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Sample records for plastic-like effect laboratory

  1. Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2011-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

  2. Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2011-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

  3. The Alpha Dynamo Effects in Laboratory Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; Stewart C. Prager

    2001-10-16

    A concise review of observations of the alpha dynamo effect in laboratory plasmas is given. Unlike many astrophysical systems, the laboratory pinch plasmas are driven magnetically. When the system is overdriven, the resultant instabilities cause magnetic and flow fields to fluctuate, and their correlation induces electromotive forces along the mean magnetic field. This alpha-effect drives mean parallel electric current, which, in turn, modifies the initial background mean magnetic structure towards the stable regime. This drive-and-relax cycle, or the so-called self-organization process, happens in magnetized plasmas in a timescale much shorter than resistive diffusion time, thus it is a fast and unquenched dynamo process. The observed alpha-effect redistributes magnetic helicity (a measure of twistedness and knottedness of magnetic field lines) but conserves its total value. It can be shown that fast and unquenched dynamos are natural consequences of a driven system where fluctuations are statistically either not stationary in time or not homogeneous in space, or both. Implications to astrophysical phenomena will be discussed.

  4. The Effect of Chemistry Laboratory Activities on Students' Chemistry Perception and Laboratory Anxiety Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogdu, Cemil

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry lesson should be supported with experiments to understand the lecture effectively. For safety laboratory environment and to prevent laboratory accidents; chemical substances' properties, working principles for chemical substances' usage should be learnt. Aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of experiments which depend on…

  5. Cost-effective utilisation of basic biochemical laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost-effective use of laboratory investigations is vital in primary care. Tahir Pillay, MB ChB, ... He is passionate about strengthening the role of the generalist in healthcare in South Africa. Correspondence to: .... Laboratories can bill for this extra ...

  6. The Effect of Guided-Inquiry Laboratory Experiments on Science Education Students' Chemistry Laboratory Attitudes, Anxiety and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to search the effect of guided inquiry laboratory experiments on students' attitudes towards chemistry laboratory, chemistry laboratory anxiety and their academic achievement in the laboratory. The study has been carried out with 37 third-year, undergraduate science education students, as a part of their Science Education Laboratory…

  7. MICROWAVE SYSTEM FOR RESEARCH BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON LABORATORY ANIMALS

    OpenAIRE

    Kopylov, Alexei; Kruglik, Olga; Khlebopros, Rem

    2014-01-01

    This research is concerned with development of the microwave system for research the radiophysical microwave radiation effects on laboratory animals. The frequency was 1 GHz. The results obtained demonstrate the metabolic changes in mice under the electromagnetic field influence.

  8. Comparative study of effects of table sugar, laboratory grade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cntaganda

    four weeks, plants grown on the culture medium with laboratory grade sucrose showed consistently ... characteristics to those grown in the field (ZRYD, 1988). ... electrical neutrality, and its apparent lack of inhibitory effect on the majority of.

  9. The Butterfly Effect for Physics Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, James R.; Valentine, John H.

    2015-01-01

    A low-cost chaos dynamics lab is developed for quantitative demonstration of the butterfly effect using a magnetic pendulum. Chaotic motion is explored by recording magnetic time series. Students analyze the data in Excel® to investigate the butterfly effect as well as the reconstruction of the strange attractor using time delay plots. The lab…

  10. The Butterfly Effect for Physics Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, James R.; Valentine, John H.

    2015-01-01

    A low-cost chaos dynamics lab is developed for quantitative demonstration of the butterfly effect using a magnetic pendulum. Chaotic motion is explored by recording magnetic time series. Students analyze the data in Excel® to investigate the butterfly effect as well as the reconstruction of the strange attractor using time delay plots. The lab…

  11. Laboratory effectiveness testing of oil spill dispersants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.F.; Kyle, D.A.; Wang, Z.; Handfield, D.; Ianuzzi, D.; Ackerman, F. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-06-01

    Dispersant effectiveness tests are reviewed. Studies have been conducted of the variances among several standard regulatory tests. Three main causes of differences have been identified, oil-to-water ratio, settling time and energy. Energy can be partially compensated for in high energy tests by correcting for natural dispersion. With this correction and with high oil-to-water ratios and a settling time of at least 10 minutes, five apparatuses yield very similar results for a variety of oils and dispersants. Recent studies into the energy variation of dispersant tests show that the energy level varies in many apparatuses. The repeatability of energy levels in apparatus is largely responsible for the variation in dispersant effectiveness values in certain apparatus. Studies of analytical procedures show that traditional extraction and analysis methods cause a bias to results. Methods to overcome these difficulties are presented.

  12. Comparing sensitivity of ecotoxicological effect endpoints between laboratory and field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selck, H.; Riemann, B.; Christoffersen, K.

    2002-01-01

    multispecies field tests using tributyltin (TBT) and linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) were compared with published laboratory single-species test results and measured in situ concentrations. Extrapolation methods were evaluated by comparing predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs), calculated by AF...

  13. Laboratory investigation of the loading rate effects in sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huy, N.Q.; Van Tol, A.F.; Hölscher, P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve the interpretation of the quasi-static (e.g. Statnamic) pile load tests, a research project has been started to investigate effects of the loading rate on the bearing capacity of a pile in sand. A series of laboratory tests has been carried out. The testing program consists of a

  14. The ATLAS project: The effects of a constructionist digital laboratory project on undergraduate laboratory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoepe, Todd C; Cavedon, Dana K; Derian, Joseph M; Levy, Celine S; Morales, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Anatomical education is a dynamic field where developments in the implementation of constructive, situated-learning show promise in improving student achievement. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an individualized, technology heavy project in promoting student performance in a combined anatomy and physiology laboratory course. Mixed-methods research was used to compare two cohorts of anatomy laboratories separated by the adoption of a new laboratory atlas project, which were defined as preceding (PRE) and following the adoption of the Anatomical Teaching and Learning Assessment Study (ATLAS; POST). The ATLAS project required the creation of a student-generated, photographic atlas via acquisition of specimen images taken with tablet technology and digital microscope cameras throughout the semester. Images were transferred to laptops, digitally labeled and photo edited weekly, and compiled into a digital book using Internet publishing freeware for final project submission. An analysis of covariance confirmed that student final examination scores were improved (P atlas project (PRE, n = 75; POST, n = 90; means ± SE; 74.9 ± 0.9 versus 78.1 ± 0.8, respectively) after controlling for cumulative student grade point average. Analysis of questionnaires collected (n = 68) from the post group suggested students identified with atlas objectives, appreciated the comprehensive value in final examination preparation, and the constructionism involved, but recommended alterations in assignment logistics and the format of the final version. Constructionist, comprehensive term-projects utilizing student-preferred technologies could be used to improve performance toward student learning outcomes. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  15. Cost effectiveness of adopted quality requirements in hospital laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Alneil; Ahmed-Abakur, Eltayib; Abugroun, Elsir; Bakhit, Siham; Holi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed in quasi-experiment to assess adoption of the essential clauses of particular clinical laboratory quality management requirements based on international organization for standardization (ISO 15189) in hospital laboratories and to evaluate the cost effectiveness of compliance to ISO 15189. The quality management intervention based on ISO 15189 was conceded through three phases; pre - intervention phase, Intervention phase and Post-intervention phase. In pre-intervention phase the compliance to ISO 15189 was 49% for study group vs. 47% for control group with P value 0.48, while the post intervention results displayed 54% vs. 79% for study group and control group respectively in compliance to ISO 15189 and statistically significant difference (P value 0.00) with effect size (Cohen's d) of (0.00) in pre-intervention phase and (0.99) in post - intervention phase. The annual average cost per-test for the study group and control group was 1.80 ± 0.25 vs. 1.97 ± 0.39, respectively with P value 0.39 whereas the post-intervention results showed that the annual average total costs per-test for study group and control group was 1.57 ± 0.23 vs 2.08 ± 0.38, P value 0.019 respectively, with cost-effectiveness ratio of (0.88) in pre -intervention phase and (0.52) in post-intervention phase. The planned adoption of quality management requirements (QMS) in clinical laboratories had great effect to increase the compliance percent with quality management system requirement, raise the average total cost effectiveness, and improve the analytical process capability of the testing procedure.

  16. TUAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY: EFFECT OF CONSTRUCTIVIST LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep TATLI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The lab applications, which were started to be applied through mid 19th century, not only provide a new point of view but also bring about a new dimension to the lessons. At early times they were used to prove theoretical knowledge but lately they turned into environments where students freely discover knowledge as an individual or in groups. The activities that have come up with the recent form of labs substantially contributed to training ideal students for constructivist approach, who research, inquire, test, seek solutions, wear scientist shoes and deeply reason about the concept of concern. However, on the present stage of our educational system, these activities cannot be included in science lessons for several reasons. At that point virtual labs emerged as an alternative solution for the problems of the instruction in science courses. Thanks to virtual labs presenting different disciplines in a flexible manner, the interaction between the teacher and the learner become 7/24 independent from time and place. This article presents a study that provides insight in the appropriateness of Virtual and real laboratory applications on constructivist learning environment using interactive virtual chemistry laboratory (VCL development was used in academic year of 2009-2010 for a six week period. The sample of this quasi-experimental study was 90 students from three different 9th grade classrooms of an Anatolian Secondary school in the center of Trabzon city. The student groups were randomly attained as one experimental and two control groups. The data collection tools of the study were; questionnaire of teaching philosophy (QTP, Semi-structured interviews and unstructured observations. The results showed that virtual chemistry laboratory software was just as effective as real chemistry laboratory and it positively affected the facilitating of constructivist learning environment. It was determined that the students in experimental group conducted the

  17. Laboratory photometry of regolith analogues: Effect of porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, A.; Sen, A. K.; Gupta, R.

    2016-10-01

    New Laboratory phase curves are presented, to examine the effect of porosity on reflectance as a function of phase angle for grain size having dimension about half, twice and those larger than the illuminating wavelength. The experimental setup used for generating reflectance data is a goniometric device developed at the Department of Physics, Assam University, Silchar, India. Some of the well-documented samples having different sizes were chosen; alumina, olivine, basalt, rutile, chromite and iron. The sample surfaces were prepared with different porosities, in order to simulate natural regolith surface as much as possible. The wavelength of observation is 632.8 nm. A model based on the Radiative Transfer Equation is presented here to analyze and model the laboratory data. In the present modelling work, the empirical relation of Hapke, Mie theory and Henyey-Greenstein phase function are used. For particles having dimension about half, twice to the wavelength, Mie theory is used to calculate single scattering albedo. Although the Mie theory is insufficient for describing the scattering properties of particles larger than the wavelength, for such large particle single scattering albedo (SSA) is estimated through method of best fit. It has been found that, the porosity has a distinguishable effect on reflectance. Also the contribution of multiple scattering function for different porosity is examined. Further the results presented in the current work, demonstrates the light scattering properties of a diverse collections of regolith like samples.

  18. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, C. C. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. [Colorado State U.; Burleson, Theodore A. [Colorado State U.; Milton, Stephen V. [Colorado State U.; Morin, Auralee L. [Colorado State U.; Benson, Stephen V. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel E. [JLAB; Hannon, Fay E. [JLAB; Li, Rui [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB; Carlsten, Bruce E. [LANL; Lewellen, John W. [LANL

    2013-08-01

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  19. Information comparison of the effects of drugs on laboratory tests in drug labels and Young's book

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, A.F.; Koning, F.H. de; Egberts, T.C.; Smet, P.A. de; Solinge, W.W. van

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background: The effects of drugs on laboratory tests may lead to misinterpretation of laboratory data, unnecessary tests, higher costs and missed diagnoses. This study compared the information on drug-laboratory effects (DLE) described in 200 drug labels with that in Young's book. Methods:

  20. Ultra-Short-Pulse Laser Effects Research and Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables research into advanced laser countermeasure techniques. DESCRIPTION: This laser facility has a capability to produce very high peak power levels of...

  1. Ultra-Short-Pulse Laser Effects Research and Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables research into advanced laser countermeasure techniques.DESCRIPTION: This laser facility has a capability to produce very high peak power levels of...

  2. SINGLE EVENT EFFECTS TEST FACILITY AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Dominik, Laura J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Increasing use of microelectronics of ever diminishing feature size in avionics systems has led to a growing Single Event Effects (SEE) susceptibility arising from the highly ionizing interactions of cosmic rays and solar particles. Single event effects caused by atmospheric radiation have been recognized in recent years as a design issue for avionics equipment and systems. To ensure a system meets all its safety and reliability requirements, SEE induced upsets and potential system failures need to be considered, including testing of the components and systems in a neutron beam. Testing of ICs and systems for use in radiation environments requires the utilization of highly advanced laboratory facilities that can run evaluations on microcircuits for the effects of radiation. This paper provides a background of the atmospheric radiation phenomenon and the resulting single event effects, including single event upset (SEU) and latch up conditions. A study investigating requirements for future single event effect irradiation test facilities and developing options at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is summarized. The relatively new SNS with its 1.0 GeV proton beam, typical operation of 5000 h per year, expertise in spallation neutron sources, user program infrastructure, and decades of useful life ahead is well suited for hosting a world-class SEE test facility in North America. Emphasis was put on testing of large avionics systems while still providing tunable high flux irradiation conditions for component tests. Makers of ground-based systems would also be served well by these facilities. Three options are described; the most capable, flexible, and highest-test-capacity option is a new stand-alone target station using about one kW of proton beam power on a gas-cooled tungsten target, with dual test enclosures. Less expensive options are also described.

  3. Effects of food ecology on social play: a laboratory simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J D; Baldwin, J I

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory group of 8 squirrel monkeys was exposed to two experimental conditions in which food was made moderately and extremely difficult to obtain, compared with the free access conditions of baseline. Both experiments produced sharp decreased in the frequency of social play within 4 to 6 days. The stronger manipulation produced the more dramatic effect, reducing play to 1% of the baseline level (P less than .001). Neither experiment produced a total absence of play as was observed in a previous field study in southwestern Panama (Baldwin and Baldwin 1973, 1974) which suggests that the field study sampled conditions of even more severe and/or prolonged food deprivation. No pathological or dysfunctional consequences were observed in any of the circumstances where play was reduced to zero or near zero. The question is raised whether certain theories of play have overstated the case for the necessity of play experience in producing normal socialization in primates. Alternative hypotheses are presented concerning the factors that determine the frequency of play and the consequences of play versus no-play for socialization. After both experiments, the frequency of play rose to a level 50% higher than the average baseline levels of play. This "rebound" reached a peak 5 to 6 days after the termination of each experiment; and during the subsequent days the frequency of play declined to more normal levels. A reinforcement theory is presented as a possible explanation of the rebound effect.

  4. Laboratory Control System's Effects on Student Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Fatma Gozalan; Taspinar, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: The current study investigates whether the learning environment designed based on the laboratory control system affects the academic achievement, the attitude toward the learning-teaching process and the retention of the students in computer education. Purpose of Study: The study aims to identify the laboratory control system…

  5. Laboratory-Measured Rainfall Effects on LWIR Soil Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howington, S. E.; Ballard, J., Jr.; Wilhelms, S.

    2012-12-01

    The long-wave infrared reflectance of soils will often have distinct spectral characteristics that depend on the soil's physical and spectral properties. Rainfall has the effect of sorting soil particles at the ground surface, thus changing its long-wave infrared reflectance. This study examines how rainfall alters the measured directional-hemispherical thermal infrared (8-14 μm) spectral reflectance by comparing disturbed soil with undisturbed soil and pre-rain with post-rain conditions. The study uses a soil with a specified sand/silt ratio and a calibrated, laboratory rainfall simulator. For an accumulated rainfall of 8 cm, the mean disturbed soil thermal infrared spectral reflectance within 8.1 - 9.2 μm waveband increases from an initial reflectance of 13 percent to a maximum reflectance of 31 percent. Sixty percent of this reflectance change occurred with only 1 cm accumulated rainfall. This study shows that, for this described disturbed sand/silt soil mixture, small accumulated rainfall amounts significantly alter the directional-hemispherical thermal infrared spectral reflectance.

  6. Laboratory investigation of water extraction effects on saltwater wedge displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Noorabadi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a close connection between saltwater intrusion into aquifers and groundwater extraction. Freshwater extraction in coastal aquifers is one of the most important reasons for the saltwater intrusion into these aquifers. Condition of extraction system such as well depth, discharge rate, saltwater concentration and etc. could affect this process widely. Thus, investigating different extraction conditions comprises many management advantages.  In the present study, the effects of freshwater extraction on saltwater interface displacement have been investigated in a laboratory box. Three different well depths (H were considered with combinations of 3 different extraction rates (Q and 3 saltwater concentrations (C for detailed investigation of the effects of these factors variations on saltwater displacement. SEAWAT model has been used to simulate all the scenarios to numerically study of the process. The experimental and numerical results showed that when the C and Q rates were small and the well depth was shallow, the saltwater interface wouldn’t reach the extraction well, so the extracted water remained uncontaminated. When the C and Q rates were increased and the well was deepened, the salinity of the extracted water became higher. When the Q and C rates were high enough, in the shallow well depth, the final concentration of the extracted water was low but a huge part of the porous media was contaminated by the saltwater, furthermore when the well was deepened enough, the final concentration of the extracted water was increased but a small part of the porous media was contaminated by the saltwater. Finally, the results showed that when the Q and H rates were high enough, the extraction well behaved like a barrier and didn’t allow the advancing saltwater wedge toe to be intruded beyond the wells.

  7. Flake storage effects on properties of laboratory-made flakeboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. G. Carll

    1998-01-01

    Aspen (Populus gradidentata) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) flakes were prepared with tangential-grain and radial-grain faces on a laboratory disk flaker. These were gently dried in a steam-heated rotary drum dryer. Approximately 1 week after drying, surface wettability was measured on a large sample of flakes using an aqueous dye solution. Three replicate boards of...

  8. Portrayal of the History of the Photoelectric Effect in Laboratory Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Stephen; Niaz, Mansoor; Metz, Don; McMillan, Barbara; Dietrich, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The literature on the pedagogical aspects of the photoelectric effect as used in the undergraduate student laboratory shows that little research has been done in this area. Our current study is an analysis of the instructions in 38, electronically published laboratory manuals for the photoelectric effect. The analyses were based on history and…

  9. The effect of thermal loading on laboratory fume hood performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J D; Chessin, S J; Chesnovar, B W; Lillquist, D R

    2000-11-01

    A modified version of the ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995 Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods was used to evaluate the relationship between thermal loading in a laboratory fume hood and subsequent tracer gas leakage. Three types of laboratory burners were used, alone and in combination, to thermally challenge the hood. Heat output from burners was measured in BTU/hr, which was based on the fuel heat capacity and flow rate. Hood leakage was measured between 2824 and 69,342 BTU/hr. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was released at 23.5 LPM for each level of thermal loading. Duct temperature was also measured during the heating process. Results indicate a linear relationship for both BTU/hr vs. hood leakage and duct temperature vs. hood leakage. Under these test conditions, each increase of 10,000 BTU/hr resulted in an additional 4 ppm SF6 in the manikin's breathing zone (r2 = 0.68). An additional 3.1 ppm SF6 was measured for every 25 degrees F increase in duct temperature (r2 = 0.60). Both BTU/hr and duct temperature models showed p hood leakage than duct temperature. The results of this study indicate that heat output may compromise fume hood performance. This finding is consistent with those of previous studies.

  10. The Benefits and Challenges of an Interfaced Electronic Health Record and Laboratory Information System: Effects on Laboratory Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrides, Athena K; Bixho, Ida; Goonan, Ellen M; Bates, David W; Shaykevich, Shimon; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Landman, Adam B; Tanasijevic, Milenko J; Melanson, Stacy E F

    2017-03-01

    - A recent government regulation incentivizes implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) with computerized order entry and structured results display. Many institutions have also chosen to interface their EHR with their laboratory information system (LIS). - To determine the impact of an interfaced EHR-LIS on laboratory processes. - We analyzed several different processes before and after implementation of an interfaced EHR-LIS: the turnaround time, the number of stat specimens received, venipunctures per patient per day, preanalytic errors in phlebotomy, the number of add-on tests using a new electronic process, and the number of wrong test codes ordered. Data were gathered through the LIS and/or EHR. - The turnaround time for potassium and hematocrit decreased significantly (P = .047 and P = .004, respectively). The number of stat orders also decreased significantly, from 40% to 7% for potassium and hematocrit, respectively (P < .001 for both). Even though the average number of inpatient venipunctures per day increased from 1.38 to 1.62 (P < .001), the average number of preanalytic errors per month decreased from 2.24 to 0.16 per 1000 specimens (P < .001). Overall there was a 16% increase in add-on tests. The number of wrong test codes ordered was high and it was challenging for providers to correctly order some common tests. - An interfaced EHR-LIS significantly improved within-laboratory turnaround time and decreased stat requests and preanalytic phlebotomy errors. Despite increasing the number of add-on requests, an electronic add-on process increased efficiency and improved provider satisfaction. Laboratories implementing an interfaced EHR-LIS should be cautious of its effects on test ordering and patient venipunctures per day.

  11. Laboratory investigations of effective flow behavior in unsaturated heterogeneous sands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Dorthe; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    such that on the average a uniform pressure profile was established and gravity flow applied. Solute breakthrough curves measured at discrete points in the tank using time domain reflectometry, as well as dye tracer paths, showed that flow and transport took place in a very tortuous pattern where several grid cells were...... controlled method. The heterogeneous sand systems were established in a laboratory tank for three realizations of random distributions of the homogeneous sands comprising a system of 207 grid cells. The water flux was controlled at the upper boundary, while a suction was applied at the lower boundary...

  12. Laboratory studies on electrical effects during volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Büttner

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This laboratory study reports on electrical phenomena during the explosive eruption of a basaltoid silicate melt. Contact electricity is produced in the phase of thermo-hydraulic fracturing of magma during the explosive interaction with water. The electrical charge produced is directly proportional to the force of the explosion, as the force of explosion is linearly proportional to the surface generated by the thermo-hydraulic fracturing. Simulation of the ejection history using inerted gas as a driving medium under otherwise constant conditions did not result in significant electric charging. The results have the potential to explain in nature observed lightening in eruption clouds of explosive volcanic events.

  13. The Entrance and Exit Effects in Small Electrochemical Filter-Press Reactors Used in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias-Ferrer, Angel; Gonzalez-Garcia, Jose; Saez, Veronica; Exposito, Eduardo; Sanchez-Sanchez, Carlos M.; Mantiel, Vicente; Walsh, Frank C.; Aldaz, Antonio; Walsh, Frank C.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed to examine the entrance and exit effects in small electrochemical filter-press reactors used in the laboratory is presented. The single compartment of the filter-press reactor is filled with different turbulence promoters to study their influence as compared to the empty configuration.

  14. Investigating the Effect of Argument-Driven Inquiry in Laboratory Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircioglu, Tuba; Ucar, Sedat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of argument-driven inquiry (ADI) based laboratory instruction on the academic achievement, argumentativeness, science process skills, and argumentation levels of pre-service science teachers in the General Physics Laboratory III class. The study was conducted with 79 pre-service science teachers.…

  15. Effect of hepatitis C virus infection on selected laboratory values in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of hepatitis C virus infection on selected laboratory values in pregnant ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Background and Objectives: Both hepatitis C and Human Immunodeficiency viruses affect laboratory indices. ... Senegal (6); Sierra Leone (1); South Africa (96); South Sudan (1); Sudan (3) ...

  16. Laboratory studies of biological effects of sulfur oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalbey, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Selected results from exposures of laboratory animals to airborne sulfur oxides were briefly summarized. The main observation during acute exposures was reflex bronchoconstriction and a resultant increase in pulmonary resistance. The increase in resistance due to sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) was potentiated by simultaneous exposure to aerosols under conditions which would increase the transfer of sulfur oxides into the respiratory tract and promote transformation to a higher oxidation state, especially one that is acid. Sulfate aerosols, particularly sulfuric acid aerosols, were more potent than SO/sub 2/ in causing bronchoconstriction. Chronic exposure to high concentrations (400 to 650 ppM) of SO/sub 2/ resulted in experimental bronchitis in several species. Longterm exposure to more realistic concentrations of SO/sub 2/ produced little or no changes in respiratory function or morphology. Significant alterations in both pulmonary function and morphology have been reported after chronic exposure to sulfuric acid aerosols. Recent data indicate that changes in the lung may progress after cessation of such exposures.

  17. Effective Laboratory Method of Chromite Content Estimation in Reclaimed Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignaszak Z.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an original method of measuring the actual chromite content in the circulating moulding sand of foundry. This type of material is applied for production of moulds. This is the case of foundry which most frequently perform heavy casting in which for the construction of chemical hardening mould is used, both the quartz sand and chromite sand. After the dry reclamation of used moulding sand, both types of sands are mixed in various ratios resulting that in reclaimed sand silos, the layers of varying content of chromite in mixture are observed. For chromite recuperation from the circulating moulding sand there are applied the appropriate installations equipped with separate elements generating locally strong magnetic field. The knowledge of the current ratio of chromite and quartz sand allows to optimize the settings of installation and control of the separation efficiency. The arduous and time-consuming method of determining the content of chromite using bromoform liquid requires operational powers and precautions during using this toxic liquid. It was developed and tested the new, uncomplicated gravimetric laboratory method using powerful permanent magnets (neodymium. The method is used in the production conditions of casting for current inspection of chromite quantity in used sand in reclamation plant.

  18. Effects of Conceptual Systems and Instructional Methods on General Chemistry Laboratory Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Lance E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three instructional methods and conceptual systems orientation on achievement in a freshman general chemistry laboratory course. Traditional approach, learning cycle, and computer simulations are discussed. (KR)

  19. Compendium of Test Results of Recent Single Event Effect Tests Conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Steven S.; Allen, Gregory R.; Irom, Farokh; Scheick, Leif Z.; Adell, Philippe C.; Miyahira, Tetsuo F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports heavy ion and proton-induced single event effect (SEE) results from recent tests for a variety of microelectronic devices. The compendium covers devices tested over the last two years by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  20. A multivariate assessment of the effect of the laboratory homework component of a microcomputer-based laboratory for a college freshman physics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlo, Susan E.

    Microcomputer-based laboratories (MBLs) have been defined as software that uses an electronic probe to collect information about a physical system and then converts that information into graphical systems in real-time. Realtime Physics Laboratories (RTP) are an example of laboratories that combine the use of MBLs with collaboration and guided-inquiry. RTP Mechanics Laboratories include both laboratory activities and laboratory homework for the first semester of college freshman physics courses. Prior research has investigated the effectiveness of the RTP laboratories as a package (laboratory activities with laboratory homework). In this study, an experimental-treatment had students complete both the RTP laboratory activity and the associated laboratory homework during the same laboratory period. Observations of this treatment indicated that students primarily consulted the laboratory instructor and referred to their completed laboratory activity while completing the homework in their collaborative groups. In the control-treatment, students completed the laboratory homework outside the laboratory period. Measures of force and motion conceptual understanding included the Force and Motion Conceptual Understanding (FMCE), a 47 multiple-choice question test. Analyses of the FMCE indicated that it is both a reliable and a valid measure of force and motion conceptual understanding. A distinct, five-factor structure for the FMCE post-test answers reflected specific concepts related to force and motion. However, the three FMCE pretest factors were less distinct. Analysis of the experimental-treatment, compared to a control-treatment, included multiple regression analysis with covariates of age, prior physics-classroom experience, and the three FMCE pretest factors. Criterion variables included each of the five post-test factors, the total laboratory homework score, and a group of seven exam questions. The results were all positive, in favor of the experimental

  1. Possible amotivational effects following marijuana smoking under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherek, Don R; Lane, Scott D; Dougherty, Donald M

    2002-02-01

    Human participants earned money by responding on a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule (initial value $50) or received money without responding on a fixed-time (FT) schedule. During the session, participants could terminate the PR schedule and initiate an FT 200-s schedule. In Experiment 1, increases in monetary value produced increased number of responses, time spent, and money earned in the PR component. In Experiment 2, marijuana smoking produced potency-related reductions in the number of responses, time spent, and money earned in the PR component, effects that can be interpreted as amotivational. Increasing the monetary value of the reinforcer diminished the acute marijuana effects on PR responding, suggesting that marijuana exerted an effect primarily on reinforcers of a smaller magnitude.

  2. Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohon, Jared L. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Glauthier, T. J. [TJG Energy Associates, LLC., Bloomberg, VA (United States); Augustine, Norman R. [U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security, Washington, DC (United States); Austin, Wanda M. [Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, CA (United States); Elachi, Charles [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Fleury, Paul A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hockfield, Susan J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Meserve, Richard A. [Covington and Burling LLP, Washington, DC (United States); Murray, Cherry A. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-02-27

    The Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories was charged by Congress in January 2014 to evaluate the mission, capabilities, size, performance, governance, and agency oversight of the 17 Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories. Given the incredibly broad scope and aggressive timeline (the original deadline was February 2015), the Secretary of Energy and Congress agreed to split the task into two phases. This interim report contains the preliminary observations and recommendations gleaned from Phase 1 of the study, which consisted of a literature review; visits to five of the National Laboratories; semi-structured interviews with staff from across the National Laboratories, DOE, other Federal agencies, companies, other non-governmental organizations, and additional interested parties; and presentations at monthly public Commission meetings. The Commission notes that the purpose of the National Laboratories is to provide critical capabilities and facilities in service of DOE’s mission and the needs of the broader national and international science and technology (S&T) community, including other Federal agencies, academia, and private industry. The National Laboratories are successfully fulfilling that mission today. While the Commission believes significant improvements can be made to many aspects of DOE management and governance of the laboratories, those issues do not detract from the National Laboratories’ remarkable contributions to the American public. In Phase 2 the Commission will focus on ways to make the process of carrying out their missions more efficient and effective.

  3. Effect of Diet on Metabolism of Laboratory Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, P. C.; Riskowski, G. L.; McKee, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    In previous studies when rats were fed a processed, semipurified, extruded rodent food bar (RFB) developed for space science research, we noted a difference in the appearance of gastrointestinal tissue (GI); therefore the following study evaluated GI characteristics and growth and metabolic rates of rats fed chow (C) or RFB. Two hundred and twenty-four rats (78 g mean body weight) were randomly assigned to 28 cages and provided C or RFB. Each cage was considered the experimental unit and a 95 percent level of significance, indicated by ANOVA, was used for inference. After each 30-, 60-, and 90-day period, eight cages were shifted from the C to RFB diet and housing density was reduced by two rats per cage. The two rats removed from each cage were sacrificed and used for GI evaluation. Metabolic rates of the rats in each cage were determined by indirect calorimetry. No differences in body weight were detected at 0, 30, 60 or 90 days between C and RFB. Heat production (kcal/hr/kg), CO2 production (L/hr/kg) and O2 consumption (L/hr/kg) were different by light:dark and age with no effect of diet. Respiratory quotient was different by age with no effect of light:dark or diet. Rats on the C diet ate less food and drank more water than those on RFB. C rats produced more fecal and waste materials than the RFB. GI lengths increased with age but were less in RFB than C. GI full and empty weights increased with age but weighed less in RFB than C. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) numbers increased with age with no effect of diet. No differences in ileum-associated GALT area were detected between C and RFB. Switching C to RFB decreased GI length, GI full and empty weights, with no changes in GALT number or area. We concluded RFB decreased GI mass without affecting metabolic rate or general body growth.

  4. Effective population size and evolutionary dynamics in outbred laboratory populations of Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laurence D. Mueller; Amitabh Joshi; Marta Santos; Michael R. Rose

    2013-12-01

    Census population size, sex-ratio and female reproductive success were monitored in 10 laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster selected for different ages of reproduction. With this demographic information, we estimated eigenvalue, variance and probability of allele loss effective population sizes. We conclude that estimates of effective size based on genefrequency change at a few loci are biased downwards. We analysed the relative roles of selection and genetic drift in maintaining genetic variation in laboratory populations of Drosophila. We suggest that rare, favourable genetic variants in our laboratory populations have a high chance of being lost if their fitness effect is weak, e.g. 1% or less. However, if the fitness effect of this variation is 10% or greater, these rare variants are likely to increase to high frequency. The demographic information developed in this study suggests that some of our laboratory populations harbour more genetic variation than expected. One explanation for this finding is that part of the genetic variation in these outbred laboratory Drosophila populations may be maintained by some form of balancing selection. We suggest that, unlike bacteria, medium-term adaptation of laboratory populations of fruit flies is not primarily driven by new mutations, but rather by changes in the frequency of preexisting alleles.

  5. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  6. Who needs labs and who needs statins? Comparative and cost effectiveness analyses of non-laboratory-based, laboratory-based, and staged primary cardiovascular disease screening guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Ankur; Weinstein, Milton C.; Salomon, Joshua A.; Cutler, David; Gaziano, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Early detection and treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors produces significant clinical benefits, but no consensus exists on optimal screening algorithms. This study aimed to evaluate the comparative and cost effectiveness of staged laboratory-based and non-laboratory-based total cardiovascular disease risk assessment. Methods and Results We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and cost-effectiveness modeling methods to compare strategies with and without laboratory components, and using single-stage and multistage algorithms, including approaches based on Framingham risk scores (laboratory-based assessments for all individuals). Analyses were conducted using data from 5,998 adults in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey without history of CVD, using 10-year CVD death as the main outcome. A micro-simulation model projected lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for 60 Framingham-based, non-laboratory-based, and staged screening approaches. Across strategies the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.774–0.780 in men and 0.812–0.834 in women. There were no statistically significant differences in AUC between multistage and Framingham-based approaches. In cost-effectiveness analyses, multistage strategies had ICERs of $52,000/QALY and $83,000/QALY for men and women, respectively. Single-stage/Framingham-based strategies were dominated (higher cost and lower QALYs) or had unattractive ICERs (>$300,000/QALY) compared to single-stage/non-laboratory-based and multistage approaches. Conclusions Non-laboratory-based CVD risk assessment can be useful in primary CVD prevention, as a substitute for laboratory-based assessments or as the initial component of a multistage approach. Cost-effective multistage screening strategies could avoid 25–75% of laboratory testing used in CVD risk screening with predictive power comparable to Framingham risks

  7. Space Weathering Effects on Sulfates and Carbonates: Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, Catherine; Bu, Caixia; Rodriguez lopez, Gerard; McFadden, Lucy Ann; Li, Jian-Yang; Ruesch, Ottaviano

    2016-10-01

    Introduction: The solar wind plasma continuously streams from the Sun, interacting with the surfaces of airless bodies throughout the solar system. Sulfates and carbonates, identified by the UV-Vis spectral slope [1] and 3.4 / 4.0 μm absorption features [2] on the surface of Ceres, will be exposed to solar H, He at ~1keV/amu. We investigate the stability of anhydrous salts under 4 keV He+ irradiation as proxy for the solar wind.Experiment: Anhydrous MgSO4, Na2SO4, and Na2CO3 powders are pressed into pellets, with compositions confirmed by XRD. Pellet samples are placed in ultra-high vacuum (10-9 Torr) and the effects of 4keV He+ irradiation on surface composition and chemistry are monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy, as a function of ion fluence. We measure ex situ diffuse optical reflectance prior and subsequent to irradiation through ranges 0.2-2.5µm (Lambda 1050) and 0.6-10µm (Thermo Nicolet 670).Results: Ion irradiation of MgSO4 damages the crystal structure, preferentially removing oxygen along with sulfur. XPS measurements imply the formation of MgO after 5x1017 He+cm-2 (~15,000 years at 2.7AU). During irradiation, we observe secondary ion ejection (Mg, MgO, O, OH, H, S, and SO) and neutral SO2. In addition, XPS sulfur spectra suggest the presence of a small amount of trapped SO2, confirming this decomposition product observed in the optical UV spectra at ~240 and 280nm [3,4] with dehydration, as well as in the IR at ~7.8μm [5] with irradiation. Our observations are consistent with the potential decomposition pathway for MgSO4 to SO2 provided by McCord et al. (2001) [6]. Spectral darkening and reddening in the UV-Vis region after irradiation are observed by ex situ optical spectroscopy. We suggest that space weathering by solar ions limits the stability of salts on Ceres and other airless bodies, which influences the optical reflectance.Acknowledgements: We thank the NASA SSW program for support

  8. Examining the Effects of Reflective Journals on Pre-Service Science Teachers' General Chemistry Laboratory Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Canan; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    The general chemistry laboratory is an appropriate place for learning chemistry well. It is also effective for stimulating higher-order thinking skills, including reflective thinking, a skill that is crucial for science teaching as well as learning. This study aims to examine the effects of feedback-supported reflective journal-keeping activities…

  9. [Perspective for clinical laboratory management and its systematization--effects of the systematization of clinical laboratory management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S

    1993-04-01

    There are a large number of ideas concerning the systematization of clinical laboratory management. Therefore many types of laboratory systems have been constructed. As our hospital is not large, we adopted a small scale laboratory system. In introducing it, we expected not only an increase in value-added labor productivity by automating laboratory tests, but also an improvement in technologist's cost awareness. Consequently, new system equipment has itself performed the former in many sections, but not the latter. Improvement in cost awareness was caused by the technologist's routine work in managing reagent and material stocks. We found that this soft-type systematization has been more important than the advanced hard-type system.

  10. Effects of earthquake induced rock shear on containment system integrity. Laboratory testing plan development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, Rodney S. (RSRead Consulting Inc. (Canada))

    2011-07-15

    This report describes a laboratory-scale testing program plan to address the issue of earthquake induced rock shear effects on containment system integrity. The document contains a review of relevant literature from SKB covering laboratory testing of bentonite clay buffer material, scaled analogue tests, and the development of related material models to simulate rock shear effects. The proposed testing program includes standard single component tests, new two-component constant volume tests, and new scaled analogue tests. Conceptual drawings of equipment required to undertake these tests are presented along with a schedule of tests. The information in this document is considered sufficient to engage qualified testing facilities, and to guide implementation of laboratory testing of rock shear effects. This document was completed as part of a collaborative agreement between SKB and Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in Canada

  11. "I got it on Ebay!": cost-effective approach to surgical skills laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ethan; Schenarts, Paul J; Shostrom, Valerie; Schenarts, Kimberly D; Evans, Charity H

    2017-01-01

    Surgical education is witnessing a surge in the use of simulation. However, implementation of simulation is often cost-prohibitive. Online shopping offers a low budget alternative. The aim of this study was to implement cost-effective skills laboratories and analyze online versus manufacturers' prices to evaluate for savings. Four skills laboratories were designed for the surgery clerkship from July 2014 to June 2015. Skills laboratories were implemented using hand-built simulation and instruments purchased online. Trademarked simulation was priced online and instruments priced from a manufacturer. Costs were compiled, and a descriptive cost analysis of online and manufacturers' prices was performed. Learners rated their level of satisfaction for all educational activities, and levels of satisfaction were compared. A total of 119 third-year medical students participated. Supply lists and costs were compiled for each laboratory. A descriptive cost analysis of online and manufacturers' prices showed online prices were substantially lower than manufacturers, with a per laboratory savings of: $1779.26 (suturing), $1752.52 (chest tube), $2448.52 (anastomosis), and $1891.64 (laparoscopic), resulting in a year 1 savings of $47,285. Mean student satisfaction scores for the skills laboratories were 4.32, with statistical significance compared to live lectures at 2.96 (P online resources to purchase surgical equipment, surgical educators overcome financial obstacles limiting the use of simulation and provide learning opportunities that medical students perceive as beneficial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantifying and understanding the fitness effects of protein mutations: Laboratory versus nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jeffrey I; Bolon, Daniel N A; Tawfik, Dan S

    2016-07-01

    The last decade has seen a growing number of experiments aimed at systematically mapping the effects of mutations in different proteins, and of attempting to correlate their biophysical and biochemical effects with organismal fitness. While insightful, systematic laboratory measurements of fitness effects present challenges and difficulties. Here, we discuss the limitations associated with such measurements, and in particular the challenge of correlating the effects of mutations at the single protein level ("protein fitness") with their effects on organismal fitness. A variety of experimental setups are used, with some measuring the direct effects on protein function and others monitoring the growth rate of a model organism carrying the protein mutants. The manners by which fitness effects are calculated and presented also vary, and the conclusions, including the derived distributions of fitness effects of mutations, vary accordingly. The comparison of the effects of mutations in the laboratory to the natural protein diversity, namely to amino acid changes that have fixed in the course of millions of years of evolution, is also debatable. The results of laboratory experiments may, therefore, be less relevant to understanding long-term inter-species variations yet insightful with regard to short-term polymorphism, for example, in the study of the effects of human SNPs.

  13. A Review of the Effects of Sedation on Thermoregulation: Insights for the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Aaron

    2016-06-01

    To examine the effects that the sedative and analgesic medications commonly used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have on thermoregulation. A structured review strategy was used. MEDLINE and CINAHL were searched for published studies, and reference lists of retrieved studies were scrutinized for further studies. Data were extracted using a standardized extraction tool. A total of nine studies examined the effect that sedative and analgesic medications have on thermoregulation. Midazolam has minimal impact on thermoregulation, whereas opioids, dexmedetomidine, and propofol markedly decrease vasoconstriction and shivering thresholds. Patients who receive sedation in the cardiac catheterization laboratory may be at risk of hypothermia because of the use of medications that impair thermoregulation. Further research is required to identify the prevalence of unplanned hypothermia during sedation in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  15. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  16. Effects of Alcohol on Women's Risky Sexual Decision Making during Social Interactions in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawacki, Tina

    2011-01-01

    This experiment examined the effects of alcohol on women's sexual decision making during a laboratory social interaction with a potential dating partner. Participants completed an assessment of sex-related alcohol expectancies, were randomly assigned to consume alcohol, no alcohol, or a placebo, and then interacted with a male confederate.…

  17. From the Laboratory to the Classroom: The Effects of Equivalence-Based Instruction on Neuroanatomy Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienup, Daniel M.; Mylan, Sanaa E.; Brodsky, Julia; Pytte, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Equivalence-based instruction (EBI) has been used to successfully teach college-level concepts in research laboratories, but few studies have examined the results of such instruction on classroom performance. The current study answered a basic question about the ordering of training stimuli as well as an applied question regarding the effects of…

  18. New ion beam materials laboratory for materials modification and irradiation effects research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y., E-mail: Zhangy1@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Crespillo, M.L.; Xue, H.; Jin, K.; Chen, C.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Fontana, C.L. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Graham, J.T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Weber, W.J., E-mail: wjweber@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    A new multifunctional ion beam materials laboratory (IBML) has been established at the University of Tennessee, in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The IBML is currently equipped with two ion sources, a 3 MV tandem accelerator, three beamlines and three endstations. The IBML is primarily dedicated to fundamental research on ion–solid interaction, ion beam analysis, ion beam modification, and other basic and applied research on irradiation effects in a wide range of materials. An overview of the IBML facility is provided, and experimental results are reported to demonstrate the specific capabilities.

  19. New Ion Beam Materials Laboratory for Materials Modification and Irradiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Crespillo, Miguel L [University of Tennessee (UT); Xue, Haizhou [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jin, Ke [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, Chien-Hung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fontana, Cristiano L [ORNL; Graham, Dr. Joseph T. [The University of Tennessee; Weber, William J [ORNL

    2014-11-01

    A new multifunctional ion beam materials laboratory (IBML) has been established at the University of Tennessee, in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The IBML is currently equipped with two ion sources, a 3 MV tandem accelerator, three beamlines and three endstations. The IBML is primarily dedicated to fundamental research on ion-solid interaction, ion beam analysis, ion beam modification, and other basic and applied research on irradiation effects in a wide range of materials. An overview of the IBML facility is provided, and experimental results are reported to demonstrate the specific capabilities.

  20. Effectiveness of five-day-old 10% bleach in a student microbiology laboratory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    In the student laboratory, 10% bleach (sodium hypochlorite) is used to disinfect benches before and after work, and when a spill occurs. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Guidelines recommend diluting bleach daily. In a student laboratory setting, the organisms in use are known and may include only selected standard bacteria. Diluting bleach daily is time consuming and wastes bleach. We hypothesized that 10% bleach stored in low density polyethylene (LDPE) wash bottles would maintain sufficient chlorine concentration to be effective against the organisms used in the student laboratory for five days, so that bleach could be diluted weekly instead of daily. Approximately 3 x 10(6) CFU of each bacterium were spotted to a laboratory bench surface in duplicate and allowed to air dry. One spot was individually cleaned with five-day old 10% bleach following the same protocol as student laboratories. The second spot was uncleaned and sampled as a control. Contact plates containing D/E Neutralizing agar were touched to the spots, incubated overnight at 35 degrees C and examined for growth. An uninoculated spot was also sampled as a background control. A total of 22 different organisms were tested, representing the major groups of organisms used in the student laboratories. All organisms tested were eliminated by the five-day old bleach. All uncleaned spots showed dense growth. The background control had no growth. Reducing the dilution of bleach to once a week rather than daily will save time and money, which can then be devoted to more teaching and curriculum responsibilities, while still maintaining laboratory safety.

  1. Potential effect of fiddler crabs on organic matter distribution: A combined laboratory and field experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natálio, Luís F.; Pardo, Juan C. F.; Machado, Glauco B. O.; Fortuna, Monique D.; Gallo, Deborah G.; Costa, Tânia M.

    2017-01-01

    Bioturbators play a key role in estuarine environments by modifying the availability of soil elements, which in turn may affect other organisms. Despite the importance of bioturbators, few studies have combined both field and laboratory experiments to explore the effects of bioturbators on estuarine soils. Herein, we assessed the bioturbation potential of fiddler crabs Leptuca leptodactyla and Leptuca uruguayensis in laboratory and field experiments, respectively. We evaluated whether the presence of fiddler crabs resulted in vertical transport of sediment, thereby altering organic matter (OM) distribution. Under laboratory conditions, the burrowing activity by L. leptodactyla increased the OM content in sediment surface. In the long-term field experiment with areas of inclusion and exclusion of L. uruguayensis, we did not observe influence of this fiddler crab in the vertical distribution of OM. Based on our results, we suggest that small fiddler crabs, such as the species used in these experiments, are potentially capable of alter their environment by transporting sediment and OM but such effects may be masked by environmental drivers and spatial heterogeneity under natural conditions. This phenomenon may be related to the small size of these species, which affects how much sediment is transported, along with the way OM interacts with biogeochemical and physical processes. Therefore, the net effect of these burrowing organisms is likely to be the result of a complex interaction with other environmental factors. In this sense, we highlight the importance of performing simultaneous field and laboratory experiments in order to better understanding the role of burrowing animals as bioturbators.

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management System 2011 Effectiveness Review and Declaration Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farren Hunt

    2011-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed an annual Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) effectiveness review per 48 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 970.5223-1, 'Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Work Planning and Execution.' The annual review assessed Integrated Safety Management (ISM) effectiveness, provided feedback to maintain system integrity, and helped identify target areas for focused improvements and assessments for fiscal year (FY) 2012. The information presented in this review of FY 2011 shows that the INL has performed many corrective actions and improvement activities, which are starting to show some of the desired results. These corrective actions and improvement activities will continue to help change culture that will lead to better implementation of defined programs, resulting in moving the Laboratory's performance from the categorization of 'Needs Improvement' to the desired results of 'Effective Performance.'

  3. An investigation into the effectiveness of problem-based learning in a physical chemistry laboratory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürses, Ahmet; Açıkyıldız, Metin; Doğar, Çetin; Sözbilir, Mustafa

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) approach in a physical chemistry laboratory course. The parameters investigated were students’ attitudes towards a chemistry laboratory course, scientific process skills of students and their academic achievement. The design of the study was one group pre-test post-test. Four experiments, covering the topics adsorption, viscosity, surface tension and conductivity were performed using a PBL approach in the fall semester of the 2003/04 academic year at Kazim Karabekir Education Faculty of Atatürk University. Each experiment was done over a three week period. A total of 40 students, 18 male and 22 female, participated in the study. Students took the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Concept Test (PCLCT), Attitudes towards Chemistry Laboratory (ATCL) questionnaire and Science Process Skills Test (SPST) as pre and post-tests. In addition, the effectiveness of the PBL approach was also determined through four different scales; Scales Specific to Students’ Views of PBL. A statistically significant difference between the students’ academic achievement and scientific process skills at p

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management System 2010 Effectiveness Review and Declaration Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas J. Haney

    2010-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory completes an annual Integrated Safety Management System effectiveness review per 48 CFR 970.5223-1 “Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Work Planning and Execution.” The annual review assesses ISMS effectiveness, provides feedback to maintain system integrity, and helps identify target areas for focused improvements and assessments for the following year. Using one of the three Department of Energy (DOE) descriptors in DOE M 450.4-1 regarding the state of ISMS effectiveness during Fiscal Year (FY) 2010, the information presented in this review shows that INL achieved “Effective Performance.”

  5. Effect of Cooperative Learning and Traditional Methods on Students' Achievements and Identifications of Laboratory Equipments in Science-Technology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Suleyman

    2011-01-01

    Science lessons taught via experiments motivate the students, and make them more insistent on learning science. This study aims to examine the effects of cooperative learning on students' academic achievements and their skills in identifying laboratory equipments. The sample for the study consisted of a total of 43 sophomore students in primary…

  6. Effects of the Physical Laboratory versus the Virtual Laboratory in Teaching Simple Electric Circuits on Conceptual Achievement and Attitudes Towards the Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekbiyik, Ahmet; Ercan, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Current study examined the effects of virtual and physical laboratory practices on students' conceptual achievement in the subject of electricity and their attitudes towards simple electric circuits. Two groups (virtual and physical) selected through simple random sampling was taught with web-aided material called "Electricity in Our…

  7. Laboratory measures of methylphenidate effects in cocaine-dependent patients receiving treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roache, J D; Grabowski, J; Schmitz, J M; Creson, D L; Rhoades, H M

    2000-02-01

    Two experiments examined the effects of methylphenidate in male and female patients enrolled in an outpatient treatment program for primary cocaine dependence. The first study was a component of a double-blind efficacy trial wherein 57 patients were first tested in a human laboratory for their initial responsiveness to medication. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or methylphenidate treatment and received their first dose in the human laboratory environment before continuing in outpatient treatment. Methylphenidate was given as a 20-mg sustained-release dose (twice daily) plus an additional 5-mg immediate-release dose combined with the morning dose. Methylphenidate increased heart rate and subjective ratings; however, the subjective effects were primarily of a "dysphoric" nature, and significant effects were limited to increases in anxiety, depression, and anger on the Profile of Mood States; shaky/jittery ratings on a visual analog scale; and dysphoria on the lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) scale of the Addiction Research Center Inventory. Methylphenidate did not increase cocaine craving nor ratings suggesting abuse potential (i.e., Morphine-Benzedrine Group or drug-liking scores, etc.). None of the drug effects observed in the human laboratory was of clinical concern, and no subject was precluded from continuing in the outpatient study. After outpatient treatment completion, 12 patients were brought back into a second double-blind human laboratory study in which three doses (15, 30, and 60 mg) of immediate-release methylphenidate were administered in an ascending series preceded and followed by placebo. Methylphenidate produced dose-related increases in heart rate, subjective ratings of shaky/jittery, and LSD/dysphoria without significantly altering cocaine craving or stimulant euphoria ratings. These results suggest that stimulant substitution-type approaches to the treatment of cocaine dependence are not necessarily contraindicated

  8. The effects of tricyclazole treatment on aquatic macroinvertebrates in the field and in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rossaro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of tricyclazole treatments on benthic macroinvertebrates in the field and in laboratory were studied. In field conditions, low density of benthic populations was observed, both in treated and untreated plots, which was attributed to the short period of submersion of the rice field and high water temperature, fungicide treatments had no significant effect. Both laboratory acute toxicity test and a test using a mesocosm suggested a low toxicity of tricyclazole on invertebrates. A reduction of the macroinvertebrate density was observed only when tricyclazole concentration was applied at concentrations 100 times the ones tested in the field, acute toxicity test gave an LC50 after 48 h of 26 mg*L–1, in agreement with data obtained for other species.

  9. Study of embryotoxic effects of intranasally administred desloratadine on laboratory animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alekhina Т.А.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to detect possible changes in embryogenesis and negative effects of third generation antihistamine – desloratadine – after intranasal administration of 1.3 mg/m3 and 13.0 mg/m3 of the substance to laboratory animals during their prenatal period. In these circumstances, desloratadine does not cause any significant changes of embryogenesis parameters. Macroscopic examination of the fetus and placenta in animals of experimental groups did not reveal any pathology or physiological deviations from the norm. 13.0 mg/m3 concentration of the drug caused a decrease in the weight of embryos in comparison with control group of animals and physiological data, despite a well developed, without visible pathology, placenta. This neces­sitates an in-depth study of possible teratogenic effects of intranasally administred desloratadine to laboratory animals.

  10. Effect of a standardised dietary restriction protocol on multiple laboratory strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Grandison

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outcomes of lifespan studies in model organisms are particularly susceptible to variations in technical procedures. This is especially true of dietary restriction, which is implemented in many different ways among laboratories. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we have examined the effect of laboratory stock maintenance, genotype differences and microbial infection on the ability of dietary restriction (DR to extend life in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. None of these factors block the DR effect. CONCLUSIONS: These data lend support to the idea that nutrient restriction genuinely extends lifespan in flies, and that any mechanistic discoveries made with this model are of potential relevance to the determinants of lifespan in other organisms.

  11. Effects of laboratory maintenance on the nature of surface reactive antigens of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko, R J; Bullard, J C; Duncan, W P

    1976-01-01

    The extensive in vitro cultivation methods used in propagating and maintaining gonococcal cells were found to affect their virulence, antigenicity, and ultrastructure. Adapting a laboratory-maintained strain of gonococci to animal virulence resulted in two lines of pilated cells with similar colonial morphologies. The animal-adapted cells, however, had a greater amount of extracellular pili and a more prominent peptidoglycan cell wall layer. They were also more resistant to the bactericidal effects of guinea-pig complement and more reactive in macroagglutination and bactericidal tests with strain-specific gonococcal antibody. In comparative guinea-pig protection trials, formalin-fixed cells of the animal-adapted cell line were 500 times more effective as immunogens than the laboratory-maintained cell line. Images PMID:825184

  12. The leverage effect on wealth distribution in a controllable laboratory stock market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenge; Yang, Guang; An, Kenan; Huang, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    Wealth distribution has always been an important issue in our economic and social life, since it affects the harmony and stabilization of the society. Under the background of widely used financial tools to raise leverage these years, we studied the leverage effect on wealth distribution of a population in a controllable laboratory market in which we have conducted several human experiments, and drawn the conclusion that higher leverage leads to a higher Gini coefficient in the market. A higher Gini coefficient means the wealth distribution among a population becomes more unequal. This is a result of the ascending risk with growing leverage level in the market plus the diversified trading abilities and risk preference of the participants. This work sheds light on the effects of leverage and its related regulations, especially its impact on wealth distribution. It also shows the capability of the method of controllable laboratory markets which could be helpful in several fields of study such as economics, econophysics and sociology.

  13. Laboratory Activity to Effectively Teach Introductory Geomicrobiology Concepts to Non-Geology Majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Marvasi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We have designed a three-week experiment that can complement any microbiology course, to teach main geomicrobiology concepts for non-geology majors. One of the most difficult concepts for non-geology majors to comprehend is how bacteria serve as a platform for different mineralization reactions. In our three-week laboratory practice, students learn the main principles and conditions required for an induced bacterial mineralization. Upon completion of the laboratory experience, students will: 1 learn how microbialinduced mineralization (such as calcium carbonate formation is affected by differential media and growth conditions; 2 understand how bacterial physiology affects any induced in situ or in vitro mineralization; 3 comprehend how growing conditions and bacterial physiologies interrelate, resulting in differential crystal formation. The teaching-learning process was assessed using a pre-/posttest with an increase from 26% to 76% in the number of positive answers from the students. We also measured the students’ proficiency while conducting specific technical tasks, revealing no major difficulties while conducting the experiments. A final questionnaire was provided with satisfactory evaluations from the students regarding the organization and content of the practices. 84–86% of the students agreed that the exercises improved their knowledge in geomicrobiology and would like to attend similar laboratories in the future. Such response is the best indicator that the laboratory practice can be implemented in any undergraduate/graduate microbiology course to effectively teach basic geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors.

  14. Laboratory activity to effectively teach introductory geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Davila-Vazquez, Yarely C; Martinez, Lilliam Casillas

    2013-01-01

    We have designed a three-week experiment that can complement any microbiology course, to teach main geomicrobiology concepts for non-geology majors. One of the most difficult concepts for non-geology majors to comprehend is how bacteria serve as a platform for different mineralization reactions. In our three-week laboratory practice, students learn the main principles and conditions required for an induced bacterial mineralization. Upon completion of the laboratory experience, students will: 1) learn how microbial-induced mineralization (such as calcium carbonate formation) is affected by differential media and growth conditions; 2) understand how bacterial physiology affects any induced in situ or in vitro mineralization; 3) comprehend how growing conditions and bacterial physiologies interrelate, resulting in differential crystal formation. The teaching-learning process was assessed using a pre-/posttest with an increase from 26% to 76% in the number of positive answers from the students. We also measured the students' proficiency while conducting specific technical tasks, revealing no major difficulties while conducting the experiments. A final questionnaire was provided with satisfactory evaluations from the students regarding the organization and content of the practices. 84-86% of the students agreed that the exercises improved their knowledge in geomicrobiology and would like to attend similar laboratories in the future. Such response is the best indicator that the laboratory practice can be implemented in any undergraduate/graduate microbiology course to effectively teach basic geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors.

  15. Effect of common salt on laboratory reared immature stages ofAedes aegypti (L)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mukhopadhyay AK; Tamizharasu W; Satya Babu P; Chandra G; Hati AK

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of common salt (NaCl) on immature stages of laboratory reared Aedes aegypti (L).Methods:A laboratory colony ofAedes aegypti mosquitoes of Rajahmundry strain was established in the laboratory of National Institute for Communicable Disease(NICD), Rajahmundry unit at (26±2) ℃ with relative humidity of (70±10)%. 1.00%, 1.25% and 1.50% solutions of common salt (NaCl) were selected to observe the susceptibility status of immature stages ofAedes aegypti in laboratory.Results: Fifty percent larvae ofAedes aegyptidied within 19, 31 and 48 hours when exposed to 1.50%, 1.25% and 1.00% common salt solution, respectively. Ninety percent of the larvae died within 29, 57 and 108 hours when exposed to the same salt solutions, respectively. Very high pupal mortality was observed varying from 81.8% to 40.0%. Formation of pupae was found inversely proportional in the presence of concentration of common salt in breeding water.Conclusions: With easy availability, less toxicity and long lasting nature, common salt may be applied in unused containers, especially in junkyards where surveillance mechanism is poor along with other conventional vector control methods in order to control breeding ofAedes aegypti, the vector of dengue/ dengue hemorrhagic fever and chikungunya.

  16. Application of failure mode and effect analysis in an assisted reproduction technology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intra, Giulia; Alteri, Alessandra; Corti, Laura; Rabellotti, Elisa; Papaleo, Enrico; Restelli, Liliana; Biondo, Stefania; Garancini, Maria Paola; Candiani, Massimo; Viganò, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Assisted reproduction technology laboratories have a very high degree of complexity. Mismatches of gametes or embryos can occur, with catastrophic consequences for patients. To minimize the risk of error, a multi-institutional working group applied failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to each critical activity/step as a method of risk assessment. This analysis led to the identification of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk priority number (RPN) scoring system. In total, 11 individual steps and 68 different potential failure modes were identified. The highest ranked failure modes, with an RPN score of 25, encompassed 17 failures and pertained to "patient mismatch" and "biological sample mismatch". The maximum reduction in risk, with RPN reduced from 25 to 5, was mostly related to the introduction of witnessing. The critical failure modes in sample processing were improved by 50% in the RPN by focusing on staff training. Three indicators of FMEA success, based on technical skill, competence and traceability, have been evaluated after FMEA implementation. Witnessing by a second human operator should be introduced in the laboratory to avoid sample mix-ups. These findings confirm that FMEA can effectively reduce errors in assisted reproduction technology laboratories.

  17. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  18. An Laboratory Experiment for Comparing Effectiveness of Three Types of Online Recommendations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Lin; WANG Kanliang

    2008-01-01

    The widespread use of Internet accelerates the rapid development of business to customer electronic commerce. To reduce information overload and help their customers to make better purchase decisions, e-commerce websites are beginning to use online recommendations. This paper compares the effectiveness of three types of online recommendations, the personalized recommendation, best sellers, and consumers' reviews, which are widely used in e-commerce. This research used a laboratory experiment combined with a questionnaire. This paper also establishes an integrated model of the facts that influence recommendation effectiveness.

  19. Physicochemical inactivation of Lassa, Ebola, and Marburg viruses and effect on clinical laboratory analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, S.W.; McCormick, J.B.

    1984-09-01

    Clinical specimens from patients infected with Lassa, Ebola, or Marburg virus may present a serious biohazard to laboratory workers. The authors have examined the effects of heat, alteration of pH, and gamma radiation on these viruses in human blood and on the electrolytes, enzymes, and coagulation factors measured in laboratory tests that are important in the care of an infected patient. Heating serum at 60 degrees C for 1 h reduced high titers of these viruses to noninfectious levels without altering the serum levels of glucose, blood urea nitrogen, and electrolytes. Dilution of blood in 3% acetic acid, diluent for a leukocyte count, inactivated all of these viruses. All of the methods tested for viral inactivation markedly altered certain serum proteins, making these methods unsuitable for samples that are to be tested for certain enzyme levels and coagulation factors.

  20. Effects of temperature on bacterial transport and destruction in bioretention media: field and laboratory evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Seagren, Eric A; Davis, Allen P; Karns, Jeffrey S

    2012-06-01

    Microbial activities are significantly influenced by temperature. This study investigated the effects of temperature on the capture and destruction of bacteria from urban stormwater runoff in bioretention media using 2-year field evaluations coupled with controlled laboratory column studies. Field data from two bioretention cells show that the concentration of indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli) was reduced during most storm events, and that the probability of meeting specific water quality criteria in the discharge was increased. Indicator bacteria concentration in the input flow typically increased with higher daily temperature. Although bacterial removal efficiency was independent of temperature in the field and laboratory, column tests showed that bacterial decay coefficients in conventional bioretention media (CBM) increase exponentially with elevated temperature. Increases in levels of protozoa and heterotrophic bacteria associated with increasing temperature appear to contribute to faster die-off of trapped E. coli in CBM via predation and competition.

  1. Virtual Earth System Laboratory (VESL): Effective Visualization of Earth System Data and Process Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. D.; Larour, E. Y.; Cheng, D. L. C.; Halkides, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Virtual Earth System Laboratory (VESL) is a Web-based tool, under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and UC Irvine, for the visualization of Earth System data and process simulations. It contains features geared toward a range of applications, spanning research and outreach. It offers an intuitive user interface, in which model inputs are changed using sliders and other interactive components. Current capabilities include simulation of polar ice sheet responses to climate forcing, based on NASA's Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). We believe that the visualization of data is most effective when tailored to the target audience, and that many of the best practices for modern Web design/development can be applied directly to the visualization of data: use of negative space, color schemes, typography, accessibility standards, tooltips, etc cetera. We present our prototype website, and invite input from potential users, including researchers, educators, and students.

  2. [Implementation of "5S" methodology in laboratory safety and its effect on employee satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Yavuz; Ozkutuk, Aydan; Dogan, Ozlem

    2014-04-01

    Health institutions use the accreditation process to achieve improvement across the organization and management of the health care system. An ISO 15189 quality and efficiency standard is the recommended standard for medical laboratories qualification. The "safety and accommodation conditions" of this standard covers the requirement to improve working conditions and maintain the necessary safety precautions. The most inevitable precaution for ensuring a safe environment is the creation of a clean and orderly environment to maintain a potentially safe surroundings. In this context, the 5S application which is a superior improvement tool that has been used by the industry, includes some advantages such as encouraging employees to participate in and to help increase the productivity. The main target of this study was to implement 5S methods in a clinical laboratory of a university hospital for evaluating its effect on employees' satisfaction, and correction of non-compliance in terms of the working environment. To start with, first, 5S education was given to management and employees. Secondly, a 5S team was formed and then the main steps of 5S (Seiri: Sort, Seiton: Set in order, Seiso: Shine, Seiketsu: Standardize, and Shitsuke: Systematize) were implemented for a duration of 3 months. A five-point likert scale questionnaire was used in order to determine and assess the impact of 5S on employees' satisfaction considering the areas such as facilitating the job, the job satisfaction, setting up a safe environment, and the effect of participation in management. Questionnaire form was given to 114 employees who actively worked during the 5S implementation period, and the data obtained from 63 (52.3%) participants (16 male, 47 female) were evaluated. The reliability of the questionnaire's Cronbach's alpha value was determined as 0.858 (pjob and setting up a safe environment created a statistically significant effect on employees, and some sufficient satisfaction was

  3. The Prosocial Effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA): Controlled Studies in Humans and Laboratory Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamilar-Britt, Philip; Bedi, Gillinder

    2015-01-01

    Users of ±3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ‘ecstasy’) report prosocial effects such as sociability and empathy. Supporting these apparently unique social effects, data from controlled laboratory studies indicate that MDMA alters social feelings, information processing, and behavior in humans, and social behavior in rodents. Here, we review this growing body of evidence. In rodents, MDMA increases passive prosocial behavior (adjacent lying) and social reward while decreasing aggression, effects that may involve serotonin 1A receptor mediated oxytocin release interacting with vasopressin receptor 1A. In humans, MDMA increases plasma oxytocin and produces feelings of social affiliation. It decreases identification of negative facial expressions (cognitive empathy) and blunts responses to social rejection, while enhancing responses to others’ positive emotions (emotional empathy) and increasing social approach. Thus, consistent with drug folklore, laboratory administration of MDMA robustly alters social processing in humans and increases social approach in humans and animals. Effects are consistent with increased sociability, with mixed evidence about enhanced empathy. These neurobiologically-complex prosocial effects likely motivate recreational ecstasy use. PMID:26408071

  4. Effect of Biochar on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Nitrogen Cycling in Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Nikolas; Harter, Johannes; Kaldamukova, Radina; Ruser, Reiner; Graeff-Hönninger, Simone; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    The extensive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizers in agriculture is a major source of anthropogenic N2O emissions contributing 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Soil biochar amendment has been suggested as a means to reduce both CO2 and non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions. The reduction of N2O emissions by biochar has been demonstrated repeatedly in field and laboratory experiments. However, the mechanisms of the reduction remain unclear. Further it is not known how biochar field-weathering affects GHG emissions and how agro-chemicals, such as the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP), that is often simultaneously applied together with commercial N-fertilizers, impact nitrogen transformation and N2O emissions from biochar amended soils. In order investigate the duration of the biochar effect on soil N2O emissions and its susceptibility to DMPP application we performed a microcosm and field study with a high-temperature (400 ° C) beech wood derived biochar (60 t ha-1 and 5 % (w/w) biochar in the field and microcosms, respectively). While the field site contained the biochar already for three years, soil and biochar were freshly mixed for the laboratory microcosm experiments. In both studies we quantified GHG emissions and soil nitrogen speciation (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium). While the field study was carried out over the whole vegetation period of the sunflower Helianthus annuus L., soil microcosm experiments were performed for up to 9 days at 28° C. In both experiments a N-fertilizer containing DMPP was applied either before planting of the sunflowers or at the beginning of soil microcosms incubation. Laboratory microcosm experiments were performed at 60% water filled pore space reflecting average field conditions. Our results show that biochar effectively reduced soil N2O emissions by up to 60 % in the field and in the soil microcosm experiments. No significant differences in N2O emission mitigation potential between field-aged and fresh

  5. A Six Sigma approach to the rate and clinical effect of registration errors in a laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanker, Naadira; van Wyk, Johan; Zemlin, Annalise E; Erasmus, Rajiv T

    2010-05-01

    Laboratory errors made during the pre-analytical phase can have an impact on clinical care. Quality management tools such as Six Sigma may help improve error rates. To use elements of a Six Sigma model to establish the error rate of test registration onto the laboratory information system (LIS), and to deduce the potential clinical impact of these errors. In this retrospective study, test request forms were compared with the tests registered onto the LIS, and all errors were noted before being rectified. The error rate was calculated. The corresponding patient records were then examined to determine the actual outcome, and to deduce the potential clinical impact of the registration errors. Of the 47 543 tests requested, 72 errors were noted, resulting in an error rate of 0.151%, equating to a sigma score of 4.46. The patient records reviewed indicated that these errors could, in various ways, have impacted on clinical care. This study highlights the clinical effect of errors made during the pre-analytical phase of the laboratory testing process. Reduction of errors may be achieved through implementation of a Six Sigma programme.

  6. Effectiveness of Barcoding for Reducing Patient Specimen and Laboratory Testing Identification Errors: A Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Susan R.; Favoretto, Alessandra M.; Derzon, James H.; Christenson, Robert; Kahn, Stephen; Shaw, Colleen; Baetz, Rich Ann; Mass, Diana; Fantz, Corrine; Raab, Stephen; Tanasijevic, Milenko; Liebow, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This is the first systematic review of the effectiveness of barcoding practices for reducing patient specimen and laboratory testing identification errors. Design and Methods The CDC-funded Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Initiative systematic review methods for quality improvement practices were used. Results A total of 17 observational studies reporting on barcoding systems are included in the body of evidence; 10 for patient specimens and 7 for point-of-care testing. All 17 studies favored barcoding, with meta-analysis mean odds ratios for barcoding systems of 4.39 (95% CI: 3.05 – 6.32) and for point-of-care testing of 5.93 (95% CI: 5.28 – 6.67). Conclusions Barcoding is effective for reducing patient specimen and laboratory testing identification errors in diverse hospital settings and is recommended as an evidence-based “best practice.” The overall strength of evidence rating is high and the effect size rating is substantial. Unpublished studies made an important contribution comprising almost half of the body of evidence. PMID:22750145

  7. Effects of kaolin on Ophelimus maskelli (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in laboratory and nursery experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Verde, G; Rizzo, R; Barraco, G; Lombardo, A

    2011-02-01

    Although recent research has demonstrated that clays provide satisfactory control of some agricultural insect pests, the effect of clays on gall wasps that damage forest trees has not been previously reported. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the clay kaolin in the laboratory and in the field in reducing the damage caused by the eulophid Ophelimus maskelli (Ashmead) on seedlings of eucalyptus (Eucalyptus L'Hér.) species. In the laboratory, kaolin + wetting agent significantly reduced the percentage of infested leaves and the number of galls per leaf. In the nursery, gall number per leaf was not correlated with leaf area with kaolin + wetting agent but was related to leaf area for all other treatments (wetting agent alone, imidacloprid, and untreated control). In the nursery, gall number per leaf was lower with kaolin + wetting agent and with imidacloprid than with the other two treatments. Overall, kaolin effectively reduced eulophid infestations, and its effect was more persistent than that of imidacloprid. Although application of kaolin might not be feasible on large forested areas, kaolin could represent a valuable control method in nurseries, where the repeated application with more toxic chemicals can result in high concentrations of residual pesticides in the soil.

  8. The effect of introducing computers into an introductory physics problem-solving laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laura Ellen

    2000-10-01

    Computers are appearing in every type of classroom across the country. Yet they often appear without benefit of studying their effects. The research that is available on computer use in classrooms has found mixed results, and often ignores the theoretical and instructional contexts of the computer in the classroom. The University of Minnesota's physics department employs a cooperative-group problem solving pedagogy, based on a cognitive apprenticeship instructional model, in its calculus-based introductory physics course. This study was designed to determine possible negative effects of introducing a computerized data-acquisition and analysis tool into this pedagogy as a problem-solving tool for students to use in laboratory. To determine the effects of the computer tool, two quasi-experimental treatment groups were selected. The computer-tool group (N = 170) used a tool, designed for this study (VideoTool), to collect and analyze motion data in the laboratory. The control group (N = 170) used traditional non-computer equipment (spark tapes and Polaroid(TM) film). The curriculum was kept as similar as possible for the two groups. During the ten week academic quarter, groups were examined for effects on performance on conceptual tests and grades, attitudes towards the laboratory and the laboratory tools, and behaviors within cooperative groups. Possible interactions with gender were also examined. Few differences were found between the control and computer-tool groups. The control group received slightly higher scores on one conceptual test, but this difference was not educationally significant. The computer-tool group had slightly more positive attitudes towards using the computer tool than their counterparts had towards the traditional tools. The computer-tool group also perceived that they spoke more frequently about physics misunderstandings, while the control group felt that they discussed equipment difficulties more often. This perceptual difference interacted

  9. Effect of a common reference plasma on the inter-laboratory variation of the measurement of total and free protein S: a collaborative study of the Dutch Working Group on Haemostasis Laboratory Diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, P.; Verbruggen, H.W.; Weerd, B. de; Dool, E.J. den; Oerle, R. van

    2002-01-01

    The comparability of test results for protein S between laboratories is hampered by a high inter-laboratory variability. The effect of the use and type of common reference plasma on the inter-laboratory variability of the total and free protein S measurement was evaluated. The results of 10 plasma

  10. Field and laboratory studies reveal interacting effects of stream oxygenation and warming on aquatic ectotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberk, Wilco C E P; Durance, Isabelle; Vaughan, Ian P; Ormerod, Steve J

    2016-05-01

    Aquatic ecological responses to climatic warming are complicated by interactions between thermal effects and other environmental stressors such as organic pollution and hypoxia. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated how oxygen limitation can set heat tolerance for some aquatic ectotherms, but only at unrealistic lethal temperatures and without field data to assess whether oxygen shortages might also underlie sublethal warming effects. Here, we test whether oxygen availability affects both lethal and nonlethal impacts of warming on two widespread Eurasian mayflies, Ephemera danica, Müller 1764 and Serratella ignita (Poda 1761). Mayfly nymphs are often a dominant component of the invertebrate assemblage in streams, and play a vital role in aquatic and riparian food webs. In the laboratory, lethal impacts of warming were assessed under three oxygen conditions. In the field, effects of oxygen availability on nonlethal impacts of warming were assessed from mayfly occurrence in 42 293 UK stream samples where water temperature and biochemical oxygen demand were measured. Oxygen limitation affected both lethal and sublethal impacts of warming in each species. Hypoxia lowered lethal limits by 5.5 °C (±2.13) and 8.2 °C (±0.62) for E. danica and S. ignita respectively. Field data confirmed the importance of oxygen limitation in warmer waters; poor oxygenation drastically reduced site occupancy, and reductions were especially pronounced under warm water conditions. Consequently, poor oxygenation lowered optimal stream temperatures for both species. The broad concordance shown here between laboratory results and extensive field data suggests that oxygen limitation not only impairs survival at thermal extremes but also restricts species abundance in the field at temperatures well below upper lethal limits. Stream oxygenation could thus control the vulnerability of aquatic ectotherms to global warming. Improving water oxygenation and reducing pollution can provide

  11. Geometric effect on a laboratory-scale wavefield inferred from a three-dimensional numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimitsu, Nana; Furumura, Takashi; Maeda, Takuto

    2016-09-01

    The coda part of a waveform transmitted through a laboratory sample should be examined for the high-resolution monitoring of the sample characteristics in detail. However, the origin and propagation process of the later phases in a finite-sized small sample are very complicated with the overlap of multiple unknown reflections and conversions. In this study, we investigated the three-dimensional (3D) geometric effect of a finite-sized cylindrical sample to understand the development of these later phases. This study used 3D finite difference method simulation employing a free-surface boundary condition over a curved model surface and a realistic circular shape of the source model. The simulated waveforms and the visualized 3D wavefield in a stainless steel sample clearly demonstrated the process of multiple reflections and the conversions of the P and S waves at the side surface as well as at the top and bottom of the sample. Rayleigh wave propagation along the curved side boundary was also confirmed, and these waves dominate in the later portion of the simulated waveform with much larger amplitudes than the P and S wave reflections. The feature of the simulated waveforms showed good agreement with laboratory observed waveforms. For the simulation, an introduction of an absorbing boundary condition at the top and bottom of the sample made it possible to efficiently separate the contribution of the vertical and horizontal boundary effects in the simulated wavefield. This procedure helped to confirm the additional finding of vertically propagating multiple surface waves and their conversion at the corner of the sample. This new laboratory-scale 3D simulation enabled the appearance of a variety of geometric effects that constitute the later phases of the transmitted waves.

  12. Effects of implant angulation, material selection, and impression technique on impression accuracy: a preliminary laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Sveikata, Kestutis; Savickas, Raimondas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary laboratory study was to evaluate the effects of 5- and 25-degree implant angulations in simulated clinical casts on an impression's accuracy when using different impression materials and tray selections. A convenience sample of each implant angulation group was selected for both open and closed trays in combination with one polyether and two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials. The influence of material and technique appeared to be significant for both 5- and 25-degree angulations (P impression accuracy. The open-tray technique was more accurate with highly nonaxially oriented implants for the small sample size investigated.

  13. Lasting effects of workplace strength training for neck/shoulder/arm pain among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Larsen, Anders I; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

    2014-01-01

    , (2) training culture, that is, relatively more employees trained at the workplace and with colleagues, (3) self-reported health changes, and (4) prevention of neck and wrist pain development among initially pain-free employees. Conclusions. This natural experiment shows that strength training can......Objectives. This study investigated long-term effects and implementation processes of workplace strength training for musculoskeletal disorders. Methods. 333 and 140 laboratory technicians from private and public sector companies, respectively, replied to a 3-year follow-up questionnaire subsequent...

  14. Effects of exercise on craving and cigarette smoking in the human laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurti, Allison N; Dallery, Jesse

    2014-06-01

    Exercise is increasingly being pursued as a treatment to reduce cigarette smoking. The efficacy of clinical, exercise-based cessation interventions may be enhanced by conducting laboratory studies to determine maximally effective conditions for reducing smoking, and the mechanisms through which the effects on smoking are achieved. The main purpose of this study was to assess whether the effects of exercise on two components of craving (anticipated reward from smoking, anticipated relief from withdrawal) mediated the relationship between exercise and delay (in min) to ad libitum smoking. Experiment 1 (N=21) assessed the effects of exercise intensity (inactivity, low, moderate) on craving components up to 60 min post-exercise. Because moderate-intensity exercise most effectively reduced craving on the reward component, all participants exercised at a moderate intensity in Experiment 2. Using an ABAB within-subjects design, Experiment 2 (N=20) evaluated whether the effects of moderate-intensity exercise on reward and relief components of craving mediated the relationship between exercise and participants' delays (in min) to ad libitum smoking. Delays were significantly longer after exercise (M=21 min) versus inactivity (M=4 min), and the effects of exercise on delay were mediated through the reward component of craving. Future research should continue to explore the mechanisms through which exercise influences behavioral indices of smoking in the human laboratory. Additionally, given the benefits uniquely afforded by exercise-based cessation interventions (e.g., improving mood and other health outcomes), implementing these interventions in clinical settings may contribute substantially to improving public health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Repellency Effect of Myrtle Essential Oil and DEET against Phlebotomus papatasi, under Labo-ratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Yaghoobi-Ershadi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL is an increasing and important public health problem in Iran. The use of repellents is recommended as one of the important means of personal protection against vectors of ZCL. This paper reports the repellency effect of the plant Myrtle, Myrtus communis (Myrtaceae, essential oil for protection against 3-7-day-old unfed females of the sandfly, Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli for the first time in Iran. The tests were carried out under laboratory conditions, using dose-response testing procedure on white rabbits and the results were compared with commonly used repellent, diethyl-3-methylbenzamid (DEET. The modified Wirtz method using K & D apparatus was employed. Effective Dose (EDs values were estimated from the probit regression line. ED50 was measured as 0.1140 and 0.0006 mg/cm2 for Myrtle essential oil and DEET, respectively. The laboratory tests showed that both Myrtle essential oil and DEET had repellency effects against P.papatasi. In addition, the insecticidal action of Myrtle oil was also observed. We concluded that the two repellents could be used as a mean of personal protection against sand flies.

  16. The Effect of Using V Diagrams on the Achievement of Student in Basic Chemistry Laboratory Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek ÇELİKLER

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, importance of V-diagrams for experimental learning, using of it for integration of theoretic knowledge with laboratory observations and how the V-diagrams can be prepared have been explained. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of V-diagrams on the learning achievement of acids and bases, simple gas Laws, solutions and solubility, effect of temperature on solubility, effect of concentration on reaction rate, hydrolysis of salts electrolysis and chemical kinetics, in chemistry laboratory of second year mathematic trainer teachers. The subjects were divided into two groups: experimental (N=67 and control (N=67. Before the application, both groups received a pre-test. The results of the test showed no significance difference between the experimental and control groups (t= 0.225; p= 0,823. The post-test achievement scores of the experimental group using V-diagrams in teaching showed a significant difference in favor of the experimental group (t= 16.880; p=0.000

  17. Atmospheric effects on Quaternary polarization encoding for free space communication, laboratory simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Soorat, Ram

    2015-01-01

    We have simulated atmospheric effects such as fog and smoke in laboratory environment to simulate depolarisation due to atmospheric effects during a free space optical communi- cation. This has been used to study noise in two components of quaternary encoding for polarization shift keying. Individual components of a Quaternary encoding, such as vertical and horizontal as well as 45$^\\circ$ and 135$^\\circ$ , are tested separately and indicates that the depo- larization effects are different for these two situation. However, due to a differential method used to extract information bits, the protocol shows extremely low bit error rates. The information obtained is useful during deployment of a fully functional Quaternary encoded PolSK scheme in free space.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code : pH effects user manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janardhanam, Vijay (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); James, Scott Carlton

    2012-02-01

    This document describes the implementation level changes in the source code and input files of Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC) that are necessary for including pH effects into algae-growth dynamics. The document also gives a brief introduction to how pH effects are modeled into the algae-growth model. The document assumes that the reader is aware of the existing algae-growth model in SNL-EFDC. The existing model is described by James, Jarardhanam and more theoretical considerations behind modeling pH effects are presented therein. This document should be used in conjunction with the original EFDC manual and the original water-quality manual.

  19. Effects of emodin on treating murine nonalcoholic fatty liver induced by high caloric laboratory chaw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Dong; Fu-Er Lu; Zhi-Qiang Gao; Li-Jun Xu; Kai-Fu Wang; Xin Zou

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of emodin on the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver in rats induced by high caloric laboratory chaw.METHODS: Non-alcoholic fatty liver model was successfully established by feeding with high caloric laboratory chaw for 12 wk. Then the model rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, namely model control group, emodin group and dietary treatment group. The rats in emodin group in othergroups were given distilled water of the same volume. The rats in model control group were fed with high caloric laboratory chaw while animals in other groups were fed with normal diet. Four weeks later, liver index (liver/body weight ratio), serum activities of liver-associated enzymes, blood lipid, fasting blood glucose, fasting plasma insulin, HOMA insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), hepatic triglyceride content and histology features of all groups were assayed. The expression of hepatic peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma was determined by RT-PCR.RESULTS: The body weight, liver index, serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), blood lipid, hepatic triglyceride content of model control group were significantly elevated, with moderate to severe hepatocyte steatosis.The expression of hepatic PPAR gamma mRNA was obviously reduced in model control group. Compared with model control group, the body weight, liver index, serum activities of ALT, blood lipids and hepatic triglyceride of emodin group significantly decreased and hepatic histology display was also greatly improved. Meanwhile, the expression of hepatic PPAR gamma mRNA was elevated.However, high serum activities of ALT and hyperlipidemia were persisted in dietary treatment group although liver index was decreased and liver histology was somewhat improved.CONCLUSION: It is suggested that emodin might be effective in the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver in rats. Its therapeutic mechanism could be associated with increasing the expression of hepatic PPAR gamma mRNA.

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of a laboratory-based professional development program for science educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amolins, Michael W; Ezrailson, Cathy M; Pearce, David A; Elliott, Amy J; Vitiello, Peter F

    2015-12-01

    The process of developing effective science educators has been a long-standing objective of the broader education community. Numerous studies have recommended not only depth in a teacher's subject area but also a breadth of professional development grounded in constructivist principles, allowing for successful student-centered and inquiry-based instruction. Few programs, however, have addressed the integration of the scientific research laboratory into the science classroom as a viable approach to professional development. Additionally, while occasional laboratory training programs have emerged in recent years, many lack a component for translating acquired skills into reformed classroom instruction. Given the rapid development and demand for knowledgeable employees and an informed population from the biotech and medical industries in recent years, it would appear to be particularly advantageous for the physiology and broader science education communities to consider this issue. The goal of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a laboratory-based professional development program focused on the integration of reformed teaching principles into the classrooms of secondary teachers. This was measured through the program's ability to instill in its participants elevated academic success while gaining fulfillment in the classroom. The findings demonstrated a significant improvement in the use of student-centered instruction and other reformed methods by program participants as well as improved self-efficacy, confidence, and job satisfaction. Also revealed was a reluctance to refashion established classroom protocols. The combination of these outcomes allowed for construction of an experiential framework for professional development in applied science education that supports an atmosphere of reformed teaching in the classroom.

  1. Caloric restriction in lean and obese strains of laboratory rat: effects on body composition, metabolism, growth and overall health

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data related to obese and lean strains of rat commonly used in the laboratory that are calorically restricted and its effects on physiologic parameters (Body...

  2. NIF laboratory astrophysics simulations investigating the effects of a radiative shock on hydrodynamic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, A. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Kalantar, D.; MacLaren, S.; Raman, K.; Miles, A.; Trantham, Matthew; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K.; Doss, F. W.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-10-01

    This poster will describe simulations based on results from ongoing laboratory astrophysics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) relevant to the effects of radiative shock on hydrodynamically unstable surfaces. The experiments performed on NIF uniquely provide the necessary conditions required to emulate radiative shock that occurs in astrophysical systems. The core-collapse explosions of red supergiant stars is such an example wherein the interaction between the supernova ejecta and the circumstellar medium creates a region susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities. Radiative and nonradiative experiments were performed to show that R-T growth should be reduced by the effects of the radiative shocks that occur during this core-collapse. Simulations were performed using the radiation hydrodynamics code Hyades using the experimental conditions to find the mean interface acceleration of the instability and then further analyzed in the buoyancy drag model to observe how the material expansion contributes to the mix-layer growth. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas under Grant Number DE-FG52-09NA29548.

  3. Vaccine Effectiveness against Medically Attended Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza in Japan, 2011–2012 Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motoi; Minh, Le Nhat; Yoshimine, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Morimoto, Konosuke; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza during the 2011–2012 season in Japan using a test-negative case-control study design. The effect of co-circulating non-influenza respiratory viruses (NIRVs) on VE estimates was also explored. Nasopharyngeal swab samples were collected from outpatients with influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) in a community hospital in Nagasaki, Japan. Thirteen respiratory viruses (RVs), including influenza A and B, were identified from the samples using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The difference in VE point estimates was assessed using three different controls: ILI patients that tested negative for influenza, those that tested negative for all RVs, and those that tested positive for NIRVs. The adjusted VE against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza using all influenza-negative controls was 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], −60.5 to 44.1). The adjusted VEs using RV-negative and NIRV-positive controls were −1.5% (95% CI, −74.7 to 41) and 50% (95% CI, −43.2 to 82.5), respectively. Influenza VE was limited in Japan during the 2011–2012 season. Although the evidence is not conclusive, co-circulating NIRVs may affect influenza VE estimates in test-negative case-control studies. PMID:24551167

  4. Vaccine effectiveness against medically attended laboratory-confirmed influenza in Japan, 2011-2012 Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motoi; Minh, Le Nhat; Yoshimine, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Morimoto, Konosuke; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza during the 2011-2012 season in Japan using a test-negative case-control study design. The effect of co-circulating non-influenza respiratory viruses (NIRVs) on VE estimates was also explored. Nasopharyngeal swab samples were collected from outpatients with influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) in a community hospital in Nagasaki, Japan. Thirteen respiratory viruses (RVs), including influenza A and B, were identified from the samples using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The difference in VE point estimates was assessed using three different controls: ILI patients that tested negative for influenza, those that tested negative for all RVs, and those that tested positive for NIRVs. The adjusted VE against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza using all influenza-negative controls was 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], -60.5 to 44.1). The adjusted VEs using RV-negative and NIRV-positive controls were -1.5% (95% CI, -74.7 to 41) and 50% (95% CI, -43.2 to 82.5), respectively. Influenza VE was limited in Japan during the 2011-2012 season. Although the evidence is not conclusive, co-circulating NIRVs may affect influenza VE estimates in test-negative case-control studies.

  5. Vaccine effectiveness against medically attended laboratory-confirmed influenza in Japan, 2011-2012 Season.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoi Suzuki

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza during the 2011-2012 season in Japan using a test-negative case-control study design. The effect of co-circulating non-influenza respiratory viruses (NIRVs on VE estimates was also explored. Nasopharyngeal swab samples were collected from outpatients with influenza-like illnesses (ILIs in a community hospital in Nagasaki, Japan. Thirteen respiratory viruses (RVs, including influenza A and B, were identified from the samples using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The difference in VE point estimates was assessed using three different controls: ILI patients that tested negative for influenza, those that tested negative for all RVs, and those that tested positive for NIRVs. The adjusted VE against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza using all influenza-negative controls was 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], -60.5 to 44.1. The adjusted VEs using RV-negative and NIRV-positive controls were -1.5% (95% CI, -74.7 to 41 and 50% (95% CI, -43.2 to 82.5, respectively. Influenza VE was limited in Japan during the 2011-2012 season. Although the evidence is not conclusive, co-circulating NIRVs may affect influenza VE estimates in test-negative case-control studies.

  6. The leverage effect on wealth distribution in a controllable laboratory stock market.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenge Zhu

    Full Text Available Wealth distribution has always been an important issue in our economic and social life, since it affects the harmony and stabilization of the society. Under the background of widely used financial tools to raise leverage these years, we studied the leverage effect on wealth distribution of a population in a controllable laboratory market in which we have conducted several human experiments, and drawn the conclusion that higher leverage leads to a higher Gini coefficient in the market. A higher Gini coefficient means the wealth distribution among a population becomes more unequal. This is a result of the ascending risk with growing leverage level in the market plus the diversified trading abilities and risk preference of the participants. This work sheds light on the effects of leverage and its related regulations, especially its impact on wealth distribution. It also shows the capability of the method of controllable laboratory markets which could be helpful in several fields of study such as economics, econophysics and sociology.

  7. Evaluating the effectiveness of a laboratory-based professional development program for science educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amolins, Michael Wayne

    The development of effective science educators has been a long-standing goal of the American education system. Numerous studies have suggested a breadth of professional development programs that have sought to utilize constructivist principles in order to orchestrate movement toward student-led, inquiry-based instruction. Very few, however, have addressed a missing link between the modern scientific laboratory and the traditional science classroom. While several laboratory-based training programs have begun to emerge in recent years, the skills necessary to translate this information into the classroom are rarely addressed. The result is that participants are often left without an outlet or the confidence to integrate these into their lessons. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a laboratory-based professional development program focused on classroom integration and reformed science teaching principles. This was measured by the ability to invigorate its seven participants in order to achieve higher levels of success and fulfillment in the classroom. These participants all taught at public high schools in South Dakota, including both rural and urban locations, and taught a variety of courses. Participants were selected for this study through their participation in the Sanford Research/USD Science Educator Research Fellowship Program. Through the use of previously collected data acquired by Sanford Research, this study attempted to detail the convergence of three assessments in order to demonstrate the growth and development of its participants. First, pre- and post-program surveys were completed in order to display the personal and professional growth of its participants. Second, pre- and post-program classroom observations employing the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol allowed for the assessment of pedagogical modifications being integrated by each participant, as well as the success of such modifications in constructively

  8. Statin adverse effects: patients' experiences and laboratory monitoring of muscle and liver injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaipichit, Nataporn; Krska, Janet; Pratipanawatr, Thongchai; Jarernsiripornkul, Narumol

    2015-04-01

    Although statins have great benefit on the prevention of cardiovascular diseases with limited adverse effects (AEs), little is known about patients' contribution of AE reports in clinical practice. To explore patients' experiences of statin AEs and related laboratory monitoring in clinical practice. Outpatient clinics of two University hospitals in northeast Thailand. Generic symptom checklist questionnaires for self-reporting AEs were distributed to patients prescribed simvastatin, atorvastatin, or rosuvastatin at outpatient clinics. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Reported symptoms were assessed for causality considering previously known statin AEs, concomitant diseases and drugs. Potential statin AEs reported by patients and monitoring of laboratory parameters related to musculoskeletal and liver disorders. Of the total 718 valid responses, 76.0 % of patients reported at least one symptom, most of which (69.0 %) were probable/possible statin AEs. Musculoskeletal and liver-related symptoms were reported by 283 (39.4 %) and 134 patients (18.7 %), respectively. Probable/possible AEs were categorized in 56.7 % of their musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal symptoms. Majority of patients had at least one laboratory test on initiation of (64.8 %) and during statin treatment (61.8 %). Patients taking atorvastatin or rosuvastatin, and patients with history of chronic renal diseases were more likely to have creatine kinase (CK) monitored on initiation of and during statin treatment. Additionally, taking drugs which could potentially increase muscle injury (OR 1.929, P statin treatment. Reporters of musculoskeletal symptoms also had significantly higher mean CK level than those not reporting any musculoskeletal symptoms (207.35 ± 155.40 vs. 143.95 ± 83.07 U/L, respectively; P = 0.037). Patient reporting of liver AEs was not related to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level and monitoring, however, prior history of liver disorders was significantly

  9. Effectiveness of Podcasts Delivered on Mobile Devices as a Support for Student Learning During General Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Cynthia B.; Mason, Diana S.

    2013-04-01

    Chemistry instructors in teaching laboratories provide expert modeling of techniques and cognitive processes and provide assistance to enrolled students that may be described as scaffolding interaction. Such student support is particularly essential in laboratories taught with an inquiry-based curriculum. In a teaching laboratory with a high instructor-to-student ratio, mobile devices can provide a platform for expert modeling and scaffolding during the laboratory sessions. This research study provides data collected on the effectiveness of podcasts delivered as needed in a first-semester general chemistry laboratory setting. Podcasts with audio and visual tracks covering essential laboratory techniques and central concepts that aid in experimental design or data processing were prepared and made available for students to access on an as-needed basis on iPhones® or iPod touches®. Research focused in three areas: the extent of podcast usage, the numbers and types of interactions between instructors and student laboratory teams, and student performance on graded assignments. Data analysis indicates that on average the podcast treatment laboratory teams accessed a podcast 2.86 times during the laboratory period during each week that podcasts were available. Comparison of interaction data for the lecture treatment laboratory teams and podcast treatment laboratory teams reveals that scaffolding interactions with instructors were statistically significantly fewer for teams that had podcast access rather than a pre-laboratory lecture. The implication of the results is that student laboratory teams were able to gather laboratory information more effectively when it was presented in an on-demand podcast format than in a pre-laboratory lecture format. Finally, statistical analysis of data on student performance on graded assignments indicates no significant differences between outcome measures for the treatment groups when compared as cohorts. The only statistically

  10. Antinociceptive effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine in the hot-plate test in laboratory rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestehave, Sara; Munro, Gordon; Pedersen, Tina Brønnum; Abelson, Klas S P

    2016-09-27

    Researchers performing experiments on animals should always strive towards the refinement of experiments, minimization of stress and provision of better animal welfare. An adequate analgesic strategy is important to improve post-operative recovery and welfare in laboratory rats and mice. In addition, it is desirable to provide post-operative analgesia using methods that are minimally invasive and stressful. This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of orally administered buprenorphine ingested in Nutella® in comparison with subcutaneous buprenorphine administration. By exposing the animal to a thermal stimulus using a hot plate, significant antinociceptive effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine administered in Nutella® were demonstrated. This was evident at doses of 1.0 mg/kg 60 and 120 min post administration (P Nutella® in a 10-fold higher dose, as well as approximately 60 min earlier, than with the more commonly employed subcutaneous route of administration.

  11. Barometric pumping effect for radon-due neutron flux in underground laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Stenkin, Yu V; Gromushkin, D M; Shchegolev, O B; Sulakov, V P

    2016-01-01

    It is known that neutron background is a big problem for low-background experiments in underground Laboratories. Our global net of en-detectors sensitive to thermal neutrons includes the detectors running both on the surface and at different depths underground. We present here results obtained with the en-detector of 0.75 m^2 which is running more than 3 years in underground room at a depth of 25 m of water equivalent in Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow. Spontaneous increases in thermal neutron flux up to a factor of 3 were observed in delayed anti-correlation with barometric pressure. The phenomenon can be explained by a radon barometric pumping effect resulting in similar effect in neutron flux produced in (alpha,n)-reactions by alpha-decays of radon and its daughters in surrounding rock

  12. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Amy C; Andrusiv, Lubov P; Courtney, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile.

  13. Part I: Virtual Laboratory versus Traditional Laboratory: Which Is More Effective for Teaching Electrochemistry? Part II: The Green Synthesis of Aurones Using a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the teaching laboratory in science education has been debated over the last century. The goals and purposes of the laboratory are still debated and while most science educators consider laboratory a vital part of the education process, they differ widely on the purposes for laboratory and what methods should be used to teach…

  14. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  15. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory The Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose...

  16. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  17. Collaborative Testing in Practical Laboratories: An Effective Teaching-Learning Method in Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuping; Li, Enzhong

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an experimental teaching and learning program used in histology with first-year students in the second term in the Faculty of Biology at Huanghuai University, China. Eighty-six students were divided randomly into two groups (n=43 per group). Tests were conducted at the end of each practical laboratory (10 laboratories in total) in which collaborative testing was used in the experimental group and traditional testing in the control group. To assess achievement, a final examination in histology was carried out at the end of the course. To determine students' attitude to the teaching styles, a questionnaire survey was conducted at the end of the term. Results showed that students preferred the collaborative testing format. In the experimental group, students' scores were significantly higher than those of students in the control group in final examinations. These findings indicate that collaborative testing enhances student learning and understanding of the material taught, and suggest that collaborative testing is an effective teaching-learning method in histology.

  18. Effects of ostracism and sex on alcohol consumption in a clinical laboratory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Amy K; Cranford, Alexi N; Blumenthal, Heidemarie

    2015-09-01

    Drinking to cope with negative affect is a drinking pattern that leads to problematic alcohol use both in college and after graduation. Despite theory and correlational evidence to this effect, establishing a link between stress and alcohol consumption among college students in the laboratory has yielded both a limited number of studies and, at times, inconsistent results. The present study attempts to resolve these issues through investigating the effects of an ecologically relevant stressor-ostracism-on alcohol consumption in a clinical laboratory setting. Social drinking college students (N = 40; 55% female) completed a 5-min game of Cyberball and were randomly assigned either to be included or excluded in the virtual ball-toss game. The amount (in ml) of beer consumed in a subsequent mock taste test served as our primary dependent variable, with breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) as a secondary dependent variable. Results indicated that excluded participants reported a trend toward an increase in negative affect from pre- to post-Cyberball, and endorsed significantly lower self-esteem, belonging, control, and belief in a meaningful existence compared to included participants. A significant Sex × Condition effect indicated that excluded women consumed less beer than both included women and excluded men, supported by a nonsignificant trend in BrAC. Men did not differ in their consumption of beer as a result of Cyberball condition. Implications of sex and social context on alcohol use are discussed, as well as ostracism as a method for investigating relationships between social stress and alcohol use.

  19. Effects of Tween 80 on Growth and Biofilm Formation in Laboratory Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Christina K; Kjems, Jørgen; Mygind, Tina; Snabe, Torben; Meyer, Rikke L

    2016-01-01

    Tween 80 is a widely used non-ionic emulsifier that is added to cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and foods. Because of its widespread use we need to understand how it affects bacteria on our skin, in our gut, and in food products. The aim of this study is to investigate how Tween 80 affects the growth and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Pseudomonas fluorescens, which are common causes of spoilage and foodborne illnesses. Addition of 0.1% Tween 80 to laboratory growth media increased the growth rate of planktonic S. aureus batch cultures, and it also increased the total biomass when S. aureus was grown as biofilms. In contrast, Tween 80 had no effect on batch cultures of L. monocytogenes, it slowed the growth rate of P. fluorescens, and it led to formation of less biofilm by both L. monocytogenes and P. fluorescens. Furthermore, Tween 80 lowered the antibacterial efficacy of two hydrophobic antimicrobials: rifampicin and the essential oil isoeugenol. Our findings underline the importance of documenting indirect effects of emulsifiers when studying the efficacy of hydrophobic antimicrobials that are dispersed in solution by emulsification, or when antimicrobials are applied in food matrixes that include emulsifiers. Furthermore, the species-specific effects on microbial growth suggests that Tween 80 in cosmetics and food products could affect the composition of skin and gut microbiota, and the effect of emulsifiers on the human microbiome should therefore be explored to uncover potential health effects.

  20. Effects of Tween 80 on growth and biofilm formation in laboratory media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Krogsård Nielsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tween 80 is a widely used nonionic emulsifier that is added to cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and foods. Because of its widespread use we need to understand how it affects bacteria on our skin, in our gut, and in food products. The aim of this study is to investigate how Tween 80 affects the growth and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas fluorescens, which are common causes of spoilage and foodborne illnesses. Addition of 0.1% Tween 80 to laboratory growth media increased the growth rate of planktonic S. aureus batch cultures, and it also increased the total biomass when S. aureus was grown as biofilms. In contrast, Tween 80 had no effect on batch cultures of L. monocytogenes, it slowed the growth rate of P. fluorescens, and it led to formation of less biofilm by both L. monocytogenes and P. fluorescens. Furthermore, Tween 80 lowered the antibacterial efficacy of two hydrophobic antimicrobials: rifampicin and the essential oil isoeugenol. Our findings underline the importance of documenting indirect effects of emulsifiers when studying the efficacy of hydrophobic antimicrobials that are dispersed in solution by emulsification, or when antimicrobials are applied in food matrixes that include emulsifiers. Furthermore, the species-specific effects on microbial growth suggests that Tween 80 in cosmetics and food products could affect the composition of skin and gut microbiota, and the effect of emulsifiers on the human microbiome should therefore be explored to uncover potential health effects.

  1. Lasting effects of workplace strength training for neck/shoulder/arm pain among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Larsen, Anders I; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt;

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study investigated long-term effects and implementation processes of workplace strength training for musculoskeletal disorders. Methods. 333 and 140 laboratory technicians from private and public sector companies, respectively, replied to a 3-year follow-up questionnaire subsequent...... to a 1-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) with high-intensity strength training for prevention and treatment of neck, shoulder, and arm pain. Being a natural experiment, the two participating companies implemented and modified the initial training program in different ways during the subsequent 2......, (2) training culture, that is, relatively more employees trained at the workplace and with colleagues, (3) self-reported health changes, and (4) prevention of neck and wrist pain development among initially pain-free employees. Conclusions. This natural experiment shows that strength training can...

  2. Human-health effects of radium: an epidemiolgic perspective of research at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbings, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The topic of health effects of radium has recently been considerably broadened by the identification of multiple myeloma as a specific outcome of bone-seeking radionuclides, and by evidence that the incidence of breast cancer may be significantly increased by radium exposure. All soft-tissue tumors are now suspect, especially leukemias. Concepts of dose-response need to be broadened to include the concept of risk factors, or, if one prefers, of susceptible subgroups. Biological factors relating to radium uptake and retention require study, as do risk factors modifying risk of both the clasical tumors, osteosarcoma and nasal sinus/mastoid, and the more recently suspect soft-tissue tumors. The history, organization, and current research activities in epidemiology at Argonne National Laboratory are described, and findings of the last decade and a half reviewed. Plans for future research are briefly discussed.

  3. Effect of the soil treated with biochar on the rye-grass in laboratory experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulyás Miklós

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The application of biochars to improve soils and to mitigate global climate change is a popular research area all over the world, although it is not a new topic. In our study, wood chips char (BC and animal bone char (ABC were applied. The pot experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions. 2 grams of rye-grass (Lolium perenne were seeded into each pot. The following various soil parameters were measured: pH (KCl, AL-P2O5, AL-K2O, total water soluble salt content and organic matter content. The measured parameters from the plant samples were: total-P, total-K and micronutrients. Results show that the negative or positive effect of pyrolysis solids cannot be determined clearly, further experiments are needed.

  4. Effects of clorazepate, diazepam, and oxazepam on a laboratory measurement of aggression in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, A M; Berman, M E; Taylor, S P

    1998-07-01

    The effects of three benzodiazepines on human aggressive behavior were examined in 44 medically healthy men. Volunteers were administered either placebo, 10 mg diazepam, 15 mg chlorazepate, or 50 mg oxazepam orally using double-blind procedures. Approximately 90 min after drug ingestion, participants were given the opportunity to administer electric shocks to an increasingly provocative fictitious opponent during a competitive reaction-time task. Aggression was defined as the level of shock the participant was willing to administer to the opponent. Results support the notion that diazepam (but not all benzodiazepines) can elicit aggressive behavior under controlled, laboratory conditions. Implications regarding the clinical use of various benzodiazepines for the tranquilization of potentially assaultive patients are discussed.

  5. Effect of individually tailored biopsychosocial workplace interventions on chronic musculoskeletal pain and stress among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Jay; Brandt, Mikkel; Hansen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    2014 (follow-up). METHODS: Participants (n = 112) were allocated to receive either physical, cognitive, and mindfulness group-based training (PCMT group) or a reference group (REF) for 10 weeks at the worksite. PCMT consisted of 4 major elements: 1) resistance training individually tailored to the pain......, as outcome measures. RESULTS: A significant (P difference at follow-up of -1.0 (95%CI: -1.4 to -0.6). No significant effect on stress was observed (treatment by time P = 0.16). Exploratory analyses for each body...... pain using individually tailored physical and cognitive elements. STUDY DESIGN: This trial uses a single-blind randomized controlled design with allocation concealment in a 2-armed parallel group format among laboratory technicians. The trial "Implementation of physical exercise at the Workplace (IRMA...

  6. MAID : An effect size based model for microarray data integration across laboratories and platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Aled M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling has the potential to unravel molecular mechanisms behind gene regulation and identify gene targets for therapeutic interventions. As microarray technology matures, the number of microarray studies has increased, resulting in many different datasets available for any given disease. The increase in sensitivity and reliability of measurements of gene expression changes can be improved through a systematic integration of different microarray datasets that address the same or similar biological questions. Results Traditional effect size models can not be used to integrate array data that directly compare treatment to control samples expressed as log ratios of gene expressions. Here we extend the traditional effect size model to integrate as many array datasets as possible. The extended effect size model (MAID can integrate any array datatype generated with either single or two channel arrays using either direct or indirect designs across different laboratories and platforms. The model uses two standardized indices, the standard effect size score for experiments with two groups of data, and a new standardized index that measures the difference in gene expression between treatment and control groups for one sample data with replicate arrays. The statistical significance of treatment effect across studies for each gene is determined by appropriate permutation methods depending on the type of data integrated. We apply our method to three different expression datasets from two different laboratories generated using three different array platforms and two different experimental designs. Our results indicate that the proposed integration model produces an increase in statistical power for identifying differentially expressed genes when integrating data across experiments and when compared to other integration models. We also show that genes found to be significant using our data integration method are of direct

  7. Laboratory and field studies on the effect of molinate, clomazone, and thiobencarb on nontarget aquatic invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, A S; Stevens, M M; Macmillan, D L

    2001-10-01

    The midge Chironomus tepperi was used in laboratory experiments to assess the relative toxicity of formulated molinate, clomazone, and thiobencarb, three herbicides used in Australian rice crops. Static bioassays were initiated with first-instar larvae at herbicide concentrations between 0.0625 and 2 times the anticipated field concentrations (AFCs) expected from the registered application rates. Adult emergence success, development time, and wing length were used as indices of the effect of each herbicide. Clomazone had no effect on any parameters at concentrations up to 0.288 mg/L (p > 0.05). Molinate significantly increased development time at concentrations equivalent to the AFC (3.6 mg/L) and above (p < 0.05). Thiobencarb reduced emergence success of adult C. tepperi at 0.0625 times the AFC (0.1875 mg/L) as well as decreasing male adult size and increasing development time for males and females at 0.125 times the AFC (p < 0.05). Nontarget effects of the herbicides on aquatic invertebrate communities were assessed in shallow experimental ponds using commercial application rates. One week after treatment, only thiobencarb had a significant effect, suppressing populations of chironomids, calanoids, and cyclopoids (p < 0.05). Four weeks later, all populations had recovered, equaling or exceeding control densities.

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management System FY 2012 Effectiveness Review and Declaration Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farren Hunt

    2012-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed an Annual Effectiveness Review of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), per 48 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 970.5223 1, “Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Work Planning and Execution.” The annual review assessed Integrated Safety Management (ISM) effectiveness, provided feedback to maintain system integrity, and identified target areas for focused improvements and assessments for fiscal year (FY) 2013. Results of the FY 2012 annual effectiveness review demonstrated that the INL’s ISMS program was significantly strengthened. Actions implemented by the INL demonstrate that the overall Integrated Safety Management System is sound and ensures safe and successful performance of work while protecting workers, the public, and environment. This report also provides several opportunities for improvement that will help further strengthen the ISM Program and the pursuit of safety excellence. Demonstrated leadership and commitment, continued surveillance, and dedicated resources have been instrumental in maturing a sound ISMS program. Based upon interviews with personnel, reviews of assurance activities, and analysis of ISMS process implementation, this effectiveness review concludes that ISM is institutionalized and is “Effective”.

  9. Direct and Indirect Effects of Pesticides on the Insidious Flower Bug (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) Under Laboratory Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Nathan J; Cloyd, Raymond A

    2017-06-01

    Greenhouse producers are interested in integrating natural enemies along with pesticides to suppress western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), populations. The insidious flower bug, Orius insidiosus (Say), is a commercially available natural enemy of western flower thrips. We conducted a series of laboratory experiments to determine the direct and indirect effects of 28 pesticides (insecticides, miticides, and fungicides), 4 pesticide mixtures, and 4 surfactants (36 total treatments plus a water control) on the adult O. insidiosus survival and predation on western flower thrips adults under laboratory conditions. The number of live and dead O. insidiosus adults was recorded after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. The results of the study indicate that the fungicides (aluminum tris, azoxystrobin, fenhexamid, and kresoxim-methyl), insect growth regulators (azadirachtin, buprofezin, kinoprene, and pyriproxyfen), botanicals (Capsicum oleoresin extract, garlic oil, soybean oil; and rosemary, rosemary oil, peppermint oil, and cottonseed oil), and entomopathogenic fungi (Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae) were minimally directly harmful to adult O. insidiosus, with 80% to 100% adult survival. However, abamectin, spinosad, pyridalyl, chlorfenapyr, tau-fluvalinate, imidacloprid, dinotefuran, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam directly affected O. insidiosus survival after 96 h (0-60% adult survival). The pesticide mixtures of abamectin + spinosad and chlorfenapyr + dinotefuran reduced adult survival (20% and 0%, respectively, after 48 h). Furthermore, the surfactants were not directly harmful to O. insidiosus adults. All western flower thrips adults were killed by the surviving adult O. insidiosus after 48 h, indicating no indirect effects of the pesticides on predation. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Effects of the veterinary pharmaceutical ivermectin on soil invertebrates in laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römbke, J; Krogh, K A; Moser, T; Scheffczyk, A; Liebig, M

    2010-02-01

    As part of the risk assessment of veterinary pharmaceuticals, the potential impact of these chemicals on soil ecosystems has to be determined according to European law. However, almost no data from standardized laboratory tests are available. Therefore, in the EU FP6 ERAPharm, the effects of the widely used veterinary pharmaceutical ivermectin, an anthelminthic, were studied in chronic laboratory tests performed according to OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) guidelines. In detail, three soil invertebrate species--the earthworm Eisenia fetida, the springtail Folsomia candida, and the predatory mite Hypoaspis aculeifer--were tested. The nominal concentrations of ivermectin mixed into the test substrate artificial soil was verified using residue analysis, which indicated that the test substance is persistent for at least up to 28 days. As expected when considering the mode of action of this substance, survival and reproduction of collembolans were clearly affected [LC(50) = 8.4 mg/kg soil dry weight (dw); NOEC(repro) = 0.3 mg/kg soil (dw)]. Predatory mites reacted less sensitively [LC(50) > or = 31.6 mg/kg soil (dw); NOEC(repro) = 3.2 mg/kg soil (dw)]. Earthworm survival and reproduction were affected in the same order of magnitude as the predatory mites [LC(50) > or = 10 mg/kg soil (dw); NOEC(repro) = 2.5 mg/kg soil (dw)]. These results are in good agreement with the few data known from nonstandardized tests for the same or related soil invertebrate species. The results of these tests indicate that the effects of ivermectin on soil invertebrates--in particular, collembolans--cannot be excluded at field-relevant concentrations, as determined in a risk assessment according to VICH guidelines. More sophisticated higher-tier tests (e.g., in multispecies or semifield test systems) are recommended in order to assess the potential risk more accurately.

  11. Effects of topiramate on urge to drink and the subjective effects of alcohol: a preliminary laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Robert; MacKillop, James; Monti, Peter M; Rohsenow, Damaris J; Tidey, Jennifer; Gwaltney, Chad; Swift, Robert; Ray, Lara; McGeary, John

    2008-03-01

    Topiramate was recently reported to be efficacious in reducing drinking rates and craving among individuals with alcohol dependence in a randomized controlled trial, but dose effects could not be determined. This laboratory study systematically examined the dose-dependent effects of topiramate on cue-elicited craving and other putative mechanisms of its pharmacotherapeutic effects on drinking. Male and female heavy drinkers (n = 61) were randomized to 1 of 3 medication conditions (200 mg/d; 300 mg/d; placebo) in a double-blind study. Participants reached the target dose after a 32-day titration period, then were stabilized for approximately 1 week. All then participated in a laboratory assessment of alcohol cue reactivity and of the subjective effects of a moderate dose of alcohol. Both doses of topiramate reduced the frequency of heavy drinking during the titration period as compared to placebo. However, topiramate did not affect self-reported craving for alcohol during the titration period, during the cue reactivity protocol, or in response to the alcohol challenge procedure. Topiramate reduced the stimulating effects of alcohol ingestion compared to placebo, but only in the 200 mg group. The results of this study support previous findings that topiramate reduces drinking, but the behavioral mechanism underlying this effect does not appear to be attenuation of craving for alcohol as measured using the approaches employed in this study. Rather, the results tentatively suggest that topiramate may exert its beneficial effects by altering the subjective experiences of alcohol consumption. Limitations of the current study are discussed and complementary methods are recommended for future studies, such as the use of behavioral economic paradigms and ecological momentary assessment.

  12. Effect of weak acid hypochlorous solution on selected viruses and bacteria of laboratory rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taharaguchi, Motoko; Takimoto, Kazuhiro; Zamoto-Niikura, Aya; Yamada, Yasuko K

    2014-01-01

    Weak acid hypochlorous solution (WAHS) is known to have efficacy for inactivating pathogens and to be relatively safe with respect to the live body. Based on these advantages, many animal facilities have recently been introducing WAHS for daily cleaning of animal houses. In this study, we determined the effect of WAHS in inactivating specific pathogens of laboratory rodents and pathogens of opportunistic infection. WAHS with an actual chloride concentration of 60 ppm and a pH value of 6.0 was generated using purpose-built equipment. One volume of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), Sendai virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella pneumotropica, Corynebacterium kutscheri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was mixed with 9 or 99 volumes of WAHS (×10 and ×100 reaction) for various periods (0.5, 1, and 5 min) at 25°C. After incubation, the remaining infectious viruses and live bacteria were determined by plaque assay or culture. In the ×100 reaction mixture, infectious viruses and live bacteria could not be detected for any of the pathogens examined even with the 0.5-min incubation. However, the effects for MHV, B. bronchiseptica, and P. aeruginosa were variable in the ×10 reaction mixture with the 0.5- and 1-min incubations. Sufficient effects were obtained by elongation of the reaction time to 5 min. In the case of MHV, reducing organic substances in the virus stock resulted in the WAHS being completely effective. WAHS is recommended for daily cleaning in animal facilities but should be used properly in order to obtain a sufficient effect, which includes such things as using a large enough volume to reduce effects of organic substances.

  13. Effectiveness of daylighting design and occupant visual satisfaction in a LEED gold laboratory building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Ying; Oswald, Anne [Department of Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Yang, Xiaodi [School of Architecture, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Using daylight as primary light source has been widely recognized as an important strategy to reduce building energy demand and enhance indoor environment quality. However, to design and operate a building to make full use of daylight, which is a dynamic light source, to meet diverse occupant needs remains a challenge. This paper reports a post-occupancy study of the visual environment in a laboratory building on a university campus, and puts a spotlight on the building occupants as it examines the effectiveness of the daylighting design and systems integration in creating a visual environment to support occupant comfort and satisfaction while reducing artificial lighting demand. Results show generally high satisfaction with daylit work environment and positive effect of the horizontal shading strategy. Issues about the integration between daylighting and electric lighting systems and level of occupant control are identified and discussed for improving the effectiveness of daylighting and enhancing the quality of the visual environment in the building of study. A multiple-tool methodology is developed and tested, which included occupant surveys, interviews, illuminance measurements, continuous data loggers, fisheye-lens camera and glare-identifying software, and documentation of spatial settings, systems features, and user behavior. (author)

  14. Laboratory evaluation of Ethiopian local plant Phytolacca dodecandra extract for its toxicity effectiveness against aquatic macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunamoorthi, K; Bishaw, D; Mulat, T

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the toxicity effectiveness of berries crude extract of Endod [vernacular name (local native language, Amharic); Phytolacca dodecandra] against aquatic macroinvertebrates Baetidae (Mayflies) and Hydropsychidae (Caddisflies), under laboratory conditions. In Ethiopia, toxic plant, berries of Phytolacca dodecandra are being commonly used for washing clothes and to control fresh water snails. Macroinvertebrates are useful biological indicators of change in the aquatic ecosystems. The present study clearly revealed that the LC50 and LC90 values for berries crude extract of Phytolacca dodecandra against Baetidae were 181.94 and 525.78 mg/l and lethal doses (LC50 and LC90) required for Hydropsychidae were 1060.69 and 4120.4 mg/l respectively. The present investigation demonstrated that Baetidae was more susceptible than Hydropsychidae, even at shorter exposure period of 2 h. From our preliminary investigation the toxicity effectiveness of crude extracts of Phytolacca dodecandra has been clearly shown. In addition, it requires further explorations which address both the toxicity activity and the active principles that are responsible for its toxicity effectiveness. Ultimately, the release/introduction of Phytolacca dodecandra plant berries extracts into the river/streams leads to disruption of food chain in the aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, at this moment preserving the aquatic ecosystem is extremely essential and inevitable.

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management System FY 2013 Effectiveness Review and Declaration Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farren Hunt

    2013-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed an Annual Effectiveness Review of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), per 48 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 970.5223 1, “Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Work Planning and Execution.” The annual review assessed Integrated Safety Management (ISM) effectiveness, provided feedback to maintain system integrity, and identified target areas for focused improvements and assessments for Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Results of the FY 2013 annual effectiveness review demonstrate that the INL’s ISMS program is “Effective” and continually improving and shows signs of being significantly strengthened. Although there have been unacceptable serious events in the past, there has also been significant attention, dedication, and resources focused on improvement, lessons learned and future prevention. BEA’s strategy of focusing on these improvements includes extensive action and improvement plans that include PLN 4030, “INL Sustained Operational Improvement Plan, PLN 4058, “MFC Strategic Excellence Plan,” PLN 4141, “ATR Sustained Excellence Plan,” and PLN 4145, “Radiological Control Road to Excellence,” and the development of LWP 20000, “Conduct of Research.” As a result of these action plans, coupled with other assurance activities and metrics, significant improvement in operational performance, organizational competence, management oversight and a reduction in the number of operational events is being realized. In short, the realization of the fifth core function of ISMS (feedback and continuous improvement) and the associated benefits are apparent.

  16. Is there a First Night Effect on Sleep Bruxism? A Sleep Laboratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoko; Lavigne, Gilles; Rompré, Pierre; Kato, Takafumi; Urade, Masahiro; Huynh, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep bruxism (SB) is reported to vary in frequency over time. The aim of this study was to assess the first night effect on SB. Methods: A retrospective polysomnographic (PSG) analysis was performed of data from a sample of SB patients (12 females, 4 males; age range: 17-39 years) recorded in a sleep laboratory over 2 consecutive nights. Sleep parameters and jaw muscle activity variables (i.e., rhythmic masticatory muscle activity [RMMA]) for SB were quantified and compared between the 2 nights. Subjects were classified into groups according to severity of RMMA frequency, such as low frequency (2-4 episodes/h and/or < 25 bursts/h) and moderate-high frequency (≥ 4 episodes/h and ≥ 25 bursts/h). Results: Overall, no first night effects were found for most sleep variables. However, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and stage transitions showed significant time and group interactions (repeated measures ANOVAs, p ≤ 0.05). The RMMA episode index did not differ between the 2 nights, whereas the second night showed significantly higher burst index, bruxism time index, and mean burst duration (repeated measure ANOVAs, p ≤ 0.05). Five patients of 8 in the low frequency group were classified into the moderate-high frequency group on the second night, whereas only one patient in the moderate-high frequency group moved to the low frequency group. Conclusions: The results showed no overall first night effect on severity of RMMA frequency in young and healthy patients with SB. In clinical practice, one-night sleep recording may be sufficient for moderate-high frequency SB patients. However, low RMMA frequency in the first night could be confirmed by a second night based on the patient's medical and dental history. Citation: Hasegawa Y; Lavigne G; Rompré P; Kato T; Urade M; Huynh N. Is there a first night effect on sleep bruxism? A sleep laboratory study. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(11):1139-1145. PMID:24235894

  17. Indomethacin nanocrystals prepared by different laboratory scale methods: effect on crystalline form and dissolution behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martena, Valentina; Censi, Roberta [University of Camerino, School of Pharmacy (Italy); Hoti, Ela; Malaj, Ledjan [University of Tirana, Department of Pharmacy (Albania); Di Martino, Piera, E-mail: piera.dimartino@unicam.it [University of Camerino, School of Pharmacy (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    The objective of this study is to select very simple and well-known laboratory scale methods able to reduce particle size of indomethacin until the nanometric scale. The effect on the crystalline form and the dissolution behavior of the different samples was deliberately evaluated in absence of any surfactants as stabilizers. Nanocrystals of indomethacin (native crystals are in the {gamma} form) (IDM) were obtained by three laboratory scale methods: A (Batch A: crystallization by solvent evaporation in a nano-spray dryer), B (Batch B-15 and B-30: wet milling and lyophilization), and C (Batch C-20-N and C-40-N: Cryo-milling in the presence of liquid nitrogen). Nanocrystals obtained by the method A (Batch A) crystallized into a mixture of {alpha} and {gamma} polymorphic forms. IDM obtained by the two other methods remained in the {gamma} form and a different attitude to the crystallinity decrease were observed, with a more considerable decrease in crystalline degree for IDM milled for 40 min in the presence of liquid nitrogen. The intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) revealed a higher dissolution rate for Batches A and C-40-N, due to the higher IDR of {alpha} form than {gamma} form for the Batch A, and the lower crystallinity degree for both the Batches A and C-40-N. These factors, as well as the decrease in particle size, influenced the IDM dissolution rate from the particle samples. Modifications in the solid physical state that may occur using different particle size reduction treatments have to be taken into consideration during the scale up and industrial development of new solid dosage forms.

  18. Indomethacin nanocrystals prepared by different laboratory scale methods: effect on crystalline form and dissolution behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martena, Valentina; Censi, Roberta; Hoti, Ela; Malaj, Ledjan; Di Martino, Piera

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to select very simple and well-known laboratory scale methods able to reduce particle size of indomethacin until the nanometric scale. The effect on the crystalline form and the dissolution behavior of the different samples was deliberately evaluated in absence of any surfactants as stabilizers. Nanocrystals of indomethacin (native crystals are in the γ form) (IDM) were obtained by three laboratory scale methods: A (Batch A: crystallization by solvent evaporation in a nano-spray dryer), B (Batch B-15 and B-30: wet milling and lyophilization), and C (Batch C-20-N and C-40-N: Cryo-milling in the presence of liquid nitrogen). Nanocrystals obtained by the method A (Batch A) crystallized into a mixture of α and γ polymorphic forms. IDM obtained by the two other methods remained in the γ form and a different attitude to the crystallinity decrease were observed, with a more considerable decrease in crystalline degree for IDM milled for 40 min in the presence of liquid nitrogen. The intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) revealed a higher dissolution rate for Batches A and C-40-N, due to the higher IDR of α form than γ form for the Batch A, and the lower crystallinity degree for both the Batches A and C-40-N. These factors, as well as the decrease in particle size, influenced the IDM dissolution rate from the particle samples. Modifications in the solid physical state that may occur using different particle size reduction treatments have to be taken into consideration during the scale up and industrial development of new solid dosage forms.

  19. Effect of fuel properties on the bottom ash generation rate by a laboratory fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozelle, P.L.; Pisupati, S.V.; Scaroni, A.W. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Energy & Geoenvironmental Engineering

    2007-06-15

    The range of fuels that can be accommodated by an FBC boiler system is affected by the ability of the fuel, sorbent, and ash-handling equipment to move the required solids through the boiler. Of specific interest is the bottom ash handling equipment, which must have sufficient capacity to remove ash from the system in order to maintain a constant bed inventory level, and must have sufficient capability to cool the ash well below the bed temperature. Quantification of a fuel's bottom ash removal requirements can be useful for plant design. The effect of fuel properties on the rate of bottom ash production in a laboratory FBC test system was examined. The work used coal products ranging in ash content from 20 to 40+ wt. %. The system's classification of solids by particle size into flyash and bottom ash was characterized using a partition curve. Fuel fractions in the size range characteristic of bottom ash were further analyzed for distributions of ash content with respect to specific gravity, using float sink tests. The fuel fractions were then ashed in a fixed bed. In each case, the highest ash content fraction produced ash with the coarsest size consist (characteristic of bottom ash). The lower ash content fractions were found to produce ash in the size range characteristic of flyash, suggesting that the high ash content fractions were largely responsible for the production of bottom ash. The contributions of the specific gravity fractions to the composite ash in the fuels were quantified. The fuels were fired in the laboratory test system. Fuels with higher amounts of high specific gravity particles, in the size ranges characteristic of bottom ash, were found to produce more bottom ash, indicating the potential utility of float sink methods in the prediction of bottom ash removal requirements.

  20. Anxiolytic effects of a combination of Melissa officinalis and Valeriana officinalis during laboratory induced stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David O; Little, Wendy; Haskell, Crystal F; Scholey, Andrew B

    2006-02-01

    Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian) have been used both traditionally and contemporaneously as mild sedatives, anxiolytics and hypnotics. Recent research has suggested that both may attenuate laboratory induced stress. As the two herbs are most often sold in combination with each other the current study assessed the anxiolytic properties of such a combination during laboratory-induced stress. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, balanced cross-over experiment, 24 healthy volunteers received three separate single doses (600 mg, 1200 mg, 1800 mg) of a standardized product containing M. officinalis and V. officinalis extracts, plus a placebo, on separate days separated by a 7 day wash out period. Modulation of mood and anxiety were assessed during pre-dose and 1 h, 3 h and 6 h post-dose completions of a 20 min version of the Defined Intensity Stressor Simulation (DISS) battery. Cognitive performance on the four concurrent tasks of the battery was also assessed. The results showed that the 600 mg dose of the combination ameliorated the negative effects of the DISS on ratings of anxiety. However, the highest dose (1800 mg) showed an increase in anxiety that was less marked but which reached significance during one testing session. In addition, all three doses led to decrements in performance on the Stroop task module within the battery, and the two lower doses led to decrements on the overall score generated on the DISS battery. These results suggest that a combination of Melissa officinalis and Valeriana officinalis possesses anxiolytic properties that deserve further investigation. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The effects on community college student physics achievement and attitudes about learning physics due to inquiry-based laboratory activities versus cookbook laboratory activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, George Allen Brittingham

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine the effects on community college student physics conceptual achievement and attitudes about learning physics due to the use of inquiry-based laboratory activities versus cookbook laboratory activities. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed to test for differences in mean post-test Force Concept Inventory (FCI) score for two different types of physics lab instruction (IL versus CBL). Results of the ANCOVA, F (1, 35) = 0.761, p lecture test grades for the lab groups taught using inquiry and cookbook methods. The mean lecture test scores of the inquiry-based lab group (M = 81.39, S.D. = 8.15) were found to be significantly higher, t (36) = -2.021, p Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) percent favorable scores for the lab groups taught using inquiry and cookbook methods. Results of the t-test, t (36) = 0.897, p < 0.376, failed to reject the null hypothesis that the CLASS scores differed by lab instruction type.

  2. Laboratory and Field Investigations of Dynamic Effects in Soil Water Retention Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yung-Chia; Tseng, Yen-Huiang; Ye, Jiun-Yan

    2015-04-01

    The unsaturated soil is a multi-phase system and the embedded physical mechanisms and chemical reactions are very complicated. The characteristics of groundwater flow and mechanisms of mass transport are still ambiguous so far. In order to fully understand the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone, the soil water retention curve plays an important role in description of water flow. However, the measurements and calculations of soil water retention curve are usually obtained under the static condition or steady state (equilibrium), in which the dynamic effects (non-equilibrium) are not considered, and the obtained relationship between capillary pressure and saturation is skeptical. Therefore, the sandbox experiments and field tests will be conducted to discuss the dynamic effects in the soil water retention curve and hysteresis effect in this study. In the laboratory, the relations between capillary pressure, saturation, the rate of change of water content, and dynamic constant are evaluated through different setting of boundary conditions and different sizes of particles. In the field, the tests are conducted to describe the soil water retention curve through the rain simulator and artificial evaporation. Besides, the dynamic dewpoint potentiameter is used to analyze the hysteresis effect of soil samples, and its results are compared with the results obtained from sandbox and field experiments. Finally, through a series of experiments, the relationship between capillary pressure and saturation under the dynamic effects is established, and the associated theories and mechanisms are discussed. The works developed in this study can provide as reference tools for the hydrogeological investigation and contaminated site remediation in the future. Keywords: capillary pressure, saturation, soil water retention curve, hysteresis, sandbox experiment, field test

  3. Single Event Effects Test Facility Options at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Dominik, Laura J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Increasing use of microelectronics of ever diminishing feature size in avionics systems has led to a growing Single Event Effects (SEE) susceptibility arising from the highly ionizing interactions of cosmic rays and solar particles. Single event effects caused by atmospheric radiation have been recognized in recent years as a design issue for avionics equipment and systems. To ensure a system meets all its safety and reliability requirements, SEE induced upsets and potential system failures need to be considered, including testing of the components and systems in a neutron beam. Testing of integrated circuits (ICs) and systems for use in radiation environments requires the utilization of highly advanced laboratory facilities that can run evaluations on microcircuits for the effects of radiation. This paper provides a background of the atmospheric radiation phenomenon and the resulting single event effects, including single event upset (SEU) and latch up conditions. A study investigating requirements for future single event effect irradiation test facilities and developing options at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is summarized. The relatively new SNS with its 1.0 GeV proton beam, typical operation of 5000 h per year, expertise in spallation neutron sources, user program infrastructure, and decades of useful life ahead is well suited for hosting a world-class SEE test facility in North America. Emphasis was put on testing of large avionics systems while still providing tunable high flux irradiation conditions for component tests. Makers of ground-based systems would also be served well by these facilities. Three options are described; the most capable, flexible, and highest-test-capacity option is a new stand-alone target station using about one kW of proton beam power on a gas-cooled tungsten target, with dual test enclosures. Less expensive options are also described.

  4. Nonlinear effects on western boundary current structure and separation: a laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierini, S.; Falco, P.; Zambardino, G.; McClimans, T. A.; Ellingsen, I.

    2009-04-01

    The role played by nonlinear effects in shaping the structure of barotropic western boundary currents (WBCs) and in determining WBC separation from the coast has been investigated through laboratory simulations by means of the 5-m-diameter Coriolis rotating basin at SINTEF (Trondheim, Norway) in the framework of the HYDRALAB-III project. The laboratory setup consists of two parallel rectangular channels separated by an island and linked by two curved connections: in the first channel, a piston is forced at a constant speed U ranging from 0.05 to 3 cm/s over a distance of 2.5 m, producing a virtually unsheared current at the entrance of the second channel. In the latter, a linear reduction of the water depth provides the topographic beta-effect that produces the westward intensification. Nearly steady currents are obtained and measured photogrammetrically over a region of about 1 m2. The broad range of piston speeds permitted by the mechanical apparatus has allowed us to achieve an unprecedented coverage of the range of nonlinearity for WBCs in terms of experimental data, so that the cross-stream WBC profile could be analyzed from the nearly linear Munk-type case (e.g., for U=0.1 cm/s with T=30 s, where T is the rotation period of the basin) up to the more realistic highly nonlinear limit (particularly significant is the case U=1 cm/s and T=30 s, which is close to be dynamically similar to the Gulf Stream). Thanks to the large size of the rotating basin, cross-stream widths of the simulated WBC as large as 80 cm could be obtained. Moreover, in order to analyze the process of WBC separation, coastal variations have been introduced along the western boundary in the form of wedge-shaped continents with different coastline orientations, whose northern limit corresponds to an idealized Cape Hatteras. While weak WBCs follow the coast also past the cape, for sufficiently strong nonlinear effects the current detaches from the coast as a consequence of flow deceleration

  5. Effects of Various Dental Materials on Alkaline Phosphatase Extracted from Pulp: An Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lorin R.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that demonstrates the effects of various dental materials on a representative enzyme from the pulp is outlined. The experiment encourages students to consider the effects that various restorative materials and techniques might have on enzymes in the living pulp. (Author/MLW)

  6. Effectiveness of Student-Generated Video as a Teaching Tool for an Instrumental Technique in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeremy T.; Box, Melinda C.; Eguren, Kristen E.; Parker, Thomas A.; Saraldi-Gallardo, Victoria M.; Wolfe, Michael I.; Gallardo-Williams, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Multimedia instruction has been shown to serve as an effective learning aid for chemistry students. In this study, the viability of student-generated video instruction for organic chemistry laboratory techniques and procedure was examined and its effectiveness compared to instruction provided by a teaching assistant (TA) was evaluated. After…

  7. Comparative Study of the Effectiveness of Three Learning Environments: Hyper-Realistic Virtual Simulations, Traditional Schematic Simulations and Traditional Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Guadalupe; Naranjo, Francisco L.; Perez, Angel L.; Suero, Maria Isabel; Pardo, Pedro J.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the educational effects of computer simulations developed in a hyper-realistic virtual environment with the educational effects of either traditional schematic simulations or a traditional optics laboratory. The virtual environment was constructed on the basis of Java applets complemented with a photorealistic visual output.…

  8. A Laboratory to Demonstrate the Effect of Thermal History on Semicrystalline Polymers Using Rapid Scanning Rate Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Kessler, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the effect of thermal history on the thermal properties of semicrystalline polymers is essential for materials scientists and engineers. In this article, we describe a materials science laboratory to demonstrate the effect of parameters such as heating rate and isothermal annealing conditions on the thermal behavior of…

  9. A Laboratory to Demonstrate the Effect of Thermal History on Semicrystalline Polymers Using Rapid Scanning Rate Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Kessler, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the effect of thermal history on the thermal properties of semicrystalline polymers is essential for materials scientists and engineers. In this article, we describe a materials science laboratory to demonstrate the effect of parameters such as heating rate and isothermal annealing conditions on the thermal behavior of…

  10. Laboratory simulation of the geothermal heating effects on ocean overturning circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Huang, Shi-Di; Zhou, Sheng-Qi; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by a desire to understand the geothermal heating effects on ocean circulation, a large-scale circulation generated and sustained by thermal forcing at the surface subject to a small amount of heating from the bottom boundary is investigated through laboratory experiments. Despite its idealization, our experiments demonstrate that the leading order effect of geothermal heating is to significantly enhance the abyssal overturning, in agreement with the findings in ocean circulation models. Our experiments also demonstrate that geothermal heating cannot influence the poleward heat transport due to the strong stratification in the thermocline. Our study further reveals that the ratio of geothermal-flux-induced turbulent dissipation to the dissipation due to other energies is the key parameter determining the dynamical importance of geothermal heating. This quantity explains why the impact of geothermal heating is sensitive to the deep stratification, the diapycnal mixing, and the amount of geothermal flux. Moreover, it is found that this dissipation ratio may be used to understand results from different studies in a consistent way.

  11. Effects of process parameters on solid self-microemulsifying particles in a laboratory scale fluid bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tusharmouli; Plakogiannis, Fotios M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to select the critical process parameters of the fluid bed processes impacting the quality attribute of a solid self-microemulsifying (SME) system of albendazole (ABZ). A fractional factorial design (2(4-1)) with four parameters (spray rate, inlet air temperature, inlet air flow, and atomization air pressure) was created by MINITAB software. Batches were manufactured in a laboratory top-spray fluid bed at 625-g scale. Loss on drying (LOD) samples were taken throughout each batch to build the entire moisture profiles. All dried granulation were sieved using mesh 20 and analyzed for particle size distribution (PSD), morphology, density, and flow. It was found that as spray rate increased, sauter-mean diameter (D(s)) also increased. The effect of inlet air temperature on the peak moisture which is directly related to the mean particle size was found to be significant. There were two-way interactions between studied process parameters. The main effects of inlet air flow rate and atomization air pressure could not be found as the data were inconclusive. The partial least square (PLS) regression model was found significant (P < 0.01) and predictive for optimization. This study established a design space for the parameters for solid SME manufacturing process.

  12. Bioremediation of endosulfan in laboratory-scale constructed wetlands: effect of bioaugmentation and biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Congcong; Xie, HuiJun; Mu, Yang; Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Cui; Liang, Shuang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Xu, Jingtao; Wang, Qian

    2014-11-01

    Bioremediation is widely used in organic pollutants disposal. However, very little has been known on its application in constructed wetlands contaminated with organochlorine pesticide, endosulfan in particular. To evaluate the effect of bioremediation on endosulfan removal and clarify the fate, bioaugmentation and biostimulation were studied in laboratory-scale vertical-flow constructed wetlands. After 20 days' experiment, endosulfan isomers removal efficiencies were increased to 89.24-97.62 % through bioremediation. In bacteria bioaugmentation (E-in) and sucrose biostimulation (E-C), peak concentrations of endosulfan in sediment were reduced by 31.02-76.77 %, and plant absorption were 347.45-576.65 μg kg(-1). By contrast, plant absorption in KH2PO4 biostimulation (E-P) was increased to 811.64 and 1,067.68 μg kg(-1). Degradation process was probably promoted in E-in and E-C, while plant absorption was enhanced in E-P. Consequently, E-in and E-C were effective for endosulfan removal in constructed wetlands, while adding KH2PO4 had potential to cause air pollution. Additionally, combined bioremediation was not recommended.

  13. Effect of Triflumuron and Pyriproxyfen on Musca domestica L Larval Stages in the Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:  The residual effect of triflumuron and pyriproxyfen on Musca domestica L larval stages was studied in the laboratory."n"nMethods: Both IGRs at varying concentrations ranging between 0.5 to 2.5 mg/L were placed inside beakers with mice chow and vitamin B complex and water as food for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd instars M.domestica larvae."n"nResults: Both IGRs inhibit M. domestica adult emergence of 98-98.5% when applied at the lowest concentration of 0.5 mg/L on the 1st instar, 93-97% of adult emergence inhibition on the 2nd instar,and 91-97% of adult emergence inhibi­tion on the 3rd instar larvae respectively. There was no significant difference between triflumuron and pyriproxy­fen on house­fly adult emergence inhibition when fed to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd instars M.domestica larvae (P> 0.05. However, there was a significant difference between the IGRs and the control (P< 0.05."n"nConclusion: Both triflumuron and pyriproxyfen are effective in inhibiting adult emergence of housefly M  domes­tica and therefore should be recommended for fly control particularly in chicken farms and dumping grounds in Malaysia for housefly control activities.

  14. Effect of putative mitoviruses on in vitro growth of Gremmeniella abietina isolates under different laboratory conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeralo, C.; Botella, L.; Santamaria, O.; Diez, J.

    2012-07-01

    Mitoviruses have been found in several forest pathogens (i.e. Cryphonectria parasitica, Gremmeniella abietina), and because they have been shown to reduce the virulence of host fungi there is a growing interest in studying their use as a biocontrol. This study was carried out to test the effect of temperature (5 degree centigrade, 15 degree centigrade, 25 degree centigrade and 35 degree centigrade), pH (4, 5, 7 and 9) and osmotic potential (-0.6, -1.2, -1.8 and 2.4 MPa) on the mycelial growth of seven G. abietina isolates under controlled laboratory conditions. Four of the isolates hosted mitoviruses and three of them did not. During the experiment, mycelial growth was recorded every week for a period of 8 weeks. Results showed no differences in growth behavior between mitovirus infected and non-infected isolates when placed under different pH modifications. However, the mitovirus-infected isolates presented larger mycelial growth than the mitovirus-free ones when at the fungi's optimal growing temperature of 15 degree centigrade. When growing at certain osmotic potentials (-0.6 and -1.8 MPa) a reduction in growth of the mitovirus-infected isolates was observed. The results of this experiment suggest that mycelial growth among non-infected isolates and isolates naturally infected by mitovirus vary under different culture conditions, thus providing further insight into the effects of mitovirus on Gremmeniella abietina isolates. (Author) 57 refs.

  15. Excruciating Effect of Formaldehyde Exposure to Students in Gross Anatomy Dissection Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OG Avwioro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Formaldehyde is extensively used for preservation of cadavers in departments of anatomy. However, it is a noxious chemical which may cause serious health problems.Objective: To assess the effect of exposure of medical students to formaldehyde at the Department of Anatomy, Niger Delta University, Nigeria. Methods: In a questionnaire-based study, 93 second-year medical students were surveyed at the Department of Human Anatomy, Niger Delta University, Nigeria. The average duration of exposure for each student in the dissection hall was 6 hr/wk. Participants with history of cough, respiratory or skin diseases were excluded from the study. Results: Out of 93 questionnaires distributed, 75 were completed and returned (response rate: 81%. Of 75 students, 58 (77% were strongly affected by unpleasant smell of formaldehyde. It was followed by “runny or congested nose” and “redness of the eyes.” “Skin-related diseases” was identified as the least ranked effect of formaldehyde.Conclusion: Due to the numerous health challenges that formaldehyde causes to students in the gross anatomy dissection laboratories, it cannot be considered as a suitable chemical for embalmment of cadaver for dissection.

  16. Effect of aqueous extract of Cucumis sativus Linn. fruit in ulcerative colitis in laboratory animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mithun Vishwanath K Patil; Amit D Kandhare; Sucheta D Bhise

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the ameliorative effect of aqueous extract of fruit of Cucumis sativus (C. sativus) (CS) in acetic acid induced colitis in wistar rats. Methods: The animals were administered with 2 mL acetic acid (4%) via intra rectal. The animals were divided into various treatment groups (n=6). Prednisolone was used as standard drug and C. sativus was administered at a dose of 100, 250 and 500 mg/kg p.o. The control group of animals received 1 mL of vehicle (distilled water). Ulcer area, ulcer index, spleen weight, colon weight to length ratio, macroscopic score, hematological parameters, colonic myeloperoxidase (MPO) and histological changes were recorded after the treatment regimen of 11 d. Results: Intrarectal instillation of acetic acid caused enhanced ulcer area, ulcer index, spleen weight, colon weight to length ratio, colonic MPO and hematological parameters. Pretreatment with C. sativus for 7 d exhibited significant effect in lowering of ulcer area, ulcer index as well as neutrophil infiltration at a dose of 250 and 500 mg/kg in acetic acid induced colitis. Conclusion: The present investigation demonstrates C. sativus is of potent therapeutic value in the amelioration of experimental colitis in laboratory animals by inhibiting the inflammatory mediator.

  17. Effect of Triflumuron and Pyriproxyfen on Musca domestica L Larval Stages in the Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:  The residual effect of triflumuron and pyriproxyfen on Musca domestica L larval stages was studied in the laboratory.Methods: Both IGRs at varying concentrations ranging between 0.5 to 2.5 mg/L were placed inside beakers with mice chow and vitamin B complex and water as food for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd instars M.domestica larvae.Results: Both IGRs inhibit M. domestica adult emergence of 98-98.5% when applied at the lowest concentration of 0.5 mg/L on the 1st instar, 93-97% of adult emergence inhibition on the 2nd instar,and 91-97% of adult emergence inhibi­tion on the 3rd instar larvae respectively. There was no significant difference between triflumuron and pyriproxy­fen on house­fly adult emergence inhibition when fed to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd instars M.domestica larvae (P> 0.05. However, there was a significant difference between the IGRs and the control (P< 0.05.Conclusion: Both triflumuron and pyriproxyfen are effective in inhibiting adult emergence of housefly M  domes­tica and therefore should be recommended for fly control particularly in chicken farms and dumping grounds in Malaysia for housefly control activities.

  18. Effectiveness of Straw Mulch on Infiltration, Splash Erosion, Runoff and Sediment in Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholami Leila

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mulches have extraordinary potential in reducing surface runoff, increasing infiltration of water into the soil and decreasing soil erosion. The straw mulches as a biological material, has the ability to be a significant physical barrier against the impact of raindrops and reduce the detachment of soil aggregates. The present study is an attempt to determine the efficiency of straw mulch as conservation treatment in changes in the splash erosion, time-to-runoff, runoff coefficient, infiltration coefficient, time-to-drainage, drainage coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss. The laboratory experiments have been conducted for sandy-loam soil taken from deforested area, about 15 km of Warsaw west, Poland under lab conditions with simulated rainfall intensities of 60 and 120 mmh–1, in 4 soil moistures of 12, 25, 33 and 40% and the slope of 9%. Compared with bare treatments, results of straw mulch application showed the significant conservation effects on splash erosion, runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss and significant enhancement effects on infiltration and drainage. The results of Spearman-Rho correlation showed the significant (p < 0.05 correlation with r = –0.873, 0.873, 0.878 and 0.764 between rainfall intensity and drainage coefficient, downstream splash, sediment concentration and soil loss and with r = –0.976, 0.927 and –0.927 between initial soil moisture content and time-to-runoff, runoff coefficient and infiltration coefficient, respectively.

  19. [The combined effect of lead and zinc on the embryonic development of laboratory rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezetskaia, E N; Onul, N M

    2014-01-01

    In the article there are presented the results of the study of the impact of inorganic lead and zinc compounds, as well as their organic forms produced with the use of nanotechnoloy, on the embryonic development of laboratory rats. Metals were orally administered daily during 19 days of gestation at the doses of 0.05 mg/kg of lead, and 1.5 mg/kg of zinc. The impact of the test substances was evaluated by integral and specific indices with the use of physiological, morphological and quantitative methods of analysis. Lead in a dose of 0.05 mg/kg was established to disturb the antenatal development of the offspring of experimental animals, which is pronounced in the increased embryo lethality rate, deterioration of somatometric indices of male fetuses in the litter as compared with the control group, and compared with females. In permits to suggest the greater sensitivity of male fetuses to exposure to lead. The isolated impact of zinc in the dose of 1.5 mg/kg body weight does not influence on the levels of embrio mortality rate, as well as somatometric indices of fetuses. However, the combined administration of the compounds of zinc and lead weakens the embryotoxic effect of the latter in terms of embrio lethality and the amount of live fetuses in the litter with more effective bioprotection for zinc in the nanoaquachelate form.

  20. Effects of chemical smokes on flora and fauna under field and laboratory exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, D.J.; Novak, E.W.; Lower, W.R.; Yanders, A.; Kapila, S.; Wang, R.

    1987-06-01

    Various types of obscurant smokes are used routinely in training by the U.S. Army. Because continued routine use of the smokes could be detrimental to the native flora and fauna at training sites, a preliminary biological and chemical field study of fogoil, hexachloroethane, and tank diesel smokes was conducted. Smoke plumes were sampled and chemically analyzed at distances of 15-150 m from the smoke source where Tradescantia clones 4430 and 03 and the native plant Ambrosia dumosa and the native rodent Dipodomys merriami were exposed for 30 min. In addition, Tradescantia clone 4430 was exposed to tank diesel in the laboratory at concentration levels equivalent to exposure at 15 and 50 m. Tradescantia clones were examined for mutagenic effects indicated by micronuclei induction in developing pollen and pink somatic mutations in stamen hairs. Photosynthetic perturbations were measured in Tradescantia and A. dumosa using variable fluorescence induction. Animals were examined for sister chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations. It was found that all of the smokes tested exerted varying degrees of physiological and mutagenic effects in one or more assay system at one or more exposure distance. The studies reported here indicate that exposed ecological systems, or at least components of these systems, are at a higher risk than are unexposed components (e.g., organisms) for several types of damage attributed to obscurant smoke exposure.

  1. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S., E-mail: ikeda.s.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 216-8502 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kumaki, M. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  2. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  3. Effect of Peers Assessment and Short Report in Year III Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Norliza Abd; Kofli, Noorhisham Tan

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory course in Biochemical and Chemical Engineering Programmes at the Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, has introduced the peer group evaluation, presentation, reports submitted by groups/individual as assessment tools for 3rd year laboratory course. The experiments for the course…

  4. Effective Laboratory Work in Biochemistry Subject: Students' and Lecturers' Perspective in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Yunita Arian Sani; Senam; Laksono F. X., Endang Widjajanti

    2017-01-01

    Biochemistry subject had problem in learning and teaching, especially in laboratory work. We explored laboratory learning implementation in Biochemistry subject. Participants of this research were 195 students who took biochemistry subject and 4 lecturers of biochemistry in three universities in Indonesia. We obtained data using questionnaires and…

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management System FY 2016 Effectiveness Review and Declaration Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, Farren J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) effectiveness review of fiscal year (FY) 2016 shows that INL has integrated management programs and safety elements throughout the oversight and operational activities performed at INL. The significant maturity of Contractor Assurance System (CAS) processes, as demonstrated across INL’s management systems and periodic reporting through the Management Review Meeting process, over the past two years has provided INL with current real-time understanding and knowledge pertaining to the health of the institution. INL’s sustained excellence of the Integrated Safety and effective implementation of the Worker Safety and Health Program is also evidenced by other external validations and key indicators. In particular, external validations include VPP, ISO 14001, DOELAP accreditation, and key Laboratory level indicators such as ORPS (number, event frequency and severity); injury/illness indicators such as Days Away, Restricted and Transfer (DART) case rate, back & shoulder metric and open reporting indicators, demonstrate a continuous positive trend and therefore improved operational performance over the last few years. These indicators are also reflective of the Laboratory’s overall organizational and safety culture improvement. Notably, there has also been a step change in ESH&Q Leadership actions that have been recognized both locally and complex-wide. Notwithstanding, Laboratory management continues to monitor and take action on lower level negative trends in numerous areas including: Conduct of Operations, Work Control, Work Site Analysis, Risk Assessment, LO/TO, Fire Protection, and Life Safety Systems, to mention a few. While the number of severe injury cases has decreased, as evidenced by the reduction in the DART case rate, the two hand injuries and the fire truck/ambulance accident were of particular concern. Aggressive actions continue in order to understand the causes and

  6. Vitellogenin as a biomarker for estrogenic effects in brown trout, Salmo trutta: laboratory and field investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Poul; Hansen, Pernille R; Larsen, Katrine J; Erratico, Claudio; Korsgaard, Bodil; Holbech, Henrik

    2008-11-01

    The sensitivity of juvenile brown trout towards estrogenic chemicals (17beta-estradiol [E2], estrone [E1], 17alpha-ethinylestradiol [EE2], 4-tert-octylphenol [OP], and n-butylparaben [BP]) was tested in laboratory experiments with plasma and liver vitellogenin concentrations as endpoints. Vitellogenin concentrations were also assessed in juvenile brown trout collected in streams affected by agricultural runoff and discharges from scattered houses in the open land. In the laboratory, juvenile brown trout were exposed to the chemicals in flow-through tanks for 7 to 12 d and concentration-response relationships for the induction of vitellogenin synthesis were obtained. The actual exposure concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The median plasma vitellogenin concentration in first year control brown trout reared in recirculated groundwater was 165 ng/ml with 783 ng/ml as the highest value. The median effective concentration (EC50) values for vitellogenin induction (based on plasma concentrations) were 3.7 ng EE2/L, 15 ng E2/L, 88 ng E1/L, 68 microg BP/L, and 7 microg OP/L. Median effective concentrations derived from liver vitellogenin concentrations were similar. The 166 brown trout caught in the field were mainly first and second year fish and a few third year fish. Plasma vitellogenin concentrations were below 1000 ng/L in 146 of the fish, between 1000 ng/L and 4234 ng/L in 19 fish and 5.3 x 10(6) ng/L in one male fish. Vitellogenin concentrations did not differ between first and second year fish, but were elevated in third year fish. The data may indicate that juvenile (<2 years) trout with plasma vitellogenin concentrations above 1000 ng/ml have had their vitellogenin synthesis induced by exposure to estrogens in the environment. Plasma and liver vitellogenin concentrations were closely correlated in brown trout with elevated vitellogenin concentrations. It is noteworthy, however, that exposure to synthetic estrogens (EE2, BP

  7. Biological effects of high strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. Interim progress report, March 9, 1976--September 8, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Kaune, W.T.; Decker, J.R.; Hjeresen, D.L.

    1976-09-01

    Progress is reported on a broad and comprehensive series of biological experiments made under strictly controlled laboratory conditions to screen for possible effects of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields on small laboratory animals. Electric field strengths comparable to and exceeding those under existing and anticipated transmission line designs will be used. Dosimetry studies will complement the animal studies to establish the relationship between tissue dose and any observed biological effects. Information derived from this project will provide a better basis for evaluating potential hazards of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields and help define parameters to be studied in clinical evaluations on humans.

  8. Larvicidal effect of disinfectant soap on Anopheles gambiae s.s (Diptera: Culicidae) in laboratory and semifield environs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mosquito larval control using chemicals and biological agents is of paramount importance in vector population and disease incidence reduction. A commercial synthetic disinfectant soap was evaluated against larvae of Anopheles gambiae s.s. in both laboratory and semi field conditions. Method Five concentrations of commercial synthetic disinfectant soap (0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1%) were prepared and evaluated against third instar larvae in laboratory and semi field environments. Mortality was scored at 12, 24, 48, and 72 hrs. Each dosage had 6 replicates, having twenty 3rd instar larvae of An.gambiae s.s. Results In the laboratory phase, all dosages had significantly higher larval mortalities than in controls, while in semi field conditions, the dosages of 0.0001, 0.001 and 0.01% had lower mortalities than laboratory trials. In the comparison between semi field and laboratory trials, only 0.1 and 1% dosage had significant difference with more mortality in semifield conditions. Proportions of larvae that died during mortality monitoring intervals in laboratory and semi field had significant differences only at 12 hrs and 72 hrs. Conclusion The findings of this study have demonstrated that the mortality of larvae caused by commercial synthetic disinfectant soap is worth further studies in open water bodies. More studies are necessary to find out the effect of sunlight on the chemistry of the synthetic disinfectant and other variables in small scale full field trials. PMID:24885903

  9. [Internal audit in medical laboratory: what means of control for an effective audit process?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hejl, Carine; Chianéa, Denis; Dedome, Emmanuel; Sanmartin, Nancy; Bugier, Sarah; Linard, Cyril; Foissaud, Vincent; Vest, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    To prepare the French Accreditation Committee (COFRAC) visit for initial certification of our medical laboratory, our direction evaluated its quality management system (QMS) and all its technical activities. This evaluation was performed owing an internal audit. This audit was outsourced. Auditors had an expertise in audit, a whole knowledge of biological standards and were independent. Several nonconformities were identified at that time, including a lack of control of several steps of the internal audit process. Hence, necessary corrective actions were taken in order to meet the requirements of standards, in particular, the formalization of all stages, from the audit program, to the implementation, review and follow-up of the corrective actions taken, and also the implementation of the resources needed to carry out audits in a pre-established timing. To ensure an optimum control of each step, the main concepts of risk management were applied: process approach, root cause analysis, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA). After a critical analysis of our practices, this methodology allowed us to define our "internal audit" process, then to formalize it and to follow it up, with a whole documentary system.

  10. Laboratory studies on the effects of shear on fish: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dauble, D. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moursund, R. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Abernethy, C. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cada, G. F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2000-09-01

    The overall objective of these studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish-friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish’s tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system; in other words, determining or assuming conditions known to injure fish will assist engineers in the design of a fish-friendly turbine system. To address the development of biological specifications, this experiment designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response. The test data reported here provide quantified strain rates and the relationship of these forces to direct and indirect biological effects on fish. The study concludes that juvenile salmonids and American shad should survive shear environments where strain rates do not exceed 500 cm/s/cm at a Dy of 1.8 cm. Additional studies are planned with a sensor fish to better link hydraulic conditions found within the laboratory and field environments.

  11. Biodegradation of plastics in soil and effects on nitrification activity. A laboratory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettas Ardisson, Giulia; Tosin, Maurizio; Barbale, Marco; Degli-Innocenti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The progressive application of new biodegradable plastics in agriculture calls for improved testing approaches to assure their environmental safety. Full biodegradation (≥90%) prevents accumulation in soil, which is the first tier of testing. The application of specific ecotoxicity tests is the second tier of testing needed to show safety for the soil ecosystem. Soil microbial nitrification is widely used as a bioindicator for evaluating the impact of chemicals on soil but it is not applied for evaluating the impact of biodegradable plastics. In this work the International Standard test for biodegradation of plastics in soil (ISO 17556, 2012) was applied both to measure biodegradation and to prepare soil samples needed for a subsequent nitrification test based on another International Standard (ISO 14238, 2012). The plastic mulch film tested in this work showed full biodegradability and no inhibition of the nitrification potential of the soil in comparison with the controls. The laboratory approach suggested in this Technology Report enables (i) to follow the course of biodegradation, (ii) a strict control of variables and environmental conditions, (iii) the application of very high concentrations of test material (to maximize the possible effects). This testing approach could be taken into consideration in improved testing schemes aimed at defining the biodegradability of plastics in soil.

  12. Biodegradation of plastics in soil and effects on nitrification activity. A laboratory approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eBettas Ardisson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The progressive application of new biodegradable plastics in agriculture calls for improved testing approaches to assure their environmental safety. Full biodegradation (≥ 90% prevents accumulation in soil, which is the first tier of testing. The application of specific ecotoxicity tests is the second tier of testing needed to show safety for the soil ecosystem. Soil microbial nitrification is widely used as a bioindicator for evaluating the impact of chemicals on soil but it is not applied for evaluating the impact of biodegradable plastics. In this work the International Standard test for biodegradation of plastics in soil (ISO 17556, 2012 was applied both to measure biodegradation and to prepare soil samples needed for a subsequent nitrification test based on another International Standard (ISO 14238, 2012. The plastic mulch film tested in this work showed full biodegradability and no inhibition of the nitrification potential of the soil in comparison with the controls. The laboratory approach suggested in this Technology Report enables (i to follow the course of biodegradation, (ii a strict control of variables and environmental conditions, (iii the application of very high concentrations of test material (to maximize the possible effects. This testing approach could be taken into consideration in improved testing schemes aimed at defining the biodegradability of plastics in soil.

  13. Biodegradation of plastics in soil and effects on nitrification activity. A laboratory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettas Ardisson, Giulia; Tosin, Maurizio; Barbale, Marco; Degli-Innocenti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The progressive application of new biodegradable plastics in agriculture calls for improved testing approaches to assure their environmental safety. Full biodegradation (≥90%) prevents accumulation in soil, which is the first tier of testing. The application of specific ecotoxicity tests is the second tier of testing needed to show safety for the soil ecosystem. Soil microbial nitrification is widely used as a bioindicator for evaluating the impact of chemicals on soil but it is not applied for evaluating the impact of biodegradable plastics. In this work the International Standard test for biodegradation of plastics in soil (ISO 17556, 2012) was applied both to measure biodegradation and to prepare soil samples needed for a subsequent nitrification test based on another International Standard (ISO 14238, 2012). The plastic mulch film tested in this work showed full biodegradability and no inhibition of the nitrification potential of the soil in comparison with the controls. The laboratory approach suggested in this Technology Report enables (i) to follow the course of biodegradation, (ii) a strict control of variables and environmental conditions, (iii) the application of very high concentrations of test material (to maximize the possible effects). This testing approach could be taken into consideration in improved testing schemes aimed at defining the biodegradability of plastics in soil. PMID:25566223

  14. Spanish participation in the Haw Project: Laboratory investigations on Gamma irradiation effects in rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas, C. de las; Miralles, L.; Teixidor, P.; Garcia Veigas, J.; Dies, X.; Ortega, X.; Pueyo, J.J.

    1993-12-31

    In order to prove the safe disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HAW) in salt rock, a five years test disposal of thirty highly radioactive radiation sources is planned in the Asse salt mine, in the Federal Republic of Germany. The thirty radiation sources consist of steel canisters containing the vitrified radionuclides Caesium 137 and Strontium 90 in quantities sufficient to cover the bandwidth of heat generation and gamma radiation of real HAW. The radiation sources will be emplaced in six boreholes located in two galleries at the 800 m level. Two electrical heater tests were already started in November 1988 and are continuosly surveyed in respect of the rock mass. Also the handling system necessary for the emplacement of the radioactive canisters was developed and succesfully tested. A laboratory investigation programme on radiation effects in salt is being performed in advance to the radioactive canister emplacement. This programme includes the investigation of thermally and radiolytically induced water and gas release from the rock salt and the radiolytical decomposition of salt minerals. Part of this programme has been carried out since 1988 at the University of Barcelona, basically what refers to colloidal sodium determinations by light absorption measurements and microstructural studies on irradiated salt samples. For gamma dose and dose rate measurements in the test field, measuring systems consisting of ionisation chambers as well as solid state dosemeters were developed and tested. Thermomechanical computer code validation is performed by calculational predictions and parallel investigation of the stress and displacement fields in the underground test field.

  15. The effects of emotion regulation strategies on the pain experience: a structured laboratory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Amy J D; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Gagnon, Michelle M; Williams, Jaime; Clark, David

    2015-05-01

    Although emotion regulation modulates the pain experience, inconsistencies have been identified regarding the impact of specific regulation strategies on pain. Our goal was to examine the effects of emotion suppression and cognitive reappraisal on automatic (ie, nonverbal) and cognitively mediated (ie, verbal) pain expressions. Nonclinical participants were randomized into either a suppression (n = 58), reappraisal (n = 51), or monitoring control (n = 42) condition. Upon arrival to the laboratory, participants completed the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, to quantify self-reported suppression and reappraisal tendencies. Subsequently, they completed a thermal pain threshold and tolerance task. They were then provided with instructions to use, depending on their experimental condition, suppression, reappraisal, or monitoring strategies. Afterward, they were exposed to experimentally induced pain. Self-report measures of pain, anxiety, and tension were administered, and facial expressions, heart rate, and galvanic skin response were recorded. The Facial Action Coding System was used to quantify general and pain-related facial activity (ie, we defined facial actions that occurred during at least 5% of pain stimulation periods as "pain-related actions"). Reappraisal and suppression induction led to reductions in nonverbal and verbal indices of pain. Moreover, self-reported tendencies to use suppression and reappraisal (as measured by the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire) did not interact with experimental condition in the determination of participants' responses. Results suggest that consciously applying emotion regulation strategies during a painful task can moderate both cognitively mediated (e.g., verbal) and automatic (e.g., facial activity) expressions of pain.

  16. Controlled laboratory system to study soil solarization and organic amendment effects on plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Eyal; Katan, Jaacov; Austerweil, Miriam; Gamliel, Abraham

    2007-11-01

    ABSTRACT A controlled laboratory system for simulating soil solarization, with and without organic amendment, was developed and validated using physical, chemical, and biological parameters. The system consists of soil containers that are exposed to controlled and constant aeration, and to temperature fluctuations that resemble those occurring during solarization at various depths. This system enables a separate analysis of volatiles and other components. We recorded a sharp decrease in oxygen concentration in the soil atmosphere followed by a gradual increase to the original concentration during solarization in the field and heating in the simulation system of soil amended with wild rocket (Diplotaxis tenuifolia) or thyme (Thymus vulgaris). The combined treatment of organic amendment and solarization (or heating in the controlled system) was highly effective at controlling populations of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici. Changes in soil pH, enzymatic activities, and microbial populations followed, in most cases, trends which were similar under both solarization and the heating system, when exposed to controlled aerobic conditions. The reliability and validity of the system in simulating physical, chemical, and biological processes taking place during solarization is demonstrated.

  17. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph; Jost, Rémy; Bhattacharya, S K; Johnson, Matthew S; Savarino, Joël

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. ["Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ((15)N, (17)O, and (18)O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ(15)N, δ(18)O, and Δ(17)O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of (15)ɛ = (-15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of (15)ɛ = (-47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from -40 to -74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of (14)NO3 (-) and (15)NO3 (-) in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying this model under the experimental temperature as well as considering the

  18. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph; Jost, Rémy; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Savarino, Joël

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. ["Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate (15N, 17O, and 18O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ15N, δ18O, and Δ17O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of 15ɛ = (-15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of 15ɛ = (-47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from -40 to -74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of 14NO3- and 15NO3- in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying this model under the experimental temperature as well as considering the shift in width and center well

  19. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joël [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Copenhagen Center for Atmospheric Research (CCAR), Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jost, Rémy [Laboratoire de Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPHY) Univ. de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Bhattacharya, S. K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Nangang, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [“Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry,” J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 18}O, and Δ{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from −40 to −74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying

  20. A laboratory investigation into the effects of slope on lava flow morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Tracy K. P.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    2000-03-01

    In an attempt to model the effect of slope on the dynamics of lava flow emplacement, four distinct morphologies were repeatedly produced in a series of laboratory simulations where polyethylene glycol (PEG) was extruded at a constant rate beneath cold sucrose solution onto a uniform slope which could be varied from 1° through 60°. The lowest extrusion rates and slopes, and highest cooling rates, produced flows that rapidly crusted over and advanced through bulbous toes, or pillows (similar to subaerial "toey" pahoehoe flows and to submarine pillowed flows). As extrusion rate and slope increased, and cooling rate decreased, pillowed flows gave way to rifted flows (linear zones of liquid wax separated by plates of solid crust, similar to what is observed on the surface of convecting lava lakes), then to folded flows with surface crusts buckled transversely to the flow direction, and, at the highest extrusion rates and slopes, and lowest cooling rates, to leveed flows, which solidified only at their margins. A dimensionless parameter, Ψ, primarily controlled by effusion rate, cooling rate and flow viscosity, quantifies these flow types. Increasing the underlying slope up to 30° allows the liquid wax to advance further before solidifying, with an effect similar to that of increasing the effusion rate. For example, conditions that produce rifted flows on a 10° slope result in folded flows on a 30° slope. For underlying slopes of 40°, however, this trend reverses, slightly owing to increased gravitational forces relative to the strength of the solid wax. Because of its significant influence on heat advection and the disruption of a solid crust, slope must be incorporated into any quantitative attempt to correlate eruption parameters and lava flow morphologies. These experiments and subsequent scaling incorporate key physical parameters of both an extrusion and its environment, allowing their results to be used to interpret lava flow morphologies on land, on the

  1. Effects of Organic Pesticides on Enchytraeids (Oligochaeta in Agroecosystems: Laboratory and Higher-Tier Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Römbke

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Enchytraeidae (Oligochaeta, Annelida are often considered to be typical forestliving organisms, but they are regularly found in agroecosystems of the temperate regions of the world. Although less known than their larger relatives, the earthworms, these saprophagous organisms play similar roles in agricultural soils (but at a smaller scale, e.g., influencing soil structure and organic matter dynamics via microbial communities, and having a central place in soil food webs. Their diversity is rarely studied or often underestimated due to difficulties in distinguishing the species. New genetic techniques reveal that even in anthropogenically highly influenced soils, more than 10 species per site can be found. Because of their close contact with the soil pore water, a high ingestion rate and a thin cuticle, they often react very sensitively to a broad range of pesticides. Firstly we provide a short overview of the diversity and abundance of enchytraeid communities in agroecosystems. Afterwards, we explore the available data on enchytraeid sensitivity toward pesticides at different levels of biological organization, focusing on pesticides used in (mainly European agroecosystems. Starting with non-standardized studies on the effects of pesticides on the sub-individual level, we compile the results of standard laboratory tests performed following OECD and ISO guidelines as well as those of higher-tier studies (i.e., semi-field and field tests. The number of comparable test data is still limited, because tests with enchytraeids are not a regulatory requirement in the European Union. While focusing on the effects of pesticides, attention is also given to their interactions with environmental stressors (e.g., climate change. In conclusion, we recommend to increase the use of enchytraeids in pesticide risk assessment because of their diversity and functional importance as well as their increasingly simplified use in (mostly standardized tests at all levels

  2. Biochemistry and metabolism of lake trout: laboratory and field studies on the effects of contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passino, Dora R. May

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of ambient and higher concentrations of PCB's (Aroclor 1254) and DDE in food and water on fry of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Lake Michigan, I measured several biochemical indicators of stress in exposed and unexposed (control) fry. No differences between treatments were observed in oxygen consumption rates or lactate concentrations of unexercised fry, but apparent differences in specific swimming speed and lactate response in fry that swam to exhaustion suggested that exposed fry had lower stamina. Observed differences between biochemical profiles of 1-day-old sac fry reared from eggs originating from lake trout collected off Saugatuck and those originating from eggs of brood stock at the Marquette (Michigan) hatchery may have been caused by organochlorine contamination or by genetic and dietary differences between the parental stocks. Activity of the enzyme allantoinase was measured in juvenile and adult lake trout as an indicator of sublethal effects of Great Lakes contaminants. The 50% inhibition of allantoinase in vitro occurred at 6.0 mg/L Cu++, 6.7 mg/L Cd++, 34 mg/L Hg++, and 52 mg/L Pb++. Allantoinase was not affected by in vitro exposure to PCB's up to 7 μg/g, or DDE or DDT up to 10 μg/g; however, in vivo exposure resulting in 2.6 μg/g PCB's in the whole fish activated allantoinase slightly (10% significance level). Allantoinase activity was negatively correlated with total length for fish from Lake Michigan but not for fish from Lake Superior or from laboratory stocks. Mercury, PCB's, and DDT, possibly acting in combination with each other and with additional contaminants, may be the cause of the negative correlation of allantoinase activity with size in Lake Michigan lake trout.

  3. Effectiveness of 12 Insecticides to a Laboratory Population of Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Newly Established in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Shang, Su-Qin

    2015-06-01

    The codling moth Cydia pomonella (L.) is an economically important fruit pest that has spread rapidly from its original site in Xinjiang to other northwestern regions of China. Insecticides are widely used to control this pest but its invasion has never been completely stopped. The aim of this study was to establish a laboratory population of the codling moth occurring in China, to investigate the effectiveness of 12 conventional insecticides to this laboratory population, and to recommend the discriminating doses for use in resistance monitoring. The laboratory population was generally similar to other laboratory strains although parameters such as survival rate and larval duration were low when compared with field populations. Toxicity varied among the insecticides tested with LC50 values ranging from 0.016 mg/l for emamectin benzoate to 55.77 mg/l for chlorbenzuron. Discriminating dose levels were determined from dose-mortality reference curves for the detection of resistance in field populations. Effectiveness of 12 insecticides to a laboratory population of codling moth in China was evaluated for the first time. This can be integrated into resistance management strategies, especially in orchards with a history of frequent insecticides applications, in order to monitor or decrease insecticide resistance in the future. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Effectiveness of a computerized alert system based on re-testing intervals for limiting the inappropriateness of laboratory test requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Brambilla, Marco; Bonelli, Patrizia; Aloe, Rosalia; Balestrino, Antonio; Nardelli, Anna; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Fabi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    There is consolidated evidence that the burden of inappropriate laboratory test requests is very high, up to 70%. We describe here the function of a computerized alert system linked to the order entry, designed to limit the number of potentially inappropriate laboratory test requests. A computerized alert system based on re-testing intervals and entailing the generation of pop-up alerts when preset criteria of appropriateness for 15 laboratory tests were violated was implemented in two clinical wards of the University Hospital of Parma. The effectiveness of the system for limiting potentially inappropriate tests was monitored for 6months. Overall, 765/3539 (22%) test requests violated the preset criteria of appropriateness and generated the appearance of electronic alert. After alert appearance, 591 requests were annulled (17% of total tests requested and 77% of tests alerted, respectively). The total number of test requests violating the preset criteria of inappropriateness constantly decreased over time (26% in the first three months of implementation versus 17% in the following period; ptest withdrawn was 3387 Euros (12.8% of the total test cost) throughout the study period. The results of this study suggest that a computerized alert system may be effective to limit the inappropriateness of laboratory test requests, generating significant economic saving and educating physicians to a more efficient use of laboratory resources. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  6. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR).DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  7. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  8. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  9. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR). DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  10. Effects of Combined Hands-on Laboratory and Computer Modeling on Student Learning of Gas Laws: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiufeng

    2006-01-01

    Based on current theories of chemistry learning, this study intends to test a hypothesis that computer modeling enhanced hands-on chemistry laboratories are more effective than hands-on laboratories or computer modeling laboratories alone in facilitating high school students' understanding of chemistry concepts. Thirty-three high school chemistry…

  11. Science teachers' perceptions of the effectiveness of technology in the laboratories: Implications for science education leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Niveen K.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify science teachers' perceptions concerning the use of technology in science laboratories and identify teachers' concerns and recommendations for improving students' learning. Survey methodology with electronic delivery was used to gather data from 164 science teachers representing Texas public schools. The data confirmed that weaknesses identified in the 1990s still exist. Lack of equipment, classroom space, and technology access, as well as large numbers of students, were reported as major barriers to the implementation of technology in science laboratories. Significant differences were found based on gender, grade level, certification type, years of experience, and technology proficiency. Females, elementary teachers, traditionally trained teachers, and less experienced teachers revealed a more positive attitude toward the use of technology in science laboratories. Participants in this study preferred using science software simulations to support rather than replace traditional science laboratories. Teachers in this study recommended professional development programs that focused on strategies for a technology integrated classroom.

  12. [Increasing effectiveness of the use of laboratory data in the therapeutic-diagnostic process through automatization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarovskiĭ, V V; Shcherbatkin, D D; Nazarov, G D

    1989-01-01

    Introduction of the complex computer-aided mechanization and automatization into the laboratory process and their integration with other automated information hospital systems significantly raise efficacy of laboratory data application in treatment and diagnosis, thus reducing work losses of the medical staff. The structure of biochemical research for clinical therapeutic and surgical departments is presented along with the main biochemical diagnostic programmes for some diseases.

  13. Effect of a laboratory result pager on provider behavior in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, L; Stavroudis, Ta; Miller, Re; Lehmann, Hp; Lehmann, Cu

    2011-01-01

    A computerized laboratory result paging system (LRPS) that alerts providers about abnormal results ("push") may improve upon active laboratory result review ("pull"). However, implementing such a system in the intensive care setting may be hindered by low signal-to-noise ratio, which may lead to alert fatigue. To evaluate the impact of an LRPS in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Utilizing paper chart review, we tallied provider orders following an abnormal laboratory result before and after implementation of an LRPS. Orders were compared with a predefined set of appropriate orders for such an abnormal result. The likelihood of a provider response in the post-implementation period as compared to the pre-implementation period was analyzed using logistic regression. The provider responses were analyzed using logistic regression to control for potential confounders. The likelihood of a provider response to an abnormal laboratory result did not change significantly after implementation of an LRPS. (Odds Ratio 0.90, 95% CI 0.63-1.30, p-value 0.58) However, when providers did respond to an alert, the type of response was different. The proportion of repeat laboratory tests increased. (26/378 vs. 7/278, p-value = 0.02). Although the laboratory result pager altered healthcare provider behavior in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, it did not increase the overall likelihood of provider response.

  14. A Model for Program-Wide Assessment of the Effectiveness of Writing Instruction in Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitta, Erin K.; Zemliansky, Pavel; Turner, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a model for program-wide assessment of the effectiveness of writing instruction in a chemistry laboratory course. This model, which involves collaboration between faculty from chemistry, the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) program, and the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, is based on several theories and…

  15. Effect of macrofauna, oxygen exchange and particle reworking on iron and manganese sediment gogeochemistry: a laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferro, I.; Van Nugteren, P.; Middelburg, J.J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of bioturbation on iron and manganese cycling in rine sediments was studied in laboratory experiments in which faunal effects which combine in the field (particle mixing and oxygen exchange) were studied separately. Particle mixing and sediment aeration both enhance metal oxide reduction

  16. Effects of Conceptual Change Texts and Laboratory Experiments on Fourth Grade Students' Understanding of Matter and Change Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Jale; Bayraktar, Sule

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether conceptual change texts and laboratory experiments are effective in overcoming misconceptions and whether the concepts were acquired permanently when these methods were utilized. In this study, we addressed some topics from the "Matter and Change" unit in science and technology class of…

  17. Effect of macrofauna, oxygen exchange and particle reworking on iron and manganese sediment gogeochemistry: a laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferro, I.; Van Nugteren, P.; Middelburg, J.J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of bioturbation on iron and manganese cycling in rine sediments was studied in laboratory experiments in which faunal effects which combine in the field (particle mixing and oxygen exchange) were studied separately. Particle mixing and sediment aeration both enhance metal oxide reduction

  18. Comparative Laboratory-Scale Testing of Dispersant Effectiveness of 23 Crude Oils Using Four Different Testing Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    A controlled laboratory study was conducted to measure the dispersion effectiveness of Corexit 9500 on 20 different crude oils. This study was a part of a larger project initiated by the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) testing 20 oils to compare the predict...

  19. Effects of Transgenic Cry 1 Ac plus CpTI Cotton on the Bioecology of Main Parasitoids in Laboratory Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Jin-jie; VANDER Weft Wopke; MA Yah; LUO Jun-yu

    2008-01-01

    @@ Effects of transgenic CrylAc plus CpTI cotton (double genes cotton) on development of main parasitoids were studied in the laboratory.Compared with the traditional cotton,the differences of the moulting rate and adult weight of cotton aphid-Aphydius from double gene cotton field were not obvious.

  20. Biological effects of high-strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. Interim report, March 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Anderson, L.E.; Kaune, W.T.

    1979-12-01

    Progress is described on a project assessing the biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small laboratory animals (rats and mice). The report includes sections on hematology and seram chemistry, immunology, pathology, metabolism, bone growth, endocrinology, cardiovascular function, neurophysiology, growth and development, and animal behavior. (ACR)

  1. To Compare the Effects of Computer Based Learning and the Laboratory Based Learning on Students' Achievement Regarding Electric Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, Bekir; Kanli, Uygar; Ingec, Sebnem Kandil

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the research problem was: "Is the computer based physics instruction as effective as laboratory intensive physics instruction with regards to academic success on electric circuits 9th grade students?" For this research of experimental quality the design of pre-test and post-test are applied with an experiment and a control…

  2. Effects of pesticides on soil invertebrates in model ecosystem and field studies: a review and comparison with laboratory toxicity data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jänsch, S.; Frampton, G.K.; Römbke, J.; Brink, van den P.J.; Scott-Fordsmand, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    A systematic review was carried out to investigate the extent to which higher-tier (terrestrial model ecosystem [TME] and field) data regarding pesticide effects can be compared with laboratory toxicity data for soil invertebrates. Data in the public domain yielded 970 toxicity endpoint data sets, r

  3. The Effect of Creative and Critical Thinking Based Laboratory Applications on Creative and Logical Thinking Abilities of Prospective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koray, Ozlem; Koksal, Mustafa Serdar

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of creative and critical thinking based laboratory method on prospective primary teachers' creative and logical thinking abilities. This research was conducted with 90 prospective elementary school teachers who were enrolled in two classes of education faculty during the spring semester of the…

  4. The Effect of Simulation-Assisted Laboratory Applications on Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes towards Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulukök, Seyma; Sari, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effects of computer-assisted laboratory applications on pre-service science teachers' attitudes towards science teaching were investigated and the opinions of the pre-service teachers about the application were also determined. The study sample consisted of 46 students studying science teaching Faculty of Education. The study…

  5. NDE Acoustic Microscopy Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to develop advanced, more effective high-resolution micro-NDE materials characterization methods using scanning acoustic microscopy. The laboratory's...

  6. Effects of seven diets on the population dynamics of laboratory cultured Tisbe holothuriae Humes (Copepoda, Harpacticoida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliou, H.; Moraïtou-Apostolopoulou, M.

    1991-09-01

    The harpacticoid copepod Tisbe holothuriae was collected from Saronicos Gulf (Greece) and reared under constant laboratory conditions. In order to study the effects of food on the population dynamics, seven diets were tested: the seaweed Ulva; five artificial compound feeds: the liquid Fryfood® (Waterlife), a powder of Mytilus, yeast, soya and Spirulina, respectively; and a mixed diet consisting of Ulva and Fryfood. The life cycle parameters (mortality, sex ratio, generation time, offspring production) were measured, and the demographic variables [mean generation time (T), net reproductive rate (Ro), and intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm)] were determined. As to their efficiency regarding population dynamics, the diets ranked as follows: (1) Ulva+Fryfood, (2), Ulva, (3) Fryfood, (4) Mytilus, (5) soya, (6) yeast, and (7) Spirulina. In this order they cause a progressive increase of both larval mortality and generation time, a progressive decrease of sex ratio, number of offspring per egg sac, number of egg sacs per female and, consequently, of Ro and rm. The observed differences between diets were most pronounced with respect to offspring production. Of the compound diets, those containing animal extracts were more efficient than those containing vegetable materials. Ulva plays an important role in the nutrition of T. holothuriae, favouring offspring production as well as larval survival, development and pigmentation. Ulva in combination with Fryfood led to a greater copepodid survival and offspring production. This mixed diet proved to be the most favourable for rearing the Greek population of t. holothuriae, resulting in an efficient intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm=0.304) of the population.

  7. Numerical study of wave effects on groundwater flow and solute transport in a laboratory beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.; Xia, Yuqiang; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Lin; Jackson, Nancy L.; Miller, Richard S.

    2014-09-01

    A numerical study was undertaken to investigate the effects of waves on groundwater flow and associated inland-released solute transport based on tracer experiments in a laboratory beach. The MARUN model was used to simulate the density-dependent groundwater flow and subsurface solute transport in the saturated and unsaturated regions of the beach subjected to waves. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, Fluent, was used to simulate waves, which were the seaward boundary condition for MARUN. A no-wave case was also simulated for comparison. Simulation results matched the observed water table and concentration at numerous locations. The results revealed that waves generated seawater-groundwater circulations in the swash and surf zones of the beach, which induced a large seawater-groundwater exchange across the beach face. In comparison to the no-wave case, waves significantly increased the residence time and spreading of inland-applied solutes in the beach. Waves also altered solute pathways and shifted the solute discharge zone further seaward. Residence Time Maps (RTM) revealed that the wave-induced residence time of the inland-applied solutes was largest near the solute exit zone to the sea. Sensitivity analyses suggested that the change in the permeability in the beach altered solute transport properties in a nonlinear way. Due to the slow movement of solutes in the unsaturated zone, the mass of the solute in the unsaturated zone, which reached up to 10% of the total mass in some cases, constituted a continuous slow release of solutes to the saturated zone of the beach. This means of control was not addressed in prior studies.

  8. POSSIBILITIES OF CLINICAL LABORATORY EVALUATION OF ANTIPLATELET THERAPY EFFECTIVENESS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Sirotkina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the functional activity of platelets by the optical standard aggregatometry and induced flow cytofluorometry during antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA.Material and methods. The evaluation of platelet function in 30 patients with ischemic heart disease treated with dual antiplatelet therapy (ASA and clopidogrel was performed by two methods: the standard photometric method with the assessment of degree of light transmission at the maximum point and by the original method of induced flow cytofluorometry with the platelet activity evaluation by changing of glycoprotein (GP IIb/IIIa receptor level and the expression of P-selectin before and after ADP induction.Results. Increase in platelet functional activity was detected in patients with ASA monotherapy at initial evaluation by both induced flow cytofluorometry and standard photometric method. After one month dual antiplatelet therapy platelet function significantly decreased according to standard photometric method (from 61.4Ѓ}3.6 to 45.9Ѓ}3.7; p<0.05; the induction of 2.5 mM ADP, as well as according to flow cytofluorometry with changing of GP IIb/IIIa receptor level (from 12.2Ѓ}0.8% to 5.2Ѓ}0.8%; p<0.05 and the expression of P-selectin (from 70.5Ѓ}5.9% to 57.4Ѓ}5.9%; p<0.05.Conclusion. The combined use of laboratory methods to assess platelet function (traditional and high-tech provides cardiologist with additional tool for assessing the effectiveness of antiplatelet therapy in patients with ischemic heart disease.

  9. POSSIBILITIES OF CLINICAL LABORATORY EVALUATION OF ANTIPLATELET THERAPY EFFECTIVENESS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Sirotkina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the functional activity of platelets by the optical standard aggregatometry and induced flow cytofluorometry during antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA.Material and methods. The evaluation of platelet function in 30 patients with ischemic heart disease treated with dual antiplatelet therapy (ASA and clopidogrel was performed by two methods: the standard photometric method with the assessment of degree of light transmission at the maximum point and by the original method of induced flow cytofluorometry with the platelet activity evaluation by changing of glycoprotein (GP IIb/IIIa receptor level and the expression of P-selectin before and after ADP induction.Results. Increase in platelet functional activity was detected in patients with ASA monotherapy at initial evaluation by both induced flow cytofluorometry and standard photometric method. After one month dual antiplatelet therapy platelet function significantly decreased according to standard photometric method (from 61.4Ѓ}3.6 to 45.9Ѓ}3.7; p<0.05; the induction of 2.5 mM ADP, as well as according to flow cytofluorometry with changing of GP IIb/IIIa receptor level (from 12.2Ѓ}0.8% to 5.2Ѓ}0.8%; p<0.05 and the expression of P-selectin (from 70.5Ѓ}5.9% to 57.4Ѓ}5.9%; p<0.05.Conclusion. The combined use of laboratory methods to assess platelet function (traditional and high-tech provides cardiologist with additional tool for assessing the effectiveness of antiplatelet therapy in patients with ischemic heart disease.

  10. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

    2012-12-31

    90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur during passage through a Welka UPG turbine at ambient current velocities less than about 2.5 m/s. Survival and Behavior of Juvenile Atlantic Salmon and Adult American Shad on Exposure to a Hydrokinetic Turbine This report describes a series of experiments designed to measure the effect of exposure to a full-scale, vertical axis hydrokinetic turbine on downstream migrating juvenile Atlantic salmon and upstream migrating adult American shad. Studies were performed in a large-scale, open-channel flume, and all individuals approached the turbine under volitional control. No injuries were observed, and there was no measurable increase in mortality associated with turbine passage. Exposure to the turbine elicited behavioral responses from both species, however, with salmon passing primarily over the downrunning blades. Shad movement was impeded in the presence of the device, as indicated by fewer attempts of shorter duration and reduced distance of ascent up the flume. More work should be performed in both laboratory and field conditions to determine the extent to which observed effects are likely to influence fish in riverine environments. Analysis is needed to assess the potential for multiple units to lead to greater mortality rates or impacts on fish movements and migrations. Additionally, future research should focus on expanding the existing data by developing better estimates of encounter and avoidance probabilities.

  11. The Effect of Learning Style Preferences on Pre-Service Teachers' Performance in General Chemistry Laboratory Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Ural ALŞAN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of learning style preferences on freshmen physics, chemistry and biology pre service teachers’ performances in general chemistry laboratory course was investigated. Grasha-Riechman Learning Style Inventory was administered to the pre-service teachers to determine their learning styles. Pre service teachers’ performances were determined by evaluating their experiment reports, midterm exams and final exam. One-Way ANOVA was conducted to determine whether pre-service teachers’ performances differ according to their learning styles in general chemistry laboratory course. The findings displayed that pre-service teachers’ learning styles affected their performances in general chemistry laboratory course. In this study, it was found that pre-service teachers who had “avoidant” learning style preference exhibited the lowest performances, while those who had “independent” and “independent/competitive” learning style preferences showed the highest performances.

  12. Production of N(+)-asterisk from N2 + hnu - Effective EUV emission yields from laboratory and dayglow data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, R. R.; Samson, James A. R.; Chung, Y.; Lee, E.-M.; He, Z.-X.

    1991-01-01

    Photodissociative ionization of N2 into the unbound N2(+) H 2Sigma-g(+) state is identified as the parentage of a number of N(+) and N-excited states that contribute to the u.v. dayglow. Yields have been obtained for the production of extreme ultraviolet emission lines of N(+) and N from a laboratory experiment using a broadband synchrotron radiation source with fluorescence spectroscopy. The yields are termed 'effective', in that they are constant percentages of the H state cross section. These are compared wih effective yields needed to reproduce N II 1085 and 916 A lines from four dayglow observations using a model of solar energy deposition and photoelectron production and loss in the earth's thermosphere. The 1085 A effective yield measured in the laboratory (18 percent) agrees with that from the dayglow data (average of 17 percent) to well within experimental uncertainties. Thus, it is concluded that photodissociative ionization of N2 is the primary source of the N II 1085 A dayglow. However, there is an order of magnitude discrepancy among the various dayglow observations of the 1085/916 intensity ratio, only one of which is consistent with the laboratory observation of 4.4. Neither contamination by other dayglow features nor atmospheric extinction can account for the disparities. Laboratory measurements of N2 and O2 absorption cross sections at these wavelengths are also reported.

  13. Testing sediment biological effects with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca: the gap between laboratory and nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feiyue; Goulet, Richard R; Chapman, Peter M

    2004-12-01

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is widely used in laboratory sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation tests. However, its responses in the laboratory are probably very different from those in the field. A review of the literature indicates that in its natural habitat this species complex is primarily epibenthic, derives little nutrition from the sediments, and responds primarily to contaminants in the overlying water column (including water and food), not sediment or porewater. In laboratory sediment toxicity tests H. azteca is deprived of natural food sources such as algal communities on or above the sediments, and is subjected to constant light without any cover except that afforded by burial into the sediments. Under these constraining laboratory conditions, H. azteca has been reported to respond to sediment or porewater contamination. In nature, contamination of overlying water from sediment is less likely than in the laboratory because of the large, generally non-static sink of natural surface water. H. azteca does not appear to be the most appropriate test species for direct assessments of the bioavailability and toxicity of sediment contaminants, though it is probably appropriate for testing the toxicity of surface waters. Toxic and non-toxic responses will be highly conservative, though the latter are probably the most persuasive given the exposure constraints. Thus H. azteca is probably a suitable surrogate species for determining sediments that are likely not toxic to field populations; however, it is not suitable for determining sediments that are likely toxic to field populations.

  14. A cross-laboratory preclinical study on the effectiveness of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maysami, Samaneh; Wong, Raymond; Pradillo, Jesus M; Denes, Adam; Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari; Orset, Cyrille; Rahman, Mahbubur; Rubio, Marina; Schwaninger, Markus; Vivien, Denis; Bath, Philip M; Rothwell, Nancy J; Allan, Stuart M

    2016-03-01

    Stroke represents a global challenge and is a leading cause of permanent disability worldwide. Despite much effort, translation of research findings to clinical benefit has not yet been successful. Failure of neuroprotection trials is considered, in part, due to the low quality of preclinical studies, low level of reproducibility across different laboratories and that stroke co-morbidities have not been fully considered in experimental models. More rigorous testing of new drug candidates in different experimental models of stroke and initiation of preclinical cross-laboratory studies have been suggested as ways to improve translation. However, to our knowledge, no drugs currently in clinical stroke trials have been investigated in preclinical cross-laboratory studies. The cytokine interleukin 1 is a key mediator of neuronal injury, and the naturally occurring interleukin 1 receptor antagonist has been reported as beneficial in experimental studies of stroke. In the present paper, we report on a preclinical cross-laboratory stroke trial designed to investigate the efficacy of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in different research laboratories across Europe. Our results strongly support the therapeutic potential of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in experimental stroke and provide further evidence that interleukin 1 receptor antagonist should be evaluated in more extensive clinical stroke trials.

  15. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

    2012-12-31

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and

  16. The effect of lead on the developmental stability of Drosophila subobscura through selection in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurbalija Zorana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA, the increased variation of bilateral symmetry in a sample of individuals, can indicate disturbance in developmental stability caused by environmental and/or genomic stress. This developmental instability was analyzed in Drosophila subobscura maintained for seven generations on two different concentrations of lead in laboratory conditions. The FA4 index showed that the genotypes reared on the higher lead concentration were in developmental homeostasis, except for males in the F7 generation, for both wing size parameters. The results show that different degrees of lead pollution cause different responses to selection of the exposed population in laboratory conditions.

  17. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Static and Variable Magnetic Fields on Freshwater Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

    2012-04-01

    benthic invertebrates (Gill et al. 2005, 2009). It is known that numerous marine and freshwater organisms are sensitive to electrical and magnetic fields, often depending on them for such diverse activities as prey location and navigation (DOE 2009; Normandeau et al. 2011). Despite the wide range of aquatic organisms that are sensitive to EMF and the increasing numbers of underwater electrical transmitting cables being installed in rivers and coastal waters, little information is available to assess whether animals will be attracted, repelled, or unaffected by these new sources of EMF. This knowledge gap is especially significant for freshwater systems, where electrosensitive organisms such as paddlefish and sturgeon may interact with electrical transmission cables. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments to test the sensitivity of freshwater fish and invertebrates to the levels of EMF that are expected to be produced by HK projects in rivers. In this context, EM fields are likely to be emitted primarily by generators in the water column and by transmission cables on or buried in the substrate. The HK units will be located in areas of high-velocity waters that are used as only temporary habitats for most riverine species, so long-term exposure of fish and benthic invertebrates to EMF is unlikely. Rather, most aquatic organisms will be briefly exposed to the fields as they drift downstream or migrate upstream. Because the exposure of most aquatic organisms to EMF in a river would be relatively brief and non-lethal, we focused our investigations on detecting behavioral effects. For example, attraction to the EM fields could result in prolonged exposures to the fields or the HK rotor. On the other hand, avoidance reactions might hinder upstream migrations of fish. The experiments reported here are a continuation of studies begun in FY 2010, which focused on the potential effects of static magnetic fields on snails, clams, and fathead minnows (Cada et al. 2011

  18. Comparative study of the effectiveness of three learning environments: Hyper-realistic virtual simulations, traditional schematic simulations and traditional laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Suero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the educational effects of computer simulations developed in a hyper-realistic virtual environment with the educational effects of either traditional schematic simulations or a traditional optics laboratory. The virtual environment was constructed on the basis of Java applets complemented with a photorealistic visual output. This new virtual environment concept, which we call hyper-realistic, transcends basic schematic simulation; it provides the user with a more realistic perception of a physical phenomenon being simulated. We compared the learning achievements of three equivalent, homogeneous groups of undergraduates—an experimental group who used only the hyper-realistic virtual laboratory, a first control group who used a schematic simulation, and a second control group who used the traditional laboratory. The three groups received the same theoretical preparation and carried out equivalent practicals in their respective learning environments. The topic chosen for the experiment was optical aberrations. An analysis of variance applied to the data of the study demonstrated a statistically significant difference (p value <0.05 between the three groups. The learning achievements attained by the group using the hyper-realistic virtual environment were 6.1 percentage points higher than those for the group using the traditional schematic simulations and 9.5 percentage points higher than those for the group using the traditional laboratory.

  19. [Onsite microbiology services and outsourcing microbiology and offsite laboratories--advantage and disadvantage, thinking of effective utilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Naoto

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, budget restrictions have prompted hospital managers to consider outsourcing microbiology service. But there are many advantages onsite microbiology services. Onsite microbiology services have some advantages. 1) High recovery rate of microorganism. 2) Shorter turn around time. 3) Easy to communicate between physician and laboratory technician. 4) Effective utilization of blood culture. 5) Getting early information about microorganism. 6) Making antibiogram (microbiological local factor). 7) Getting information for infection control. The disadvantages are operating costs and labor cost. The important point of maximal utilization of onsite microbiology service is close communication between physicians to microbiology laboratory. It will be able to provide prompt and efficient report to physicians through discussion about Gram stain findings, agar plate media findings and epidemiological information. The rapid and accurate identification of pathogen affords directed therapy, thereby decreasing the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and shortening the length of hospital stay and unnecessary ancillary procedures. When the physician use outsourcing microbiology services, should discuss with offsite laboratories about provided services. Infection control person has to arrange data of susceptibility about every isolate and monitoring multi-drug resistant organism. Not only onsite microbiology services but also outsourcing microbiology services, to communicate bedside and laboratory is most important point of effective utilization.

  20. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Static and Variable Magnetic Fields on Freshwater Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

    2012-04-01

    benthic invertebrates (Gill et al. 2005, 2009). It is known that numerous marine and freshwater organisms are sensitive to electrical and magnetic fields, often depending on them for such diverse activities as prey location and navigation (DOE 2009; Normandeau et al. 2011). Despite the wide range of aquatic organisms that are sensitive to EMF and the increasing numbers of underwater electrical transmitting cables being installed in rivers and coastal waters, little information is available to assess whether animals will be attracted, repelled, or unaffected by these new sources of EMF. This knowledge gap is especially significant for freshwater systems, where electrosensitive organisms such as paddlefish and sturgeon may interact with electrical transmission cables. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments to test the sensitivity of freshwater fish and invertebrates to the levels of EMF that are expected to be produced by HK projects in rivers. In this context, EM fields are likely to be emitted primarily by generators in the water column and by transmission cables on or buried in the substrate. The HK units will be located in areas of high-velocity waters that are used as only temporary habitats for most riverine species, so long-term exposure of fish and benthic invertebrates to EMF is unlikely. Rather, most aquatic organisms will be briefly exposed to the fields as they drift downstream or migrate upstream. Because the exposure of most aquatic organisms to EMF in a river would be relatively brief and non-lethal, we focused our investigations on detecting behavioral effects. For example, attraction to the EM fields could result in prolonged exposures to the fields or the HK rotor. On the other hand, avoidance reactions might hinder upstream migrations of fish. The experiments reported here are a continuation of studies begun in FY 2010, which focused on the potential effects of static magnetic fields on snails, clams, and fathead minnows (Cada et al. 2011

  1. Podcast Effectiveness as Scaffolding Support for Students Enrolled in First-Semester General Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mary Cynthia Barton

    2010-01-01

    Podcasts covering essential first-semester general chemistry laboratory techniques and central concepts that aid in experimental design or data processing were prepared and made available for students to access on an as-needed basis on iPhones [arrow right] or iPod touches [arrow right]. Research focused in three areas: the extent of podcast…

  2. The effect of noise in a performance measure on work motivation: A real effort laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, R.; van Praag, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an individual real effort laboratory experiment where subjects are paid for measured performance. Measured performance equals actual performance plus noise. We compare a stable environment where the noise is small with a volatile environment where the noise is

  3. The effects of laboratory culturing on (Z)-9-tricosene (muscalure) quantities on female houseflies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, N; Den Otter, CJ

    2001-01-01

    Using gas chromatography the relative amounts of (Z)-9-tricosene (muscalure) and some other hydrocarbons on the cuticle of 1- to 20-day-old houseflies (Musca domestica L.) from different strains were determined. Flies from a WHO strain, in culture since 196 1, and first-generation laboratory-culture

  4. Creating Cost-Effective DNA Size Standards for Use in Teaching and Research Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    I have devised a method with which a molecular size standard can be readily manufactured using Lambda DNA and PCR. This method allows the production of specific sized DNA fragments and is easily performed in a standard molecular biology laboratory. The material required to create these markers can also be used to provide a highly robust and…

  5. Podcast Effectiveness as Scaffolding Support for Students Enrolled in First-Semester General Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mary Cynthia Barton

    2010-01-01

    Podcasts covering essential first-semester general chemistry laboratory techniques and central concepts that aid in experimental design or data processing were prepared and made available for students to access on an as-needed basis on iPhones [arrow right] or iPod touches [arrow right]. Research focused in three areas: the extent of podcast…

  6. Discovering Inexpensive, Effective Catalysts for Solar Energy Conversion: An Authentic Research Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Sarah E.; Hooker, Paul D.; Nickel, Anne-Marie; Leichtfuss, Amanda R.; Adams, Carissa S.; de la Cerda, Dionisia; She, Yuqi; Gerken, James B.; Pokhrel, Ravi; Ambrose, Nicholas J.; Khaliqi, David; Stahl, Shannon S.; Schuttlefield Christus, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical water oxidation is a major focus of solar energy conversion efforts. A new laboratory experiment has been developed that utilizes real-time, hands-on research to discover catalysts for solar energy conversion. The HARPOON, or Heterogeneous Anodes Rapidly Perused for Oxygen Overpotential Neutralization, experiment allows an array of…

  7. The effect of noise in a performance measure on work motivation: A real effort laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, R.; van Praag, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an individual real effort laboratory experiment where subjects are paid for measured performance. Measured performance equals actual performance plus noise. We compare a stable environment where the noise is small with a volatile environment where the noise is large

  8. Effectiveness of formaldehyde in Caligus infection of laboratory reared grey mullet, Mugil cephalus (L)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Mortality due to infection by a copepod ectoparasite, Caligus bombayensis (R) was recorded in laboratory reared grey mullet. Spread of infection was rapid and most of infected fish died within 4 days and the entire batch died in 6-10 days. Treatment...

  9. Discovering Inexpensive, Effective Catalysts for Solar Energy Conversion: An Authentic Research Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Sarah E.; Hooker, Paul D.; Nickel, Anne-Marie; Leichtfuss, Amanda R.; Adams, Carissa S.; de la Cerda, Dionisia; She, Yuqi; Gerken, James B.; Pokhrel, Ravi; Ambrose, Nicholas J.; Khaliqi, David; Stahl, Shannon S.; Schuttlefield Christus, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical water oxidation is a major focus of solar energy conversion efforts. A new laboratory experiment has been developed that utilizes real-time, hands-on research to discover catalysts for solar energy conversion. The HARPOON, or Heterogeneous Anodes Rapidly Perused for Oxygen Overpotential Neutralization, experiment allows an array of…

  10. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurtono, Tantular; Suprana, Yayang Ade; Latif, Abdul; Dewa, Restu Mulya; Machmudah, Siti; Widiyastuti,, E-mail: widi@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Winardi, Sugeng [Chemical Engineering Department, Institute of Technology Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm.

  11. Flying Electronic Warfare Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides NP-3D aircraft host platforms for Effectiveness of Navy Electronic Warfare Systems (ENEWS) Program antiship missile (ASM) seeker simulators used...

  12. Flying Electronic Warfare Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides NP-3D aircraft host platforms for Effectiveness of Navy Electronic Warfare Systems (ENEWS) Program antiship missile (ASM) seeker simulators used...

  13. The effect of phosphorus binding clay (Phoslock) in mitigating cyanobacterial nuisance: A laboratory study on the effects on water quality variables and plankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhout, J.F.X.; Lurling, M.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory study examined the lanthanum modified clay Phoslock® for its effectiveness to bind soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), release of nutrients from this modified clay, its influence on water quality variables (pH, oxygen saturation %, conductivity and turbidity), effects on phytoplankton

  14. The effect of phosphorus binding clay (Phoslock) in mitigating cyanobacterial nuisance: A laboratory study on the effects on water quality variables and plankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhout, J.F.X.; Lurling, M.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory study examined the lanthanum modified clay Phoslock® for its effectiveness to bind soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), release of nutrients from this modified clay, its influence on water quality variables (pH, oxygen saturation %, conductivity and turbidity), effects on phytoplankton

  15. Blood derived products in pediatrics: New laboratory tools for optimizing potency assignment and reducing side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiral, Jean; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2017-04-01

    mainly due to Protein C or Protein S deficiencies (congenital or acquired). Progress in analytical methods and biotechnology allow better control of the manufacturing processes for all blood derived or plasma extracted products and recombinant proteins, and contribute to improved manufacturing processes to minimize the occurrence of side effects. These adverse events can be due to the aging of the blood cell concentrate with release of their granule content, and generation of EVs, which can produce anaphylactic reactions and risk of thrombosis, but also to the presence of activated coagulation Factors in purified products, such as Factor Xia as recently identified in immunoglobulin concentrates. Characterization and measurement of contaminant products is of special usefulness during product preparation and for optimization of manufacturing processes for purified extracted products, but also for recombinant proteins. The pharmaceutical industry introduces these new methods for validating manufacturing processes, or for quality control assessments. The objective is first to warrant the full quality and safety of the lots produced, and assure the highest efficacy with the lowest risks when used in patients. For cell concentrates and fresh blood, storage conditions are critical and measurement of analytes such as EVs or Annexin V allows evaluation of quality of each individual transfused pouch. In addition to all the rules around viral and bacterial transmission risk, and immune tolerance, our available laboratory methods contribute to reducing the side effects of blood cell concentrates and derived plasma products, as well as those of the therapeutic recombinant proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Host species and environmental effects on bacterial communities associated with Drosophila in the laboratory and in the natural environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Staubach

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Drosophila is a classic model organism to study adaptation as well as the relationship between genetic variation and phenotypes. Although associated bacterial communities might be important for many aspects of Drosophila biology, knowledge about their diversity, composition, and factors shaping them is limited. We used 454-based sequencing of a variable region of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene to characterize the bacterial communities associated with wild and laboratory Drosophila isolates. In order to specifically investigate effects of food source and host species on bacterial communities, we analyzed samples from wild Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans collected from a variety of natural substrates, as well as from adults and larvae of nine laboratory-reared Drosophila species. We find no evidence for host species effects in lab-reared flies; instead, lab of origin and stochastic effects, which could influence studies of Drosophila phenotypes, are pronounced. In contrast, the natural Drosophila-associated microbiota appears to be predominantly shaped by food substrate with an additional but smaller effect of host species identity. We identify a core member of this natural microbiota that belongs to the genus Gluconobacter and is common to all wild-caught flies in this study, but absent from the laboratory. This makes it a strong candidate for being part of what could be a natural D. melanogaster and D. simulans core microbiome. Furthermore, we were able to identify candidate pathogens in natural fly isolates.

  17. Effects of Heterogeneous Adsorption Affinity on Natural Organic Matter (NOM) Transport in Laboratory Sand Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis, D. P.; Bolster, D.; Maurice, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Transport of reactive sorbing solutes through porous media is commonly quantified by implementing an effective retardation coefficient in the advection-dispersion equation (ADE), which describes dispersion in accordance with Fick's law. However, anomalous (non-Fickian) transport behavior can be observed in systems with heterogeneous retardation coefficients (Dentz & Castro, 2009). In such systems, the ADE is unable to reproduce the non-Fickian nature of plume shapes and breakthrough curves, motivating the development and application of alternative solute transport theories, such as the continuous time random walk (CTRW) or multi-rate mass transfer (MRMT). Heterogeneity in retardation coefficients in practice arises from variability in the geochemical properties controlling sorption-desorption kinetics between the solute and mineral surfaces. These distributions have been described in the context of heterogeneity of the porous medium, but to date little attention has been given to the potential role of a geochemically heterogeneous solute. In this work, we consider a system in which anomalous transport arises during the passage of natural organic matter (NOM), a polydisperse mixture of compounds derived from the breakdown of plants and microorganisms in the environment, through homogeneous laboratory sand columns. NOM solutions were passed through columns containing either hematite, corundum, or a naturally-coated quartz sand at a variety of pH and ionic strength conditions. Influent and effluent NOM concentration was measured as UV absorbance at 254 nm. The resulting breakthrough curves are non-Fickian, displaying power-law tailing at late times. Such curves cannot be predicted by the ADE model. Reactivity of NOM components is known to be related to their molecular weight (MW), which tends to be log-normally distributed in aquatic NOM isolates (Cabaniss et al., 2000). Low-MW compounds are more water-soluble, have a higher diffusion coefficient, and due to their

  18. Effect of long-term geomagnetic field deprivation on the concentration of some elements in the hair of laboratory rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombarkiewicz, Barbara

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of long-term geomagnetic field (GMF) deprivation on the concentration of selected elements in the hair of laboratory rats. A total of 32 Wistar laboratory rats were divided into four equal groups (males and females) kept under hypomagnetic conditions (GMF vertical component below 20nT) and two control groups (males and females) kept free of field disturbances (GMF vertical component approx. 38000nT). At the beginning and at 7 months of the experiment, hair was taken from the dorsal part of all rats and analysed using atomic emission spectrometry for the concentration of selected magnetic elements (Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Mn and Cu). Long-term GMF deprivation was found to affect the concentration of Fe, Mn, Cu and Cr, but had no significant effect on the concentration of Co or Ni in the hair of the analysed rats.

  19. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  20. Analytical Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s analytical laboratories in Pittsburgh, PA, and Albany, OR, give researchers access to the equipment they need to thoroughly study the properties of materials...

  1. Geomechanics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geomechanics Laboratory allows its users to measure rock properties under a wide range of simulated service conditions up to very high pressures and complex load...

  2. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  3. The centrality of laboratory services in the HIV treatment and prevention cascade: The need for effective linkages and referrals in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemnji, George; Fonjungo, Peter; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Peter, Trevor; Kantor, Rami; Nkengasong, John

    2014-05-01

    Strong laboratory services and systems are critical for delivering timely and quality health services that are vital to reduce patient attrition in the HIV treatment and prevention cascade. However, challenges exist in ensuring effective laboratory health systems strengthening and linkages. In particular, linkages and referrals between laboratory testing and other services need to be considered in the context of an integrated health system that includes prevention, treatment, and strategic information. Key components of laboratory health systems that are essential for effective linkages include an adequate workforce, appropriate point-of-care (POC) technology, available financing, supply chain management systems, and quality systems improvement, including accreditation. In this review, we highlight weaknesses of and gaps between laboratory testing and other program services. We propose a model for strengthening these systems to ensure effective linkages of laboratory services for improved access and retention in care of HIV/AIDS patients, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

  4. The effects of laboratory housing and spatial enrichment on brain size and metabolic rate in the eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mischa P. Turschwell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has long been hypothesised that there is a functional correlation between brain size and metabolic rate in vertebrates. The present study tested this hypothesis in wild-caught adult mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki by testing for an intra-specific association between resting metabolic rate (RMR and brain size while controlling for variation in body size, and through the examination of the effects of spatial enrichment and laboratory housing on body mass-independent measures of brain size and RMR. Controlling for body mass, there was no relationship between brain size and RMR in wild-caught fish. Contrary to predictions, spatial enrichment caused a decrease in mass-independent brain size, highlighting phenotypic plasticity in the adult brain. As expected, after controlling for differences in body size, wild-caught fish had relatively larger brains than fish that had been maintained in the laboratory for a minimum of six weeks, but wild-caught fish also had significantly lower mass-independent RMR. This study demonstrates that an organisms' housing environment can cause significant plastic changes to fitness related traits including brain size and RMR. We therefore conclude that current standard laboratory housing conditions may cause captive animals to be non-representative of their wild counterparts, potentially undermining the transferability of previous laboratory-based studies of aquatic ectothermic vertebrates to wild populations.

  5. The effects of laboratory housing and spatial enrichment on brain size and metabolic rate in the eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turschwell, Mischa P; White, Craig R

    2016-01-21

    It has long been hypothesised that there is a functional correlation between brain size and metabolic rate in vertebrates. The present study tested this hypothesis in wild-caught adult mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki by testing for an intra-specific association between resting metabolic rate (RMR) and brain size while controlling for variation in body size, and through the examination of the effects of spatial enrichment and laboratory housing on body mass-independent measures of brain size and RMR. Controlling for body mass, there was no relationship between brain size and RMR in wild-caught fish. Contrary to predictions, spatial enrichment caused a decrease in mass-independent brain size, highlighting phenotypic plasticity in the adult brain. As expected, after controlling for differences in body size, wild-caught fish had relatively larger brains than fish that had been maintained in the laboratory for a minimum of six weeks, but wild-caught fish also had significantly lower mass-independent RMR. This study demonstrates that an organisms' housing environment can cause significant plastic changes to fitness related traits including brain size and RMR. We therefore conclude that current standard laboratory housing conditions may cause captive animals to be non-representative of their wild counterparts, potentially undermining the transferability of previous laboratory-based studies of aquatic ectothermic vertebrates to wild populations.

  6. Laboratory measurements of the effect of internal waves on sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likun; Swinney, Harry L.; Lin, Ying-Tsong

    2016-11-01

    The fidelity of acoustic signals used in communication and imaging in the oceans is limited by density fluctuations arising from many sources, particularly from internal waves. We present results from laboratory experiments on sound propagation through an internal wave field produced by a wave generator consisting of multiple oscillating plates. The fluid density as a function of height is measured and used to determine the sound speed as a function of the height. Sound pulses from a transducer propagate through the fluctuating stratified density field and are detected to determine sound refraction, pulse arrival time, and sound signal distortion. The results are compared with sound ray model and numerical models of underwater sound propagation. The laboratory experiments can explore the parameter dependence by varying the fluid density profile, the sound pulse signal, and the internal wave amplitude and frequency. The results lead to a better understanding of sound propagation through and scattered by internal waves.

  7. Effectiveness of biological geotextiles in reducing runoff and soil loss under different environmental conditions using laboratory and field plot data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, T.

    2009-04-01

    Preliminary investigations suggest biological geotextiles could be an effective and inexpensive soil conservation method, with enormous global potential. Biological geotextiles are a possible temporary alternative for vegetation cover and can offer immediate soil protection. However, limited data are available on the erosion-reducing effects of biological geotextiles. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of selected types of biological geotextile in reducing runoff and soil loss under controlled laboratory conditions and under field conditions reflecting different environments (i.e. continental, temperate and tropical). In laboratory experiments, interrill runoff, interrill erosion and concentrated flow erosion were simulated using various rainfall intensities, flow shear stresses and slope gradients. Field plot data on the effects of biological geotextiles on sheet and rill erosion were collected in several countries under natural rainfall (U.K., Hungary, Lithuania, South Africa, Brazil, China and Thailand). The laboratory experiments indicate that all tested biological geotextiles were effective in reducing interrill runoff (on average 59% of the value for bare soil) and interrill erosion rates (on average 16% of the value for bare soil). Since simulated concentrated flow discharge sometimes flowed below the geotextiles, the effectiveness in reducing concentrated flow erosion was significantly less (on average 59% of the value for bare soil). On field plots, where both interrill and rill erosion occur, all tested geotextiles reduced runoff depth by a mean of 54% of the control value for bare soil and in some cases, runoff depth increased compared to bare soil surfaces, which can be attributed to the impermeable and hydrophobic characteristics of some biological geotextiles. In the field, soil loss rates due to interrill and rill erosion were reduced by a mean of 21% of the value of bare soil by biological geotextiles. This study

  8. Understanding species-microplastics interactions : a laboratory study on the effects of microplastics on the Azorean barnacle, Megabalanus azoricus

    OpenAIRE

    Hentschel, Lisa-Henrike, 1987-

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the impact of microplastics on the marine environment, wildlife and humans is a complex issue. Effects of contaminated microplastics (polyvinylchloride (PVC), mean size 1.5 µm) on the Azorean barnacle (Megabalanus Azoricus) were investigated within a global research project (GAME), in which akin experiments were conducted simultaneously at seven different sites worldwide in order to obtain comparable data for a range of benthic invertebrates. During a six weeks laboratory experi...

  9. Laboratory bioassay for assessing the effects of sludge supernatant on plant growth and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, K.S.; Liberta, A.E.

    1982-12-01

    A laboratory bioassay is described for assessing the effects of sludge supernatant on juvenile corn growth and the ability of vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi, indigenous to coal spoil, to form mycorrhizae. The bioassay demonstrated that application rates can be identified that have the potential to promote increased plant dry weight without suppressing the formation of VA mycorrhizae in a plant's root system.

  10. The effectiveness of computer-generated 3D animations in inquiry chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theall, Rachel Morgan

    It has been shown that students need a molecular-level understanding of substances in order to comprehend chemistry. For solid structures, atomic-level understanding requires students to learn additional and different concepts than for other states of matter. To aid understanding, animations were created to model unit cell structures and depict the properties of unit cells. In order to determine if these animations are helpful to students, they were tested during a laboratory exercise in which students had previously been using model kits and images from textbooks to learn about solid structures. Students evaluated in this study were from two lecture sections of general chemistry, one that routinely used animations during lecture and one that used a more traditional lecture format that did not include animations or models. Twelve laboratory sections of these lectures, taught by six different instructors each teaching two sections, were chosen for participation. One section for each instructor was given the animations as an optional tool for completing the laboratory assignment, which consisted of questions about unit cells and crystal structures. The results of the study indicate that students who looked at the animations performed significantly better on the assignment. For the control group, students who routinely viewed multiple representations of chemistry in lecture performed significantly better on the lab assignment than students in the lecture section where chemistry concepts were only presented on the chalkboard and overhead projector. Students in the traditional lecture section also had significantly less appreciation for the model kits used in the laboratory than students in the other lecture section. Observations of students in the lab combined with statistical results led to the revision of the solid structures investigation. Additional animations were created and inserted into the module that covered areas where students indicated more help was needed

  11. Solar energy research at Sandia Laboratories and its effects on health and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, L.L. III

    1977-10-01

    Various solar energy research and development projects at Sandia Laboratories are discussed with emphasis on the primary health and safety hazard associated with solar concentration systems. This limiting hazard is chorioretinal damage. The unique safety and health hazards associated with solar energy collector and receiver systems cannot be measured yet, but progress is being made rapidly. Research is continuing, especially for eye hazards, with more extensive work planned.

  12. The effectiveness of jute and coir blankets for erosion control in different field and laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalibová, Jana; Jačka, Lukáš; Petrů, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Vegetation cover is found to be an ideal solution to most problems of erosion on steep slopes. Biodegradable geotextiles (GTXs) have been proved to provide sufficient protection against soil loss in the period before vegetation reaches maturity, so favouring soil formation processes. In this study, 500 g m-2 jute (J500), 400 g m-2 (C400), and 700 g m-2 coir (C700) GTXs were first installed on a 9° slope under "no-infiltration" laboratory conditions, then on a 27° slope under natural field conditions. The impact of GTXs on run-off and soil loss was investigated to compare the performance of GTXs under different conditions. Laboratory run-off ratio (percentage portion of control plot) equalled 78, 83, and 91 %, while peak discharge ratio equalled 83, 91, and 97 % for J500, C700, and C400 respectively. In the field, a run-off ratio of 31, 62, and 79 %, and peak discharge ratio of 37, 74, and 87 % were recorded for C700, J500, and C400 respectively. All tested GTXs significantly decreased soil erosion. The greatest soil loss reduction in the field was observed for J500 (by 99.4 %), followed by C700 (by 97.9 %) and C400 (by 93.8 %). Irrespective of slope gradient or experimental condition, C400 performed with lower run-off and peak discharge reduction than J500 and C700. The performance ranking of J500 and C700 in the laboratory differed from the field, which may be explained by different slope gradients, and also by the role of soil, which was not included in the laboratory experiment.

  13. Savannah River Laboratory environmental transport and effects research. Annual report, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, T.V. (comp.)

    1979-11-01

    Research in the environmental sciences by the Savannah River Laboratory during 1978 is described in 43 articles. These articles are in the fields of terrestrial ecology, geologic studies, aquatic transport, aquatic ecology, atmospheric transport, emergency response, computer methods development, ocean program, and fuel cycle program. Thirty-seven of the articles were abstracted individually for ERA/EDB; those in scope were also included in INIS.

  14. Effects of Water Bottle Materials and Filtration on Bisphenol A Content in Laboratory Animal Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Jennifer A; Nguyen, Jenny Q T; Kentner, Amanda C; Brenhouse, Heather C

    2017-05-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in the polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins that are found in laboratory animal husbandry materials including cages and water bottles. Concerns about BPA exposure in humans has led to investigations that suggest physiologic health risks including disruptions to the endocrine system and CNS. However, the extent of exposure of laboratory animals to BPA in drinking water is unclear. In the first study, we compared the amount of BPA contamination in water stored in plastic bottles used in research settings with that in glass bottles. The amount of BPA that leached into water was measured across several time points ranging from 24 to 96 h by using a BPA ELISA assay. The results showed that considerable amounts of BPA (approximately 0.15 μg/L) leached from polycarbonate bottles within the first 24 h of storage. In the second study, BPA levels were measured directly from water taken from filtered compared with unfiltered taps. We observed significantly higher BPA levels in water from unfiltered taps (approximately 0.40 μg/L) compared with taps with filtration systems (approximately 0.04 μg/L). Taken together, our findings indicate that the use of different types of water bottles and water sources, combined with the use of different laboratory products (food, caging systems) between laboratories, likely contribute to decreased rigor and reproducibility in research. We suggest that researchers consider reporting the types of water bottles used and that animal care facilities educate staff regarding the importance of flushing nonfiltered water taps when filling animal water bottles.

  15. Evaluation of effectiveness of entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana using a standard laboratory bioassay

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In laboratory bioassays, the efficacy of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana against the yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) was tested under various temperature conditions. Six different strains of fungus B. bassiana was investigated. The evaluation was based on vitality bioassays including germination and growth index assessment and the bioassay of virulence based on target organism T. molitor was also assessed growth and yield of conidia different strains of fungus B. bassiana on...

  16. A cross-laboratory preclinical study on the effectiveness of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in stroke

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Stroke represents a global challenge and is a leading cause of permanent disability worldwide. Despite much effort, translation of research findings to clinical benefit has not yet been successful. Failure of neuroprotection trials is considered, in part, due to the low quality of preclinical studies, low level of reproducibility across different laboratories and that stroke co-morbidities have not been fully considered in experimental models. More rigorous testing of new drug candidates in d...

  17. Wet-dry cycles effect on ash water repellency. A laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi; Oliva, Marc; Mataix, Jorge; Jordán, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    In the immediate period after the fire, the ash layer has a strong influence on soil hydrological processes, as runoff, infiltration and erosion. Ash is very dynamic in the space and time. Until the first rainfall periods, ash is (re)distributed by the wind. After it can cover the soil surface, infiltrate or transported to other areas by water transport (Pereira et al., 2013a, b). This will have strong implications on nutrient redistribution and vegetation recovery. Ash layer may affect soil water repellency in different ways, depending on fire severity, soil properties and vegetation. Ash produced at low temperatures after low-severity burning is usually hydrophobic (Bodi et al., 2011, 2012). Wet-dry cycles have implications on ash physical and chemical properties, changing their effects in space and time. The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of fire temperature and severity on ash water repellency. Pinus sylvestris needles were collected in a Lithuania forest in Dzukija National Park (53º 54' N and 24º 22' E), transported to laboratory and washed with deionized water to remove soil particles and other residues. Needle samples were dried during 24 hours and exposed to different temperatures: 200, 300, 400 and 500 ºC, during 2 hours. Ash colour was analysed according to the Munsell Soil Color charts. Ash was black (10 YR 2/1) at 200 ºC, very dark grey (10YR 3/1) at 300 ºC, gray (10YR 5/1) at 400 ºC and light gray (10YR 7/1) at 500 ºC. Ten samples of ash released after each treatment were placed in plastic dishes (50 mm in diameter) in an amount enough to form a 5 mm thick layer, and ash water repellency was measured according to the Water Drop Penetration Test. Later, ash was carefully wetted with 15 ml of deionized water and placed in an oven during 4 days (96 hours), as in Bodí et al. (2012). This procedure was repeated 5 times in order to observe the effects of wet-dry cycles in ash water repellency. The results showed significant differences

  18. Effect of learning on the oviposition preference of field-collected and laboratory-reared Chilo partellus (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, J J; van den Berg, J; Potting, R P J

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies show that Vetiver grass, (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash), may have potential as a dead-end trap crop in an overall habitat management strategy for the spotted stem borer, Chilo partellus (Swinhoe) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae). Vetiver grass is highly preferred for oviposition, in spite of the fact that larval survival is extremely low on this grass. The oviposition behaviour of female Chilo partellus moths was investigated by determining the amount and size of egg batches allocated to maize and Vetiver plants and studying the effect of rearing conditions and oviposition experience on host plant selection. Two-choice preference tests were used to examine the effect of experience of maize (a suitable host plant) and Vetiver plants on the oviposition choice of C. partellus. For both field-collected and laboratory-reared moths, no significant differences were found in the preference distributions between the experienced groups. It is concluded that females do not learn, i.e. that they do not change their preference for Vetiver grass after having experienced oviposition on either maize or this grass, which supports the idea that trap cropping could have potential as a control method for C. partellus. Differences observed between field-collected and laboratory-reared moths in the amount and size of egg batches laid on maize and Vetiver grass indicate that data obtained from experiments with laboratory-reared insects should be treated with caution.

  19. SPIN Effects, QCD, and Jefferson Laboratory with 12 GeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokudin, Alexey [JLAB

    2013-11-01

    QCD and Spin physics are playing important role in our understanding of hadron structure. I will give a short overview of origin of hadron structure in QCD and highlight modern understanding of the subject. Jefferson Laboratory is undergoing an upgrade that will increase the energy of electron beam up to 12 GeV. JLab is one of the leading facilities in nuclear physics studies and once operational in 2015 JLab 12 will be crucial for future of nuclear physics. I will briefly discuss future studies in four experimental halls of Jefferson Lab.

  20. Effects of change in the formulation of lanthanum carbonate on laboratory parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takita, Takako; Furuhashi, Mitsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Taiki; Suzuki, Hiroo; Harada, Masaki; Maruyama, Satoshi; Tamiya, Rika; Kamiya, Eri; Okamoto, Mari; Tukada, Atsuyo; Furuhashi, Mikako; Kato, Akihiko

    2014-06-01

    Lanthanum carbonate (LC) is available in the two formulations of chewable tablets and granules. In this study, we changed the formulation of LC from chewable tablet to granules, and compared the laboratory parameters for 3 months before and after changing formulation in 58 hemodialysis (HD) patients. We also surveyed patients about their preferences for the two formulations. The mean serum phosphorus (P) levels decreased significantly (P calcium levels also increased significantly (P tablets. These findings suggest that changing the formulation of LC to granules may reduce serum P levels of the HD patients in clinical practices.

  1. Laboratory Deposition Apparatus to Study the Effects of Wax Deposition on Pipe Magnetic Field Leakage Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Mohd Fauzi Abd

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate technique for wax deposition detection and severity measurement on cold pipe wall is important for pipeline cleaning program. Usually these techniques are validated by conventional techniques on laboratory scale wax deposition flow loop. However conventional techniques inherent limitations and it is difficult to reproduce a predetermine wax deposit profile and hardness at designated location in flow loop. An alternative wax deposition system which integrates modified pour casting method and cold finger method is presented. This system is suitable to reproduce high volume of medium hard wax deposit in pipe with better control of wax deposit profile and hardness.

  2. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A.

    2009-09-14

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including changes in pressure as they pass through turbines and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). To examine pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists conducted specific tests using a hyperbaric chamber. Tests were designed to simulate Kaplan turbine passage conditions and to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes, with and without the complication of fish being acclimated to gas-supersaturated water.

  3. For geological investigations with airborne thermal infrared multispectral images: Transfer of calibration from laboratory spectrometer to TIMS as alternative for removing atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Anderson, Donald L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical method to correct TIMS (Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner) data for atmospheric effects by transferring calibration from a laboratory thermal emission spectrometer to the TIMS multispectral image. The method does so by comparing the laboratory spectra of samples gathered in the field with TIMS 6-point spectra for pixels at the location of field sampling sites. The transference of calibration also makes it possible to use spectra from the laboratory as endmembers in unmixing studies of TIMS data.

  4. The difference between laboratory and in-situ pixel-averaged emissivity: The effects on temperature-emissivity separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Tsuneo

    1993-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is a Japanese future imaging sensor which has five channels in thermal infrared (TIR) region. To extract spectral emissivity information from ASTER and/or TIMS data, various temperature-emissivity (T-E) separation methods have been developed to date. Most of them require assumptions on surface emissivity, in which emissivity measured in a laboratory is often used instead of in-situ pixel-averaged emissivity. But if these two emissivities are different, accuracies of separated emissivity and surface temperature are reduced. In this study, the difference between laboratory and in-situ pixel-averaged emissivity and its effect on T-E separation are discussed. TIMS data of an area containing both rocks and vegetation were also processed to retrieve emissivity spectra using two T-E separation methods.

  5. Effects of hand hygiene campaigns on incidence of laboratory-confirmed influenza and absenteeism in schoolchildren, Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Maha; Afifi, Salma; Dueger, Erica; El-Ashry, Nagwa; Marfin, Anthony; Kandeel, Amr; Mohareb, Emad; El-Sayed, Nasr

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive hand hygiene campaign on reducing absenteeism caused by influenza-like illness (ILI), diarrhea, conjunctivitis, and laboratory-confirmed influenza, we conducted a randomized control trial in 60 elementary schools in Cairo, Egypt. Children in the intervention schools were required to wash hands twice each day, and health messages were provided through entertainment activities. Data were collected on student absenteeism and reasons for illness. School nurses collected nasal swabs from students with ILI, which were tested by using a qualitative diagnostic test for influenza A and B. Compared with results for the control group, in the intervention group, overall absences caused by ILI, diarrhea, conjunctivitis, and laboratory-confirmed influenza were reduced by 40%, 30%, 67%, and 50%, respectively (pabsenteeism caused by these illnesses.

  6. Temperature effects on ash physical and chemical properties. A laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Úbeda, Xavier; Martin, Deborah

    2010-05-01

    Fire temperatures have different impacts on ash physical and chemical properties that depend mainly of the specie affected and time of exposition. In a real prescribed or wildland fire, the temperatures produce ash with different characteristics. Know the impacts of a specific temperature or a gradient on a certain element and specie is very difficult in real fires, especially in wildland fires, where temperatures achieve higher values and the burning conditions are not controlled. Hence, laboratory studies revealed to be an excellent methodology to understand the effects of fire temperatures in ash physical and chemical. The aim of this study is study the effects of a temperature gradient (150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 450, 500 and 550°C) on ash physical and chemical properties. For this study we collected litter of Quercus suber, Pinus pinea and Pinus pinaster in a plot located in Portugal. The selected species are the most common in the ecosystem. We submitted samples to the mentioned temperatures throughout a time of two hours and we analysed several parameters, namely, Loss on Ignition (LOI%), ash colour - through the Croma Value (CV) observed in Munsell color chart - CaCO3, Total Nitrogen (TN), Total Carbon (TC), C/N ratio, ash pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC), extractable Calcium (Ca2+), Magnesium (Mg2+), Sodium (Na+), Potassium (K+), Aluminium (Al3+), Manganese (Mn2+), Iron (Fe2+), Zinc (Zn2+), Total Phosphorous (TP), Sulphur (S) and Silica (SiO2). Since we considered many elements, in order to obtain a better explanation of all dataset, we applied a Factorial Analysis (FA), based on the correlation matrix and the Factors were extracted according to the Principle Components method. To obtain a better relation between the variables with a specific Factor we rotated the matrix according to the VARIMAX NORMALIZED method. FA identified 5 Factors that explained a total of 95% of the variance. We retained in each Factor the variables that presented an eigenvalue

  7. The effect of laboratory and lecture teaching methods on cognitive achievement in integrated science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odubunmi, Olagunju; Balogun, T. A.

    A sample of 210 class-two (grade 8) students from six randomly selected classes from six Nigerian schools was divided into two (experimental and control) groups. Using materials from some units of the Nigerian Integrated Science Project (NISP), the experimental group was taught by a laboratory method while the control group was taught by the lecture method. Data were collected using an Achievement Test for Integrated Science Students developed by the authors and student ability was measured by tests secured from the Department of Teacher Education, University of Ibadan. In analyzing the data, an analysis of covariance was employed. T-test statistics were also used to determine significant difference between means of different groups.High achievers of both groups had identical achievement, but the low achievers in the experimental group performed better than their counterparts in the control group. While the study showed that males in this study prefer laboratory method to lecture method when compared with their female counterparts, the study also revealed that females in the control classes performed better than males of the same group.

  8. The effects of student self-assessment on learning in removable prosthodontics laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W; LaBarre, Eugene E

    2014-05-01

    It has been consistently shown that there is a weak association between student self-assessment and faculty member assessment of student projects in preclinical technique laboratory settings and that students overestimate their performance. Greater overestimation is observed among students judged by faculty to be the weakest, and these students also use a wider range of scores. This study hypothesized that student self-assessment is a function of capacity to perform, accuracy of understanding grading standards, and psychological factors. Further it hypothesized that learning, defined as change in performance, is a function of ability and self-assessment. Dental students at one U.S. dental school self-assessed their performance on two projects in a removable prosthodontics laboratory course separated by a six-month period. Faculty evaluations of these projects were used to determine students' understanding of the criteria for the projects, and a standardized psychological test was used to assess the learning orientation of the students. A statistical correction was made for the artifact of regression toward the mean. The study found that self-assessment was a better predictor of future learning under these circumstances than was evaluation by faculty members.

  9. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Instrumentation is needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. This paper describes the development and characterization of oxy-acetylene driven, laboratory scale shock tubes for use in studying blast injury, candidate armor materials, and material properties at blast loading rates. The pressure-time profiles show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of blast waves and have relevant durations. The modular design includes shock tube diameters of 27 mm and 41 mm, and a selection of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 920 kPa can be produced by selection of the driver section diameter and placement of the test sample. Characterization studies of several driver/driven section combinations showed consistent results, with peak pressures having 0.8 - 6.9 percent uncertainty in the mean. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current air-driven shock tubes. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven...

  10. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  11. Laboratory Building.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  12. Evaluating the effects of laboratory protocols on eDNA detection probability for an endangered freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggott, Maxine P

    2016-05-01

    The effectiveness and accuracy of detection using environmental DNA (eDNA) is dependent on understanding the influence laboratory methods such as DNA extraction and PCR strategies have on detection probability. Ideally choice of sampling and extraction method will maximize eDNA yield and detection probability. Determining the survey effort required to reach a satisfactory detection probability (via increased PCR replicates or more sampling) could compensate for a lower eDNA yield if the sampling and extraction method has other advantages for a study, species or system. I analysed the effect of three different sampling and extraction methods on eDNA yield, detection probability and PCR replication for detecting the endangered freshwater fish Macquaria australasica from water samples. The impact of eDNA concentration, PCR strategy, target amplicon size and two marker regions: 12S (a mitochondrial gene) and 18S (a nuclear gene) was also assessed. The choice of sampling and extraction method and PCR strategy, rather than amplicon size and marker region, had the biggest effect on detection probability and PCR replication. The PCR replication effort required to achieve a detection probability of 0.95, ranged from 2 to 6 PCR replicates depending on the laboratory method used. As all methods yielded eDNA from which M. australasica was detected using the three target amplicons, differences in eDNA yield and detection probability between the three methods could be mitigated by determining the appropriate PCR replication effort. Evaluating the effect sampling and extraction methods will have on the detection probability and determining the laboratory protocols and PCR replication required to maximize detection and minimize false positives and negatives is a useful first step for eDNA occupancy studies.

  13. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  14. Psychology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides testing stations for computer-based assessment of cognitive and behavioral Warfighter performance. This 500 square foot configurable space can...

  15. Propulsion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Propulsion Lab simulates field test conditions in a controlled environment, using standardized or customized test procedures. The Propulsion Lab's 11 cells can...

  16. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  17. Analytical Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Analytical Labspecializes in Oil and Hydraulic Fluid Analysis, Identification of Unknown Materials, Engineering Investigations, Qualification Testing (to support...

  18. [Modal failure analysis and effects in the detection of errors in the transport of samples to the clinical laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parés-Pollán, L; Gonzalez-Quintana, A; Docampo-Cordeiro, J; Vargas-Gallego, C; García-Álvarez, G; Ramos-Rodríguez, V; Diaz Rubio-García, M P

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the decrease in values of biochemical glucose parameter in some samples from external extraction centres, and the risk this implies to patient safety; it was decided to apply an adaptation of the «Health Services Failure Mode and Effects Analysis» (HFMEA) to manage risk during the pre-analytical phase of sample transportation from external centres to clinical laboratories. A retrospective study of glucose parameter was conducted during two consecutive months. The analysis was performed in its different phases: to define the HFMEA topic, assemble the team, graphically describe the process, conduct a hazard analysis, design the intervention and indicators, and identify a person to be responsible for ensuring completion of each action. The results of glucose parameter in one of the transport routes, were significantly lower (P=.006). The errors and potential causes of this problem were analysed, and criteria of criticality and detectability were applied (score≥8) in the decision tree. It was decided to: develop a document management system; reorganise extractions and transport routes in some centres; quality control of the sample container ice-packs, and the time and temperature during transportation. This work proposes quality indicators for controlling time and temperature of transported samples in the pre-analytical phase. Periodic review of certain laboratory parameters can help to detect problems in transporting samples. The HFMEA technique is useful for the clinical laboratory. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. [Information on nosocomial infections in hospitals without microbiological laboratories: effective data utilization through outsourcing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikata, Rie; Hosoi, Susumu; Tsuruoka, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    To implement hospital-acquired infection control, sharing information, including the most recent data, is vital. With the current crisis in community healthcare and a subsequent lack of hospital laboratories, increasing numbers of clinical tests, unprofitable microbiological tests in particular, have been outsourced. At present, most medium- and small-scale hospitals in Japan do not conduct microbiological testing themselves, and so the outsourcing of these tests is essential for the promotion of infection control, including the provision of data on microbial detection. Our hospital, a central and the only general hospital with 160 beds in our area, usually outsources microbiological testing. With the aim of enhancing infection prevention and other clinical support services and promoting hospital infection control, were developing a system, led by the Department of Inspection, to provide appropriate information on nosocomial infections in collaboration with other departments within the hospital and partner organizations.

  20. EFFECTIVENESS OF MRSA DETECTION METHODS IN THE LABORATORY PRACTICE – A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neli M. Ermenlieva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are bacteria, responsible for severe and hard-to-manage infections in human. They are resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics – penicillins (methicillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin, and oxacillin, cephalosporins and carbapenems, but can also be resistant to the new-generation MRSA-active cephalosporins (such as ceftaroline or other groups of antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, macrolides, clindamycin, amphenicols, quinolones and tetracyclines. MRSA bacteria are pandemic and are often isolated in medical practice and nosocomial infections. The MRSA detection is a challenge to any clinical microbiology laboratory and demands implementation of strict protocols for active screening. While more expensive molecular techniques have the potential of offering highly sensitive and rapid results, the cultural methods require longer time but can achieve a comparable sensitivity for lower price.

  1. Effects of Organic Enrichment on Sandy Beach Meiofauna:A Laboratory Microcosm Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jianing; ZHOU Hong,; ZHANG Zhinan; CONG Bingqing; XU Shuhui

    2011-01-01

    Meiofauna samples from intertidal sediments of Qingdao No.2 Bathing Beach,China,were collected for field study,and subjected to organic enrichment in a laboratory microcosm experiment for 21 d.There were three different treatments including non-organic addition as the control,low-organic enrichment (2 g DW green algae per 150 mL) and high-organic enrichment (10 g DW green algae per 150 mL).After 21 d,the meiofauna richness decreased in both organic enrichment treatments.Among the three treatments,total meiofauna abundance was significantly different,and the control groups had higher abundance than the other two treatment groups.However,the responses of the meiofauna abundance in the two organic enrichment treatments were non-significantly different.The relationship of meiofaunal abundance and nematode/copepod ratios to organic matter and oxygen level in the microcosm experiments were discussed.

  2. Fossil Galaxy Groups -- Ideal Laboratories for Studying the Effects of AGN Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Jetha, Nazirah N; Raychaudhury, Somak; Sengupta, Chandreyee; Hardcastle, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We present the first of a sample of fossil galaxy groups with pre-existing Chandra and/or XMM-Newton X-ray observations and new or forthcoming low frequency GMRT data -- RXJ1416.4+2315 (z=0.137). Fossil galaxy groups are ideal laboratories for studying feedback mechanisms and how energy injection affects the IGM, since due to the lack of recent merging activity, we expect the IGM to be relatively pristine and affected only by any AGN activity that has occurred in the group. Our Chandra X-ray observations reveal features resembling AGN-inflated bubbles, whilst our GMRT radio data show evidence of extended emission from the central AGN that may be filling the bubble. This has enabled us to estimate the work done by the central AGN, place limits on the rates of energy injection and discuss the nature of the plasma filling the bubble.

  3. Effect of individually tailored biopsychosocial workplace interventions on chronic musculoskeletal pain and stress among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Jay; Brandt, Mikkel; Hansen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    pain using individually tailored physical and cognitive elements. STUDY DESIGN: This trial uses a single-blind randomized controlled design with allocation concealment in a 2-armed parallel group format among laboratory technicians. The trial "Implementation of physical exercise at the Workplace (IRMA...... region separately showed significant pain reductions of the neck, shoulders, upper back and lower back, as well as a tendency for hand pain. Within the PCMT group, general linear models adjusted for age, baseline pain, and stress levels showed significant associations for the change in pain...... with the number of physical-cognitive training sessions per week (-0.60 [95%CI -0.95 to -0.25]) and the number of mindfulness sessions (0.15 [95%CI 0.02 to 0.18]). No such associations were found with the change in stress as outcome. LIMITATIONS: Limitations of behavioral interventions include the inability...

  4. Laboratory study on the molluscicidal effect of Earth Tec: an environmentally responsible copper sulfate product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M M; Hady, H M; Salama, M M; el-Ghazali, S

    1994-08-01

    Studies were carried out, under laboratory conditions to evaluate the molluscicidal activity of Earth Tec on Biomphalaria alexandrina snails, the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni. Earth Tec is an environmentally responsible copper sulfate product manufactured and marketed as an algicide/bactericide with an active ingredient form of copper ion (Cu++). A single application, of 1 ppm of copper equivalent, for 24 hours caused 100% mortality rate of the snails. Exposure for 48 hours to 1 ppm and 2 weeks to 0.25 ppm caused mortality rates of 84% and 100% respectively. It was concluded that this chemical compound is a promising molluscicide. Field studies are ongoing and will be published in due time.

  5. Nonlinear effects associated with fast magnetosonic waves and turbulent magnetic amplification in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, PremPyari; Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Prachi; Singh, Ram Kishor; Uma, R.; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the spatio-temporal evolution of magnetic field due to the nonlinear coupling between fast magnetosonic wave (FMSW) and low frequency slow Alfvén wave (SAW). The dynamical equations of finite frequency FMSW and SAW in the presence of ponderomotive force of FMSW (pump wave) has been presented. Numerical simulation has been carried out for the nonlinear coupled equations of finite frequency FMSW and SAW. A systematic scan of the nonlinear behavior/evolution of the pump FMSW has been done for one of the set of parameters chosen in this paper, using the coupled dynamical equations. Filamentation of fast magnetosonic wave has been considered to be responsible for the magnetic turbulence during the laser plasma interaction. The results show that the formation and growth of localized structures depend on the background magnetic field but the order of amplification does not get affected by the magnitude of the background magnetic field. In this paper, we have shown the relevance of our model for two different parameters used in laboratory and astrophysical phenomenon. We have used one set of parameters pertaining to experimental observations in the study of fast ignition of laser fusion and hence studied the turbulent structures in stellar environment. The other set corresponds to the study of magnetic field amplification in the clumpy medium surrounding the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. The results indicate considerable randomness in the spatial structure of the magnetic field profile in both the cases and gives a sufficient indication of turbulence. The turbulent spectra have been studied and the break point has been found around k which is consistent with the observations in both the cases. The nonlinear wave-wave interaction presented in this paper may be important in understanding the turbulence in the laboratory as well as the astrophysical phenomenon.

  6. Effect of the extent of well purging on laboratory parameters of groundwater samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reka Mathe, Agnes; Kohler, Artur; Kovacs, Jozsef

    2017-04-01

    Chemicals reaching groundwater cause water quality deterioration. Reconnaissance and remediation demands high financial and human resources. Groundwater samples are important sources of information. Representativity of these samples is fundamental to decision making. According to relevant literature the way of sampling and the sampling equipment can affect laboratory concentrations measured in samples. Detailed and systematic research on this field is missing from even international literature. Groundwater sampling procedures are regulated worldwide. Regulations describe how to sample a groundwater monitoring well. The most common element in these regulations is well purging prior to sampling. The aim of purging the well is to avoid taking the sample from the stagnant water instead of from formation water. The stagnant water forms inside and around the well because the well casing provides direct contact with the atmosphere, changing the physico-chemical composition of the well water. Sample from the stagnant water is not representative of the formation water. Regulations regarding the extent of the purging are different. Purging is mostly defined as multiply (3-5) well volumes, and/or reaching stabilization of some purged water parameters (pH, specific conductivity, etc.). There are hints for sampling without purging. To define the necessary extent of the purging repeated pumping is conducted, triplicate samples are taken at the beginning of purging, at one, two and three times well volumes and at parameter stabilization. Triplicate samples are the means to account for laboratory errors. The subsurface is not static, the test is repeated 10 times. Up to now three tests were completed.

  7. Comparison of laboratory single species and field population-level effects of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin on freshwater invertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroer, A.F.W.; Belgers, J.D.M.; Brock, T.C.M.; Matser, A.M.; Maund, S.J.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2004-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin to freshwater invertebrates has been investigated using data from short-term laboratory toxicity tests and in situ bioassays and population-level effects in field microcosms. In laboratory tests, patterns of toxicity were consistent with

  8. Effect of seasonal variation on adult clinical laboratory parameters in Rwanda, Zambia, and Uganda: implications for HIV biomedical prevention trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Ruzagira

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of seasonal variation on adult clinical laboratory parameters in Rwanda, Zambia, and Uganda and determine its implications for HIV prevention and other clinical trials.Volunteers in a cross-sectional study to establish laboratory reference intervals were asked to return for a seasonal visit after the local season had changed from dry to rainy or vice versa. Volunteers had to be clinically healthy, not pregnant and negative for HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and syphilis infection at both visits. At each visit, blood was taken for measurement of hemoglobin, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, red blood cells, platelets, total white blood cells (WBC, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, CD4/CD8 T cells, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, direct bilirubin, total bilirubin, total immunoglobulin gamma, total protein, creatinine, total amylase, creatine phosphokinase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. Consensus dry season reference intervals were applied to rainy season values (and vice versa and the proportion of 'out-of-range' values determined. Percentage differences between dry and rainy season parameter mean values were estimated.In this cohort of 903 volunteers, less than 10.0% of consensus parameter (except LDH values in one season were "out-of-range" in the other. Twenty-two (22 percent of rainy season LDH values fell outside of the consensus dry season interval with the higher values observed in the rainy season. Variability between consensus seasonal means ranged from 0.0% (total WBC, neutrophils, monocytes, basophils, and direct bilirubin to 40.0% (eosinophils. Within sites, the largest seasonal variations were observed for monocytes (Masaka, 11.5%, LDH (Lusaka, 21.7%, and basophils (Kigali, 22.2%.Seasonality had minimal impact on adult clinical laboratory parameter values in Rwanda, Zambia, and Uganda. Seasonal variation may not be an important factor in the

  9. The photoelectric effect and study of the diffraction of light: Two new experiments in UNILabs virtual and remote laboratories network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro Sánchez, Juan; Sáenz, Jacobo; de la Torre, Luis; Carreras, Carmen; Yuste, Manuel; Heradio, Rubén; Dormido, Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    This work describes two experiments: "study of the diffraction of light: Fraunhofer approximation" and "the photoelectric effect". Both of them count with a virtual, simulated, version of the experiment as well as with a real one which can be operated remotely. The two previous virtual and remote labs (built using Easy Java(script) Simulations) are integrated in UNILabs, a network of online interactive laboratories based on the free Learning Management System Moodle. In this web environment, students can find not only the virtual and remote labs but also manuals with related theory, the user interface description for each application, and so on.

  10. Effectiveness of a naturally derived insecticide, spinosad, against the pine processionary moth Thaumetopoea wilkinsoni Tams (Lepidoptera: Thaumetopoeidae) under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiz, Gurkan; Cetin, Huseyin; Isik, Kani; Yanikoglu, Atila

    2006-05-01

    The pine processionary moth Thaumetopoea wilkinsoni Tams is a serious pest on pine trees in southwestern Turkey. The efficacy of a naturally derived insecticide, spinosad, on fourth-fifth instar larvae of T. wilkinsoni was studied under laboratory conditions. The product exhibited strong larvicidal activity and at doses above 5 mg litre(-1) caused > 90% mortality in the fourth-fifth larval stages of the species after 72 h. At 72 h the LD50 and LD90 values were 3.26 and 5.69 mg litre(-1) respectively. The results showed that spinosad is highly effective on T. wilkinsoni larvae.

  11. Learning Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Lyn; Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Considers the school library media center as an information learning laboratory. Topics include information literacy; Kuhlthau's Information Search Process model; inquiry theory and approach; discovery learning; process skills of laboratory science; the information scientist; attitudes of media specialists, teachers, and students; displays and Web…

  12. Comparison of the effects of drilling fluid on macrobenthic invertebrates associated with the seagrass, Thalassia testudinum, in the laboratory and field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, D.E.; Flemer, D.A.; Bundick, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of a macrobenthic invertebrate community associated with the seagrass, Thalassia testudinum, was evaluated under laboratory and field conditions. The research focused on: (1) the effects of pollution stress from a representative drilling fluid used in offshore oil and gas operations, and (2) a comparison of responses of the seagrass-invertebrate community in the laboratory and field. The numbers of macrobenthic invertebrates were suppressed by drilling fluid at both exposure periods in the laboratory, but inhibitory effects were absent in the field. Invertebrate densities in the field were similar among control and treated plots, and were much lower than densities occurring in the laboratory control. In most instances, species richness values were similar in the field and laboratory at the end of each 6 and 12 week period.

  13. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  14. Effects of activity and energy budget balancing algorithm on laboratory performance of a fish bioenergetics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; David, Solomon R.; Pothoven, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush that were fed ad libitum in laboratory tanks under regimes of low activity and high activity. In addition, we compared model performance under two different model algorithms: (1) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t and (2) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t + 1. Results indicated that the model significantly underestimated consumption for both inactive and active lake trout when algorithm 1 was used and that the degree of underestimation was similar for the two activity levels. In contrast, model performance substantially improved when using algorithm 2, as no detectable bias was found in model predictions of consumption for inactive fish and only a slight degree of overestimation was detected for active fish. The energy budget was accurately balanced by using algorithm 2 but not by using algorithm 1. Based on the results of this study, we recommend the use of algorithm 2 to estimate food consumption by fish in the field. Our study results highlight the importance of accurately accounting for changes in fish energy density when balancing the energy budget; furthermore, these results have implications for the science of evaluating fish bioenergetics model performance and for more accurate estimation of food consumption by fish in the field when fish energy density undergoes relatively rapid changes.

  15. Microbial community dynamics in a laboratory LNAPL contaminated biobarrier: effect of biostimulation and bioaugmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanbroekhoven, K. [Environmental Technology, VITO, Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek, Mol (Belgium)]|[Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium). Centre of Microbial and Plant Genetics; Maesen, M.; Bastiaens, L.; Diels, L.; Springael, D. [Environmental Technology, VITO, Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek, Mol (Belgium); Mot, Rene de [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium). Centre of Microbial and Plant Genetics

    2003-07-01

    A promising technology for the clean-up of contaminated groundwater is the implementation of biobarriers in which the microbial population is stimulated to degrade pollutants and prevent groundwater contamination at downstream locations. A problem may arise when an oil floating layer or LNAPL (Light Non Aqueous Phase Liquid) is present and when such large hydrocarbon amounts are introduced into the biobarrier because (i) the amount of fuel oil introduced into the biowall may be too large, pass on and contaminate the downstream clean groundwater or (ii) the oil floating layer may be toxic for the biobarrier microbial population and thus hamper groundwater and fuel oil degradation. We aimed to evaluate the LNAPL behavour in a biowall matrix and to study the microbial pollution dynamics when large amounts of hydrocarbons were released into a biobarrier-simulation. In addition, bioaugmentation was evaluated by studying the competition between an introduced microbial consortium and the endogenous population. An artifical LNAPL contamination was simulated in 3 continuous laboratory biowall test systems including (i) a poisoned system in order to study abiotic changes, (ii) a system containing a microbial population originating from a hydrogencarbon contaminated site and treated under aerobic conditions supplied with the oleophilic nutrient Inipol EAP22, and (iii) a set-up similar to the second one but inoculated with 5 different hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria (Acinetobacter sp. RAG-1. Sphingomonadaceae sp. VM935 and LB130, and Mycobacterium sp. KV27 and LB501T). (orig.)

  16. [An evaluation of the effectiveness of laboratory diagnostic methods for brucellosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, B; Zheludkov, M M; Chernysheva, M I

    1994-01-01

    The diagnostic value of bacteriological and serological methods for the laboratory diagnosis of brucellosis was studied. In the analysis of milk and cheese specimens Brucella cultures were isolated and differentiated as B.melitensis, biovar I, and B.abortus, biovar 4. In 25.6% of cases B.melitensis culture, biovar 1, was isolated from the blood of persons suspected for brucellosis. The isolation of B.melitensis culture from milk showed that this infective agent migrated from small animals to cattle, which was indicative of a high risk of human infection in the state of Zacatecas, Mexico. The comparative evaluation of serological diagnostic methods (the agglutination test in test tubes, Huddleson's slide test, the acidic rose bengal test and the 2-mercaptoethanol test) showed high sensitivity of rapid tests (Huddleson's test and the rose bengal test in 93.7% and 87.9% of cases respectively). The 2-mercaptoethanol test which gave positive results in 63.8% of cases provided additional information characterizing the course of infections process.

  17. A laboratory exposure system to study the effects of aging on super-micron aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarpia, Joshua; Sanchez, Andres L.; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony; Servantes, Brandon Lee; Hubbard, Joshua Allen

    2014-02-01

    A laboratory system was constructed that allows the super-micron particles to be aged for long periods of time under conditions that can simulate a range of natural environments and conditions, including relative humidity, oxidizing chemicals, organics and simulated solar radiation. Two proof-of-concept experiments using a non-biological simulant for biological particles and a biological simulant demonstrate the utility of these types of aging experiments. Green Visolite®, which is often used as a tracer material for model validation experiments, does not degrade with exposure to simulated solar radiation, the actual biological material does. This would indicate that Visolite® should be a good tracer compound for mapping the extent of a biological release using fluorescence as an indicator, but that it should not be used to simulate the decay of a biological particle when exposed to sunlight. The decay in the fluorescence measured for B. thurengiensis is similar to what has been previously observed in outdoor environments.

  18. A laboratory experiment assessing the effect of sea ice on wave dumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Claudio; Alberello, Alberto; Bennetts, Luke; Meylan, Mike; Babanin, Alexander; Malavasi, Stefano; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Wave-ice interaction is a critical factor in the dynamics of the marginal ice zone (MIZ), the region between open ocean and an expanse of ice floes of varying size and shape. This interaction works both ways: while waves cause the fractures of ice floes, the presence of ice floes affects waves through scattering and various dissipative processes. In order to assess the latter, a laboratory experiment has been carried out in the coastal directional basin at Plymouth University. Sea ice has been simulated with two deformable plates: 1mX1m plastic sheet with variable thickness of polypropylene, which holds the same density (~0.9 g/cm3) of ice, and PVC Forex, which hold the same mechanical property of ice. Experiments have been conducted using monochromatic as well as random wave fields with different steepness and wavelengths (both shorter and larger than the floe). The wave field has been monitored before and after the simulated ice floe with a number of wave probes deployed along the basin, including a 6-probe array to track directional properties. On the whole, results show a substantial scattering and dissipation of the wave field, which appears to be dependent on the amount of overwash on the ice floe.

  19. Effect of iron dusts on physiological responses of gram seedlings (Cicer arietinum L. under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das C.R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiments was conducted for the assessment of physiological and biochemical responses of iron dust under the influence of different pH levels (6.5, 5.0, 3.0 and two concentration of iron dust (0.1 mg and 0.6 mg with two particle size (100 μm and 300 μm sprayed on the Cicer arietinum L. seed surface for fifteen day exposure. Observation was made on germination percentage and germination rate, vigour index, % phytotoxicity of root and shoot, chlorophyll, sugar, protein and proline content in both treated and control plant. The present results revealed that the seed color changes to brown under iron stress. The lower germination percentage and germination rate gradually decrease with pH of the medium but both the parameters were not significantly affected by the iron dust. Moreover higher % phytotoxicity was observed under all treatments compared to control and also lower values of this parameter were recorded in shoot than root. The reduction trend in chlorophyll and protein content was recorded at low pH but reverse result was recorded for sugar. Moreover highest proline was recorded under highly acidic condition.

  20. The effect of microwave/laboratory light source postcuring technique and wet-aging on microhardness of composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although composite restorations are really valuable for esthetic zones, they have shown less longevity rather than amalgam restorations. Since it may be related to the method used for curing the composite, postcuring could increase the degree of conversion and result in more long-lasting composite restorations. This study was planned to evaluate the effect of two different postcuring techniques on microhardness of indirect composite resin after wet-aging and comparing them with the direct type. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 99 composite disk-shaped (6.5 × 2.5 mm specimens of composite (Gradia GC, Japan were prepared in split mold. The indirect composite specimens were postcured by laboratory light source (Labolite LV-III GC Corp, Japan or microwave unit (MC 2002 JR, LG, Korea. Then, the aging procedure was done for 24 h, 30 and 180 days in distilled water. The Vicker′s Hardness test (VHN on surface of specmens was measured by Wolpert microhardness tester and the data were analyzed by the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s post hoc tests. (P ≤ 0.05. Results: The statistical analysis revealed that surface microhardness of postcured composite by microwave and laboratory light source was more than that of direct composite ( P = 0.0001 and postcuring by microwave was more effective than postcuring by laboratory light source ( P = 0.004. The 30 days stored composite demonstrated significant decrease of VHN compared with the 24-h stored samples ( P = 0.0001, with a more significant VHN decrease after 180 days of aging ( P = 0.045. Conclusion: Postcuring increased the surface microhardness and aging reduced the surface microhardness of indirect composite.

  1. The Effectiveness of Using Virtual Laboratories to Teach Computer Networking Skills  in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Lampi, Evans

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in computer networking skills, when real equipment is limited or unavailable, is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in the acquisition of computer network configuration and troubleshooting skills. The study was conducted in the developing country of Zambia, where there is an acute shortage of network lab equipment. Effectiveness was determined by the transfer ...

  2. Observed Punishment Spillover Effects: A Laboratory Investigation of Behavior in a Social Dilemma.

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Dickinson; E. Glenn Dutcher; Rodet, Cortney S.

    2013-01-01

    Punishment has been shown to be an effective reinforcement mechanism. Intentional or not, punishment will likely generate spillover effects that extend beyond one’s immediate decision environment, and these spillovers are not as well understood. We seek to understand these secondary spillover effects in a controlled lab setting using a standard social dilemma: the voluntary contributions mechanism. We find that spillovers occur when others observe punishment outside their own social dilemma. ...

  3. Punishment History and Spillover Effects: A Laboratory Investigation of Behavior in a Social Dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Dickinson; E. Glenn Dutcher; Rodet, Cortney S.

    2011-01-01

    Punishment has been shown to be an effective reinforcement mechanism. Intentional or not, punishment will likely generate spillover effects that extend beyond one’s immediate decision environment, and these spillovers are not as well understood. We seek to understand these secondary spillover effects in a controlled lab setting using a standard social dilemma: the voluntary contributions mechanism game. We find that spillovers from punishment lead to either more or less cooperative behavior d...

  4. Antibacterial effects of Arctium lappa and Artemesia absinthium extracts in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibipour Reza

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arctium lappa (Great burduck and Artemesia absinthium are medicinal plants that some of their antibacterial and antivirus properties have been suggested in nutritional industries. The objective of this research was to study the effects of A. lappa and A. absinthium on some microorganisms including Pseudomonads aeraginosa, Haemophilus influenza, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus. Methods: Extracts were prepared by maceration method and tested on Mueller Hinton agar medium based on disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were determined by micro-dilution method. Antibiotic disks used for controlling and standardizing the examination. Results: The extracts of A. lappa and A. absinthium had significant effect on S. aureus. The MIC and MBC concentrations of the extract of A. lappa on B. subtilis were respectively 600 and 750 mg/ml. Also, these values were 230 and 540 mg/ml for H. influenza. Extract of A. absinthium showed more inhibitory effect on B. subtilis. All extracts showed inhibitory effect on B. cereus. The extracts of A. lappa and A. absinthium had inhibitory effects on H. influenza and P. aeraginosa. Among antibiotics, only Ofloxacin and Ciprofloxacin had effects on H. influenza. Extract of A. lappa showed flimsy effect on K. pneumonia, while extract of A. absinthium had no effect on this bacterium. Conclusion: Due to the effects of A. lappa and A. absinthium on some bacteria, they might be good substitutes for synthetic substances.

  5. AFSC/RACE/FBEP/Copeman: Effect of temperature and tissue type on fatty acid signatures of two species of North Pacific juvenile gadids: A laboratory feeding study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is from a laboratory study that investigated the effect of temperature and tissue type on fatty acid signatures of Pacific cod and walleye pollock.

  6. The Effectiveness of Using Virtual Laboratories to Teach Computer Networking Skills in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampi, Evans

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in computer networking skills, when real equipment is limited or unavailable, is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in the acquisition of computer network configuration and troubleshooting skills. The study was…

  7. Effects of physical randomness training on virtual and laboratory golf putting performance in novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, T C; Lamb, P F

    2017-10-09

    External randomness exists in all sports but is perhaps most obvious in golf putting where robotic putters sink only 80% of 5 m putts due to unpredictable ball-green dynamics. The purpose of this study was to test whether physical randomness training can improve putting performance in novices. A virtual random-physics golf-putting game was developed based on controlled ball-roll data. Thirty-two subjects were assigned a unique randomness gain (RG) ranging from 0.1 to 2.0-times real-world randomness. Putter face kinematics were measured in 5 m laboratory putts before and after five days of virtual training. Performance was quantified using putt success rate and "miss-adjustment correlation" (MAC), the correlation between left-right miss magnitude and subsequent right-left kinematic adjustments. Results showed no RG-success correlation (r = -0.066, p = 0.719) but mildly stronger correlations with MAC for face angle (r = -0.168, p = 0.358) and clubhead path (r = -0.302, p = 0.093). The strongest RG-MAC correlation was observed during virtual training (r = -0.692, p physical randomness in virtual training, and also that this learning may weakly transfer to real golf putting kinematics. Adaptation to external physical randomness during virtual training may therefore help golfers adapt to external randomness in real-world environments.

  8. Effect of glaucoma on eye movement patterns and laboratory-based hazard detection ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Samantha Sze-Yee; Black, Alex A; Wood, Joanne M

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the elevated crash rates of older drivers with glaucoma are poorly understood. A key driving skill is timely detection of hazards; however, the hazard detection ability of drivers with glaucoma has been largely unexplored. This study assessed the eye movement patterns and visual predictors of performance on a laboratory-based hazard detection task in older drivers with glaucoma. Participants included 30 older drivers with glaucoma (71±7 years; average better-eye mean deviation (MD) = -3.1±3.2 dB; average worse-eye MD = -11.9±6.2 dB) and 25 age-matched controls (72±7 years). Visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual fields, useful field of view (UFoV; processing speeds), and motion sensitivity were assessed. Participants completed a computerised Hazard Perception Test (HPT) while their eye movements were recorded using a desk-mounted Tobii TX300 eye-tracking system. The HPT comprises a series of real-world traffic videos recorded from the driver's perspective; participants responded to road hazards appearing in the videos, and hazard response times were determined. Participants with glaucoma exhibited an average of 0.42 seconds delay in hazard response time (p = 0.001), smaller saccades (p = 0.010), and delayed first fixation on hazards (p<0.001) compared to controls. Importantly, larger saccades were associated with faster hazard responses in the glaucoma group (p = 0.004), but not in the control group (p = 0.19). Across both groups, significant visual predictors of hazard response times included motion sensitivity, UFoV, and worse-eye MD (p<0.05). Older drivers with glaucoma had delayed hazard response times compared to controls, with associated changes in eye movement patterns. The association between larger saccades and faster hazard response time in the glaucoma group may represent a compensatory behaviour to facilitate improved performance.

  9. Effects of Direct and Indirect Exposure of Insecticides to Garden Symphylan (Symphyla: Scutigerellidae) in Laboratory Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Shimat V

    2015-12-01

    The garden symphylan, Scutigerella immaculata Newport, is a serious soil pest whose root feeding affects yield and survival of several high valued crops in the California's central coast. Because organophosphate insecticides, widely used for S. immaculata control, are rigorously regulated and little is known about the efficacy of alternate insecticides, laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine insecticide efficacy through repellency and lethality. To determine indirect repellency (noncontact) of insecticides, choice assays were conducted where five S. immaculata were introduced into the arena to choose between insecticide-treated and untreated wells whereas, in direct repellency (contact) assays, three insecticide-treated 1-cm-diameter discs were pasted into the arena and the number of visits, time spent per visitation, and number of long-duration (>10 s) stays of five S. immaculata were quantified. To determine efficacy through direct mortality, number of S. immaculata died after 72 h were determined by introducing 10 S. immaculata to insecticide-treated soil assays. In indirect exposure bioassays, seven (clothianidin, oxamyl, zeta-cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, ethoprop, azadirachtin, and a combination of beta-cyfluthrin and imidacloprid) out of 14 insecticides tested elicited repellency to S. immaculata. Of six insecticides tested in the direct exposure assays, only tolfenpyrad elicited contact repellency. In soil assays, after 72 h of introduction, bifenthrin, oxamyl, clothianidin, zeta-cypermethrin, and tolfenpyrad caused 100, 95, 80, 44, and 44% S. immaculata mortality, respectively, which was significantly greater than distilled water and four other insecticides. The implications of these results on S. immaculata management in the California's central coast are discussed.

  10. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of nitric acid uptake on frost point hygrometer performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Thornberry

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Chilled mirror hygrometers (CMH are widely used to measure water vapour in the troposphere and lower stratosphere from balloon-borne sondes. Systematic discrepancies among in situ water vapour instruments have been observed at low water vapour mixing ratios (<5 ppm in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Understanding the source of the measurement discrepancies is important for a more accurate and reliable determination of water vapour abundance in this region. We have conducted a laboratory study to investigate the potential interference of gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3 with the measurement of frost point temperature, and consequently the water vapour mixing ratio, determined by CMH under conditions representative of operation in the UT/LS. No detectable interference in the measured frost point temperature was found for HNO3 mixing ratios of up to 4 ppb for exposure times up to 150 min. HNO3 was observed to co-condense on the mirror frost, with the adsorbed mass increasing linearly with time at constant exposure levels. Over the duration of a typical balloon sonde ascent (90–120 min, the maximum accumulated HNO3 amounts were comparable to monolayer coverage of the geometric mirror surface area, which corresponds to only a small fraction of the actual frost layer surface area. This small amount of co-condensed HNO3 is consistent with the observed lack of HNO3 interference in the frost point measurement because the CMH utilizes significant reductions (>10% in surface reflectivity by the condensate to determine H2O.

  11. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of nitric acid uptake on frost point hygrometer performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Thornberry

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Chilled mirror hygrometers (CMH are widely used to measure water vapour in the troposphere and lower stratosphere from balloon-borne sondes. Systematic discrepancies among in situ water vapour instruments have been observed at low water vapour mixing ratios (<5 ppm in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Understanding the source of the measurement discrepancies is important for a more accurate and reliable determination of water vapour abundance in this region. We have conducted a laboratory study to investigate the potential interference of gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3 with the measurement of frost point temperature, and consequently the water vapour mixing ratio, determined by CMH under conditions representative of operation in the UT/LS. No detectable interference in the measured frost point temperature was found for HNO3 mixing ratios of up to 4 ppb for exposure times up to 150 min. HNO3 was observed to co-condense on the mirror frost, with the adsorbed mass increasing linearly with time at constant exposure levels. Over the duration of a typical balloon sonde ascent (90–120 min, the maximum accumulated HNO3 amounts were comparable to monolayer coverage of the geometric mirror surface area, which corresponds to only a small fraction of the actual frost layer surface area. This small amount of co-condensed HNO3 is consistent with the observed lack of HNO3 interference in the frost point measurement because the CMH utilizes significant reductions (>10% in surface reflectivity by the condensate to determine H2O.

  12. Porometric properties of siliciclastic marine sand: A comparison of traditional laboratory measurements with image analysis and effective medium modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, A.H.; Briggs, K.B.; Lavoie, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    During the 1999 sediment acoustics experiment (SAX99), porometric properties were measured and predicted for a well sorted, medium sand using standard laboratory geotechnical methods and image analysis of resin-impregnated sediments. Sediment porosity measured by laboratory water-weight-loss methods (0.372 ?? 0.0073 for mean ??1 standard deviation) is 0.026 lower than determined by microscopic image analysis of resin-impregnated sediments (0.398 ?? 0.029). Values of intrinsic permeability (m2) determined from constant-head permeameter measurements (3.29 ?? 10-11 ?? 0.60 ?? 10-11) and by microscopic image analysis coupled with effective medium theory modeling (2.78 ?? 10-11 ?? 1.01 ?? 10-11) are nearly identical within measurement error. The mean value of tortuosity factor measured from images is 1.49 ?? 0.09, which is in agreement with tortuosity factor determined from electrical resistivity measurements. Slight heterogeneity and anisotropy are apparent in the top three centimeters of sediment as determined by image-based porometric property measurements. However, the overall similarity for both measured and predicted values of porosity and permeability among and within SAX99 sites indicates sediments are primarily homogeneous and isotropic and pore size distributions are fairly uniform. The results indicate that an effective medium theory technique and two-dimensional image analysis accurately predicts bulk permeability in resin-impregnated sands.

  13. Effect of repeated compaction of tablets on tablet properties and work of compaction using an instrumented laboratory tablet press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamlen, Michael John Desmond; Martini, Luigi G; Al Obaidy, Kais G

    2015-01-01

    The repeated compaction of Avicel PH101, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCP) powder, 50:50 DCP/Avicel PH101 and Starch 1500 was studied using an instrumented laboratory tablet press which measures upper punch force, punch displacement and ejection force and operates using a V-shaped compression profile. The measurement of work compaction was demonstrated, and the test materials were ranked in order of compaction behaviour Avicel PH101 > DCP/Avicel PH101 > Starch > DCP. The behaviour of the DCP/Avicel PH101 mixture was distinctly non-linear compared with the pure components. Repeated compaction and precompression had no effect on the tensile fracture strength of Avicel PH101 tablets, although small effects on friability and disintegration time were seen. Repeated compaction and precompression reduced the tensile strength and the increased disintegration time of the DCP tablets, but improved the strength and friability of Starch 1500 tablets. Based on the data reported, routine laboratory measurement of tablet work of compaction may have potential as a critical quality attribute of a powder blend for compression. The instrumented press was suitable for student use with minimal supervisor input.

  14. Effects of transgenic Bt rice on growth, reproduction, and superoxide dismutase activity of Folsomia candida (Collembola: Isotomidae) in laboratory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yaoyu; Yan, Ruihong; Ke, Xin; Ye, Gongyin; Huang, Fangneng; Luo, Yongming; Cheng, Jiaan

    2011-12-01

    Transgenic rice expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) CrylAb protein is expected to be commercialized in China in the near future. The use of Bt rice for controlling insect pests sparks intensive debates regarding its biosafety. Folsomia candida is an euedaphic species and is often used as a "standard" test organism in assessing effects of environmental pollutants on soil organisms. In this study, growth, development, reproduction, and superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) of F. candida were investigated in the laboratory for populations reared on leaf tissue or leaf-soil mixtures of two CrylAb rice lines and a non-Bt rice isoline. Two independent tests were performed: 1) a 35-d test using petri dishes containing yeast diet (positive control) or fresh rice leaf tissue, and 2) a 28-d test in soil-litter microcosms containing yeast or a mixture of soil and rice leaf tissue. Biological parameters measured in both tests were number of progeny production, population growth rate, and SOD activity. For the petri dish test, data measured also included insect body length and number of exuviation. There were no significant differences between the populations reared on Bt and non-Bt rice leaf tissue in all measured parameters in both tests and for both Bt rice lines, suggesting no significant effects of the CrylAb protein in Bt rice on F. candida in the laboratory studies. Results of this study should add additional biosafety proofs for use of Bt rice to manage rice pests in China.

  15. Biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small and large laboratory animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Rats and mice were exposed to 60-Hz electric fields up to 330 kV/m for durations as long as four months. No significant effects were found in the following major areas: metabolic status and growth; organ and tissue morphology; brain morphology; cardiovascular function; serum chemistry; reproduction; prenatal growth and development; teratology; bone growth; peripheral nerve function; humoral and cell-mediated immunity; susceptibility to viral infection; cell and membrane function; illness/malaise; and cytogenetics. Statistically significant effects of electric field exposures were observed in the following areas: bone fracture repair; neonatal development; neuromuscular function; endocrinology; hematology; neurochemistry; urine volume and chemistry; sympathetic nervous system; behavior. It is likely that many of the effects observed are secondary to chronic stimulation of the animal by the field. Our research efforts have shifted to an in-depth investigation of nervous system functions, with emphasis in behavior, neurochemistry, neurophysiology, and dosimetry. Current and future research in these areas will focus on: relationship of effects to field strength and duration of exposure; recovery from observed effects; fundamental understanding of observed effects; fundamental understanding of interaction of field with animal (dosimetry); and biological significance of observed effects. (ERB)

  16. Effect of Individually Tailored Biopsychosocial Workplace Interventions on Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and Stress Among Laboratory Technicians: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Kenneth; Brandt, Mikkel; Hansen, Klaus; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Schraefel, M C; Sjogaard, Gisela; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is prevalent among laboratory technicians and work-related stress may aggravate the problem. This study investigated the effect of a multifaceted worksite intervention on pain and stress among laboratory technicians with chronic musculoskeletal pain using individually tailored physical and cognitive elements. This trial uses a single-blind randomized controlled design with allocation concealment in a 2-armed parallel group format among laboratory technicians. The trial "Implementation of physical exercise at the Workplace (IRMA09)--Laboratory technicians" was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov prior to participant enrolment. The study was conducted at the head division of a large private pharmaceutical company's research and development department in Denmark. The study duration was March 2014 (baseline) to July 2014 (follow-up). Participants (n = 112) were allocated to receive either physical, cognitive, and mindfulness group-based training (PCMT group) or a reference group (REF) for 10 weeks at the worksite. PCMT consisted of 4 major elements: 1) resistance training individually tailored to the pain affected area, 2) motor control training, 3) mindfulness, and 4) cognitive and behavioral therapy/education. Participants of the REF group were encouraged to follow ongoing company health initiatives. The predefined primary outcome measure was pain intensity (VAS scale 0-10) in average of the regions: neck, shoulder, lower and upper back, elbow, and hand at 10 week follow-up. The secondary outcome measure was stress assessed by Cohen´s perceived stress questionnaire. In addition, an explorative dose-response analysis was performed on the adherence to PCMT with pain and stress, respectively, as outcome measures. A significant (P change in pain with the number of physical-cognitive training sessions per week (-0.60 [95%CI -0.95 to -0.25]) and the number of mindfulness sessions (0.15 [95%CI 0.02 to 0.18]). No such associations were found with

  17. Effects of Tween 80 on Growth and Biofilm Formation in Laboratory Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christina K.; Kjems, Jørgen; Mygind, Tina;

    2016-01-01

    the total biomass when S. aureus was grown as biofilms. In contrast, Tween 80 had no effect on batch cultures of L. monocytogenes, it slowed the growth rate of P fluorescens, and it led to formation of less biofilm by both L. monocytogenes and P fluorescens. Furthermore, Tween 80 lowered the antibacterial...... are applied in food matrixes that include emulsifiers. Furthermore, the species-specific effects on microbial growth suggests that Tween 80 in cosmetics and food products could affect the composition of skin and gut microbiota, and the effect of emulsifiers on the human microbiome should therefore be explored...

  18. Compendium of Recent Test Results of Single Event Effects Conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory R.; Guertin, Steven M.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Irom, Farokh; Zajac, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports heavy ion, proton, and laser induced single event effects results for a variety of microelectronic devices targeted for possible use in NASA spacecrafts. The compendium covers devices tested within the years of 2010 through 2012.

  19. Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory is a research laboratory which complements the Optical Measurements Laboratory. The laboratory provides for Hall...

  20. Feasibility and effectiveness of massage therapy for symptom relief in cardiac catheter laboratory staff: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Shelly R; Engen, Deborah J; Bauer, Brent A; Holmes, David R; Rihal, Charanjit S; Lennon, Ryan J; Loehrer, Laura L; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L

    2012-02-01

    A pilot study was conducted to assess the feasibility and efficacy of massage therapy for cardiac catheterization laboratory staff. Staff members (N = 50) were randomly assigned to 5 or 10 weekly 30-min massages, followed by outcomes assessment. A control group (n = 10) receiving no massage therapy underwent comparable assessment. Visual analog scales, the t test, and the repeated measures model evaluated fatigue, pain, relaxation, stress/anxiety, tension/discomfort, and scheduling ease at baseline, 5 weeks, and 10 weeks. The Aickin separation test was used to assess feasibility of further research. Overall, 90% (337/375) of massage appointments were used. No significant effects were observed, but the Aickin separation test supported further research on massage therapy for fatigue, pain, relaxation, and tension/discomfort. Conducting massage therapy in the workplace is logistically feasible. Larger, longitudinal trials are warranted to better evaluate its effects on staff.

  1. Implementation of Scientific Community Laboratories and Their Effect on Student Conceptual Learning, Attitudes, and Understanding of Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Adam

    Scientific Community Laboratories, developed by The University of Maryland, have shown initial promise as laboratories meant to emulate the practice of doing physics. These laboratories have been re-created by incorporating their design elements with the University of Toledo course structure and resources. The laboratories have been titled the Scientific Learning Community (SLC) Laboratories. A comparative study between these SLC laboratories and the University of Toledo physics department's traditional laboratories was executed during the fall 2012 semester on first semester calculus-based physics students. Three tests were executed as pre-test and post-tests to capture the change in students' concept knowledge, attitudes, and understanding of uncertainty. The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) was used to evaluate students' conceptual changes through the semester and average normalized gains were compared between both traditional and SLC laboratories. The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS) was conducted to elucidate students' change in attitudes through the course of each laboratory. Finally, interviews regarding data analysis and uncertainty were transcribed and coded to track changes in the way students understand uncertainty and data analysis in experimental physics after their participation in both laboratory type. Students in the SLC laboratories showed a notable an increase conceptual knowledge and attitudes when compared to traditional laboratories. SLC students' understanding of uncertainty showed most improvement, diverging completely from students in the traditional laboratories, who declined throughout the semester.

  2. Audio Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment and facilities for auditory display research. A primary focus is the performance use of binaurally rendered 3D sound in conjunction...

  3. Elastomers Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Primary capabilities include: elastomer compounding in various sizes (micro, 3x5, 8x12, 8x15 rubber mills); elastomer curing and post curing (two 50-ton presses, one...

  4. Effects of aging on organic aerosol from open biomass burning smoke in aircraft and laboratory studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Cubison

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning (BB is a large source of primary and secondary organic aerosols (POA and SOA. This study addresses the physical and chemical evolution of BB organic aerosols. Firstly, the evolution and lifetime of BB POA and SOA signatures observed with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer are investigated, focusing on measurements at high-latitudes acquired during the 2008 NASA ARCTAS mission, in comparison to data from other field studies and from laboratory aging experiments. The parameter f60, the ratio of the integrated signal at m/z 60 to the total signal in the organic component mass spectrum, is used as a marker to study the rate of oxidation and fate of the BB POA. A background level of f60~0.3% ± 0.06% for SOA-dominated ambient OA is shown to be an appropriate background level for this tracer. Using also f44 as a tracer for SOA and aged POA and a surrogate of organic O:C, a novel graphical method is presented to characterise the aging of BB plumes. Similar trends of decreasing f60 and increasing f44 with aging are observed in most field and lab studies. At least some very aged BB plumes retain a clear f60 signature. A statistically significant difference in f60 between highly-oxygenated OA of BB and non-BB origin is observed using this tracer, consistent with a substantial contribution of BBOA to the springtime Arctic aerosol burden in 2008. Secondly, a summary is presented of results on the net enhancement of OA with aging of BB plumes, which shows large variability. The estimates of net OA gain range from ΔOA/ΔCO(mass = −0.01 to ~0.05, with a mean ΔOA/POA ~19%. With these ratios and global inventories of BB CO and POA a global net OA source due to aging of BB plumes of ~8 ± 7 Tg OA yr−1 is estimated, of the order of 5 % of recent total OA source estimates. Further field data

  5. Effect of adrenergic agonists on coronary blood flow: a laboratory study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Pelaez, Alvaro F; Gao, Zhaohui; Ahmad, Tariq A; Leuenberger, Urs A; Proctor, David N; Maman, Stephan R; Muller, Matthew D

    2016-05-01

    Myocardial oxygen supply and demand mismatch is fundamental to the pathophysiology of ischemia and infarction. The sympathetic nervous system, through α-adrenergic receptors and β-adrenergic receptors, influences both myocardial oxygen supply and demand. In animal models, mechanistic studies have established that adrenergic receptors contribute to coronary vascular tone. The purpose of this laboratory study was to noninvasively quantify coronary responses to adrenergic receptor stimulation in humans. Fourteen healthy volunteers (11 men and 3 women) performed isometric handgrip exercise to fatigue followed by intravenous infusion of isoproterenol. A subset of individuals also received infusions of phenylephrine (n = 6), terbutaline (n = 10), and epinephrine (n = 4); all dosages were based on fat-free mass and were infused slowly to achieve steady-state. The left anterior descending coronary artery was visualized using Doppler echocardiography. Beat-by-beat heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), peak diastolic coronary velocity (CBVpeak), and coronary velocity time integral were calculated. Data are presented as M ± SD Isometric handgrip elicited significant increases in BP, HR, and CBVpeak (from 23.3 ± 5.3 to 34.5 ± 9.9 cm/sec). Isoproterenol raised HR and CBVpeak (from 22.6 ± 4.8 to 43.9 ± 12.4 cm/sec). Terbutaline and epinephrine evoked coronary hyperemia whereas phenylephrine did not significantly alter CBVpeak. Different indices of coronary hyperemia (changes in CBVpeak and velocity time integral) were significantly correlated (R = 0.803). The current data indicate that coronary hyperemia occurs in healthy humans in response to isometric handgrip exercise and low-dose, steady-state infusions of isoproterenol, terbutaline, and epinephrine. The contribution of β1 versus β2 receptors to coronary hyperemia remains to be determined. In this echocardiographic study, we demonstrate that coronary blood flow increases when

  6. On the effect of accelerated winds on the wave growth through detailed laboratory measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert; Osuna, Pedro; Hernández, Aldo

    2013-04-01

    The possible influence of accelerated winds on air-water momentum fluxes is being studied through detailed laboratory measurements in a large wind-wave flume. Wind stress over the water surface, waves and surface drift are measured in the 40m long wind-wave tank at IRPHE, Marseille. While momentum fluxes are estimated directly through the eddy correlation method in a station about the middle of the tank, they provide information corresponding to rather short non-dimensional fetch not previously reported. Wave evolution along the tank is determined through a series of wave gauges, and the wind-induced surface drift is obtained at one of the first measuring stations at the beginning of the tank. At each experimental run very low wind was on (about 1m/s) for a certain period and suddenly it was constantly accelerated to reach about 13 m/s (as well as 8 and 5 m/s during different runs) in about 15 sec to as long as 600 sec. The wind was kept constant at that high speed for 2 to 10 min, and then suddenly and constantly decelerate to 0. Data from the constant high winds provided us with reference equilibrium conditions for at least 3 different wind speed. We, nevertheless, focus in the recordings while wind was being constantly accelerated expecting some contribution to the understanding of gustiness, the implied wind wave growth and the onset of surface drift. Wind-wave growth is observed to lag behind the wind stress signal, and furthermore, a two regime wind stress is noticed, apparently well correlated with a) the incipient growth and appearance of the first waves and b) the arrival of waves from the up-wind section of the tank. Results of non-dimensional wave energy as a function of non-dimensional fetch represent an extension of at least 2 decades shorter non-dimensional fetch to the wave growth curves typically found in the literature. The linear tendency of wave growth compares very well only when wind is reaching its maximum, while during the accelerated wind

  7. Laboratory Salinization of Brazilian Alluvial Soils and the Spectral Effects of Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Clenio J. Moreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation-induced salinization is an important land degradation process that affects crop yield in the Brazilian semi-arid region, and gypsum has been used as a corrective measure for saline soils. Fluvent soil samples (180 were treated with increasing levels of salinization of NaCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2. The salinity was gauged using electrical conductivity (EC. Gypsum was added to one split of these samples before they were treated by the saline solutions. Laboratory reflectance spectra were measured at nadir under a controlled environment using a FieldSpec spectrometer, a 250-W halogen lamp and a Spectralon panel. Variations in spectral reflectance and brightness were evaluated using principal component analysis, as well as the continuum-removed absorption depths of major features at 1450, 1950, 1750 and 2200 nm for both the gypsum-treated (TG and non-treated (NTG air-dried soil samples as a function of EC. Pearson’s correlation coefficients of reflectance and the band depth with EC were also obtained to establish the relationships with salinity. Results showed that NTG samples presented a decrease in reflectance and brightness with increasing CaCl2 and MgCl2 salinization. The reverse was observed for NaCl. Gypsum increased the spectral reflectance of the soil. The best negative correlations between reflectance and EC were observed in the 1500–2400 nm range for CaCl2 and MgCl2, probably because these wavelengths are most affected by water absorption, as Ca and Mg are much more hygroscopic than Na. These decreased after chemical treatment with gypsum. The most prominent features were observed at 1450, 1950 and 1750 nm in salinized-soil spectra. The 2200-nm clay mineral absorption band depth was inversely correlated with salt concentration. From these features, only the 1750 and 2200 nm ones are within atmospheric absorption windows and can be more easily measured using hyperspectral sensors.

  8. Effectiveness of the implementation of a simple radiation reduction protocol in the catheterization laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurado-Román, Alfonso, E-mail: alfonsojuradoroman@gmail.com [Unidad de Hemodinámica, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real (Spain); Sánchez-Pérez, Ignacio; Lozano Ruíz-Poveda, Fernando; López-Lluva, María T.; Pinilla-Echeverri, Natalia; Moreno Arciniegas, Andrea [Unidad de Hemodinámica, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real (Spain); Agudo-Quilez, Pilar [Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Gil Agudo, Antonio [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    Background and purpose: A reduction in radiation doses at the catheterization laboratory, maintaining the quality of procedures is essential. Our objective was to analyze the results of a simple radiation reduction protocol at a high-volume interventional cardiology unit. Methods: We analyzed 1160 consecutive procedures: 580 performed before the implementation of the protocol and 580 after it. The protocol consisted in: the reduction of the number of ventriculographies and aortographies, the optimization of the collimation and the geometry of the X ray tube-patient-receptor, the use of low dose-rate fluoroscopy and the reduction of the number of cine sequences using the software “last fluoroscopy hold”. Results: There were no significant differences in clinical baseline features or in the procedural characteristics with the exception of a higher percentage of radial approach (30.7% vs 69.6%; p < 0.001) and of percutaneous coronary interventions of chronic total occlusions after the implementation of the protocol (2.1% vs 6.7%; p = 0,001). Angiographic success was similar during both periods (98.3% vs 99.2%; p = 0.2). There were no significant differences between both periods regarding the overall duration of the procedures (26.9 vs 29.6 min; p = 0.14), or the fluoroscopy time (13.3 vs 13.2 min; p = 0.8). We observed a reduction in the percentage of procedures with ventriculography (80.9% vs 7.1%; p < 0.0001) or aortography (15.4% vs 4.4%; p < 0.0001), the cine runs (21.8 vs 6.9; p < 0.0001) and the dose–area product (165 vs 71 Gyxcm{sup 2}; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: With the implementation of a simple radiation reduction protocol, a 57% reduction of dose–area product was observed without a reduction in the quality or the complexity of procedures. - Highlights: • This simple protocol can achieve a reduction in dose–area product of 57%. • It does not interfere with the quality or complexity of the procedures. • Full advantage of “Last Fluoroscopy

  9. Field-evolved resistance to Bt maize by western corn rootworm: predictions from the laboratory and effects in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Aaron J

    2012-07-01

    Crops engineered to produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) provide an effective management tool for many key insect pests. However, pest species have repeatedly demonstrated their ability to adapt to management practices. Results from laboratory selection experiments illustrate the capacity of pest species to evolve Bt resistance. Furthermore, resistance has been documented to Bt sprays in the field and greenhouse, and more recently, by some pests to Bt crops in the field. In 2009, fields were discovered in Iowa (USA) with populations of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, that had evolved resistance to maize that produces the Bt toxin Cry3Bb1. Fields with resistant insects in 2009 had been planted to Cry3Bb1 maize for at least three consecutive years and as many as 6years. Computer simulation models predicted that the western corn rootworm might evolve resistance to Bt maize in as few as 3years. Laboratory and field data for interactions between western corn rootworm and Bt maize indicate that currently commercialized products are not high-dose events, which increases the risk of resistance evolution because non-recessive resistance traits may enhance survival on Bt maize. Furthermore, genetic analysis of laboratory strains of western corn rootworm has found non-recessive inheritance of resistance. Field studies conducted in two fields identified as harboring Cry3Bb1-resistant western corn rootworm found that survival of western corn rootworm did not differ between Cry3Bb1 maize and non-Bt maize and that root injury to Cry3Bb1 maize was higher than injury to other types of Bt maize or to maize roots protected with a soil insecticide. These first cases of field-evolved resistance to Bt maize by western corn rootworm provide an early warning and point to the need to apply better integrated pest management practices when using Bt maize to manage western corn rootworm.

  10. A Cost-Effective Atomic Force Microscope for Undergraduate Control Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. N.; Goncalves, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simple, cost-effective and robust atomic force microscope (AFM), which has been purposely designed and built for use as a teaching aid in undergraduate controls labs. The guiding design principle is to have all components be open and visible to the students, so the inner functioning of the microscope has been made clear to…

  11. Antinociceptive effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine in the hot-plate test in laboratory rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Sara Hestehave; Munro, Gordon; Pedersen, Tina Brønnum

    2017-01-01

    . In addition, it is desirable to provide post-operative analgesia using methods that are minimally invasive and stressful. This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of orally administered buprenorphine ingested in Nutella® in comparison with subcutaneous buprenorphine administration. By exposing...

  12. Evaluation of the environmental effects of stormwater pollutants for Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinzman, R.L.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Filson, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    Despite Best Management Practices (BMP), total suspended solids (TSS) and oil and grease (O and G) concentrations in stormwater runoff frequently have been above the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit effluent limits at ORNL. Although the effects of stormwater pollutants to aquatic ecosystems are of concern regionally and nationally, NPDES permit violations at ORNL are best addressed on a site-specific basis. This document explores several key questions to determine whether the TSS and O and G noncompliances at ORNL are primarily a regulatory problem (i.e., Category 1 and 2 effluent limits are neither reasonably achievable nor effective in achieving environmental protection), or a legitimate ecological concern that will require effective remediation. The three tasks outlined in the study plan were to (1) clarify the degree of TSS and O and G noncompliances at ORNL, (2) provide guidance as to appropriate limits for TSS and O and G in Category 1 and 2 discharges, and (3) provide information about the effectiveness of possible mitigation or remediation measures for TSS and O and G in stormwater releases, assuming that such measures are needed for one or more ORNL Category 1 or 2 outfalls.

  13. Nontarget effects of orchard pesticides on natural enemies: lessons from the field and laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nontarget effects of insecticide programs used to control codling moth, Cydia pomonella were studied in large-plot field trials in apples, pears, and walnuts in the western United States. We sampled the abundance of natural enemies and outbreaks of secondary pests. The insecticides used in the f...

  14. A Cost-Effective Atomic Force Microscope for Undergraduate Control Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. N.; Goncalves, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simple, cost-effective and robust atomic force microscope (AFM), which has been purposely designed and built for use as a teaching aid in undergraduate controls labs. The guiding design principle is to have all components be open and visible to the students, so the inner functioning of the microscope has been made clear to…

  15. Greenhouse Effect in the Classroom: A Project- and Laboratory-Based Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueddecke, Susann B.; Pinter, Nicholas; McManus, Scott A.

    2001-01-01

    Tests a multifaceted curriculum for use in introductory earth science classes from the secondary school to the introductory undergraduate level. Simulates the greenhouse effect with two fish tanks, heat lamps, and thermometers. Uses a hands-on science approach to develop a deeper understanding of the climate system among students. (Contains 28…

  16. An Effective and Economical Photometer for Classroom Demonstrations and Laboratory Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Anthony E.; Young, Colin C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple, effective, and inexpensive spectrophotometer design that may be used in a stand-alone teaching module, and to enhance various unit operations experiments. The spectrophotometers described performed as well as a commercial option at estimating cell concentration in a bioreactor and tracking a first-order reaction. Such devices…

  17. Effects of debris flow composition on runout, depositional mechanisms, and deposit morphology in laboratory experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Leuven, Jasper R F W; Lokhorst, Ivar R.; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting debris flow runout is of major importance for hazard mitigation. Apart from topography and volume, runout distance and area depends on debris flow composition and rheology, but how is poorly understood. We experimentally investigated effects of composition on debris flow runout, depositio

  18. Effectiveness of Podcasts Delivered on Mobile Devices as a Support for Student Learning during General Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Cynthia B.; Mason, Diana S.

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry instructors in teaching laboratories provide expert modeling of techniques and cognitive processes and provide assistance to enrolled students that may be described as scaffolding interaction. Such student support is particularly essential in laboratories taught with an inquiry-based curriculum. In a teaching laboratory with a high…

  19. Cinacalcet Use Patterns and Effect on Laboratory Values and Other Medications in a Large Dialysis Organization, 2004 through 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Peter, Wendy L.; Li, Qi; Liu, Jiannong; Persky, Martha; Nieman, Kimberly; Arko, Cheryl; Block, Geoffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cinacalcet was introduced in mid-2004 to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism in dialysis patients. We aimed to characterize adult patients who received cinacalcet prescriptions and to determine (1) dosage titration and effects on laboratory values, active intravenous vitamin D use, and phosphate binder prescriptions and (2) percentage who achieved National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative targets for serum parathyroid hormone, calcium, and phosphorus and experienced biochemical adverse effects. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: This observational study evaluated 45,487 prevalent patients from a dialysis organization database linked with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services End-Stage Renal Disease database. Patient characteristics, laboratory values (albumin, parathyroid hormone, calcium, phosphorus), intravenous vitamin D, and oral medication (cinacalcet, phosphate binders) prescriptions were evaluated for cinacalcet patients. Results: By June 2006, almost 32% of patients had received cinacalcet prescriptions. Mean baseline corrected calcium was 9.8 mg/dl and phosphorus was 6.3 mg/dl, and median parathyroid hormone was 577 pg/ml, versus 9.5 mg/dl, 5.3 mg/dl, and 215 pg/ml, respectively, for noncinacalcet patients. Patients with cinacalcet prescriptions for ≥6 mo had corrected calcium reduced by 4.2%, phosphorus by 7.0%, and parathyroid hormone by 29.9% by 12 mo. More cinacalcet patients attained Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative targets with less hyperparathyroidism, hypercalcemia, and hyperphosphatemia but more hypoparathyroidism and hypocalcemia. Over 12 mo, vitamin D use and use consistency increased, phosphate binder dosages increased, and mean cinacalcet daily dosage reached 55 mg. Conclusions: Patients with cinacalcet prescriptions exhibited more severe hyperparathyroidism and hyperphosphatemia than noncinacalcet patients. Positive effects were less dramatic than in Phase

  20. Defense Laboratory Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Effects, Modeling and Simulation • Systems • Mission • Directed Energy Effects Kirtland AFB, New Mexico North Oscura Peak and Salinas...Range Laser and Optics Laboratories (North Oscura Peak (NOP) and Salinas Peak), New Mexico These laboratories are designed to evaluate advanced sensor...capabilities include vacuum: 5 x 10-7 Torr ; Ultraviolet: 1-3 EUVS; Temperature: 80°F - 150°F; Electron: 1012e-/cm/sec @ up to 20 KeVs. It provides space

  1. The effect of slightly warm temperature on work performance and comfort in open-plan offices - a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maula, H; Hongisto, V; Östman, L; Haapakangas, A; Koskela, H; Hyönä, J

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of a temperature of 29°C on performance in tasks involving different cognitive demands and to assess the effect on perceived performance, subjective workload, thermal comfort, perceived working conditions, cognitive fatigue, and somatic symptoms in a laboratory with realistic office environment. A comparison was made with a temperature of 23°C. Performance was measured on the basis of six different tasks that reflect different stages of cognitive performance. Thirty-three students participated in the experiment. The exposure time was 3.5 h in both thermal conditions. Performance was negatively affected by slightly warm temperature in the N-back working memory task. Temperature had no effect on performance in other tasks focusing on psychomotor, working memory, attention, or long-term memory capabilities. Temperature had no effect on perceived performance. However, slightly warm temperature caused concentration difficulties. Throat symptoms were found to increase over time at 29°C, but no temporal change was seen at 23°C. No effect of temperature on other symptoms was found. As expected, the differences in thermal comfort were significant. Women perceived a temperature of 23°C colder than men.

  2. Effectiveness of practices to reduce blood culture contamination: a Laboratory Medicine Best Practices systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Susan R; Favoretto, Alessandra M; Baetz, Rich Ann; Derzon, James H; Madison, Bereneice M; Mass, Diana; Shaw, Colleen S; Layfield, Christopher D; Christenson, Robert H; Liebow, Edward B

    2012-09-01

    This article is a systematic review of the effectiveness of three practices for reducing blood culture contamination rates: venipuncture, phlebotomy teams, and prepackaged preparation/collection (prep) kits. The CDC-funded Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Initiative systematic review methods for quality improvement practices were used. Studies included as evidence were: 9 venipuncture (vs. versus intravenous catheter), 5 phlebotomy team; and 7 prep kit. All studies for venipuncture and phlebotomy teams favored these practices, with meta-analysis mean odds ratios for venipuncture of 2.69 and phlebotomy teams of 2.58. For prep kits 6 studies' effect sizes were not statistically significantly different from no effect (meta-analysis mean odds ratio 1.12). Venipuncture and the use of phlebotomy teams are effective practices for reducing blood culture contamination rates in diverse hospital settings and are recommended as evidence-based "best practices" with high overall strength of evidence and substantial effect size ratings. No recommendation is made for or against prep kits based on uncertain improvement. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. All rights reserved.

  3. Laboratory investigations on the effect of selected disinfectants on survival of the cockroaches Blattella germanica (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racewicz, M

    1983-01-01

    It was ascertained that lysol 2% and 5% showed the most toxic effect in control of cockroaches in the contact method (23.3% and 95.5% mortality after 24 hours of exposure), and that chloramine 1%, 3% and 5% was the most effective food poison (after 19 days exposure 100% of the insects died). When injecting disinfectant into the body cavity, the cockroaches showed a ten times higher sensibility to formalin and chloramine than to lysol. The use, however, of disinfectant in the contact method (particularly lysol 2%) together with an insecticide based on propoxur, allowed to reduce its dose to a half, what gave better results than the use of an insecticide alone in a normal dose.

  4. EFFECTS OF CARBOFURAN ON THE REPRODUCTIVE CAPACITY OF A FRESHWATER SNAIL, RADIX QUADRASI, UNDER LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIRGINIA S. CARING

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of 4 sublethal concentrations of carbofuran (250, 500, 1000 and 2000 ppm on the reproductive capacity of R. quadrasi was determined. Results showed that incubation period is delayed and inhibited by 1000 and 2000 ppm carbofuran but not by lower concentrations. The hatching period is longer in treated snails and not all eggs hatch in the 1000 and 2000 ppm treatment. The percentage of hatching is inversely proportional to the carbofuran concentration. Oviposition was delayed in all the treated stages and at all dosages. The higher the carbofuran concentration, the later the onset of oviposition. The reproductive period is shortened. Fecundity was decreased in snails treated at EMB and SM. However, only the 2000 ppm carbofuran concentration showed an adverse effect on the snails exposure at PSM.

  5. Biological effects of an impulse current according to laboratory researches of electroshock devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoryev О.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The federal law "About Weapons" permits the use of electroshock devices if they are safe for people. We developed requirements for the procedure medical-biological testing on the safety of electroshock devices. We did an experimental study assessing medical-biological safety of electroshock devices. The assessment is based on a point system, which use ranges of biological effects. The experiments were performed in rabbits. We used 13 electroshock devices with different characteristics. Electroshock devices were made in Russia. We found that the response of a biological object to inrush current included convulsions, respiratory and cardiac activity. We analyzed the biological effects of pulsed current electroshock device obtained in experimental conditions. It is concluded that the characteristic clinical and physiological response to the action of electric current is pulsepolyparametric and depending on a combination of characteristics and condition of the electric impulse influence object.

  6. THE CLINICAL AND LABORATORY EFFECTIVENESS OF OSELTAMIVIR FOR TREATMENT OF INFLUENZA IN HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Voloschcuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of our study was to estimate the efficacy of antiviral drug Oseltamivir for influenza treatment. We assessed the effect of Oseltamivir on the immune status of the 75 patients. It was formed 2 groups of observations with confirmed diagnosis of influenza: 38 received therapy Oseltamivir and 37 people receiving pathogenetic treatment. Treatment Oseltamivir contributes to a significant reduction in the duration of the catarrhal and intoxication syndromes and prevents the development of complications and exacerbations of chronic disease in persons with modified backdrop premorbid, which indicates for its high antiviral activity. We can assume the effect of Oseltamivir for restore the disturbed balance of cytokines, on assessing the dynamics of IL-1β, IL-8, IFNα, IFNγ in the serum.

  7. Protective Effect of Zizphus Vulgaris Extract, on Liver Toxicity in Laboratory Rats

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ebrahimi; Sadeghi, H.; A Pourmahmoudi; SH Askariyan; Askari, S

    2011-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Some of natural and synthetic products have antioxidant properties which protect the liver against the destructive factors. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Zizphus Vulgaris extracts on mice liver. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Yasouj University of Medical Sciences in 2010 on 30 healthy adult male Wistar rats. Animals were randomly divided into five equal groups: the control group (receiving, olive oil), control group ...

  8. Europium-based iron pnictides: a unique laboratory for magnetism, superconductivity and structural effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Sina; Dressel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Despite decades of intense research, the origin of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates and iron-based compounds is still a mystery. Magnetism and superconductivity are traditionally antagonistic phenomena; nevertheless, there is basically no doubt left that unconventional superconductivity is closely linked to magnetism. But this is not the whole story; recently, also structural effects related to the so-called nematic phase gained considerable attention. In order to obtain more information about this peculiar interplay, systematic material research is one of the most important attempts, revealing from time to time unexpected effects. Europium-based iron pnictides are the latest example of such a completely paradigmatic material, as they display not only spin-density-wave and superconducting ground states, but also local Eu(2+) magnetism at a similar temperature scale. Here we review recent experimental progress in determining the complex phase diagrams of europium-based iron pnictides. The conclusions drawn from the observations reach far beyond these model systems. Thus, although europium-based iron pnictides are very peculiar, they provide a unique platform to study the common interplay of structural-nematic, magnetic and electronic effects in high-temperature superconductors.

  9. Europium-based iron pnictides: a unique laboratory for magnetism, superconductivity and structural effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Sina; Dressel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Despite decades of intense research, the origin of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates and iron-based compounds is still a mystery. Magnetism and superconductivity are traditionally antagonistic phenomena; nevertheless, there is basically no doubt left that unconventional superconductivity is closely linked to magnetism. But this is not the whole story; recently, also structural effects related to the so-called nematic phase gained considerable attention. In order to obtain more information about this peculiar interplay, systematic material research is one of the most important attempts, revealing from time to time unexpected effects. Europium-based iron pnictides are the latest example of such a completely paradigmatic material, as they display not only spin-density-wave and superconducting ground states, but also local Eu2+ magnetism at a similar temperature scale. Here we review recent experimental progress in determining the complex phase diagrams of europium-based iron pnictides. The conclusions drawn from the observations reach far beyond these model systems. Thus, although europium-based iron pnictides are very peculiar, they provide a unique platform to study the common interplay of structural-nematic, magnetic and electronic effects in high-temperature superconductors.

  10. Genetic effects of acute spermatogonial x-irradiation of the laboratory rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, J.R.; Chapman, A.B.

    1977-02-01

    The genetic effects of one generation of spermatogonial x-irradiation in rats, by a single dose of 600 r in one experiment and by a fractionated dose of 450 r in another, were measured in three generations of their descendants. Estimates of dominant lethal mutation rates, (2 to 3) x 10/sup -4//gamete/r, from litter size differences between irradiated and nonirradiated stock were consistent with previous estimates from rats and mice. Similar consistency was found for estimates of sex-linked recessive mutation rates, (1 to 2) x 10/sup -4/ chromosome/r, from male proportions within strains; however, when measured in crossbreds the proportion of males was higher in the irradiated than in the nonirradiated lines. This inconsistency in results is in keeping with the contradictory results reported for recessive sex-linked lethal mutation rates in mice. The effects used to estimate recessive lethal mutation rates which were unusually high, (2 to 14) x 10/sup -4//gamete/r, were not significant. Other factors that could have contributed to the observed effects are postulated.

  11. Opposing effects of DHEA replacement in elderly subjects on declarative memory and attention after exposure to a laboratory stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, O T; Kudielka, B M; Hellhammer, D H; Hellhammer, J; Kirschbaum, C

    1998-08-01

    Aging is accompanied by a continuous decline of the adrenal steroid hormone DHEA and its ester DHEAS. Results from studies in rodents have demonstrated that DHEA(S) administration can enhance memory in several test paradigms. However studies from this laboratory did not find positive effects of DHEA treatment on cognitive performance in young and elderly humans. With respect to a possible mechanism of DHEA activity, effects on several neurotransmitter receptors as well as a possible antiglucocorticoid action are discussed. For high levels of glucocorticoids, a disruptive effect on hippocampal mediated memory is documented in rodents and humans. Therefore it was speculated that, if an antiglucocorticoid action of DHEA would underlie the observed beneficial effects of DHEA on memory, these effects might only be detectable if subjects are stressed (and therefore have high cortisol levels). To test this hypothesis 75 elderly women and men participated in a placebo controlled experiment. Subjects took DHEA (50 mg/day) or placebo for 2 weeks (double blind). Thereafter they participated in a standardized psychosocial laboratory stressor (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST). Before and after stress exposure subjects completed two declarative memory tests (visual-verbal and spatial) as well as one attention test. In addition recall of visual material learned before stress was assessed after stress. Baseline DHEAS levels were significantly lower compared with young adults. DHEA replacement increased DHEAS levels into ranges found in young subjects. DHEA-substituted subjects showed a trend towards a larger cortisol stress response. In the visual memory test subjects under DHEA recalled less items after stress which they had learned before stress. In the attention test however subjects under DHEA performed better than subjects from the placebo group after stress. No interaction between stress and DHEA was found for the spatial memory task. The effects of DHEA substitution on

  12. Comparison of the effects of drilling fluid on macrobenthic invertebrates associated with the seagrass, Thalassia testudinum, in the laboratory and field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David E.; Flemer, David A.; Bundrick, Charles M.

    1992-09-01

    The structure of a macrobenthic invertebrate community associated with the seagrass, Thalassia testudinum, was evaluated under laboratory and field conditions. The research focused on: (1) the effects of pollution stress from a representative drilling fluid used in off-shore oil and gas operations, and (2) a comparison of responses of the seagrass-invertebrate community in the laboratory and field. A series of 15·3 cm diameter cores of the seagrass-invertebrate community was collected from field sites for establishment and sampling of microcosms and in the sampling of field plots over time. Weekly exposures to drilling fluid were conducted in the laboratory microcosms at a mean total suspended matter concentration of 110·7 mg l -1 (± 17·7 SD), and in field plots by usage of acrylic exposure chambers at a mean concentration of 132·8 mg l -1 (±33·3 SD). Standing crop of T. testudinum was not affected by drilling fluid in the laboratory or field when measured after 6 and 12 week exposure periods. The numbers of macrobenthic invertebrates were suppressed by drilling fluid at both exposure periods in the laboratory, but inhibitory effects were absent in the field. Invertebrate densities in the field were similar among control and treated plots, and were much lower than densities occurring in the laboratory control. In most instances, species richness values were similar in the field and laboratory at the end of each 6 and 12 week period.

  13. Identify biosorption effects of Thiobacillus towards perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA): Pilot study from field to laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Tieyu; Sun, Yajun; Wang, Pei; Yvette, Baninla; Meng, Jing; Li, Qifeng; Zhou, Yunqiao

    2017-03-01

    The concentration of Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and the bacterial community composition along the Xiaoqing River were explored with HPLC-MS/MS and Illumina high-throughput sequencing in present study. The results showed that perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was the predominant PFAAs in all sediment samples, and high level of PFOA could lead to an evident increase in the abundance of Thiobacillus. Thiobacillus was identified with the survival ability in high concentrations of PFOA accordingly. Therefore, Thiobacillus thioparus and Thiobacillus denitrificans were selected as receptors to design indoor biosorption experiment. The growth curves under different PFOA concentrations and residual rates of PFOA in the processes of cultivation were analyzed. The results showed that upwards concentrations of PFOA below 5000 ng/L led to an obvious increase in the growth rate of T. thioparus. Whereas PFOA promoted the growth of T. denitrificans in a relatively limited range of concentration, and the effect was not obvious. The addition of different concentrations of PFOA had no apparent effects on pH values in the media of both T. thioparus and T. denitrificans. The concentrations of PFOA in liquid media reduced after the process of bacteria culturing. The removal rates of T. thioparus and T. denitrificans to PFOA were 21.1-26.8% and 13.5-18.4%, respectively. The current findings indicated that T. thioparus could play a significant role as potential biosorbent with the ability to eliminate PFOA effectively in aquatic environment, which would provide novel information for PFOA ecological decontamination and remediation.

  14. Effective attenuation lengths for photoelectrons emitted by high-energy laboratory X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonski, A., E-mail: ajablonski@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Powell, C.J. [Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MA (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Effective attenuation lengths (EALs) for high kinetic energy photoelectrons. • Weak influence of the non-dipole approximation on the EAL. • New analytical algorithm for calculating the effective attenuation length. - Abstract: We report calculations of effective attenuation lengths (EALs) for Si 2s{sub 1/2}, Cu 2p{sub 3/2}, Ag 3d{sub 5/2}, and Au 4f{sub 7/2} photoelectrons excited by Mg Kα, Al Kα, Zr Lα, and Ti Kα X-rays, where the photoelectron energies ranged from 321 eV to 4.426 keV. These EALs, appropriate for determining overlayer-film thicknesses, were calculated from the transport-approximation formalism and from Monte Carlo simulations using photoionization cross sections from the dipole and non-dipole approximations. Satisfactory consistency was found between EALs determined from the TA formalism and from MC simulations, while differences between EALs for Au 4f{sub 7/2} photoelectrons from the dipole and non-dipole approximations were between 1% (for Mg and Al Kα X-rays) and 2.5% (for Ti Kα X-rays) for photoelectron emission angles less than 50°. As in past work for electron energies less than 2 keV, we found a simple linear relation between the ratio of the average EAL (for emission angles less than 50°) to the inelastic mean free path (IMFP) and the single-scattering albedo, a function of the IMFP and the transport mean free path. The root-mean-square difference between our average EALs and those from the linear expression was 1.44%. This expression should be useful in determinations of film thicknesses by XPS with unpolarized X-rays for photoelectron energies up to about 5 keV.

  15. The e-Learning Effectiveness Versus Traditional Learning on a Health Informatics Laboratory Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogas, Spyros; Kolokathi, Aikaterini; Birbas, Konstantinos; Chondrocoukis, Gregory; Mantas, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between e-Learning and traditional learning methods of a University course on Health Informatics domain. A pilot research took place among University students who divided on two learning groups, the e-learners and the traditional learners. A comparison of the examinations' marks for the two groups of students was conducted in order to find differences on students' performance. The study results reveal that the students scored almost the same marks independently of the learning procedure. Based on that, it can be assumed that the e-learning courses have the same effectiveness as the in-classroom learning sessions.

  16. Quantitative study of guide-field effects on Hall reconnection in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, T D; Yamada, M; Ji, H; Lawrence, E; Dorfman, S; Myers, C E; Yoo, J

    2012-10-19

    The effect of guide field on magnetic reconnection is quantitatively studied by systematically varying an applied guide field in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). The quadrupole field, a signature of two-fluid reconnection at zero guide field, is altered by a finite guide field. It is shown that the reconnection rate is significantly reduced with increasing guide field, and this dependence is explained by a combination of local and global physics: locally, the in-plane Hall currents are reduced, while globally guide field compression produces an increased pressure both within and downstream of the reconnection region.

  17. Evaluation of Pyrethrin Formulations on Dengue/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Vectors in the Laboratory and Sublethal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asia, Aedes aegypti (L. has been incriminated as principal vector of dengue viruses and Ae. albopictus as the secondary vector of dengue fever. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three for-mula¬tions of pyrethrin derived from Tanacetum cinerariaefolium against the dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the laboratory. The testings employed 2 methodologies: the WHO Larval Bioassay and WHO Adult Bioassay. The results showed that all the three pyrethrin formulations had larvicidal and adulticidal activi-ties. The impact of the sublethal doses of pyrethrin formulations on Aedes spp. larvae resulted in 4-6% of alive adult emergence compared to 90% of Ae. aegypti emerging adults and 96% Ae. albopictus alive adult emergence in the control. The impact of sublethal doses of the pyrethrin formulations caused very low fecundity on both Aedes spp. compared to the control (P< 0.05.

  18. Biomarkers of effects of hypoxia and oil-shale contaminated sediments in laboratory-exposed gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitsberg, Randel; Baršienė, Janina; Freiberg, Rene; Andreikėnaitė, Laura; Tammaru, Toomas; Rumvolt, Kateriina; Tuvikene, Arvo

    2013-12-01

    In North-East Estonia, considerable amounts of toxicants (e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenols, heavy metals) leach into water bodies through discharges from the oil-shale industry. In addition, natural and anthropogenic hypoxic events in water bodies affect the health of aquatic organisms. Here we report a study on the combined effects of contaminated sediment and hypoxia on the physiology of gibel carp (Carssius auratus gibelio). We conducted a laboratory exposure study that involved exposure to polluted sediments from oil-shale industries (River Purtse) and sediments from a relatively clean environment (River Selja), together with sediments spiked with PAHs. The oxygen content (saturation vs. hypoxia (oil-shale industry on fish health parameters was clear under different oxygen levels. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect Of A Video-Based Laboratory On The High School Pupils’ Understanding Of Constant Speed Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Trudel, Abdeljalil Métioui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the physical phenomena studied in high school, the kinematical concepts are important because they constitute a precondition for the study of subsequent concepts of mechanics. Our research aims at studying the effect of a computer-assisted scientific investigation on high school pupils’ understanding of the constant speed motion. Experimentation took place in a high school physics classroom. A repeated measures analysis of variance shows that, during the implementation of this strategy, the pupils’ understanding of kinematical concepts increased in a significant way. In conclusion, we specify advantages and limits of the study and give future research directions concerning the design of a computer-assisted laboratory in high school physics.

  20. [The effect of insecticide resistance on the demographic parameters of 3 strains of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) under laboratory conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, S; Montada, D; Fuentes, O; Castex, M; Leyva, M

    1998-01-01

    The life tables of 3 strains of Culex quinquefasciatus were studied under laboratory conditions: Slab, susceptible to reference; Old Havana, treated with cypermethrin until its fourth generation; and Cotorro, from the field. It was found that the different levels of resistance to organophosphate insecticides and pyrethroids present in the Cotorro and Old Havana strains did not influence either on the duration of the period of development of the immature stages or in the sexual proportion of the emerged adults, but they had a favorable and directly proportional effect on the survival and longevity of the adults. However, they exerted a negative and inversely proportional influence on the reproduction and population growth of these strains. Useful data for the use and management of insecticides within the strategies of control of Culex quinquefasciatus, an important vector of lymphatic filariasis, are provided.

  1. Laboratory study on the cooling effect of flash water evaporative cooling technology for ventilation and air-conditioning of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Yuan, Shu; Yang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a simple cooling technology using flash water evaporation. The technology combines a water atomizer with a plate heat exchanger used for heat recovery of a ventilation system. It is mainly used to cool the ventilation airflow from outdoors and is particularly suitable to be used...... in warm/hot and dry environment where dehumidification of outdoor air is not needed. A laboratory experiment was designed and conducted to evaluate the cooling effectiveness of this technology. The experiment was conducted in a twin-climate chamber. One chamber simulated warm/hot and dry outdoor...... environments and the other simulated an air-conditioned indoor environment. The flash water evaporation cooling device was installed in the chamber that simulated indoor environment. The air from the chamber simulating outdoor environment was introduced into the cooling device and cooled by the flash water...

  2. Effects of Initial Conditions on Compressible Mixing in Supernova-Relevant Laboratory Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M; Greenough, J

    2004-04-30

    In core-collapse supernovae, strong blast waves drive interfaces susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. In addition, perturbation growth can result from material expansion in large-scale velocity gradients behind the shock front. Laser-driven experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. In this paper, we summarize recent results from our computational study of unstable systems driven by high Mach number shock and blast waves. For planar multimode systems, compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions (IC's) by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. With higher-dimensional blast waves, divergence restores the properties necessary for establishment of the self-similar state, but achieving it requires very high initial characteristic mode number and high Mach number for the incident blast wave. Initial conditions predicted by some recent stellar calculations are incompatible with self-similarity.

  3. Excito-repellency effect of deltamethrin on triatomines under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diotaiuti Liléia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates that deltamethrin in low doses produces an excito-repellency effect on triatomines, as already observed for mosquitoes. A wooden box covered with a cloth impregnated with deltamethrin at doses of 2.5 and 5mg ai/m² was utilized for the experiment. The triatomine species studied were Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus, Rhodnius neglectus and Triatoma sordida. Adults were released in one of the sides of the box and their position was noted in subsequent periods. The observations were realized on the day the cloth was impregnated and subsequently repeated at 30 and 60 days for T. sordida; on day 120, the remaining species were included. Insect mortality and attempts at flight from the box were also observed. Excito-repellency was evident for all species and doses up to day 120. The only species that attempted to fly was P. megistus. The excito-repellency effect may be considered as an additional advantage to the insecticide power, as it should be able to prevent the installation of new colonies by females that fly into the homes, and at the moment of the spraying, it should promote the flushing out of triatomines from the wall crevices and from other shelters.

  4. Dynamical effects of subducting ridges: Insights from 3-D laboratory models

    CERN Document Server

    Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio; Labanieh, Shasa; Regard, Vincent; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2005.02797.x

    2010-01-01

    We model the subduction of buoyant ridges and plateaus to study their effect on slab dynamics. Oceanic ridges parallel to the trench have a stronger effect on the process of subduction because they simultaneously affect a longer trench segment. Large buoyant slab segments sink more slowly into the asthenosphere, and their subduction result in a diminution of the velocity of subduction of the plate. We observe a steeping of the slab below those buoyant anomalies, resulting in smaller radius of curvature of the slab, that augments the energy dissipated in folding the plate and further diminishes the velocity of subduction. When the 3D geometry of a buoyant plateau is modelled, the dip of the slab above the plateau decreases, as a result of the larger velocity of subduction of the dense "normal" oceanic plate on both sides of the plateau. Such a perturbation of the dip of the slab maintains long time after the plateau has been entirely incorporated into the subduction zone. We compare experiments with the presen...

  5. Effects of two lubricant oils on marine nematode assemblages in a laboratory microcosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyrem, H; Louati, H; Essid, N; Aïssa, P; Mahmoudi, E

    2010-05-01

    The effects of two lubricating oils on nematode assemblages of a Tunisian lagoon were investigated in a microcosm experiment. Sediment from a pristine site in Ghar El Melh lagoon (Western Mediterranean) was treated with either mineral oil (Mobil 20 W-50), a synthetic lubricant (Mobil 0 W-40), the same two lubricants after use in a vehicle, and effects were examined after 5 weeks. Univariate analysis showed significant differences between most univariate indices of the nematode assemblages in all the lubricant treatments as compared to the control. Total nematode abundance (I), species richness (d) and number of species (S) decreased significantly in all lubricant contaminated microcosms. However, evenness was not affected in all treated replicates except in used mineral lubricant treatment where it was significantly higher than in the control. Diversity (H') was only altered in synthetic lubricant treatments. Results from multivariate analyses of the species abundance data demonstrated that responses of nematode species to the two lubricants treatments were varied: Daptonema trabeculosum was eliminated in all lubricant treatments and seemed to be an intolerant species to oil contamination. Spirinia gerlachi increased in mineral lubricant treatments ("clean" and used) but was eliminated in all synthetic lubricant treatments. This species could be categorized as "resistant" to mineral oil contamination and intolerant to synthetic lubricant contamination. Terschellingia longicaudata increased only in synthetic lubricant treatments ("clean" and used) and appeared to be a "synthetic oil-resistant" species.

  6. Effects of stress conditions on rheological properties of granular soil in large triaxial rheology laboratory tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓斌; 张家生; 刘宝琛; 唐孟雄

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the rheological properties of red stone granular soil,a series of rheological experiments were executed on large tri-axial rheological apparatus.Under 100,200 and 300 kPa confining stress conditions,the rheological tests were carried out.These experiment results showed that the stress conditions,especially the stress level were the critical influencing factors of the rheological deformation properties.Under the low stress level(S=0.1),the granular soil showed the elastic properties,and there was no obvious rheological deformation.Under the middle stress level(0.20.8) creep curves showed the non-linear viscous plastic rheological properties.Especially,under the stress level of S=1.0,the accelerated rheological phase of creep curves occurred at early time with a trend of failure.The stress level had obvious effects on the final rheological deformation of the soil sample,and the final rheological deformation increments nonlinearly increased with stress level.The final rheological deformation increment and step was little under low stress level,while it became large under high stress level,which showed the nonlinearly rheological properties of the granular soil.The confining pressure also had direct effects on final rheological deformation,and the final rheological deformation linearly increased with confining pressure increments.

  7. Effect of Geotextile Reinforcement on Shear Strength of Sandy Soil: Laboratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denine, Sidali; Della, Noureddine; Dlawar, Muhammed Rawaz; Sadok, Feia; Canou, Jean; Dupla, Jean-Claude

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents results of a series of undrained monotonic compression tests on loose sand reinforced with geotextile mainly to study the effect of confining stress on the mechanical behaviour of geotextile reinforced sand. The triaxial tests were performed on reconstituted specimens of dry natural sand prepared at loose relative density (Dr = 30%) with and without geotextile layers and consolidated to three levels of confining pressures 50, 100 and 200 kPa, where different numbers and different arrangements of reinforcement layers were placed at different heights of the specimens (0, 1 and 2 layers). The behaviour of test specimens was presented and discussed. Test results showed that geotextile inclusion improves the mechanical behaviour of sand, a significant increase in the shear strength and cohesion value is obtained by adding up layers of reinforcement. Also, the results indicate that the strength ratio is more pronounced for samples which were subjected to low value of confining pressure. The obtained results reveal that high value of confining pressure can restrict the sand shear dilatancy and the more effect of reinforcement efficiently.

  8. Laboratory investigation of wettability and hysteresis effects on resistivity index and capillary pressure characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, A.K.; Jing, X.D. [Centre for Petroleum Studies, T.H. Huxley School, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London (United Kingdom); Archer, J.S. [Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-01

    This paper focuses on the experimental aspects of resistivity index and water/oil capillary pressure measurements. A novel experimental procedure using water-wet and oil-wet membranes has been developed. Six potential electrodes and two current electrodes are used to provide resistivity readings across the sample and for seven adjacent intervals along the length of the core plug. The resistivity profile along the core length enables assessment of saturation distribution and end effects. The desaturation tests mimic different displacement processes that could occur during the history of the reservoir, for example, the displacement of water by oil during the initial hydrocarbon migration; the displacement of oil by mud filtrate around the wellbore during drilling and the displacement processes during the formation of transition zones under gravity/capillary forces and during waterflooding. Results from our studies indicate that both the phase-dependent and cycle-dependent hysteresis should be taken into consideration for resistivity index and capillary pressure measurements. The hysteresis effects also depend on the wettability of the rock samples.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

  10. Circadian phase-shifting effects of a laboratory environment: a clinical trial with bright and dim light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Jeffrey A

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our aims were to examine the influence of different bright light schedules on mood, sleep, and circadian organization in older adults (n = 60, ages 60–79 years with insomnia and/or depression, contrasting with responses of young, healthy controls (n = 30, ages 20–40 years. Methods Volunteers were assessed for one week in their home environments. Urine was collected over two 24-hour periods to establish baseline acrophase of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s excretion. Immediately following home recording, volunteers spent five nights and four days in the laboratory. Sleep periods were fixed at eight hours in darkness, consistent with the volunteers' usual sleep periods. Volunteers were randomly assigned to one of three light treatments (four hours per day within the wake period: (A two hours of 3,000 lux at 1–3 hours and 13–15 hours after arising; (B four hours of 3,000 lux at 6–10 hours after arising; (C four hours of dim placebo light at 6–10 hours after arising. Lighting was 50 lux during the remainder of wakefulness. The resulting aMT6s acrophase was determined during the final 30 hours in the laboratory. Results Neither mood nor total melatonin excretion differed significantly by treatment. For the three light treatments, significant and similar phase-response plots were found, indicating that the shift in aMT6s acrophase was dependent upon the circadian time of treatment. The changes in circadian timing were not significantly correlated to changes in sleep or mood. Conclusion The trial failed to demonstrate photoperiodic effects. The results suggest that even low levels of illumination and/or fixed timing of behavior had significant phase-shifting effects.

  11. Integrating decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory model and failure mode and effect analysis to determine the priority in solving production problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Failure mode and effect analysis has been applied in manufacturing and service industries but can still be improved. Failure mode and effect analysis is a common tool used to evaluate risk priority number; however, numerous scholars have doubted the effectiveness of failure mode and effect analysis and have thus proposed methods for correcting failure mode and effect analysis from its conventional formula. Because implemented actions can determine or influence resource allocation and its effects, completing one corrective action can occasionally simultaneously improve various failure modes. In this study, failure mode and effect analysis and decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory were integrated to correct failure modes and increase their effectiveness. First, failure mode and effect analysis was employed to identify the items for improvement. Second, decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory was adopted to examine the reciprocal influences and causality among these items. Finally, the priority for improving the items was proposed. By combining the advantages of failure mode and effect analysis and decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory, this research method complemented the shortcomings of the two techniques. According to the empirical research of this case study in which decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory was employed to analyze the causality among the items of the failure modes, the malfunction of production lines can be solved faster and more effectively compared with merely considering the size of risk priority number values.

  12. Advanced photoelectric effect experiment beamline at Elettra: A surface science laboratory coupled with Synchrotron Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaccione, G; Vobornik, I; Fujii, J; Krizmancic, D; Annese, E; Giovanelli, L; Maccherozzi, F; Salvador, F; De Luisa, A; Benedetti, D; Gruden, A; Bertoch, P; Polack, F; Cocco, D; Sostero, G; Diviacco, B; Hochstrasser, M; Maier, U; Pescia, D; Back, C H; Greber, T; Osterwalder, J; Galaktionov, M; Sancrotti, M; Rossi, G

    2009-04-01

    We report the main characteristics of the advanced photoelectric effect experiments beamline, operational at Elettra storage ring, featuring a fully independent double branch scheme obtained by the use of chicane undulators and able to keep polarization control in both linear and circular mode. The paper describes the novel technical solutions adopted, namely, (a) the design of a quasiperiodic undulator resulting in optimized suppression of higher harmonics over a large photon energy range (10-100 eV), (b) the thermal stability of optics under high heat load via cryocoolers, and (c) the end station interconnected setup allowing full access to off-beam and on-beam facilities and, at the same time, the integration of users' specialized sample growth chambers or modules.

  13. Formation of Soil Water Repellency by Laboratory Burning and Its Effect on Soil Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sujung; Im, Sangjun

    2010-05-01

    Fire-induced soil water repellency can vary with burning conditions, and may lead to significant changes in soil hydraulic properties. However, isolation of the effects of soil water repellency from other factors is difficult, particularly under field conditions. This study was conducted to (i) investigate the effects of burning using different plant leaf materials and (ii) of different burning conditions on the formation of soil water repellency, and (iii) isolate the effects of the resulting soil water repellency on soil evaporation from other factors. Burning treatments were performed on the surface of homogeneous fully wettable sand soil contained in a steel frame (60 x 60 cm; 40 cm depth). As controls a sample without a heat treatment, and a heated sample without fuel, were also used. Ignition and heat treatments were carried out with a gas torch. For comparing the effects of different burning conditions, fuel types included oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora), pine needle litter (litter on a coniferous forest floor, P. densiflora + P. rigida), and broad-leaf litter (Quercus mongolica + Q. aliena + Prunus serrulata var. spontanea + other species); fuel loads were 200 g, 300 g, and 500 g; and heating duration was 40 s, 90 s and 180 s. The heating duration was adjusted to control the temperature, based on previous experiments. The temperature was measured continuously at 3-second intervals and logged with two thermometers. After burning, undisturbed soil columns were sampled for subsequent experiments. Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) test was performed at every 1 mm depth of the soil columns to measure the severity of soil water repellency and its vertical extent. Soil water repellency was detected following all treatments. As the duration of heating increased, the thickness of the water repellent layer increased, whilst the severity of soil water repellency decreased. As regards fuel amount, the most severe soil water repellency was

  14. Laboratory investigation of the hydroelastic effect on liquid sloshing in rectan- gular tanks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋梅荣; 任冰; 王国玉; 王永学

    2014-01-01

    A sloshing experiment is conducted to study the hydroelastic effect in an elastic tank. For this purpose, a translational harmonic excitation is applied to a 2-D rectangular tank model. The lowest-order natural frequencies of the liquid in the tank are determined through the sweep test. The wave elevation and the sloshing pressure are obtained by changing the excitation frequency and the liquid depth. Then the characteristics and the variation of the elevation and the pressure are discussed. The results are compared with the experimental results and the theoretical calculations in a rigid tank. Our analysis indicates that, in the non- resonant cases, the elastic results, the rigid experimental results and the theoretical values are all close to each other. In contrast, under the resonant condition, the elastic experimental result is slightly smaller than the rigid one. Also, the theoretical values are smaller than the experimental results at the resonant frequency.

  15. Anomalous piezoelectric effects, found in the laboratory and reconstructed by numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Teisseyre

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Various rocks and minerals, which are not piezoelectric in the common sense, exhibit transient electric polarization in response to sudden changes in stress load. This anomalous piezoelectric effect differs from the regular, static piezoelectric response, in which electric charges appear as a result of crystal lattice deformation. The anomalous piezoelectricity is dynamic decaying in a few seconds or a few tens of seconds. However, in some materials different polarization properties are discovered. To explain certain aspects of the polarization signal increase and decay, some complicated mechanisms of electric charge generation and relaxation need to be assumed in their number ? concurrence of two or three relaxation processes. The hypothetical mechanisms are only mentioned, as the purpose of this work is to construct numerical models, behaving like the rocks investigated. Examples of experimental plots are shown together with the results of the numerical simulation of these experiments.

  16. Effect of regolith on planetary X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy: laboratory and numerical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranen, Jyri; Carpenter, James; Parviainen, Hannu; Muinonen, Karri

    Fluorescent X-rays from the surfaces of airless planetary bodies in the inner solar system have been measured by instruments on several spacecraft. X-ray emission follows photoionisation by incident solar X-rays and charged particles and reveals the elemental composition of the surface. Analyses of X-ray spectra obtained by orbiting spacecraft, use the relative intensities of elemental emission lines (e.g., Ca/Si, Fe/Si) to determine the geochemistry of the target body. Historically, the analysis of X-ray spectra has assumed that surfaces can be considered as homogeneous plane-parallel media. It has been shown, however, that relative line intensities are affected by the physical properties of the target surface (e.g. particle size distribution and packing density of the regolith) and the viewing and illumination geometry of observations. We describe experimental investigations into the effects of regolith properties on the line ratios measured by a nadir pointing (emergence angle 0° ) orbiting instrument, with with solar illumination angles in the range 25-75° from zenith. The planetary regolith analogue used in these experiments was a terrestrial, olivine rich basalt, which has been used by previous authors as an analogue to the lunar maria. The basalt samples were ground to powder and sieved to discriminate particles in the ranges, pellets. The separation of particles with different sizes allows some determination of the effects due to changes in particle size. All measurements were made at pressures of less than 0.5 mbar to prevent absorption of fluorescent X-rays in air. The relative fluorescent line ratios of several major rock forming elements (K, Ca, Ti, Si) were measured. We find that for measurements made in a "nadir" pointing geometry, the measured spectrum becomes increasingly hard as illumination angle increases (i.e. X-ray lines at higher energies are enhanced relative to those at lower energies). Some hardening of spectra is predicted by the

  17. Protective Effect of Zizphus Vulgaris Extract, on Liver Toxicity in Laboratory Rats

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    S Ebrahimi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Some of natural and synthetic products have antioxidant properties which protect the liver against the destructive factors. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Zizphus Vulgaris extracts on mice liver. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Yasouj University of Medical Sciences in 2010 on 30 healthy adult male Wistar rats. Animals were randomly divided into five equal groups: the control group (receiving, olive oil, control group (receiving olive oil and carbon tetrachloride and three intervention groups (receiving different dose of carbon tetrachloride and olive oil groups. The intervention group was given daily doses of 200, 400 and 600 mg per Kg of Zizphus Vulgaris extract by gavage respectively. After 45 days, the amount of liver enzymes, total protein, albumin and bilirubin in animal’s sera were measured. Data were analyzed by the SPSS software, using ANOVA and t-test. Results: The concentration of total protein, albumin, AST, ALT, ALP in test groups I, II and III receiving Z.Vulgaris extract (200, 400 and 600 mg/kg weight compared with control group were statistically not significant. Consumption of Z.Vulgaris reduced the bilirubin concentration in test groups I and II but this decrease was significant only in the test group I Increasing of Z.Vulgaris dose in the test group III (600 mg Z.Vulgaris per kg body weight showed increase in the level of serum bilirubin. Increase in the ratio of liver weight to body weight of rats in groups I and III in comparison with control groups was noticed although this difference was not statistically significant. Findings of this study revealed that dosage of 600 mg/kg extract of Z.Vulgaris caused significant improvements in CCl4 induced liver necrosis (P <0.01 and reduced portal cells inflammation (P <0.01. Dose of 400 mg/kg of Z.Vulgaris induced some destruction and necrosis of liver cells in animals but significant reduction of portal cells

  18. The role of peer assisted learning to improve the effectivity of clinical skill laboratory learning in dental education

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    Agus Ardinansyah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the clinical skill learning in dental education has begun in pre-clinic, known as Clinical Skill Laboratory (CSL which needs human resources, many and expensive tools and manikins, and enough times for practise. One of the method used in CSL in dental education is PeerAssisted Learning (PAL defined as “the development of knowledge and skill through active help and support among status equals or match companions”. This paper aims is to explain the role of PAL method to improve the effectivity of CSL learning in dental education in preclinical stage. Reviewing on the relevant literatures regarding peer assisted learning on the implementation of the clinical skill laboratory in dental education. The effectivity of CSL learning needs close supervision and individual feedback, so enough tutors is important through the process. This PAL method considered to be helpfull with the increasing numbers of dental students and the limitation of staff faculty. This method is found feasible, well accepted by peer-tutors and students, and can be as effective as conventional learning method. This is also useful for peer-teacher because they more intrinsically motivated, have higher conceptual learning scores, and perceive themselves to be more actively engaged with the environment than students who learn in order to be tested.  However, there are several limitation of this method. The contact time between students and medical doctors may decrease significantlyand it does not seem to be generally qualified to transfer such complex procedures.It also needs peer-teachers training and a detailed manual. Questions concerning the cost-effectiveness and profitability of student tutor-guided technical skills training may thus arise. But one institution that implemented this method states that the majority of their tutors decided to continue their teaching activity in the skills lab and that these experienced tutors, in addition to established faculty staff

  19. The effectiveness and user perception of 3-dimensional digital human anatomy in an online undergraduate anatomy laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbelink, Amy Joanne

    2007-12-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of implementing desktop 3-dimensional (3D) stereo images of human anatomy into an undergraduate human anatomy distance laboratory. User perceptions of 2D and 3D images were gathered via questionnaire in order to determine ease of use and level of satisfaction associated with the 3D software in the online learning environment. Mayer's (2001, p. 184) principles of design were used to develop the study materials that consisted of PowerPoint presentations and AVI files accessed via Blackboard. The research design employed a mixed-methods approach. Volunteers each were administered a demographic survey and were then stratified into groups based upon pre-test scores. A total sample size of 62 pairs was available for combined data analysis. Quantitative research questions regarding the effectiveness of 2D versus the 3D treatment were analyzed using a doubly-multivariate repeated measures (Doubly-MANOVA) design. Paired test scores achieved by undergraduates on a laboratory practical of identification and spatial relationships of the bones and features of a human skull were used in the analysis. The questionnaire designed to gather user perceptions consisted of quantitative and qualitative questions. Response frequencies were analyzed for the two groups and common themes were noted. Results revealed a statistically significant difference in group means for the main effect of the treatment groups 2D and 3D and for the variables of identification and relationship with the 3D group outperforming the 2D group on both dependent variables. Effect sizes were determined to be small, 0.215 for the identification variable and 0.359 for the relationship variable. Overall, all students liked the convenience of using PowerPoint and AVI files online. The 3D group felt their PowerPoint was more realistic than did the 2D group and both groups appreciated the detailed labeling of the online images. One third of the

  20. Inhibition Effect of pH on the Hatchability of Fasciola Miracidia under Laboratory Conditions

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    Mohammad YAKHCHALI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fasciolosis, caused by the liver flukes of the genus Fasciola, is one of the most prevalent diseases of domestic livestock and human throughout the world, imposing considerable economic losses. The present study was aimed to assess the effects of different pH values on hatching rate of Fasciola miracidia.Methods: The flukes were isolated from the infected livers of the slaughtered ruminants at the abattoir of Urmia City, Iran, crushed thoroughly and sieved for isola­tion of the Fasciola eggs. The eggs were washed up several times by PBS (0.01N, pH 7.2. They were incubated at different pH values of 7±0.1 (control and 3-9.5 (treatments at 28°C for 16 days.Results: The maximum hatching rate was observed at pH 7 (14.93±0.65%, while no miracidia were hatched at pH 3 and/or pH 9-9.5. There were significant differences between the hatching rate of the treatments and that of the control group.Conclusion: Water pH is proven to be a crucial factor affecting the life cycle of Fasciola and its epidemiology.

  1. Effect of methyl parathion on nitrous oxide production: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Oropeza, Marcelo; Fernández, Francisco J; Dendooven, Luc; Cabirol, Nathalie

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the diversity of a denitrifying gene (nirK) and the emission of CO(2) and N(2)O, in a "chinampa" soil contaminated with methyl parathion. Soil at 40% of water holding capacity was spiked with methyl parathion at four concentrations (i.e. 0, 0.7, 1.47 and 4.27 g kg(-1) dry soil), while emission of N(2)O and CO(2) and nirK diversity was determined after 0, 1, 14, 30, 60 and 90 days. The emission of N(2)O on a daily base and the cumulative emission of CO(2) was not affected by the different concentrations of methyl parathion applied to soil. The diversity of the nirK gene, determined by using temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE), decreased with increased methyl parathion application. It was found that methyl parathion had effect on the emissions of N(2)O and CO(2), and reduced the diversity of the nirK gene. Consequently, the reduced diversity of the nirK gene could affect the emission of N(2)O.

  2. Impaired insight in cocaine addiction: laboratory evidence and effects on cocaine-seeking behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, S.J.; Moeller, S.J.; Maloney, T.; Parvaz, M.A.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-04-15

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are often characterized by impaired insight into behaviour. Such an insight deficit has been suggested, but never directly tested, in drug addiction. Here we tested for the first time this impaired insight hypothesis in drug addiction, and examined its potential association with drug-seeking behaviour. We also tested potential modulation of these effects by cocaine urine status, an individual difference known to impact underlying cognitive functions and prognosis. Sixteen cocaine addicted individuals testing positive for cocaine in urine, 26 cocaine addicted individuals testing negative for cocaine in urine, and 23 healthy controls completed a probabilistic choice task that assessed objective preference for viewing four types of pictures (pleasant, unpleasant, neutral and cocaine). This choice task concluded by asking subjects to report their most selected picture type; correspondence between subjects self-reports with their objective choice behaviour provided our index of behavioural insight. Results showed that the urine positive cocaine subjects exhibited impaired insight into their own choice behaviour compared with healthy controls; this same study group also selected the most cocaine pictures (and fewest pleasant pictures) for viewing. Importantly, however, it was the urine negative cocaine subjects whose behaviour was most influenced by insight, such that impaired insight in this subgroup only was associated with higher cocaine-related choice on the task and more severe actual cocaine use. These findings suggest that interventions to enhance insight may decrease drug-seeking behaviour, especially in urine negative cocaine subjects, potentially to improve their longer-term clinical outcomes.

  3. A Laboratory Study of the Effects of Interbeds on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation in Shale Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiheng Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To investigate how the characteristics of interbeds affect hydraulic fracture propagation in the continental shale formation, a series of 300 mm × 300 mm × 300 mm concrete blocks with varying interbeds, based on outcrop observation and core measurement of Chang 7-2 shale formation, were prepared to conduct the hydraulic fracturing experiments. The results reveal that the breakdown pressure increases with the rise of thickness and strength of interbeds under the same in-situ field stress and injection rate. In addition, for the model blocks with thick and high strength interbeds, the hydraulic fracture has difficulty crossing the interbeds and is prone to divert along the bedding faces, and the fracturing effectiveness is not good. However, for the model blocks with thin and low strength interbeds, more long branches are generated along the main fracture, which is beneficial to the formation of the fracture network. What is more, combining the macroscopic descriptions with microscopic observations, the blocks with thinner and lower strength interbeds tend to generate more micro-fractures, and the width of the fractures is relatively larger on the main fracture planes. Based on the experiments, it is indicated that the propagation of hydraulic fractures is strongly influenced by the characteristics of interbeds, and the results are instructive to the understanding and evaluation of the fracability in the continental shale formation.

  4. The effective dose and pattern of soybean extract administration to regulate body weight of laboratory rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meilinah Hidayat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Latar Belakang: Protein dalam kedelai, β conglycinin mempunyai efek menekan nafsu makan melalui stimulasi Kolesistokinin. Kolesistokinin adalah hormon yang dilepaskan di saluran pencernaan dipicu oleh asupan protein dan berefek menekan nafsu makan untuk jangka pendek. Detam 1 adalah jenis kedelai berkualitas tinggi berdasarkan dengan Menteri Pertanian Indonesia. Ekstrak protein kedelai Detam 1 oleh Deak metode mengandung kadar β conglycinin yang tinggi. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh ekstrak protein kedelai Detam 1 metode Deak dalam menurunkan asupan makanan, berat badan, dan kadar CCK plasma selama 14 dan 28 hari pada berbagai dosis dan pola pemberian pada tikus Wistar jantan. Metode: Terdapat sebelas kelompok perlakuan (n=3, kelompok dosis (5mg/1x//hari, 10mg/1x/hari, 20mg/1x/hari, (2,5mg/2x/hari, 5mg/2x/hari, 10mg/2x/hari dan (1,7mg/3x/hari, 3,4mg/3x/ hari, 6,7mg/3x/ hari, kelompok kontrol negatif (akuades dan kelompok positif kontrol (Sibutramine. asupan makanan (g, berat badan (g dan pengukuran tingkat Cholecystokinin plasma dengan metode ELISA (ng / ml. Hasil: Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa persentase penurunan asupan makanan yang terbaik adalah: kelompok 3,4mg/3x/hari (p <0,05, penghambatan berat badan selama 14 hari: kelompok 10 mg/1x/hari, selama 28 hari: kelompok 1,7mg/3x/hari (p <0,05, peningkatan kadar Kolesistokinin plasma: kelompok 20 mg / 1 x / hari (p <0,05. Simpulan: Dosis dan pola pemberian terbaik untuk menghambat berat badan selama 14 hari adalah ekstrak 10 mg sekali sehari di pagi hari, selama 28 hari adalah 1,7 mg tiga kali sehari. (Health Science Journal of Indonesia 2016;7:17-26 Kata kunci: Kedelai Detam 1 -dosis efektif - berat badan - kolesistokinin Abstract Background: Protein in soybean, β conglycinin is responsible for anti-obesity effects by suppressing appetite via stimulation of Cholecystokinin. Cholecystokinin is a hormone released in the digestive tract in response to

  5. Effects of Nicorandil on the Clinical and Laboratory Outcomes of Unstable Angina Patients after Coronary Angioplasty

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    Homa Falsoleiman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ischemic preconditioning mediated by potassium channels is a physiological protective mechanism, . It is hypothesized that Nicorandil, which is a potassium channel activator, could protect the heart via preconditioning. Materials and Methods:This clinical trial was conducted on 162 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI in Quem hospital, from Jan2013 to Jan 2014,patients  divided into two groups. The first group received standard treatment plus Nicorandil (10 mg, twice daily for three days before and after angioplasty. The second group received standard treatment after PCI. Results: Cardiac enzyme levels were significantly lower in the Nicorandil group at 6 and 12 hours after angioplasty,(p value=0.001 while no significant differences were observed in the symptoms and four-month prognosis of the study groups(p value=0.8. Conclusion:It is recommended that a randomized clinical trial be conducted for the close evaluation of the effects of Nicorandil on unstable angina patients.

  6. Laboratory studies on the effect of ozonation on THM formation in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram

    2015-01-01

    Water samples from indoor swimming pool were ozonated at different pH values to evaluate the effect of pH on decomposition of ozone in swimming pool water. Furthermore, drinking and pool water were repeatedly ozonated followed by chlorination to evaluate THM formation. Decomposition of ozone...... was not affected by pH in the range relevant to swimming pools (pH 6.8 – 7.8) and a half-life time at 10-12 min was obtained. Repeating the ozonation, the decomposition of ozone increased at the second dose of ozone added (t½,2=8 min) and then decreased again at the third and fourth dose of ozone (t½,3=17 min; t...... chlorine for drinking water as lower TTHM formation occurred than in non-ozonated samples. For pool water, a higher TTHM formation was observed in ozonated than non-ozonated pool water. Thus, it was observed that ozone reacts markedly different in swimming pool water from the known pattern in drinking...

  7. Testing the effectiveness of 3D film for laboratory-based studies of emotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Bride

    Full Text Available Research in psychology and affective neuroscience often relies on film as a standardized and reliable method for evoking emotion. However, clip validation is not undertaken regularly. This presents a challenge for research with adolescent and young adult samples who are exposed routinely to high-definition (HD three-dimensional (3D stimuli and may not respond to older, validated film clips. Studies with young people inform understanding of emotional development, dysregulated affect, and psychopathology, making it critical to assess whether technological advances improve the study of emotion. In the present study, we examine whether 3D film is more evocative than 2D using a tightly controlled within-subjects design. Participants (n  =  408 viewed clips during a concurrent psychophysiological assessment. Results indicate that both 2D and 3D technology are highly effective tools for emotion elicitation. However, 3D does not add incremental benefit over 2D, even when individual differences in anxiety, emotion dysregulation, and novelty seeking are considered.

  8. Assessing the photoprotective effects of red ochre on human skin by in vitro laboratory experiments

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    Riaan F. Rifkin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Archaeological indicators of cognitive complexity become increasingly prevalent during the African Middle Stone Age, with the habitual exploitation of red ochre widely viewed as a key feature of the emergence of modern human behaviour. Given that some of the uses of ochre remain ambiguous, we present the preliminary results of an ongoing study in which we explore the efficacy of red ochre as a photoprotective device or sunscreen. The capacity of ochre to inhibit the susceptibility of humans to the detrimental effects of ultraviolet radiation was confirmed through the in vitro calculation of the sun protection factor values of samples derived from the Kunene Region in Namibia and the Bokkeveld Group deposits, Western Cape Province, South Africa. Visible spectroscopy was employed to determine colourimetric parameters of samples and assess the correlation between ochre colour and sun protection factor. The possible role of ochre as a sunscreen agent for hominin populations, including modern humans, during the Middle Stone Age in Africa is explored. We conclude that the habitual use of red ochre as a photoprotective agent likely played a role in the ability of prehistoric humans to adapt to novel environmental circumstances.

  9. Volcanic Lightning in the Laboratory: The Effect of Ultra-Rapid Melting on Ash Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S.; Keller, F.; Helo, C.; Buhre, S.; Castro, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Lightning discharge is a common process occurring at explosive volcanic eruptions. During the formation of ash plumes, the dynamical interaction of ash particles creates charges which can, given a sufficiently large charge gradient, cause lightning discharges within the plume (`plume lightning') or from ground to plume (`near-vent lightning'), respectively. Given the extreme heat release during the short duration of a discharge (potentially > 30.000 K), it is likely that the ash particles suspended in a plume are, in any form, affected by volcanic lightning. Genareau et al. (2015) found evidence of glass spherules and glass aggregates in ash deposits of two explosive eruptions (Eyjafjallajökull, Mt. Redoubt), and linked them to short-term melting processes induced by volcanic lightning (analogue to fulgurites). In order to systematically investigate the potential impact of lightning on air-suspended ash we have designed a new experimental setup. An electric arc between two electrodes is generated by a 400 Amp arc welding device. Ash-sized sample material is then blown into the established lightning arc, and a certain proportion of the injected silicate glasses and/or minerals is melted due to the high temperatures in and around the plasma channel. In a first set of experiments, we have used natural volcanic ash from Laacher See Tephra (Eifel, Germany) in distinct size fractions between 36 and 250 microns, in order to qualitatively investigate melting and amalgamation features. Spherule and aggregate textures similar to those reported by Genareau et al. (2015) were successfully reproduced during these experiments. In a second set of experiments, homogenized phonolitic glass fragments, in different size fractions, were subjected to the electric arc and subsequently analyzed under the EMP, in order to investigate effects of "flash melting" on major element glass chemistry. Genareau K, Wardman JB, Wilson TM, McNutt SR, Izbekov P (2015): Lightning-induced volcanic

  10. Quantitative effects of diet on fecal corticosterone metabolites in two strains of laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte; Hau, Jann; Abelson, Klas S P

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of glucocorticoids excreted in feces is becoming a widespread technique for determining animal wellbeing in a wide variety of settings. In the present study an extraction protocol and an ELISA assay for quantifying fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in BALB/c and C57bl/6 mice were validated. Lower ratios of solvent (ethanol) to mass of fecal sample were found to be sufficient in extracting FCM compared to what has been reported previously. Feeding mice a high energy diet, high in fat content (60% of calories from fat), significantly lowered the FCM excretion, approximately halving the FCM output. This diet also reduced the fecal mass voided to approximately a third of that of the regular diet. The two reductions were not correlated. A difference in defecation pattern was seen between the two strains, with the BALB/c mice having a more pronounced diurnal rhythm compared to the C57bl/6 mice. Furthermore, throughout the experiment, the C57bl/6 mice excreted significantly higher levels of FCM compared to the BALB/c mice. The mice were also challenged with synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and dexamethasone (DEX). The effect of the challenges could readily be detected, but had a considerably lesser impact on data than did the difference in diet. The study demonstrates some problematic consequences of expressing FCM excretion as a measure of fecal dry mass. The study also serves to emphasize the caution that must be exercised when interpreting FCM excretion in conjunction with an uncontrolled or varied diet, or perturbations of gastro-intestinal functioning.

  11. Effect of lubricants on friction in laboratory tests of a total disc replacement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadas, Parshia; Mahomed, Aziza; Hukins, David W L; Shepherd, Duncan E T

    2013-09-01

    Some designs of total disc replacement devices have articulating bearing surfaces, and these devices are tested in vitro with a lubricant of diluted calf serum. It is believed that the lubricant found in total disc replacement devices in vivo is interstitial fluid that may have properties between that in Ringer's solution and diluted calf serum. To investigate the effect of lubricants, a set of friction tests were performed on a generic model of a metal against metal ball-and-socket total disc replacement device. Two devices were tested: one with a ball radius of 10 mm and other with a ball radius of 16 mm; each device had a radial clearance of 0.015 mm. A spine simulator was used to measure frictional torque for each device in axial rotation, flexion-extension and lateral bending at frequencies of 0.25-2 Hz, under 1200 N axial load. Each device was tested with two different lubricants: a solution of new born calf serum diluted with deionised water and Ringer's solution. The results showed that the frictional torque generated between the bearing surfaces was significantly higher in Ringer's solution than in diluted calf serum. The use of Ringer's solution as a lubricant provides a stringent test condition to detect possible problems. Diluted calf serum is more likely to provide an environment closer to that in vivo. However, the precise properties of the fluid lubricating a total disc replacement device are not known; hence, tests using diluted calf serum may not necessarily give the same results as those obtained in vivo.

  12. Effect of different lateral occlusion schemes on peri-implant strain: A laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Jennifer; Palamara, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aims to investigate the effects of four different lateral occlusion schemes and different excursions on peri-implant strains of a maxillary canine implant. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four metal crowns with different occlusion schemes were attached to an implant in the maxillary canine region of a resin model. The included schemes were canine-guided (CG) occlusion, group function (GF) occlusion, long centric (LC) occlusion, and implant-protected (IP) occlusion. Each crown was loaded in three sites that correspond to maximal intercuspation (MI), 1 mm excursion, and 2 mm excursion. A load of 140 N was applied on each site and was repeated 10 times. The peri-implant strain was recorded by a rosette strain gauge that was attached on the resin model buccal to the implant. For each loading condition, the maximum shear strain value was calculated. RESULTS The different schemes and excursive positions had impact on the peri-implant strains. At MI and 1 mm positions, the GF had the least strains, followed by IP, CG, and LC. At 2 mm, the least strains were associated with GF, followed by CG, LC, and IP. However, regardless of the occlusion scheme, as the excursion increases, a linear increase of peri-implant strains was detected. CONCLUSION The peri-implant strain is susceptible to occlusal factors. The eccentric location appears to be more influential on peri-implant strains than the occlusion scheme. Therefore, adopting an occlusion scheme that can reduce the occurrence of occlusal contacts laterally may be beneficial in reducing peri-implant strains. PMID:28243391

  13. Lethal and sublethal effects of seven insecticides on three beneficial insects in laboratory assays and field trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maria E S; Alves, Flávia M; Pereira, Renata C; Aquino, Leonardo A; Fernandes, Flávio L; Zanuncio, José C

    2016-08-01

    Lethal and sublethal effects of insecticides on target and non-target arthropods are a concern of pest management programs. Cycloneda sanguinea, Orius insidiosus and Chauliognathus flavipes are important biological control agents for aphids, whitefly, lepidopterus eggs, thrips and mites. All three test species were subjected to a toxicity study using the insecticides acephate, bifenthrin, chlorantraniliprole, chlorpyrifos, deltamethrin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam. Experiments were done in the lab and field. In the laboratory we evaluated the mortality and sublethal effects of the concentration that killed 20% of the population (LC20) on feeding, repellence and reproduction of the species tested. The lethal effects of these insecticides at the recommended doses was evaluated in the field. Concentration-response bioassays indicated chlorantraniliprole had the lowest toxicity, while chlorpyrifos and acephate were the most toxic. Test species exposed to filter paper surfaces treated with pyrethroids, neonicotinoids and organophosphates were repelled. On the other hand, test species were not repelled from surfaces treated with chlorantraniliprole. Chlorantraniliprole therefore seemed to be the least dangerous insecticide for these three beneficial arthropod test species.

  14. Reprioritization of failures in a system failure mode and effects analysis by decision making trial and evaluation laboratory technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyed-Hosseini, S.M. [Industrial Engineering Department, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: seyedhoseini@yahoo.com; Safaei, N. [Industrial Engineering Department, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: nimasafaei@iust.ac.ir; Asgharpour, M.J. [Industrial Engineering Department, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: asgharpour@iust.ac.ir

    2006-08-15

    In this paper an effective methodology related to decision making field has been developed for reprioritization of failure modes in a system Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for corrective actions. The proposed methodology can cover some of inherently shortcomings of conventional Risk Priority Number (RPN) method and like. The current prioritization methods have two main deficiencies as: they have not considered indirect relations between components and are deficient for systems with many subsystems or components. The proposed method called Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) is an effective approach for analyzing relation between components of a system in respect to its type (direct/indirect) and severity. The main advantages of DEMATEL are involving indirect relations in analyze, allocating as possible as unique ranks to alternatives and clustering alternatives in large systems. The demonstrated results have shown that DEMATEL method can be an efficient, complementary and confident approach for reprioritization of failure modes in a FMEA. For verification of proposed methodology, two illustrative practical examples are solved and obtained outcomes are reported.

  15. Missile Electro-Optical Countermeasures Simulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory comprises several hardware-in-the-loop missile flight simulations designed specifically to evaluate the effectiveness of electro-optical air defense...

  16. CO2 dinamics and priming effect of different Hungarian soils based on laboratory incubation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacháry, Dóra; Szalai, Zoltán; Filep, Tibor; Kovács, József; Jakab, Gergely

    2017-04-01

    Soil processes are particularly important in terms of global carbon cycle, as soils globally contain approximately 2000 Gt carbon, which is higher than the carbon stock of the atmosphere and the terrestrial ecosystem together. Therefore small alterations in the soils' carbon sequestration potential can generate rapid and significant changes in the atmosphere carbon concentration. Soil texture is one of the most important soil parameters which plays a significant role in soil carbon sequestration. Fine textured soils generally considered containing more microbial biomass, and having a lower rate of biomass turnover and organic matter decomposition than coarse textured soils. In spite of this, several recent studies have shown contradicting trends. Our aim was to investigate the influence of the basic soil properties (texture, pH, organic matter content, etc.) on the biological and physicochemical processes determining the soil CO2 emission. Thirteen Hungarian soil samples (depth of 0-20 cm) were incubated during six months. The samples are mainly high clay and organic matter content forest soils, but two forest soils developed on sand were also collected. The soils are derived from C3 forests and C3 croplands from different sites of Hungary. C4 maize residues were added to the soils in order to get natural 13C enrichment for stable isotope measurement purposes and for quantifying the priming effect caused by the crop residue addition. The temperature (20°C) and humidity (70% field capacity) conditions were kept constant in an incubator. The soil respiration was measured at specified intervals (on day 3, 8, 15, 30, 51, 79, 107, 135 and 163) and trapped in 2M NaOH and quantified by titration with 1M HCl. Our first results based on the cumulative CO2 respiration values show positive priming for all type of soils. Results confirm the statement that in certain cases fine textured soils release more CO2. To determine which soil properties influence the most the soil CO2

  17. Effects of nitrogen supply on Pseudo-nitzschia calliantha and Pseudo-nitzschia cf. seriata: field and laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melliti Ben Garali, Sondes; Sahraoui, Inès; de la Iglesia, Pablo; Chalghaf, Mohamed; Diogène, Jorge; Ksouri, Jamel; Sakka Hlaili, Asma

    2016-08-01

    The effects of inorganic and organic nitrogen supply on the growth and domoic acid (DA) production of Pseudo-nitzschia cf. seriata and Pseudo-nitzschia calliantha from Bizerte Lagoon (SW Mediterranean Sea) were studied during field and laboratory experiments. Nitrogen enrichments (40 µM NO3 (-); 10 µM NH4 (+); 20 µM CH4N2O) and a control, with no added N, were carried out in separate carboys with seawater collected from Bizerte Lagoon. In the field experiments, all N-enrichments resulted in significant increases in chlorophyll a concentration, and maintained exponential growth until the end of the experiment. The initial diatom community was dominated by a bloom of P. cf. seriata (9.3 × 10(5) cells l(-1)). After 6 days of incubation, the abundance of P. cf. seriata was greatest in the urea addition (1.52 × 10(6) cells l(-1)), compared to the ammonium treatment (0.47 × 10(6) cells l(-1)), nitrate treatment (0.70 × 10(6) cells l(-1)) and control (0.36 × 10(6) cells l(-1)). The specific growth rates, calculated from increases in chlorophyll a and cell abundance, were statistically different across all treatments, with the highest in the urea and nitrate additions. Similar results were obtained from the laboratory experiments. These were carried out with P. calliantha isolated from Bizerte Lagoon and grown in f/2 medium enriched with 40 µM nitrate, 10 µM ammonium and 20 µM urea. The exponential growth rate was significantly faster for the cells cultured with urea (1.50 d(-1)) compared to the nitrate (0.90 d(-1)) and ammonium (0.80 d(-1)) treatments and the control (0.40 d(-1)). Analysis of DA, performed at the beginning and the end of the both experiments in all treatments, revealed very low concentrations (below the limit of quantification, 0.02- 1.310(-7) pg cell(-1), respectively).The field and laboratory experiments demonstrate that P.cf. seriata and P. calliantha are able to grow efficiently on the three forms of N, but with a

  18. Cost effectiveness analysis of clinically driven versus routine laboratory monitoring of antiretroviral therapy in Uganda and Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonieta Medina Lara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite funding constraints for treatment programmes in Africa, the costs and economic consequences of routine laboratory monitoring for efficacy and toxicity of antiretroviral therapy (ART have rarely been evaluated. METHODS: Cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted in the DART trial (ISRCTN13968779. Adults in Uganda/Zimbabwe starting ART were randomised to clinically-driven monitoring (CDM or laboratory and clinical monitoring (LCM; individual patient data on healthcare resource utilisation and outcomes were valued with primary economic costs and utilities. Total costs of first/second-line ART, routine 12-weekly CD4 and biochemistry/haematology tests, additional diagnostic investigations, clinic visits, concomitant medications and hospitalisations were considered from the public healthcare sector perspective. A Markov model was used to extrapolate costs and benefits 20 years beyond the trial. RESULTS: 3316 (1660LCM;1656CDM symptomatic, immunosuppressed ART-naive adults (median (IQR age 37 (32,42; CD4 86 (31,139 cells/mm(3 were followed for median 4.9 years. LCM had a mean 0.112 year (41 days survival benefit at an additional mean cost of $765 [95%CI:685,845], translating into an adjusted incremental cost of $7386 [3277,dominated] per life-year gained and $7793 [4442,39179] per quality-adjusted life year gained. Routine toxicity tests were prominent cost-drivers and had no benefit. With 12-weekly CD4 monitoring from year 2 on ART, low-cost second-line ART, but without toxicity monitoring, CD4 test costs need to fall below $3.78 to become cost-effective (<3xper-capita GDP, following WHO benchmarks. CD4 monitoring at current costs as undertaken in DART was not cost-effective in the long-term. CONCLUSIONS: There is no rationale for routine toxicity monitoring, which did not affect outcomes and was costly. Even though beneficial, there is little justification for routine 12-weekly CD4 monitoring of ART at current test costs in low

  19. Eating under observation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect that heightened awareness of observation has on laboratory measured energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Eric; Hardman, Charlotte A; Halford, Jason C G; Jones, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Laboratory paradigms are commonly used to study human energy intake. However, the extent to which participants believe their eating behavior is being measured may affect energy intake and is a methodologic factor that has received little consideration. Our main objective was to examine available evidence for the effect that heightened awareness of observation has on energy intake in a laboratory setting. We systematically reviewed laboratory studies that allowed for experimental examination of the effect that heightened awareness of observation has on energy intake. From these experimental studies we combined effect estimates using inverse variance meta-analysis, calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD) in energy intake between heightened-awareness and control conditions and qualitatively synthesized potential moderators of this effect. Nine studies, providing 22 comparisons, were eligible for inclusion. These studies largely sampled young women and examined the energy intake of energy-dense snack foods. Evidence indicated that heightened awareness of observation was associated with reduced energy intake when compared with the control condition (random-effects SMD: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.66; P observation reduces energy intake in a laboratory setting. These findings suggest that laboratory studies should attempt to minimize the degree to which participants are aware that their eating behavior is being measured. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. QUASIMEME laboratory performance study of the biological effects of tributyltin (imposex and intersex) on two marine gastropod molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, I M; Minchin, A; Bauer, B; Harding, M J; Wells, D E

    1999-06-01

    The disruption of the endocrine systems of gastropod molluscs and consequential physiological changes (imposex and intersex) are used as biomarkers for environmental contamination by tributyltin compounds. The first international laboratory performance study on the determination of imposex and intersex in neogastropod molluscs, Nucella lapillus and Littorina littorea has been undertaken by the QUASIMEME (Quality Assurance of Information for Marine Environmental Monitoring in Europe) project. Samples of live gastropods were distributed and participants were asked to record shell height and sex, together with penis length and vas deferens sequence stage (VDS) in Nucella or the intersex stage (IS) and prostate length in Littorina. Calculations were made of vas deferens sequence index (VDSI) and the relative penis size index (RPSI) in Nucella and of intersex stage index (ISI) and the average female prostate length (FPrL) in Littorina. Thirteen (87%) of the 15 participating laboratories returned data. The remaining two laboratories asked to participate in later exercises. For Nucella, seven laboratories reported sex ratios significantly different from the reference laboratory data. Differences in penis length measurements between laboratories were largely random, although there were indications of systematic errors affecting the data from three laboratories. Seven laboratories reported satisfactory data (Z-score magnitude of Z penis length or observation of reproductive organs would have a potentially greater impact on the final reported values of the summary imposex indices. The Littorina sample did not show a high degree of intersex (ISI = 0.41). The laboratories could determine the sex of Littorina reliably and only one laboratory reported data significantly different from the reference laboratory. All except two laboratories reported satisfactory data for ISI.

  1. Protective effect of overlying geosynthetic on geomembrane liner observed from landfill field tests and inclined board laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Moonkyung; Seo, Min Woo; Kim, Kang Suk; Park, Jun Boum

    2006-06-01

    Geosynthetic liner systems are generally installed in landfill sites to prevent toxic leachate from escaping into the adjoining environment by utilizing their impervious characteristics. Therefore, it is important to protect the geomembrane from being damaged or destroyed during all phases of landfilling, namely landfill construction, waste tipping and landfill closure. This paper presents firstly the observed performance of a geomembrane liner from a landfill site where the geomembrane liner was installed on the slopes of a Korean landfill; and secondly the results of an inclined board laboratory test. Two types of experiments were conducted to identify the protecting effect of the overlaying geosynthetic on the geomembrane liners. At a testing landfill site, the slope consisted of three different sub-inclines and two 2-m-wide intermediate levels. The sub-inclines were each 8 m in vertical height and their angle of inclination was 1: 1.5 (vertical: horizontal). The reported observations were made for a time period of approximately 1 year, until the landfill was filled with wastes to the top of the uppermost slope. In addition, inclined board laboratory tests were carried out. During the inclined board test, a base table is inclined slowly and steadily until the block located on the base table starts to slide, when the tension and displacements of two geosynthetics, namely the geomembrane liner and protecting geotextile, are measured. In conclusion, test results showed that the down-drag force generated by waste accumulation and sliding of upper material was to a large extent dissipated through the elongation of the protecting geosynthetic overlying the geomembrane and thus was not transferred to the geomembrane. Unless the protecting geosynthetic undergoes structural failure, this stress relaxation phenomenon continues to occur so that the magnitude of tensile force to be applied on the geomembrane remains marginal.

  2. Accreditation of the PGD laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, J.C.; Sengupta, S.; Vesela, K.; Thornhill, A.; Dequeker, E.; Coonen, E.; Morris, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Accreditation according to an internationally recognized standard is increasingly acknowledged as the single most effective route to comprehensive laboratory quality assurance, and many countries are progressively moving towards compulsory accreditation of medical testing laboratories. The ESHRE PGD Consortium and some regulatory bodies recommend that all PGD laboratories should be accredited or working actively towards accreditation, according to the internationally recognized standard ISO 1...

  3. The excito –repellency effect of pyrethroid insecticide-treated bednets on An. stephensi under laboratory condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzeh Ali Pour

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The excito-repellency effect due to the application of some insecticides is important in interrupting the malaria transmission cycle. The repellency effect of some insecticides also inhibits the entry of mosquitoes into sprayed houses, which in long-term causes alteration in endophilic and exophilic rates. Methods: In this study, a modified excito-repellency (E-R test box was used. In order to standardize this system, a number of methods and techniques were considered to evaluate the mosquitoes’ reaction to pyrethroid-impregnated nets. A cylindrical guinea – pig holder made up of aluminum mesh was placed within the exposure chamber. Treated and untreated nets covered this holder so that the guinea pig was available to mosquito for bloodfeeding. An exit trap was devised on the rear side of the exposure chamber. Nets were impregnated with lambdacyhalothrin insecticide at the concentrations of 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/m2, deltamethrin at 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/m2 and cyfluthrin at 40, 80 and 100 mg/m2 or unimpregnated in laboratory by standard dipping procedure. The bloodfeeding rate, exit rate, survival rate, mortality rate and recovery rate of mosquitoes were considered. Results: The results obtained using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA reflects a significant difference in excito-repellency of tested insecticides (p<0.05. The bloodfeeding rate of exposed mosquitoes to nets treated with lambdacyhalothrin, deltamethrin and cyfluthrin at standard dose of 25 mg/m2 were 15%, 5.3%and 9.3% respectively the exit rates were also 18.2%, 11.2% and 19.7%, and it was 98.9 % in the control group. The survival rate of mosquitoes was 63.2%, 34.9% and 67%, respectively. The bloodfeeding and exit rates for control group were 41.3% and 1.4%, respectively. Conclusion: The excito-repellency evaluation revealed that the deltamethrin-impregnated net was more effective on An. stephensi than lambdacyhalothrin and cyfluthrin insecticides, under laboratory

  4. Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory (Saxton Laboratory) is a state-of-the-art facility for conducting transportation operations research. The laboratory...

  5. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect radiative effects of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yi; Ramaswamy, V.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Horowitz, Larry W.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2005-11-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmosphere general circulation model, with its new cloud scheme, is employed to study the indirect radiative effect of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol during the industrial period. The preindustrial and present-day monthly mean aerosol climatologies are generated from running the Model for Ozone And Related chemical Tracers (MOZART) chemistry-transport model. The respective global annual mean sulfate burdens are 0.22 and 0.81 Tg S. Cloud droplet number concentrations are related to sulfate mass concentrations using an empirical relationship (Boucher and Lohmann, 1995). A distinction is made between "forcing" and flux change at the top of the atmosphere in this study. The simulations, performed with prescribed sea surface temperature, show that the first indirect "forcing" ("Twomey" effect) amounts to an annual mean of -1.5 W m-2, concentrated largely over the oceans in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The annual mean flux change owing to the response of the model to the first indirect effect is -1.4 W m-2, similar to the annual mean forcing. However, the model's response causes a rearrangement of cloud distribution as well as changes in longwave flux (smaller than solar flux changes). There is thus a differing geographical nature of the radiation field than for the forcing even though the global means are similar. The second indirect effect, which is necessarily an estimate made in terms of the model's response, amounts to -0.9 W m-2, but the statistical significance of the simulated geographical distribution of this effect is relatively low owing to the model's natural variability. Both the first and second effects are approximately linearly additive, giving rise to a combined annual mean flux change of -2.3 W m-2, with the NH responsible for 77% of the total flux change. Statistically significant model responses are obtained for the zonal mean total indirect effect in the entire NH and in the Southern Hemisphere low

  6. Biomass Suspension Combustion: Effect of Two-Stage Combustion on NOx Emissions in a Laboratory-Scale Swirl Burner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Weigang; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    A systematic study was performed in a suspension fired 20 kW laboratory-scale swirl burner test rig for combustion of biomass and co-combustion of natural gas and biomass. The main focus is put on the effect of two-stage combustion on the NO emission, as well as its effect on the incomplete...... result from the homogeneous reaction, by comparing the NO emissions when firing natural gas with NH3 addition and co-firing natural gas and biomass. The experimental results also show no significant increase of incomplete combustion of gas and char by applying optimized two-stage combustion....... exists with respect to minimizing NO emissions. When using wood and straw as co-firing fuels, 15−25% of the fuel-N is converted to NO. Straw appears to give the lowest conversion of fuel-N to NO. The results indicate that the optimal stoichiometry in the fuel-rich (λ1) zone for gaining the lowest NO may...

  7. Effect of extracts of plants with insecticidal activity on the control of Microtheca ochroloma Stal (Col: Chrysomelidae in the laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Grendene Lima

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of plants with insecticidal activity were tested on the control of Microtheca ochroloma (Col.: Chrysomelidae, an important insect-pest of Brassicaceae, in the larval and adult phases. Two 3-day-old larvae, kept under laboratory conditions (25ºC temperature, 70% relative humidity and 14 hours of photophase, were placed in a glass tube with a leaf of Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis previously treated with aqueous extracts (10% p/v of chinaberry leaf (Melia azedarach, chinaberry branch, and tobacco powder (Nicotiana tabacum. The same procedure was repeated in two assays with adult insects. In the first assay, all the previously-mentioned extracts were used, in addition to DalNeem (commercial product of Azadirachta indica. In the second, the insects were exposed to extracts of tabasco pepper fruits (Capsicum frutescens, Surinam cherry (Eugenia unifl ora, jambolan (Syzygium cuminii and eucalyptus leaves (Eucalyptus sp.. All the tests consisted of 10 insects per treatment, with five repetitions in the first test using adult insects and six repetitions in the others. Observations were made daily up to the fifth day, aiming to evaluate the mortality of the insects. All the tested extracts resulted in an effective control of the larvae of M. ochroloma. In relation to the adult insects, only the extracts of tobacco powder and DalNeem showed effective control.

  8. Supplementing claims data with outpatient laboratory test results to improve confounding adjustment in effectiveness studies of lipid-lowering treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneeweiss Sebastian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adjusting for laboratory test results may result in better confounding control when added to administrative claims data in the study of treatment effects. However, missing values can arise through several mechanisms. Methods We studied the relationship between availability of outpatient lab test results, lab values, and patient and system characteristics in a large healthcare database using LDL, HDL, and HbA1c in a cohort of initiators of statins or Vytorin (ezetimibe & simvastatin as examples. Results Among 703,484 patients 68% had at least one lab test performed in the 6 months before treatment. Performing an LDL test was negatively associated with several patient characteristics, including recent hospitalization (OR = 0.32, 95% CI: 0.29-0.34, MI (OR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.69-0.85, or carotid revascularization (OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.25-0.53. Patient demographics, diagnoses, and procedures predicted well who would have a lab test performed (AUC = 0.89 to 0.93. Among those with test results available claims data explained only 14% of variation. Conclusions In a claims database linked with outpatient lab test results, we found that lab tests are performed selectively corresponding to current treatment guidelines. Poor ability to predict lab values and the high proportion of missingness reduces the added value of lab tests for effectiveness research in this setting.

  9. Effects of divided attention and operating room noise on perception of pulse oximeter pitch changes: A laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan A.; Fellow, Postdoctoral; Schlesinger, Joseph J.; Physician, Resident; Wallace, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Anesthesiology requires performing visually-oriented procedures while monitoring auditory information about a patient’s vital signs. A concern in operating rooms environments is the amount of competing information and the effects that divided attention have on patient monitoring, such as detecting auditory changes in arterial oxygen saturation via pulse oximetry. Methods We measured the impact of visual attentional load and auditory background noise on the ability of anesthesia residents to monitor the pulse oximeter auditory display in a laboratory setting. Accuracies and response times were recorded reflecting anesthesiologists’ abilities to detect changes in oxygen saturation across three levels of visual attention in quiet and with noise. Results Results show that visual attentional load substantially impacts the ability to detect changes in oxygen saturation levels conveyed by auditory cues signaling 99 and 98% saturation. These effects are compounded by auditory noise, with up to a 17% decline in performance. These deficits are seen in the ability to accurately detect a change in oxygen saturation and in speed of response. Conclusions Most anesthesia accidents are initiated by small errors that cascade into serious events. Lack of monitor vigilance and inattention are two of the more commonly cited factors. Reducing such errors is thus a priority for improving patient safety. Specifically, efforts to reduce distractors and lower background noise should be considered during induction and emergence, periods of especially high risk, when anesthesiologists must attend to many tasks and are thus susceptible to error. PMID:23263015

  10. Lunar laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  11. Virtual Laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Hut, P

    2006-01-01

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simul...

  12. Teaching communication skills to hospice teams: comparing the effectiveness of a communication skills laboratory with in-person, second life, and phone role-playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Gillian; Ortega, Rosio; Hochstetler, Vicki; Pierson, Kristen; Lin, Peiyi; Lowes, Susan

    2014-09-01

    Communication skills are critical in hospice care but challenging to teach. Therefore, a hospice agency developed a communication skills laboratory for nurses and social workers. Learners role-played 3 common hospice scenarios. The role-play modalities were in-person, Second Life, and telephone. Learners were scored on 4 communication aspects. Learners in all modalities rated the laboratory as very effective. However, learners in the Second Life and phone modality showed greater improvements from scene 1 to 3 than those in the in-person modality. There were no significant differences in improvement between the Second Life and phone modalities. Results support the effectiveness of this communication skills laboratory while using different teaching modalities and show phone and Second Life role-plays were more effective than an in-person role-play. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Genotoxic effects in occupational exposure to formaldehyde: A study in anatomy and pathology laboratories and formaldehyde-resins production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viegas Susana

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the Report on Carcinogens, formaldehyde ranks 25th in the overall U.S. chemical production, with more than 5 million tons produced each year. Given its economic importance and widespread use, many people are exposed to formaldehyde environmentally and/or occupationally. Presently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies formaldehyde as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1, based on sufficient evidence in humans and in experimental animals. Manyfold in vitro studies clearly indicated that formaldehyde can induce genotoxic effects in proliferating cultured mammalian cells. Furthermore, some in vivo studies have found changes in epithelial cells and in peripheral blood lymphocytes related to formaldehyde exposure. Methods A study was carried out in Portugal, using 80 workers occupationally exposed to formaldehyde vapours: 30 workers from formaldehyde and formaldehyde-based resins production factory and 50 from 10 pathology and anatomy laboratories. A control group of 85 non-exposed subjects was considered. Exposure assessment was performed by applying simultaneously two techniques of air monitoring: NIOSH Method 2541 and Photo Ionization Detection equipment with simultaneously video recording. Evaluation of genotoxic effects was performed by application of micronucleus test in exfoliated epithelial cells from buccal mucosa and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Results Time-weighted average concentrations not exceeded the reference value (0.75 ppm in the two occupational settings studied. Ceiling concentrations, on the other hand, were higher than reference value (0.3 ppm in both. The frequency of micronucleus in peripheral blood lymphocytes and in epithelial cells was significantly higher in both exposed groups than in the control group (p p p p Conclusions The population studied is exposed to high peak concentrations of formaldehyde with a long-term exposure. These two aspects, cumulatively, can be the

  14. Allelopathic effects of macroalga Corallina pilulifera on the red-tide forming alga Heterosigma akashiwo under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Renjun; Tang, Xuexi

    2016-03-01

    Over the past few years, harmful algal blooms (HABs), such as red tides, have been frequently observed in coastal zones worldwide. The natural allelopathic interactions among macroalgae and red tide microalgae can alter the structure and succession of aquatic ecosystems. We investigated the influence of four environmental factors (temperature, salinity, light, and pH) on the allelopathic effects of the macroalgae Corallina pilulifera on red-tide forming Heterosigma akashiwo under laboratory conditions. Each of the factors had four levels: temperature (15, 20, 25, and 30°C), salinity (10, 20, 30, and 40), light (20, 100, 200 and 400 μmol/(m2•s)), and pH (5.5, 7, 8.5, and 10. Two-factor experiments were designed for each two environmental factors, with six combination treatments (temperature-salinity, temperature-light, temperature-pH, salinity-light, salinity-pH, and light-pH). Results showed that the allelopathic effect was significantly influenced by temperature, salinity, light, and pH. As single factors, the low temperature (15°C), low salinity (10), high-intensity light (400 μmol/(m2•s)), and high pH (10) treatments substantially enhanced the allelopathic effect. The strongest allelopathic effect of C. pilulifera on H. akashiwo was observed under the following treatments: 15°C and salinity of 40, 25°C and pH 10, 25°C with medium- to high-intensity light at 200-400 μmol/(m 2 •s), 400 μmol/(m2•s) and salinity of 10, 400 μmol/(m2•s) and pH 10, and pH 10 with a salinity of 40.

  15. Laboratory toxicity and benthic invertebrate field colonization of Upper Columbia River sediments: Finding adverse effects using multiple lines of evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, J.F.; Kemble, N.E.; Allert, A.L.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Dowling, B.; Gruenenfelder, C.; Roland, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    From 1930 to 1995, the Upper Columbia River (UCR) of northeast Washington State received approximately 12 million metric tons of smelter slag and associated effluents from a large smelter facility located in Trail, British Columbia, approximately 10 km north of the United States–Canadian border. Studies conducted during the past two decades have demonstrated the presence of toxic concentrations of heavy metals in slag-based sandy sediments, including cadmium, copper, zinc, and lead in the UCR area as well as the downstream reservoir portion of Lake Roosevelt. We conducted standardized whole-sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28-day) and the midge Chironomus dilutus (10-day) on 11 samples, including both UCR and study-specific reference sediments. Metal concentrations in sediments were modeled for potential toxicity using three approaches: (1) probable effects quotients (PEQs) based on total recoverable metals (TRMs) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEMs); (2) SEMs corrected for acid-volatile sulfides (AVS; i.e., ΣSEM - AVS); and (3) ΣSEM - AVS normalized to the fractional organic carbon (foc) (i.e., ΣSEM - AVS/foc). The most highly metal-contaminated sample (ΣPEQTRM = 132; ΣPEQSEM = 54; ΣSEM - AVS = 323; and ΣSEM - AVS/foc = 64,600 umol/g) from the UCR was dominated by weathered slag sediment particles and resulted in 80% mortality and 94% decrease in biomass of amphipods; in addition, this sample significantly decreased growth of midge by 10%. The traditional ΣAVS - SEM, uncorrected for organic carbon, was the most accurate approach for estimating the effects of metals in the UCR. Treatment of the toxic slag sediment with 20% Resinex SIR-300 metal-chelating resin significantly decreased the toxicity of the sample. Samples ΣSEM - AVS > 244 was not toxic to amphipods or midge in laboratory testing, indicating that this value may be an approximate threshold for effects in the UCR. In situ benthic invertebrate colonization

  16. Effect of temperature and salinity on stable isotopic composition of shallow water benthic foraminifera: A laboratory culture study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurtarkar, S.R.; Linshy, V.N.; Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    in the laboratory. In the present work, shallow water benthic foraminiferal species, Rosalina sp. and Pararotalia nipponica were subjected to different combinations of seawater temperature (25�C to 35�C) and salinity (25 psu to 37 psu) in the laboratory to assess...

  17. [Experience of the development special medical technical laboratory for studies of effects caused by potent electromagnetic radiation in biologic objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, B N; Kalyada, T V; Petrov, S V

    2015-01-01

    This article covers topics of creating special medical technical laboratory for medial and biologic studies concerning influence of potent high-frequency elecromagnetic radiation on various biologic objects. The authors gave example of such laboratory, described its construction features, purpose and main characteristics of the included devices.

  18. Assessing the relative importance of environmental effects, carry-over effects and species differences in thermal stress resistance: a comparison of Drosophilids across field and laboratory generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Michele; Hangartner, Sandra; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2013-10-15

    There is increasing interest in comparing species of related organisms for their susceptibility to thermal extremes in order to evaluate potential vulnerability to climate change. Comparisons are typically undertaken on individuals collected from the field with or without a period of acclimation. However, this approach does not allow the potential contributions of environmental and carry-over effects across generations to be separated from inherent species differences in susceptibility. To assess the importance of these different sources of variation, we here considered heat and cold resistance in Drosophilid species from tropical and temperate sites in the field and across two laboratory generations. Resistance in field-collected individuals tended to be lower when compared with F1 and F2 laboratory generations, and species differences in field flies were only weakly correlated to differences established under controlled rearing conditions, unlike in F1-F2 comparisons. This reflected large environmental effects on resistance associated with different sites and conditions experienced within sites. For the 8 h cold recovery assay there was no strong evidence of carry-over effects, whereas for the heat knockdown and 2 h cold recovery assays there was some evidence for such effects. However, for heat these were species specific in direction. Variance components for inherent species differences were substantial for resistance to heat and 8 h cold stress, but small for 2 h cold stress, though this may be a reflection of the species being considered in the comparisons. These findings highlight that inherent differences among species are difficult to characterise accurately without controlling for environmental sources of variation and carry-over effects. Moreover, they also emphasise the complex nature of carry-over effects that vary depending on the nature of stress traits and the species being evaluated.

  19. Effects of abamectin and deltamethrin to the foragers honeybee workers of Apis mellifera jemenatica (Hymenoptera: Apidae under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal Musleh Aljedani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the toxicity of some insecticides (abamectin and deltamethrin on the lethal time (LT50 and midgut of foragers honeybee workers of Apis mellifera jemenatica were studied under laboratory conditions. The bees were provided with water, food, natural protein and sugar solution with insecticide (concentration: 2.50 ppm deltamethrin and 0.1 ppm abamectin. The control group was not treated with any kind of insecticides. The mortality was assessed at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hour (h after insecticides treatment and period to calculate the value of lethal time (LT50. But the samples the histology study of midgut collected after 24 h were conducted by Scanning Electron Microscope. The results showed the effects of insecticides on the current results show that abamectin has an adverse effect on honeybees, there is a clear impact on the lethal time (LT50 was the abamectin faster in the death of honeybee workers compared to deltamethrin. Where have reached to abamectin (LT50 = 21.026 h, deltamethrin (LT50 = 72.011 h. However, abamectin also effects on cytotoxic midgut cells that may cause digestive disorders in the midgut, epithelial tissue is formed during morphological alterations when digestive cells die. The extends into the internal cavity, and at the top, there is epithelial cell striated border that has many holes and curves, abamectin seems to have crushed the layers of muscle. Through the current results can say abamectin most toxicity on honeybees colony health and vitality, especially foragers honeybee workers.

  20. Soil examination for a forensic trace evidence laboratory-Part 3: A proposed protocol for the effective triage and management of soil examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Brenda; Lennard, Chris; Kirkbride, K Paul; Robertson, James

    2016-05-01

    In the past, forensic soil examination was a routine aspect of forensic trace evidence examinations. The apparent need for soil examinations then went through a period of decline and with it the capability of many forensic laboratories to carry out soil examinations. In more recent years, interest in soil examinations has been renewed due-at least in part-to soil examinations contributing to some high profile investigations. However, much of this renewed interest has been in organisations with a primary interest in soil and geology rather than forensic science. We argue the need to reinstate soil examinations as a trace evidence sub-discipline within forensic science laboratories and present a pathway to support this aim. An examination procedure is proposed that includes: (i) appropriate sample collection and storage by qualified crime scene examiners; (ii) exclusionary soil examinations by trace evidence scientists within a forensic science laboratory; (iii) inclusionary soil examinations by trace evidence scientists within a forensic science laboratory; and (iv) higher-level examination of soils by specialist soil scientists and palynologists. Soil examinations conducted by trace evidence scientists will be facilitated if the examinations are conducted using the instrumentation routinely used by these examiners. Hence, the proposed examination protocol incorporates instrumentation in routine use in a forensic trace evidence laboratory. Finally, we report on an Australian soil scene variability study and a blind trial that demonstrate the utility of the proposed protocol for the effective triage and management of soil samples by forensic laboratories.

  1. Effectiveness of oxytetracycline in reducing the bacterial load in rohu fish (Labeo rohita, Hamilton) under laboratory culture condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed Ariful Haque; Md Shaheed Reza; Md Rajib Sharker; Md Mokhlasur Rahman; Md Ariful Islam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effectiveness of most widely used antibiotic, oxytetracycline (OTC) in reducing the bacterial load in rohu fish under artificial culture condition in the laboratory.Methods:University, Mymensingh-2202. The fish were reared in 8 aquaria where fish in 5 aquaria were used for replication of the treatment (experimental group) and fish in remaining 3 aquaria were considered as a control (Control group). OTC was fed to the fish in the experimental aquarium at the rate of 2 g/kg through diet twice daily whereas fish reared under control condition was given feed without antibiotic for 20 d and bacterial content in the aquarium water, gills, skin and intestine of fish were estimated at every alternative day after onset of the experiment. The experiment was conducted in the Faculty Fisheries, Bangladesh Agricultural Results: Rearing the fish with OTC treated feed resulted in gradual decrease of bacterial load in the aquarium water, gills, intestine and skin of the fish whereas the content remain unchanged or little increased in the control group. Water quality parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH and total hardness were within the suitable range in the experimental aquarium but not in control aquaria throughout the experimental period.Conclusions:bacterial load in fish and can be used commercially for maintaining the fish health in aquarium conditions. These results suggest that OTC could be a potential antibiotic to reduce the

  2. Effect of soil disturbance on recharging fluxes: case study on the Snake River Plain, Idaho National Laboratory, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John R.; Perkins, Kim S.

    2008-08-01

    Soil structural disturbance influences the downward flow of water that percolates deep enough to become aquifer recharge. Data from identical experiments in an undisturbed silt-loam soil and in an adjacent simulated waste trench composed of the same soil material, but disturbed, included (1) laboratory- and field-measured unsaturated hydraulic properties and (2) field-measured transient water content profiles through 24 h of ponded infiltration and 75 d of redistribution. In undisturbed soil, wetting fronts were highly diffuse above 2 m depth, and did not go much deeper than 2 m. Darcian analysis suggests an average recharge rate less than 2 mm/year. In disturbed soil, wetting fronts were sharp and initial infiltration slower; water moved slowly below 2 m without obvious impediment. Richards’ equation simulations with realistic conditions predicted sharp wetting fronts, as observed for disturbed soil. Such simulations were adequate for undisturbed soil only if started from a post-initial moisture distribution that included about 3 h of infiltration. These late-started simulations remained good, however, through the 76 d of data. Overall results suggest the net effect of soil disturbance, although it reduces preferential flow, may be to increase recharge by disrupting layer contrasts.

  3. Laboratory Experiments of Roughness Effects on the Lateral Surface Transient Storage Mean Residence Time in Small Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, T. R.; Haggerty, R.; Apte, S. V.; Budwig, R.; Tonina, D.

    2012-12-01

    Lateral surface transient storage (LSTS) zones are common in riverine systems. The higher mean residence times (MRTs) associated with LSTS recirculation impact water quality and solute transport. We are working to develop a predictive model of LSTS MRT based on parameters easily measured in the field. We investigated the effect of streambed roughness and LSTS shape (a lateral roughness) on MRT. We performed 9 laboratory experiments spanning roughness conditions and LSTS shapes that are based on shapes observed in natural streams. The three streambed roughness conditions were: (1) a smooth flume with a 15-cm depth; (2) a uniformly rough flume with 5-cm gravels 1-particle thick in the main channel and finer sand in the LSTS at 15-cm depth; and (3) a uniformly rough flume at 30-cm depth. We collected data on: (1) entrainment velocities at the LSTS entrance using stereo particle image velocimetry; (2) velocity and turbulence quantities along a horizontal plane in the LSTS with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter; and (3) MRT with salt injection experiments and electrical conductivity probes. Preliminary results from the experiments will be presented, and resulting insights into the predictive relationship.

  4. Effects of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on performance and perceptual responses in a laboratory-simulated BMX cycling qualification series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabala, Mikel; Requena, Bernardo; Sánchez-Muñoz, Cristóbal; González-Badillo, Juan José; García, Inmaculada; Oöpik, Vahur; Pääsuke, Mati

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3-) ingestion on performance and perceptual responses in a laboratory-simulated bicycle motocross (BMX) qualification series. Nine elite BMX riders volunteered to participate in this study. After familiarization, subjects undertook two trials involving repeated sprints (3 x Wingate tests [WTs] separated by 30 minutes of recovery; WT1, WT2, WT3). Ninety minutes before each trial, subjects ingested either NaHCO3- or placebo in a counterbalanced, randomly assigned, double-blind manner. Each trial was separated by 4 days. Performance variables of peak power, mean power, time to peak power, and fatigue index were calculated for each sprint. Ratings of perceived exertion were obtained after each sprint, and ratings of perceived readiness were obtained before each sprint. No significant differences were observed in performance variables between successive sprints or between trials. For the NaHCO3- trial, peak blood lactate during recovery was greater after WT2 (p BMX qualification series, possibly because of the short duration of each effort and the long recovery time used between the three WTs. On the contrary, NaHCO3- ingestion improved perceived readiness before each WT.

  5. Effect of a commercial air ionizer on dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae (Acari:Pyroglyphidae) in the laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suhaili Zainal Abidin; Ho Tze Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the short and long term efficacy of a commercial air ionizer in killing Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D. pteronyssinus) and Dermatophagoides farinae (D. farinae) mites. Methods: The effect of a commercial ionizer on D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae was evaluated in the laboratory, using a specially designed test. Mortality was assessed after 6, 16 and 24 hours for direct exposure and after 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72 hours for exposure in simulated mattress. New batches of mites were used for each exposure time. Results: LT50 for direct exposure of ionizer was 10 hours for D. pteronyssinus and 18 hours for D. farinae. The LT50 for exposure in simulated mattress was 132 hours or 5.5 days for D. pteronyssinus and 72 hours or 3 days for D. farinae. LT95 for direct exposure of ionizer was 36 hours for D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae. Meanwhile, the LT95 for exposure in simulated mattress was 956 hours or 39.8 days for D. pteronyssinus and 403 hours or 16.8 days for D. farinae. Conclusions:This study demonstrates the increasing mite mortalities with increasing exposure time of a commercial ionizer and suggests that negative ions produced by an ionizer kill dust mites and can be used to reduce natural mite populations on exposed surfaces such as floors, clothes, curtains, etc. However, there is reduced efficacy on mites inside stuffed materials as in mattresses and furniture.

  6. Effects of snow accumulation on soil temperature and change of salinity in frozen soil from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, K.; Sato, E.; Ishii, M.; Nemoto, M.; Mochizuki, S.

    2008-12-01

    In order to clarify the effect of snow depth on the ground temperature, snowfalls were occurred on soil samples using an artificial snowfall machine in the laboratory and variations of soil temperatures up to 30cm were measured during snowfall. The snow types used here were dendrites (type A) and sphere (type B). The snow depths on the soil surface were 10cm and 30cm for each snow type, so four deferent experimental results were obtained. At each experiment, two samples with deferent initial volumetric water content were prepared, about 10% and 20%. The initial soil temperature was set to 5°C and temperature in the laboratory was kept at -10°C. Soil temperatures were measured at the depths of 0cm, 10cm, 20cm and 30cm during the snowfall, and continuous measurements were conducted for ten hours after the stop of snowfall. From the experiments, it is confirmed that the soil temperature strongly depended on the depths of snow on the surface, density and water content. The soil sample using the type A with the depth of 30cm snow accumulation had the highest temperature at the surface, followed by the type A with 10cm snow, type B with 30cm snow and type B with 10cm snow. It was also pointed that temperature of the high water content samples showed the high temperature decrease compared with the low water one due to the high heat capacity except for the sample using type A with 10cm snow. Numerical calculation will be needed to explain these results. In addition, another experiment will be carried out to clarify the change of salinity during soil freezing with snow accumulation. The method to measure the salinity of soil is to measure the electrical conductivity of soil and volumetric water content at the same depth. The temperature condition in the cooling bath is ranged between -10 and 5°C and changed in 24 hours. Firstly, the temperature profiles will be measured to detect the frozen front, then measurements will start and discuss the results.

  7. Effect of Humic Acid on Migration, Distribution and Remediation of Dense Non-aqueous Phase Liquids: A laboratory investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z.; Wu, J.; Xu, H.; Gao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decades, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) contamination in the subsurface increases with the rapid development of oil industry and becomes the focus of many studies. The migration, distribution and remediation efficiency of DNAPLs in the subsurface environment are greatly affected by the solution chemistry besides the physical heterogeneities of aquifers. Humic acid (HA), which is ubiquitous in natural environments, is a surface active substance exhibiting solubility enhancement behavior for hydrophobic organic compounds such as DNAPLs. Here we reported a laboratory investigation to study the effects of HA on the infiltration, immobilization and subsequent recovery of DNAPL in porous media. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was selected as the representative DNAPL in this study. Two-dimensional (2-D) sandbox experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of different HA concentrations on the transport, distribution of PCE and the remediation of PCE using surfactant (Tween 80) flushing in a saturated porous media system. The surfactant flushing of PCE was performed after the PCE transport and distribution had reached equilibrium. A light transmission visualization method with charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was adopted to visualize PCE distribution and quantify its saturation. In addition, the experiments were also designed to gather data for the validation of multiphase flow models. Effluent samples were collected to determine dissolved PCE concentrations. PCE solubilization and PCE-water interfacial tension were experimentally determined in aqueous solutions of varying HA concentrations. The experimental results showed that the presence of HA can have a dramatic impact on PCE flow and entrapment, and significantly improved the recovery of PCE during surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR). The findings are of use for better understanding of the migration and entrapment of DNAPLs and developing of SEAR technology.

  8. Applying decision trial and evaluation laboratory as a decision tool for effective safety management system in aviation transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifeanyichukwu Ebubechukwu Onyegiri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, in the aviation industry, the weak engineering controls and lapses associated with safety management systems (SMSs are responsible for the seemingly unprecedented disasters. A previous study has confirmed the difficulties experienced by safety managers with SMSs and the need to direct research to this area of investigation for more insights and progress in the evaluation and maintenance of SMSs in the aviation industry. The purpose of this work is to examine the application of Decision Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL to the aviation industry in developing countries with illustration using the Nigerian aviation survey data for the validation of the method. The advantage of the procedure over other decision making methods is in its ability to apply feedback in its decision making. It also affords us the opportunity of breaking down the complex aviation SMS components and elements which are multi-variate in nature through the analysis of the contributions of the diverse system criteria from the perspective of cause and effects, which in turn yields easier and yet more effective aviation transportation accident pre-corrective actions. In this work, six revised components of an SMS were identified and DEMATEL was applied to obtain their direct and indirect impacts and influences on the overall SMS performance. Data collection was by the survey questionnaire, which served as the initial direct-relation matrix, coded in Matlab software for establishing the impact relation map (IRM. The IRM was then plotted in MS Excel spread-sheet software. From our results, safety structure and regulation has the highest impact level on an SMS with a corresponding positive relation level value. In conclusion, the results agree with those of previous researchers that used grey relational analysis. Thus, DEMATEL serves as a great tool and resource for the safety manager.

  9. The effect of C/N ratio on ammonia oxidising bacteria community structure in a laboratory nitrification-denitrification reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, S J; Head, I M; Curtis, T P; Godley, A R

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory scale reactor operated as a single sludge, denitrification-nitrification bioreactor (DNB), was fed a synthetic wastewater. The effect of the C/N ratio of the influent on the structure of beta-proteobacterial autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) communities was determined by DGGE analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified using a range of AOB-selective primers. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) was used to determine quantitative changes in the AOB communities. When operated at a C/N ratio of 2 the DNB was effective in nitrogen removal and nitrification was measured at approximately 1.0 mg NH4+-N/g dry wt/h. Altering the C/N ratio to 5 resulted in a 50% reduction in nitrification rates. Nitrification was restored to its original level when the C/N ratio was returned to 2. AOB were detected by DGGE analysis of samples from the DNB under all operating conditions but the changes in C/N ratio and nitrification rates were accompanied by changes in the community structure of the AOB. However, quantitative FISH analysis indicated that beta-proteobacterial AOB were only present in high numbers (ca. 10(8) cells/ml) under the original operating conditions with a C/N ratio of 2. Beta-proteobacterial AOB could not be detected by FISH when the C/N ratio was 5. When nitrification activity was restored by returning the C/N ratio to 2, beta-proteobacterial AOB were still not detected and it is likely that either beta-proteobacterial AOB were not responsible for ammonia oxidation or that beta-proteobacterial AOB that did not contain the target sites for the range of 4 AOB selective probes used, were present in the reactor.

  10. Virtual Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, P.

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations playa central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

  11. Effect of genetic strain and gender on age-related changes in body composition of the laboratory rat.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Body composition data for common laboratory strains of rat as a function of age. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Gordon , C., K. Jarema ,...

  12. What Is the True Color of Fresh Meat? A Biophysical Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Investigating the Effects of Ligand Binding on Myoglobin Using Optical, EPR, and NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Crowder, Michael W.; McCarrick, Robert; Lorigan, Gary A.; Tierney, David L.

    2011-01-01

    With an increased focus on integrated upper-level laboratories, we present an experiment integrating concepts from inorganic, biological, and physical chemistry content areas. Students investigate the effects of ligand strength on the spectroscopic properties of the heme center in myoglobin using UV-vis, [superscript 1]H NMR, and EPR…

  13. The Effect of Combining Analogy-Based Simulation and Laboratory Activities on Turkish Elementary School Students' Understanding of Simple Electric Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Zeynep Koyunlu; Dokme, Ibilge

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the combination of both analogy-based simulation and laboratory activities as a teaching tool was more effective than utilizing them separately in teaching the concepts of simple electricity. The quasi-experimental design that involved 66 seventh grade students from urban Turkish elementary…

  14. A Simplified Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment to Evaluate the Effect of the Ionic Strength on the Equilibrium Concentration Quotient of the Bromcresol Green Dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Hernan B.; Mirenda, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A modified laboratory experiment for undergraduate students is presented to evaluate the effects of the ionic strength, "I", on the equilibrium concentration quotient, K[subscript c], of the acid-base indicator bromcresol green (BCG). The two-step deprotonation of the acidic form of the dye (sultone form), as it is dissolved in water, yields…

  15. What Is the True Color of Fresh Meat? A Biophysical Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Investigating the Effects of Ligand Binding on Myoglobin Using Optical, EPR, and NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Crowder, Michael W.; McCarrick, Robert; Lorigan, Gary A.; Tierney, David L.

    2011-01-01

    With an increased focus on integrated upper-level laboratories, we present an experiment integrating concepts from inorganic, biological, and physical chemistry content areas. Students investigate the effects of ligand strength on the spectroscopic properties of the heme center in myoglobin using UV-vis, [superscript 1]H NMR, and EPR…

  16. Laboratory Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  17. Effectiveness and residual activity comparison of granular formulations of insect growth regulators pyriproxyfen and s-methoprene against Florida mosquitoes in laboratory and outdoor conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Jai K; Ali, Arshad; Zaim, Morteza

    2002-09-01

    Effectiveness and residual activity tests of granular formulations of 2 insect growth regulators (IGRs), s-methoprene and pyriproxyfen, against laboratory-reared larvae of 5 colonized mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, Aedes taeniorhynchus, Anopheles quadrimaculatus, and Culex nigripalpus, were conducted in the laboratory and outdoors in plastic tubs. Culex quinquefasciatus was exposed to these two IGRs in the laboratory only. Each IGR formulation was applied at 0.02 and 0.05 ppm active ingredient (Al) against 5 of the 6 mosquito species both in the laboratory and the outdoor evaluations, whereas Cx. quinquefasciatus was exposed to 0.2 and 0.4 ppm AI of s-methoprene, and 0.1 and 0.2 ppm AI of pyriproxyfen in the laboratory. s-Methoprene at 0.02 and 0.05 ppm AI resulted in variable levels (Culex quinquefasciatus and Ae. albopictus were the most tolerant to s-methopene, with maximum emergence inhibitions amounting to 84% in Cx. quinquefasciatus at 0.4 ppm and 44.3% in Ae. albopictus at 0.05 ppm during the 1st week in the laboratory. Pyriproxyfen at comparable treatment rates to s-methoprene caused very high levels (>80-100% in most cases) of initial and residual emergence inhibitions of the tested species in the laboratory as well as outdoors. In several species, pyriproxyfen induced complete inhibition of adult emergence for several weeks after treatment, even at the lower rate of 0.02 ppm. The World Health Organization has recently recommended the use of pyriproxyfen for the control of some mosquito species at specified rates in certain habitats.

  18. Characterization of wastewater treatment plant microbial communities and the effects of carbon sources on diversity in laboratory models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwon Lee

    Full Text Available We are developing a laboratory-scale model to improve our understanding and capacity to assess the biological risks of genetically engineered bacteria and their genetic elements in the natural environment. Our hypothetical scenario concerns an industrial bioreactor failure resulting in the introduction of genetically engineered bacteria to a downstream municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP. As the first step towards developing a model for this scenario, we sampled microbial communities from the aeration basin of a MWWTP at three seasonal time points. Having established a baseline for community composition, we investigated how the community changed when propagated in the laboratory, including cell culture media conditions that could provide selective pressure in future studies. Specifically, using PhyloChip 16S-rRNA-gene targeting microarrays, we compared the compositions of sampled communities to those of inocula propagated in the laboratory in simulated wastewater conditionally amended with various carbon sources (glucose, chloroacetate, D-threonine or the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C2mim]Cl. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria were predominant in both aeration basin and laboratory-cultured communities. Laboratory-cultured communities were enriched in γ-Proteobacteria. Enterobacteriaceae, and Aeromonadaceae were enriched by glucose, Pseudomonadaceae by chloroacetate and D-threonine, and Burkholderiacea by high (50 mM concentrations of chloroacetate. Microbial communities cultured with chloroacetate and D-threonine were more similar to sampled field communities than those cultured with glucose or [C2mim]Cl. Although observed relative richness in operational taxonomic units (OTUs was lower for laboratory cultures than for field communities, both flask and reactor systems supported phylogenetically diverse communities. These results importantly provide a foundation for laboratory models of industrial

  19. Dose-effects relationships in wild populations of the aquatic snail Campeloma decisum at Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, E. [Colorado State University (United States); Higley, K. [Oregon State University (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In the last decade regulatory bodies worldwide have implemented standards to protect populations of non-human biota (NHB) from the consequences of radiation exposure. This is a departure from previous regulatory frameworks, which were concerned only with protecting man. The implementation of these new standards initiated an ongoing discussion concerning appropriate dose-rate limits for NHB. For the most part, the data utilized for estimating appropriately protective dose-rate limits has come from data collected via the irradiation of NHB in a laboratory setting. While some dose-effects studies have been performed under field conditions, such experiments represent a minority of the available data. This deficit in the literature has resulted in challenges to the established paradigm, with researchers reporting increased radiosensitivity in NHB under field conditions. However, many such studies overlook critical components of dose-effects analysis: lacking either robust ecological technique or dosimetric rigor. The study cited herein provides rigorous analysis of factors affecting populations of aquatic snails and is intended as a framework for identifying those factors statistically indicative of snail population. These benchmarks (e.g., number of snails, mass of individuals) were employed as proxies for snail population health, and how it was impacted by over two dozen environmental variables. Dose-rates were calculated via a novel voxel model, developed for this study to estimate internal dose rates for the species of interest. A linear regression model was employed to tease out the relationship between individual snails, their environment, and radiation dose rate. There was no evidence that snail population health was influenced by radiation exposure (p=0.70) at the observed dose rates. Of the environmental variables tested, water concentration of Ca was well correlated with snail mass size (p<0.001), while water concentration of P was well correlated with the

  20. Laboratory-derived temperature preference and effect on the feeding rate and survival of juvenile Hemimysis anomala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jennifer; Rudstam, Lars S.; Boscarino, Brent T.; Walsh, Maureen G.; Lantry, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Hemimysis anomala is a warm-water mysid that invaded the Great Lakes region in 2006 and has since rapidly spread throughout the basin. We conducted three laboratory experiments to better define the temperature preference, tolerance limits, and temperature effects on feeding rates of juvenile Hemimysis, using individuals acclimated to mid (16 °C) and upper (22 °C) preferred temperature values previously reported for the species. For temperature preference, we fit a two-parameter Gaussian (μ, σ) function to the experimental data, and found that the peak values (μ, interpreted as the preference temperature) were 22.0 °C (SE 0.25) when acclimated to 16 and 21.9 °C (SE 0.38) when acclimated to 22 °C, with the σ-values of the curves at 2.6 and 2.5 °C, respectively. No mysids were observed in temperatures below 10 or above 28 °C in these preference experiments. In short-term tolerance experiments for temperatures between 4 and 32 °C, all mysids died within 8 h at 30.2 °C for 16 °C acclimated mysids, and at 31.8 °C for 22 °C acclimated mysids. No lower lethal limit was found. Feeding rates increased with temperature from an average of 4 Bosmina eaten per hour at 5 °C to 19 Bosmina eaten per hour at 27 °C. The results of our experiments indicate an optimal temperature for Hemimysis between 21 and 27 °C, which corresponds with temperatures during periods of high population growth in the field. These results contribute a better understanding of this species' biological response to temperature that will help guide field studies and inform bioenergetics modeling.

  1. Effects of biochar addition on greenhouse gas emissions and microbial responses in a short-term laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Gayoung; Kang, Hojeong

    2012-01-01

    Biochar application to soil has drawn much attention as a strategy to sequester atmospheric carbon in soil ecosystems. The applicability of this strategy as a climate change mitigation option is limited by our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the observed changes in greenhouse gas emissions from soils, microbial responses, and soil fertility changes. We conducted an 8-wk laboratory incubation using soils from PASTURE (silt loam) and RICE PADDY (silt loam) sites with and without two types of biochar (biochar from swine manure [CHAR-M] and from barley stover [CHAR-B]). Responses to addition of the different biochars varied with the soil source. Addition of CHAR-B did not change CO and CH evolution from the PASTURE or the RICE PADDY soils, but there was a decrease in NO emissions from the PASTURE soil. The effects of CHAR-M addition on greenhouse gas emissions were different for the soils. The most substantial change was an increase in NO emissions from the RICE PADDY soil. This result was attributed to a combination of abundant denitrifiers in this soil and increased net nitrogen mineralization. Soil phosphatase and N-acetylglucosaminidase activity in the CHAR-B-treated soils was enhanced compared with the controls for both soils. Fungal biomass was higher in the CHAR-B-treated RICE PADDY soil. From our results, we suggest CHAR-B to be an appropriate amendment for the PASTURE and RICE PADDY soils because it provides increased nitrogen availability and microbial activity with no net increase in greenhouse gas emissions. Application of CHAR-M to RICE PADDY soils could result in excess nitrogen availability, which may increase NO emissions and possible NO leaching problems. Thus, this study confirms that the ability of environmentally sound biochar additions to sequester carbon in soils depends on the characteristics of the receiving soil as well as the nature of the biochar.

  2. Laboratory model study of the effect of aeration on axial velocity attenuation of turbulent jet flows in plunge pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 张法星; 田忠; 许唯临; 刘斌; 卫望汝

    2015-01-01

    In the laboratory model experiment, the velocities of the jet flow along the axis are measured, using the CQY−Z8a velocity-meter. The velocity attenuations of the jet flow along the axis under different conditions are studied. The effects of the aeration concentration, the initial jet velocity at the entry and the thickness of the jet flow on the velocity attenuation of the jet flow are analyzed. It is seen that the velocity attenuation of the jet flow along the axis sees a regular variation. It is demonstrated by the test results that under the experimental conditions, the velocity along the axis decreases linearly. The higher the air concentration is, the faster the velocity will be decayed. The absolute value of the slopeK increases with the rise of the air concentration. The relationship can be defined as=a+bKACK. The coefficientA is 0.03 under the experimental conditions. With the low air concentration of the jet flow, the thinner the jet flow is, the faster the velocity will be decayed. With the increase of the air concentra- tion, the influence of the thickness of the jet flow on the velocity attenuation is reduced. When the air concentration is increased to a certain value, the thickness of the jet flow may not have any influence on the velocity attenuation. The initial jet velocity itself at the entry has no influence on the variation of the velocity attenuation as the curves of the velocity attenuation at different velocities at the entry are practically parallel, even coinciding one with another. Therefore, improving the air concentration of the jet flow and disper- sing the jet flow in the plunge pool could reduce the influence of the jet flow on the scour.

  3. Effect of Climatic Conditions on Differences in Thermo-Technical Properties of Organic Bedding in Laboratory Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lendelová Jana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to analyse the influence of climatic factors on the thermal performance of separated liquid manure. The samples of organic bedding were collected from the lying area of dairy housing and preparatory store. The measurement of properties of recycled manure solids (RMS was carried out in laboratory conditions. Samples were examined with determining the temperature effect on the thermal conductivity λ of ’dry‘ separated liquid manure (with a dry matter content of 60% and ’wet‘ liquid manure (with a dry matter content of 26%, in air temperatures ranging from 0 °C to 40 °C. Subsequently, the thermal resistance of three selected types of cows lying structures was calculated for winter and summer boundary values. Based on the results of thermal conductivity and thermal resistance, it was observed that dry separated liquid manure as an alternative bedding has, in low temperature (up to 5 °C, the most suitable thermal performance if it is maintained in a dry condition (with a dry matter content of 60%. With increasing temperature (above 20 °C and increasing humidity of bedding (below 26%, thermo-technical properties get worse; however, when comparing the thermal resistance of the cow bed structure with sandwich mattresses with a 50 mm layer of organic bedding and the deep cubicle filled with 200 mm of organic bedding, the thermal resistance of floor structure decreases by 7.6% or 18.4%, respectively. With a proper handling of the recycled organic bedding, it is possible to use its economic advantages.

  4. Effect of harvest time on fermentation profiles of maize ensiled in laboratory silos and determination of drying losses at 60°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Kristensen, Niels Bastian; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2007-01-01

    The objectives were to investigate the effect of premature ensiling of maize on alcohol fermentation in laboratory silos and the loss of fermentation products and glucose in silage following drying at 60°C for 48 h. During four consecutive weeks maize was harvested and ensiled for 60 days in vacuum......-sealed laboratory silos. The content of DM in silage increased (p...-glucose content was reduced by approximately 45% after drying. Alcohols and esters were completely lost in drying. We conclude that ensiling of pre-mature maize does not lead to extensive alcohol fermentation in laboratory silos following 60 days of ensiling, and that dry matter correction based on fermentation...

  5. Embedding Laboratory Experience in Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James R.; Barroso, Luciana R.; Simpson, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Demonstrations can be very effective at enhancing student learning and represent a mechanism for embedding laboratory experiences within a classroom setting. A key component to an effective demonstration is active student engagement throughout the entire process, leading to a guided laboratory experience in a lecture setting. Students are involved…

  6. Modelling depression in animals and the potential antidepressant effect of histaminergic modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Magara, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Depression is at the top position for "years lived with disability" (Smith, 2014). Its aetiology is unknown, but the pathogenesis implicates changes in glutamatergic neuronal plasticity. Glutamatergic plasticity likely mediates the effects of antidepressants acting through monoamines. Histamine is a monoaminergic neuromodulator able to regulate glutamatergic plasticity and synaptic transmission. The Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rat has face and predictive validity as model ...

  7. The Effect of Heating on the Degradation of Ground Laboratory and Space Irradiated Teflon(r) FEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Martin, Morgana

    2002-01-01

    The outer most layer of the multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is back surface aluminized Teflon(R) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene). As seen by data collected after each of the three servicing missions and as observed during the second servicing mission (SM2), the FEP has become embrittled in the space environment, leading to degradation of the mechanical properties and severe on-orbit cracking of the FEP. During SM2, a sample of aluminized-FEP was retrieved from HST that had cracked and curled, exposing its aluminum backside to space. Because of the difference in optical properties between FEP and aluminum, this insulation piece reached 200 C on-orbit, which is significantly higher than the nominal MLI temperature extreme of 50 C. This piece was more brittle than other retrieved material from the first and third servicing missions (SM1 and SM3A, respectively). Due to this observation and the fact that Teflon thermal shields on the solar array bi-stems were heated on-orbit to 130 C, experiments have been conducted to determine the effect of heating on the degradation of FEP that has been irradiated in a ground laboratory facility or in space on HST. Teflon FEP samples were X-ray irradiated in a high vacuum facility in order to simulate the damage caused by radiation in the space environment. Samples of pristine FEP, X-ray irradiated FEP and FEP retrieved from the HST during SM3A were heat treated from 50 to 200 C at 25 intervals in a high vacuum facility and then tensile tested. In addition, samples were tested in a density gradient column to determine the effect of the radiation and heating on the density of FEP. Results indicate that although heating does not degrade the tensile properties of non-irradiated Teflon, there is a significant dependence of the percent elongation at failure of irradiated Teflon as a function of heating temperature. Irradiated Teflon was found to undergo increasing degradation in the elongation

  8. Effects of different phosphate lowering strategies in patients with CKD on laboratory outcomes: A systematic review and NMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeliki Veroniki, Argie; Thabane, Lehana; Busse, Jason W.; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Iorio, Alfonso; Cruz Lopes, Luciane; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), a complication of chronic kidney disease, has been linked to reduced quality and length of life. High serum phosphate levels that result from CKD-MBD require phosphate-lowering agents, also known as phosphate binders. The objective of this systematic review is to compare the effects of available phosphate binders on laboratory outcomes in patients with CKD-MBD. Methods Data sources included MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1996 to April 2016, and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials up to April 2016. Teams of two reviewers, independently and in duplicate, screened titles and abstracts and potentially eligible full text reports to determine eligibility, and subsequently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias in eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Eligible trials enrolled patients with CKD-MBD and randomized them to receive calcium-based phosphate binders (delivered as calcium acetate, calcium citrate or calcium carbonate), non-calcium-based phosphate binders (NCBPB) (sevelamer hydrochloride, sevelamer carbonate, lanthanum carbonate, sucroferric oxyhydroxide and ferric citrate), phosphorus restricted diet (diet), placebo or no treatment and reported effects on serum levels of phosphate, calcium and parathyroid hormone. We performed Bayesian network meta-analyses (NMA) to calculate the effect estimates (mean differences) and 95% credible intervals for serum levels of phosphate, calcium and parathyroid hormone. We calculated direct, indirect and network meta-analysis estimates using random-effects models. We applied the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach to rate the quality of evidence for each pairwise comparison. Results Our search yielded 1108 citations; 71 RCTs were retrieved for full review and 16 proved eligible. Including an additional 13 studies from a previous review, 29 studies that enrolled 8335 participants proved

  9. Effect of oil-based formulations of acaripathogenic fungi to control Rhipicephalus microplus ticks under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Mariana G; Golo, Patrícia S; Angelo, Isabele C; Perinotto, Wendell M S; Sá, Fillipe A; Quinelato, Simone; Bittencourt, Vânia R E P

    2012-08-13

    . bassiana oil-based formulations showed hatching rates that decreased 102.5 and 3.65 times, respectively. In the bioassay with larvae, M. anisopliae s.l. oil-based formulations caused nearly 100% mortality five days after treatment, while larva treated with B. bassiana oil-based formulations reached 100% mortality at day 20 after treatment. Larva from oil-based control groups showed mortality at day 15 after treatment, which indicated a possible toxic effect of the oil for this R. microplus stage. The results showed that the fungal mineral oil formulations tested were more effective than the aqueous suspension. Oil-based formulations at 10, 15 and 20% enhanced the activity of M. anisopliae s.l. Ma 959, and B. bassiana Bb 986, isolates against R. microplus eggs, larvae, and engorged females tick. Mineral oil was effective as an adjuvant in formulations of M. anisopliae s.l., Ma 959, and B. bassiana, Bb 986, for the control of R. microplus under laboratory conditions.

  10. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  11. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratories The Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  12. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratory The Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  13. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratoriesThe Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  14. FOOTWEAR PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory provides biomechanical and physical analyses for both military and commercial footwear. The laboratory contains equipment that is integral to the us...

  15. Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) houses 22 research laboratories for conducting a wide-range of research including catalyst formulation, chemical analysis,...

  16. Restructuring the CS 1 classroom: Examining the effect of open laboratory-based classes vs. closed laboratory-based classes on Computer Science 1 students' achievement and attitudes toward computers and computer courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Jean Foster

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of classroom restructuring involving computer laboratories on student achievement and student attitudes toward computers and computer courses. The effects of the targeted student attributes of gender, previous programming experience, math background, and learning style were also examined. The open lab-based class structure consisted of a traditional lecture class with a separate, unscheduled lab component in which lab assignments were completed outside of class; the closed lab-based class structure integrated a lab component within the lecture class so that half the class was reserved for lecture and half the class was reserved for students to complete lab assignments by working cooperatively with each other and under the supervision and guidance of the instructor. The sample consisted of 71 students enrolled in four intact classes of Computer Science I during the fall and spring semesters of the 2006--2007 school year at two southern universities: two classes were held in the fall (one at each university) and two classes were held in the spring (one at each university). A counterbalanced repeated measures design was used in which all students experienced both class structures for half of each semester. The order of control and treatment was rotated among the four classes. All students received the same amount of class and instructor time. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) via a multiple regression strategy was used to test the study's hypotheses. Although the overall MANOVA model was statistically significant, independent follow-up univariate analyses relative to each dependent measure found that the only significant research factor was math background: Students whose mathematics background was at the level of Calculus I or higher had significantly higher student achievement than students whose mathematics background was less than Calculus I. The results suggest that classroom structures that

  17. Effect of the Science Process Skills Laboratory Approach Supported with Peer-Instruction on Some of Science Process Skills of Pre-service Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysel Kocakülah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays increasing importance of science process skills and laboratory approach in science education requires the acquisition of scientific process skills that teachers should have been gained those skills during pre-service training courses to transfer their students. Peer instruction, which results in effective outcomes for concept teaching recently, comprises another aspect of this study. The aim of this study is to determine whether scientific process skills laboratory approach, which is supported with peer instruction, is an effective method to improve some high level scientific process skills of pre-service teachers. Single group experimental research design was used in this study. Data were collected by using open ended experiment worksheets, student rubrics, experiment evaluation questionnaire and semi-structured interviews during peer instruction supported scientific process skills laboratory approach in which third year primary science education students at Balikesir University took part in six weeks long application. Findings of the study show that pre-service teachers’ skills of determining variables, changing and controlling variables and making inferences improved while constructing hypotheses and setting up experiment skills were not improved. It is suggested that peer instruction supported scientific process skills laboratory approach should be used to acquire scientific process skills.

  18. Sandia Laboratories energy programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundergan, C.D.; Mead, P.L.; Gillespie, R.S. (eds.)

    1977-03-01

    As one of the multiprogram laboratories of the Energy Research and Development Administration, Sandia Laboratories applies its resources to a number of nationally important programs. About 75 percent of these resources are applied to research and development for national security programs having to do primarily with nuclear weapons--the principal responsibility of the Laboratories. The remaining 25 percent are applied to energy programs and energy-related activities, particularly those requiring resources that are also used in nuclear weapon and other national security programs. Examples of such energy programs and activities are research into nuclear fusion, protection of nuclear materials from theft or diversion, and the disposal of radioactive waste. A number of technologies and disciplines developed for the weapon program are immediately applicable for the development of various energy sources. Instruments developed to detect, measure, and record the detonation of nuclear devices underground, now being used to support the development of in-situ processing of coal and oil shale, are examples. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of these and other energy programs being conducted by these laboratories in the development of economical and environmentally acceptable alternative energy sources. Energy programs are undertaken when they require capabilities used at the Laboratories for the weapon program, and when they have no adverse effect upon that primary mission. The parallel operation of weapon and energy activities allows optimum use of facilities and other resources.

  19. Anatomy and Humanity: Examining the Effects of a Short Documentary Film and First Anatomy Laboratory Experience on Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosani, Farah; Neuberger, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Medical students begin their education inside a laboratory dissecting cadavers to learn human gross anatomy. Many schools use the course experience as a way to instill empathy and some have begun integrating video and recorded interviews with body donors to humanize the experience, but their impact has yet to be measured. This study examines the…

  20. Report on the laboratory examination of the effect of fungal invasion on the durability of untreated mine support timbers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hall, PJ

    1967-02-01

    Full Text Available The technique developed on the laboratory for assessing the progress of decay in individual test poles 3 ft. in length and 5 ins. in diameter by the periodic measurement of their resistance to bending, has been further applied to an examination...

  1. Analytical quality, performance indices and laboratory service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilden, Jørgen; Magid, Erik

    1999-01-01

    analytical error, bias, cost effectiveness, decision-making, laboratory techniques and procedures, mass screening, models, statistical, quality control......analytical error, bias, cost effectiveness, decision-making, laboratory techniques and procedures, mass screening, models, statistical, quality control...

  2. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  3. Re-analysis of previous laboratory phase curves: 2. Connections between opposition effect morphology and spectral features of stony meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déau, Estelle; Spilker, Linda J.; Flandes, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We investigate connections between the opposition phase curves and the spectra from ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths of stony meteorites. We use two datasets: the reflectance dataset of Capaccioni et al. ([1990] Icarus, 83, 325), which consists of optical phase curves (from 2° to 45°) of 17 stony meteorites (three carbonaceous chondrites, 11 ordinary chondrites, and three achondrites), and the spectral dataset from the RELAB database consisting of near-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectra of the same meteorites. We re-analyzed the first dataset and fit it with two morphological models to derive the amplitude A, the angular width HWHM of the surge and the slope S of the linear part. Our re-analysis confirms that stony meteorites have a non-monotonic behavior of the surge amplitude with albedo, which is also observed in planetary surfaces (Déau et al. [2013] Icarus, 226, 1465), laboratory samples (Nelson et al. [2004] Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf., 35, p. 1089) and asteroids (Belskaya and Shevchenko [2000] Icarus, 147, 94). We find a very strong correlation between the opposition effect morphological parameters and the slope of the spectra between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm. In particular, we found that meteorites with a positive amplitude-albedo correlation have a positive spectral slope between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm, while meteorites with a negative amplitude-albedo correlation have a negative spectral slope between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm. We have ruled out the role of the meteorite samples' macro-properties (grain size, porosity and macroscopic roughness) in the correlations found because these properties were constant during the preparation of the samples. If this hypothesis is correct, this implies that other properties like the composition or the micro-properties (grain inclusions, grain shape or microscopic roughness) could have a preponderant role in the non-monotonic behavior of the surge morphology with albedo at small and moderate phase angles. Further

  4. Effect of three different grip angles on physical parameters during laboratory test in handcycling in able-bodied participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eAbel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Handcycling is a relatively new wheelchair sport that has gained increased popularity for people with lower limb disabilities. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of three different grip positions on physical parameters during handcycling in a laboratory setting.Methods: Twenty one able-bodied participants performed three maximum incremental handcycling tests until exhaustion, each with a different grip angle. The angle between the grip and the crank was randomly set at 90° (horizontal, 0° (vertical or 10° (diagonal. The initial load was 20 W and increased by 20 W each five minutes. In addition, participants performed a 20 s maximum effort.Results: The relative peak functional performance (W/kg, peak heart rate (bpm, associated lactate concentrations (mmol/l and peak oxygen uptake per kilogram body weight (ml.min-1.kg-1 for the different grip positions during the stage test were: (a Horizontal: 1.43 ± 0.21 W/kg, 170.14 ± 12.81 bpm, 9.54 ± 1.93 mmol/l, 30.86 ± 4.57 ml/kg; (b Vertical: 1.38 ± 0.20 W/kg, 171.81 ± 13.87 bpm, 9.91 ± 2.29 mmol/l, 29.75 ± 5.13 ml/kg; (c Diagonal: 1.40 ± 0.22 W/kg, 169.19 ± 13.31 bpm, 9.34 ± 2.36 mmol/l, 29.39 ± 4.70 ml/kg. Statistically significant (p <0.05 differences could only be found for lactate concentration between the vertical grip position and the other grips during submaximal handcycling. Conclusion: The orientation of three different grip angles made no difference to the peak load achieved during an incremental handcycling test and a 20 second maximum effort. At submaximal load, higher lactate concentrations were found when the vertical grip position was used, suggesting that this position may be less efficient than the alternative diagonal or horizontal grip positions.

  5. Use of High-Definition Audiovisual Technology in a Gross Anatomy Laboratory: Effect on Dental Students' Learning Outcomes and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Maha; Sleiman, Naama H; Thomas, Maureen; Kashani, Nahid; Ditmyer, Marcia M

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory cadaver dissection is essential for three-dimensional understanding of anatomical structures and variability, but there are many challenges to teaching gross anatomy in medical and dental schools, including a lack of available space and qualified anatomy faculty. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of high-definition audiovisual educational technology in the gross anatomy laboratory in improving dental students' learning outcomes and satisfaction. Exam scores were compared for two classes of first-year students at one U.S. dental school: 2012-13 (no audiovisual technology) and 2013-14 (audiovisual technology), and section exams were used to compare differences between semesters. Additionally, an online survey was used to assess the satisfaction of students who used the technology. All 284 first-year students in the two years (2012-13 N=144; 2013-14 N=140) participated in the exams. Of the 140 students in the 2013-14 class, 63 completed the survey (45% response rate). The results showed that those students who used the technology had higher scores on the laboratory exams than those who did not use it, and students in the winter semester scored higher (90.17±0.56) than in the fall semester (82.10±0.68). More than 87% of those surveyed strongly agreed or agreed that the audiovisual devices represented anatomical structures clearly in the gross anatomy laboratory. These students reported an improved experience in learning and understanding anatomical structures, found the laboratory to be less overwhelming, and said they were better able to follow dissection instructions and understand details of anatomical structures with the new technology. Based on these results, the study concluded that the ability to provide the students a clear view of anatomical structures and high-quality imaging had improved their learning experience.

  6. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  7. Neurogaming Technology Meets Neuroscience Education: A Cost-Effective, Scalable, and Highly Portable Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory for Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Bianca; Badcock, Nicholas A; Grootswagers, Tijl; Hardwick, Katherine; Teichmann, Lina; Wehrman, Jordan; Williams, Mark; Kaplan, David Michael

    2017-01-01

    Active research-driven approaches that successfully incorporate new technology are known to catalyze student learning. Yet achieving these objectives in neuroscience education is especially challenging due to the prohibitive costs and technical demands of research-grade equipment. Here we describe a method that circumvents these factors by leveraging consumer EEG-based neurogaming technology to create an affordable, scalable, and highly portable teaching laboratory for undergraduate courses in neuroscience. This laboratory is designed to give students hands-on research experience, consolidate their understanding of key neuroscience concepts, and provide a unique real-time window into the working brain. Survey results demonstrate that students found the lab sessions engaging. Students also reported the labs enhanced their knowledge about EEG, their course material, and neuroscience research in general.

  8. Reward, punishment and probabilities in policy measurements: An extra laboratory experiment about effectiveness and efficiency of incentives in palm oil production

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Stefan; Mußhoff, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Palm oil production creates negative externalities, e.g. through intensive fertiliser application. If policy wants to determine externalities an effective and efficient measurement seems desirable. Embedded in an extra laboratory field experiment on Sumatra, a business simulation game tests several incentives for reducing the use of fertiliser. These incentives are differently designed, i.e., either reward or punishment, varying in their magnitude and probability of occurrence but constant in...

  9. Effect of pyramiding Bt and CpTI genes on resistance of cotton to Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) under laboratory and field conditions

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) varieties, adapted to China, have been bred that express two genes for resistance to insects. the Cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bt), and a trypsin inhibitor gene from cowpea (CpTI). Effectiveness of the double gene modification in conferring resistance to cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), was studied in laboratory and field experiments. In each experiment, performance of Bt+CpTI cotton was c...

  10. Effect of phloem thickness on heterozygosity in laboratory-reared mountain pine beetles. Forest Service research note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amman, G.D.; Stock, M.W.

    1995-02-01

    Mountain pine beetles (Dendrocotonus ponderosae Hopkins) were collected from naturally infested trees of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) in northern Utah. Bettles were reared in logs through six generations in a laboratory, and heterozygosity measured. Heterozygosity levels initially decreased when individual pairs of beetles were reared. However, when beetles were allowed to selected mates at random, heterozygosity rose to levels higher than those in the starting population. Heterozygosity was higher in bettles reared in thin than those in thick phloem.

  11. Effects of night time road traffic noise—an overview of laboratory and field studies on noise dose and subjective noise sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhrström, E.; Rylander, R.; Björkman, M.

    1988-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of research on sleep and noise at the Department of Environmental Hygiene, University of Gothenburg. Different methods were developed to study primary and after effects of night time road traffic noise on sleep. Three one-week laboratory experiments were undertaken to study the relevance of different noise descriptors— Leq, maximum peak noise level and number of events with high peak noise levels—for sleep disturbance effects. The noise exposure was either single noise evenys or a continuous, even road traffic noise. It was concluded that Leq was not related to sleep disturbance effects. Peak noise levels were significantly related to subjective sleep quality and body movements. Results from a third continuing study showed that there is a threshold for effects of the number of single noise events on sleep quality. Habituation to noise among subjects with differing noise sensitivity was studied in a two-week experiment. A significant noise effect on subjective sleep quality was found among sensitive subjects only. No habituation was seen for the negative influence of noise on sleep quality, mood and performance. Long-term effects of road traffic noise were also investigated in a field survey among 106 individuals. This study revealed the presence of a decrease in sleep quality as well as psycho-social effects on tiredness and mood, together with increased reports of headaches and nervous stomach. As in the laboratory study, sensitive individuals were more affected by noise than less sensitive individuals.

  12. When Gender Identity Doesn't Equal Sex Recorded at Birth: The Role of the Laboratory in Providing Effective Healthcare to the Transgender Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Zil; Corneil, Trevor A; Greene, Dina N

    2017-08-01

    Transgender is an umbrella term used to describe individuals who identify with a gender incongruent to or variant from their sex recorded at birth. Affirming gender identity through a variety of social, medical, and surgical interventions is critical to the mental health of transgender individuals. In recent years, awareness surrounding transgender identities has increased, which has highlighted the health disparities that parallel this demographic. These disparities are reflected in the experience of transgender patients and their providers when seeking clinical laboratory services. Little is known about the effect of gender-affirming hormone therapy and surgery on optimal laboratory test interpretation. Efforts to diminish health disparities encountered by transgender individuals and their providers can be accomplished by increasing social and clinical awareness regarding sex/gender incongruence and gaining insight into the physiological manifestations and laboratory interpretations of gender-affirming strategies. This review summarizes knowledge required to understand transgender healthcare including current clinical interventions for gender dysphoria. Particular attention is paid to the subsequent impact of these interventions on laboratory test utilization and interpretation. Common nomenclature and system barriers are also discussed. Understanding gender incongruence, the clinical changes associated with gender transition, and systemic barriers that maintain a gender/sex binary are key to providing adequate healthcare to transgender community. Transgender appropriate reference interval studies are virtually absent within the medical literature and should be explored. The laboratory has an important role in improving the physiological understanding, electronic medical system recognition, and overall social awareness of the transgender community. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  13. Design of a mobile aerosol research laboratory and data processing tools for effective stationary and mobile field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Drewnick

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A~compact mobile aerosol research laboratory (MoLa for stationary and mobile measurements of aerosol and trace gas characteristics was developed at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry (MPIC. Major efforts were made to design an aerosol inlet system which is optimized and characterized for both, stationary and mobile measurements. The instrumentation on board allows the determination of a multitude of physical and chemical aerosol parameters, for example particle number and mass concentration (PM1/2.5/10, particle size distributions in the diameter range 6 nm up to 32 μm, and chemical composition of the sub-micron aerosol. Furthermore trace gas concentrations of O3, SO2, CO, CO2, NO, NO2 and water vapor as well as meteorological parameters like temperature, relative humidity, pressure, wind, solar radiation and precipitation are measured together with various housekeeping parameters. All instruments collect data with high time resolution in the second to minute-range. The measurement platform as well as data acquisition and handling tools are optimized for efficient application to various measurement settings. The mobile laboratory is designed to be used for mobile investigation of anthropogenically influenced environments. Possible applications include pollutant mapping, chasing of mobile sources or Lagrangian-type measurements in emission plumes, but also stationary measurements with possible frequent position changes and a well-characterized instrument setup. In addition to the design and features of the mobile laboratory, its inlet system and instrumentation as well as examples of applications of this platform are presented. Challenges associated with such measurements and approaches to extract the desired information from the mobile data sets are discussed.

  14. Design of a mobile aerosol research laboratory and data processing tools for effective stationary and mobile field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Drewnick

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A compact mobile aerosol research laboratory (MoLa for stationary and mobile measurements of aerosol and trace gas characteristics was developed at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry (MPIC in Mainz, Germany. Major efforts were made to design an aerosol inlet system which is optimized and characterised for both, stationary and mobile measurements using a particle loss modelling approach. The instrumentation on board allows the determination of a multitude of physical and chemical aerosol parameters, for example particle number and mass concentration (PM1/2.5/10, particle size distributions in the diameter range 6 nm up to 32 μm, and chemical composition of the sub-micron aerosol. Furthermore, trace gas concentrations of O3, SO2, CO, CO2, NO, NO2 and water vapour as well as meteorological parameters like temperature, relative humidity, pressure, wind, solar radiation and precipitation are measured together with various housekeeping parameters. All instruments collect data with high time resolution in the second to minute-range. The measurement platform, as well as data acquisition and handling tools, are optimized for efficient application to various measurement settings. The mobile laboratory is designed to be used for mobile investigation of anthropogenically influenced environments. Possible applications include pollutant mapping, chasing of mobile sources or Lagrangian-type measurements in emission plumes, but also stationary measurements with possible frequent position changes and a well-characterised instrument setup. In addition to the design and features of the mobile laboratory, its inlet system and instrumentation as well as examples of applications of this platform are presented. Challenges associated with such measurements and approaches to extract the desired information from the mobile datasets are discussed.

  15. Effects of hydraulic dredging on the physiological responses of the target species Chamelea gallina (Mollusca: Bivalvia: laboratory experiments and field surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Moschino

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of mechanical stress in the Venus clam Chamelea gallina during hydraulic dredging were assessed in both laboratory and field studies in order to measure physiological biomarkers at organism level (clearance rate, respiration rate, scope for growth, and survival in air test. In the laboratory, mechanical stress was simulated by shaking clams in a vortex mixer. In the field, clams were collected seasonally at two sites along the northern Adriatic coast (Lido and Jesolo and four levels of stress were applied: the highest was that used in commercial fishing (i.e. high water pressure and mechanised sorting and the lowest manual sampling by SCUBA divers. Survival in air was the most sensitive biomarker in evaluating mechanical stress in the laboratory. Clearance rate also decreased significantly when shaking was applied. Field results indicated that high water pressure and mechanised sorting affected clearance, scope for growth and survival in air, all showing decreasing trends as mechanical stress increased at both sampling sites. The detrimental effects of mechanical disturbance may be emphasised depending on season, when exogenous and endogenous stress increases. A potential risk is highlighted mostly for undersized clams that are fished and then discarded.

  16. The effect of a test ordering software intervention on the prescription of unnecessary laboratory tests - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Carlos Manuel Silva; da Costa Teixeira, Andreia Sofia; de Azevedo, Luís Filipe Ribeiro; Sá, Luísa Maria Barbosa; Santos, Paulo Alexandre Azevedo Pereira; do Couto, Maria Luciana Gomes Domingues; da Costa Pereira, Altamiro Manuel Rodrigues; Hespanhol, Alberto Augusto Oliveira Pinto; da Costa Santos, Cristina Maria Nogueira

    2017-02-20

    The way software for electronic health records and laboratory tests ordering systems are designed may influence physicians' prescription. A randomised controlled trial was performed to measure the impact of a diagnostic and laboratory tests ordering system software modification. Participants were family physicians working and prescribing diagnostic and laboratory tests. The intervention group had a modified software with a basic shortcut menu changes, where some tests were withdrawn or added, and with the implementation of an evidence-based decision support based on United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations. This intervention group was compared with usual software (control group). The outcomes were the number of tests prescribed from those: withdrawn from the basic menu; added to the basic menu; marked with green dots (USPSTF's grade A and B); and marked with red dots (USPSTF's grade D). Comparing the monthly average number of tests prescribed before and after the software modification, from those tests that were withdrawn from the basic menu, the control group prescribed 33.8 tests per 100 consultations before and 30.8 after (p = 0075); the intervention group prescribed 31.3 before and 13.9 after (p < 0001). Comparing the tests prescribed between both groups during the intervention, from those tests that were withdrawn from the basic menu, the intervention group prescribed a monthly average of 14.0 vs. 29.3 tests per 100 consultations in the control group (p < 0.001). From those tests that are USPSTF's grade A and B, intervention group prescribed 66.8 vs. 74.1 tests per 100 consultations in the control group (p = 0.070). From those tests categorised as USPSTF grade D, the intervention group prescribed an average of 9.8 vs. 11.8 tests per 100 consultations in the control group (p = 0.003). Removing unnecessary tests from a quick shortcut menu of the diagnosis and laboratory tests ordering system had a significant

  17. A cost-effective treatment for severe generalized erosion and loss of vertical dimension of occlusion: laboratory-fabricated composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Michael J; Stapleton, Brandon M; Harris, Bryan T; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes preventive and restorative treatment planning for a 56-year-old female patient with severe, chronic, poorly controlled gastroesophageal reflux disease and resulting loss of vertical dimension of occlusion. First, the demineralization process was controlled through collaboration with the patient's physician, and measures were taken to restore adequate stimulated salivary flow. Then, for financial reasons, indirect laboratory-fabricated composite resin restorations were adhesively bonded to replace lost tooth structure and reestablish the patient's collapsed vertical dimension. Indirect-laboratory fabricated restorations can be a cost-effective alternative to direct composite resin or all-ceramic restorations for the treatment of chronic severe erosion, but there are no long-term clinical reports in the current literature to support or contraindicate the use of indirect composites for this type of clinical application. Therefore, careful, long-term follow-up evaluations are planned for this patient.

  18. Effects of male nutrition on sperm storage and remating behavior in wild and laboratory Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Solana; Goane, Lucía; Cladera, Jorge; Vera, M Teresa

    2011-11-01

    Male physiological condition can affect his ability to modulate female sexual receptivity. Thus, studying this aspect can have biological and practical implications. Here, we examine how male nutritional status affected the amount of sperm stored, remating rate and refractory period of the tephritid fruit fly Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) females. Both wild and laboratory flies were evaluated. We also examine female sperm storage patterns. Experiments were carried out by manipulating male adult diet and exposing these males to virgin females. Females mated with differently treated males were either dissected to count the amount of sperm stored or exposed to virgin males to determine remating rate and the length of the refractory period. We found that male nutritional status affected the amount of the sperm stored and the renewal of sexual receptivity in wild flies. For laboratory flies, male nutritional status affected the length of the refractory period but not the amount of sperm stored by females. In addition, we report that the ventral receptacle is not an important organ of sperm storage in this species. We conclude that male nutritional condition influences the ability to modulate female sexual receptivity, possibly through a combination of the quantity and quality of the ejaculate. From an applied perspective, providing males with an enriched diet will likely result in increased efficacy of the sterile insect technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of systemic isotretinoin treatment on laboratory variables in patients with acne and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haydar Uçak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Isotretinoin (ISO is a synthetic retinoid that is a preferred drug for unresponsive to conventional therapy in the treatment of severe cystic acne. In this study, to evaluate retrospectively laboratory values in patients with acne using oral ISO treatment was aimed. Methods: 40 patients were enrolled to the study that admitted to the dermatology clinic and clinically diagnosed as acne vulgaris and oral isotretinoin treatment was started. Patient’s retreatment and 3rd month of the teatment values of liver function tests (AST, ALT, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL and triglyceride (TG levels were obtained by screening of files. Results:Compared to values of patients before and 3rd month of treatment, statistically significant differences was detected for total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, TG and AST values (p<0.001, p<0.001, p= 0.003, p= 0.01, p=0.001 respectively. Conclusion: We think that starting a good diet before treatment would be useful to prevent TG disorder. In addition, we believe it would be useful to do strict laboratory follow in patients with familial hypertriglyceridemia during treatment. We believe that it is more necessary to follow up the blood lipid values rather than liver and kidney function tests. However, we also think that it would be sufficient to follow up once every 2 or 3 months.

  20. Laboratory Aspects of Hyperprolactinemia Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rykova, O.V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the modern laboratory aspects of diagnosing hyperprolactinemia and monitoring the effectiveness of treatment according to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Hyperprolactinemia: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline 2011.

  1. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is

  2. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is

  3. Effectiveness of influenza vaccine against laboratory-confirmed influenza, in the late 2011–2012 season in Spain, among population targeted for vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In Spain, the influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated in the last three seasons using the observational study cycEVA conducted in the frame of the existing Spanish Influenza Sentinel Surveillance System. The objective of the study was to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza-like illness (ILI) among the target groups for vaccination in Spain in the 2011–2012 season. We also studied influenza VE in the early (weeks 52/2011-7/2012) and late (weeks 8-14/2012) phases of the epidemic and according to time since vaccination. Methods Medically attended patients with ILI were systematically swabbed to collect information on exposure, laboratory outcome and confounding factors. Patients belonging to target groups for vaccination and who were swabbed 4 months, respectively, since vaccination. A decrease in VE with time since vaccination was only observed in individuals aged ≥ 65 years. Regarding the phase of the season, decreasing point estimates were only observed in the early phase, whereas very low or null estimates were obtained in the late phase for the shortest time interval. Conclusions The 2011–2012 influenza vaccine showed a low-to-moderate protective effect against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza in the target groups for vaccination, in a late season and with a limited match between the vaccine and circulating strains. The suggested decrease in influenza VE with time since vaccination was mostly observed in the elderly population. The decreasing protective effect of the vaccine in the late part of the season could be related to waning vaccine protection because no viral changes were identified throughout the season. PMID:24053661

  4. Comparative effect of angiotensin II type I receptor blockers and calcium channel blockers on laboratory parameters in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Yayoi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both angiotensin II type I receptor blockers (ARBs and calcium channel blockers (CCBs are widely used antihypertensive drugs. Many clinical studies have demonstrated and compared the organ-protection effects and adverse events of these drugs. However, few large-scale studies have focused on the effect of these drugs as monotherapy on laboratory parameters. We evaluated and compared the effects of ARB and CCB monotherapy on clinical laboratory parameters in patients with concomitant hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods We used data from the Clinical Data Warehouse of Nihon University School of Medicine obtained between Nov 1, 2004 and July 31, 2011, to identify cohorts of new ARB users (n = 601 and propensity-score matched new CCB users (n = 601, with concomitant mild to moderate hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We used a multivariate-adjusted regression model to adjust for differences between ARB and CCB users, and compared laboratory parameters including serum levels of triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, non-fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, sodium, potassium, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and white blood cell (WBC, red blood cell (RBC and platelet (PLT counts up to 12 months after the start of ARB or CCB monotherapy. Results We found a significant reduction of serum TC, HbA1c, hemoglobin and hematocrit and RBC count and a significant increase of serum potassium in ARB users, and a reduction of serum TC and hemoglobin in CCB users, from the baseline period to the exposure period. The reductions of RBC count, hemoglobin and hematocrit in ARB users were significantly greater than those in CCB users. The increase of serum potassium in ARB users was significantly greater than that in CCB users. Conclusions Our study suggested that hematological adverse effects and

  5. Effect of vitamin B/sub 6/ on the neurotoxicity and pharmacology of desmethylmisonidazole and misonidazole: clinical and laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C.N.; Hirst, V.K.; Brown, D.M.; Halsey, J.

    1984-08-01

    The clinical usefulness of misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) is severely limited by neurotoxicity. Based on theoretical considerations and on laboratory data suggesting that pyridoxine (PN) decreased MISO toxicity in mice. The authors attempted to ameliorate the clinical neuropathy of DMM using oral PN. Pharmacokinetic analysis suggested interaction of PN and DMM but no protection against neuropathy was observed. Serial experiments with C3H and BALB/c mice were done using various forms of vitamin B/sub 6/ (PN, pyridoxal, pyridoxal phosphate) administered orally and i.p. No consistent protection was observed. Dexamethasone did not alter MISO toxicity in mice, contrary to the clinical findings. They conclude that vitamin B/sub 6/ is not useful in preventing clinical neurotoxicity of MISO or DMM.

  6. Effect of individually tailored biopsychosocial workplace interventions on chronic musculoskeletal pain, stress and work ability among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jay, Kenneth; Petersen, Mikkel Brandt; Sundstrup, Emil

    2014-01-01

    biopsychosocial intervention strategy on musculoskeletal pain, stress and work disability in lab technicians with a history of musculoskeletal pain at a single worksite in Denmark. METHODS/DESIGN: In this single-blind two-armed parallel-group randomized controlled trial with allocation concealment, participants...... by questionnaire (modified visual analogue scale 0-10). DISCUSSION: This study will provide experimental evidence to guide workplace initiatives designed towards reducing chronic musculoskeletal pain and stress. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02047669.......BACKGROUND: Among laboratory technicians, the prevalence of neck and shoulder pain is widespread possibly due to typical daily work tasks such as pipetting, preparing vial samples for analysis, and data processing on a computer including mouse work - all tasks that require precision in motor...

  7. Recent experimental results of effects of perfluoroalkyl substances in laboratory animals - Relation to current regulations and guidance values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienthal, Hellmuth; Dieter, Hermann H; Hölzer, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Michael

    2017-03-02

    The detection of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in surface and drinking water from various countries raised the attention to the presence of these chemicals in environmental probes and led to several regulatory actions to limit exposure in human beings. There was particular concern about perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), due to their former wide-spread use. Recently, several institutions published revisions of former regulatory or recommended maximum concentrations in drinking water and food, which are markedly lower than the former values. The present short overview describes the current regulations for PFAS and compares them with the outcome of several experimental studies in laboratory animals at low-level exposure to PFOA and PFOS. In addition, regulations for short-chain PFAS are presented which, due to lack of toxicological information, are evaluated according to the concepts of Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) or the Health-related Indication Values (HRIV).

  8. The Effectiveness of Science Laboratory Course Regarding the Scientific Process Skills and Scientific Creativity of Prospective Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esin ŞAHİN-PEKMEZ

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research, primary science and mathematics prospective teachers’ scientific process skills and scientific creativity levels have been determined in science laboratory course. The research sample covers 84 primary science and mathematics prospective teachers. The content of the course includes some science scenarios which require the use of samples’ scientific creativity and critical thinking. In the light of these scenarios, the teacher candidates were required to design an experiment and then using their scientific process skills carry out the experiment. According to their written accounts student teachers abilities of scientific creativity and using scientific process skills were measured. As a result it was found out that, prospective teachers’ scientific process skills in both departments are at a good level and there is a significant difference in favor of mathematics prospective teachers. However, there is not a significant difference in terms of scientific creativity of the mathematics and science prospective teachers.

  9. Effects of Neutralization, Decoloration, and Deodorization on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons during Laboratory-Scale Oil Refining Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiang Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of technological operations during oil refining process on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in neutralized, bleached, and deodorized oils was investigated on the basis of laboratory-scale study. Under the best experimental conditions, benzo[a]pyrene decreased by 85.1%, 99.7%, and 40.8% in neutralized, bleached, and deodorized oils, respectively. Total of 16 analytes decreased by 55.7%, 87.5%, and 47.7%, respectively. Bleaching with activated charcoal was the most efficient procedure to reduce PAHs in crude oil. Neutralization had a modest influence on sixteen analytes; however, deodorization was only responsible for a slight decrease in the light PAHs and heavy PAHs contents. Data obtained in this study suggest that the use of activated carbon during oil refining process is highly recommended; moreover, these results provide a useful guidance for oil refining plant to reduce security risk and ensure the quality of the vegetable oil products.

  10. Effects of fluctuating temperature and immersion on asexual reproduction in the intertidal sea anemone Haliplanella luciae (verrill) in laboratory culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.L.; Shick, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    Haliplanella luciae (Verrill) was maintained in laboratory cultures according to a 2 x 2 factorial design. The factors were (1) constant immersion or continuously alternating periods of 6 h immersion followed by 6 h emersion, and (2) 18/sup 0/C constant temperature or 24/sup 0/C during one 6-h emersion period each day and 18/sup 0/C for the remaining 18 h. Significantly different numbers of fissions were observed between both the two immersion and two temperature conditions. A negative correlation was found between the number of fissions and the total dry weight of tissue per bowl. There was a different distribution of individual weights in the two immersion conditions. Some instances of pedal laceration were observed.

  11. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troxell, Wade [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2011-12-22

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSU's overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory's focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3

  12. Denver District Laboratory (DEN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program CapabilitiesDEN-DO Laboratory is a multi-functional laboratory capable of analyzing most chemical analytes and pathogenic/non-pathogenic microorganisms found...

  13. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  14. Lincoln Laboratory Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lincoln Laboratory Grid (LLGrid) is an interactive, on-demand parallel computing system that uses a large computing cluster to enable Laboratory researchers to...

  15. Gun Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Gun Dynamics Laboratory is a research multi-task facility, which includes two firing bays, a high bay area and a second floor laboratory space. The high bay area...

  16. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratoryThe Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  17. Preliminary Status Report of Neutron Radiation Effects and Damage to Neutron Imaging System Equipment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleuel, D. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anderson, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, L. A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brand, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, J. A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Caggiano, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); FItsos, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Goldblum, B. L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Hall, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Harrig, K. P. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Johnson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kruse, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Laplace, T. A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Mahowald, M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Matthews, E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Nielson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ratkiewicz, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rusnak, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Souza, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ureche, A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ummel, C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wiedrick, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zeiser, F. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway)

    2017-02-08

    A high-intensity neutron source is being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform neutron imaging (NI). Two accelerators are be- ing installed in the shielded, underground, north cave of Building 194 to produce neutrons via deuterium- deuterium fusion at 4 MeV or 7 MeV in a windowless gas cell. Over months to years of future experiments, elec- tronic and mechanical equipment in the room will be ir- radiated by a large uence of neutrons, which could cause them to fail or function incorrectly. Neutrons will also activate equipment and materials in the room, making frequent maintenance di cult and time-consuming, ex- acerbating the consequence of equipment failure. To test the neutron response and failure probability of mission- critical components, a variety of equipment intended to be located closest to the neutron source was irradiated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL's) 88-inch cyclotron, using neutrons produced from the breakup of deuterons impinging a thick beryllium target. The high neutron production and high neutron energy of this reaction in combination with the close-in geom- etry possible at the cyclotron allows the application of neutron doses expected to be delivered in months of NI facility operation in only a few days. In most cases, each piece of equipment was irradiated while powered, moni- tored remotely for failure, to test both its live response to irradiation in addition to permanent e ects. Aluminum activation foils were used as uence monitors, assuming the spectral shape measured by Meulders et. al.[1] While the neutron spectrum of the NI facility and the LBNL fa- cility were not identical, relative electronics and materials damage cross sections were used to equate an equivalent amount of energy-dependent neutron damage.

  18. The effect of repetitive intraperitoneal anesthesia by application of fentanyl-medetomidine and midazolam in laboratory rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Held, Manuel; Knoeller, Tabea; Amr, Amro; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Jaminet, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Literature reviews show numerous options for anesthesia in the small laboratory animals. Many methods are associated with complications, such as high technical effort, difficult monitoring, respiratory and cardiovascular depression, and prolonged sedation. In the present study, we report first time results after repeated use of an intraperitoneal combined anesthesia with a high tolerability. Three hundred and seventy-four anesthesias were performed on 38 adult male Lewis rats (280-460 g). Each animal was anesthetized repeatedly over a period of three months, using an intraperitoneal combination of Fentanyl-Medetomidine and Midazolam (FMM). The time required for the animals to lose ear pinch response and the ability to perform a righting and pedal withdrawal reflex was measured. For evaluation of the clinical state, a four-point vitality scale was developed. The anesthesia was antagonized with Naloxone, Flumazenil, and Atipamezole (s.c.). The animals lost all three reflex responses within 5 (± 2.4) min of injection. Without antagonism of anesthesia, the ear pinch response returned on average within 125 (± 21.5) min. After antagonism of anesthesia, the rats needed 5 (± 2.9) min to regain all three reflex responses. No significant differences of vitality-index were measured after repeated use of FMM during the investigation period. A repeatable and secure anesthesia is indispensable for any experimental studies that require multiple anesthesia of a single animal. Intraperitoneal combination of FMM provides an adequate procedure to induce a well tolerable, repeatable state of anesthesia, which conforms to all the necessary requirements for laboratory rats.

  19. History of the 185-/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory and its effects on reactor operations at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The 185-D deaeration building and the 189-D refrigeration building were constructed at Hanford during 1943 and 1944. Both buildings were constructed as part of the influent water cooling system for D reactor. The CMS studies eliminated the need for 185-D function. Early gains in knowledge ended the original function of the 189-D building mission. In 1951, 185-D and 189-D were converted to a thermal-hydraulic laboratory. The experiments held in the thermal-hydraulic lab lead to historic changes in Hanford reactor operations. In late 1951, the exponential physics experiments were moved to the 189-D building. In 1958, new production reactor experiments were begun in 185/189-D. In 1959, Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor experiments were added to the 185/189-D facility. By 1960, the 185/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory was one of the few full service facilities of its type in the nation. During the years 1961--1963 tests continued in the facility in support of existing reactors, new production reactors, and the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor. In 1969, Fast Flux Test Facility developmental testings began in the facility. Simulations in 185/189-D building aided in the N Reactor repairs in the 1980`s. In 1994 the facility was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, because of its pioneering role over many years in thermal hydraulics, flow studies, heat transfer, and other reactor coolant support work. During 1994 and 1995 it was demolished in the largest decontamination and decommissioning project thus far in Hanford Site history.

  20. Process innovation laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Most organizations today are required not only to operate effective business processes but also to allow for changing business conditions at an increasing rate. Today nearly every business relies on their enterprise information systems (EIS) for process integration and future generations of EIS...... will increasingly be driven by business process models. Consequently business process modelling and improvement is becoming a serious challenge. The aim of this paper is to establish a conceptual framework for business process innovation (BPI) in the supply chain based on advanced EIS. The challenge is thus...... to create a new methodology for developing and exploring process models and applications. The paper outlines the process innovation laboratory as a new approach to BPI. The process innovation laboratory is a comprehensive framework and a collaborative workspace for experimenting with process models...