel electrophoresis and further mass spectrometric characterization of the cross-links is underway.

  6. Characterization of auxin-binding proteins from zucchini plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rice, M. S.; Lomax, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously identified two auxin-binding polypeptides in plasma membrane (PM) preparations from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) (Hicks et al. 1989, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, 4948-4952). These polypeptides have molecular weights of 40 kDa and 42 kDa and label specifically with the photoaffinity auxin analog 5-N3-7-3H-IAA (azido-IAA). Azido-IAA permits both the covalent and radioactive tagging of auxin-binding proteins and has allowed us to characterize further the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, including the nature of their attachment to the PM, their relationship to each other, and their potential function. The azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides remain in the pelleted membrane fraction following high-salt and detergent washes, which indicates a tight and possibly integral association with the PM. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of partially purified azido-IAA-labeled protein demonstrates that, in addition to the major isoforms of the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides, which possess isoelectric points (pIs) of 8.2 and 7.2, respectively, several less abundant isoforms that display unique pIs are apparent at both molecular masses. Tryptic and chymotryptic digestion of the auxin-binding proteins indicates that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are closely related or are modifications of the same polypeptide. Phase extraction with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 results in partitioning of the azido-IAA-labeled polypeptides into the aqueous (hydrophilic) phase. This apparently paradoxical behavior is also exhibited by certain integral membrane proteins that aggregate to form channels. The results of gel filtration indicate that the auxin-binding proteins do indeed aggregate strongly and that the polypeptides associate to form a dimer or multimeric complex in vivo. These characteristics are consistent with the hypothesis that the 40-kDa and 42-kDa polypeptides are subunits of a multimeric integral membrane protein which has an auxin-binding site, and which may

  7. Preparation of 2D crystals of membrane proteins for high-resolution electron crystallography data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyrathne, Priyanka D; Chami, Mohamed; Pantelic, Radosav S; Goldie, Kenneth N; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Electron crystallography is a powerful technique for the structure determination of membrane proteins as well as soluble proteins. Sample preparation for 2D membrane protein crystals is a crucial step, as proteins have to be prepared for electron microscopy at close to native conditions. In this review, we discuss the factors of sample preparation that are key to elucidating the atomic structure of membrane proteins using electron crystallography.

  8. Drosophila Golgi membrane protein Ema promotes autophagosomal growth and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungsu; Naylor, Sarah A; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2012-05-01

    Autophagy is a self-degradative process in which cellular material is enclosed within autophagosomes and trafficked to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagosomal biogenesis is well described; however mechanisms controlling the growth and ultimate size of autophagosomes are unclear. Here we demonstrate that the Drosophila membrane protein Ema is required for the growth of autophagosomes. In an ema mutant, autophagosomes form in response to starvation and developmental cues, and these autophagosomes can mature into autolysosomes; however the autophagosomes are very small, and autophagy is impaired. In fat body cells, Ema localizes to the Golgi complex and is recruited to the membrane of autophagosomes in response to starvation. The Drosophila Golgi protein Lva also is recruited to the periphery of autophagosomes in response to starvation, and this recruitment requires ema. Therefore, we propose that Golgi is a membrane source for autophagosomal growth and that Ema facilitates this process. Clec16A, the human ortholog of Ema, is a candidate autoimmune susceptibility locus. Expression of Clec16A can rescue the autophagosome size defect in the ema mutant, suggesting that regulation of autophagosome morphogenesis may be a fundamental function of this gene family.

  9. The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Kołodziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wołoszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-12-01

    Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic

  10. A membrane protein/signaling protein interaction network for Arabidopsis version AMPv2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Sylvie; Sero, Antoinette; Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume; Chen, Jin; Sardi, Maria I; Parsa, Saman A; Kim, Do-Young; Acharya, Biswa R; Stein, Erica V; Hu, Heng-Chen; Villiers, Florent; Takeda, Kouji; Yang, Yingzhen; Han, Yong S; Schwacke, Rainer; Chiang, William; Kato, Naohiro; Loqué, Dominique; Assmann, Sarah M; Kwak, June M; Schroeder, Julian I; Rhee, Seung Y; Frommer, Wolf B

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between membrane proteins and the soluble fraction are essential for signal transduction and for regulating nutrient transport. To gain insights into the membrane-based interactome, 3,852 open reading frames (ORFs) out of a target list of 8,383 representing membrane and signaling proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana were cloned into a Gateway-compatible vector. The mating-based split ubiquitin system was used to screen for potential protein-protein interactions (pPPIs) among 490 Arabidopsis ORFs. A binary robotic screen between 142 receptor-like kinases (RLKs), 72 transporters, 57 soluble protein kinases and phosphatases, 40 glycosyltransferases, 95 proteins of various functions, and 89 proteins with unknown function detected 387 out of 90,370 possible PPIs. A secondary screen confirmed 343 (of 386) pPPIs between 179 proteins, yielding a scale-free network (r(2) = 0.863). Eighty of 142 transmembrane RLKs tested positive, identifying 3 homomers, 63 heteromers, and 80 pPPIs with other proteins. Thirty-one out of 142 RLK interactors (including RLKs) had previously been found to be phosphorylated; thus interactors may be substrates for respective RLKs. None of the pPPIs described here had been reported in the major interactome databases, including potential interactors of G-protein-coupled receptors, phospholipase C, and AMT ammonium transporters. Two RLKs found as putative interactors of AMT1;1 were independently confirmed using a split luciferase assay in Arabidopsis protoplasts. These RLKs may be involved in ammonium-dependent phosphorylation of the C-terminus and regulation of ammonium uptake activity. The robotic screening method established here will enable a systematic analysis of membrane protein interactions in fungi, plants and metazoa.

  11. A membrane protein / signaling protein interaction network for Arabidopsis version AMPv2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Lalonde

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between membrane proteins and the soluble fraction are essential for signal transduction and for regulating nutrient transport. To gain insights into the membrane-based interactome, 3,852 open reading frames (ORFs out of a target list of 8,383 representing membrane and signaling proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana were cloned into a Gateway compatible vector. The mating-based split-ubiquitin system was used to screen for potential protein-protein interactions (pPPIs among 490 Arabidopsis ORFs. A binary robotic screen between 142 receptor-like kinases, 72 transporters, 57 soluble protein kinases and phosphatases, 40 glycosyltransferases, 95 proteins of various functions and 89 proteins with unknown function detected 387 out of 90,370 possible PPIs. A secondary screen confirmed 343 (of 387 pPPIs between 179 proteins, yielding a scale-free network (r2=0.863. Eighty of 142 transmembrane receptor-like kinases (RLK tested positive, identifying three homomers, 63 heteromers and 80 pPPIs with other proteins. Thirty-one out of 142 RLK interactors (including RLKs had previously been found to be phosphorylated; thus interactors may be substrates for respective RLKs. None of the pPPIs described here had been reported in the major interactome databases, including potential interactors of G protein-coupled receptors, phospholipase C, and AMT ammonium transporters. Two RLKs found as putative interactors of AMT1;1 were independently confirmed using a split luciferase assay in Arabidopsis protoplasts. These RLKs may be involved in ammonium-dependent phosphorylation of the C-terminus and regulation of ammonium uptake activity. The robotic screening method established here will enable a systematic analysis of membrane protein interactions in fungi, plants and metazoa.

  12. Gender-Specific Prognosis and Risk Impact of C-Reactive Protein, Hemoglobin and Platelet in the Development of Coronary Spasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yow Hung, Kuang-Hung Hsu, Wei-Syun Hu, Nen-Chung Chang, Chun-Yao Huang, Ming-Jui Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scarce data are available on hemoglobin and platelet in relation to coronary artery spasm (CAS development. We sought to determine the roles that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, hemoglobin and platelet play in CAS patients.Methods: Patients (337 women and 532 men undergoing coronary angiography with or without CAS but without obstructive coronary artery disease were evaluated during a 12-year period.Results: Among women with high hemoglobin levels, the odds ratios (OR from the lowest (<1 mg/l to the highest tertiles (>3 mg/l of hs-CRP were 1.21, 2.15, and 5.93 (p=0.009. In women with low hemoglobin levels, an elevated risk was found from the middle to the highest tertiles of hs-CRP (OR 0.59 to 3.85 (p=0.004. This relationship was not observed in men. In men, platelet count was the most significant risk factor for CAS (p=0.004. The highest likelihood of developing CAS was found among women with the highest hs-CRP tertile and low platelet counts (OR 8.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.20-35.01 and among men with the highest hs-CRP tertile and high platelet counts (OR 4.58; 95% CI 0.48-43.97. Neither hemoglobin level nor platelet count was associated with frequent recurrent angina in both genders with CAS whereas death and myocardial infarction were rare.Conclusions: There are positive interactions among hs-CRP, hemoglobin and platelet in women with this disease, but not in men. While hemoglobin is a modifier in CAS development in women, platelet count is an independent risk factor for men. Both women and men have good prognosis of CAS.

  13. Comparative transcriptional analysis of Bacillus subtilis cells overproducing either secreted proteins, lipoproteins or membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marciniak Bogumiła C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus subtilis is a favorable host for the production of industrially relevant proteins because of its capacity of secreting proteins into the medium to high levels, its GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe status, its genetic accessibility and its capacity to grow in large fermentations. However, production of heterologous proteins still faces limitations. Results This study aimed at the identification of bottlenecks in secretory protein production by analyzing the response of B. subtilis at the transcriptome level to overproduction of eight secretory proteins of endogenous and heterologous origin and with different subcellular or extracellular destination: secreted proteins (NprE and XynA of B. subtilis, Usp45 of Lactococcus lactis, TEM-1 β-lactamase of Escherichia coli, membrane proteins (LmrA of L. lactis and XylP of Lactobacillus pentosus and lipoproteins (MntA and YcdH of B. subtilis. Responses specific for proteins with a common localization as well as more general stress responses were observed. The latter include upregulation of genes encoding intracellular stress proteins (groES/EL, CtsR regulated genes. Specific responses include upregulation of the liaIHGFSR operon under Usp45 and TEM-1 β-lactamase overproduction; cssRS, htrA and htrB under all secreted proteins overproduction; sigW and SigW-regulated genes mainly under membrane proteins overproduction; and ykrL (encoding an HtpX homologue specifically under membrane proteins overproduction. Conclusions The results give better insights into B. subtilis responses to protein overproduction stress and provide potential targets for genetic engineering in order to further improve B. subtilis as a protein production host.

  14. Msp1 Is a Membrane Protein Dislocase for Tail-Anchored Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlever, Matthew L; Mateja, Agnieszka; McGilvray, Philip T; Day, Kasey J; Keenan, Robert J

    2017-07-20

    Mislocalized tail-anchored (TA) proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane are cleared by a newly identified quality control pathway involving the conserved eukaryotic protein Msp1 (ATAD1 in humans). Msp1 is a transmembrane AAA-ATPase, but its role in TA protein clearance is not known. Here, using purified components reconstituted into proteoliposomes, we show that Msp1 is both necessary and sufficient to drive the ATP-dependent extraction of TA proteins from the membrane. A crystal structure of the Msp1 cytosolic region modeled into a ring hexamer suggests that active Msp1 contains a conserved membrane-facing surface adjacent to a central pore. Structure-guided mutagenesis of the pore residues shows that they are critical for TA protein extraction in vitro and for functional complementation of an msp1 deletion in yeast. Together, these data provide a molecular framework for Msp1-dependent extraction of mislocalized TA proteins from the outer mitochondrial membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015), 10.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them.

  16. Expression and Purification of SARS Coronavirus Membrane Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴五星; 雷明军; 吴少庭; 陈智浩; 梁靓; 潘晖榕; 秦莉; 高士同; 袁仕善; 张仁利

    2004-01-01

    To construct a recombinant plasmid Pet23a-M, the gene encoding severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus membrane protein was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into the expression plasmid Pet23a. Results of restriction endonuclease analysis, PCR detection and DNA sequencing analysis revealed that the cloned DNA sequence was the same as that reported. The re combinants were transformed into Escherichia coli (E. Coli) BL21 (DE3) and induced by Isopropylβ-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The expression of 27 kD (1 kD=0. 992 1 ku) protein was detected by SDS-PAGE and pured by metal chelated chromatography. Results of Western-blot showed that this expressed protein could react with antibodies in sera of SARS patients during convalescence. This provided the basis for the further study on SARS virus vaccine and diagnostic agents.

  17. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  18. Membrane cholesterol access into a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Albasanz, José L.; Rodriguez-Espigares, Ismael; Pastor, Manuel; Sanz, Ferran; Martí-Solano, Maria; Manna, Moutusi; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Hildebrand, Peter