WorldWideScience

Sample records for plastic composite material

  1. Machining of Fibre Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are difficult to machine because of the anisotropy and inhomogeneity characterizing their microstructure and the abrasiveness of their reinforcement components. During machining, very rapid cutting tool wear development is experienced, and surface integrity damage is often produced in the machined parts. An accurate selection of the proper tool and machining conditions is therefore required, taking into account that the phenomena responsible for material removal in cutting of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are fundamentally different from those of conventional metals and their alloys. To date, composite materials are increasingly used in several manufacturing sectors, such as the aerospace and automotive industry, and several research efforts have been spent to improve their machining processes. In the present review, the key issues that are concerning the machining of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are discussed with reference to the main recent research works in the field, while considering both conventional and unconventional machining processes and reporting the more recent research achievements. For the different machining processes, the main results characterizing the recent research works and the trends for process developments are presented. PMID:29562635

  2. Machining of Fibre Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Caggiano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are difficult to machine because of the anisotropy and inhomogeneity characterizing their microstructure and the abrasiveness of their reinforcement components. During machining, very rapid cutting tool wear development is experienced, and surface integrity damage is often produced in the machined parts. An accurate selection of the proper tool and machining conditions is therefore required, taking into account that the phenomena responsible for material removal in cutting of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are fundamentally different from those of conventional metals and their alloys. To date, composite materials are increasingly used in several manufacturing sectors, such as the aerospace and automotive industry, and several research efforts have been spent to improve their machining processes. In the present review, the key issues that are concerning the machining of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are discussed with reference to the main recent research works in the field, while considering both conventional and unconventional machining processes and reporting the more recent research achievements. For the different machining processes, the main results characterizing the recent research works and the trends for process developments are presented.

  3. Preparation of a new gamma irradiated PVC-Olive oil cake plastic composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messaud, F.A.; Almsmary, Y.A.; Elwerfalli, S.M.; Benayad, S.M.; Haraga, S.O.; Benfaid, N.A.; Kabar, Y.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper dealt with the investigation on preparing new plastic composite material, utilizing polyvinyl chloride polymer (a commercial product in abu-kammash chemical complex) and olive oil cake (a waste of many olive oil production factories), followed by gamma irradiation (26.3 Kg ry) o induce crosslinking of the polymer. The new material possess good, electrical and mechanical properties as compared to plastic products of (PVC plastic pipe factory), and which could be used as new construction anti corrosive material, such as special roofing and partitioning or household goods

  4. Theoretical Development of an Orthotropic Elasto-Plastic Generalized Composite Material Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert; Carney, Kelly; DuBois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Harrington, Joseph; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    The need for accurate material models to simulate the deformation, damage and failure of polymer matrix composites is becoming critical as these materials are gaining increased usage in the aerospace and automotive industries. While there are several composite material models currently available within LSDYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corporation), there are several features that have been identified that could improve the predictive capability of a composite model. To address these needs, a combined plasticity and damage model suitable for use with both solid and shell elements is being developed and is being implemented into LS-DYNA as MAT_213. A key feature of the improved material model is the use of tabulated stress-strain data in a variety of coordinate directions to fully define the stress-strain response of the material. To date, the model development efforts have focused on creating the plasticity portion of the model. The Tsai-Wu composite failure model has been generalized and extended to a strain-hardening based orthotropic yield function with a nonassociative flow rule. The coefficients of the yield function, and the stresses to be used in both the yield function and the flow rule, are computed based on the input stress-strain curves using the effective plastic strain as the tracking variable. The coefficients in the flow rule are computed based on the obtained stress-strain data. The developed material model is suitable for implementation within LS-DYNA for use in analyzing the nonlinear response of polymer composites.

  5. Technological physics and special materials: wood-plastic composites obtained by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peteu, Gh.; Iliescu, V.

    1995-01-01

    General estimates and references are made in connection with the role of technological physics in obtaining materials with specific features. The first part of the paper presents the modification of weak wood essences as well as technological processes at bench-scale and semi industrial scale of wood-plastic composites, under various irradiation conditions. Two technological installations for the fabrication of wood-plastic composites on both scales with technical and practical specifications of their performances are presented. Experimental data for different wood-plastic composite systems using some local wood essences in combination with several polymer and copolymer systems are given. Impregnation and polymerization levels are mentioned for every specific system. The radiation dose rate and integrated dose are given for every experimental polymerization system. The features of the wood-plastic composites are compared with the initial wood essences. Finally, a few technical and economic assessments of wood-plastic composites and their implications in the domestic economy are presented. (author)

  6. Machinability Study on Milling Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials using Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, H.; Haron, C. H. C.; Ghani, J. A.; Suhaily, M.; Yuzairi, A. R.

    2018-04-01

    The surface roughness (Ra) and delamination factor (Fd) of a milled kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials are depending on the milling parameters (spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut). Therefore, a study was carried out to investigate the relationship between the milling parameters and their effects on a kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials. The composite panels were fabricated using vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) method. A full factorial design of experiments was use as an initial step to screen the significance of the parameters on the defects using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). If the curvature of the collected data shows significant, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is then applied for obtaining a quadratic modelling equation that has more reliable in expressing the optimization. Thus, the objective of this research is obtaining an optimum setting of milling parameters and modelling equations to minimize the surface roughness (Ra) and delamination factor (Fd) of milled kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials. The spindle speed and feed rate contributed the most in affecting the surface roughness and the delamination factor of the kenaf composite materials.

  7. Analytical method for predicting plastic flow in notched fiber composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, P.L.; Ebert, L.J.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical system was developed for prediction of the onset and progress of plastic flow of oriented fiber composite materials in which both externally applied complex stress states and stress raisers were present. The predictive system was a unique combination of two numerical systems, the ''SAAS II'' finite element analysis system and a micromechanics finite element program. The SAAS II system was used to generate the three-dimensional stress distributions, which were used as the input into the finite element micromechanics program. Appropriate yielding criteria were then applied to this latter program. The accuracy of the analytical system was demonstrated by the agreement between the analytically predicted and the experimentally measured flow values of externally notched tungsten wire reinforced copper oriented fiber composites, in which the fiber fraction was 50 vol pct

  8. Simulated small-angle scattering patterns for a plastically deformed model composite material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shenoy, V.B.; Cleveringa, H.H.M.; Phillips, R.; Giessen, E. van der; Needleman, A.

    2000-01-01

    The small-angle scattering patterns predicted by discrete dislocation plasticity versus local and non-local continuum plasticity theory are compared in a model problem. The problem considered is a two-dimensional model composite with elastic reinforcements in a crystalline matrix subject to

  9. How craftsmen and home hobbyists can make and use wood-plastic composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard N. Rosen

    1974-01-01

    An inexpensive method that can be used by the home hobbyist, craftsman, or small businessman for making wood-plastic composites is described. Several examples are given to demonstrate the ease and versatility of the method.

  10. Impregnating Systems for Producing Wood-Plastic Composite Materials and Resinified Woods by Radiochemical Means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laizier, J.; Laroche, R.; Marchand, J.

    1969-01-01

    The effect of the nature of the components in the impregnation mixture on the characteristics of wood-plastic combinations has been studied in the case of beech by applying a wide variety of compositions. In particular, the effect of water (in the impregnator, and in the form of moisture in the wood) on the characteristics of the products obtained has been determined. It has been shown that, in place of the conventional method for preparing resinified woods (using a ternary monomer-solvent-water mixture), it is possible to use a method involving comonomers, which obviate the need to dry the wood after treatment. The evaluation of the results obtained is based on the value of the impregnation rate and on the modifications in microscopic structure; these emphasize the differences between the types of filler and enable comparisons to be drawn with the dimensional stabilities observed. Measurements of variations in dimensions and the recurrence of moisture have made it possible to establish a classification based on the types of monomer used and the operating conditions. It is shown that a whole range of products is obtained, the properties of which differ widely and are comparatively easily adaptable to the purpose specified. These properties illustrate clearly the differences and characteristics of resinified woods as opposed to conventional wood-plastic materials. (author) [fr

  11. Composite of wood-plastic and micro-encapsulated phase change material (MEPCM) used for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamekhorshid, A.; Sadrameli, S.M.; Barzin, R.; Farid, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A composite of wood–plastic-MEPCM has been produced. • Compression molding has been used for the composite preparation. • Thermal and properties were investigated using DSC analysis and cycling test. • Leakage test has been performed for the encapsulated PCM. • The composites can be used as a building material for thermal energy management. - Abstract: Application of phase change materials (PCMs) in lightweight building is growing due to the high latent heat of fusion of PCMs and their ability to control temperature by absorbing and releasing heat efficiently. Wood-plastic composites (WPC) are materials used in the interior parts of buildings that have improved properties compared to conventional materials. However, these materials have low energy storage capacity, which can be improved by incorporating PCM in them. Leakage of PCM is a major obstacle to the industrial applications, which can be solved through the use of microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM). This paper presents the performance tests conducted for a composite of wood-plastic-MEPCM for using in buildings for thermal storage. The wood-plastic-MEPCM composites were produced in this project using compression molding and their thermal and mechanical properties were investigated using DSC analysis, cycling test, leakage test, and three point bending analysis. The results showed that there is no leakage of PCM during phase change. The results also indicated that the composite has reasonable thermal properties, but its mechanical properties need to be improved by increasing the pressure during the molding process or by using extrusion method. The produced composites can be used as a building material for thermal energy management of building.

  12. Composite material making from empty fruit bunches of palm oil (EFB) and Ijuk (Arengapinnata) using plastic bottle waste as adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihayat, T.; Salim, S.; Audina, N.; Khan, N. S. P.; Zaimahwati; Sami, M.; Yunus, M.; Salisah, Z.; Alam, P. N.; Saifuddin; Yusuf, I.

    2018-03-01

    Reviewed from the current technological required a new methods to capable offering a high profit value without overriding the quality. The development of composite technology is now beginning to shift from traditional composite materials based petroleum to natural fibers composite. In the present study, aim to made specimens using natural fibers in form of EFB as a composite reinforcedment with Polyethylene Terephtalate (PET) derived from Plastic bottles waste as matrix with mixed composition parameters and time-tolerance in the mixing process to build a biocomposite material. The characterization of mechanical properties includes tensile test (ASTM D638-01) and bending test (ASTM D790-02) followed by thermal analysis using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), and morphological analysis using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The analysis effect of EFB, Ijuk and PET mixtures on the composite matrix is very influential with mechanical properties characterization, including tensile test and bending strength. The results demonstrated that from the sample named : 50 : 25: 25, hybrid composites showed improved properties such as tensile strength of 167 MPa while the 90:05:05 based composites exhibited tensile strength values of 30 MPa, respectively. In term the flexural test the best result of composition on the properties with 10 minutes duration time its load value 7,5 Mpa for 80:10:10.

  13. Novel high-strength Fe-based composite materials with large plasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werniewicz, Katarzna; Kuehn, Uta; Mattern, Norbert; Eckert, Juergen; Siegel, Uwe; Bartusch, Birgit; Schultz, Ludwig [IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Kulik, Tadeusz [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering (Poland)

    2007-07-01

    Among glass-forming alloy systems reported so far, Fe-based bulk metallic glasses play a special role. Compared to other amorphous alloys e.g. Zr-, Ti-based, such glasses show superior mechanical strength. However, due to the general brittleness their wider application as structural materials is strongly restricted. The alternative approach to overcome this defect is to design BMG composites. In this work we present a series of new Fe-Cr-Mo-Ga-(Si,C) composite materials derived from an Fe-Cr-Mo-Ga-C-P-B glassy alloy, with the aim to improve the ductility of this high-strength material. The effect of the composition and the phase formation on the resulting mechanical properties was investigated. It has been found that the formation of a complex microstructure, which essentially consists of soft Ga-rich dendrites embedded in a hard Cr- and Mo-rich matrix, leads to a material with excellent compressive mechanical properties. While the obtained values of true strength are comparable with data reported for Fe-Cr-Mo-Ga-C-P-B BMG, the values of true strain are greatly improved for investigated composites.

  14. Fiber-reinforced plastic composites. Possibilities and limitations of applications as machine-construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophey, Lothar

    1988-01-01

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite structural materials in engineering applications is discussed in a survey of currently available technology and future prospects. The ongoing rapid growth in the use of these materials is described, and the criteria to be applied in selecting base materials, lamination schemes, fasteners, and processing methods are examined in detail and illustrated with graphs, diagrams, flow charts, and drawings. A description of a sample application (comparing the properties of steel, CFRP, SiC-reinforced Al, CFRP/steel, and CFRP/Al automobile piston rods) is included.

  15. Radiation processing of composite materials on the basis of coconut hair and plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owolabi, O.; Czvikovszky, T.

    1983-01-01

    Composite materials containing coconut hair as fibrous reinforcements and synthetic polyester resin as matrix were prepared. The coconut hair, together with the unsaturated polyester resin and other required ingredients (fillers, complexing agents, etc.) were pre-processed in a BRABENDER-type kneader or similar equipment to produce a bulk moulding compound ('BMC' or 'Premix') and later hot pressed for 10 minutes at 130 degC and 30 bars to produce sheets of 2 mm thickness. The tensile-, flexural- and impact strength of the sheets were measured and served as the main basis of comparison. The effect of increasing coconut hair percentage was studied. The effect of preirradiation of the coconut hair, pretreatment with hot sodium hydroxide solution and a combination of the two, to improve the coupling of the coconut hair and synthetic polyester were also studied. Composite materials were also made from a mixture of coconut hair and chopped glass fibers as reinforcements in the same BMC material. The radiation-treated coconut fiber gives a useful composite material for hot-press moulding. (author)

  16. An Experimental Study on the Thermal Performance of Phase-Change Material and Wood-Plastic Composites for Building Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hee Chung

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the usefulness of phase-change material (PCM-based thermal plates fabricated from wood-plastic composites (WPCs in mitigating the urban heat island effect. The thermal performance of plates containing PCMs with two different melting temperatures and with two different albedo levels was evaluated. The results showed that the PCM with a melting temperature of 44 °C maintained lower surface and inner temperatures than the PCM with a melting temperature of 25 °C. Moreover, a higher surface albedo resulted in a lower surface temperature. However, the thermal performance of PCMs with different melting temperatures but the same surface albedo did not differ. Using PCM-based materials in roof finishing materials can reduce surface temperatures and improve thermal comfort.

  17. Radiographic testing - optimum radiographs of plastics and composite materials with dosimeter control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuster, J.

    1978-01-01

    In view of great differencies in X-ray transmission it is more difficult to get optimum radiographs of plastics and especially of reinforced plastics than for example of metals. A procedure will be reported how to get with little effort optimum radiographs especially also in the range of long wavelength radiation corresponding 10 to 25 kV.P. (orig.) [de

  18. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry......, viscoelastic behavior, and internal stress states. Other physical properties considered are thermal and electrical conductivities, diffusion coefficients, dielectric constants and magnetic permeability. Special attention is given to the effect of pore shape on the mechanical and physical behavior of porous....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro-thermal behavior...

  19. Durability of wood plastic composites manufactured from recycled plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Turku

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of accelerated weathering, xenon-arc light and freeze-thaw cycling on wood plastic composites extruded from a recycled plastic was studied. The results showed that, in general, weathering had a stronger impact on samples made from plastic waste compared to a sample made from virgin material. After weathering, the mechanical properties, tensile and flexural, were reduced by 2–30%, depending on the plastic source. Wettability of the samples was shown to play a significant role in their stability. Chemical analysis with infrared spectroscopy and surface observation with a scan electron microscope confirmed the mechanical test results. Incorporation of carbon black retained the properties during weathering, reducing the wettability of the sample, diminishing the change of mechanical properties, and improving color stability. Keywords: Environmental science, Mechanical engineering, Materials science

  20. Durability of Capped Wood Plastic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Mankowski; Mark J. Manning; Damien P. Slowik

    2015-01-01

    Manufacturers of wood plastic composites (WPCs) have recently introduced capped decking to their product lines. These new materials have begun to take market share from the previous generation of uncapped products that possessed a homogenous composition throughout the thickness of their cross-section. These capped offerings have been introduced with claims that the...

  1. Optimization of wood plastic composite decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravivarman, S.; Venkatesh, G. S.; Karmarkar, A.; Shivkumar N., D.; Abhilash R., M.

    2018-04-01

    Wood Plastic Composite (WPC) is a new class of natural fibre based composite material that contains plastic matrix reinforced with wood fibres or wood flour. In the present work, Wood Plastic Composite was prepared with 70-wt% of wood flour reinforced in polypropylene matrix. Mechanical characterization of the composite was done by carrying out laboratory tests such as tensile test and flexural test as per the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. Computer Aided Design (CAD) model of the laboratory test specimen (tensile test) was created and explicit finite element analysis was carried out on the finite element model in non-linear Explicit FE code LS - DYNA. The piecewise linear plasticity (MAT 24) material model was identified as a suitable model in LS-DYNA material library, describing the material behavior of the developed composite. The composite structures for decking application in construction industry were then optimized for cross sectional area and distance between two successive supports (span length) by carrying out various numerical experiments in LS-DYNA. The optimized WPC deck (Elliptical channel-2 E10) has 45% reduced weight than the baseline model (solid cross-section) considered in this study with the load carrying capacity meeting acceptance criterion (allowable deflection & stress) for outdoor decking application.

  2. Composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Stacy A [Knoxville, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Solihull, GB; Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  3. Molding apparatus. [for thermosetting plastic compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus for compression molding of thermosetting plastics compositions including interfitting hollow male and female components is reported. The components are adapted to be compressed to form a rocket nozzle in a cavity. A thermal jacket is provided exteriorly adjacent to the female component for circulating a thermal transfer fluid to effect curing of a thermosetting plastics material being molded. Each of the male and female components is provided with suitable inlets and outlets for circulating a thermal transfer fluid.

  4. Supporting the development process for building products by the use of research portfolio analysis: A case study for wood plastics composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Friedrich

    2016-06-01

    Our study evaluated European scientific projects in composites from which we derived a Research Portfolio serving as future matrix for ideation. It was found that research databanks can serve as basis for strategic innovation planning. We were able to identify several appropriate future technologies and material applications in the field of bio-based plastics composites. Our methodology particularly supports manufacturers with less formalized innovation processes.

  5. Composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sambrook, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    A superconductor composite is described comprising at least one longitudinally extending superconductor filament or bundle of sub-filaments, each filament or bundle of sub-filaments being surrounded by and in good electrical contact with a matrix material, the matrix material comprising a plurality of longitudinally extending cells of a metal of high electrical conductivity surrounded by a material of lower electrical conductivity. The high electrical conductivity material surrounding the superconducting filament or bundle of sub-filaments is interrupted by a radially extending wall of the material of the lower electrical conductivity, the arrangement being such that at least two superconductor filaments or sub-filaments are circumferentially circumscribed by a single annulus of the material of high electrical conductivity. The annulus is electrically interrupted by a radially extending wall of the material of low electrical conductivity

  6. Computational materials science: Nanoscale plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    How does plastic deformation of polycrystalline materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm look at the atomic scale? A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline alluminium reveals some surprising behaviour.......How does plastic deformation of polycrystalline materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm look at the atomic scale? A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline alluminium reveals some surprising behaviour....

  7. Heat release rate of wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. M. Stark; R. H. White; C. M. Clemons

    1997-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites are becoming more important as a material that fulfills recycling needs. In this study, fire performance tests were conducted on several compositions of wood and plastic materials using the Ohio State University rate of heat release apparatus. Test results included five-minute average heat release rate in kW/m2 (HRR avg) and maximum heat release...

  8. Study of elastic and thermal parameters of a composite material fluoro-plastic - thermo-exfoliated graphite by photothermoacoustic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozachenko, V.V.; Kucherov, I.Ya.; Revo, S.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The composite materials (CM) with success are widely used in a science and in an industry. From the practical point of view important for CM the mechanical and thermal properties are. Therefore, study of these properties for them is the important problem. At change of a temperature state of materials of their property in many cases are featured by combinations of elastic and thermal parameters E/1-σ=E n and χ/ρc=D T , where E, -σ, ρ and c are the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, thermal conductivity coefficient, density and specific heat of materials, respectively. Now for examination of substances in various aggregate states has received development a photothermoacoustic (PTA) method. As shown in this work, use a PTA method with piezoelectric detection of a PTA signal from a layered plate, under certain conditions, allows immediately determining the reduced Young's modulus E n and thermal diffusivity D T . Therefore, the purpose of this work was study the PTA effect with piezoelectric detection of an informative signal from CM. Were explored steel-copper CM such as 'sandwich' and fluoro plastic-thermo exfoliated graphite FP-TEG CM. Explored triplex structure as a plate made of a CM sample and a two-layer piezoelectric transducer. The surface of a CM is uniformly irradiated with a modulated light flux. The sample is heated and the thermal waves are generated. In the sample, the temperature field of thermal waves generates, due to the thermoelastic effect, acoustic vibration and waves that are registered by a piezoelectric. The rather low frequencies of modulation are considered, at which length of ultrasonic waves is much more than the reference sizes of structure (quasi-static approach). The amplitudes ratio and phase difference of voltages oscillations taken from separate layer of piezoelectric transducer, as functions of physical and geometrical parameters of structure and a frequency of a light flux modulation is found. Experimentally the

  9. Plastic strain and flux jumps in hard and composite superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimov, I.L.; Mints, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    A study is made into the effect of the critical current density dependence upon the value of plastic strain on the critical state stability in hard and composite superconductors under conditions of plastic yield of the material. Criteria of the critical state stability relative to the jointly developing magnetic flux jumps and plastic strain jerks, are found. (author)

  10. Japan. Wood-Plastic Composites [Status and technology of polymer-containing fibrous materials in the Eastern Hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, T. [Central Research Laboratory, Showa Denko K.K., Ota-Ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    1968-10-15

    Radiation chemistry research has made rapid progress in Japan over the last ten years, and many encouraging results have been obtained with radiation polymerization and graft-polymerization as well as in other fields. Several papers on wood-plastic composites (WPC) have been published in Japanese journals, but very little work on actual applications has been reported. This general review of basic studies and studies of the application of WPC in Japan is divided into three parts: radiation methods, chemical methods (catalyst-heat treatment) and the scope of future research and development.

  11. Composite materials for cryogenic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the composition, mechanical properties and capabilities of various types of composite materials for cryogenic structures. Attention is given to high-pressure plastic laminates, low-pressure plastic laminates, metal-matrix laminates, and aggregates (low-temperature concretes). The ability of these materials to match the strength and modulus of stainless steels suggests that their usage will substantially increase as alloying elements become scarce and more expensive

  12. Radiation processing of wood-plastic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czvikovszky, T.

    1992-01-01

    There are three main types of radiation-processed composite material derived from plastics and fibrous natural polymers. The first are the monomer-impregnated, radiation-treated wood-plastic composites (WPC). They became a commercial success in the early 1970s. More recently, work has focused on improving the WPCs by creating in them interpenetrating network (IPN) systems by the use of appropriate multifunctional oligomers and monomers. The main kinetic features of radiation-initiated chain polymerization remain applicable even in impregnated wood. The second type are the plastics filled or reinforced with dispersed wood fiber or other cellulosics (WFRP). In their case, radiation processing offers a new opportunity to apply radiation-reactive adhesion promoters between wood or cellulosic fibers and the thermoplastic matrices. The third type are the laminar composites made by electron beam coating of wood-based agglomerate sheets and boards. This chapter reviews the industrial applications and the radiation processing of the three types of the wood-plastic composites and indicates future trends. (orig.)

  13. External insulation with cellular plastic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Nielsen, Anker

    2014-01-01

    External thermal insulation composite systems (ETICS) can be used as extra insulation of existing buildings. The system can be made of cellular plastic materials or mineral wool. There is a European Technical guideline, ETAG 004, that describe the tests that shall be conducted on such systems....... This paper gives a comparison of systems with mineral wool and cellular plastic, based on experience from practice and literature. It is important to look at the details in the system and at long time stability of the properties such as thermal insulation, moisture and fire. Investigation of fire properties...

  14. Composites from wood and plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Clemons

    2010-01-01

    Composites made from thermoplastics and fillers or reinforcements derived from wood or other natural fibers are a dynamic research area encompassing a wide variety of composite materials. For example, as the use of biopolymers grows, wood and other natural fiber sources are being investigated as renewable sources of fillers and reinforcements to modify performance....

  15. Fracture of anisotropic materials with plastic strain-gradient effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2013-01-01

    A unit cell is adopted to numerically analyze the effect of plastic anisotropy on frac-ture evolution in a micro-reinforced fiber-composite. The matrix material exhibit size-effects and an anisotropic strain-gradient plasticity model accounting for such size-effects through a mate-rial length scale...

  16. SU-C-213-05: Evaluation of a Composite Copper-Plastic Material for a 3D Printed Radiation Therapy Bolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitzthum, L; Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Reynolds, T; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel 3D printed bolus fabricated from a copper-plastic composite as a thin flexible, custom fitting device that can replicate doses achieved with conventional bolus techniques. Methods: Two models of bolus were created on a 3D printer using a composite copper-PLA/PHA. Firstly, boluses were constructed at thicknesses of 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mm. Relative dose measurements were performed under the bolus with an Attix Chamber as well as with radiochromic film. Results were compared to superficial Attix Chamber measurements in a water equivalent material to determine the dosimetric water equivalence of the copper-PLA/PHA plastic. Secondly, CT images of a RANDO phantom were used to create a custom fitting bolus across the anterolateral scalp. Surface dose with the bolus placed on the RANDO phantom was measured with radiochromic film at tangential angles with 6, 10, 10 flattening filter free (FFF) and 18 MV photon beams. Results: Mean surface doses for 6, 10, 10FFF and 18 MV were measured as a percent of Dmax for the flat bolus devices of each thickness. The 0.4 mm thickness bolus was determined to be near equivalent to 2.5 mm depth in water for all four energies. Surface doses ranged from 59–63% without bolus and 85–90% with the custom 0.4 mm copper-plastic bolus relative to the prescribed dose for an oblique tangential beam arrangement on the RANDO phantom. Conclusion: Sub-millimeter thickness, 3D printed composite copper-PLA/PHA bolus can provide a build-up effect equivalent to conventional bolus. At this thickness, the 3D printed bolus allows a level of flexure that may provide more patient comfort than current 3D printing materials used in bolus fabrication while still retaining the CT based custom patient shape. Funding provided by an intra-department grant of the University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology.

  17. SU-C-213-05: Evaluation of a Composite Copper-Plastic Material for a 3D Printed Radiation Therapy Bolus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitzthum, L; Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Reynolds, T; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel 3D printed bolus fabricated from a copper-plastic composite as a thin flexible, custom fitting device that can replicate doses achieved with conventional bolus techniques. Methods: Two models of bolus were created on a 3D printer using a composite copper-PLA/PHA. Firstly, boluses were constructed at thicknesses of 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mm. Relative dose measurements were performed under the bolus with an Attix Chamber as well as with radiochromic film. Results were compared to superficial Attix Chamber measurements in a water equivalent material to determine the dosimetric water equivalence of the copper-PLA/PHA plastic. Secondly, CT images of a RANDO phantom were used to create a custom fitting bolus across the anterolateral scalp. Surface dose with the bolus placed on the RANDO phantom was measured with radiochromic film at tangential angles with 6, 10, 10 flattening filter free (FFF) and 18 MV photon beams. Results: Mean surface doses for 6, 10, 10FFF and 18 MV were measured as a percent of Dmax for the flat bolus devices of each thickness. The 0.4 mm thickness bolus was determined to be near equivalent to 2.5 mm depth in water for all four energies. Surface doses ranged from 59–63% without bolus and 85–90% with the custom 0.4 mm copper-plastic bolus relative to the prescribed dose for an oblique tangential beam arrangement on the RANDO phantom. Conclusion: Sub-millimeter thickness, 3D printed composite copper-PLA/PHA bolus can provide a build-up effect equivalent to conventional bolus. At this thickness, the 3D printed bolus allows a level of flexure that may provide more patient comfort than current 3D printing materials used in bolus fabrication while still retaining the CT based custom patient shape. Funding provided by an intra-department grant of the University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology

  18. Properties of plastic filtration material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paluch, W.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses properties of filters made of thermoplastic granulated material. The granulated plastic has a specific density of 10.3-10.6 kN/m/sup 3/ and a bulk density of about 6 kN/m/sup 3/. Its chemical resistance to acids, bases and salts is high but is it soluble in organic solvents. Filters made of this material are characterized by a porosity coefficient of 36.5% and a bulk density of 5.7-6.8 kN/m/sup 3/. Physical and mechanical properties of filter samples made of thermoplastic granulated material (50x50x50 mm) were investigated under laboratory conditions. Compression strength and influencing factors were analyzed (ambient temperature, manufacturing technology). Tests show that this filtration material developed by Poltegor is superior to other filtration materials used in Poland.

  19. HYGROSCOPICITY OF WOOD PLASTIC COMPOSITES MADE WITH PADOU FLOUR AND POLYPROPYLENE PELLETS

    OpenAIRE

    Moise Emmanuel NZUDJOM SOUOP; Joseph Albert MUKAM FOTSING

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of objects in wood-plastic composites which is a material already available in many developed countries seems almost unknown in Cameroon since the production factory of objects in wood-plastic composites does not exist up till here. Interested in the study of properties of wood-plastic composites throughconnection of simple plastic and wood, we have oriented our paper in the elaboration, realization and physical characterization of wood-plastic composites with Padou and polypr...

  20. Metallic composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frommeyer, G.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and properties of metallic composite materials and composite materials with metallic matrix are considered. In agreement with the morphology of constituent phases the following types of composite materials are described: dispersion-strengthened composite materials; particle-reinforced composite materials; fibrous composite materials; laminar composite materials. Data on strength and electric properties of the above-mentioned materials, as well as effect of the amount, location and geometric shape of the second phase on them, are presented

  1. Plastic Recycling Experiments in Materials Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Waskom, Tommy L.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to introduce a series of plastic recycling experiments to students in materials-related courses such as materials science, material technology and materials testing. With the plastic recycling experiments, students not only can learn the fundamentals of plastic processing and properties as in conventional materials courses, but also can be exposed to the issue of materials life cycle and the impact on society and environment.

  2. Toward Modeling Limited Plasticity in Ceramic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grinfeld, Michael; Schoenfeld, Scott E; Wright, Tim W

    2008-01-01

    The characteristic features of many armor-related ceramic materials are the anisotropy on the micro-scale level and the very limited, though non-vanishing, plasticity due to limited number of the planes for plastic slip...

  3. Supporting the development process for building products by the use of research portfolio analysis: A case study for wood plastics composite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, Daniel; Luible, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Today’s plastics are increasingly compounded using renewable fibres. Such composites raised the interest of the massively bulk-plastics consuming building industry. However, “green” products are still rare and their development constitutes a challenge particularly for small companies. Our study evaluated European scientific projects in composites from which we derived a Research Portfolio serving as future matrix for ideation. It was found that research databanks can serve as basis for str...

  4. Characterization of Wood-Plastic Composites Made with Different Lignocellulosic Materials that Vary in Their Morphology, Chemical Composition and Thermal Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Chang Hung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four kinds of lignocellulosic fibers (LFs, namely, those from Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata, Taiwan red pine (Pinus taiwanensis, India-charcoal trema (Trema orientalis and makino bamboo (Phyllostachys makinoi, were selected as reinforcements and incorporated into high-density polyethylene (HDPE to manufacture wood-plastic composites (WPCs by a flat platen pressing process. In addition to comparing the differences in the physico-mechanical properties of these composites, their chemical compositions were evaluated and their thermal decomposition kinetics were analyzed to investigate the effects of the lignocellulosic species on the properties of the WPCs. The results showed that the WPC made with Chinese fir displayed a typical M-shaped vertical density profile due to the high aspect ratio of its LFs, while a flat vertical density profile was observed for the WPCs made with other LFs. Thus, the WPC made with Chinese fir exhibited higher flexural properties and lower internal bond strength (IB than other WPCs. In addition, the Taiwan red pine contained the lowest holocellulose content and the highest extractives and α-cellulose contents, which gave the resulting WPC lower water absorption and flexural properties. On the other hand, consistent with the flexural properties, the results of thermal decomposition kinetic analysis showed that the activation energy of the LFs at 10% of the conversion rate increased in the order of Taiwan red pine (146–161 kJ/mol, makino bamboo (158–175 kJ/mol, India-charcoal trema (185–194 kJ/mol and Chinese fir (194–202 kJ/mol. These results indicate that the morphology, chemical composition and thermal stability of the LFs can have a substantial impact on the physico-mechanical properties of the resulting WPCs.

  5. A Review of Wood Plastic Composites effect on the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Taifor Azeez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wood Plastic Composites (WPCs are environmentally friend materials with a wide range of applications in the field of constructions, comprising high mechanical and physical properties with low cost raw materials as plastic wastes and different carpentry process wood reminder. The effects of wood, plastic waste and additives on various properties of the material such as mechanical (modulus of elasticity and modulus of rupture, physical (moisture absorption and fire retardancy have been investigated in order to push the output functions of the products to the limits of work conditions requirements. This study, overviews the importance of Wood Plastic Composites in conserving the environment by depletion post consume plastics from landfills, and the impact of these composites in developing the economic via opening new flourished markets for modern products. Both the ecological and economical requirements oblige the Iraqi government to replace the negatively healthy effects formaldehyde wood composites (medium density fiberboard MDF which are widely consumed in Iraqi markets with Wood Plastic Composites. a long-term strategy plan in which the researchers and the capitals meet under supervision of the government is very necessary and recommended in this paper to establish and develop WPCs industry in Iraq.

  6. COMPOSITES FROM RECYCLED WOOD AND PLASTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ultimate goal of this research was to develop technology to convert recycled wood fiber and plastics into durable products that are recyclable and otherwise environmentally friendly. Two processing technologies were used to prepare wood-plastic composites: air-laying and melt...

  7. Construction loads experienced by plastic composite ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Damage to plastic composite ties during handling and track installation has been reported by a number of railroads. Results from : a survey conducted to identify specific handling issues were used to develop field and laboratory tests to measure the ...

  8. Aerogel / Polymer Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Clayton, LaNetra M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The invention provides new composite materials containing aerogels blended with thermoplastic polymer materials at a weight ratio of aerogel to thermoplastic polymer of less than 20:100. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability. The composite materials also have better flexibility and less brittleness at low temperatures than the parent thermoplastic polymer materials.

  9. Characterizing wood-plastic composites via data-driven methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    John G. Michopoulos; John C. Hermanson; Robert Badaliance

    2007-01-01

    The recent increase of wood-plastic composite materials in various application areas has underlined the need for an efficient and robust methodology to characterize their nonlinear anisotropic constitutive behavior. In addition, the multiplicity of various loading conditions in structures utilizing these materials further increases the need for a characterization...

  10. Valorisation of waste plastic bags in cement-mortar composites as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-07

    Jan 7, 2015 ... Keywords: Waste plastic bags, cement-plastic-mortar composite, aggregates coating ..... and closely attached to the aggregate by physical bonds and ... transformation steps, known as fusing material behaviour. In fact,.

  11. Development of composite ceramic materials with improved thermal conductivity and plasticity based on garnet-type oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovkina, L. S.; Orlova, A. I.; Boldin, M. S.; Sakharov, N. V.; Chuvil'deev, V. N.; Nokhrin, A. V.; Konings, R.; Staicu, D.

    2017-06-01

    Powders based on the complex garnet-type oxide Y2.5Nd0.5Al5O12 - x wt. % Ni (x = 0, 10, 20) were prepared using wet chemistry methods. Ceramics based on these compounds were obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) with a relative densities: 99%. 4% (TD = 4.77 g/cm3 (0%)), 97.6% (TD = 4.88 g/cm3 (10%)), 94.4% (TD = 5.06 g/cm3 (20%)). The influence of nickel concentration on the mechanical (fracture toughness, microhardness) and thermophysical (thermal conductivity) properties of the composites was studied.

  12. Development of composite ceramic materials with improved thermal conductivity and plasticity based on garnet-type oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovkina, L.S., E-mail: golovkina_lyudmila@mail.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod, 603950 Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation); Orlova, A.I.; Boldin, M.S.; Sakharov, N.V.; Chuvil' deev, V.N.; Nokhrin, A.V. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod, 603950 Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation); Konings, R.; Staicu, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Directorate G – Nuclear Safety and Security, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Powders based on the complex garnet-type oxide Y{sub 2.5}Nd{sub 0.5}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} - x wt. % Ni (x = 0, 10, 20) were prepared using wet chemistry methods. Ceramics based on these compounds were obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) with a relative densities: 99%. 4% (TD = 4.77 g/cm{sup 3} (0%)), 97.6% (TD = 4.88 g/cm{sup 3} (10%)), 94.4% (TD = 5.06 g/cm{sup 3} (20%)). The influence of nickel concentration on the mechanical (fracture toughness, microhardness) and thermophysical (thermal conductivity) properties of the composites was studied. - Highlights: •Powders were prepared using wet chemistry methods. •Ceramics were sintering by SPS method (ρ{sub rel} ∼ 99%); t{sub shrinkage} < 10 min. •By increasing Ni concentration in composites, their fracture toughness was enhanced. •Thermal conductivity increases with elevated concentration of Ni.

  13. [Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics as implant materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, R; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Siebels, W; Mittelmeier, W; Gradinger, R

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics have been used clinically as an implant material for different applications for over 20 years.A review of technical basics of the composite materials (carbon fibers and matrix systems), fields of application,advantages (e.g., postoperative visualization without distortion in computed and magnetic resonance tomography), and disadvantages with use as an implant material is given. The question of the biocompatibility of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics is discussed on the basis of experimental and clinical studies. Selected implant systems made of carbon composite materials for treatments in orthopedic surgery such as joint replacement, tumor surgery, and spinal operations are presented and assessed. Present applications for carbon fiber reinforced plastics are seen in the field of spinal surgery, both as cages for interbody fusion and vertebral body replacement.

  14. A Plastic Damage Mechanics Model for Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a plasticity-based damage mechanics model for Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). The present model differs from existing models by combining a matrix and fiber description in order to describe the behavior of the ECC material. The model provides...

  15. Tension and Compression Creep Apparatus for wood-Plastic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott E. Hamel; John C. Hermanson; Steven M. Cramer

    2011-01-01

    Design of structural members made of wood-plastic composites (WPC) is not possible without accurate test data for tension and compression. The viscoelastic behavior of these materials means that these data are required for both the quasi-static stress-strain response, and the long-term creep response. Their relative incompressibility causes inherent difficulties in...

  16. Composite material dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  17. Durability of wood-plastic composite lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    2010-01-01

    Wood-plastic composite (WPC) lumber has been marketed as a low-maintenance, high-durability product. Retail sales in the United States were slightly less than $1 billion in 2008. Applications include docking, railing, windows, doors, fencing, siding, moldings, landscape timbers, car interior parts, and furniture. The majority of these products are used outdoors and...

  18. Corrosion resistant composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanin, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Foundations for corrosion-resistant composite materials design are considered with account of components compatibility. Fibrous and lamellar composites with metal matrix, dispersion-hardened steels and alloys, refractory metal carbides-, borides-, nitrides-, silicides-based composites are described. Cermet compositions and fields of their application, such as protective coatings for operation in agressive media at high temperatures, are presented

  19. Plasticity of pressure-sensitive materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ochsner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Classical plasticity theory of metals is independent of the hydrostatic pressure. However, if the metal contains voids or pores or if the structure is composed of cells, this classical assumption is no more valid and the influence of the hydrostatic pressure must be incorporated in the constitutive description. Looking at the microlevel, metal plasticity is connected with the uniform planes of atoms organized with long-range order. Planes may slip past each other along their close-packed directions. The result is a permanent change of shape within the crystal and plastic deformation. The presence of dislocations increases the likelihood of planes slipping. Nowadays, the theory of pressure sensitive plasticity is successfully applied to many other important classes of materials (polymers, concrete, bones etc.) even if the phenomena on the micro-level are different to classical plasticity of metals. The theoretical background of this phenomenological approach based on observations on the macro-level is describe...

  20. Nano-composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  1. Discrimination of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material in Plastic Scintillator Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Schweppe, John E.; Warner, Ray A.

    2003-01-01

    Plastic scintillator material is used in many applications for the detection of gamma-rays from radioactive material, primarily due to the sensitivity per unit cost compared to other detection materials. However, the resolution and lack of full-energy peaks in the plastic scintillator material prohibits detailed spectroscopy. Therefore, other materials such as doped sodium iodide are used for spectroscopic applications. The limited spectroscopic information can however be exploited in plastic scintillator materials to provide some discrimination. The discrimination between man-made and naturally occurring sources would be useful in reducing alarm screening for radiation detection applications which target man-made sources. The results of applying the limited energy information from plastic scintillator material for radiation portal monitors are discussed.

  2. Plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong Gi Hyeon

    1987-04-01

    This book deals with plastic, which includes introduction for plastic, chemistry of high polymers, polymerization, speciality and structure of a high molecule property of plastic, molding, thermosetting plastic, such as polyethylene, polyether, polyamide and polyvinyl acetyl, thermal plastic like phenolic resins, xylene resins, melamine resin, epoxy resin, alkyd resin and poly urethan resin, new plastic like ionomer and PPS resin, synthetic laminated tape and synthetic wood, mixed materials in plastic, reprocessing of waste plastic, polymer blend, test method for plastic materials and auxiliary materials of plastic.

  3. Multifunctional materials and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Jeon, Ki-Wan

    2017-08-22

    Forming multifunctional materials and composites thereof includes contacting a first material having a plurality of oxygen-containing functional groups with a chalcogenide compound, and initiating a chemical reaction between the first material and the chalcogenide compound, thereby replacing oxygen in some of the oxygen-containing functional groups with chalcogen from the chalcogen-containing compound to yield a second material having chalcogen-containing functional groups and oxygen-containing functional groups. The first material is a carbonaceous material or a macromolecular material. A product including the second material is collected and may be processed further to yield a modified product or a composite.

  4. Treatment of contaminated waste plastics material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, J.; Hitchcock, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive contaminated plastics material is treated by reducing it to uniform-sized debris and extruding it from a heated extruder into a sealed container in monolithic block form or as an in-fill matrix for other contaminated waste articles to create a substantially void-free sealed mass for disposal. Density adjusting fillers may be included. Extrusion may alternatively take place into a clean sealable plastics tube. (author)

  5. Modelling of elasto-plastic material behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halleux, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    The present report describes time-independent elasto-plastic material behaviour modelling techniques useful for implementation in fast structural dynamics computer programs. Elasto-plastic behaviour is characteristic for metallic materials such as steel and is thus of particular importance in the study of reactor safety-related problems. The classical time-independent elasto-plastic flow theory is recalled and the fundamental incremental stress-strain relationships are established for strain rate independent material behaviour. Some particular expressions useful in practice and including reversed loading are derived and suitable computational schemes are shwon. Modelling of strain rate effects is then taken into account, according to experimental data obtained from uniaxial tension tests. Finally qualitative strain rate history effects are considered. Applications are presented and illustrate both static and dynamic material behaviour

  6. On the homogenization of metal matrix composites using strain gradient plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2014-01-01

    The homogenized response of metal matrix composites (MMC) is studied using strain gradient plasticity. The material model employed is a rate independent formulation of energetic strain gradient plasticity at the micro scale and conventional rate independent plasticity at the macro scale. Free...

  7. Plastic Materials for Insulating Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. F.; Grossman, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the production and use of polymer materials as thermal insulators. Lists several materials that provide varying degrees of insulation. Describes the production of polymer foam and focuses on the major applications of polystyrene foam, polyurethane foam, and polyisocyanurate foam. (TW)

  8. Aktau Plastics Plant Explosives Material Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CASE JR.,ROGER S.

    1999-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been cooperating with the Republic of Kazakhstanin Combined Threat Reduction (CTR) activities at the BN350 reactor located at the Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex (MAEC) in the city of Aktau, Kazakhstan since 1994. DOE contract personnel have been stationed at this facility for the last two years and DOE representatives regularly visit this location to oversee the continuing cooperative activities. Continued future cooperation is planned. A Russian news report in September 1999 indicated that 75 metric tons of organic peroxides stored at the Plastics Plant near Aktau were in danger of exploding and killing or injuring nearby residents. To ensure the health and safety of the personnel at the BN350 site, the DOE conducted a study to investigate the potential danger to the BN350 site posed by these materials at the Plastics Plant. The study conclusion was that while the organic peroxides do have hazards associated with them, the BN350 site is a safe distance from the Plastics Plant. Further, because the Plastics Plant and MAEC have cooperative fire-fighting agreements,and the Plastics Plant had exhausted its reserve of fire-fighting foam, there was the possibility of the Plastics Plant depleting the store of fire-fighting foam at the BN350 site. Subsequently, the DOE decided to purchase fire-fighting foam for the Plastics Plant to ensure the availability of free-fighting foam at the BN350 site.

  9. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  10. Electrically conductive composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Roger L.; Sylwester, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  11. Wood-plastic composites as promising green-composites for automotive industries!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashori, Alireza

    2008-07-01

    Wood-plastic composite (WPC) is a very promising and sustainable green material to achieve durability without using toxic chemicals. The term WPCs refers to any composites that contain plant fiber and thermosets or thermoplastics. In comparison to other fibrous materials, plant fibers are in general suitable to reinforce plastics due to relative high strength and stiffness, low cost, low density, low CO2 emission, biodegradability and annually renewable. Plant fibers as fillers and reinforcements for polymers are currently the fastest-growing type of polymer additives. Since automakers are aiming to make every part either recyclable or biodegradable, there still seems to be some scope for green-composites based on biodegradable polymers and plant fibers. From a technical point of view, these bio-based composites will enhance mechanical strength and acoustic performance, reduce material weight and fuel consumption, lower production cost, improve passenger safety and shatterproof performance under extreme temperature changes, and improve biodegradability for the auto interior parts.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Okayasu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An examination has been made of the mechanical and failure properties of several composite materials, such as a short and a long carbon fiber reinforced plastic (short- and long-CFRP and metal based composite material. The short CFRP materials were used for a recycled CFRP which fabricated by the following process: the CFRP, consisting of epoxy resin with carbon fiber, is injected to a rectangular plate cavity after mixing with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene resin with different weight fractions of CFRP. The fatigue and ultimate tensile strength (UTS increased with increasing CFRP content. These correlations, however, break down, especially for tensile strength, as the CFPR content becomes more than 70%. Influence of sample temperature on the bending strength of the long-CFRP was investigated, and it appears that the strength slightly degreases with increasing the temperature, due to the weakness in the matrix. Broken fiber and pull-out or debonding between the fiber and matrix were related to the main failure of the short- and long-CFRP samples. Mechanical properties of metal based composite materials have been also investigated, where fiber-like high hardness CuAl2 structure is formed in aluminum matrix. Excellent mechanical properties were obtained in this alloy, e.g., the higher strength and the higher ductility, compared tothe same alloy without the fiber-like structure. There are strong anisotropic effects on the mechanical properties due to the fiber-like metal composite in a soft Al based matrix.

  13. Composite Material Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Hamid (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A device to protect electronic circuitry from high voltage transients is constructed from a relatively thin piece of conductive composite sandwiched between two conductors so that conduction is through the thickness of the composite piece. The device is based on the discovery that conduction through conductive composite materials in this configuration switches to a high resistance mode when exposed to voltages above a threshold voltage.

  14. Waste Plastic Converting into Hydrocarbon Fuel Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Moinuddin; Mamunor Rashid, Mohammad; Molla, Mohammad

    2010-09-15

    The increased demand and high prices for energy sources are driving efforts to convert organic compounds into useful hydrocarbon fuels. Although much of this work has focused on biomass, there are strong benefits to deriving fuels from waste plastic material. Natural State Research Inc. (NSR) has invented a simple and economically viable process to decompose the hydrocarbon polymers of waste plastic into the shorter chain hydrocarbon of liquid fuel (patent pending). The method and principle of the production / process will be discussed. Initial tests with several widely used polymers indicate a high potential for commercialization.

  15. Composites and blends from biobased materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, S.S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The program is focused on the development of composites and blends from biobased materials to use as membranes, high value plastics, and lightweight composites. Biobased materials include: cellulose derivative microporous materials, cellulose derivative copolymers, and cellulose derivative blends. This year`s research focused on developing an improved understanding of the molecular features that cellulose based materials with improved properties for gas separation applications. Novel cellulose ester membrane composites have been developed and are being evaluated under a collaborative research agreement with Dow Chemicals Company.

  16. Fracture morphology of carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Srinivasa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites have been extensively used in fabrication of primary structures for aerospace, automobile and other engineering applications. With continuous and widespread use of these composites in several advanced technology, the frequency of failures is likely to increase. Therefore, to establish the reasons for failures, the fracture modes should be understood thoroughly and unambiguously. In this paper, CFRP composite have been tested in tension, compression and flexural loadings; and microscopic study with the aid of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM has been performed on failed (fractured composite surfaces to identify the principle features of failure. Efforts have been made in correlating the fracture surface characteristics to the failure mode. The micro-mechanics analysis of failure serves as a useful guide in selecting constituent materials and designing composites from the failure behavior point of view. Also, the local failure initiation results obtained here has been reliably extended to global failure prediction.

  17. ASSESSMENTS OF FUTURE ENVIRONMENTAL TRENDS AND PROBLEMS OF INCREASED USE, RECYCLING, AND COMBUSTION OF FIBER-REINFORCED, PLASTIC AND METAL COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the study is to identify and define future environmental concerns related to the projected utilization, recycling, and combustion of composite materials. The study is being conducted for the Office of Strategic Assessment and Special Studies (OSASS) of the U.S. Env...

  18. Application of wheat B-starch in biodegradable plastic materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šárka, E.; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Kotek, Jiří; Růžek, L.; Korbářová, A.; Bubník, Z.; Růžková, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2011), s. 232-242 ISSN 1212-1800 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/09/0607 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biodegradable plastic * polycaprolactone * B-starch Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.522, year: 2011 http://www.agriculturejournals.cz/publicFiles/39918.pdf

  19. Superconducting composites materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerjouan, P.; Boterel, F.; Lostec, J.; Bertot, J.P.; Haussonne, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The new superconductor materials with a high critical current own a large importance as well in the electronic components or in the electrotechnical devices fields. The deposit of such materials with the thick films technology is to be more and more developed in the years to come. Therefore, we tried to realize such thick films screen printed on alumina, and composed mainly of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ material. We first realized a composite material glass/YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ , by analogy with the classical screen-printed inks where the glass ensures the bonding with the substrate. We thus realized different materials by using some different classes of glass. These materials owned a superconducting transition close to the one of the pure YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ material. We made a slurry with the most significant composite materials and binders, and screen-printed them on an alumina substrate preliminary or not coated with a diffusion barrier layer. After firing, we studied the thick films adhesion, the alumina/glass/composite material interfaces, and their superconducting properties. 8 refs.; 14 figs.; 9 tabs [fr

  20. Manufacture of wood/plastic composites by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Takeo

    1976-01-01

    The manufacture and use of wood/plastic composite (WPC) as an example of wood matrix and wood sawdust/plastic composites (SDP) as an example of plastic matrix are reviewed. The raw material for WPC are mostly vinyl monomers, particularly methyl methacrylate and styrene. The reaction in WPC polymerization is radical polymerization. Researches on the radiation sources mostly resulted in gamma-ray. Electron beam can be applied only to thin products. The future use of WPC may be for furnitures, sporting goods, decorative parts and the like. Vital study on the reduction of manufacturing costs is required, for example, the improvement of reaction and the adoption of continuous process must be considered. The raw materials for SDP are wood sawdust, vinyl monomer (mostly methyl methacrylate) and resins. Electron beam accelerators are the most preferable radiation source because of its high efficiency and safe operation. SDP shows good forming property. The most preferable use of SDP is as interior materials for prefabricated houses, for example, opening frames for bath rooms. Some combination of the technologies of wood engineering, chemical engineering and radiation engineering must be established to develop and maintain the demands. The present radiation sources are forced to grow to large scale industrially, but the establishment of radiation source technology which can be enlarged stepwise is important to keep pace with the development. (Iwakiri, K.)

  1. Standard Guide for Testing Materials for Aerospace Plastic Transparent Enclosures

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide is intended to summarize the standard test methods available on individual and composite materials utilized in fabrication of aerospace plastic transparent enclosures. As such, it is intended to specifically include transparent thermoplastics, transparent elastomers, and reinforced plastics, whether thermoplastic or thermosetting. 1.2 This guide is intended as an aid in the search for test methods pertinent to Aerospace Plastic Transparent Enclosures. It should be understood that all methods listed may not apply to all enclosures. 1.3 The standards included refer to the properties or aspects listed in Table 1. The properties or aspects are listed in alphabetical order and the descriptions used are intended to facilitate the search. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limi...

  2. Filling behaviour of wood plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duretek, I.; Lucyshyn, T.; Holzer, C.

    2017-01-01

    Wood plastic composites (WPC) are a young generation of composites with rapidly growing usage within the plastics industry. The advantages are the availability and low price of the wood particles, the possibility of partially substituting the polymer in the mixture and sustainable use of the earth’s resources. The current WPC products on the market are to a large extent limited to extruded products. Nowadays there is a great interest in the market for consumer products in more use of WPC as an alternative to pure thermoplastics in injection moulding processes. This work presents the results of numerical simulation and experimental visualisation of the mould filling process in injection moulding of WPC. The 3D injection moulding simulations were done with the commercial software package Autodesk® Moldflow® Insight 2016 (AMI). The mould filling experiments were conducted with a box-shaped test part. In contrast to unfilled polymers the WPC has reduced melt elasticity so that the fountain flow often does not develop. This results in irregular flow front shapes in the moulded part, especially at high filler content.

  3. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  4. Industry to Education Technical Transfer Program & Composite Materials. Composite Materials Course. Fabrication I Course. Fabrication II Course. Composite Materials Testing Course. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massuda, Rachel

    These four reports provide details of projects to design and implement courses to be offered as requirements for the associate degree program in composites and reinforced plastics technology. The reports describe project activities that led to development of curricula for four courses: composite materials, composite materials fabrication I,…

  5. Evaluation of residual stresses in composite materials by using neutron diffraction; study of elasto-plasticity; Etude des composites a matrice metallique par la technique de la diffraction de neutrons: analyse du comportement elastoplastique et evaluation des contraintes residuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy-Tubiana, R

    1999-11-05

    This work deals with the study of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) using neutrons diffraction method and the analysis of the elastoplastic behavior in such materials. First, we evaluated macro-stresses in aluminium MMC reinforced with 17%vol. of SiC particles. One of the analyzed sample has been 4 point bending deformed, measurements have been performed after relaxation. The difference between the coefficients of thermal expansion constrains the matrix to be in tensile state and the particles in compressive state in the sample which has not be deformed. In the sample deformed, the MMC response is predicted by the science of Resistance Materials applied to a bent bar. We assume that macro-stresses are the sum of stresses with different origins (elastic, plastic, thermal mismatch): elastic mismatch is evaluated by Eshelby model and we determined micro-stresses in the unbent bar: they are equivalent and constant along width direction. For the bent bar, we observe relaxation of thermal stresses in the surface region. Theses results are confirmed by measurements of tensile/compressive sample using neutrons diffraction method. We also observed the influence of mechanical and thermal treatment on such MMC: the shear stress (established by the auto-coherent model) depends only on the way of cooling. Finally, a study was performed on titanium MMC for SNECMA on rotor beings used in the gas turbine engine industry. Evolution of stresses between felloe and boring is confirmed by a finite elements modeling and they are the first experimental results in this application. (author)

  6. Performance of waste-paper/PETG wood–plastic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijie Huang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Wood–plastic composites were prepared from polyethylene terephthalate- 1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol ester (PETG and waste-paper fiber that was unmodified, modified with alkyl-ketene-dimer (AKD, and modified with a silane-coupling agent. The mechanical properties, water absorption properties, surface structure, and thermal properties of the three prepared materials were compared. The results showed that the optimum amount of waste-paper powder is 10 wt%, while that of the waste-paper particles is 60–80 mesh. The use of AKD and coupling agent KH550 can reduce the water absorption of the composite; however, the reductive effect of the coupling agent is better, in that it is reduced by 0.3%. Modification using a 1-wt% KH550 coupling agent can effectively increase the tensile strength of a composite from 31.36 to 41.67 MPa (increase of 32.8%, while the bending strength increased from 86.47 to 98.31 MPa (increase of 13.7%. This also enhances the thermal stability of the composites. With the addition of the coupling agent, the composite material maintains good mechanical properties even after being immersed in water; this can enable the safe use of these composite materials in outdoor environments.

  7. Performance of waste-paper/PETG wood–plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lijie; An, Shuxiang; Li, Chunying; Huang, Chongxing; Wang, Shuangfei; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Mingzi; Chen, Jie; Zhou, Lei

    2018-05-01

    Wood-plastic composites were prepared from polyethylene terephthalate- 1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol ester (PETG) and waste-paper fiber that was unmodified, modified with alkyl-ketene-dimer (AKD), and modified with a silane-coupling agent. The mechanical properties, water absorption properties, surface structure, and thermal properties of the three prepared materials were compared. The results showed that the optimum amount of waste-paper powder is 10 wt%, while that of the waste-paper particles is 60-80 mesh. The use of AKD and coupling agent KH550 can reduce the water absorption of the composite; however, the reductive effect of the coupling agent is better, in that it is reduced by 0.3%. Modification using a 1-wt% KH550 coupling agent can effectively increase the tensile strength of a composite from 31.36 to 41.67 MPa (increase of 32.8%), while the bending strength increased from 86.47 to 98.31 MPa (increase of 13.7%). This also enhances the thermal stability of the composites. With the addition of the coupling agent, the composite material maintains good mechanical properties even after being immersed in water; this can enable the safe use of these composite materials in outdoor environments.

  8. Micromechanics of Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, George

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a broad exposition of analytical and numerical methods for modeling composite materials, laminates, polycrystals and other heterogeneous solids, with emphasis on connections between material properties and responses on several length scales, ranging from the nano and microscales to the macroscale. Many new results and methods developed by the author are incorporated into a rich fabric of the subject, which has been explored by several researchers over the last 40 years.   The first  part of the book reviews anisotropic elasticity theory, and then it describes the frequently used procedures and theorems for bounding and estimating overall properties, local fields and energy changes in elastic inhomogeneities, heterogeneous media, fiber composites and functionally graded materials.  Those are caused by mechanical loads and by phase eigenstrains, such as thermal, transformation and inelastic strains, and also by cavities and cracks.    Worked examples show that the eigendeformations may...

  9. Pyrolysis of plastic packaging waste: A comparison of plastic residuals from material recovery facilities with simulated plastic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrados, A.; Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; López, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F.; Torres, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of plastic waste. ► Comparison of different samples: real waste, simulated and real waste + catalyst. ► Study of the effects of inorganic components in the pyrolysis products. - Abstract: Pyrolysis may be an alternative for the reclamation of rejected streams of waste from sorting plants where packing and packaging plastic waste is separated and classified. These rejected streams consist of many different materials (e.g., polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), aluminum, tetra-brik, and film) for which an attempt at complete separation is not technically possible or economically viable, and they are typically sent to landfills or incinerators. For this study, a simulated plastic mixture and a real waste sample from a sorting plant were pyrolyzed using a non-stirred semi-batch reactor. Red mud, a byproduct of the aluminum industry, was used as a catalyst. Despite the fact that the samples had a similar volume of material, there were noteworthy differences in the pyrolysis yields. The real waste sample resulted, after pyrolysis, in higher gas and solid yields and consequently produced less liquid. There were also significant differences noted in the compositions of the compared pyrolysis products.

  10. Plastic raw materials in Neolithic pottery production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Bobrinsky

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is dedicated to the investigation of various natural silts as the most ancient type of raw material used in pottery production. The authors describe the specific features of the composition of plain and mountain silts, and discover the same features in ancient ceramics from different regions in Russia. It can be concluded that silts were the earliest raw material used, a tradition that faded away during the evolution of pottery production.

  11. Mechanical properties: wood lumber versus plastic lumber and thermoplastic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Zandomenico Dias

    Full Text Available Abstract Plastic lumber and thermoplastic composites are sold as alternatives to wood products. However, many technical standards and scientific studies state that the two materials cannot be considered to have the same structural behaviour and strength. Moreover, there are many compositions of thermoplastic-based products and plenty of wood species. How different are their mechanical properties? This study compares the modulus of elasticity and the flexural, compressive, tensile and shear strengths of such materials, as well as the materials' specific mechanical properties. It analyses the properties of wood from the coniferae and dicotyledon species and those of commercialized and experimental thermoplastic-based product formulations. The data were collected from books, scientific papers and manufacturers' websites and technical data sheets, and subsequently compiled and presented in Ashby plots and bar graphs. The high values of the compressive strength and specific compressive and tensile strengths perpendicular to the grain (width direction shown by the experimental thermoplastic composites compared to wood reveal their great potential for use in compressed elements and in functions where components are compressed or tensioned perpendicularly to the grain. However, the low specific flexural modulus and high density of thermoplastic materials limit their usage in certain civil engineering and building applications.

  12. Coating material composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Tadashi; Ozeki, Takao; Kobayashi, Juichi; Nakamoto, Hideo; Maeda, Yutaka.

    1969-01-01

    A coating material composition is provided which can easily be cross-linked by irradiation with active energy, particularly electron beams and ultraviolet light, using a mixture of a prepolymer (a) with an addition reaction product (b). Such compositions have coating properties as good as thermosetting acrylic or amino alkyd resins. The prepolymer (a) is produced by primarily reacting at least 0.1 mol of saturated cyclocarboxylic acid anhydrides and/or alpha-, beta-ethylene unsaturated carboxylic acid anhydrides by addition reaction with one mol of hydroxyl radicals of a basic polymer having a molecular weight of 1,000 to 100,000, the basic polymer being obtained from 1%-40% of a hydroxyl radical containing vinyl monomer and at least 30% of (meth)acrylate monomer. One mol of the sum of hydroxyl radicals and carboxyl radicals of the primary reaction product undergoes a secondary addition reaction with at least 0.1 mol of an epoxy radical-containing vinyl monomer to form the prepolymer(a). The addition reaction product(b) is produced by reacting an epoxy radical-containing vinyl monomer with alpha-, beta-ethylene unsaturated carboxylic acids or their anhydrides. The coating material composition contains a majority of a mixture consisting of 10%-90% of (a) and 90%-10% of (b) above by weight. Four examples of the production of basic polymers, seven examples of the production of prepolymers, seven examples of the production of oligomers, and five examples of applications are given. (Iwakiri, K.)

  13. Study of Selected Composites Copper Concentrate-Plastic Waste Using Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyszka, Danuta

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents thermal analysis of selected composites (copper concentrate, plastic waste) in two stages. The first stage consisted in thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis on the applied plastic waste and copper concentrate, and subsequently, a comparative study has been carried out on products obtained, constituting composites of those materials. As a result of analyses, it was found that up to ca. 400 °C composites show high thermal stability, whereas above that temperature, a thermal decomposition of the composite occurs, resulting in emissions of organic compounds, i.e. hydrocarbon compounds and organic oxygenate derivatives.

  14. Dual energy CT inspection of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite combined with metal components

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavřík, Daniel; Jakůbek, J.; Kumpová, Ivana; Pichotka, M.

    6, Part B, November (2016), s. 47-55 ISSN 2214-6571 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-07210S Keywords : dual energy computed tomography * carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite * metal artefact suppression Subject RIV: JI - Composite Material s http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214657116300107

  15. Plasticity dependent damage evolution in composites with strain-gradient effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2015-01-01

    . (2013). In this study the reinforcement is assumed perfectly stiff and consequently only one new cohesive material parameter is introduced. Results are shown for both conventional isotropy as well as plastic anisotropy with higher-order material behavior. Due to fiber-matrix decohesion a sudden stress......A unit cell approach is adopted to numerically analyze the effect of reinforcement size on fracture evolution in metal matrix composites. The matrix material shows plastic size-effects and is modeled by an anisotropic version of the single parameter strain-gradient (higher-order) plasticity model...... by Fleck and Hutchinson (2001). The fracture process along the fiber-matrix interface is modeled using a recently proposed cohesive law extension, where plasticity affects the fracture process as both the average as well as the jump in plastic strain across the interface are accounted for Tvergaard et al...

  16. Strength and thermal stability of fiber reinforced plastic composites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, the strength properties and thermal stability of plastic composites reinforced with rattan fibers were investigated in this work. Particles of rattan species (Eremospatha macrocarpa (EM) and Laccosperma secundiflorum (LS)) were blended with High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) to produce fiber reinforced plastic ...

  17. Composite materials processing, applications, characterizations

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Composite materials are used as substitutions of metals/traditional materials in aerospace, automotive, civil, mechanical and other industries. The present book collects the current knowledge and recent developments in the characterization and application of composite materials. To this purpose the volume describes the outstanding properties of this class of advanced material which recommend it for various industrial applications.

  18. Pyrolysis of plastic packaging waste: A comparison of plastic residuals from material recovery facilities with simulated plastic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrados, A; de Marco, I; Caballero, B M; López, A; Laresgoiti, M F; Torres, A

    2012-05-01

    Pyrolysis may be an alternative for the reclamation of rejected streams of waste from sorting plants where packing and packaging plastic waste is separated and classified. These rejected streams consist of many different materials (e.g., polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), aluminum, tetra-brik, and film) for which an attempt at complete separation is not technically possible or economically viable, and they are typically sent to landfills or incinerators. For this study, a simulated plastic mixture and a real waste sample from a sorting plant were pyrolyzed using a non-stirred semi-batch reactor. Red mud, a byproduct of the aluminum industry, was used as a catalyst. Despite the fact that the samples had a similar volume of material, there were noteworthy differences in the pyrolysis yields. The real waste sample resulted, after pyrolysis, in higher gas and solid yields and consequently produced less liquid. There were also significant differences noted in the compositions of the compared pyrolysis products. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Composite Materials for Low-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials with improved thermal conductivity and good mechanical strength properties should allow for the design and construction of more thermally efficient components (such as pipes and valves) for use in fluid-processing systems. These materials should have wide application in any number of systems, including ground support equipment (GSE), lunar systems, and flight hardware that need reduced heat transfer. Researchers from the Polymer Science and Technology Laboratory and the Cryogenics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center were able to develop a new series of composite materials that can meet NASA's needs for lightweight materials/composites for use in fluid systems and also expand the plastic-additive markets. With respect to thermal conductivity and physical properties, these materials are excellent alternatives to prior composite materials and can be used in the aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, food-packaging, and textile markets. One specific application of the polymeric composition is for use in tanks, pipes, valves, structural supports, and components for hot or cold fluid-processing systems where heat flow through materials is a problem to be avoided. These materials can also substitute for metals in cryogenic and other low-temperature applications. These organic/inorganic polymeric composite materials were invented with significant reduction in heat transfer properties. Decreases of 20 to 50 percent in thermal conductivity versus that of the unmodified polymer matrix were measured. These novel composite materials also maintain mechanical properties of the unmodified polymer matrix. These composite materials consist of an inorganic additive combined with a thermoplastic polymer material. The intrinsic, low thermal conductivity of the additive is imparted into the thermoplastic, resulting in a significant reduction in heat transfer over that of the base polymer itself, yet maintaining most of the polymer's original properties. Normal

  20. Magnetic losses in composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramprecht, J; Sjoeberg, D

    2008-01-01

    We discuss some of the problems involved in homogenization of a composite material built from ferromagnetic inclusions in a nonmagnetic background material. The small signal permeability for a ferromagnetic spherical particle is combined with a homogenization formula to give an effective permeability for the composite material. The composite material inherits the gyrotropic structure and resonant behaviour of the single particle. The resonance frequency of the composite material is found to be independent of the volume fraction, unlike dielectric composite materials. The magnetic losses are described by a magnetic conductivity which can be made independent of frequency and proportional to the volume fraction by choosing a certain bias. Finally, some concerns regarding particles of small size, i.e. nanoparticles, are treated and the possibility of exciting exchange modes are discussed. These exchange modes may be an interesting way to increase losses in composite materials

  1. From waste plastics to industrial raw materials: A life cycle assessment of mechanical plastic recycling practice based on a real-world case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fu; Guo, Jianfeng; Zhang, Wujie; Summers, Peter A; Hall, Philip

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical recycling of waste plastics is an environmental solution to the problem of waste plastic disposal, and has already become a common practice in industry. However, limited information can be found on either the industralised plastic recycling or the recycled materials, despite the use of recycled plastics has already extended to automobile production. This study investigates the life cycle environmental impacts of mechanical plastic recycling practice of a plastic recycling company in China. Waste plastics from various sources, such as agricultural wastes, plastic product manufacturers, collected solid plastic wastes and parts dismantled from waste electric and electronic equipments, are processed in three routes with products end up in different markets. The results of life cycle assessments show that the extrusion process has the largest environmental impacts, followed by the use of fillers and additives. Compared to production of virgin plastics and composites, the mechanical recycling is proved to be a superior alternative in most environmental aspects. Substituting virgin plastic composites with recycled plastic composites has achieved the highest environmental benefits, as virgin composite production has an impact almost 4 times higher that of the recycled composite production in each ReCiPe endpoint damage factor. Sensitivity analysis shows that the coverage of collecting network contribute affect little to overall environmental impact, and centralisation plays an important role in reducing overall environmental impacts. Among the fillers and additives, impact modifiers account for the most significant contributions to the environmental impacts of recycled composites. This study provides necessary information about the existing industrialised plastic recycling practice, and recommendations are given. Research implications are presented with the purpose to achieve higher substitution rate and lower environmental impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  2. Carbon/carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thebault, J.; Orly, P.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites are singular materials from their components, their manufacturing process as well as their characteristics. This paper gives a global overview of these particularities and applications which make them now daily used composites. (authors)

  3. Composite materials design and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gay, Daniel; Tsai, Stephen W

    2002-01-01

    PART ONE. PRINCIPLES OF CONSTRUCTIONCOMPOSITE MATERIALS, INTEREST AND PROPERTIESWhat is Composite Material Fibers and MatrixWhat can be Made Using Composite Materials?Typical Examples of Interest on the Use of Composite MaterialsExamples on Replacing Conventional Solutions with CompositesPrincipal Physical PropertiesFABRICATION PROCESSESMolding ProcessesOther Forming ProcessesPractical Hints in the Manufacturing ProcessesPLY PROPERTIESIsotropy and AnisotropyCharacteristics of the Reinforcement-Matrix MixtureUnidirectional PlyWoven FabricsMats and Reinforced MatricesMultidimensional FabricsMetal Matrix CompositesTestsSANDWICH STRUCTURES:What is a Sandwich Structure?Simplified FlexureA Few Special AspectsFabrication and Design ProblemsNondestructive Quality ControlCONCEPTION AND DESIGNDesign of a Composite PieceThe LaminateFailure of LaminatesSizing of LaminatesJOINING AND ASSEMBLYRiveting and BoltingBondingInsertsCOMPOSITE MATERIALS AND AEROSPACE CONSTRUCTIONAircraftHelicoptersPropeller Blades for AirplanesTur...

  4. Multifunctional Composite Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polymeric composite materials that are currently utilized in aircraft structures are susceptible to significant damage from lightning strikes. Enhanced electrical...

  5. Evaluation of bolted connections in wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnandha, Yudhi; Satyarno, Iman; Awaludin, Ali; Irawati, Inggar Septia; Ihsan, Muhamad; Wijanarko, Felyx Biondy; William, Mahdinur, Fardhani, Arfiati

    2017-03-01

    Wood-plastic composite (WPC) is a relatively new material that consists of sawdust and plastic polymer using the extrusion process. Due to its attributes such as low water content, low maintenance, UV durability and being fungi and termite resistant. Nowadays, WPC has already been produced in Indonesia using sawdust from local wood such as Albizia (Paraserianthes falcataria) and Teak (Tectona grandis). Moreover preliminary studies about the physical and mechanical WPC board from Albizia sawdust and HDPE plastic have been carried out. Based on these studies, WPC has a high shear strength around 25-30 MPa higher than its original wood shear strength. This paper was a part of the research in evaluating WPC as potential sheathing in a shear wall system. Since still little is known about connection behavior in WPC using Indonesian local wood, this study evaluated the connection for both of these two types of wood-plastic composite. WPC board from Albizia sawdust will be projected as shear wall sheathing and WPC stud from Teak sawdust projected to be shear wall frame. For this study, the embedding strength for both WPC was determined according to ASTM D 5764 standard, using two types of bolts (stainless bolt and standard bolt) with several diameters as variation (6 mm, 8 mm, 10 and 12 mm). Hence, dowel-bearing test under fastened condition conducted accordance to ASTM D5652, hereby the yield strength then compared with the prediction yield strength from European Yield Model (EYM). According to both single and double shear connection, it can be concluded that yield strength from the EYM method tended to under-predict the 5% diameter offset yield than the actual yield strength from the test. The yield strength itself increase with the increase of bolt diameter. For single shear connection, the highest yield strength was 12 mm standard bolt around 9732 N, slightly higher than stainless bolt around 9393 N. Whereby for double shear connection, the highest yield strength was

  6. Elastic-plastic analysis of AS4/PEEK composite laminate using a one-parameter plasticity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    A one-parameter plasticity model was shown to adequately describe the plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK (APC-2) unidirectional thermoplastic composite. This model was verified further for unidirectional and laminated composite panels with and without a hole. The elastic-plastic stress-strain relations of coupon specimens were measured and compared with those predicted by the finite element analysis using the one-parameter plasticity model. The results show that the one-parameter plasticity model is suitable for the analysis of elastic-plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK composite laminates.

  7. Engineering Biodegradable Flame Retardant Wood-Plastic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linxi

    Wood-plastic composites (WPCs), which are produced by blending wood and polymer materials, have attracted increasing attentions in market and industry due to the low cost and excellent performance. In this research, we have successfully engineered WPC by melt blending Polylactic Acid (PLA) and Poly(butylene adipate-co-terphthalate) (PBAT) with recycled wood flour. The thermal property and flammability of the composite are significantly improved by introducing flame retardant agent resorcinol bis(biphenyl phosphate) (RDP). The mechanical and morphological properties are also investigated via multiple techniques. The results show that wood material has increased toughness and impact resistance of the PLA/PBAT polymer matrix. SEM images have confirmed that PLA and PBAT are immiscible, but the incompatibility is reduced by the addition of wood. RDP is initially dispersed in the blends evenly. It migrates to the surface of the sample after flame application, and serves as a barrier between the fire and underlying polymers and wood mixture. It is well proved in the research that RDP is an efficient flame retardant agent in the WPC system.

  8. Reinforced concrete treatment as composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oller, S.; Onate, E.; Miguel, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the general mixing theory applied to the numerical simulation of multiphase composite material behaviour as reinforced concrete materials. This theory is based on the mixture of that composite basic substances and allows to evaluate the inter-dependence behaviour between the different compounding constitutive models. If it would be necessary to consider the initial anisotropy of each compound it could be done by mean of the mapped isotropic plastic formulation. The approach is a generalization of the classic isotropic plasticity theory to be applied to either ortho tropic or anisotropic materials such as reinforced concrete. The existence of a stress and strain real anisotropic spaces, and the respective fictitious isotropic spaces are assumed, where a mapped fictitious problem is solved. Those spaces are relating by means of two fourth order transformation tensors. Both formulation are joined establishing a powerful work tool for the treatment of bulk-fiber composite materials. The induced anisotropy behaviour is take into account by each compounding constitutive formulation. (author). 24 refs., 3 figs

  9. Erosion-resistant composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  10. Composite materials for aircraft structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, A. A; Dutton, Stuart; Kelly, Donald

    2004-01-01

    ... materials for aircraft structures / Alan Baker, Stuart Dutton, and Donald Kelly- 2nd ed. p. cm. - (Education series) Rev. ed. of: Composite materials for aircraft structures / edited by B. C. Hos...

  11. Stress Wave Propagation in Viscoelastic-Plastic Rock-Like Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rock-like materials are composites that can be regarded as a mixture composed of elastic, plastic, and viscous components. They exhibit viscoelastic-plastic behavior under a high-strain-rate loading according to element model theory. This paper presents an analytical solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials under a high-strain-rate loading and verifies the solution through an experimental test. A constitutive equation of viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was first established, and then kinematic and kinetic equations were then solved to derive the analytic solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials. An experimental test using the SHPB (Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar for a concrete specimen was conducted to obtain a stress-strain curve under a high-strain-rate loading. Inverse analysis based on differential evolution was conducted to estimate undetermined variables for constitutive equations. Finally, the relationship between the attenuation factor and the strain rate in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was investigated. According to the results, the frequency of the stress wave, viscosity coefficient, modulus of elasticity, and density play dominant roles in the attenuation of the stress wave. The attenuation decreases with increasing strain rate, demonstrating strongly strain-dependent attenuation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials.

  12. New recycling approaches for thermoset polymeric composite wastes – an experimental study on polyester based concrete materials filled with fibre reinforced plastic recyclates

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, M. C. S.; Fiúza, António; Meira Castro, A C; Dinis, M. L.; Silva, Francisco J. G.; Meixedo, João Paulo

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a new waste management solution for thermoset glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) based products was assessed. Mechanical recycling approach, with reduction of GFRP waste to powdered and fibrous materials was applied, and the prospective added-value of obtained recyclates was experimentally investigated as raw material for polyester based mortars. Different GFRP waste admixed mortar formulations were analyzed varying the content, between 4% up to 12% in we...

  13. Strong Adhesion of Silver/Polypyrrole Composite onto Plastic Substrates toward Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Jin; Hashimoto, Yasuo; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2013-06-01

    Flexible electronics require sufficient adhesion to substrates, such as a plastic or a polymer, of the electric wiring for devices. A composite of a conducting metal and a polymer is a candidate alternative to pure metals in terms of wire flexibility. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adhesiveness of a silver/polypyrrole composite to plastic substrates and to clarify the mechanism of adhesion. The composite was prepared on various plastic substrates by dropping its fluid dispersion. Its adhesiveness was evaluated by the peel-off test and its interfacial structure was characterized by microscopy measurements. Some polymers including Teflon with generally weak adhesion to different materials showed a high adhesiveness of more than 90%. The strong adhesion was related to the anchoring effect of the composite penetrating into the pores near the surface of the substrate.

  14. Valorization of post-consumer waste plastic in cementitious concrete composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzouk, O. Yazoghli; Dheilly, R.M.; Queneudec, M.

    2007-01-01

    The sheer amount of disposable bottles being produced nowadays makes it imperative to identify alternative procedures for recycling them since they are non-biodegradable. This paper describes an innovative use of consumed plastic bottle waste as sand-substitution aggregate within composite materials for building application. Particularly, bottles made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) have been used as partial and complete substitutes for sand in concrete composites. Various volume fractions of sand varying from 2% to 100% were substituted by the same volume of granulated plastic, and various sizes of PET aggregates were used. The bulk density and mechanical characteristics of the composites produced were evaluated. To study the relationship between mechanical properties and composite microstructure, scanning electron microscopy technique was employed. The results presented show that substituting sand at a level below 50% by volume with granulated PET, whose upper granular limit equals 5 mm, affects neither the compressive strength nor the flexural strength of composites. This study demonstrates that plastic bottles shredded into small PET particles may be used successfully as sand-substitution aggregates in cementitious concrete composites. These new composites would appear to offer an attractive low-cost material with consistent properties; moreover, they would help in resolving some of the solid waste problems created by plastics production and in saving energy

  15. Composite Materials in Overhead Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Kjærsgaard; Holbøll, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    towers and recently conductors based on composite materials are available at transmission levels. In this paper it is investigated which composite based solutions are available in connection with complete overhead line systems including insulators, towers and conductors. The components are reviewed......The use of composite materials, e.g. fibreglass materials, in overhead transmission line systems is nothing new. Composite based insulators have been applied to transmission lines for over 30 years, mainly as suspension and post insulators and often as an option for special applications. Also...... with respect to solved and persisting known failures/problems of both mechanical and electrical nature. Major challenges related to extensive use of composite materials in an overhead line system are identified, as are possible benefits - both when using standard as well as customised composite components, e...

  16. Superconducting composites materials. Materiaux composites supraconducteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerjouan, P; Boterel, F; Lostec, J; Bertot, J P; Haussonne, J M [Centre National d' Etudes des Telecommunications (CNET), 22 - Lannion (FR)

    1991-11-01

    The new superconductor materials with a high critical current own a large importance as well in the electronic components or in the electrotechnical devices fields. The deposit of such materials with the thick films technology is to be more and more developed in the years to come. Therefore, we tried to realize such thick films screen printed on alumina, and composed mainly of the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} material. We first realized a composite material glass/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, by analogy with the classical screen-printed inks where the glass ensures the bonding with the substrate. We thus realized different materials by using some different classes of glass. These materials owned a superconducting transition close to the one of the pure YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} material. We made a slurry with the most significant composite materials and binders, and screen-printed them on an alumina substrate preliminary or not coated with a diffusion barrier layer. After firing, we studied the thick films adhesion, the alumina/glass/composite material interfaces, and their superconducting properties. 8 refs.; 14 figs.; 9 tabs.

  17. Experimental analysis of plastic materials containing radionuclides for decontamination viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazaki, Kazue; Nakano, Mikio; Takehara, Teruaki; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Nakagawa, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on 11 March, 2011, the high radioactive dosage was found in polluted water for agriculture use at Baba, Haramachi, Minami-Soma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Field experiment for decontamination of water had been studied by using commercial plastic materials. The agricultural water comes from Tetsuzan dam is full of radioactive-contaminated water. Experimental analysis showed that the plastic materials can take up radioactive elements for several months soaked in the polluted agricultural water. The quantitative analyses using X-ray fluorescence analysis, Ge semiconductor and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS), revealed the detection of the radionuclides on the plastic materials with diatom and clays. The results suggest the adsorption of radionuclides on the surface of plastic materials due to FDNPP accident. The plastic materials associated with clays and diatoms could be stronger carriers of radionuclides in the polluted water. Adherence of diatoms to the plastic fiber in the water for 7 months suggested that some plastic materials were taking up heavy metals (Zn, Ba, Pb, Sb) with radioactive elements (Cs etc.). Mechanisms by which radioactive pollutants and microorganisms are adsorbed onto and desorbed from clays at aqueous interface can be understood by combining chemical analysis with electron microscopy observation. (author)

  18. Strain-Detecting Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Terryl A. (Inventor); Smith, Stephen W. (Inventor); Piascik, Robert S. (Inventor); Horne, Michael R. (Inventor); Messick, Peter L. (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor); Glaessgen, Edward H. (Inventor); Hailer, Benjamin T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A composite material includes a structural material and a shape-memory alloy embedded in the structural material. The shape-memory alloy changes crystallographic phase from austenite to martensite in response to a predefined critical macroscopic average strain of the composite material. In a second embodiment, the composite material includes a plurality of particles of a ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy embedded in the structural material. The ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy changes crystallographic phase from austenite to martensite and changes magnetic phase in response to the predefined critical macroscopic average strain of the composite material. A method of forming a composite material for sensing the predefined critical macroscopic average strain includes providing the shape-memory alloy having an austenite crystallographic phase, changing a size and shape of the shape-memory alloy to thereby form a plurality of particles, and combining the structural material and the particles at a temperature of from about 100-700.degree. C. to form the composite material.

  19. Outcrops of plastic material on the surface of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksanfomality, L. V.

    2015-05-01

    The archive data of the television experiment performed by the Venera-14 spacecraft on the surface of the planet Venus in March, 1982, were reprocessed, which significantly improved the image definition quality. An unusual geologic object located relatively near the camera was found, which allowed its details to be analyzed. The object is a low long bank in shape; it is formed by a relatively thin, jagged, almost vertical stratum. The bank contours the oval formation 1.5-2 m across that stands out against the layered surface. The location of the bank suggests that its material is extruded from under the layered plates surrounding the oval formation. A segment of the bank resembling a falling wave is inclined and partly covers the surface by forming the beddings. The object is likely formed by the rocks that remain semisoftened (plastic), when they appear on the surface at the temperature characteristic for the Venusian surface (about 740 K). It is suggested that, from the data on the physical and chemical conditions and the composition of the Venusian surface, the nature of the observed plastic medium can be hypothesized, and it can be even modeled under laboratory conditions.

  20. Hydrocarbon composition products of the catalytic recycling plastics waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents the IR spectroscopy results of the hydrocarbon composition of products, which is obtained from catalytic processing of plastic wastes. The optimal conditions for the hydrogenation with to producny liquid of products are identified.  These liquid products are enriched with aromatics, paraffinic- naphthenic and unsaturated hydrocarbons. The main characteristics of the distillates received by hydrogenation of plastics (as density, refractive index, iodine number, pour point, cloud point, filtering, sulfur content,  fractional and composition of the hydrocarbon group.

  1. Mechanics in Composite Materials and Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dae Gil

    1993-03-01

    This book includes introduction of composite materials, stress, in-plane stiffness of laminates strain rate, ply stress, failure criterion and bending, composite materials micromechanics, composite plates and micromechanics of composite materials. It also deals with process of composite materials such as autoclave vacuum bag degassing process, connection of composite materials, filament winding process, resin transfer molding, sheet molding compound and compression molding.

  2. Exterior Decay of Wood-Plastic Composite Boards: Characterization and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca Ibach; Grace Sun; Marek Gnatowski; Jessie Glaeser; Mathew Leung; John Haight

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate free water content and distribution in wood-plastic composite (WPC) materials decayed during exterior exposure near Hilo, Hawaii. Two segments of the same board blend were selected from 6 commercial decking boards that had fungal fruiting bodies. One of the two board segments was exposed in sun, the other in shadow...

  3. Durability of wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.J. Morrell; Nicole M. Stark; David E. Pendleton; Armando G. McDonald

    2006-01-01

    Deterioration is broadly defined as any negative effect on the properties of a material. The effects can be due to biological attack or to various non-living agents (sunlight, moisture, temperature), but often, deterioration results from a combination of factors. Nowhere is this more evident than with WPCs, owing to the marriage of dissimilar materials. This article...

  4. Biotechnology and Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    means. Silk made from the caterpillar, Bombyx mori , has outstanding mechanical and good thermal properties. The Bombyx mori synthesises the components of...Silk Proteins for Composite Fibers 185 In natural systems, the two c=nm=n sources of silks are the dch!sticated silkworm, mori , and the orb weaving...unit cell remain parallel to their original orientation during deformation. This prevents the formation of any voids or gaps in the model. Using the

  5. Forecasting waste compositions: A case study on plastic waste of electronic display housings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Jef R; Vanegas, Paul; Kellens, Karel; Wang, Feng; Huisman, Jaco; Dewulf, Wim; Duflou, Joost R

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid succession of technological developments, the architecture and material composition of many products used in daily life have drastically changed over the last decades. As a result, well-adjusted recycling technologies need to be developed and installed to cope with these evolutions. This is essential to guarantee continued access to materials and to reduce the ecological impact of our material consumption. However, limited information is currently available on the material composition of arising waste streams and even less on how these waste streams will evolve. Therefore, this paper presents a methodology to forecast trends in the material composition of waste streams. To demonstrate the applicability and value of the proposed methodology, it is applied to forecast the evolution of plastic housing waste from flat panel display (FPD) TVs, FPD monitors, cathode ray tube (CRT) TVs and CRT monitors. The results of the presented forecasts indicate that a wide variety of plastic types and additives, such as flame retardants, are found in housings of similar products. The presented case study demonstrates that the proposed methodology allows the identification of trends in the evolution of the material composition of waste streams. In addition, it is demonstrated that the recycling sector will need to adapt its processes to deal with the increasing complexity of plastics of end-of-life electronic displays while respecting relevant directives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Colemanite: a fire retardant candidate for wood plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evren Terzi; Saip Nami Kartal; Sabriye Piskin; Nicole Stark; Aysel Kanturk Figen; Robert H. White

    2018-01-01

    The use of raw boron minerals (i.e. tincalconite, colemanite, and ulexite) was evaluated to increase the fire performance of wood plastic composites (WPCs) in comparison with commercially available fire retardants (FRs). Cone calorimetry and limited oxygen index tests were performed to evaluate the fire properties of WPC specimens. Artificial weathering and 3-point...

  7. Field and Laboratory Decay Evaluations of wood-plastic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Marek Gnatowski; Grace Sun

    2013-01-01

    Experimental wood–plastic composites (WPCs) were made so that they matched the manufacturing process, dimensions, and water absorption of some commercial decking boards. WPC samples from selected formulations were divided into two identical groups. The first group was exposed in exterior conditions in Vancouver, British Columbia, and Hilo, Hawaii, at sun and shadow...

  8. Considerations in the weathering of wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    During weathering, wood-plastic composites (WPCs) can fade and lose stiffness and strength. Weathering variables that induce these changes include exposure to UV light and water. Each variable degrades WPCs independently, but can also act synergistically. Recent efforts have highlighted the need to understand how WPCs weather, and to develop schemes for protection. The...

  9. Moisture Sorption in Artificially aged wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. Kristoffer Segerholm; Rebecca E. Ibach; Magnus E.P. Wålinder

    2012-01-01

    Moisture sorption in wood-plastic composites (WPCs) affects their durability and dimensional stability. In certain outdoor exposures, the moisture properties of WPCs are altered due to e.g. cracks induced by swelling and shrinkage of the components, as well as UV degradation or biological attack. The aim of this work was to study the effect of different artificial...

  10. Micromechanical validation of a mesomodel for plasticity in composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the performance of a recent homogenized orthotropic plasticity model for fiber reinforced composites (Vogler et al. (2013)) is investigated by comparing the model response against a micromechanical model. It is assumed that the micromechanical model which contains a recent

  11. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  12. Characterization and evaluation physical properties biodegradable plastic composite from seaweed (Eucheuma cottonii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deni, Glar Donia; Dhaningtyas, Shalihat Afifah; Fajar, Ibnu; Sudarno

    2015-12-01

    The characterization and evaluation of biodegradable plastic composed of a mixture PVA - carrageenan - chitosan was conducted in this study. Obtained data were then compared to commercial biodegradable plastic. Characteristic of plastic was mechanical tested such as tensile - strength and elongation. Plastic degradation was studied using composting method for 7 days and 14 days. The results showed that the increase carrageenan will decrease tensile-strength and elongation plastic composite. In addition, increase carrageenan would increase the degraded plastics composite.

  13. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D. K.; Burrows, R. W.; Shinton, Y. D.

    1985-01-01

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations are discussed. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  14. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.; Shinton, Y.D.

    1985-01-04

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  15. Radiation effects on carbon fiber-reinforced plastics for spacecraft materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, Akira; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Sasuga, Tsuneo; Morino, Yoshiki; Seguchi, Tadao; Yudate, Kozo.

    1995-02-01

    The effects of space environment were studied for two kinds of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics(CFRP) which were an epoxy resin composite using construction materials of satellite and a polyimide(PMR-15) composite expecting bright future space materials for long term operation. Resistibility of these materials to the space environments were evaluated from the change of mechanical properties after exposure of electron, proton, atomic oxygen and thermal cycling. It was found that the CFRP with PMR-15 as a matrix had good performance in the space environments. No differences in the mechanical properties for the materials were observed between proton and electron irradiations. (author)

  16. PLASTIC MATERIALS IN EUROPEAN AGRICULTURE: ACTUAL USE AND PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Scarascia-Mugnozza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The world consumption of plastics in agriculture amounts yearly to 6.5 million tons. In addition to conventional polymers used in agriculture for greenhouses and mulches such as PE, PVC, EVA, photo-selective and luminescent polymers have been used, in order to improve the quality of crops. For the same reason plastic nets are used mainly in countries with tropical and Mediterranean climates. For an environmentally friendly agricultural activity, an alternative strategy can be represented by bio-based agricultural raw materials. For low environmental impact applications, biodegradable materials for agricultural films are nowadays produced. An overview of the main methods for the disposal and recycling of plastic materials are presented with the results of mechanical and radiometric tests on recycled plastics. The strategies to reduce the burden of plastics in agriculture are: a correct procedure for the collection, disposal and recycling of post-consumption plastics; the increase of lifetime duration and performance; and the introduction and promotion of bio-based materials.

  17. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor); Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  18. Mechanical compatibility and stress analyses in composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmoeller, H.; Ruge, J.

    1976-01-01

    This paper gives a short description of the problem of mechanical interactions and mechanical compatibility in composite bodies. The formation of stress-strain states, caused by the mechanical compatibility by bonding of the interfaces, is discussed. The difference between the continuous and discontinuous type of material transition in the interface is described. Flat laminated materials are at first considered. For this type of composite bodies thermal stresses and thermal residual stresses are elastically-plastically calculated. (orig.) [de

  19. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  20. Associated computational plasticity schemes for nonassociated frictional materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhoft, K.; Karim, M. R.; Lyamin, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    A new methodology for computational plasticity of nonassociated frictional materials is presented. The new approach is inspired by the micromechanical origins of friction and results in a set of governing equations similar to those of standard associated plasticity. As such, procedures previously...... developed for associated plasticity are applicable with minor modification. This is illustrated by adaptation of the standard implicit scheme. Moreover, the governing equations can be cast in terms of a variational principle, which after discretization is solved by means of a newly developed second...

  1. 49 CFR 178.522 - Standards for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... plastic receptacles. 178.522 Section 178.522 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Standards for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles. (a) The following are the identification codes for composite packagings with inner plastic receptacles: (1) 6HA1 for a plastic receptacle within...

  2. Spallation products induced by energetic neutrons in plastic detector material

    CERN Document Server

    Grabisch, K; Enge, W; Scherzer, R

    1977-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate plastic detector sheets were irradiated with secondary neutrons of the 22 GeV/c proton beam at the CERN accelerator. He, Li and Be particles which are produced in nuclear interactions of the neutrons with the target elements C, N and O of the plastic detector material are measured. Preliminary angle and range distributions and isotropic abundances of the secondary particles are discussed. (6 refs).

  3. Material Modelling - Composite Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    is successfully justified comparing predicted results with experimental data obtained in the HETEK-project on creep, relaxation, and shrinkage of very young concretes cured at a temperature of T = 20^o C and a relative humidity of RH = 100%. The model is also justified comparing predicted creep, shrinkage......, and internal stresses caused by drying shrinkage with experimental results reported in the literature on the mechanical behavior of mature concretes. It is then concluded that the model presented applied in general with respect to age at loading.From a stress analysis point of view the most important finding...... in this report is that cement paste and concrete behave practically as linear-viscoelastic materials from an age of approximately 10 hours. This is a significant age extension relative to earlier studies in the literature where linear-viscoelastic behavior is only demonstrated from ages of a few days. Thus...

  4. Earthquake statistics and plastic events in soft-glassy materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benzi, Roberto; Kumar, Pinaki; Toschi, Federico; Trampert, Jeannot

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new approach for generating synthetic earthquakes based on the physics of soft glasses. The continuum approach produces yield-stress materials based on Lattice–Boltzmann simulations. We show that if the material is stimulated below yield stress, plastic events occur, which have strong

  5. A plastic micropump constructed with conventional techniques and materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohm, S.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    1999-01-01

    A plastic micropump which can be produced using conventional production techniques and materials is presented. By applying well-known techniques and materials, economic fabrication of micropumps for various applications is feasible even at low production volumes. The micropump is capable of pumping

  6. Hybrid and hierarchical composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Soo; Sano, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses a broad spectrum of areas in both hybrid materials and hierarchical composites, including recent development of processing technologies, structural designs, modern computer simulation techniques, and the relationships between the processing-structure-property-performance. Each topic is introduced at length with numerous  and detailed examples and over 150 illustrations.   In addition, the authors present a method of categorizing these materials, so that representative examples of all material classes are discussed.

  7. All-natural bio-plastics using starch-betaglucan composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnelli, Domenico; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Giosafatto, Concetta Valeria L; Ogrodowicz, Natalia; Kruczała, Krzysztof; Mikkelsen, Mette S; Maigret, Jean-Eudes; Lourdin, Denis; Mortensen, Kell; Blennow, Andreas

    2017-09-15

    Grain polysaccharides represent potential valuable raw materials for next-generation advanced and environmentally friendly plastics. Thermoplastic starch (TPS) is processed using conventional plastic technology, such as casting, extrusion, and molding. However, to adapt the starch to specific functionalities chemical modifications or blending with synthetic polymers, such as polycaprolactone are required (e.g. Mater-Bi). As an alternative, all-natural and compostable bio-plastics can be produced by blending starch with other polysaccharides. In this study, we used a maize starch (ST) and an oat β-glucan (BG) composite system to produce bio-plastic prototype films. To optimize performing conditions, we investigated the full range of ST:BG ratios for the casting (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75 and 0:100 BG). The plasticizer used was glycerol. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), using TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) as a spin probe, showed that the composite films with high BG content had a flexible chemical environment. They showed decreased brittleness and improved cohesiveness with high stress and strain values at the break. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction displayed a decrease in crystallinity at high BG content. Our data show that the blending of starch with other natural polysaccharides is a noteworthy path to improve the functionality of all-natural polysaccharide bio-plastics systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Elasto-Plastic Stress Analysis in Rotating Disks and Pressure Vessels Made of Functionally Graded Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir T. Kalali

    Full Text Available Abstract A new elastio-plastic stress solution in axisymmetric problems (rotating disk, cylindrical and spherical vessel is presented. The rotating disk (cylindrical and spherical vessel was made of a ceramic/metal functionally graded material, i.e. a particle-reinforced composite. It was assumed that the material's plastic deformation follows an isotropic strain-hardening rule based on the von-Mises yield criterion. The mechanical properties of the graded material were modeled by the modified rule of mixtures. By assuming small strains, Hencky's stress-strain relation was used to obtain the governing differential equations for the plastic region. A numerical method for solving those differential equations was then proposed that enabled the prediction of stress state within the structure. Selected finite element results were also presented to establish supporting evidence for the validation of the proposed approach.

  9. Genetic Homogenization of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tobola

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on numerical studies of electromagnetic properties of composite materials used for the construction of small airplanes. Discussions concentrate on the genetic homogenization of composite layers and composite layers with a slot. The homogenization is aimed to reduce CPU-time demands of EMC computational models of electrically large airplanes. First, a methodology of creating a 3-dimensional numerical model of a composite material in CST Microwave Studio is proposed focusing on a sufficient accuracy of the model. Second, a proper implementation of a genetic optimization in Matlab is discussed. Third, an association of the optimization script and a simplified 2-dimensional model of the homogeneous equivalent model in Comsol Multiphysics is proposed considering EMC issues. Results of computations are experimentally verified.

  10. The use of plasticizing additives based on recycled raw materials in the petrochemical rubber mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. S. Shashok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, the development of alternative products for elastomers based on recycling petrochemical raw materials is a new trend of the rubber industry progress. Petrochemical raw materials include spent lubricants and motor oils are among such recycling products. In this context, the influence of the products of recycling waste engine oil (DVCH and RA in comparison with industrial oil (I-20 on the technological properties of filled elastomeric compositions was investigated. The elastomeric compositions were based on poly isoprene and divinyl rubbers. The plasticizing components were manufactured by IOOO “DVCH-Menedzhment”. They are mixture of hydro-carbons, C16–C20 and differ from each other in the content of linear and branched paraffin. Plastic-elastic properties of rubber compounds on the shear disk viscometer MV2000 in accordance with GOST 10722–76 was carried out. Kinetics of vulcanization on the rheometer ODR2000 according to GOST 12535–84 was defined. It is shown that the introduction of RA test plasticizing component provides a significant effect on Mooney viscosity, as compared to elastomeric compositions containing a plasticizer and I-20 and plasticizing additive DVCH. It revealed that the administration of all components in the studied plasticizing elastomer compositions based on a combination poly isoprene and divinyl rubbers has no significant effect on the rate of relaxation of stress of rubber compounds. It is found that elastomeric compositions containing as additives investigated processing waste oil products (DVCH and RA are characterized by a slightly smaller value of time to reach an optimal degree of vulcanization.

  11. Modeling Non-Linear Material Properties in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-16013 MODELING NON-LINEAR MATERIAL PROPERTIES IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS Michael F. Macri Andrew G...REPORT TYPE Technical 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MODELING NON-LINEAR MATERIAL PROPERTIES IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS ...systems are increasingly incorporating composite materials into their design. Many of these systems subject the composites to environmental conditions

  12. Composite materials application on FORMOSAT-5 remote sensing instrument structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Chueh Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite material has been widely applied in space vehicle structures due to its light weight and designed stiffness modulus. Some special mechanical properties that cannot be changed in general metal materials, such as low CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion and directional material stiffness can be artificially adjusted in composite materials to meet the user’s requirements. Space-qualified Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP composite materials are applied In the FORMOSAT-5 Remote Sensing (RSI structure because of its light weight and low CTE characteristics. The RSI structural elements include the primary mirror supporting plate, secondary mirror supporting ring, and supporting frame. These elements are designed, manufactured, and verified using composite materials to meet specifications. The structure manufacturing process, detailed material properties, and CFRP structural element validation methods are introduced in this paper.

  13. ELASTO-PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COMPOSITE POWDERS WITH LAYERED CARBON AND CARBIDE-FORMING ELEMENT COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coating structure formation under magnetron spraying of titanium and carbon cathodes and combined cathodes, namely cobalt (EP 131 – nickel, tungsten – carbon have been investigated under conditions of carbide separate synthesis within the temperature range of 650–1200 °C. Usage of cobalt and nickel particles as matrix material leads to their rapid thermal expansion under heating during sintering process in the dilatometer. Subsequent plastic deformation of sintered samples provides obtaining a composite powder material that is a composite with framing structure of cobalt, titanium and tungsten carbides in the coatings.

  14. Energetic materials: crystallization, characterization and insensitive plastic bonded explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijden, Antoine E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Yves L.M.; Marino, Emanuela; Bouma, Richard H.B.; Scholtes, Gert J.H.G.; Duvalois, Willem [TNO Defence, Security and Safety, P. O. Box 45, 2280 AA Rijswijk (Netherlands); Roelands, Marc C.P.M. [TNO Science and Industry, P. O. Box 342, 7300 AH Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2008-02-15

    The product quality of energetic materials is predominantly determined by the crystallization process applied to produce these materials. It has been demonstrated in the past that the higher the product quality of the solid energetic ingredients, the less sensitive a plastic bonded explosive containing these energetic materials becomes. The application of submicron or nanometric energetic materials is generally considered to further decrease the sensitiveness of explosives. In order to assess the product quality of energetic materials, a range of analytical techniques is available. Recent attempts within the Reduced-sensitivity RDX Round Robin (R4) have provided the EM community a better insight into these analytical techniques and in some cases a correlation between product quality and shock initiation of plastic bonded explosives containing (RS-)RDX was identified, which would provide a possibility to discriminate between conventional and reduced sensitivity grades. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Methods for the continuous production of plastic scintillator materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bross, Alan; Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Mellott, Kerry

    1999-10-19

    Methods for producing plastic scintillating material employing either two major steps (tumble-mix) or a single major step (inline-coloring or inline-doping). Using the two step method, the polymer pellets are mixed with silicone oil, and the mixture is then tumble mixed with the dopants necessary to yield the proper response from the scintillator material. The mixture is then placed in a compounder and compounded in an inert gas atmosphere. The resultant scintillator material is then extruded and pelletized or formed. When only a single step is employed, the polymer pellets and dopants are metered into an inline-coloring extruding system. The mixture is then processed under a inert gas atmosphere, usually argon or nitrogen, to form plastic scintillator material in the form of either scintillator pellets, for subsequent processing, or as material in the direct formation of the final scintillator shape or form.

  16. Composite Materials: An Educational Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Tony E.; Snide, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the need to incorporate the concepts and applications of advanced composite materials into existing chemical engineering programs. Discussed are the justification for, and implementation of topics including transport phenomena, kinetics and reactor design, unit operations, and product and process design. (CW)

  17. Durability of aircraft composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dextern, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Confidence in the long term durability of advanced composites is developed through a series of flight service programs. Service experience is obtained by installing secondary and primary composite components on commercial and military transport aircraft and helicopters. Included are spoilers, rudders, elevators, ailerons, fairings and wing boxes on transport aircraft and doors, fairings, tail rotors, vertical fins, and horizontal stabilizers on helicopters. Materials included in the evaluation are boron/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy, graphite/epoxy and boron/aluminum. Inspection, maintenance, and repair results for the components in service are reported. The effects of long term exposure to laboratory, flight, and outdoor environmental conditions are reported for various composite materials. Included are effects of moisture absorption, ultraviolet radiation, and aircraft fuels and fluids.

  18. A plane stress softening plasticity model for orthotropic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourenço, P.B.; Borst, R. de; Rots, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    A plane stress model has been developed for quasi-brittle orthotropic materials. The theory of plasticity, which is adopted to describe the inelastic behaviour, utilizes modern algorithmic concepts, including an implicit Euler backward return mapping scheme, a local Newton-Raphson method and a

  19. Modern plastic solar cells : materials, mechanisms and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiechi, Ryan C.; Havenith, Remco W.A.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Koster, L. Jan Anton; Loi, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    We provide a short review of modern 'plastic' solar cells, a broad topic that spans materials science, physics, and chemistry. The aim of this review is to provide a primer for non-experts or researchers in related fields who are curious about this rapidly growing field of interdisciplinary

  20. Creep of fibrous composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans

    1985-01-01

    Models are presented for the creep behaviour of fibrous composite materials with aligned fibres. The models comprise both cases where the fibres remain rigid in a creeping matrix and cases where the fibres are creeping in a creeping matrix. The treatment allows for several contributions...... to the creep strength of composites. The advantage of combined analyses of several data sets is emphasized and illustrated for some experimental data. The analyses show that it is possible to derive creep equations for the (in situ) properties of the fibres. The experiments treated include model systems...... such as Ni + W-fibres, high temperature materials such as Ni + Ni3Al + Cr3C2-fibres, and medium temperature materials such as Al + SiC-fibres. For the first two systems reasonable consistency is found for the models and the experiments, while for the third system too many unquantified parameters exist...

  1. On the bending of structural materials with plastic anisotropic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachugin, D. V.; Pavilaynen, G. V.

    2018-05-01

    The study of a deformation features of metal alloys which are sensitive to tension or compression loading is an important technical challenge in the design and creation of a new shipbuilding and aircraft constructions. We use a mathematical model for the elastic-plastic bending of such material where SD(strength-different) parameter is taken into account. The problem is solved analytically and numerically. As an example of the material with the SD-effect the steel alloy is considered.

  2. The size, mass, and composition of plastic debris in the western North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morét-Ferguson, Skye; Law, Kara Lavender; Proskurowski, Giora; Murphy, Ellen K; Peacock, Emily E; Reddy, Christopher M

    2010-10-01

    This study reports the first inventory of physical properties of individual plastic debris in the North Atlantic. We analyzed 748 samples for size, mass, and material composition collected from surface net tows on 11 expeditions from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to the Caribbean Sea between 1991 and 2007. Particles were mostly fragments less than 10mm in size with nearly all lighter than 0.05 g. Material densities ranged from 0.808 to 1.24 g ml(-1), with about half between 0.97 and 1.04 g ml(-1), a range not typically found in virgin plastics. Elemental analysis suggests that samples in this density range are consistent with polypropylene and polyethylene whose densities have increased, likely due to biofouling. Pelagic densities varied considerably from that of beach plastic debris, suggesting that plastic particles are modified during their residence at sea. These analyses provide clues in understanding particle fate and potential debris sources, and address ecological implications of pelagic plastic debris. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Derivative criteria of plasticity anddurability of metal materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustov Yuriy Ivanovich

    Full Text Available Criteria of plasticity and durability derivative of standard indicators of plasticity (δ, ψ and durability (σ , σ are offered. Criteria К and К follow from the equation of relative indicators of durability and plasticity. The purpose of the researches is the establishment of interrelation of derivative criteria with the Page indicator. The values of derivative criteria were defined for steels 50X and 50XH after processing by cold, and also for steels 50G2 and 38HGN after sorbitizing. It was established that the sum of the offered derivative criteria of plasticity and durability С considered for the steels is almost equal to unit and corresponds to a square root of relative durability and plasticity criterion C . Both criteria testify to two-unity opposite processes of deformation and resistance to deformation. By means of the equations for S and С it is possible to calculate an indicator of uniform plastic deformation of σ and through it to estimate synergetic criteria - true tension and specific energy of deformation and destruction of metal materials. On the basis of the received results the expressions for assessing the uniform and concentrated components of plastic deformation are established. The preference of the dependence of uniform relative lengthening from a cubic root of criterion К , and also to work of the criteria of relative lengthening and relative durability is given. The advantage of the formulas consists in simplicity and efficiency of calculation, in ensuring necessary accuracy of calculation of the size δ for the subsequent calculation of structural and power (synergetic criteria of reliability of metals.

  4. Asymmetric Dielectric Elastomer Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a dielectric elastomer composite material comprising a plurality of elastomer-coated electrodes arranged in an assembly. Embodiments of the invention provide improved force output over prior DEs by producing thinner spacing between electrode surfaces. This is accomplished by coating electrodes directly with uncured elastomer in liquid form and then assembling a finished component (which may be termed an actuator) from coated electrode components.

  5. Effect of boron compounds on the thermal and combustion properties of wood-plastic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Altuntaş, Ertuğrul; Karaoğul, Eyyup; Alma, Mehmet Hakkı

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the thermal properties and fire resistancesof the wood plastic composites produced with waste lignocellulosic materialswere investigated. For this purpose, lignocellulosic waste, high densitypolyethylene, (HDPE) sodium borate (borax) and boric acid was used to producethe wood-plastic composites. A twin-screw extruder was used during theproduction of the wood plastic composites. The produced composite granule waspressed at 175 °C hot press. The effects of boric acid and borax ad...

  6. Method of determining elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramic materials using spherical indenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    The invention pertains a method of determining elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramics, intermetallics, metals, plastics and other hard, brittle materials which fracture prior to plastically deforming when loads are applied. Elastic and plastic mechanical properties of ceramic materials are determined using spherical indenters. The method is most useful for measuring and calculating the plastic and elastic deformation of hard, brittle materials with low values of elastic modulus to hardness.

  7. Diffraction analysis of materials under strong plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyzalla, A.

    2001-01-01

    The applicability of X-ray diffraction in analyses of the microstructure texture and intrinsic stresses of materials under strong plastic deformation is illustrated by examples and discussed. The experimental methods and findings are supplemented by numeric calculations. It is shown how the microstructure, texture and intrinsic stresses can thus be optimized already in the production process. Analyses of changes in materials during operation of a component provide information on loads and material response to loads which can then be used for optimization of the component, e.g. by constructional modifications or selective heat treatment [de

  8. Characterization of wood plastic composites made from landfill-derived plastic and sawdust: Volatile compounds and olfactometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Félix, Juliana S.; Domeño, Celia; Nerín, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: This work details the characterization of VOCs of WPC, produced from residual materials which would have landfills as current destination, and evaluates their odor profile. Highlights: ► More than 140 volatile compounds were identified in raw materials and WPC products. ► Markers were related to the thermal degradation, sawdust or coupling agents. ► WPC prototype showed a characteristic odor profile of burnt, sweet and wax-like. ► Aldehydes, carboxylic acids, ketones and phenols were odor descriptors of WPC. - Abstract: Application of wood plastic composites (WPCs) obtained from recycled materials initially intended for landfill is usually limited by their composition, mainly focused on release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which could affect quality or human safety. The study of the VOCs released by a material is a requirement for new composite materials. Characterization and quantification of VOCs of several WPC produced with low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate (PE/EVA) films and sawdust were carried out, in each stage of production, by solid phase microextraction in headspace mode (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). An odor profile was also obtained by HS-SPME and GC–MS coupled with olfactometry analysis. More than 140 compounds were observed in the raw materials and WPC samples. Some quantified compounds were considered WPC markers such as furfural, 2-methoxyphenol, N-methylphthalimide and 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol. Hexanoic acid, acetic acid, 2-methoxyphenol, acetylfuran, diacetyl, and aldehydes were the most important odorants. None of the VOCs were found to affect human safety for use of the WPC

  9. Characterization of wood plastic composites made from landfill-derived plastic and sawdust: Volatile compounds and olfactometric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Félix, Juliana S., E-mail: jfelix@unizar.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, I3A, EINA, University of Zaragoza (UNIZAR), Zaragoza 50018 (Spain); Domeño, Celia, E-mail: cdomeno@unizar.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, I3A, EINA, University of Zaragoza (UNIZAR), Zaragoza 50018 (Spain); Nerín, Cristina, E-mail: cnerin@unizar.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, I3A, EINA, University of Zaragoza (UNIZAR), Zaragoza 50018 (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Graphical abstract: This work details the characterization of VOCs of WPC, produced from residual materials which would have landfills as current destination, and evaluates their odor profile. Highlights: ► More than 140 volatile compounds were identified in raw materials and WPC products. ► Markers were related to the thermal degradation, sawdust or coupling agents. ► WPC prototype showed a characteristic odor profile of burnt, sweet and wax-like. ► Aldehydes, carboxylic acids, ketones and phenols were odor descriptors of WPC. - Abstract: Application of wood plastic composites (WPCs) obtained from recycled materials initially intended for landfill is usually limited by their composition, mainly focused on release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which could affect quality or human safety. The study of the VOCs released by a material is a requirement for new composite materials. Characterization and quantification of VOCs of several WPC produced with low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate (PE/EVA) films and sawdust were carried out, in each stage of production, by solid phase microextraction in headspace mode (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). An odor profile was also obtained by HS-SPME and GC–MS coupled with olfactometry analysis. More than 140 compounds were observed in the raw materials and WPC samples. Some quantified compounds were considered WPC markers such as furfural, 2-methoxyphenol, N-methylphthalimide and 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol. Hexanoic acid, acetic acid, 2-methoxyphenol, acetylfuran, diacetyl, and aldehydes were the most important odorants. None of the VOCs were found to affect human safety for use of the WPC.

  10. Plasticity models of material variability based on uncertainty quantification techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Reese E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Rizzi, Francesco [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Boyce, Brad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Templeton, Jeremy Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Ostien, Jakob [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The advent of fabrication techniques like additive manufacturing has focused attention on the considerable variability of material response due to defects and other micro-structural aspects. This variability motivates the development of an enhanced design methodology that incorporates inherent material variability to provide robust predictions of performance. In this work, we develop plasticity models capable of representing the distribution of mechanical responses observed in experiments using traditional plasticity models of the mean response and recently developed uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques. Lastly, we demonstrate that the new method provides predictive realizations that are superior to more traditional ones, and how these UQ techniques can be used in model selection and assessing the quality of calibrated physical parameters.

  11. composite materials under static loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamrat Mostefa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work constitutes a contribution to the analysis of the behavior of beams repaired by composite materials. To analyze the overall behavior and failure modes of the beams, an experimental study of nine reinforced concrete beams, pre-cracked and then repaired by composite materials was conducted. Six beams were pre-cracked and repaired in the tensioned part (bending repair and in the other two beams on the tensioned and lateral parts with strips in the shape of U (shear repair. A comparative study was made between the ultimate moments measured experimentally and those calculated by the theoretical models. Compared to the control beam, the resistance gain for the beams repaired in bending is 50% to 90%, while that of beams repaired in shear is from 120% to177 %. The beams repaired in shear exhibit a ductile rupture in bending. However, the beams repaired in bending were failed by the lift-off of composite or by failure of concrete cover layer (except for beams repaired by fiber glass. BAEL99, EC2-04 and ACI318-08 models give the best prediction of the ultimate moments with a mean value of 1.16 for the ratio of MExp./Mtheor. and a mean standard deviation of 0.33.

  12. Composition variability and equivalence of Shonka TE plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spokas, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    A number of conducting plastic mixtures had been developed by Francis R. Shonka, and collaborators, in the Physical Sciences Laboratory of Illinois Benedictine College (formerly St. Procopius College). Several of these mixtures have been used widely in radiation research. In particular, a tissue-equivalent (muscle) formulation designated A-150 has been used extensively in the dosimetry, research and measurements of gamma, neutron and pion beams. Certain confusion has arisen concerning the composition of A-150. The definition of A-150 is reviewed and what is known of the composition is summarized. The equivalence of A-150 and ICRU ''muscle'' with respect to photons is discussed as a function of photon energy using the latest data on extra-nuclear photon cross sections. (U.S.)

  13. Nonlinear analysis of AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite laminate using a one parameter plasticity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1990-01-01

    A one-parameter plasticity model was shown to adequately describe the orthotropic plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK (APC-2) unidirectional thermoplastic composite. This model was verified further for unidirectional and laminated composite panels with and without a hole. The nonlinear stress-strain relations were measured and compared with those predicted by the finite element analysis using the one-parameter elastic-plastic constitutive model. The results show that the one-parameter orthotropic plasticity model is suitable for the analysis of elastic-plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK composite laminates.

  14. Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for separation of cesium and strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.; Mason, C.F.V.; Rais, J.

    1997-01-01

    Preparation and use is described for polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for extraction of cesium and strontium. The use of polymeric materials containing plasticizers which are solvents for hydrophobic anions such as derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide or tetraphenylborate which are capable of extracting cesium and strontium ions from aqueous solutions in contact with the polymeric materials, is described. The polymeric material may also include a synergistic agent for a given ion like polyethylene glycol or a crown ether, for removal of radioactive isotopes of cesium and strontium from solutions of diverse composition and, in particular, for solutions containing large excess of sodium nitrate

  15. A new macroscopically anisotropic pressure dependent yield function for metal matrix composite based on strain gradient plasticity for the microstructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza; Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2013-01-01

    Metal matrix composites with long aligned elastic fibers are studied using an energetic rate independent strain gradient plasticity theory with an isotropic pressure independent yield function at the microscale. The material response is homogenized to obtain a conventional macroscopic model...... is investigated numerically using a unit cell model with periodic boundary conditions containing a single fiber deformed under generalized plane strain conditions. The homogenized response can be modeled by conventional plasticity with an anisotropic yield surface and a free energy depending on plastic strain...

  16. Microstructure and properties of ceramics and composites joined by plastic deformation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretta, K. C.; Singh, D.; Chen, N.; Gutierrez-Mora, F.; Lorenzo-Martin, M. de la, Cinta; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Routbort, J. L.; Energy Systems; Univ. of Seville

    2008-12-01

    A review is presented of the design of suitable materials systems for joining by high-temperature plastic deformation, details of the joining techniques, microstructures and properties of the resulting composite bodies, and prospects and limitation for this type of joining technology. Joining parameters and resulting forms are discussed for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/mullite particulate composites, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} particulate/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulate and whisker-reinforced composites, hydroxyapatite bioceramics, La{sub 0.85}Sr{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} electronic ceramics, MgF{sub 2} optical ceramics, and Ni{sub 3}Al intermetallics. Results are contrasted with those obtained by other methods of joining brittle, high-temperature materials, with special focus on durability and mechanical properties.

  17. Microstructure and properties of ceramics and composites joined by plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretta, K.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4838 (United States)], E-mail: ken.goretta@aoard.af.mil; Singh, D.; Chen Nan [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4838 (United States); Gutierrez-Mora, F.; Cinta Lorenzo-Martin, M. de la [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4838 (United States); University of Seville, Seville 41080 (Spain); Dominguez-Rodriguez, A. [University of Seville, Seville 41080 (Spain); Routbort, J.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4838 (United States)

    2008-12-20

    A review is presented of the design of suitable materials systems for joining by high-temperature plastic deformation, details of the joining techniques, microstructures and properties of the resulting composite bodies, and prospects and limitation for this type of joining technology. Joining parameters and resulting forms are discussed for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/mullite particulate composites, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} particulate/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulate and whisker-reinforced composites, hydroxyapatite bioceramics, La{sub 0.85}Sr{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} electronic ceramics, MgF{sub 2} optical ceramics, and Ni{sub 3}Al intermetallics. Results are contrasted with those obtained by other methods of joining brittle, high-temperature materials, with special focus on durability and mechanical properties.

  18. Sustainable fibre materials for replacing plastics in 3D-forming applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsen, Eirik Ulsaker

    2017-01-01

    Plastic is a very broad family of materials that may provide a wide array of mechanical properties depending on the plastic or production method in question. This is why many industries have chosen plastic as their material of choice for the production of anything from plastic bags to underground piping. There is, however, a prominent issue concerning the heavy environmental impact of plastic. This is both due to the processing of crude oil and lack of biodegradability which in turn impact na...

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on plastic food packaging materials: a review. 1. Chemical and physical changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchalla, R.; Schuttler, C.; Bögl, K.W.

    1993-01-01

    Irradiation of prepackaged food causes chemical and physical changes in plastic packaging materials. The effects of ionizing radiation on these materials have been studied for almost 40 years; the respective literature is reviewed to provide the basis for a safety evaluation of plastics for use in food irradiation. Permeability of plastic films is generally not affected; deterioration of mechanical properties, that may occur with certain polymers, can usually be controlled with adequate stabilizers; and changes in infrared and UV/VIS spectra are slight at food irradiation doses. Gaseous radiolysis products include hydrogen, methane, CO 2 , CO, hydrocarbons, and for chlorine-containing polymers, hydrogen chloride. A range of volatile products, mainly hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids, has been characterized for low density polyethylene and polypropylene, other important materials, e.g., polystyrene and poly(vinyl chloride), are less well-investigated. Comparatively little is known on the effect of irradiation on multilayer structures. Radiation-induced changes are shown to depend on the chemical structure of the polymer, on the composition (additives) and processing history of the plastic, and on the irradiation conditions

  20. Modern filaments for composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivelli-Viskonti, I.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of modern state and ways to improve properties of different filaments for the forecast of the filament application in composite materials has been conducted. In the near future as before the greatest attention will be paid to fibre glass, as this material is widely used in the reinforcing of organic matrices. Carbon and kevlar filaments are the most prospective ones. For the service at medium, high or superhigh temperatures selection of matrix material is more significant than selection of filament. Organic matrices can not be used at temperatures > 250 deg C: this is already the range of metal matrix application. Though at temperatures above room one many filaments can be used, boron filaments and metal wire are the only reinforcing materials, inspite of the fact that carbon filaments are successfully used for metal matrix reinforcing. At very high temperatures only carbon filaments or silicon carbide ones can be used, but their cost is very high and besides economical problems there are many difficulties of technical character

  1. Mesoscopic approach to modeling elastic-plastic polycrystalline material behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, M.; Cizelj, L.

    2001-01-01

    Extreme loadings during severe accident conditions might cause failure or rupture of the pressure boundary of a reactor coolant system. Reliable estimation of the extreme deformations can be crucial to determine the consequences of such an accident. One of important drawbacks of classical continuum mechanics is idealization of inhomogenous microstructure of materials. This paper discusses the mesoscopic approach to modeling the elastic-plastic behavior of a polycrystalline material. The main idea is to divide the continuum (e.g., polycrystalline aggregate) into a set of sub-continua (grains). The overall properties of the polycrystalline aggregate are therefore determined by the number of grains in the aggregate and properties of randomly shaped and oriented grains. The random grain structure is modeled with Voronoi tessellation and random orientations of crystal lattices are assumed. The elastic behavior of monocrystal grains is assumed to be anisotropic. Crystal plasticity is used to describe plastic response of monocrystal grains. Finite element method is used to obtain numerical solutions of strain and stress fields. The analysis is limited to two-dimensional models.(author)

  2. Reinforced Plastic Composites Production: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    National emissions standards for hazardous air pollutants for reinforced plastic composites production facilities. Regulates production and ancillary processes used to manufacture products with thermoset resins and gel coats.

  3. Laminated materials with plastic interfaces: modeling and calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandino Aquino de los Ríos, Gilberto; Castañeda Balderas, Rubén; Diaz Diaz, Alberto; Duong, Van Anh; Chataigner, Sylvain; Caron, Jean-François; Ehrlacher, Alain; Foret, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a model of laminated plates called M4-5N and validated in a previous paper is modified in order to take into account interlaminar plasticity by means of displacement discontinuities at the interfaces. These discontinuities are calculated by adapting a 3D plasticity model. In order to compute the model, a Newton–Raphson-like method is employed. In this method, two sub-problems are considered: one is linear and the other is non-linear. In the linear problem the non-linear equations of the model are linearized and the calculations are performed by making use of a finite element software. By iterating the resolution of each sub-problem, one obtains after convergence the solution of the global problem. The model is then applied to the problem of a double lap, adhesively bonded joint subjected to a tensile load. The adhesive layer is modeled by an elastic–plastic interface. The results of the M4-5N model are compared with those of a commercial finite element software. A good agreement between the two computation techniques is obtained and validates the non-linear calculations proposed in this paper. Finally, the numerical tool and a delamination criterion are applied to predict delamination onset in composite laminates

  4. Injury to crops by gas as produced from plastic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inden, T; Tachibana, S

    1971-01-01

    The effects of gas formations of phthalate and epoxy plasticizers on crops were studied at room temperature and 100 to 200 C. The materials were tested either alone Or as products including polyvinyl chloride and a stabilizer. At room temperature, dioctylphthalate (DOP) did not injure the cucumber leaves, whereas diisobutyl phthalate (DIBF) injured 74.1%, and dibutyl phthalate injured 36.5% of the surface of the leaves. Among many stabilizers tested, triphenyl phosphite injured 80% of the surface area of cucumber leaves. At 100 C to 200 C for 48 hours DIBP and CLP injured the Chinese cabbage leaves most, about 80% of the surface area. The following chemicals for the manufacturing of the plasticizers were also found to injure Chinese cabbage leaves, isobutanol 18.3%, 2-ethyl-hexanol 98.3%, isodecanol 98.5%, phthalic acid 40.0, and adipic acid 6.6%.

  5. Manufacturability of Wood Plastic Composite Sheets on the Basis of the Post-Processing Cooling Curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Matthews

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Extruded wood-plastic composites (WPCs are increasingly regarded as promising materials for future manufacturing industries. It is necessary to select and tune the post-processing methods to be able to utilize these materials fully. In this development, temperature-related material properties and the cooling rate are important indicators. This paper presents the results of natural cooling in a factory environment fit into a cooling curve function with temperature zones for forming, cutting, and packaging overlaid using a WPC material. This information is then used in the evaluation of manufacturability and productivity in terms of cost effectiveness and technical quality by comparing the curve to actual production time data derived from a prototype post-process forming line. Based on this information, speed limits for extrusion are presented. This paper also briefly analyzes techniques for controlling material cooling to counter the heat loss before post-processing.

  6. Mathematical model predicts the elastic behavior of composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoroastro de Miranda Boari

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have found that the non-uniform distribution of reinforcing elements in a composite material can markedly influence its characteristics of elastic and plastic deformation and that a composite's overall response is influenced by the physical and geometrical properties of its reinforcing phases. The finite element method, Eshelby's method and dislocation mechanisms are usually employed in formulating a composite's constitutive response. This paper discusses a composite material containing SiC particles in an aluminum matrix. The purpose of this study was to find the correlation between a composite material's particle distribution and its resistance, and to come up with a mathematical model to predict the material's elastic behavior. The proposed formulation was applied to establish the thermal stress field in the aluminum-SiC composite resulting from its fabrication process, whereby the mixture is prepared at 600 °C and the composite material is used at room temperature. The analytical results, which are presented as stress probabilities, were obtained from the mathematical model proposed herein. These results were compared with the numerical ones obtained by the FEM method. A comparison of the results of the two methods, analytical and numerical, reveals very similar average thermal stress values. It is also shown that Maxwell-Boltzmann's distribution law can be applied to identify the correlation between the material's particle distribution and its resistance, using Eshelby's thermal stresses.

  7. Characterization of terahertz waves on foreign materials of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Sun-Kyu; Chiou, Chien-Ping; Jung, Jong-An

    2018-04-01

    Carbon-fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are widely utilized due to their comparatively high performance in engineering structures. It is well understood that a nondestructive technique would be very beneficial. A new terahertz radiation has been recognized for its importance in technological applications. Recently, T-ray (terahertz ray) advances in technology and instrumentation have provided a probing field on the electromagnetic spectrum. In carbon composites, the penetration characterization of T-ray waves was fundamentally investigated in order to measure the painting thickness. Also, another study dealt with THz scan images of honeycomb sandwich composite panels using a refractive index (n), an absorption coefficient (α), the electrical conductivity of glass fiber embedded epoxy matrix composites, and carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) skin. For experiments, a method of detecting FRP composites with impact damage is presented, which utilizes aluminum wires intertwined with woven carbon fibers as they are inserted into the surface of the CFRP honeycomb sandwich panels. Intensive characterization of T-ray for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of carbon composite reinforced plastics (CFRP) composites is discussed in relation to the E-field influence with CFRP composite laminates.

  8. Biological degradation of wood-plastic composites (WPC) and strategies for improving the resistance of WPC against biological decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anke Schirp; Rebecca E. Ibach; David E. Pendleton; Michael P. Wolcott

    2008-01-01

    Much of the research on wood-plastic composites (WPC) has focused on formulation development and processing while high biological durability of the material was assumed. The gap between assumption and knowledge in biodeterioration of WPC needs to be reduced. Although some information on the short-term resistance of WPC against biological degradation is available, long-...

  9. Constancy in composition of polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.J.; Nath, R.

    1979-01-01

    Variations in the atomic compostion, and mass and electron densities of polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate (PMM) plastics were assessed from experimentally determined mass attenuation coefficients for 125 I and 137 Cs gamma rays. The means and standard deviations in the mass densities of 16 samples of PMM and 10 samples of polystyrene were found to be 1.174 +- 1.4% and 1.042 +- 0.6% g/cm 3 , respectively. Based upon transmission measurements on various solutions of ethyl alcohol in water, the standard deviations in the effective atomic numbers of PMM and polystyrene were determined to be 0.77% and 1.3%, respectively. Based upon experimentally determined mass attenuation coefficients for 137 Cs, the standard deviations in electron density for PMM and polystyrene were 0.5% and 1.2%, respectively. Similar measurements on tap water and two grades of distilled water failed to detect any differences in atomic composition

  10. Using Virtual Testing for Characterization of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph

    Composite materials are finally providing uses hitherto reserved for metals in structural systems applications -- airframes and engine containment systems, wraps for repair and rehabilitation, and ballistic/blast mitigation systems. They have high strength-to-weight ratios, are durable and resistant to environmental effects, have high impact strength, and can be manufactured in a variety of shapes. Generalized constitutive models are being developed to accurately model composite systems so they can be used in implicit and explicit finite element analysis. These models require extensive characterization of the composite material as input. The particular constitutive model of interest for this research is a three-dimensional orthotropic elasto-plastic composite material model that requires a total of 12 experimental stress-strain curves, yield stresses, and Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio in the material directions as input. Sometimes it is not possible to carry out reliable experimental tests needed to characterize the composite material. One solution is using virtual testing to fill the gaps in available experimental data. A Virtual Testing Software System (VTSS) has been developed to address the need for a less restrictive method to characterize a three-dimensional orthotropic composite material. The system takes in the material properties of the constituents and completes all 12 of the necessary characterization tests using finite element (FE) models. Verification and validation test cases demonstrate the capabilities of the VTSS.

  11. Properties of foam and composite materials made o starch and cellulose fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Composite materials were made of starch and cellulose fibers. Pre-gelatinized starch was effective in dispersing pulp fiber in a starch matrix to form a viscous starch/fiber dough. The starch/fiber dough was a useful feedstock for various composite foam and plastic materials. Viscous blends of star...

  12. Composites materials: the technology of future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.N.; Memon, I.R.; Ahmad, F.; Zafar, N.

    2001-01-01

    Composite materials have a long history of usage. Their precise beginnings are not known; however all recorded history contains references to some form of composite material. e.g. straw was used by man to strengthen mud bricks thousands of years ago. This article presents the use of advanced composites materials in aircraft and space industry. Its brief history, use in military and civil aviation, use in space program, future usage, advantages in terms of cost, weight and strength. Use of composites in unmanned aerial vehicles and problems associated with usage of composites materials are also discussed. (author)

  13. Elastomer modified polypropylene–polyethylene blends as matrices for wood flour–plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Clemons

    2010-01-01

    Blends of polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) could potentially be used as matrices for wood–plastic composites (WPCs). The mechanical performance and morphology of both the unfilled blends and wood-filled composites with various elastomers and coupling agents were investigated. Blending of the plastics resulted in either small domains of the minor phase in a...

  14. Composite plastic coatings and face rolled materials technology, energy- and environment-saving, based on irradiation of liquid monomers by broad and high-current electron beams in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisburd, David

    1994-05-01

    The technology is based on the well-known process of hardening some organic liquid monomers and oligomers (resins and lacquers) under the action of ionizing radiation, i.e. electron, ion, ultra-violet, laser, and X-ray beams. The main mechanism of hardening is 3D polymerization of initial monomers induced by irradiation. First of all 1D polymer chains are created. And the next stage is cross-linking of them. Numerical attempts to apply such a process for plastic materials production met some earnest difficulties. Our decision to perform the whole processing in vacuum changed radically the main properties of radiation induced hardening technology. The inhibition of polymerization by reactive oxygen became unessential. The output window foil of accelerator became unnecessary. Application of super broad beams such as 1 sq.m became possible. The entire efficiency of grid electricity was increased to 60% and it was not the limit. One of the main advantages is that the processing carried out in vacuum may satisfy the highest ecological standards. The technology developed is contamination free and environment-saving.

  15. Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses the roles of composite laminates and aggregates in cryogenic technology. Filamentary-reinforced composites are emphasized because they are the most widely used composite materials. Topics considered include composite systems and terminology, design and fabrication, composite failure, high-pressure reinforced plastic laminates, low-pressure reinforced plastics, reinforced metals, selectively reinforced structures, the effect of cryogenic temperatures, woven-fabric and random-mat composites, uniaxial fiber-reinforced composites, composite joints in cryogenic structures, joining techniques at room temperature, radiation effects, testing laminates at cryogenic temperatures, static and cyclic tensile testing, static and cyclic compression testing, interlaminar shear testing, secondary property tests, and concrete aggregates. It is suggested that cryogenic composite technology would benefit from the development of a fracture mechanics model for predicting the fitness-for-purpose of polymer-matrix composite structures

  16. Composite material and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Samuels, William D.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2004-04-20

    The composite material and methods of making the present invention rely upon a fully dense monolayer of molecules attached to an oxygenated surface at one end, and an organic terminal group at the other end, which is in turn bonded to a polymer. Thus, the composite material is a second material chemically bonded to a polymer with fully dense monolayer there between.

  17. ANALYSIS OF BIODEGRABILITY OF DEGRADABLE/BIODEGRADABLE PLASTIC MATERIAL IN CONTROLLED COMPOSTING ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Adamcová

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have obtained eight degradable/biodegradable materials based on starch (certified compostable, sample 4–7, HDPE mixed with totally degradable plastic additive (TDPA, sample 2 and polyethylene with the addition of pro-oxidant additive (d2w, sample 1. Composition of sample 3 has not been reported. The materials have been tested as to the rate and character of their degradability/biodegradability in controlled composting conditions. Experiment explored also the effect of degradation/biodegradation of plastic bags on compost quality. The material of the original samples was subjected to assessment using the Nicolet 6700 FT-IR spectrometer, the outcome thereof was obtaining infrared spectra of the samples. For further specification the original samples were tested using the thermogravimetrical analysis. The texture of the foils at different stages of degradation is presented in the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM photographs. Plastic bags certified as compostable have degraded in laboratory conditions and their degradation had no impact on the quality and features of compost. Selected samples (4, 6 showed significant erosion on surface when subjected to the SEM analysis. Samples labeled (by their producers as 100% degradable (samples 1, 2, 3 did not show any visual signs of degradation and the process of degradation had no impact on the quality and features of compost. Only one of the samples (sample 1 showed certain erosion of surface when submitted for the SEM analysis.

  18. Morphology and microstructure of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Srinivansan, K.

    1991-01-01

    Lightweight continuous carbon fiber based polymeric composites are currently enjoying increasing acceptance as structural materials capable of replacing metals and alloys in load bearing applications. As with most new materials, these composites are undergoing trials with several competing processing techniques aimed at cost effectively producing void free consolidations with good mechanical properties. As metallic materials have been in use for several centuries, a considerable database exists on their morphology - microstructure; and the interrelationships between structure and properties have been well documented. Numerous studies on composites have established the crucial relationship between microstructure - morphology and properties. The various microstructural and morphological features of composite materials, particularly those accompanying different processing routes, are documented.

  19. A composite material based on recycled tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malers, L.; Plesuma, R.; Locmele, L.

    2009-01-01

    The present study is devoted to the elaboration and investigation of a composite material based on mechanically grinded recycled tires and a polymer binder. The correlation between the content of the binder, some technological parameters, and material properties of the composite was clarified. The apparent density, the compressive stress at a 10% strain, the compressive elastic modulus in static and cyclic loadings, and the insulating properties (acoustic and thermal) were the parameters of special interest of the present investigation. It is found that a purposeful variation of material composition and some technological parameters leads to multifunctional composite materials with different and predictable mechanical and insulation properties.

  20. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  1. Water equivalence of some plastic-water phantom materials for clinical proton beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sulaiti, L.; Shipley, D.; Thomas, R.; Owen, P.; Kacperek, A.; Regan, P.H.; Palmans, H.

    2012-01-01

    Plastic-water phantom materials are not exactly water equivalent since they have a different elemental composition and different interaction cross sections for protons than water. Several studies of the water equivalence of plastic-water phantom materials have been reported for photon and electron beams, but none for clinical proton beams. In proton beams, the difference between non-elastic nuclear interactions in plastic-water phantom materials compared to those in water should be considered. In this work, the water equivalence of Plastic Water ® (PW) 1 , Plastic Water ® Diagnostic Therapy (PWDT) 1 and solid water (WT1) 2 phantoms was studied for clinical proton energies of 60 MeV and 200 MeV. This was done by evaluating the fluence correction factor at equivalent depths; first with respect to water and then with respect to graphite by experiment and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using FLUKA. MC simulations showed that the fluence correction with respect to water was less than 0.5% up to the entire penetration depth of the protons at 60 MeV and less than 1% at 200 MeV up to 20 cm depth for PWDT, PW and WT1. With respect to graphite the fluence correction was about 0.5% for 60 MeV and about 4% for 200 MeV. The experimental results for modulated and un-modulated 60 MeV proton beams showed good agreement with the MC simulated fluence correction factors with respect to graphite deviating less than 1% from unity for the three plastic-water phantoms. - Highlights: ► We study plastic-water in clinical proton beams by experiment and Monte Carlo. ► We obtain fluence correction factors for water and graphite. ► The correction factor for water was close to 1 at 60 MeV and <0.990 at 200 MeV. ► The correction factor for graphite was ∼0.5% at 60 MeV and up to 4% at 200 MeV.

  2. Thermal Properties of Wood-Plastic Composites Prepared from Hemicellulose-extracted Wood Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Enayati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemicellulose of Southern Yellow Pine wood spices was extracted by pressurized hot water at three different temperatures: 140°C, 155°C and 170°C. Compounding with PP (polypropylene was performed by extrusion after preparing wood flour and sieving to determine its mesh size. The ratio of wood to polymer was 50:50 based on oven-dry weight of wood flour. All extraction treatments and control samples were compounded under two sets of conditions, without and with 2% MAPP as coupling agent. Injection molding was used to make tensile test samples (dogbone from the pellets made by extrusion. Thermal properties of wood-plastic composites were studied by TGA and DSC while the thermal stability of pretreated wood flours, PP and MAPP were studied by TGA as well. The greater weight loss of wood materials was an indication that higher treatment temperature increases the extractability of hemicellulose. The removal of hemicellulose by extraction improves thermal stability of wood flour, especially for extraction at 170°C. Wood-plastic composites made from extracted fibers at 170°C showed the highest thermal stability. Coupling agent did not have a significant effect on thermal stability but it improved the degree of crystallinity of the composites.Surface roughness of wood fiber increased after treatment. Extraction of hemicellulose increased the degree of crystallinity but it was not significant except for samples from treated wood flour at 170°C and with MAPP.

  3. Statistical reliability analyses of two wood plastic composite extrusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crookston, Kevin A.; Mark Young, Timothy; Harper, David; Guess, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Estimates of the reliability of wood plastic composites (WPC) are explored for two industrial extrusion lines. The goal of the paper is to use parametric and non-parametric analyses to examine potential differences in the WPC metrics of reliability for the two extrusion lines that may be helpful for use by the practitioner. A parametric analysis of the extrusion lines reveals some similarities and disparities in the best models; however, a non-parametric analysis reveals unique and insightful differences between Kaplan-Meier survival curves for the modulus of elasticity (MOE) and modulus of rupture (MOR) of the WPC industrial data. The distinctive non-parametric comparisons indicate the source of the differences in strength between the 10.2% and 48.0% fractiles [3,183-3,517 MPa] for MOE and for MOR between the 2.0% and 95.1% fractiles [18.9-25.7 MPa]. Distribution fitting as related to selection of the proper statistical methods is discussed with relevance to estimating the reliability of WPC. The ability to detect statistical differences in the product reliability of WPC between extrusion processes may benefit WPC producers in improving product reliability and safety of this widely used house-decking product. The approach can be applied to many other safety and complex system lifetime comparisons.

  4. Photomobile polymer materials towards eight driven plastic motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomi Ikeda

    2007-01-01

    We present the first report of working photomechanical devices, and simple plastic motors, driven only by light. The size scale of the energy transduction systems here is mm for demonstration, but is not principle material-limited, so numerous applications on the nano-scale are possible where efficient power supply to mechanical systems is battery-free and non-contact. The photomobile polymers function with a minimum of moving parts which minimizes the friction and surface contact difficulties on the small scale, and one can further envisage applications as direct solar-to-mechanical energy conversion and storage systems, and use in devices requiring through-space power transmission such as microfluidic device control, bio-interfaces, or other remote power supply. (Author)

  5. Verification and Validation of a Three-Dimensional Generalized Composite Material Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffarth, Canio; Harrington, Joseph; Rajan, Subramaniam D.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; DuBois, Paul; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    A general purpose orthotropic elasto-plastic computational constitutive material model has been developed to improve predictions of the response of composites subjected to high velocity impact. The three-dimensional orthotropic elasto-plastic composite material model is being implemented initially for solid elements in LS-DYNA as MAT213. In order to accurately represent the response of a composite, experimental stress-strain curves are utilized as input, allowing for a more general material model that can be used on a variety of composite applications. The theoretical details are discussed in a companion paper. This paper documents the implementation, verification and qualitative validation of the material model using the T800-F3900 fiber/resin composite material

  6. Study of Wood Plastic Composites elastic behaviour using full field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciaa A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the mechanical properties and microstructure of HDPE/wood fibre composites are investigated. The four-point bending and tensile behaviour of Wood Plastic Composite (WPC with or without additive are studied by using full-field strain measurements by 3-D Digital Image Correlation (3-D DIC. A non-linear behaviour is shown. The modulus of elasticity (MOE is calculated as the tangent at zero strain of a Maxwell-Bingham model fitted onto experimental data. Four-point bending tests are analyzed thanks to the spatial standard deviation of the longitudinal strain field to determine the degree of heterogeneity. Cyclic tensile tests have been performed in order to analyze the damage of the material. Moreover, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM is used to characterize the morphology of the wood fibre/HDPE matrix interface for specimens with maleic anhydride modified polyethylene additive (MAPE.

  7. Study of Wood Plastic Composites elastic behaviour using full field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mbarek, T.; Robert, L.; Hugot, F.; Orteu, J. J.; Sammouda, H.; Graciaa, A.; Charrier, B.

    2010-06-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties and microstructure of HDPE/wood fibre composites are investigated. The four-point bending and tensile behaviour of Wood Plastic Composite (WPC) with or without additive are studied by using full-field strain measurements by 3-D Digital Image Correlation (3-D DIC). A non-linear behaviour is shown. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) is calculated as the tangent at zero strain of a Maxwell-Bingham model fitted onto experimental data. Four-point bending tests are analyzed thanks to the spatial standard deviation of the longitudinal strain field to determine the degree of heterogeneity. Cyclic tensile tests have been performed in order to analyze the damage of the material. Moreover, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is used to characterize the morphology of the wood fibre/HDPE matrix interface for specimens with maleic anhydride modified polyethylene additive (MAPE).

  8. Assessment of plastic packaging waste : material origin, methods, properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijsterburg, B.J.; Goossens, J.G.P.

    2014-01-01

    The global plastics production has increased annually and a substantial part is used for packaging (in Europe 39%). Most plastic packages are discarded after a relatively short service life and the resulting plastic packaging waste is subsequently landfilled, incinerated or recycled. Laws of several

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in §§ 63.5800 and...

  10. Plastic phase change material and articles made therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhari, Ramin

    2016-04-19

    The present invention generally relates to a method for manufacturing phase change material (PCM) pellets. The method includes providing a melt composition, including paraffin and a polymer. The paraffin has a melt point of between about 10.degree. C. and about 50.degree. C., and more preferably between about 18.degree. C. and about 28.degree. C. In one embodiment, the melt composition includes various additives, such as a flame retardant. The method further includes forming the melt composition into PCM pellets. The method further may include the step of cooling the melt to increase the melt viscosity before pelletizing. Further, PCM compounds are provided having an organic PCM and a polymer. Methods are provided to convert the PCM compounds into various form-stable PCMs. A method of coating the PCMs is included to provide PCMs with substantially no paraffin seepage and with ignition resistance properties.

  11. Microhardness of bulk-fill composite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Kelić, Katarina; Matić, Sanja; Marović, Danijela; Klarić, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine microhardness of high- and low-viscosity bulk-fill composite resins and compare it with conventional composite materials. Four materials of high-viscosity were tested, including three bulk-fills: QuiXfi l (QF), x-tra fil (XTF) and Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TEBCF), while nanohybrid composite GrandioSO (GSO) served as control. The other four were low-viscosity composites, three bulk-fill materials: Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR), Venus Bulk Fill (VBF) and ...

  12. Excised Abdominoplasty Material as a Systematic Plastic Surgical Training Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Erol Demirseren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving a level of technical skill and confidence in surgical operations is the main goal of plastic surgical training. Operating rooms were accepted as the practical teaching venues of the traditional apprenticeship model. However, increased patient population, time, and ethical and legal considerations made preoperation room practical work a must for plastic surgical training. There are several plastic surgical teaching models and simulators which are very useful in preoperation room practical training and the evaluation of plastic surgery residents. The full thickness skin with its vascular network excised in abdominoplasty procedures is an easily obtainable real human tissue which could be used as a training model in plastic surgery.

  13. Wood-based composite materials : panel products, glued-laminated timber, structural composite lumber, and wood-nonwood composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M. Stark; Zhiyong Cai; Charles Carll

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the general types and composition of wood-based composite products and the materials and processes used to manufacture them. It describes conventional wood-based composite panels and structural composite materials intended for general construction, interior use, or both. This chapter also describes wood–nonwood composites. Mechanical...

  14. ASSESSMENT OF PLASTIC FLOWS AND STOCKS IN SERBIA USING MATERIAL FLOW ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vujić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Material flow analysis (MFA was used to assess the amounts of plastic materials flows and stocks that are annually produced, consumed, imported, exported, collected, recycled, and disposed in the landfills in Serbia. The analysis revealed that approximatelly 269,000 tons of plastic materials are directly disposed in uncontrolled landfills in Serbia without any preatretment, and that siginificant amounts of these materials have already accumulated in the landfills. The substantial amounts of landfilled plastics represent not only a loss of valuable recourses, but also pose a seriuos treath to the environment and human health, and if the trend of direct plastic landfilling is continued, Serbia will face with grave consecequnces.

  15. AN EXACT ELASTO-PLASTIC SOLUTION OF METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITE CANTILEVER BEAM LOADED BY A SINGLE FORCE AT ITS FREE END

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur SAYMAN

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an elastic-plastic stress analysis is carried out in a metal matrix composite cantilever beam loaded by a single force at its free end. A composite consisting of stainless-steel reinforced aluminium was produced for this work. The orientation angle of the fibers is chosen as 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90°. The material is assumed to be perfectly plastic in the elasto-plastic solution. An analytical solution is performed for satisfying both the governing differential equation in the plane stress case and boundary conditions for small plastic deformations. The solution is carried out under the assumption of the Bernoulli-Navier hypotheses. The composite material is assumed as hardening linearly. The Tsai-Hill theory is used as a yield criterion.

  16. Friction material composites copper-metal-free material design perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2015-01-01

    This book examines material composites used in connection with brake friction, their design and safety. To aid in understanding, the essentials of friction are explained. This second edition was extended to include friction material composites without copper, as they offer an environmentally friendlier option. The second edition is intended to support beginners by offering insights into the essentials of friction material composites, helping them to develop a broader understanding of brake friction materials. Friction materials find wide-ranging applications in household and industrial appliances, brake pads for automotive applications, rail brake friction pads and composition brake blocks. This second edition is an introductory volume to a set of related books, and is based on the author’s experience and expertise with various material manufacturers, brake manufacturers, vehicle manufacturers, researchers and testing labs around the world with which the author has been associated for the past 28 years.

  17. The industrial metabolism of plastics : analysis of material flows, energy consumption and CO2 emissions in the lifecycle of plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, Ludovicus Antonius Josephus

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with the question: Which are promising options for decreasing material consumption, energy consumption and CO2 emissions in the lifecycle of plastics? The research described in this thesis mainly focuses on measures that change the material system, i.e. measures that change the

  18. Novel Nano composite Optical Plastics: Dispersion of Titanium in Polyacrylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suri, G.; Tyagi, M.; Seshadri, G.; Khandal, R.K.; Verma, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Polyacrylates have become the preferred materials for optical applications replacing the conventionally used glass due to their superior optical clarity. The major disadvantage with polyacrylates is their low (1.40-1.50) refractive index besides their poor impact resistance. The improvements in refractive index as well as mechanical properties can be achieved by way of incorporation of metals or metal compounds in the matrix. A novel methodology for the incorporation of high refractive index metals into low refractive index polymeric materials to improve the refractive index and impact resistance of the latter has been developed. With the in-situ formation of nanoparticles of TiO 2 , the refractive index of polyacrylates improved from 1.45 to 1.53 and the Abbe number increased from 40 to 57. One of the interesting dimension of this study pertains to the possibility of tailor-making of the two key optical properties of materials by way of varying the amount of TiO 2 being formed in-situ. Thermal stability and impact resistance of nano dispersed (4.3% by wt. of Ti) polyacrylates are found to be better than the neat polyacrylates. Moreover, TiO 2 -containing polyacrylate is of light weight. TEM, SEM, and IR analysis confirms the in-situ formation of nanoparticles of TiO 2 . Gamma irradiation has been used as an eco-friendly technique for polymerization. The developed compositions can be cast polymerized into clear and bubble free material for optical applications.

  19. Marine fungi: Degraders of poly-3-hydroxyalkanoate based plastic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matavulj Milan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for new biosynthetic and biodegradable materials to save nonrenewable resources and reduce global pollution problems is an urgent task. Recently, materials like thermoplastic poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA, have been found synthesized by bacteria as storage materials. The major PHAs synthesized are poly-b-hydroxybutyrate (PHB, poly-b-hydroxyvalerate (PHV and their copolymers. They are already commercially produced and used as BIOPOLTM (ICI, England. Their complete degradability by bacteria has already been shown. Today, oceans and estuaries serve as major landfills, and since fungi are an important part of the degrading microbiota, in order to prove their participation in the degradation process, a simple degradation test suitable for fungi and marine conditions had to be developed. Several solid media based on artificial sea water, differing in the content of non-alkanoate organics and supplemented with 0.1% PHA (or BIOPOLTM as a main source of carbon have been tested. The testing principle consists of clearing the turbid medium in test tube or plates caused by suspended granules of PHA. All media tested supported the growth of fungi. For the discrete and transparent clearing of zones, a mineral medium with 0.01% peptone, 0.01% yeast extract, and 0.1% PHB or BIOPOLTM was finally chosen where the fine and evenly distributed turbidity is accomplished by a specific procedure. This method allows the investigation of degradability of PHA-based plastic materials as well as screening for fungal ability to depolymerise pure PHA homopolymers. Using this medium, 32 strains of marine yeasts and 102 strains of marine mycelial fungi belonging to different systematic and ecological groups were tested for their ability to degrade PHAs. Only about 4% of the strains were able to degrade BIOPOLTM and about 6% depolymerised pure PHB homopolymer. This is in sharp contrast to the results of our previous experiments with 143 strains of terrestrial fungi

  20. A Generalized Orthotropic Elasto-Plastic Material Model for Impact Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffarth, Canio

    Composite materials are now beginning to provide uses hitherto reserved for metals in structural systems such as airframes and engine containment systems, wraps for repair and rehabilitation, and ballistic/blast mitigation systems. These structural systems are often subjected to impact loads and there is a pressing need for accurate prediction of deformation, damage and failure. There are numerous material models that have been developed to analyze the dynamic impact response of polymer matrix composites. However, there are key features that are missing in those models that prevent them from providing accurate predictive capabilities. In this dissertation, a general purpose orthotropic elasto-plastic computational constitutive material model has been developed to predict the response of composites subjected to high velocity impacts. The constitutive model is divided into three components - deformation model, damage model and failure model, with failure to be added at a later date. The deformation model generalizes the Tsai-Wu failure criteria and extends it using a strain-hardening-based orthotropic yield function with a non-associative flow rule. A strain equivalent formulation is utilized in the damage model that permits plastic and damage calculations to be uncoupled and capture the nonlinear unloading and local softening of the stress-strain response. A diagonal damage tensor is defined to account for the directionally dependent variation of damage. However, in composites it has been found that loading in one direction can lead to damage in multiple coordinate directions. To account for this phenomena, the terms in the damage matrix are semi-coupled such that the damage in a particular coordinate direction is a function of the stresses and plastic strains in all of the coordinate directions. The overall framework is driven by experimental tabulated temperature and rate-dependent stress-strain data as well as data that characterizes the damage matrix and failure

  1. Study on the radiation effect of plastic syringe materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, H.C.; Yun, B.M.; Kim, K.Y.; Kong, Y.K.; Park, H.Y.

    1983-01-01

    From the viewpoint of gammasterilization, the defects of domestic polypropylene as the syringe material are to get worse the mechanical properties and discoloration by irradiation. Therefore, the domestic polystyrene (GPPS 150) were inspected to use as substitute for the polypropylene. The gel point of the polystyrene was about 100Mrad and none momentous change of the mechanical properties were appeared until the dose reached to the point. Above the point, as the crosslinking reaction proceed both strength of tensile and impact were increased with discoloration. No significant problem was also found in the water extract test and chemical resistance test. In addition to the pure polystyrene, the copolymer of butadiene (HIPS 425) and the blend material of polypropylene were also inspected for the purpose and almost same results were obtained in the radiation irradiation. From the above result, it is considered that polystyrene and the copolymer and the blend mentioned above are available for the medical plastics which would be sterilized by gamma-radiation. (Author)

  2. The plastic flow localization effect on crystalline material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajot, A.

    2011-01-01

    Irradiation affects the mechanical properties of materials. In particular, an increase of yield strength followed by a decrease of ductility and a reduction of the elongation to fracture are observed above a threshold irradiation dose. The last two phenomena are correlated with the appearance of bands free of defects (clear bands) in which plastic deformation is confined. These bands also determine accumulation of dislocations at grain boundaries, thereby favouring local grain decohesion and possibly initiating fracture. Clear bands have an important impact on metal resistance, nevertheless our level of understanding is not sufficient to evaluate quantitatively their effect on the loss of ductility and reduction of elongation to fracture that are observed experimentally. A clear band is a microstructural defect, created when loading an irradiated material. Its complex interaction with defects on the nano scale affects the behaviour of the metal at the macroscopic scale. A full understanding implies the application of a multi scale modeling approach. This explains why, even though clear bands have first been

  3. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2011-05-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  4. Composites as structural materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megusar, J.

    1989-01-01

    In fusion reactors, materials are used under extreme conditions of temperature, stress, irradiation, and chemical environment. The absence of adequate materials will seriously impede the development of fusion reactors and might ultimately be one of the major difficulties. Some of the current materials problems can be solved by proper design features. For others, the solution will have to rely on materials development. A parallel and balanced effort between the research in plasma physics and fusion-related technology and in materials research is, therefore, the best strategy to ultimately achieve economic, safe, and environmentally acceptable fusion. The essential steps in developing composites for structural components of fusion reactors include optimization of mechanical properties followed by testing under fusion-reactor-relevant conditions. In optimizing the mechanical behavior of composite materials, a wealth of experience can be drawn from the research on ceramic matrix and metal matrix composite materials sponsored by the Department of Defense. The particular aspects of this research relevant to fusion materials development are methodology of the composite materials design and studies of new processing routes to develop composite materials with specific properties. Most notable examples are the synthesis of fibers, coatings, and ceramic materials in their final shapes form polymeric precursors and the infiltration of fibrous preforms by molten metals

  5. Analysis physical properties of composites polymer from cocofiber and polypropylene plastic waste with maleic anhydrate as crosslinking agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelita, E.; Hidayani, T. R.; Akbar, A.

    2017-07-01

    This research was conducted with the aim to produce composites polymer with polypropylene plastic waste materials and cocofiber which aims to produce wood replacement material in the home furnishings industry. This research was conducted with several stages. The first stage is the process of soaking coco fiber with detergent to remove oil and 2% NaOH. The second stage is to combine the polypropylene plastic waste with cocofiber is a chemical bond, modification by adding maleic anhydride as a crosslinking agent and benzoyl peroxide as an initiator each as much as 1%. Mixing materials done by reflux method using xylene solvent. In this study, carried out a wide range of weight variation of coco fiber are added to the 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%. The third stage is a polymer composite molding process using hot press at a temperature of 158°C. The results of polymer composites Showed optimum condition on the addition of 40% cocofiber with supple tensile strength value of 90.800 kgf /cm2 and value of elongation break at 3.6726 x 104 (kgf/cm2), melting point at 160.02°C, burning point 463.43°C, residue of TGA is 19%, the density of 0.84 g/mL. From these data, conclude that the resulting polymer composites meet the SNI 03-2105-2006 about ordinary composite polymer and polymer composite structural type 8 regular types from 17.5 to 10.5.

  6. Micro-structural evolution in plastically deformed crystalline materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, Christopher

    predictions for the two models to be obtained. Application of the two models to the pure shear boundary value problem is used to characterize plastic behavior, which also allows for the identification of inherent properties through closed form expressions. Single crystal Monazite containing a void is studied......Two rate-independent strain gradient crystal plasticity models are developed and applied in numerical studies designed to identify the properties inherent to model predictions of plastic deformation. The two models incorporate gradients of slip into the framework of conventional crystal plasticity...... in order to model size-dependent plasticity effects. This gradient dependence is achieved by relating a slip measure which combines both slip and their gradients to a shear hardening curve, as commonly done in conventional plasticity theories. Finite element codes are implemented which allow for numerical...

  7. Nanocellulose based polymer composite for acoustical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Mohammad; Purniawan, Agung; Susanti, Diah; Priyono, Slamet; Ardhyananta, Hosta; Rahmasita, Mutia E.

    2018-04-01

    Natural fibers are biodegradable materials that are innovatively and widely used for composite reinforcement in automotive components. Nanocellulose derived from natural fibers oil palm empty bunches have properties that are remarkable for use as a composite reinforcement. However, there have not been many investigations related to the use of nanocellulose-based composites for wideband sound absorption materials. The specimens of nanocellulose-based polyester composite were prepared using a spray method. An impedance tube method was used to measure the sound absorption coefficient of this composite material. To reveal the characteristics of the nanocellulose-based polyester composite material, SEM (scanning electron microscope), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red), TGA (Thermogravimetric Analysis), and density tests were performed. Sound absorption test results showed the average value of sound absorption coefficient of 0.36 to 0,46 for frequency between 500 and 4000 Hz indicating that this nanocellulose-based polyester composite materials had a tendency to wideband sound absorption materials and potentially used as automotive interior materials.

  8. In Situ Manufacturing of Plastics and Composites to Support H&R Exploration, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering and BAE Systems propose to develop processes to manufacture plastics and composites for radiation shielding based on In Situ Resources Utilization...

  9. Finite element analysis of cylindrical indentation for determining plastic properties of materials in small volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y Charles; Kurapati, Siva N V R K; Yang Fuqian

    2008-01-01

    The cylindrical indentation is analysed, using the finite element method, for determining the plastic properties of elastic-plastic materials and the effect of strain hardening. The results are compared with those obtained from spherical indentation, the commonly used technique for measuring plastic properties of materials in small volumes. The analysis shows that the deformation under a cylindrical indenter quickly reaches a fully plastic state and that the size (diameter) of the plastic zone remains constant during further indentation. The indentation load is proportional to the indentation depth at large indentation depth, from which the indentation pressure P m at the onset of yielding can be readily extrapolated. The analysis of cylindrical indentation suggests that it does not need parameters such as impression radius (a) and contact stiffness (S) for determining the plastic behaviour of materials. Thus, the cylindrical indentation can suppress the uncertainties in measuring material properties

  10. Elastic-plastic-creep response of structures under composite time history of loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zudans, Z.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to derive the theory, to develop efficient numerical techniques accounting for plasticity, creep and overall equilibrium, to describe the overall structure of the resulting computer program, and to demonstrate the capability of this analysis on a real structure. Classical plasticity theory is used to develop a novel method based on the concept of 'plastic stress' for consideration of inelastic behavior. It is shown that materials stres-strain curves can be followed to any desired degree of accuracy both for isotropic and kinematic hardening. It is further shown that for kinematic hardening it is necessary to base the incremental change on the state corresponding to the mean of the initial and the final states in order to satisfy the yield condition at the final state. The equation of state and strain hardening is used to describe the creep behavior. A novel numerical technique to describe a complex load history is developed by using time as a parameter, history breakpoint determination by scanning of various load vectors and by linear interpolation between any two breakpoints in the load history. The 'plastic stress' load vector concept is utilized with iteration and extrapolation to converge to the equilibrium states with simultaneous satisfaction of the stress-strain relations for each of the iterated states. The essential features of the computer program DYPLAS-FSH, based on the theory and techniques described above, and a postprocessor program POR-FSH, based on RDT F9-5T for ratcheting and fatigue evaluation, are identified and discussed. These computer programs are used to analyse the ellipsoidal pressure vessel head of the intermediate heat exchanger of EBR-II, penetrated by two closely spaced non-radial nozzles, subjected to four consecutive composite cycles of complex mechanical and thermal loads

  11. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  12. Biomedical composites materials, manufacturing and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Davim, J Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Composite materials are engineered materials, made from two or more constituents with significantly different physical or chemical properties which remain separate on a macroscopic level within the finished structure. Due to their special mechanical and physical properties they have the potential to replace conventional materials in various fields such as the biomedical industry.

  13. New absorbent acoustic materials from plastic bottle remnants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Rey, R.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the building acoustics field usually fibrous materials are used as sound absorbing materials. Nowadays polyester fiber is one of the most used but the pure chip of polyester has a problem. Polyester is obtained of petroleum and its price was increasing last years. This paper, presents an alternative polyester wool which obtained by PET treatment (recycle of plastic bottle’s. Absorption coefficient values at normal incidence measured in reverberation chamber were compared (new wool obtained by PET method and materials obtained from pure chip of polyester.Furthermore, this paper propound a empiric model that describe the acoustic performance of this new wool. The results have been good. The pure fiber has been replaced by recycle fiber in its manufacture process.

    En el ámbito de acústica de la edificación es común el uso de materiales fibrosos como materiales absorbentes acústicos. Uno de estos materiales cada vez más utilizado es la lana de poliéster. Un problema que presenta el chip virgen de poliéster es que se obtiene del petróleo, cuyo precio no hace más que incrementarse en los últimos años. En este trabajo se presenta una lana de poliéster alternativa, obtenida mediante el tratamiento del PET, a través del conveniente ciclo de reciclado de botellas de plástico. Se comparan valores del coeficiente de absorción; en incidencia normal y en cámara reverberante de los materiales elaborados a partir de chip virgen y de las nuevas lanas obtenidas del PET. Además, se propone un modelo empírico de comportamiento acústico de estas nuevas lanas. Los resultados obtenidos han sido favorables, la fibra virgen ya ha sido sustituida por fibra reciclada en su proceso de fabricación.

  14. Fully plastic crack opening analyses of complex-cracked pipes for Ramberg-Osgood materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jae Uk; Choi, Jae Boong; Huh, Nam Su; Kim, Yun Jae

    2016-01-01

    The plastic influence functions for calculating fully plastic Crack opening displacement (COD) of complex-cracked pipes were newly proposed based on systematic 3-dimensional (3-D) elastic-plastic Finite element (FE) analyses using Ramberg-Osgood (R-O) relation, where global bending moment, axial tension and internal pressure are considered separately as a loading condition. Then, crack opening analyses were performed based on GE/EPRI concept by using the new plastic influence functions for complex-cracked pipes made of SA376 TP304 stainless steel, and the predicted CODs were compared with FE results based on deformation plasticity theory of tensile material behavior. From the comparison, the confidence of the proposed fully plastic crack opening solutions for complex-cracked pipes was gained. Therefore, the proposed engineering scheme for COD estimation using the new plastic influence functions can be utilized to estimate leak rate of a complex-cracked pipe for R-O material.

  15. Production of palm frond based wood plastic composite by using twin screw extruder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russita, M.; Bahruddin

    2018-04-01

    Wood plastic composite (WPC) is the blending product from wood as filler and polymer thermoplastic as matric. Palm frond waste is a material with selulose about 68%, so it has potential to be developed as raw material for WPC. The purpose of this research was to learn how to produce WPC based on palm frond use twin screw extruder. It used popropilen as matric. As for aditif, it used Maleated Polypropilene (MAPP) as compatibilizer and paraffin as plasticizer. The size of palm frond is 40 – 80 mesh. WPC is made from blending polipropylene, palm frond, MAPP and paraffin with dry mixing method in room temperature. Then, PP, Palm frond and additive from dry mixing is fed into twin screw extruder at 190°C and 60 rpm. It use palm frond/polypropylene 60/40, MAPP 5% w/w and paraffin 2% w/w. From the result, it shown that WPC based on palm frond met the standards forcommercial WPC. It has tensile strength up to 19.2 MPa, bending strength 43.6 MPa and water adsorption 0,32% w/w. So, WPC based on palm frond has prospective to be developed for commercial WPC.

  16. Incorporation of Plasticity and Damage Into an Orthotropic Three-Dimensional Model with Tabulated Input Suitable for Use in Composite Impact Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; Dubois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Rajan,Subramaniam; Blackenhorn, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    The need for accurate material models to simulate the deformation, damage and failure of polymer matrix composites under impact conditions is becoming critical as these materials are gaining increased usage in the aerospace and automotive industries. While there are several composite material models currently available within commercial transient dynamic finite element codes, several features have been identified as being lacking in the currently available material models that could substantially enhance the predictive capability of the impact simulations. A specific desired feature pertains to the incorporation of both plasticity and damage within the material model. Another desired feature relates to using experimentally based tabulated stress-strain input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage as opposed to specifying discrete input properties (such as modulus and strength) and employing analytical functions to track the response of the material. To begin to address these needs, a combined plasticity and damage model suitable for use with both solid and shell elements is being developed for implementation within the commercial code LS-DYNA. The plasticity model is based on extending the Tsai-Wu composite failure model into a strain-hardening based orthotropic plasticity model with a non-associative flow rule. The evolution of the yield surface is determined based on tabulated stress-strain curves in the various normal and shear directions and is tracked using the effective plastic strain. The effective plastic strain is computed by using the non-associative flow rule in combination with appropriate numerical methods. To compute the evolution of damage, a strain equivalent semi-coupled formulation is used, in which a load in one direction results in a stiffness reduction in multiple coordinate directions. A specific laminated composite is examined to demonstrate the process of characterizing and analyzing the response of a composite using the developed

  17. Chemical composition of lunar material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, J A; Abbey, S; Champ, W H

    1970-01-30

    Chemical and emission spectrographic analyses of three Apollo 11 samples, 10017-29, 10020-30, and 10084-132, are given. Major and minor constituents were determined both by conventional rock analysis methods and by a new composite scheme utilizing a lithium fluoborate method for dissolution of the samples and atomic absorption spectroscopy and colorimetry. Trace constituents were determined by optical emission spectroscopy involving a d-c arc, air-jet controlled.

  18. Crystallinity in starch plastics: consequences for material properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, van J.J.G.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.

    1997-01-01

    The processing of starches with biodegradable additives has made biodegradable plastics suitable for a number of applications. Starch plastics are partially crystalline as a result of residual crystallinity and the recrystallization of amylose and amylopectin. Such crystallinity is a key determinant

  19. Fibrous and textile materials for composite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fangueiro, Raul

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the fibers and textiles used in composite materials. It presents both existing technologies currently used in commercial applications and the latest advanced research and developments. It also discusses the different fiber forms and architectures, such as short fibers, unidirectional tows, directionally oriented structures or advanced 2D- and 3D-textile structures that are used in composite materials. In addition, it examines various synthetic, natural and metallic fibers that are used to reinforce polymeric, cementitious and metallic matrices, as well as fiber properties, special functionalities, manufacturing processes, and composite processing and properties. Two entire chapters are dedicated to advanced nanofiber and nanotube reinforced composite materials. The book goes on to highlight different surface treatments and finishes that are applied to improve fiber/matrix interfaces and other essential composite properties. Although a great deal of information about fibers and textile str...

  20. Properties of plasticized composite films prepared from nanofibrillated cellulose and birch wood xylan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Natanya Majbritt Louie; Blomfeldt, Thomas O. J.; Hedenqvist, Mikael S.

    2012-01-01

    was combined with nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and films were cast with and without glycerol, sorbitol or methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG) as plasticizers. Microscopy revealed some NFC agglomeration in the composite films as well as a layered nanocellulose structure. Equilibrium moisture content...... in plasticized films increased with glycerol content but was independent of xylan:NFC ratio in unplasticized films. Sorbitol- and MPEG-plasticized films showed equilibrium moisture contents of approximately 10 wt% independent of plasticizer content. Tensile testing revealed increases in tensile strength...... with increased NFC content in the xylan:NFC composition range from 50:50 to 80:20 and plasticizer addition generally provided less brittle films. The oxygen permeability of unplasticized xylan-NFC films fell into a range which was similar to that for previously measured pure NFC films and was statistically...

  1. Evaluation Of Gas Diffusion Through Plastic Materials Used In Experimental And Sampling Equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter

    1993-01-01

    . Calculations show that diffusion of oxygen through plastic tubing and reactors into anoxic water can be a serious problem for a series of plastic materials. Comparison of the method for turbulent and laminar flow in tubings shows that the difference is insignificant for most cases. Calculations show also......Plastic materials are often used in experimental and sampling equipment. Plastics are not gas tight, since gases are able to diffuse through the walls of tubing and containers made of plastic. Methods for calculating the significance of gas diffusion through the walls of containers and the walls...... of tubings for both turbulent and laminar flow conditions is presented. A more complex model for diffusion under laminar flow conditions is developed. A comprehensive review on gas diffusion coefficients for the main gases (O2, N2, CO2, CH4 etc.) and for a long range of plastic materials is also presented...

  2. Mechanics of composite materials: Unified micromechanical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboundi, J.

    1991-01-01

    Although many books have been written on the mechanics of composite materials, only a vew few have been devoted almost exclusively to the micromechanics aspects. The present monograph is devoted primarily to the micromechanics of fiber and particle reinforced composites with some additional treatment of laminates as well. Thus, this book would probably be more suitable as a reference book than a textbook

  3. Carbon fibre as a composites materials precursor-A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, A.F.; Yusof, N.; Mustafa, A.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon fibers are widely used as reinforcement in composite materials such as carbon fiber reinforced plastics, carbon fiber reinforced ceramics, carbon-carbon composites and carbon fiber reinforced metals, due to their high specific strength and modulus. Carbon fiber composites are ideally suited to applications where strength, stiffness, lower weight and outstanding fatigue characteristics are critical requirements. Generally, there are two main sectors of carbon fiber applications. Application of carbon fiber in high technology sectors includes aerospace and nuclear engineering whereby the use of carbon fiber is driven by maximum performance and not significantly influenced by cost factors. Meanwhile, the application in general engineering and transportations sector is dominated by cost constraints. Carbon fibers used in composites are often coated or surface treated to improve interaction between the fiber surface and the matrix. PAN/ CNT composite fibers are good candidates for the development of next generation carbon fibers with improved tensile strength and modulus while retaining its compressive strength. This paper aims at reviewing and critically discussing the fabrication aspects of carbon fiber for composites which can be divided into several sections: precursor selection, spinning process, pretreatment of the precursor, pyrolysis process, and also surface treatment of the carbon fiber. The future direction of carbon fiber for composite is also briefly identified to further extend the boundary of science and technology in order to fully exploit its potential. (author)

  4. The Effects of Plastic Anisotropy in Warm and Hot Forming of Magnesium Sheet Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleff, Eric M.; Antoniswamy, Aravindha R.; Carpenter, Alexander J.; Yavuz, Emre

    Mg alloy sheet materials often exhibit plastic anisotropy at room temperature as a result of the limited slip systems available in the HCP lattice combined with a commonly strong basal texture. Less well studied is plastic anisotropy developed at the elevated temperatures associated with warm and hot forming. At these elevated temperatures, particularly above 200°C, the activation of additional slip systems significantly increases ductility. However, plastic anisotropy is also induced at elevated temperatures by a strong crystallographic texture, and it can require an accounting in material constitutive models to achieve accurate forming simulations. The type and degree of anisotropy under these conditions depend on both texture and deformation mechanism. The current understanding of plastic anisotropy in Mg AZ31B and ZEK100 sheet materials at elevated temperatures is reviewed in this article. The recent construction of material forming cases is also reviewed with strategies to account for plastic anisotropy in forming simulations.

  5. Composite materials for wind power turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, P.; Lilholt, H.; Lystrup, Aa.

    2005-01-01

    , and industrial potential. The important technologies of today are prepreg (pre-impregnated) technology and resin infusion technology. The mechanical properties of fiber composite materials are discussed, with a focus on fatigue performance. Damage and materials degradation during fatigue are described. Testing...

  6. Radiation Processing of Advanced Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Jeun, Joonpyo; Nho, Young Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Advanced composites, such as carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics, are being used widely for many applications. Carbon fiber/epoxies composites have attracted special attention from the aircraft, aerospace, marine engineering, sporting goods and transportation industries, because they have useful mechanical properties including high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios, a corrosion resistant, impact and damage tolerance characteristics and wear properties. Thermal curing has been the dominant industrial process for advanced composites until now, however, a radiation curing process using UV, microwave x-ray, electron-beam(E-beam) and {gamma}-ray has emerged as a better alternative in recent years. These processes are compatible with the manufacturing of composites using traditional fabrication methods including a filament/tape winding, pultrusion, resin transfer moulding and hand lay-up. In this study, E-beam curable carbon fiber/epoxy composites were manufactured, and their mechanical properties were investigated. Two epoxy resins (bisphenol-A, bisphenol-F) containing photo-initiators (tri aryl sulfonium hexafluorophosphate, tri aryl sulfonium hexafluoroantimonate) were used as a matrix and a 4H-satin carbon woven fabric was used as a reinforcement. And then an electron beam irradiated the composites up to 200 kGy in a vacuum and an inert atmosphere. The cure cycle was optimized and the properties of composites were evaluated and analyzed via a differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, sol-gel extractions, FT-NIR, universal test machine, and an impact tester. The gel content, glass transition temperature and mechanical strength of the irradiated composites were increased with an increasing radiation dose.

  7. Small scale plasticity and compressive properties of composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    in the commercial finite element code Abaqus [3]. In addition, in a supplementary study, taken into account the length scale effect of the yielding behavior using a strain gradient dependent plasticity law [4] implemented as a user element [5], it is possible investigating the scale effect on the yielding behavior...

  8. Long term durability of wood-plastic composites made with chemically modified wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Craig M. Clemons

    2017-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites (WPCs) have slower moisture sorption than solid wood, but over time moisture can impact the strength, stiffness, and decay of the composite. These changes will become increasingly important if WPCs are used in more challenging environments such as in ground-contact applications. There are several options for mitigating the moisture sorption of...

  9. Elastic-plastic deformation of fiber composites with a tetragonal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, E.IU.; Svistkova, L.A. (Permskii Politekhnicheskii Institut, Perm (USSR))

    1991-02-01

    Results of numerical solutions are presented for elastic-plastic problems concerning arbitrary loading of unidirectional composites in the transverse plane. The nucleation and evolution of microplastic zones in the matrix and the effect of this process on the macroscopic characteristics of the composite are discussed. Attention is also given to the effect of the fiber shape on the elastic-plastic deformation of the matrix and to deformation paths realized in simple microdeformation processes. The discussion is illustrated by results obtained for a composite consisting of a VT1-0 titanium alloy matrix reinforced by Ti-Mo fibers.

  10. Damping in aerospace composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agneni, A.; Balis Crema, L.; Castellani, A.

    Experimental results are presented on specimens of carbon and Kevlar fibers in epoxy resin, materials used in many aerospace structures (control surfaces and wings in aircraft, large antennas in spacecraft, etc.). Some experimental methods of estimating damping ratios are first reviewed, either in the time domain or in the frequency domain. Some damping factor estimates from experimental tests are then shown; in order to evaluate the effects of the aerospace environment, damping factors have been obtained in a typical range of temperature, namely between +120 C and -120 C, and in the pressure range from room pressure to 10 exp -6 torr. Finally, a theoretical approach for predicting the bounds of the damping coefficients is shown, and prediction data are compared with experimental results.

  11. Application of multi-criteria material selection techniques to constituent refinement in biobased composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Sabbie A.; Lepech, Michael D.; Billington, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Biobased composites have the potential to replace certain engineered materials. • Woven reinforcement can provide better material properties in biobased composites. • Short fiber filler can provide lower environmental impact in biobased composites. • Per function, different fibers are desired to lower composite environmental impact. - Abstract: Biobased composites offer a potentially low environmental impact material option for the construction industries. Designing these materials to meet both performance requirements for an application and minimize environmental impacts requires the ability to refine composite constituents based on environmental impact and mechanical properties. In this research, biobased composites with varying natural fiber reinforcement in a poly(β-hydroxybutyrate)-co-(β-hydroxyvalerate) matrix were characterized based on material properties through experiments and environmental impact through life cycle assessments. Using experimental results, these biobased composites were found to have competitive flexural properties and thermal conductivity with certain short-chopped glass fiber reinforced plastics. Multi-criteria material selection techniques were applied to weigh desired material properties with greenhouse gas emissions, fossil fuel demand, and Eco-Indicator ’99 score. The effects of using different reinforcing fibers in biobased composites were analyzed using the developed selection scheme as a tool for choosing constituents. The use of multi-criteria material selection provided the ability to select fiber reinforcement for biobased composites and showed when it would be more appropriate to use a novel biobased composite or a currently available engineered material

  12. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  13. Potential of Electronic Plastic Waste as a Source of Raw Material and Energy Recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norazli Othman; Nor Ezlin Ahmad Basri; Lariyah Mohd Sidek

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, the production of electronic equipment is one of the fastest growing industrial activities in this world. The increase use of plastic in this sector resulted in an increase of electronic plastic waste. Basically, electronic plastic material contains various chemical elements which act as a flame retardant when electronic equipment is operated. In general, the concept of recycling electronic plastic waste should be considered in order to protect the environment. For this purpose, research has been conducted to different resins of electronic plastic waste to identify the potential of electronic plastic waste as a source of raw material and energy recovery. This study was divided into two part for example determination of physical and chemical characteristics of plastic resins and calculation of heating value for plastic resins based on Dulong formula. Results of this research show that the average calorific value of electronic waste is 30,872.42 kJ/ kg (7,375 kcal/ kg). The emission factor analysis showed that the concentration of emission value that might occur during waste management activities is below the standard set by the Environment Quality Act 1974. Basically, this research shows that electronic plastic waste has the potential to become the source of raw material and energy recovery. (author)

  14. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Wood Plastic Composite Made Up of Durian Husk Fiber and Recycled Polystyrene Foam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koay Seong Chun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene foam is one of the major plastic waste that hardly to recycle. The present research is aims to recycle polystyrene foam as raw material to produce wood plastic composites (WPC. The WPC was produced from recycled polystyrene (rPS and durian husk fiber (DHF using melt compound and compression moulding processes. This paper is focus on effect of fiber content on tensile and thermal properties of rPS/DHF composite. The results found the tensile strength modulus of this WPC increased at higher fiber content, but elongation at break was reduced. However, this composites exhibited an early thermal degradation when subjected to high temperature and this was commonly found among WPC. The thermal degradation of rPS/DHF composites yielded high percentage of char residue due to char formation of DHF. Overall, the rPS/DHF composites with 60 phr fiber content able to achieved strength slight above 16 MPa without any chemical treatment additives. This indicates the rPS/DHF composites can be a potential WPC if further modify with to improve its strength.

  16. Hybrid friction stir welding for dissimilar materials through electro-plastic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xun; Lan, Shuhuai; Ni, Jun

    2018-05-29

    A hybrid Friction Stir Welding approach and device for dissimilar materials joining employing Electro-Plastic Effect. The approach and device include an introduction of high density, short period current pulses into traditional friction stir welding process, which therefore can generate a localized softened zone in the workpiece during plastic stirring without significant additional temperature increase. This material softened zone is created by high density current pulses based on Electro-Plastic Effect and will move along with the friction stir welding tool. Smaller downward force, larger processing window and better joint quality for dissimilar materials are expected to be achieved through this hybrid welding technique.

  17. Comparison of solute-binding properties of plastic materials used as pharmaceutical product containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Dennis; Couch, Tom; Gillum, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Material/water equilibrium binding constants (E(b)) were determined for 11 organic solutes and 2 plastic materials commonly used in pharmaceutical product containers (plasticized polyvinyl chloride and polyolefin). In general, solute binding by the plasticized polyvinyl chloride material was greater, by nearly an order of magnitude, than the binding by the polyolefin (on an equal weight basis). The utilization of the binding constants to facilitate container compatibility assessments (e.g., drug loss by container binding) for drug-containing products is discussed.

  18. Microwave Measurements of Ferrite Polymer Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Dosoudil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the microwave measurements performed on the nickel-zinc sintered ferrite with the chemical formula Ni0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4 produced by the ceramic technique and composite materials based on this ferrite and a non-magnetic polymer (polyvinyl chloride matrix. The prepared composite samples had the same particle size distribution 0-250um but different ferrite particle concentrations between 23 vol% and 80 vol%. The apparatus for measurement of the signal proportional to the absolute value of scattering parameter S11 (reflexion coefficient is described and the dependence of measured reflected signal on a bias magnetic field has been studied. By means of experiments, the resonances to be connected with the geometry of microwave experimental set-up were distinguished from ferromagnetic resonance arising in ferrite particles of composite structure. The role of local interaction fields of ferrite particles in composite material has been discussed.

  19. An experimental study of plastic deformation of materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Tine

    The thesis falls in three parts, focusing on different aspects of plastic deformation of metals. Part I investigates the dislocation structures induced by hot deformation and compares these with the structures after cold deformation. In particular, it is shown that the dislocation structures...... after cold deformation by calorimetry and by analysis of the dislocation structure. The stored energy measured by calorimetry is found to be larger than that determined from the dislocation structure by a factor between 1.9 and 2.7, and this factor decreases with the plastic strain. Part III aimed...

  20. The theoretical and experimental researches of Pb-Al composite materials extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ryzińska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the analysis of the character of a simultaneous plastic flow of composite material of a hard core-soft sleeve structure. Experimental research work using model composite material Aluminium-Lead and theoretical analysis allowed to identify the initial cracking conditions, its character and localization, depending on geometrical parameters of the composite materials and the extrusion ratio value. It has been shown that the higher the parameters’ values are, the longer the flawless extruded product is (cracking appears in the further stages of the process.

  1. Finite-Element Modeling of a Damaged Pipeline Repaired Using the Wrap of a Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapin, A. A.; Chebakov, M. I.; Dumitrescu, A.; Zecheru, G.

    2015-07-01

    The nonlinear static problem of FEM modeling of a damaged pipeline repaired by a composite material and subjected to internal pressure is considered. The calculation is carried out using plasticity theory for the pipeline material and considering the polymeric filler and the composite wrap. The level of stresses in various zones of the structure is analyzed. The most widespread alloy used for oil pipelines is selected as pipe material. The contribution of each component of the pipeline-filler-wrap system to the level of stresses is investigated. The effect of the number of composite wrap layers is estimated. The results obtained allow one to decrease the costs needed for producing test specimens.

  2. Health monitoring method for composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Jr., Kenneth S.; Morris, Shelby J [Hampton, VA

    2011-04-12

    An in-situ method for monitoring the health of a composite component utilizes a condition sensor made of electrically conductive particles dispersed in a polymeric matrix. The sensor is bonded or otherwise formed on the matrix surface of the composite material. Age-related shrinkage of the sensor matrix results in a decrease in the resistivity of the condition sensor. Correlation of measured sensor resistivity with data from aged specimens allows indirect determination of mechanical damage and remaining age of the composite component.

  3. Abundance and composition of near surface microplastics and plastic debris in the Stockholm Archipelago, Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewert, Berit; Ogonowski, Martin; Barth, Andreas; MacLeod, Matthew

    2017-07-15

    We collected plastic debris in the Stockholm Archipelago using a manta trawl, and additionally along a transect in the Baltic Sea from the island of Gotland to Stockholm in a citizen science study. The samples were concentrated by filtration and organic material was digested using hydrogen peroxide. Suspected plastic material was isolated by visual sorting and 59 of these were selected to be characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Polypropylene and polyethylene were the most abundant plastics identified among the samples (53% and 24% respectively). We found nearly ten times higher abundance of plastics near central Stockholm than in offshore areas (4.2×10 5 plastics km -2 compared to 4.7×10 4 plastics km -2 ). The abundance of plastic debris near Stockholm was similar to urban areas in California, USA, and the overall abundance in the Stockholm Archipelago was similar to plastic abundance reported in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Study on Plastic Coated Overburnt Brick Aggregate as an Alternative Material for Bituminous Road Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are different places in India where natural stone aggregates are not available for constructional work. Plastic coated OBBA can solve the problem of shortage of stone aggregate to some extent. The engineers are always encouraged to use locally available materials. The present investigation is carried out to evaluate the plastic coated OBBA as an alternative material for bituminous road construction. Shredded waste plastics are mixed with OBBA in different percentages as 0.38, 0.42, 0.46, 0.50, 0.54, and 0.60 of the weight of brick aggregates. Marshall Method of mix design is carried out to find the optimum bitumen content of such bituminous concrete mix prepared by plastic coated OBBA. Bulk density, Marshall Stability, flow, Marshall Quotient, ITS, TSR, stripping, fatigue life, and deformations have been determined accordingly. Marshall Stability value of 0.54 percent of plastic mix is comparatively higher than the other mixes except 0.60 percent of plastic mix. Test results are within the prescribed limit for 0.54 percent of plastic mix. There is a significant reduction in rutting characteristics of the same plastic mix. The fatigue life of the mix is also significantly higher. Thus plastic coated OBBA is found suitable in construction of bituminous concrete road.

  5. X-ray testing of fiber composite plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmann, O.; Lembke, B.

    1984-01-01

    Besides the ultrasonic test, X-raying is the most important non-destructive test procedure for supporting fibre composite structures. This report presents some auxiliary means and test results regarding the limits of fault detectibility during the X-raying of fiber composite structures, preferrably carbon fiber laminates (CFRP). (orig.) [de

  6. Materials dependence of mixed gas plasticization behavior in asymmetric membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Tymen; Masetto, N.; Wessling, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The mass transport of asymmetric membranes for the separation of carbon dioxide/methane mixtures is determined by competitive sorption and plasticization. With increasing feed pressure in mixed gas experiments, the selectivity decreases due to both effects. Distinction whether one or the other

  7. Homogenization in thermoelasticity: application to composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyroux, R [Lab. de Mecanique et Genie Civil, Univ. Montpellier 2, 34 Montpellier (France); Licht, C [Lab. de Mecanique et Genie Civil, Univ. Montpellier 2, 34 Montpellier (France)

    1993-11-01

    One of the obstacles to the industrial use of metal matrix composite materials is the damage they rapidly undergo when they are subjected to cyclic thermal loadings; local thermal stresses of high level can develop, sometimes nearby or over the elastic limit, due to the mismatch of elastic and thermal coefficients between the fibers and the matrix. For the same reasons, early cracks can appear in composites like ceramic-ceramic. Therefore, we investigate the linear thermoelastic behaviour of heterogeneous materials, taking account of the isentropic coupling term in the heat conduction equation. In the case of periodic materials, recent results, using the homogenization theory, allowed us to describe macroscopic and microscopic behaviours of such materials. This paper is concerned with the numerical simulation of this problem by a finite element method, using a multiscale approach. (orig.).

  8. Coupling effect of waste automotive engine oil in the preparation of wood reinforced LDPE plastic composites for panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maame Adwoa Bentumah Animpong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated the formulation of wood plastic composite (WPC materials with flexural strength of 13.69 ± 0.09 MPa for applications in outdoor fencing using municipal waste precursors like low density polyethylene (LDPE plastics (54.0 wt. %, sawn wood dust with particle size between 64 and 500 μm derived from variable hardwood species (36.0 wt. % and used automotive engine oil (10 wt. %. The WPC panels were prepared by pre-compounding, extruding at a screw auger torque of 79.8 Nm and pressing through a rectangular mould of dimension 132 mm × 37 mm × 5 mm at temperature 150 °C. The efficacy of black waste oil, as a coupling agent, was demonstrated by the absence of voids and pull-outs on microscopic examination using scanning electron microscopy. No hazardous substances were exhaled during thermo-gravimetric mass spectrometry analysis. The percentage crystallinity of the LDPE in the as-prepared material determined by differential scanning calorimetry was 11.3%. Keywords: Wood plastic composites, Low density polyethylene, Wood dust, Physical, Thermal and mechanical properties

  9. Structured Piezoelectric Composites: Materials and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Ende, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The piezoelectric effect, which causes a material to generate a voltage when it deforms, is very suitable for making integrated sensors, and (micro-) generators. However, conventional piezoelectric materials are either brittle ceramics or certain polymers with a low thermal stability, which limits their practical application to certain specific fields. Piezoelectric composites, which contain an active piezoelectric (ceramic) phase in a robust polymer matrix, can potentially have better proper...

  10. Hydrogels from Amorphous Calcium Carbonate and Polyacrylic Acid: Bio-Inspired Materials for "Mineral Plastics".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shengtong; Mao, Li-Bo; Lei, Zhouyue; Yu, Shu-Hong; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-09-19

    Given increasing environmental issues due to the large usage of non-biodegradable plastics based on petroleum, new plastic materials, which are economic, environmentally friendly, and recyclable are in high demand. One feasible strategy is the bio-inspired synthesis of mineral-based hybrid materials. Herein we report a facile route for an amorphous CaCO3 (ACC)-based hydrogel consisting of very small ACC nanoparticles physically cross-linked by poly(acrylic acid). The hydrogel is shapeable, stretchable, and self-healable. Upon drying, the hydrogel forms free-standing, rigid, and transparent objects with remarkable mechanical performance. By swelling in water, the material can completely recover the initial hydrogel state. As a matrix, thermochromism can also be easily introduced. The present hybrid hydrogel may represent a new class of plastic materials, the "mineral plastics". © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Compendium of information on identification and testing of materials for plastic solar thermal collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinniss, V.D.; Sliemers, F.A.; Landstrom, D.K.; Talbert, S.G.

    1980-07-31

    This report is intended to organize and summarize prior and current literature concerning the weathering, aging, durability, degradation, and testing methodologies as applied to materials for plastic solar thermal collectors. Topics covered include (1) rate of aging of polymeric materials; (2) environmental factors affecting performance; (3) evaluation and prediction of service life; (4) measurement of physical and chemical properties; (5) discussion of evaluation techniques and specific instrumentation; (6) degradation reactions and mechanisms; (7) weathering of specific polymeric materials; and (8) exposure testing methodology. Major emphasis has been placed on defining the current state of the art in plastics degradation and on identifying information that can be utilized in applying appropriate and effective aging tests for use in projecting service life of plastic solar thermal collectors. This information will also be of value where polymeric components are utilized in the construction of conventional solar collectors or any application where plastic degradation and weathering are prime factors in material selection.

  12. Incorporation of Damage and Failure into an Orthotropic Elasto-Plastic Three-Dimensional Model with Tabulated Input Suitable for Use in Composite Impact Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; Dubois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Khaled, Bilal; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    A material model which incorporates several key capabilities which have been identified by the aerospace community as lacking in the composite impact models currently available in LS-DYNA(Registered Trademark) is under development. In particular, the material model, which is being implemented as MAT 213 into a tailored version of LS-DYNA being jointly developed by the FAA and NASA, incorporates both plasticity and damage within the material model, utilizes experimentally based tabulated input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage as opposed to specifying discrete input parameters (such as modulus and strength), and is able to analyze the response of composites composed with a variety of fiber architectures. The plasticity portion of the orthotropic, three-dimensional, macroscopic composite constitutive model is based on an extension of the Tsai-Wu composite failure model into a generalized yield function with a non-associative flow rule. The capability to account for the rate and temperature dependent deformation response of composites has also been incorporated into the material model. For the damage model, a strain equivalent formulation is utilized to allow for the uncoupling of the deformation and damage analyses. In the damage model, a diagonal damage tensor is defined to account for the directionally dependent variation of damage. However, in composites it has been found that loading in one direction can lead to damage in multiple coordinate directions. To account for this phenomena, the terms in the damage matrix are semi-coupled such that the damage in a particular coordinate direction is a function of the stresses and plastic strains in all of the coordinate directions. The onset of material failure, and thus element deletion, is being developed to be a function of the stresses and plastic strains in the various coordinate directions. Systematic procedures are being developed to generate the required input parameters based on the results of

  13. Strength of cellulosic fiber/starch acetate composites with variable fiber and plasticizer content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joffe, Roberts; Madsen, Bo; Nättinen, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    In this experimental study, the performance of injection-molded short flax and hemp fibers in plasticized starch acetate were analyzed in terms of strength. Parameters involved in the analysis are a variable fiber and plasticizer content. The measured strength of the composites varies in the range...... of 12–51 MPa for flax fibers and 11–42 MPa for hemp fibers, which is significantly higher than the properties of the unreinforced starch acetate matrix. The micro-structural parameters used in modeling of composite strength were obtained from optical observations and indirect measurements. Some...

  14. Chemical constituent influence on ionizing radiation treatment of a wood–plastic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palm, Andrew; Smith, Jennifer; Driscoll, Mark; Smith, Leonard; Scott Larsen, L.

    2016-01-01

    A dose range of 0–200 kGy was used to irradiate polyethylene-based wood plastic composite (WPC) specimens. An evaluation of mechanical properties in bending resulted in an increase in ultimate strength, but little effect to stiffness. The bending test results were compared to previous testing in order to examine reproducibility. Hardness tests were also conducted, revealing an increase at a dose range of 0–250 kGy. - Highlights: • Feasibility of electron beam treatment of a wood plastic composite. • No significant impact on modulus of elasticity. • Increase in ultimate strength and hardness.

  15. Cracking and impact performance characteristics of plastic composite ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    As followup to a workshop on Engineered Composite Ties sponsored by the American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-Way Association and the Federal Railroad Administration, the Transportation Technology Center, Inc., in Pueblo, CO, conducted a se...

  16. Preliminary Validation of Composite Material Constitutive Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    John G. Michopoulos; Athanasios lliopoulos; John C. Hermanson; Adrian C. Orifici; Rodney S. Thomson

    2012-01-01

    This paper is describing the preliminary results of an effort to validate a methodology developed for composite material constitutive characterization. This methodology involves using massive amounts of data produced from multiaxially tested coupons via a 6-DoF robotic system called NRL66.3 developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. The testing is followed by...

  17. Composite materials. From gammas to weight measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    A gamma photons backscattering gauge called 'Filbor 2' has been designed by the CEA/DAMRI (Saclay, France) and allows to measure the resin content of fiber wicks (boron, carbon, kevlar, glass..) devoted to the manufacturing of elements made of composite materials. (J.S.)

  18. Ceramic nanostructure materials, membranes and composite layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burggraaf, A.J.; Keizer, Klaas; van Hassel, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Synthesis methods to obtain nanoscale materials will be briefly discussed with a focus on sol-gel methods. Three types of nanoscale composites (powders, membranes and ion implanted layers) will be discussed and exemplified with recent original research results. Ceramic membranes with a thickness of

  19. Fe-based composite materials with improved mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werniewicz, Katarzyna [IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Kuehn, Uta; Mattern, Norbert; Eckert, Juergen; Schultz, Ludwig [IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Kulik, Tadeusz [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw (Poland)

    2008-07-01

    Following a previous study by the authors two new compositions (Fe{sub 89.0}Cr{sub 5.5}Mo{sub 5.5}){sub 91}C{sub 9} and (Fe{sub 89.0}Cr{sub 5.5}Mo{sub 5.5}){sub 83}C{sub 17} have been developed with the aim of improving the ductility of Fe{sub 65.5}Cr{sub 4}Mo{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}P{sub 12}C{sub 5}B{sub 5.5} bulk metallic glass (BMG). In contrast to the alloys in that study, the recently prepared Fe-based materials are Ga-free. It was expected that the variations in the composition will lead to the changes in the phase formation and, hence, in the mechanical response of the investigated alloys. It was recognized that in-situ formed Fe-based composites show superior plasticity ({epsilon}{sub pl}{approx}37%) for the alloy with lower C content and ({epsilon}{sub pl}{approx}4%) for the alloy with higher C content compared to monolithic glass ({epsilon}{sub pl}{approx}0.2%). Furthermore, on the basis of present as well as previous investigations it has been shown that the Ga addition is beneficial for the plasticity of these Fe-based alloys. It was observed that the (Fe{sub 89.0}Cr{sub 5.5}Mo{sub 5.5}){sub 83}C{sub 17} alloy exhibits a significantly smaller fracture strain ({epsilon}{sub f}{approx}5%) compared to its Ga-containing counterpart ({epsilon}{sub f}{approx}16%). Therefore, it can be concluded that appropriate alloying additions are crucial in enhancing the mechanical properties of the complex Fe-based materials developed here.

  20. Plastic film materials for dosimetry of very large absorbed doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne; Abdel-Rahim, F.

    1985-01-01

    Most plastic films have limited response ranges for dosimetry because of radiation-induced brittleness, degradation, or saturation of the signal used for analysis (e.g. spectrophotometry) at high doses. There are, however, a few types of thin plastic films showing linearity of response even up...... to doses as high as 2 × 106 Gy (200 Mrad) without severe loss of mechanical properties. Among many candidate film types tested, those showing such resistance to radiation damage and continued response at such high doses are polyethylene terephthalate, high-density polyethylene, dyed polyvinylchloride......, the dyed polychlorostyrenes show essentially the same response to radiation-processing gamma-ray fields and to very high-intensity electron beams, and a relatively stable absorption spectrum at wavelengths for dosimetry analysis in the visible spectral region of ≈430 nm....

  1. BIOFILTERS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT AFTER RECYCLED PLASTIC MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Kania-Surowiec

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the possibility of using biological deposits in wastewater treatment of recycled plastics were presented. There are many aspects of this issue that should be considered to be able to use information technology solutions in the industry. This includes, inter alia, specify the types of laboratory tests based on the analysis of changes in the fluid during the wastewater treatment process, knowledge and selection factors for proper growth of biofilm in the deposit and to develop the right concept and a prototype for a particular processing plant, plastic processing plant. It is possible to determine the parameters that will increase the efficiency of sewage treatment while minimizing the financial effort on the part of the Company. Selection methods of wastewater treatment is also associated with the environmental strategy of the country at the enterprise level specified in the Environmental Policy. This is an additional argument for the use of biological methods in the treatment of industrial waste water.

  2. Optically stimulated luminescence of common plastic materials for accident dose reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, I.; Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. L. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K. S. [Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Optically stimulate luminescence(OSL) has many applications in a variety of radiation dosimetry fields, including personal dosimetry, environmental radiation level monitor, retrospective dosimetry for dating, and reconstruction of radiation doses from radiation accident. In the reconstruction of radiation doses from radiation accident, OSL technique has been used to estimate the doses exposed to public area through analysis of housewares or house construing materials. Recently, many efforts have been carried out for dose reconstruction using personal electronic devices such as mobile phones and USB memory chips. Some of natural minerals such as quartz and feldspar have OSL properties. Quartz is the second most abundant mineral in continental crust of the Earth. In some of common plastics, inorganic fillers (quartz, alumina etc.) are added to make strengthen of their properties depends on applications areas. The aim of this research is to explore a possibility of use of the common plastic materials for dose reconstruction in radiation accident case. In this research the OSL dose response-curve and fading characteristics of the common plastics were tested and evaluated. Finally, we expect this work contribute to elevate the possibility of the dose reconstruction. The general conclusion of this work is that the possibility of dose reconstruction using common plastic materials is showed using the OSL characteristics of the materials. However, the tested common plastic materials have relatively low sensitivities. Further work is required to establish a database of OSL properties of common plastic materials for emergency dose reconstruction by using housewares.

  3. Oral epithelial cell reaction after exposure to Invisalign plastic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premaraj, Thyagaseely; Simet, Samantha; Beatty, Mark; Premaraj, Sundaralingam

    2014-01-01

    Invisalign plastic aligners (Align Technology, Santa Clara, Calif) are used to correct malocclusions. The aligners wrap around the teeth and are in contact with gingival epithelium during treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cellular responses of oral epithelium exposed to Invisalign plastic in vitro. Oral epithelial cells were exposed to eluate obtained by soaking Invisalign plastic in either saline solution or artificial saliva for 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Cells grown in media containing saline solution or saliva served as controls. Morphologic changes were assessed by light microscopy. The 3-[4, 5-dimethythiazol- 2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and flow cytometry were used to determine cell viability and membrane integrity, respectively. Cellular adhesion and micromotion of epithelial cells were measured in real time by electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing. Cells exposed to saline-solution eluate appeared rounded, were lifted from the culture plates, and demonstrated significantly increased metabolic inactivity or cell death (P <0.05). Saliva eluates did not induce significant changes in cell viability compared with untreated cells. Flow cytometry and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing showed that cells treated with saline-solution eluate exhibited compromised membrane integrity, and reduced cell-to-cell contact and mobility when compared with saliva-eluate treatment. Exposure to Invisalign plastic caused changes in viability, membrane permeability, and adhesion of epithelial cells in a saline-solution environment. Microleakage and hapten formation secondary to compromised epithelial integrity might lead to isocyanate allergy, which could be systemic or localized to gingiva. However, these results suggest that saliva might offer protection. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An efficient method of material recycling of municipal plastic waste

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fortelný, Ivan; Michálková, Danuše; Kruliš, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 9 (2004), s. 975-979 ISSN 0141-3910. [IUPAC Microsymposium on Degradation, Stabilisation and Recycling of Polymers /42./. Prague, 14.07.2003-17.07.2003] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS4050008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : recycling * municipal plastic waste * compatibilisation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.685, year: 2004

  5. BIOFILTERS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT AFTER RECYCLED PLASTIC MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Irena Kania-Surowiec

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of using biological deposits in wastewater treatment of recycled plastics were presented. There are many aspects of this issue that should be considered to be able to use information technology solutions in the industry. This includes, inter alia, specify the types of laboratory tests based on the analysis of changes in the fluid during the wastewater treatment process, knowledge and selection factors for proper growth of biofilm in the deposit and to develop the...

  6. Development of a formalism of movable cellular automaton method for numerical modeling of fracture of heterogeneous elastic-plastic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Psakhie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A general approach to realization of models of elasticity, plasticity and fracture of heterogeneous materials within the framework of particle-based numerical methods is proposed in the paper. It is based on building many-body forces of particle interaction, which provide response of particle ensemble correctly conforming to the response (including elastic-plastic behavior and fracture of simulated solids. Implementation of proposed approach within particle-based methods is demonstrated by the example of the movable cellular automaton (MCA method, which integrates the possibilities of particle-based discrete element method (DEM and cellular automaton methods. Emergent advantages of the developed approach to formulation of many-body interaction are discussed. Main of them are its applicability to various realizations of the concept of discrete elements and a possibility to realize various rheological models (including elastic-plastic or visco-elastic-plastic and models of fracture to study deformation and fracture of solid-phase materials and media. Capabilities of particle-based modeling of heterogeneous solids are demonstrated by the problem of simulation of deformation and fracture of particle-reinforced metal-ceramic composites.

  7. Accelerated Aging of Polymer Composite Bridge Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Nancy Margaret; Blackwood, Larry Gene; Torres, Lucinda Laine; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo; Yoder, Timothy Scott

    1999-03-01

    Accelerated aging research on samples of composite material and candidate ultraviolet (UV) protective coatings is determining the effects of six environmental factors on material durability. Candidate fastener materials are being evaluated to determine corrosion rates and crevice corrosion effects at load-bearing joints. This work supports field testing of a 30-ft long, 18-ft wide polymer matrix composite (PMC) bridge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Durability results and sensor data from tests with live loads provide information required for determining the cost/benefit measures to use in life-cycle planning, determining a maintenance strategy, establishing applicable inspection techniques, and establishing guidelines, standards, and acceptance criteria for PMC bridges for use in the transportation infrastructure.

  8. Strategies to improve the mechanical properties of starch-based materials: plasticization and natural fibers reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lopez-Gil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable polymers are starting to be introduced as raw materials in the food-packaging market. Nevertheless, their price is very high. Starch, a fully biodegradable and bioderived polymer is a very interesting alternative due to its very low price. However, the use of starch as the polymer matrix for the production of rigid food packaging, such as trays, is limited due to its poor mechanical properties, high hidrophilicity and high density. This work presents two strategies to overcome the poor mechanical properties of starch. First, the plasticization of starch with several amounts of glycerol to produce thermoplastic starch (TPS and second, the production of biocomposites by reinforcing TPS with promising fibers, such as barley straw and grape waste. The mechanical properties obtained are compared with the values predicted by models used in the field of composites; law of mixtures, Kerner-Nielsen and Halpin-Tsai. To evaluate if the materials developed are suitable for the production of food-packaging trays, the TPS-based materials with better mechanical properties were compared with commercial grades of oil-based polymers, polypropylene (PP and polyethylene-terphthalate (PET, and a biodegradable polymer, polylactic acid (PLA.

  9. The Plastic Bakery : A Case of Material Driven Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majumdar, P.; Karana, E.; Sonneveld, M.H.; Karana, E.; Giaccardi, E.; Nimkulrat, N.; Niedderer, K.; Camere, S.

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of scholars argue that understanding how people experience materials in products, i.e. Materials Experience, is essential in
    designing meaningful material applications. Material Driven Design (MDD) has been developed as the method to understand these experiential traits
    of

  10. Machinability of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper deals with the study of machinability of GFRP composite tubes of different fiber orientation angle vary from 300 to 900. Machining studies were carried out on an all geared lathe using three different cutting tools: namely Carbide (K-20), Cubic Boron Nitride (CBN) and Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD). Experiments ...

  11. Excellent plasticity of a new Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite upon dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R.F. [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Jiao, Z.M. [Institute of Applied Mechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Y.S.; Wang, Z. [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Z.H.; Ma, S.G. [Institute of Applied Mechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Qiao, J.W., E-mail: qiaojunwei@gmail.com [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-11-20

    Quasi-static and dynamic compressive properties of in-situ Ti{sub 60}Zr{sub 14}V{sub 12}Cu{sub 4}Be{sub 10} bulk metallic glass matrix composites containing ductile dendrites were investigated. Upon quasi-static compressive loading, the composite exhibits a high fracture strength of ~2,600 MPa, combined with a considerable plasticity of ~40% at room temperature. However, upon dynamic loading, an excellent plasticity of ~16% can be obtained due to the abundant dislocations and severe lattice distortions within dendrites and multiplication of shear bands within the glass matrix analyzed by transmission-electron microscopy. A constitutive relationship is obtained by Johnson-Cook plasticity model, which is employed to model the dynamic flow stress behavior. In addition, under dynamic compression, the adiabatic temperature rise increases with increasing strain rates, resulting in that the softening effect within the glass matrix is obviously enhanced during deformation.

  12. Durability and plasticity of a material under different trajectories cycle loading in dependence on the loading prehistory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozharovskij, N.S.; Bobyr', N.I.

    1979-01-01

    Results of investigations into the durability and plasticity of a material under combined proportional cyclic loading over different trajectories depending upon the values of intensity of preliminary plastic deformation obtained by different loading methods are presented. The effect of loading prehistory type on material plastic properties and its durability are shown

  13. Durability and plasticity of a material under different trajectories cycle loading in dependence on the loading prehistory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozharovskii, N S; Bobyr, N I [Kievskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1979-12-01

    Results of investigations into the durability and plasticity of a material under combined proportional cyclic loading over different trajectories depending upon the values of intensity of preliminary plastic deformation obtained by different loading methods are presented. The effect of loading prehistory type on material plastic properties and its durability are shown.

  14. Failure of structural elements made of polymer supported composite materials during the multiyear natural aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinkov, Pavel; Ogorodov, Leonid; Grabovyy, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Modern high-rise construction introduces a number of limitations and tasks. In addition to durability, comfort and profitability, projects should take into account energy efficiency and environmental problems. Polymer building materials are used as substitutes for materials such as brick, concrete, metal, wood and glass, and in addition to traditional materials. Plastic materials are light, can be formed into complex shapes, durable and low, and also possess a wide range of properties. Plastic materials are available in various forms, colors and textures and require minimal or no color. They are resistant to heat transfer and diffusion of moisture and do not suffer from metal corrosion or microbial attack. Polymeric materials, including thermoplastics, thermoset materials and wood-polymer composites, have many structural and non-structural applications in the construction industry. They provide unique and innovative solutions at a low cost, and their use is likely to grow in the future. A number of polymer composite materials form complex material compositions, which are applied in the construction in order to analyze the processes of damage accumulation under the conditions of complex nonstationary loading modes, and to determine the life of structural elements considering the material aging. This paper present the results of tests on short-term compression loading with a deformation rate of v = 2 mm/min using composite samples of various shapes and sizes.

  15. Study on mechanical properties of the laminated composite materials with compatible heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashkov, P.O.; Pektemirov, B.G.; Yaroshenko, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    Considered is the behaviour during axial extension of trilament composite materials, the mechanical properties of which are formed mainly by heat treatment. Application in the composite of the materials with compatible heat treatment is most rational. It is shown that for (ATsMg+N18K8M5T+ATsMg), (KhN78+VKS+KhH78) composites, the constituents of which are relatively plastic and tightly bound with each other, the tensile strength and uniform strain are changed additively

  16. Additive Manufacturing of Composites and Complex Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spowart, Jonathan E.; Gupta, Nikhil; Lehmhus, Dirk

    2018-03-01

    Advanced composite materials form an important class of high-performance industrial materials used in weight-sensitive applications such as aerospace structures, automotive structures and sports equipment. In many of these applications, parts are made in small production runs, are highly customized and involve long process development times. Developments in additive manufacturing (AM) methods have helped in overcoming many of these limitations. The special topic of Additive Manufacturing of Composites and Complex Materials captures the state of the art in this area by collecting nine papers that present much novel advancement in this field. The studies under this topic show advancement in the area of AM of carbon fiber and graphene-reinforced composites with high thermal and electrical conductivities, development of new hollow glass particle-filled syntactic foam filaments for printing lightweight structures and integration of sensors or actuators during AM of metallic parts. Some of the studies are focused on process optimization or modification to increase the manufacturing speed or tuning manufacturing techniques to enable AM of new materials.

  17. Structural Behaviour of Strengthened Composite Materials. Experimental Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Munteanu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Masonry represents one of the earliest structural materials used by mankind. A lot of the ancient building structures were made using masonry. A large number of these buildings have been stated historical monuments. Most commonly masonry elements which are able to cover large spans was masonry arches. The paper makes a detailed presentation on structural behaviour and failure mechanisms of a horizontally loaded masonry arch. The arch model was built at a 1 : 1 scale using solid bricks and M10Z mortar. It was firstly loaded with vertically acting dead loads and with horizontal load acting in its plane. In this loading hypothesis, a plastic hinge occurred leading to the failure of the arch and loss of load bearing capacity. In the next stage of the experimental program, the arch was strengthened using a composite material membrane at the upper face. The membrane consisted in a continuous, glass-fiber fabric and epoxy resin. After proper curing, the same loading hypothesis was used. The failure mechanisms changed and a larger horizontal loading level was noticed. Further on, the arch was rehabilitated using a different composite material layout, the membrane was applied both on upper and bottom faces as well as partially on the lateral faces of the arch. This new rehabilitation layout leads to a significant increase in the load bearing capacity of the arch. The failure mechanisms were changed causing a significantly better overall structural behaviour of the arch.

  18. Decay resistance of wood-plastic composites reinforced with extracted or delignified wood flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Yao Chen; Nicole M. Stark; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Yongming Fan; Jianmin Gao

    2014-01-01

    The moisture and decay resistance of wood-plastic composites (WPCs) reinforced with extracted or delignified wood flour (WF) was investigated. Three different extractions were preformed: toluene/ethanol (TE), acetone/water (AW), and hot water (HW). Delignification (DL) was performed using a sodium chlorite/acetic acid solution. All WPCs specimens were made with 50% by...

  19. Wood-plastic composites utilizing wood flours derived from fast- growing trees common to the midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are several non- or under-utilized hardwood trees common to the Midwestern states. Wood flour (WF) derived from fast-growing Midwest trees (Osage orange, Black Locust and Red Mulberry) were evaluated as a source of bio-based fiber reinforcements. Wood plastic composites (WPC) of high density p...

  20. Wood-plastic composites using thermomechanical pulp made from oxalic acid-pretreated red pine chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.E. Winandy; N.M. Stark; E. Horn

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics and properties of wood fiber is one of many factors of critical importance to the performance of wood-plastic composites. In commercial thermo-mechanical pulping (TMP) of wood chips to produce fibers, high temperatures (>100°C) are used to separate the fibers during TMP refining. These mechanical pressures and temperatures are usually modulated...

  1. Wood plastic composites from modified wood. Part 3. Durability of WPCs with bioderived matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westin, M.; Larsson-Brelid, P.; Segerholm, B.K.; Oever, van den M.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The decay resistance of fully bio-derived wood plastic composites, WPCs, was tested in both laboratory and field tests. The laboratory tests were performed according to modified versions of AWPA E10 (soil-block test) and ENV 807 (tests in three un-sterile soils) and the field tests according to EN

  2. Properties of wood-plastic composites (WPCs) reinforced with extracted and delignified wood flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao Chen; Nicole M. Stark; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Jianmin Gao; Yongming Fan

    2014-01-01

    The water sorption and mechanical properties of wood-plastic composites (WPCs) made of extracted and delignified wood flour (WF) has been investigated. WF was prepared by extraction with the solvent systems toluene/ethanol (TE), acetone/water (AW), and hot water (HW), and its delignification was conducted by means of sodium chlorite/acetic acid (AA) solution. A 2 4...

  3. Laboratory and exterior decay of wood plastic composite boards: voids analysis and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace Sun; Rebecca E. Ibach; Meghan Faillace; Marek Gnatowski; Jessie A. Glaeser; John Haight

    2016-01-01

    After exposure in the field and laboratory soil block culture testing, the void content of wood–plastic composite (WPC) decking boards was compared to unexposed samples. A void volume analysis was conducted based on calculations of sample density and from micro-computed tomography (microCT) data. It was found that reference WPC contains voids of different sizes from...

  4. Surface characterization of weathered wood-plastic composites produced from modified wood flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    James S. Fabiyi; Armando G. McDonald; Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    The effects of weathering on the surface properties of wood-plastic composites (WPC) were examined. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) based WPCs made from modified wood flour (untreated, extractives free, and holocellulose (delignified) fibers) were subjected to accelerated (xenon-arc) weathering. Colorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy were employed to...

  5. Recent activities in flame retardancy of wood-plastic composites at the Forest Products Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Nicole M. Stark; Nadir Ayrilmis

    2011-01-01

    For a variety of reasons, wood-plastic composite (WPC) products are widely available for some building applications. In applications such as outdoor decking, WPCs have gained a significant share of the market. As an option to improve the efficient use of wood fiber, the USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory (FPL), has an extensive research program on WPCs....

  6. Properties of flat-pressed wood plastic composites containing fire retardants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Jan. T. Benthien; Heiko Thoemen; Robert H. White

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the flat-pressed wood plastic composites (WPCs) incorporated with various fire retardants (FRs) [5 or 15% by weight (wt)] at 50 wt % of the wood flour (WF). The WPC panels were made from dry-blended WF, polypropylene (PP) with maleic anhydride grafted PP (2 wt %), and FR powder formulations using a...

  7. Moisture Performance of wood-plastic composites reinforced with extracted and delignified wood flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao Chen; Nicole M. Stark; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Jianmin Gao; Yongming Fan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of using extracted and delignified wood flour on water sorption properties of wood–plastic composites. Wood flour (WF) extraction was performed with three solvent systems: toluene/ethanol (TE), acetone/water (AW), and hot water (HW); delignification was conducted using sodium chlorite/acetic acid solution. A 24 full-factorial...

  8. Composition dependence of the synergistic effect of nucleating agent and plasticizer in poly(lactic acid: A Mixture Design study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Fehri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Blends consisting of commercial poly(lactic acid (PLA, poly(lactic acid oligomer (OLA8 as plasticizer and a sulfonic salt of a phthalic ester and poly(D-lactic acid as nucleating agents were prepared by melt extrusion, following a Mixture Design approach, in order to systematically study mechanical and thermal properties as a function of composition. The full investigation was carried out by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA and tensile tests. The crystallization half-time was also studied at 105 °C as a function of the blends composition. A range of compositions in which the plasticizer and the nucleation agent minimized the crystallization half-time in a synergistic way was clearly identified thanks to the application of the Mixture Design approach. The results allowed also the identification of a composition range to maximize the crystallinity developed during the rapid cooling below glass transition temperature in injection moulding, thus allowing an easier processing of PLA based materials. Moreover the mechanical properties were discussed by correlating them to the chemical structural features and thermal behaviour of blends.

  9. Application of electron-chemical curing in the production of thin composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopetchenov, V.; Shik, V.; Konev, V.; Kurapov, A.; Misin, I.; Gavrilov, V.; Malik, V. (Polyrad Research and Production Co., Moscow (Russian Federation))

    Thousands of tons of various thin composite materials in rolls for electrotechnical and domestic application including a whole range of electrical insulating materials, such as varnished and polymer fabrics, glass-micatapes, prepregs, thin laminated plastics and clad laminates, materials for decorative and domestic purposes - pressure sensitive adhesive tape and laminates, covering and finishing compositions based on fabrics, films and papers are produced. An important advantage of the electron-chemical processing in the production of composite materials is an essential energy saving (reduction of energy consumption 3-5 times). Absence of the organic diluents in binders decreases fire and explosion hazards of the production and sufficiently decreases danger for the environment of the technology used. Research and Production Company ''Polyrad'' is engaged in the development of technologies and equipment for the production of thin composite materials by the Electron-Chemical Method. (author).

  10. Application of electron-chemical curing in the production of thin composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopetchenov, V.; Shik, V.; Konev, V.; Kurapov, A.; Misin, I.; Gavrilov, V.; Malik, V.

    1993-01-01

    Thousands of tons of various thin composite materials in rolls for electrotechnical and domestic application including a whole range of electrical insulating materials, such as varnished and polymer fabrics, glass-micatapes, prepregs, thin laminated plastics and clad laminates, materials for decorative and domestic purposes - pressure sensitive adhesive tape and laminates, covering and finishing compositions based on fabrics, films and papers are produced. An important advantage of the electron-chemical processing in the production of composite materials is an essential energy saving (reduction of energy consumption 3-5 times). Absence of the organic diluents in binders decreases fire and explosion hazards of the production and sufficiently decreases danger for the environment of the technology used. Research and Production Company ''Polyrad'' is engaged in the development of technologies and equipment for the production of thin composite materials by the Electron-Chemical Method. (author)

  11. Final Report: Development of Renewable Microbial Polyesters for Cost Effective and Energy-Efficient Wood-Plastic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David N. Thompson, Robert W. Emerick, Alfred B. England, James P. Flanders, Frank J. Loge, Katherine A. Wiedeman, Michael P. Wolcott

    2010-04-08

    The forestry, wood and paper industries in the United States provide thousands of productive well-paying jobs; however, in the face of the recent economic downturn it faces significant challenges in remaining economically viable and competitive. To compete successfully on a global market that is increasingly driven by the need for sustainable products and practices, the industry must improve margins and diversify product lines while continuing to produce the staple products. One approach that can help to accomplish this goal sustainably is the forest biorefinery. In the forest biorefinery, traditional waste streams are utilized singly or in combination to manufacture additional products in a profitable and environmentally sustainable manner. In this project, we proposed to produce wood fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites (WFRTCs) using microbial thermoplastic polyesters in place of petroleum-derived plastic. WFRTCs are a rapidly growing product area, averaging a 38% growth rate since 1997. Their production is dependent on substantial quantities of petroleum based thermoplastics, increasing their overall energy costs by over 230% when compared to traditional Engineered Wood Products (EWP). Utilizing bio-based thermoplastics for these materials can reduce our dependence on foreign petroleum. Renewable microbial polyesters are not currently used in WFRTCs primarily because their production costs are several times higher than those of conventional petrochemical-derived plastics, limiting their use to small specialty markets. The strategy for this project was to economically produce WFRTCs using microbial polyesters by reducing or eliminating the most costly steps in the bio-plastic production. This would be achieved by producing them in and from waste effluents from the municipal and forest products sectors, and by eliminating the costly purification steps. After production the plasticladen biosolids would be dried and used directly to replace petroleum

  12. Stratospheric experiments on curing of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudinov, Viacheslav; Kondyurin, Alexey; Svistkov, Alexander L.; Efremov, Denis; Demin, Anton; Terpugov, Viktor; Rusakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    Future space exploration requires a large light-weight structure for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories and other constructions. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the technology of polymerization of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment on Erath orbit. In orbit, the material is exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, plasma of free space due to cosmic rays, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The development of appropriate polymer matrix composites requires an understanding of the chemical processes of polymer matrix curing under the specific free space conditions to be encountered. The goal of the stratospheric flight experiment is an investigation of the effect of the stratospheric conditions on the uncured polymer matrix of the composite material. The unique combination of low residual pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short-wave UV component, cosmic rays and other aspects associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. We have done the stratospheric flight experiments with uncured composites (prepreg). A balloon with payload equipped with heater, temperature/pressure/irradiation sensors, microprocessor, carrying the samples of uncured prepreg has been launched to stratosphere of 25-30 km altitude. After the flight, the samples have been tested with FTIR, gel-fraction, tensile test and DMA. The effect of cosmic radiation has been observed. The composite was successfully cured during the stratospheric flight. The study was supported by RFBR grants 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011.

  13. Using Composite Materials in a Cryogenic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batton, William D.; Dillard, James E.; Rottmund, Matthew E.; Tupper, Michael L.; Mallick, Kaushik; Francis, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the design and operation of an extended-shaft cryogenic pump to increase the efficiency of pumping. In general, the efficiency of pumping a cryogenic fluid is limited by thermal losses which is itself caused by pump inefficiency and leakage of heat through the pump structure. A typical cryogenic pump includes a drive shaft and two main concentric static components (an outer pressure containment tube and an intermediate static support tube) made from stainless steel. The modifications made include replacement of the stainless-steel drive shaft and the concentric static stainless-steel components with components made of a glass/epoxy composite. The leakage of heat is thus reduced because the thermal conductivity of the composite is an order of magnitude below that of stainless steel. Taking advantage of the margin afforded by the decrease in thermal conductivity, the drive shaft could be shortened to increase its effective stiffness, thereby increasing the rotordynamic critical speeds, thereby further making it possible to operate the pump at a higher speed to increase pumping efficiency. During the modification effort, an analysis revealed that substitution of the shorter glass/epoxy shaft for the longer stainless-steel shaft was not, by itself, sufficient to satisfy the rotordynamic requirements at the desired increased speed. Hence, it became necessary to increase the stiffness of the composite shaft. This stiffening was accomplished by means of a carbon-fiber-composite overwrap along most of the length of the shaft. Concomitantly with the modifications described thus far, it was necessary to provide for joining the composite-material components with metallic components required by different aspects of the pump design. An adhesive material formulated specially to bond the composite and metal components was chosen as a means to satisfy these requirements.

  14. The elastic response of composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laws, N.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of linear elasticity is used to study the elastic response of composite materials. The main concern is the prediction of overall moduli. Some attention is paid to the problem of deciding upon when the idea of an overall modulus is meaningful. In addition it is shown how to calculate some rigorous bounds on the overall moduli, and some predictions of the self-consistent method are discussed. The paper mainly concentrates on isotropic dispersions of spheres, unidirectional fibre-reinforced materials and laminates. (author)

  15. A new approach for modeling composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz de la Osa, R.; Moreno, F.; Saiz, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    The increasing use of composite materials is due to their ability to tailor materials for special purposes, with applications evolving day by day. This is why predicting the properties of these systems from their constituents, or phases, has become so important. However, assigning macroscopical optical properties for these materials from the bulk properties of their constituents is not a straightforward task. In this research, we present a spectral analysis of three-dimensional random composite typical nanostructures using an Extension of the Discrete Dipole Approximation (E-DDA code), comparing different approaches and emphasizing the influences of optical properties of constituents and their concentration. In particular, we hypothesize a new approach that preserves the individual nature of the constituents introducing at the same time a variation in the optical properties of each discrete element that is driven by the surrounding medium. The results obtained with this new approach compare more favorably with the experiment than previous ones. We have also applied it to a non-conventional material composed of a metamaterial embedded in a dielectric matrix. Our version of the Discrete Dipole Approximation code, the EDDA code, has been formulated specifically to tackle this kind of problem, including materials with either magnetic and tensor properties.

  16. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  17. Improved Materials for Composite and Adhesive Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Analysis of Thick Composites," 28th National Society for Advancement of Material and Process Engineering Symposium, Disneyland Hotel, Anaheim... Grant , "Deconvolution as an Aid to Quantification in Electron Spectroscopy Studies of Surfaces and Thin Films," IX International Vacuum Congress, V...International Conference on Solid Surfaces, Madrid, Spain, Sept. 26-Oct. 1, 1983. 8. M. F. Koenig and J. T. Grant , "Direct Comparison of Deconvoluted

  18. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballif, III, John L.; Yuan, Wei W.

    1980-01-01

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  19. Thermally Conductive Structural 2D Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Dimensional Pitch Polyimide Composite Micrographs ........ 27 Figure 23. 4-Ply Silver Polyimide Laminate ...through-thickness thermal conductivity of up to 20 W/m.K. This novel structural prepreg material will be developed through engineering of an optimal fiber...with an EPON 862/Epikure W epoxy resin system to form unidirectional prepreg tapes. Each prepreg was then cut to 6 inch by 6 inch plies and

  20. A fiber bundle-plastic chain model for quasi-brittle materials under uniaxial loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Zhi; Yu, Zhiwu

    2015-01-01

    A fiber bundle-plastic chain model for quasi-brittle materials under both uniaxial compression and tension conditions is developed. By introducing a plastic chain model into the fiber bundle model, a bundle-chain model for quasi-brittle materials is proposed with physical considerations. The model achieves a novel and convenient approach to describe the stochastic effective stress-driven plasticity. It is found that the numerical solutions obtained with this model agree with experimental results when subjected to both monotonic and cyclic uniaxial loading. The model generates a numerical solution with higher accuracy than the present models, when compared with the experimental results on certain problems. An example is shown which utilizes this model to describe the stochastic properties of a constitutive model given as standard. Furthermore, the difference between the existing plastic fiber bundle models in the literature and this model is also obtained in this work. (paper)

  1. Simulation of X-ray diffraction-line broadening due to dislocations in a model composite material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Cleveringa, H.H.M.; Delhez, R; van der Giessen, E.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray diffraction-line profiles of two-dimensional, plastically deformed model composite materials are calculated and analysed in detail. The composite consists of elastic reinforcements in a crystalline solid and is subjected to macroscopic shear. Slip occurs in the matrix only due to the

  2. High-performance biodegradable polylactide composites fabricated using a novel plasticizer and functionalized eggshell powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Junjun; Li, Yi; Bai, Yungang; Li, Zonglin; Cao, Zengwen; Yu, Yancun; Han, Changyu; Dong, Lisong

    2018-06-01

    A novel polyester poly(diethylene glycol succinate) (PDEGS) was synthesized and evaluated as a plasticizer for polylactide (PLA) in this study. Meanwhile, an effective sustainable filler, functionalized eggshell powder (FES) with a surface layer of calcium phenyphosphonate was also prepared. Then, PLA biocomposites were prepared from FES and PDEGS using a facile melt blending process. The addition of 15 wt% PDEGS as plasticizer showed good miscibility with PLA macromolecules and increased the chain mobility of PLA. The crystallization kinetics of PLA composites revealed that the highly effective nucleating FES significantly improved the crystallization ability of PLA at both of non-isothermal and isothermal conditions. In addition, the effective plasticizer and well-dispersed FES increased the elongation at break from 6% of pure PLA to over 200% for all of the plasticized PLA composites. These biodegradable PLA biocomposites, coupled with excellent crystallization ability and tunable mechanical properties, demonstrate their potential as alternatives to traditional commodity plastics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Flexible Composite-Material Pressure Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Glen; Haggard, Roy; Harris, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    A proposed lightweight pressure vessel would be made of a composite of high-tenacity continuous fibers and a flexible matrix material. The flexibility of this pressure vessel would render it (1) compactly stowable for transport and (2) more able to withstand impacts, relative to lightweight pressure vessels made of rigid composite materials. The vessel would be designed as a structural shell wherein the fibers would be predominantly bias-oriented, the orientations being optimized to make the fibers bear the tensile loads in the structure. Such efficient use of tension-bearing fibers would minimize or eliminate the need for stitching and fill (weft) fibers for strength. The vessel could be fabricated by techniques adapted from filament winding of prior composite-material vessels, perhaps in conjunction with the use of dry film adhesives. In addition to the high-bias main-body substructure described above, the vessel would include a low-bias end substructure to complete coverage and react peak loads. Axial elements would be overlaid to contain damage and to control fiber orientation around side openings. Fiber ring structures would be used as interfaces for connection to ancillary hardware.

  4. Nanocellulose Composite Materials Synthesizes with Ultrasonic Agitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Timothy; Folken, Andrew; Fritch, Byron; Bradley, Derek

    We have extended current techniques in forming nanocellulose composite solids, suspensions and aerogels to enhance the breakdown of cellulose into its molecular components. Using only mechanical processing which includes ball milling, using a simple mortar and pestle, and ultrasonic agitation, we are able to create very low concentration uniform nanocellulose suspensions in water, as well as incorporate other materials such as graphite, carbon nanotubes, and magnetic materials. Of interest is that no chemical processing is necessary, nor is the use of nanoparticles, necessary for composite formation. Using both graphite and carbon nanotubes, we are able to achieve conducting nanocellulose solids and aerogels. Standard magnetic powder can also be incorporated to create magnetic solids. The technique also allows for the creation of an extremely fine nanocellulose suspension in water. Using extremely low concentrations, less than 1% cellulose by mass, along with careful control over processing parameters, we are able to achieve highly dilute, yet homogenous nanocellulose suspensions. When air dried, these suspensions have similar hardness and strength properties to those created with more typical starting cellulose concentrations (2-10%). However, when freeze-dried, these dilute suspensions form aerogels with a new morphology with much higher surface area than those with higher starting concentrations. We are currently examining the effect of this higher surface area on the properties of nanocellulose aerogel composites and how it influences the impact of incorporating nanocellulose into other polymer materials.

  5. Potential Markets for Wood-Plastic Composites in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, T. [Central Research Laboratory, Showa Denko K.K., Ota-Ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    1968-10-15

    The marketing possibilities of natural and treated woods are compared. A description is given of the advantages and disadvantages of these materials, together with the effects that improved quality might have on marketing prospects. Extensive reference tables illustrate the change in supply and demand over a number of years. (author)

  6. Grain dynamics and plastic properties of highly refined materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, Miguel; Retamal, Cesar, E-mail: mlagos@utalca.c, E-mail: cretamal@utalca.c [Facultad de IngenierI a, Universidad de Talca, Campus Los Niches, Curico (Chile)

    2010-12-15

    It has been shown that a grain boundary may undergo two competing classes of elastic instability when the in-plane shear stress exceeds the proper critical values. It may buckle acquiring a sinusoidal shape or may develop a periodic series of fissures, separating bands with a sigmoidal profile. The two instabilities lead to grain sliding, but the corresponding expressions relating the relative velocity between adjacent grains with stress do differ. The plastic properties for small strains were calculated for the two force laws, which we called force models A and B. A comparison of the theoretical results with published experimental data shows that model A, while giving predictions within the experimental uncertainties for a series of superplastic aluminium and titanium alloys, fails for Avesta 2304 steel. However, excellent results are obtained when model B is applied for this steel.

  7. Grain dynamics and plastic properties of highly refined materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagos, Miguel; Retamal, Cesar

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that a grain boundary may undergo two competing classes of elastic instability when the in-plane shear stress exceeds the proper critical values. It may buckle acquiring a sinusoidal shape or may develop a periodic series of fissures, separating bands with a sigmoidal profile. The two instabilities lead to grain sliding, but the corresponding expressions relating the relative velocity between adjacent grains with stress do differ. The plastic properties for small strains were calculated for the two force laws, which we called force models A and B. A comparison of the theoretical results with published experimental data shows that model A, while giving predictions within the experimental uncertainties for a series of superplastic aluminium and titanium alloys, fails for Avesta 2304 steel. However, excellent results are obtained when model B is applied for this steel.

  8. Grain dynamics and plastic properties of highly refined materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, Miguel; Retamal, César

    2010-12-01

    It has been shown that a grain boundary may undergo two competing classes of elastic instability when the in-plane shear stress exceeds the proper critical values. It may buckle acquiring a sinusoidal shape or may develop a periodic series of fissures, separating bands with a sigmoidal profile. The two instabilities lead to grain sliding, but the corresponding expressions relating the relative velocity between adjacent grains with stress do differ. The plastic properties for small strains were calculated for the two force laws, which we called force models A and B. A comparison of the theoretical results with published experimental data shows that model A, while giving predictions within the experimental uncertainties for a series of superplastic aluminium and titanium alloys, fails for Avesta 2304 steel. However, excellent results are obtained when model B is applied for this steel.

  9. Elution of Monomers from Provisional Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Daniel Schulz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the elution of substances from different materials used for the manufacturing of temporary indirect restorations, after storage in saliva and ethanol 75%. 10 samples of three chemically cured materials (Protemp 3 Garant, Systemp.c&b, and Trim and one light-cured material (Clip F were stored in saliva and ethanol 75% for 24 h, 7, and days 28 days. From the storage media at each time period, samples were prepared and analysed by LC-MS/MS, in order to access the elution of monomers. The results differed among the materials (P ≤ 0.05. No monomers were detected in the samples of Protemp 3 Garant and Clip F. Substances were detected only in ethanol samples of Systemp.c&b and Trim. The amount of BisGMA, TEGDMA, and UDMA 2 released from Systemp.c&b was higher compared to Trim. Storage time affected the release of substances (P ≤ 0.05. The highest release was observed within the first 24 h. It can be concluded that provisional resin composite materials do not show high release of monomers and this release is material dependent. However, the detection of additional peaks during the analysis, suggesting the formation of by-products of the eluted substances, may not be in favour of these materials with respect to their toxicity.

  10. Non-local plasticity effects on the tensile properties of a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2001-01-01

    For a metal reinforced by aligned short fibres the effect of a material length scale characterising the inelastic deformations of the metal is studied. The elastic-plastic constitutive relations used here to represent the nonlocal effects are formulated so that the instantaneous hardening moduli...... depend on the gradient of the effective plastic strain. Numerical cell-model analyses are used to obtain a parametric understanding of the influence of different combinations of the main material parameters. The analyses show a strong dependence on the fibre diameter for given values of all other...

  11. The influence of material properties on plastic hinge rotational capacity and strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, H.M.G.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.; Daniels, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    In this article the effects of standardised material stress-strain behaviours on plastic hinge length, moment and rotational capacity are investigated using a specially developed computer program. Material properties are described using three standard post-yield stress-strain characteristics, as

  12. Earthquake statistics inferred from plastic events in soft-glassy materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benzi, Roberto; Toschi, Federico; Trampert, Jeannot

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new approach for generating synthetic earthquake catalogues based on the physics of soft glasses. The continuum approach produces yield-stress materials based on Lattice-Boltzmann simulations. We show that, if the material is stimulated below yield stress, plastic events occur, which

  13. Steady State Crack Propagation in Layered Material Systems Displaying Visco-plastic Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2012-01-01

    The steady state fracture toughness of elastic visco-plastic materials is studied numerically, using both a conventional and a higher order model. Focus is on the combined effect of strain hardening, strain gradient hardening and strain rate hardening on cracking in layered material systems...

  14. Analytical, Numerical and Experimental Examination of Reinforced Composites Beams Covered with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimzade, A. A.; Tuhta, S.

    2012-03-01

    In the article, analytical, numerical (Finite Element Method) and experimental investigation results of beam that was strengthened with fiber reinforced plastic-FRP composite has been given as comparative, the effect of FRP wrapping number to the maximum load and moment capacity has been evaluated depending on this results. Carbon FRP qualitative dependences have been occurred between wrapping number and beam load and moment capacity for repair-strengthen the reinforced concrete beams with carbon fiber. Shown possibilities of application traditional known analysis programs, for the analysis of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) strengthened structures.

  15. Synthesizing Smart Polymeric and Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chaokun

    Smart materials have been widely investigated to explore new functionalities unavailable to traditional materials or to mimic the multifunctionality of biological systems. Synthetic polymers are particularly attractive as they already possess some of the attributes required for smart materials, and there are vast room to further enhance the existing properties or impart new properties by polymer synthesis or composite formulation. In this work, three types of smart polymer and composites have been investigated with important new applications: (1) healable polymer composites for structural application and healable composite conductor for electronic device application; (2) conducting polymer polypyrrole actuator for implantable medical device application; and (3) ferroelectric polymer and ceramic nanoparticles composites for electrocaloric effect based solid state refrigeration application. These application entail highly challenging materials innovation, and my work has led to significant progress in all three areas. For the healable polymer composites, well known intrinsically healable polymer 2MEP4F (a Diels-Alder crosslinked polymer formed from a monomer with four furan groups and another monomer with two maleimide groups) was first chosen as the matrix reinforced with fiber. Glass fibers were successfully functionalized with maleimide functional groups on their surface. Composites from functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F healable polymer were made to compare with composites made from commercial carbon fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. Dramatically improved short beam shear strength was obtained from composite of functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. The high cost of 2MEP4F polymer can potentially limit the large-scale application of the developed healable composite, we further developed a new healable polymer with much lower cost. This new polymer was formed through the Diels-Alder crosslinking of poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) and 1,1'-(Methylenedi-4

  16. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma treatment of cellulose based fillers for wood plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekobou, William; Englund, Karl; Pedrow, Patrick; Scudiero, Louis

    2011-10-01

    The main challenge of wood plastic composites (WPC) resides in the low interfacial adhesion due to incompatibility between the cellulose based filler that has a polar surface and most common matrixes, polyolefins which are non-polar. Plasma treatment is a promising technique for surface modification and its implementation into the processing of WPC would provide this industry with a versatile and nearly environmentally benign manufacturing tool. Our investigation aims at designing a cold atmospheric pressure plasma reactor for coating fillers with a hydrophobic material prior to compounding with the matrix. Deposition was achieved with our reactor that includes an array of high voltage needles, a grounded metal mesh, Ar as carrier gas and C2H2 as the precursor molecule. Parameters studied have included gas feed rates and applied voltage; FTIR, ESCA, AFM and SEM imaging were used for film diagnostics. We will also report on deposition rate and its dependence on radial and axial position as well as the effects of plasma-polymerized acetylene on the surface free energy of cellulose based substrates.

  17. Radiation sterilization of plastic packing materials and aseptic packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuoka, Keiko

    1986-01-01

    In the present day of 'satiation', quality, not quantity, is emphasized for foods, the consumers being oriented toward raw and healthy foodstuff. Aseptic Packaging is excellent means of conservation. While conventionally chemicals have been used for sterilization of packing materials for aseptic packaging, the sterilization by radiation is used in part recently. The following are described : history of aseptic packaging and its features, sterilization by radiation, γ-ray sterilization of large-sized containers, the development of an aseptic packaging system using electron rays, the occurrence of offensive odors from packing materials (comparison of odors from various materials, volatile substances occurring in irradiated polyethylene, influence of film grade upon the formation of carboxylic acid, influence of the irradiation conditions upon the occurrences of volatile substances, volatile substances occurring in the irradiation of bag-in-box packing materials), changes in properties of the packing materials. (Mori, K.)

  18. Modeling of ECC materials using numerical formulations based on plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2006-01-01

    scale it is shown that the cohesive law for a unidirectional fiber reinforced cementitious composite can be found through superposition of the cohesive law for mortar and the fiber bridging curve. On the meso scale I it is shown that the maximum crack opening observed during crack propagation in ECC...

  19. Gold nanoparticles in plastic columnar discotic liquid crystalline material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Mukesh, E-mail: mukeshphysics927@gmail.com [Center of Material Sciences, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Kumar, Sandeep [Raman Research Institute, C.V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Dhar, Ravindra, E-mail: dr.ravindra.dhar@gmail.com [Center of Material Sciences, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India)

    2016-05-10

    Highlights: • Dispersion of Gold nanoparticles in a discotic liquid crystal has been studied. • σ{sub i} increases by seven orders of magnitude in the case of 1.2 wt% GNPs composites. • X-ray scattering results revel that a decrement in the core–core separation. • Study suggests that dispersion at low concentrations is uniform. • Band gap has decreased due to dispersion of GNPs in HAT4. - Abstract: We have studied the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on the thermodynamical, optical and dielectrical parameters of a discotic liquid crystal (DLC) namely hexabutyloxytriphenylene (HAT4). It has been observed that with the increase of GNPs concentration in DLC, composites shows two different regions. In the first regions i.e. low concentrations (<1 wt%), columnar hexagonal-isotropic (Col{sub hp}-I{sub L}) transition temperature and enthalpy (ΔH) decrease rapidly while in the second region i.e. higher concentrations (>1 wt%) Col{sub hp}-I{sub L} transition temperature and ΔH are approximately constant. It has been observed that, in the case of composites having 0.2 and 0.6 wt% of GNPs, conductivity has enhanced but it is poor as compared to the composite having 1.2 wt% of GNPs. For 1.2 wt% of GNPs, conductivity has increased by seven orders of magnitude as compared to the DLC. Optical study suggests that band gap of nanocomposites has decreased due to dispersion of GNPs.

  20. Gamma irradiation technology for composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Guillermo R; Gonzalez, Maria E.

    2003-01-01

    A composite of sugar cane bagasse and low-density polyethylene was prepared. Gamma -radiation of Cobalt-60 (Co 60 ) and reactive additives were used, to make compatible the lignocellulosic fibers with the polymeric matrix. Gamma-radiation was applied in different stages with different purposes: a) Irradiation of cellulosic fibers treated or not with reactive additive, in presence of air, to produce macro radicals increasing their reactivity during extrusion with polyethylene. A homogeneous and fusible material resulted that can be used as raw material in thermoforming processes with cost in between that of its constitutive elements; b) Irradiation of final products, to produce the cross-linking of polymeric chains. The fibers remain trapped in the cross-linked matrix. A homogeneous and infusible material with high mechanical properties was obtained. (author)

  1. Corn gluten meal as a biodegradable matrix material in wood fibre reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beg, M.D.H.; Pickering, K.L.; Weal, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate corn gluten meal (CGM) as a biodegradable matrix material for wood fibre reinforced composites. CGM was used alone, as well as hybridized with polypropylene, and reinforced with radiata pine (Pinus Radiata) fibre using a twin-screw extruder followed by injection moulding. Tensile testing, scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were carried out to assess the composites. For composites from CGM and wood fibres, extrusion was carried out with the aid of the following plasticizers: octanoic acid, glycerol, polyethylene glycol and water. Windows of processability for the different plasticizers were obtained for all plasticizers. These were found to lie between 20 and 50 wt.% of plasticizer with a maximum of approximately 20% wood fibre reinforcement. The best mechanical properties were obtained with a matrix containing 10 wt.% octanoic acid and 30 wt.% water, which gave a tensile strength and Young's modulus of 18.7 MPa and 4 GPa, respectively. Hybrid matrix composites were compounded with a maleated polypropylene coupling agent and benzoyl peroxide as a cross-linking agent. The highest tensile strength and Young's modulus obtained from hybrid matrix composites were 36.9 MPa and 5.8 GPa with 50 wt.% fibre

  2. Corn gluten meal as a biodegradable matrix material in wood fibre reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beg, M.D.H. [Department of Materials and Process Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand); Pickering, K.L. [Department of Materials and Process Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)]. E-mail: klp@waikato.ac.nz; Weal, S.J. [Department of Materials and Process Engineering, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2005-12-05

    This study was undertaken to investigate corn gluten meal (CGM) as a biodegradable matrix material for wood fibre reinforced composites. CGM was used alone, as well as hybridized with polypropylene, and reinforced with radiata pine (Pinus Radiata) fibre using a twin-screw extruder followed by injection moulding. Tensile testing, scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were carried out to assess the composites. For composites from CGM and wood fibres, extrusion was carried out with the aid of the following plasticizers: octanoic acid, glycerol, polyethylene glycol and water. Windows of processability for the different plasticizers were obtained for all plasticizers. These were found to lie between 20 and 50 wt.% of plasticizer with a maximum of approximately 20% wood fibre reinforcement. The best mechanical properties were obtained with a matrix containing 10 wt.% octanoic acid and 30 wt.% water, which gave a tensile strength and Young's modulus of 18.7 MPa and 4 GPa, respectively. Hybrid matrix composites were compounded with a maleated polypropylene coupling agent and benzoyl peroxide as a cross-linking agent. The highest tensile strength and Young's modulus obtained from hybrid matrix composites were 36.9 MPa and 5.8 GPa with 50 wt.% fibre.

  3. Properties of nanoclay PVA composites materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. M. Ali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/ Na-rich Montmorillonite (MMT nanocomposites were prepared using solution method to create polymer-clay nanocomposite (PCN material. The PCN material was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD, demonstrating polymer-clay intercalation that has a high d-spacing (lower diffraction angles in the PCN XRD pattern, compared to the pure MMT clay XRD pattern, which has a low d-spacing (high diffraction angles. The nano-scanning electron microscope (NSEM was used to study the morphological image of the PVA, MMT and PCN materials. The results showed that intercalation that took place between the PVA and MMT produced the PCN material. The mechanical properties of the pure PVA and the intercalated polymer material were studied. It was found that the small amount of MMT clay made the tensile modulus and percentage of the total elongation of the nano-composite significantly higher than the pure PVA polymer value, due to polymer-clay intercalation. The thermal stability of the intercalated polymer has been studied using thermal analytical techniques such as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The results showed that the PCN material is more thermally stable than the pure PVA polymer.

  4. Design aid for shear strengthening of reinforced concrete T-joints using carbon fiber reinforced plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergely, Ioan

    The research presented in the present work focuses on the shear strengthening of beam column joints using carbon fiber composites, a material considered in seismic retrofit in recent years more than any other new material. These composites, or fiber reinforced polymers, offer huge advantages over structural steel reinforced concrete or timber. A few of these advantages are the superior resistance to corrosion, high stiffness to weight and strength to weight ratios, and the ability to control the material's behavior by selecting the orientation of the fibers. The design and field application research on reinforced concrete cap beam-column joints includes analytical investigations using pushover analysis; design of carbon fiber layout, experimental tests and field applications. Several beam column joints have been tested recently with design variables as the type of composite system, fiber orientation and the width of carbon fiber sheets. The surface preparation has been found to be critical for the bond between concrete and composite material, which is the most important factor in joint shear strengthening. The final goal of this thesis is to develop design aids for retrofitting reinforced concrete beam column joints. Two bridge bents were tested on the Interstate-15 corridor. One bent was tested in the as-is condition. Carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite sheets were used to externally reinforce the second bridge bent. By applying the composite, the displacement ductility has been doubled, and the bent overall lateral load capacity has been increased as well. The finite element model (using DRAIN-2DX) was calibrated to model the actual stiffness of the supports. The results were similar to the experimental findings.

  5. Finite element implementation and numerical issues of strain gradient plasticity with application to metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksson, Per; Gudmundson, Peter; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2009-01-01

    A framework of finite element equations for strain gradient plasticity is presented. The theoretical framework requires plastic strain degrees of freedom in addition to displacements and a plane strain version is implemented into a commercial finite element code. A couple of different elements...... of quadrilateral type are examined and a few numerical issues are addressed related to these elements as well as to strain gradient plasticity theories in general. Numerical results are presented for an idealized cell model of a metal matrix composite under shear loading. It is shown that strengthening due...... to fiber size is captured but strengthening due to fiber shape is not. A few modelling aspects of this problem are discussed as well. An analytic solution is also presented which illustrates similarities to other theories....

  6. Influence of Cellulose on the Mechanical and Thermal Stability of ABS Plastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Crews

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystalline cellulose was explored as possible biodegradable fillers in the fabrication of ABS plastic composites. TGA indicates that upon inclusion of cellulose microcrystals the thermal stability of the ABS plastics was improved significantly when compared to the neat ABS plastic counterparts. Furthermore, inclusion of extracted cellulose from plant biomass showed a higher thermal stability with maximum decomposition temperatures around 131.95°C and 124.19°C for cellulose from cotton and Hibiscus sabdariffa, respectively, when compared to that of the purchased cellulose. In addition, TMA revealed that the average CTE value for the neat ABS and 1 : 1 ratio of cellulose to ABS fabricated in this study was significantly lower than the reported CTE (ca. 73.8 μm/m°C.

  7. Micromechanical models for graded composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, T; Dvorak, G.J.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    1997-01-01

    of piecewise homogeneous layers with equivalent elastic properties estimated by Mori-Tanaka and self-consistent methods are also analysed under similar boundary conditions. Comparisons of the overall and local fields predicted by the discrete and homogenized models are made using a C/SiC composite system...... fields are predicted by Mori-Tanaka estimates. On the other hand, the response of graded materials with a skeletal microstructure in a wide transition zone between clearly defined matrix phases is better approximated by the self-consistent estimates. Certain exceptions are noted for loading by overall...... transverse shear stress; The results suggest that the averaging methods originally developed for statistically homogeneous aggregates may be selectively applied, with a reasonable degree of confidence, to aggregates dth composition gradients, subjected to both uniform and nonuniform overall loads. (C) 1997...

  8. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  9. Characterization of material composite marble-polyester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corpas, F. A.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we characterize a new material composite, formed with a polyester and crushed white marble mixture. The final purpose is double: to obtain a material for applications sufficiently competitive after an economic viability study, increasing the yield of the main commodity, using waste marble and improving the jobs in the quarries area. From the results obtained, we deduce then that this material could be used to inside and outside adornment.

    En este trabajo, caracterizamos un nuevo material compuesto, formado con una mezcla de poliéster y de mármol blanco triturado. El propósito final es doble: por un lado obtener un material para aplicaciones lo suficientemente competitivas como para que se pueda iniciar un estudio económico de viabilidad, aumentando el rendimiento de la materia prima y mejorando las salidas laborales de las comarcas extractoras. Para la caracterización del material se ha determinado el porcentaje adecuado de poliéster. Así como las propiedades mecánicas (flexión, compresión y dureza, químicas, fatiga térmica y su influencia a la exposición solar In order to characterized of material, we have determined the suitable porcentage of polyester Also we have carried out a study of the mechanical (stretching, resistance to traction, hardeness and thermal fatigue chemicals properties and solar radiation influence. De los resultados obtenidos, este material podría ser utilizado para ornamentación tanto de interior como de exterior.

  10. Carbon Fiber Composite Materials for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Jr., Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mainka, Hendrik [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Volkswagen (VW) is internationally recognized for quantity and quality of world-wide vehicle production and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is internationally recognized in materials research and development. With automotive production ramping up in the recently constructed VW Group of America facility in Chattanooga, Tennessee, ORNL and VW initiated discussions in 2012 concerning opportunities for collaboration around ORNL’s carbon fiber and composites programs. ORNL is conducting an internationally recognized program to develop and implement lower cost carbon fibers and composites for automotive and other “energy missions” for the US Department of Energy. Significant effort is ongoing in selecting, developing, and evaluating alternative precursors, developing and demonstrating advanced conversion techniques, and developing and tailoring surface treatment, sizings, and formatting fiber for specific composite matrices and end-use applications. ORNL already had North America’s most comprehensive suite of tools for carbon fiber research and development and established a semiproduction demonstration line referred to as the Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF) to facilitate implementation of low cost carbon fiber (LCCF) approaches in early 2013. ORNL and VW agreed to collaborate in a formal Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (NFE-12-03992) specifically focused on evaluating applicability of low cost carbon fiber products for potential vehicle components. The goal of the work outlined in this report was to develop and qualify uses for carbon fiber-reinforced structures in connection with civilian ground transportation. Significant progress was achieved in evaluating and understanding lignin-based precursor materials; however, availability of carbon fiber converted from lignin precursor combined with logistical issues associated with the Visa limitations for the VW participant resulted in significantly shortening of the collaboration

  11. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) SiC fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  12. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James

    2001-01-01

    Under the former NASA EPM Program, much initial progress was made in identifying constituent materials and processes for SiC/SiC ceramic composite hot-section components. This presentation discusses the performance benefits of these approaches and elaborates on further constituent and property improvements made under NASA UEET. These include specific treatments at NASA that significantly improve the creep and environmental resistance of the Sylramic(TM) Sic fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI Sic matrix. Also discussed are recent findings concerning the beneficial effects of certain 2D-fabric architectures and carbon between the BN interphase coating and Sic matrix.

  13. Intelligent Image Segment for Material Composition Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xiaodan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of material composition detection, the image analysis is an inevitable problem. Multilevel thresholding based OTSU method is one of the most popular image segmentation techniques. How, with the increase of the number of thresholds, the computing time increases exponentially. To overcome this problem, this paper proposed an artificial bee colony algorithm with a two-level topology. This improved artificial bee colony algorithm can quickly find out the suitable thresholds and nearly no trap into local optimal. The test results confirm it good performance.

  14. 40 CFR 63.5795 - How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.5795 How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or an existing affected source? (a) A reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new...

  15. Chemistry with Inexpensive Materials: Spray Bottles and Plastic Bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoltewicz, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Presents eight chemistry activities that are interesting and involve simple, easily available materials. Topics include mystery writing, valentine hearts, flame tests, evaporation race, buoyancy versus mass, determination of relative masses of gases, mole sample container, and cold and hot packs. (DDR)

  16. Development and Characterization of a Rate-Dependent Three-Dimensional Macroscopic Plasticity Model Suitable for Use in Composite Impact Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; DuBois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    Several key capabilities have been identified by the aerospace community as lacking in the material/models for composite materials currently available within commercial transient dynamic finite element codes such as LS-DYNA. Some of the specific desired features that have been identified include the incorporation of both plasticity and damage within the material model, the capability of using the material model to analyze the response of both three-dimensional solid elements and two dimensional shell elements, and the ability to simulate the response of composites composed with a variety of composite architectures, including laminates, weaves and braids. In addition, a need has been expressed to have a material model that utilizes tabulated experimentally based input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage as opposed to utilizing discrete input parameters (such as modulus and strength) and analytical functions based on curve fitting. To begin to address these needs, an orthotropic macroscopic plasticity based model suitable for implementation within LS-DYNA has been developed. Specifically, the Tsai-Wu composite failure model has been generalized and extended to a strain-hardening based orthotropic plasticity model with a non-associative flow rule. The coefficients in the yield function are determined based on tabulated stress-strain curves in the various normal and shear directions, along with selected off-axis curves. Incorporating rate dependence into the yield function is achieved by using a series of tabluated input curves, each at a different constant strain rate. The non-associative flow-rule is used to compute the evolution of the effective plastic strain. Systematic procedures have been developed to determine the values of the various coefficients in the yield function and the flow rule based on the tabulated input data. An algorithm based on the radial return method has been developed to facilitate the numerical implementation of the material

  17. Study of an athermal quasi static plastic deformation in a 2D granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie

    2017-11-01

    In crystalline materials, the plasticity has been well understood in terms of dynamics of dislocation, i.e. flow defects in the crystals where the flow defects can be directly visualized under a microscope. In a contrast, the plasticity in amorphous materials, i.e. glass, is still poorly understood due to the disordered nature of the materials. In this talk, I will discuss the recent results we have obtained in our ongoing research of the plasticity of a 2D glass in the athermal quasi static limit where the 2D glass is made of bi-disperse granular disks with very low friction. Starting from a densely packed homogeneous and isotropic initial state, we apply pure shear deformation to the system. For a sufficiently small strain, the response of the system is linear and elastic like; when the strain is large enough, the plasticity of the system gradually develops and eventually the shear bands are fully developed. In this study, we are particularly interested in how to relate the local plastic deformation to the macroscopic response of the system and also in the development of the shear bands.

  18. Towards long lasting zirconia-based composites for dental implants: Transformation induced plasticity and its consequence on ceramic reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveron, Helen; Fornabaio, Marta; Palmero, Paola; Fürderer, Tobias; Adolfsson, Erik; Lughi, Vanni; Bonifacio, Alois; Sergo, Valter; Montanaro, Laura; Chevalier, Jérôme

    2017-01-15

    Zirconia-based composites were developed through an innovative processing route able to tune compositional and microstructural features very precisely. Fully-dense ceria-stabilized zirconia ceramics (84vol% Ce-TZP) containing equiaxed alumina (8vol%Al 2 O 3 ) and elongated strontium hexa-aluminate (8vol% SrAl 12 O 19 ) second phases were obtained by conventional sintering. This work deals with the effect of the zirconia stabilization degree (CeO 2 in the range 10.0-11.5mol%) on the transformability and mechanical properties of Ce-TZP-Al 2 O 3 -SrAl 12 O 19 materials. Vickers hardness, biaxial flexural strength and Single-edge V-notched beam tests revealed a strong influence of ceria content on the mechanical properties. Composites with 11.0mol% CeO 2 or above exhibited the classical behaviour of brittle ceramics, with no apparent plasticity and very low strain to failure. On the contrary, composites with 10.5mol% CeO 2 or less showed large transformation-induced plasticity and almost no dispersion in strength data. Materials with 10.5mol% of ceria showed the highest values in terms of biaxial bending strength (up to 1.1GPa) and fracture toughness (>10MPa√m). In these ceramics, as zirconia transformation precedes failure, the Weibull modulus was exceptionally high and reached a value of 60, which is in the range typically reported for metals. The results achieved demonstrate the high potential of using these new strong, tough and stable zirconia-based composites in structural biomedical applications. Yttria-stabilized (Y-TZP) zirconia ceramics are increasingly used for developing metal-free restorations and dental implants. Despite their success related to their excellent mechanical resistance, Y-TZP can undergo Low Temperature Degradation which could be responsible for restoration damage or even worst the failure of the implant. Current research is focusing on strategies to improve the LTD resistance of Y-TZP or to develop alternative composites with better

  19. The Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties of Wood Plastic Composites by Selective Laser Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhe Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Wood-plastic composites (WPCs made by selective laser sintering (SLS approach of 3D printing offer many advantages over single polymer materials, such as low cost, sustainability, and better sintering accuracy. However, WPCs made via SLS are too weak to have widespread applications. In order to increase the mechanical properties of WPCs, a novel type of WPCs containing 0, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.15 wt % carbon nanotubes (CNT, 14 wt % wood fibers, 86 wt % polyether sulfone (PES was manufactured via SLS. The experimental results showed that the addition of small amount of CNTs can significantly increase the mechanical properties of the wood/PES composite material. The tensile strength, bending strength, and elasticity modulus were 76.3%, 227.9%, and 128.7% higher with 0.1 wt % CNTs than those without CNTs. The mechanical properties of specimens first increased and then decreased with the addition of CNTs. The SEM results of the specimens’ fracture morphology indicate that the preferable bonding interfaces between wood flour grains and PES grains were achieved by adding CNTs to the composites. There are two reasons why the composites possessed superior mechanical properties: CNTs facilitate the laser sintering process of WPCs due to their thermal conductivities, and CNTs directly reinforce WPCs.

  20. Turning of wood plastic composites by water jet and abrasive water jet

    OpenAIRE

    Hutyrová, Z.; Ščučka, J. (Jiří); Hloch, S. (Sergej); Hlaváček, P. (Petr); Zeleňák, M. (Michal)

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the verification of suitability of water jet and abrasive water jet application for the disintegration of rotating samples of wood plastic composites (WPCs) with diameter d=36 mm. The influence of selected technological factors (traverse speed of cutting head v [mm/ min] and size of abrasive particles [MESH]) on the topography of resulting surfaces has in particular been studied. Surface topography and quality have been assessed using the methods of optical and co...

  1. Turning of wood plastic composites by water jet and abrasive water jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutyrová, Z.; Ščučka, Jiří; Hloch, Sergej; Hlaváček, Petr; Zeleňák, Michal

    -, September 2015 (2015), s. 1-9 ISSN 0268-3768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : wood plastic composite * water jet * size of abrasive particles * surface quality * traverse speed Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00170-015-7831-6

  2. Turning of wood plastic composites by water jet and abrasive water jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutyrová, Z.; Ščučka, Jiří; Hloch, Sergej; Hlaváček, Petr; Zeleňák, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 84, 5-8 (2016), s. 1615-1623 ISSN 0268-3768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : wood plastic composite * water jet * turning * traverse speed * size of abrasive particles Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 2.209, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00170-015-7831-6

  3. Shock resistance of composite material pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pays, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    Composite materials have found a wide range of applications for EDF nuclear plants. Applications include fire pipework, demineralized water, service water, and emergency-supplied service water piping. Some of those pipework is classified nuclear safety, their integrity (resistance to water aging and earthquakes or accidental excess pressure (water hammer)) must be safeguarded. As composite materials generally suffer damage for low energy impacts (under 10 J), the pipes planned for the Civaux power plant have been studied for their resistance to a low speed shock (0 to 50 m/s) and of a 0 to 110 J energy level. For three representative diameters (20, 150, 600 mm), the minimum impact energy that leads to a leak has been determined to be respectively 18, 20 and 48 J. Then the leak rate versus impact energy was plotted; until roughly 90 J, the leak rate remains stable at less than 25 cm 3 /h and raises to higher values (300 cm 3 /h) afterwards. The level of leakage in the range of impact energy tested always stays within the limits set by the Safety Authorities for metallic pipes. These results have been linked to destructive examinations, to clarify the damage mechanisms. Other tests are still ongoing to follow the evolution of the damage and of the leak rate while the pipe is maintained under service pressure during one year

  4. Size-Tuned Plastic Flow Localization in Irradiated Materials at the Submicron Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yinan; Po, Giacomo; Ghoniem, Nasr

    2018-05-01

    Three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (3D-DDD) simulations reveal that, with reduction of sample size in the submicron regime, the mechanism of plastic flow localization in irradiated materials transitions from irradiation-controlled to an intrinsic dislocation source controlled. Furthermore, the spatial correlation of plastic deformation decreases due to weaker dislocation interactions and less frequent cross slip as the system size decreases, thus manifesting itself in thinner dislocation channels. A simple model of discrete dislocation source activation coupled with cross slip channel widening is developed to reproduce and physically explain this transition. In order to quantify the phenomenon of plastic flow localization, we introduce a "deformation localization index," with implications to the design of radiation-resistant materials.

  5. Simplified method for elastic plastic analysis of material presenting bilinear kinematic hardening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.

    1983-12-01

    A simplified method for elastic plastic analysis is presented. Material behavior is assumed to be elastic plastic with bilinear kinematic hardening. The proposed method give a strain-stress field fullfilling material constitutive equations, equations of equilibrium and continuity conditions. This strain-stress is obtained through two linear computations. The first one is the conventional elastic analysis of the body submitted to the applied load. The second one use tangent matrix (tangent Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio) for the determination of an additional stress due to imposed initial strain. Such a method suits finite elements computer codes, the most useful result being plastic strains resulting from the applied loading (load control or deformation control). Obviously, there is not unique solution, for stress-strain field is not depending only of the applied load, but of the load history. Therefore, less pessimistic solutions can be got by one or two additional linear computations [fr

  6. Correlation between Composition and Properties of Composite Material Based on Scrap Tires

    OpenAIRE

    Mālers, L; Plēsuma, R; Ločmele, L; Kalniņš, M

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of present work is to investigate mechanical and insulation properties of the composite material based on scrap tires and polyurethane-type binder in correlation with composition of composite material. The studies of material’s hardness must be considered as an express-method for estimation of the selected mechanical properties (E and ccompressive stress) of the composite material without direct experimental testing of given parameters. It was shown that composite material must be r...

  7. Implicit integration of plasticity models for granular materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahadi, A.; Krenk, Steen

    2003-01-01

    A stress integration algorithm for granular materials based on fully implicit integration with explicit updating is presented. In the implicit method the solution makes use of the gradient to the potential surface at the final stress state which is unknown. The final stress and hardening parameters...... stresses are not supported the functions and their derivatives are not representative outside the compressive octant of the principal stress space. The elastic predictor is therefore preconditioned in order to ensure that the first predictor is within the valid region. Capability and robustness...

  8. PLASTICITY OF SELECTED METALLIC MATERIALS IN DYNAMIC DEFORMATION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek PAWLICKI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of a modernized flywheel machine has been presented in the paper. The laboratory stand enables to perform dynamic tensile tests and impact bending with a linear velocity of the enforcing element in the range of 5÷40 m/s. A new data acquisition system, based on the tensometric sensors, allows for significant qualitative improvement of registered signals. Some preliminary dynamic forming tests were performed for the selected group of metallic materials. Subsequent microstructural examinations and identification of the fracture type enabled to describe a correlation between strain rate, strain and microstructure.

  9. Material properties of plasticized hardwood xylans for potential application as oxygen barrier films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröndahl, Maria; Eriksson, Lisa; Gatenholm, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Free films based on glucuronoxylan isolated from aspen wood were prepared by casting from aqueous solutions and drying in a controlled environment. Addition of xylitol or sorbitol facilitated film formation and thus examination of the material properties of these films. The mechanical properties of the films were evaluated using tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis in a controlled ambient relative humidity. The strain at break increased, and the stress at break and Young's modulus of the films decreased with increasing amounts of xylitol and sorbitol due to plasticization. At high amount of plasticizer, it was found that films with xylitol gave lower extensibility. Wide-angle X-ray scattering analysis showed that xylitol crystallized in a distinct phase, which we believe contributes to the more brittle behavior of these films. The effect of the plasticizers on the glass transition temperature was determined using dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. An increased amount of plasticizer shifted the glass transition to lower temperatures. The effect of moisture on the properties of plasticized films was investigated using water vapor sorption isotherms and by humidity scans in dynamic mechanical analysis. Sorption isotherms showed a transition from type II to type III when adding plasticizer. The films showed low oxygen permeability and thus have a potential application in food packaging.

  10. On Loosening Plastic Composite under Active Load and Its Influence on the Deformation and Strength Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Komkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Processing the test results of the composite, which is a mechanical mixture of metal particles with a plastic polymer binder, has shown that its deformation and strength properties are substantially different from those of stable plastic material. The specimen tests for tensile and compression with measuring transverse deformations, as well as torsion tests of tubular samples have revealed that the process of its deformation is accompanied by a change in the original structure.The composite instability is caused by the fact that during this process, it acquires considerable loosening that depends on the type of the stress-state. Hard metal particles are hardly deformed at any stress-state, but they form a layer of bonds that affect the mixture behavior under force action. The total deformation is the plastic flow of the binder on which deformation, caused both by sliding and by loss of the surface layer bonds, is superimposed.The analysis shows that with destruction at tensile test the non-linear part of the bulk deformation (dilatancy is 6 times more than "conditionally" elastic (3.5 times compressed. The objective of this work is to develop a technique for determining a dilatancy, define its influence on deformation and strength properties of the composite, and improve the mathematical model of the material. The proposed model based on the tensor-nonlinear equations describes loosening, as an additional component of the mean deformation and as a mean stress component, hereinafter referred to as: the first - by the deformation, the second – by the stress. A ratio value of the nonlinear part of deformation with the quadratic tensor argument to the linear part, which reaches 0.3, shows the need for such equations. It also shows the influence of deformation on the relationship between the deviators.To enhance capabilities of mathematical model is possible after including therein the equations for the spherical part of the tensor of deformation

  11. Potassium methyl siliconate-treated pulp fibers and their effects on wood plastic composites: Water sorption and dimensional stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Piao; Zhiyong Cai; Nicole M. Stark; Charles J. Monlezun

    2013-01-01

    Potassium methyl siliconate (PMS) was investigated as a new nano modifier of wood fiber and wood flour to improve the compatibility between the fiber/flour and the plastic matrix in fiber reinforced plastic composites. Before injection molding, bleached and brown pulp fibers and mixed species wood flour were pretreated in PMS solutions. The morphology of the treated...

  12. The crack-initiation threshold in ceramic materials subject to elastic/plastic indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, J.; Davidson, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The threshold for indentation cracking is established for a range of ceramic materials, using the techniques of scanning electron microscopy and acoustic emission. It is found that by taking into account indentation plasticity, current theories may be successfully combined to predict threshold indentation loads and crack sizes. Threshold cracking is seen to relate to radial rather than median cracking. (author)

  13. Developments in Processing by Severe Plastic Deformation at the 3rd Pan American Materials Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Roberto B.; Kawasaki, Megumi; Langdon, Terence G.

    2017-10-01

    The 3rd Pan American Materials Congress in San Diego, California, February 26-March 2, 2017, provided an opportunity to bring together many participants working in the field of severe plastic deformation. This article provides a brief review of these activities.

  14. Bio-composites : opportunities for value-added biobased materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drzal, L.T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science]|[Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Composite Materials and Structures Center

    2003-07-01

    In order to reduce dependency on foreign oil, there is a growing need to develop and commercialize new bio-based green materials and technologies that can produce bio-based structural materials that are competitive with current synthetic products. The use of bio-based products would also improve the environment and create new opportunities for the agricultural economy. This paper described ongoing research into bio-based materials and products that replace petroleum-based products. In particular, it examined the use of biocomposites made by embedding natural/biofibers such as kenaf, hemp, flax, jute, henequen, pineapple leaf fiber, corn stalk fibers and native Michigan grasses into petroleum-derived traditional plastics such as polypropylene, unsaturated polyesters and epoxies. It also examines the use of green biocomposites developed by embedding these bio-fibers into renewable resource-based bioplastics such as cellulosic plastics and soy-based plastics. New processing methods that combine biofibers with plastics were needed to produce the biocomposites with desirable mechanical properties. The study showed that biofiber reinforced petroleum-based plastic biocomposites can produce a structural material that offers a balance between ecology, economy and technology. The potential for using these materials for automotive and building materials was also presented. 1 tab., 28 figs.

  15. Rapid discrimination of plastic packaging materials using MIR spectroscopy coupled with independent components analysis (ICA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassouf, Amine, E-mail: amine.kassouf@agroparistech.fr [ER004 “Lebanese Food Packaging”, Faculty of Sciences II, Lebanese University, 90656 Jdeideth El Matn, Fanar (Lebanon); INRA, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 1 Avenue des Olympiades, 91300 Massy (France); AgroParisTech, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 16 rue Claude Bernard, 75005 Paris (France); Maalouly, Jacqueline, E-mail: j_maalouly@hotmail.com [ER004 “Lebanese Food Packaging”, Faculty of Sciences II, Lebanese University, 90656 Jdeideth El Matn, Fanar (Lebanon); Rutledge, Douglas N., E-mail: douglas.rutledge@agroparistech.fr [INRA, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 1 Avenue des Olympiades, 91300 Massy (France); AgroParisTech, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 16 rue Claude Bernard, 75005 Paris (France); Chebib, Hanna, E-mail: hchebib@hotmail.com [ER004 “Lebanese Food Packaging”, Faculty of Sciences II, Lebanese University, 90656 Jdeideth El Matn, Fanar (Lebanon); Ducruet, Violette, E-mail: violette.ducruet@agroparistech.fr [INRA, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 1 Avenue des Olympiades, 91300 Massy (France); AgroParisTech, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 16 rue Claude Bernard, 75005 Paris (France)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • An innovative technique, MIR-ICA, was applied to plastic packaging separation. • This study was carried out on PE, PP, PS, PET and PLA plastic packaging materials. • ICA was applied to discriminate plastics and 100% separation rates were obtained. • Analyses performed on two spectrometers proved the reproducibility of the method. • MIR-ICA is a simple and fast technique allowing plastic identification/classification. - Abstract: Plastic packaging wastes increased considerably in recent decades, raising a major and serious public concern on political, economical and environmental levels. Dealing with this kind of problems is generally done by landfilling and energy recovery. However, these two methods are becoming more and more expensive, hazardous to the public health and the environment. Therefore, recycling is gaining worldwide consideration as a solution to decrease the growing volume of plastic packaging wastes and simultaneously reduce the consumption of oil required to produce virgin resin. Nevertheless, a major shortage is encountered in recycling which is related to the sorting of plastic wastes. In this paper, a feasibility study was performed in order to test the potential of an innovative approach combining mid infrared (MIR) spectroscopy with independent components analysis (ICA), as a simple and fast approach which could achieve high separation rates. This approach (MIR-ICA) gave 100% discrimination rates in the separation of all studied plastics: polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS) and polylactide (PLA). In addition, some more specific discriminations were obtained separating plastic materials belonging to the same polymer family e.g. high density polyethylene (HDPE) from low density polyethylene (LDPE). High discrimination rates were obtained despite the heterogeneity among samples especially differences in colors, thicknesses and surface textures. The reproducibility of

  16. Rapid discrimination of plastic packaging materials using MIR spectroscopy coupled with independent components analysis (ICA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassouf, Amine; Maalouly, Jacqueline; Rutledge, Douglas N.; Chebib, Hanna; Ducruet, Violette

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An innovative technique, MIR-ICA, was applied to plastic packaging separation. • This study was carried out on PE, PP, PS, PET and PLA plastic packaging materials. • ICA was applied to discriminate plastics and 100% separation rates were obtained. • Analyses performed on two spectrometers proved the reproducibility of the method. • MIR-ICA is a simple and fast technique allowing plastic identification/classification. - Abstract: Plastic packaging wastes increased considerably in recent decades, raising a major and serious public concern on political, economical and environmental levels. Dealing with this kind of problems is generally done by landfilling and energy recovery. However, these two methods are becoming more and more expensive, hazardous to the public health and the environment. Therefore, recycling is gaining worldwide consideration as a solution to decrease the growing volume of plastic packaging wastes and simultaneously reduce the consumption of oil required to produce virgin resin. Nevertheless, a major shortage is encountered in recycling which is related to the sorting of plastic wastes. In this paper, a feasibility study was performed in order to test the potential of an innovative approach combining mid infrared (MIR) spectroscopy with independent components analysis (ICA), as a simple and fast approach which could achieve high separation rates. This approach (MIR-ICA) gave 100% discrimination rates in the separation of all studied plastics: polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS) and polylactide (PLA). In addition, some more specific discriminations were obtained separating plastic materials belonging to the same polymer family e.g. high density polyethylene (HDPE) from low density polyethylene (LDPE). High discrimination rates were obtained despite the heterogeneity among samples especially differences in colors, thicknesses and surface textures. The reproducibility of

  17. Study on Impact Acoustic-Visual Sensor-Based Sorting of ELV Plastic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiu; Tian, Chuyuan; Ren, Jingwei; Bian, Zhengfu

    2017-06-08

    This paper concentrates on a study of a novel multi-sensor aided method by using acoustic and visual sensors for detection, recognition and separation of End-of Life vehicles' (ELVs) plastic materials, in order to optimize the recycling rate of automotive shredder residues (ASRs). Sensor-based sorting technologies have been utilized for material recycling for the last two decades. One of the problems still remaining results from black and dark dyed plastics which are very difficult to recognize using visual sensors. In this paper a new multi-sensor technology for black plastic recognition and sorting by using impact resonant acoustic emissions (AEs) and laser triangulation scanning was introduced. A pilot sorting system which consists of a 3-dimensional visual sensor and an acoustic sensor was also established; two kinds commonly used vehicle plastics, polypropylene (PP) and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and two kinds of modified vehicle plastics, polypropylene/ethylene-propylene-diene-monomer (PP-EPDM) and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene/polycarbonate (ABS-PC) were tested. In this study the geometrical features of tested plastic scraps were measured by the visual sensor, and their corresponding impact acoustic emission (AE) signals were acquired by the acoustic sensor. The signal processing and feature extraction of visual data as well as acoustic signals were realized by virtual instruments. Impact acoustic features were recognized by using FFT based power spectral density analysis. The results shows that the characteristics of the tested PP and ABS plastics were totally different, but similar to their respective modified materials. The probability of scrap material recognition rate, i.e., the theoretical sorting efficiency between PP and PP-EPDM, could reach about 50%, and between ABS and ABS-PC it could reach about 75% with diameters ranging from 14 mm to 23 mm, and with exclusion of abnormal impacts, the actual separation rates were 39.2% for PP, 41

  18. Final Report: Development of Renewable Microbial Polyesters for Cost Effective and Energy- Efficient Wood-Plastic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David N.; Emerick, Robert W.; England, Alfred B.; Flanders, James P.; Loge, Frank J.; Wiedeman, Katherine A.; Wolcott, Michael P.

    2010-03-31

    In this project, we proposed to produce wood fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites (WFRTCs) using microbial thermoplastic polyesters in place of petroleum-derived plastic. WFRTCs are a rapidly growing product area, averaging a 38% growth rate since 1997. Their production is dependent on substantial quantities of petroleum based thermoplastics, increasing their overall energy costs by over 230% when compared to traditional Engineered Wood Products (EWP). Utilizing bio-based thermoplastics for these materials can reduce our dependence on foreign petroleum. We have demonstrated that biopolymers (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA) can be successfully produced from wood pulping waste streams and that viable wood fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite products can be produced from these materials. The results show that microbial polyester (PHB in this study) can be extruded together with wastewater-derived cell mass and wood flour into deck products having performance properties comparable to existing commercial HDPE/WF composite products. This study has thus proven the underlying concept that the microbial polyesters produced from waste effluents can be used to make cost-effective and energy-efficient wood-plastic composites. The cost of purified microbial polyesters is about 5-20 times that of HDPE depending on the cost of crude oil, due to high purification (40%), carbon substrate (40%) and sterilized fermentation (20%) costs for the PHB. Hence, the ability to produce competitive and functional composites with unpurified PHA-biomass mixtures from waste carbon sources in unsterile systems—without cell debris removal—is a significant step forward in producing competitive value-added structural composites from forest products residuals using a biorefinery approach. As demonstrated in the energy and waste analysis for the project, significant energy savings and waste reductions can also be realized using this approach. We recommend that the next step for development of

  19. Composition of estuarine colloidal material: organic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigleo, A.C.; Hoering, T.C.; Helz, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    Colloidal material in the size range 1.2 nm to 0.4 ??m was isolated by ultrafiltration from Chesapeake Bay and Patuxent River waters (U.S.A.). Temperature controlled, stepwise pyrolysis of the freeze-dried material, followed by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses of the volatile products indicates that the primary organic components of this polymer are carbohydrates and peptides. The major pyrolysis products at the 450??C step are acetic acid, furaldehydes, furoic acid, furanmethanol, diones and lactones characteristic of carbohydrate thermal decomposition. Pyrroles, pyridines, amides and indole (protein derivatives) become more prevalent and dominate the product yield at the 600??C pyrolysis step. Olefins and saturated hydrocarbons, originating from fatty acids, are present only in minor amounts. These results are consistent with the composition of Chesapeake phytoplankton (approximately 50% protein, 30% carbohydrate, 10% lipid and 10% nucleotides by dry weight). The pyrolysis of a cultured phytoplankton and natural particulate samples produced similar oxygen and nitrogencontaining compounds, although the proportions of some components differ relative to the colloidal fraction. There were no lignin derivatives indicative of terrestrial plant detritus in any of these samples. The data suggest that aquatic microorganisms, rather than terrestrial plants, are the dominant source of colloidal organic material in these river and estuarine surface waters. ?? 1982.

  20. Composite materials from new textile technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez, M. A.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes in a general way the most important of the advanced textile technologies which are oriented to the manufacturing of organic matrix composite materials, the paper presents their applications and the possibilities of future development. The use of these advanced weaving techniques allows the production of near-net-shaped preforms, which results in important savings in processing costs; moreover, these textile processes offer the possibility of introducing out-of plane reinforcing fibres, so there is an important increment of the impact strength and the damage tolerance of the final material.

    En el presente artículo se describen, de forma genérica, las más importantes de las tejedurías avanzadas destinadas a la fabricación de materiales compuestos de matriz orgánica, presentándose sus aplicaciones y futuras posibilidades de desarrollo. La utilización de estos procesos de tejeduría avanzados permite la elaboración de preformas cercanas a la forma final de la pieza, lo que se traduce en importantes reducciones en los costes de fabricación; además, estos procesos textiles ofrecen la posibilidad de introducir fibras de refuerzo fuera del plano, aumentando de forma considerable la resistencia a impacto y la tolerancia al daño del material final.

  1. Acoustic damage detection in laser-cut CFRP composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Michiteru; Harada, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) composite material, which is expected to reduce the weight of automotive, airplane and etc., was cut by laser irradiation with a pulsed-CO2 laser (TRUMPF TFL5000; P=800W, 20kHz, τ=8μs, λ=10.6μm, V=1m/min) and single-mode fiber lasers (IPG YLR-300-SM; P=300W, λ=1.07μm, V=1m/min)(IPG YLR- 2000-SM; P=2kW, λ=1.07μm, V=7m/min). To detect thermal damage at the laser cutting of CFRP materials consisting of thermoset resin matrix and PAN or PITCH-based carbon fiber, the cut quality was observed by X-ray CT. The effect of laser cutting process on the mechanical strength for CFRP tested at the tensile test. Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, high-speed camera and scanning electron microscopy were used for the failure process analysis. AE signals and fractographic features characteristic of each laser-cut CFRP were identified.

  2. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  3. Supercapacitors Based on Nickel Oxide/Carbon Materials Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Lota, Katarzyna; Sierczynska, Agnieszka; Lota, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the thesis, the properties of nickel oxide/active carbon composites as the electrode materials for supercapacitors are discussed. Composites with a different proportion of nickel oxide/carbon materials were prepared. A nickel oxide/carbon composite was prepared by chemically precipitating nickel hydroxide on an active carbon and heating the hydroxide at 300 ∘C in the air. Phase compositions of the products were characterized using X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The morphology of the composite...

  4. INVESTIGATION OF MATERIAL RESISTANCE TO PLASTIC DEFORMATION AT PROCESSING METALS BY PRESSURE WITH IMPOSING ULTRASONIC OSCILLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Klubovich

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains substantiation for application of experimental technique in order to investigate material resistance to plastic deformation at processing metals by pressure with imposing ultrasonic oscillations while proceeding from laws of similarity. It is shown that at modeling any metal processing by pressure with imposing ultrasonic oscillations it is possible to consider that actual elastic and plastic metal properties remain constant during processing under ultrasound action. The second aspect that requires a special attention at modeling is pulse or vibration-shock deformation at processing metals by pressure with imposing ultrasonic oscillations.

  5. Assessment of radiation shielding materials for protection of space crews using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWitt, J.M.; Benton, E.R.; Uchihori, Y.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    A significant obstacle to long duration human space exploration such as the establishment of a permanent base on the surface of the Moon or a human mission to Mars is the risk posed by prolonged exposure to space radiation. In order to keep mission costs at acceptable levels while simultaneously minimizing the risk from radiation to space crew health and safety, a judicious use of optimized shielding materials will be required. We have undertaken a comprehensive study using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) to characterize the radiation shielding properties of a range of materials-both common baseline materials such as Al and polyethylene, and novel multifunctional materials such as carbon composites-at heavy ion accelerators. The study consists of analyzing CR-39 PNTD exposed in front of and behind shielding targets of varying composition and at a number of depths (target thicknesses) relevant to the development and testing of materials for space radiation shielding. Most targets consist of 10 cm x 10 cm slabs of solid materials ranging in thickness from 1 to >30 g/cm 2 . Exposures have been made to beams of C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, and Fe at energies ranging from 290 MeV/amu to 1 GeV/amu at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences HIMAC and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Analysis of the exposed detectors yields LET spectrum, dose, and dose equivalent as functions of target depth and composition, and incident heavy ion charge, energy, and fluence. Efforts are currently underway to properly weigh and combine these results into a single quantitative estimate of a material's ability to shield space crews from the interplanetary galactic cosmic ray flux.

  6. Structural conditions of maximal plasticity of two-phase metal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movchan, B.A.

    1975-01-01

    Analysis is given of experimental values of the strength and plasticity of iron- and tungsten-based two-phase materials with the regulated amount of the second phase and the grain size. Specimens in the form of a 120 mm x 200 mm sheet with a thickness of 0.8-1.2 mm are prepared by means of the electron beam evaporation technique and subsequent condensation of the materials on a preheated support. The variable content of the second phase along the sheet in the range 0.5 volume per cent and more than a 10-fold change in the grain size of the metallic matrix are attained by a simultaneous evaporation of pure metal (99.98 per cent) and nonlmetallic material-niobium carbide or zirconium dioxide ZrO 2 -from two separate sources. The content of arbitrarily distributed spherical particles of the second phase corresponding to a maximum of the plasticity depends only on the structural parameter - the d/D ratio. The absolute falue of the plasticity and its dependence on the temperature is a complex function of many variables - mechanical properties of particles and the matrix, peculiarities of interphase interaction on the boundary particle - matrix, the size of particles, the rate of plastic deformation and relaxation processes

  7. Survival of Spoilage and Pathogenic Microorganisms on Cardboard and Plastic Packaging Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Siroli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the interaction of corrugated and plastic materials with pathogenic and spoiling microorganisms frequently associated to fresh produce. The effect of the two packaging materials on the survival during the storage of microorganisms belonging to the species Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enteritidis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus plantarum, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Aspergillus flavus was studied through traditional plate counting and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results obtained showed that cardboard materials, if correctly stored, reduced the potential of packaging to cross-contaminate food due to a faster viability loss by spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms compared to the plastic ones. In fact, the cell loads of the pathogenic species considered decreased over time independently on the inoculation level and packaging material used. However, the superficial viability losses were significantly faster in cardboard compared to plastic materials. The same behavior was observed for the spoilage microorganisms considered. The SEM microphotographs indicate that the reduction of superficial contamination on cardboard surfaces was due to the entrapping of the microbial cells within the fibers and the pores of this material. In addition, SEM data showed that the entrapped cells were subjected to more or less rapid lyses, depending on the species, due to the absence of water and nutrients, with the exception of molds. The latter spoilers were able to proliferate inside the cardboard fibers only when the absorption of water was not prevented during the storage. In conclusion, the findings of this work showed the reduction of cross-contamination potential of corrugated compared to plastic packaging materials used in fruit and vegetable sector. However, the findings outlined the importance of hygiene and low humidity during cardboard storage to prevent the mold growth on

  8. Multiple criteria decision making with life cycle assessment for material selection of composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Milani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of interdisciplinary approaches in today’s modern engineering, current efforts in optimal design of composites include seeking material selection protocols that can (1 simultaneously consider a series of mechanical/electrical/chemical cost criteria over a set of alternative material options, and (2 closely take into account environmental aspects of final products including recycling and end-of-life disposal options. In this paper, in addition to a review of some recent experimental and methodological advances in the above areas, a new application of multiple criteria decision making (MCDM is presented to deal with decision conflicts often seen among design criteria in composite material selection with the help of life cycle assessment (LCA. To show the application, an illustrative case study on a plastic gear material selection is conducted where the cost, mechanical and thermal properties along with environmental impact criteria are to be satisfied simultaneously. A pure plastic gear is compared to a Polyethylene terephthalate (PET/aluminum-powder composite alternative. Results suggest that simple MCDM models, including a signal-to-noise measure adapted to MCDM in the same case study, can be used to explore both trade-offs and design break-even points in large decision spaces as the decision maker’s perspective over environmental, material performance and cost attributes change during the design process. More advanced topics including the account of material data uncertainties are addressed.

  9. Accumulation of organic compounds leached from plastic materials used in biopharmaceutical process containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Dennis R; Zietlow, David; Garber, Mary Jo; Sadain, Salma; Reiber, Duane; Terbush, William

    2007-01-01

    Plastic materials are widely used in medical items, such as solution containers, transfusion sets, transfer tubing, and devices. An emerging trend in the biotechnology industry is the utilization of plastic containers to prepare, transport, and store an assortment of solutions including buffers, media, and in-process and finished product. The direct contact of such containers with the product at one or more points in its lifetime raises the possibility that container leachables may accumulate in the finished product. The interaction between several commercially available container materials and numerous model test solutions (representative of buffers and media used in biopharmaceutical applications) was investigated. This paper summarizes the identification of leachables associated with the container materials and documents the levels to which targeted leachables accumulate in the test solutions under defined storage conditions.

  10. Effect of the Addition of Carbon Nanomaterials on Electrical and Mechanical Properties of Wood Plastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingli Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Wood Plastic Composites (WPCs are a new generation of green composites that could optimize the use of harvested trees and increase the entire value chain. In this study, the electrical and mechanical properties of WPCs containing carbon blacks (CB, flake graphite (FG and carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been investigated. The electrical property of WPCs is improved significantly owing to the introduction of these carbon nanomaterial fillers. The volume and surface resistivity values of the investigated composites all obviously decreased with the increase in filler content, especially CNTs, which displayed the most satisfactory results. Based on a series of laboratory experiments carried out to investigate the mechanical performance, it can be concluded that the addition of the carbon nanomaterial fillers decreases the mechanical properties of WPCs slightly with the increase in filler content because of the weak interfacial interactions between the fillers and polymer matrix.

  11. Demineralized dentin matrix composite collagen material for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianan; Yang, Juan; Zhong, Xiaozhong; He, Fengrong; Wu, Xiongwen; Shen, Guanxin

    2013-01-01

    Demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) had been successfully used in clinics as bone repair biomaterial for many years. However, particle morphology of DDM limited it further applications. In this study, DDM and collagen were prepared to DDM composite collagen material. The surface morphology of the material was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). MC3T3-E1 cells responses in vitro and tissue responses in vivo by implantation of DDM composite collagen material in bone defect of rabbits were also investigated. SEM analysis showed that DDM composite collagen material evenly distributed and formed a porous scaffold. Cell culture and animal models results indicated that DDM composite collagen material was biocompatible and could support cell proliferation and differentiation. Histological evaluation showed that DDM composite collagen material exhibited good biocompatibility, biodegradability and osteoconductivity with host bone in vivo. The results suggested that DDM composite collagen material might have a significant clinical advantage and potential to be applied in bone and orthopedic surgery.

  12. Comparison of mechanical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube and graphene nanosheet/polyethylene oxide composites plasticized with lithium triflate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkane, A.; Gaidukov, S.

    2017-10-01

    A strong engineering interest in nanostructured conducting polymers and its composite materials have been widely used to build various sensor devices, electronic interconnect devices, fuel cells and batteries. Preparation of polymeric nano-composites with finely controlled structure, especially, at nano-scale, is still one of the most perspective modification ways of the properties of polymeric composites. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polyethylene oxide (PEO) and graphene nanosheets (GR)/PEO composites and composite of MWCNT/GR/PEO were prepared by solution casting and hot-pressing method. Composites were plasticized by 5% of Lithium triflate (LiTrifl), which play role of additional ion source in conducting polymer composite. Mechanical tensile tests were performed to evaluate nanoparticles influence on the mechanical strength of the conductive polymer composite materials. Difference of tensile tests of prepared composition can be seen from tensile tests data curves. The results of tensile tests indicated that the nanoparticles can provide PEO/5%LiTrifl composite with stiffening effects at rather low filler content (at least 0.05% by volume).

  13. An experimental study on joining of severe plastic deformed aluminium materials with friction welding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Mumin [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)], E-mail: mumins@trakya.edu.tr; Erol Akata, H.; Ozel, Kaan [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    In this study, 5083 aluminium alloys, which were exposed to severe plastic deformation, were joined with friction welding method and the variation in mechanical properties of the joints was experimentally investigated. Severe plastic deformation methods can be classified as equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) (in other words, equal cross section lateral extrusion - ECSLE) and cyclic extrusion-compression. Aluminium alloy as test material 5083 and square cross-sectional equal channel angular pressing die for severe plastic deformation were used in the study. Firstly 5083 alloys, as purchased, were joined with friction welding method. The optimum parameters for friction time, upset time, friction pressure and upset pressure, which are necessary for welding, were obtained. Afterwards, 5083 aluminium materials as purchased were prepared as square cross-section and then 1-pass severe plastic deformation was applied to specimen by equal channel angular pressing die. The obtained parts as square form were prepared as cylindrical form by machining and then the parts were joined by continuous drive friction welding equipment that was designed and produced in laboratory conditions before. Later, the tensile strengths of the parts, obtained at optimum conditions, were compared with those of the joined parts as purchased form. Then, hardness variations and microstructures of joints were examined. Finally, the obtained results were commented on.

  14. Development of bio based plastic materials for packaging from soybeans waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, A.; Rashidi, A. R.; Roslan, A.; Idris, S. A.

    2017-09-01

    Demands of plastic material which increase with the increasing of human population encourage researchers to find alternative solution to replace petro based plastic. Thus, in the present study, a novel "green bioplastic" packaging was developed using soybean waste which is a major waste in soy sauce food industry. The evaluation of the effect of ratio of starch, soy waste and plasticizer in this bioplastic production was studied and their characteristics were compared with available bioplastics. Characteristics study was done in terms of burning test, water absorption capacity, thermal and tensile strength measurement and the result obtained were analyzed. The glass transition temperature (Tg) for soy waste bioplastic is 117˚C. The water absorption test shows that an increase in mass up to 114.17% which show large amount of water uptake capacity of this bioplastics. And about 38% of percentage loss was observed when compared with other novel bioplastics. The results clearly show that the amount of glycerol as a plasticizer had an inversely proportional relationship with the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg). The average maximum force value for tensile strength test is 6.71 N. The burning test show that the soy wastes bioplastic release a very faint smell of soy and glue-like substance. The flame ignited a Yellowish-Orange colour and released some sparks. Based on the overall results, soy-based have been proven to become an excellent bio-based packaging materials.

  15. The Effect of Methylation and Anti-Oxidant on Discoloration of Weathered Wood Plastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peivand Darabi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As the outdoor application of Wood Plastic Composites (WPCs become more widespread, the resistance of these products against weathering, particularly ultraviolet (UV light becomes more important. When WPCs are exposed to outdoor ultraviolet light, rain, snow and atmosphere pollution, they will be degraded which can be indicated by color fade. To investigate the effects of methylation and Anti-Oxidant separately and together on discoloration of weathered wood plastic composites, composites of poplar wood flour and high density polyethylene.Were made according to the ASTMD 2565, samples were placed in Atlas Xenon apparatus for 250 and 2000 hours. Discoloration and FT-IR spectra of the samples were measured and compared. The results have shown that methylation in short term and long term can relatively reduce the discoloration of weathered samples and also in short term can hinder the photodegradation. FT-IR spectra showed that, in long term, neither of the treatments could protect lignin from irradiation within wood flour. But methylation limited the depth of penetration of weathering. The Antioxidant did not have an influence on color change in a long period of time, but was able to relatively decrease it in short term.

  16. Novel AC Servo Rotating and Linear Composite Driving Device for Plastic Forming Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jin-Tao; Zhao, Sheng-Dun; Li, Yong-Yi; Zhu, Mu-Zhi

    2017-07-01

    The existing plastic forming equipment are mostly driven by traditional AC motors with long transmission chains, low efficiency, large size, low precision and poor dynamic response are the common disadvantages. In order to realize high performance forming processes, the driving device should be improved, especially for complicated processing motions. Based on electric servo direct drive technology, a novel AC servo rotating and linear composite driving device is proposed, which features implementing both spindle rotation and feed motion without transmission, so that compact structure and precise control can be achieved. Flux switching topology is employed in the rotating drive component for strong robustness, and fractional slot is employed in the linear direct drive component for large force capability. Then the mechanical structure for compositing rotation and linear motion is designed. A device prototype is manufactured, machining of each component and the whole assembly are presented respectively. Commercial servo amplifiers are utilized to construct the control system of the proposed device. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed composite driving device, experimental study on the dynamic test benches are conducted. The results indicate that the output torque can attain to 420 N·m and the dynamic tracking errors are less than about 0.3 rad in the rotating drive. the dynamic tracking errors are less than about 1.6 mm in the linear feed. The proposed research provides a method to construct high efficiency and accuracy direct driving device in plastic forming equipment.

  17. Shakedown Analysis of Composite Steel-Concrete Frame Systems with Plastic and Brittle Elements Under Seismic Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alawdin Piotr

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the earthquake analysis of composite steel-concrete frames is performed by finding solution of the optimization problem of shakedown analysis, which takes into account the nonlinear properties of materials. The constructions are equipped with systems bearing structures of various elastic-plastic and brittle elements absorbing energy of seismic actions. A mathematical model of this problem is presented on the base of limit analysis theory with partial redistribution of self-stressed internal forces. It is assumed that the load varies randomly within the specified limits. These limits are determined by the possible direction and magnitude of seismic loads. The illustrative example of such analysis of system is introduced. Some attention has been paid to the practical application of the proposed mathematical model.

  18. Shakedown Analysis of Composite Steel-Concrete Frame Systems with Plastic and Brittle Elements Under Seismic Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawdin, Piotr; Bulanov, George

    2017-06-01

    In this paper the earthquake analysis of composite steel-concrete frames is performed by finding solution of the optimization problem of shakedown analysis, which takes into account the nonlinear properties of materials. The constructions are equipped with systems bearing structures of various elastic-plastic and brittle elements absorbing energy of seismic actions. A mathematical model of this problem is presented on the base of limit analysis theory with partial redistribution of self-stressed internal forces. It is assumed that the load varies randomly within the specified limits. These limits are determined by the possible direction and magnitude of seismic loads. The illustrative example of such analysis of system is introduced. Some attention has been paid to the practical application of the proposed mathematical model.

  19. Plasticization of Poly (lactic) acid Film as a Potential Coating Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Li, Hua; Liu, Qingsong; Dong, Hongbiao; Duan, Yafei; Zhang, Jiasong

    2018-01-01

    PLA-based composite films with different plasticizers, such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Tributyl citrate (TBC), were prepared using a solvent casting method and their machanical, water absorbency and NO3 --N permeability properties were tested. Tensile strength, elongation at break, water absorbency and NO3 --N permeability of neat PLA film were 1.99 ± 0.04 MPa, 2.7 ± 0.46%, 29.33 ± 0.3% and 216.03 ± 19.92 mg·L-1·m-2·h-1, respectively. After the addition of plasticizers the tensile strength were decreased, tensile strength of flims added 40wt% TBC and PEG decreased by 59.3% and 52.26%. While the elongation at break of the PLA film gradually increased. The elongation at break reached the value of 23.96±0.48% and 38.55±1.66% for the films added PEG and TBC respectively at the concentration of 40wt%. Water absorbency decreased as the increase of plasticizers. The NO3 --N permeability attained a maximum of 300.05±10.47 and 270.97±14.54 mg·L-1·m-2·h-1 for films added PEG and TBC at the concentration of 10 wt % respectively. Considered the NO3 --N permeability, PEG at 10wt% seemed the better plasticizer for PLA used in control release of fertilizer.

  20. Composite Materials in Aircraft Mishaps Involving Fire: A Literature Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wright, Mark

    2003-01-01

    .... The Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR), which provides technical guidance for aircraft fire safety, was concerned that hazards presented by new composite materials and greater quantities of composites may not be adequately addressed...

  1. Developing Raman spectroscopy for the nondestructive testing of composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The proposed research will develop the application of Raman Spectroscopy as a nondestructive evaluation tool for the condition assessment of carbon fiber composites. Composite materials are increasingly being used in engineered structures and compone...

  2. Developing polymer composite materials: carbon nanotubes or graphene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuemei; Sun, Hao; Li, Houpu; Peng, Huisheng

    2013-10-04

    The formation of composite materials represents an efficient route to improve the performances of polymers and expand their application scopes. Due to the unique structure and remarkable mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical and catalytic properties, carbon nanotube and graphene have been mostly studied as a second phase to produce high performance polymer composites. Although carbon nanotube and graphene share some advantages in both structure and property, they are also different in many aspects including synthesis of composite material, control in composite structure and interaction with polymer molecule. The resulting composite materials are distinguished in property to meet different applications. This review article mainly describes the preparation, structure, property and application of the two families of composite materials with an emphasis on the difference between them. Some general and effective strategies are summarized for the development of polymer composite materials based on carbon nanotube and graphene. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Numerical simulation of mechanical behavior of composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    Oller, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    An original mechanical formulation to treat nonlinear orthotropic behavior of composite materials is presented in this book. It also examines different formulations that allow us to evaluate the behavior of composite materials through the composition of its components, obtaining a new composite material. Also two multiple scale homogenization methods are given, one based on the analytical study of the cells (Ad-hoc homogenization), and other one, more general based on the finite element procedure applied on the macro scale (upper-scale) and in the micro scale (sub-scale). A very general formulation to simulate the mechanical behavior for traditional composite structures (plywood, reinforced concrete, masonry, etc.), as well as the new composite materials reinforced with long and short fibers, nanotubes, etc., are also shown in this work. Typical phenomena occurring in composite materials are also described in this work, including fiber-matrix debounding, local buckling of fibers and its coupling with the over...

  4. Microbiology, biochemistry, and volatile composition of Tulum cheese ripened in goat's skin or plastic bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayaloglu, A A; Cakmakci, S; Brechany, E Y; Deegan, K C; McSweeney, P L H

    2007-03-01

    Tulum cheeses were manufactured from raw ewe's milk and ripened in goat's skin bags (tulums) or plastic containers to understand the effect of ripening container on the chemical composition, biochemistry, microbiology, and volatile composition of Tulum cheeses during 150 d of ripening. Chemical compositions of the cheeses ripened in tulums were significantly different and the moisture contents decreased rapidly in those cheeses because of the porous structure of the tulum. Higher microbial counts were detected in the cheeses ripened in plastic than in cheeses ripened in tulums. Differences in nitrogenous compounds and total free AA of the cheeses were not significant. Total concentrations of free AA in cheeses increased with age and Glu, Ala, Val, Leu, and Phe were the most abundant AA in the cheeses. Urea-PAGE of pH 4.6-insoluble fractions of the cheeses during ripening showed similar degradation patterns in all cheeses. Peptide profiles by reversed-phase HPLC of pH 4.6- and ethanol-soluble or ethanol-insoluble fractions of the cheeses revealed only minor differences in the concentrations of some peptides among the cheeses; however, age-related changes in peptide concentrations were significantly different among the cheeses. Cheeses were analyzed at 90 d of ripening for volatile compounds by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. One hundred volatile components were identified, including 11 acids, 16 esters, 12 methyl ketones, 7 aldehydes, 22 alcohols, 7 sulfur compounds, 6 terpenes, and 19 miscellaneous compounds. The main components were short-chain fatty acids, 2-butanone, diacetyl, and primary alcohols. Quantitative differences in several volatile compounds were evident among the cheeses. Cheeses ripened in tulums or plastic had similar aroma patterns, but the concentrations of some components were different.

  5. Mechanical strength model for plastic bonded granular materials at high strain rates and large strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browning, R.V.; Scammon, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Modeling impact events on systems containing plastic bonded explosive materials requires accurate models for stress evolution at high strain rates out to large strains. For example, in the Steven test geometry reactions occur after strains of 0.5 or more are reached for PBX-9501. The morphology of this class of materials and properties of the constituents are briefly described. We then review the viscoelastic behavior observed at small strains for this class of material, and evaluate large strain models used for granular materials such as cap models. Dilatation under shearing deformations of the PBX is experimentally observed and is one of the key features modeled in cap style plasticity theories, together with bulk plastic flow at high pressures. We propose a model that combines viscoelastic behavior at small strains but adds intergranular stresses at larger strains. A procedure using numerical simulations and comparisons with results from flyer plate tests and low rate uniaxial stress tests is used to develop a rough set of constants for PBX-9501. Comparisons with the high rate flyer plate tests demonstrate that the observed characteristic behavior is captured by this viscoelastic based model. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  6. The use of plastic debris as nesting material by a colonial seabird and associated entanglement mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votier, Stephen C; Archibald, Kirsten; Morgan, Greg; Morgan, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Entanglement with plastic debris is a major cause of mortality in marine taxa, but the population-level consequences are unknown. Some seabirds collect marine debris for nesting material, which may lead to entanglement. Here we investigate the use of plastics as nesting material by northern gannets Morus bassanus and assess the associated levels of mortality. On average gannet nests contained 469.91 g (range 0-1293 g) of plastic, equating to an estimated colony total of 18.46 tones (range 4.47-42.34 tones). The majority of nesting material was synthetic rope, which appears to be used preferentially. On average 62.85 ± 26.84 (range minima 33-109) birds were entangled each year, totalling 525 individuals over eight years, the majority of which were nestlings. Although mortality rates are high, they are unlikely to have population-level effects. The use of synthetic fibres as nesting material is a common strategy among seabirds, but the impacts of entanglement warrants further investigation. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Finite element simulations and experiments to determine the residual damage of a CFRP composite material after ballistic impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herlaar, K.; Jagt-Deutekom, M. van der

    2005-01-01

    The use of lightweight systems is essential for future combat systems. More and more steel structures are replaced by composite structures. This also influences the vulnerability of the platform. A finite element material model is created in Autodyn of the carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP)

  8. Interphase and intergranular stress generation in composites exhibiting plasticity in both phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daymond, Mark R; Hartig, Christian; Mecking, Heinrich

    2005-01-01

    The internal stress state of Fe-Cu composites has been measured by in situ deformation studies using neutron diffraction. A range of volume fractions from 17% Fe to 83% Fe (remainder Cu) have been investigated. Both phase specific and grain family specific elastic strains have been determined. The results are compared with predictions from a multiphase elasto-plastic self-consistent model, and are found to be in good agreement. The selection of parameters used in the model to improve agreement between experimental and predicted results is suggested to be due to changing geometrical constraint

  9. Effects of wood fiber surface chemistry on strength of wood–plastic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migneault, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.migneault@uqat.ca [University of Quebec in Abitibi-Temiscamingue (UQAT), 445 boulevard de l’Université, Rouyn-Noranda, Québec J9X 5E4 (Canada); Koubaa, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.koubaa@uqat.ca [UQAT (Canada); Perré, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.perre@ecp.fr [École centrale de Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, F-92 295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Riedl, Bernard, E-mail: Bernard.Riedl@sbf.ulaval.ca [Université Laval, 2425 rue de la Terrasse, Québec City, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed variations of surface chemical characteristics according to fiber origin. • Surface chemical characteristics of fibers could partly explain the differences in mechanical properties of the wood–plastic composites. • Fibers with carbohydrate rich surface led to stronger wood–plastic composites because the coupling between the matrix and fibers using coupling agent is achieved with polar sites mostly available on carbohydrates. • Conversely, lignin or extractives rich surface do not have oxidized functions for the esterification reaction with coupling agent and thus led to wood–plastic composites with lower mechanical properties. • Other factors such as mechanical interlocking and fiber morphology interfere with the effects of fiber surface chemistry. - Abstract: Because wood–plastic composites (WPC) strength relies on fiber-matrix interaction at fiber surface, it is likely that fiber surface chemistry plays an important role in WPC strength development. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationships between fiber surface chemical characteristics and WPC mechanical properties. Different fibers were selected and characterized for surface chemical characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). WPC samples were manufactured at 40% fiber content and with six different fibers. High density polyethylene was used as matrix and maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was used as compatibility agent. WPC samples were tested for mechanical properties and fiber-matrix interface was observed with scanning electron microscope. It was found WPC strength decreases as the amount of unoxidized carbon (assigned to lignin and extractives) measured with XPS on fiber surface increases. In the opposite case, WPC strength increases with increasing level of oxidized carbon (assigned to carbohydrates) on fiber surface. The same

  10. Effects of wood fiber surface chemistry on strength of wood–plastic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migneault, Sébastien; Koubaa, Ahmed; Perré, Patrick; Riedl, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed variations of surface chemical characteristics according to fiber origin. • Surface chemical characteristics of fibers could partly explain the differences in mechanical properties of the wood–plastic composites. • Fibers with carbohydrate rich surface led to stronger wood–plastic composites because the coupling between the matrix and fibers using coupling agent is achieved with polar sites mostly available on carbohydrates. • Conversely, lignin or extractives rich surface do not have oxidized functions for the esterification reaction with coupling agent and thus led to wood–plastic composites with lower mechanical properties. • Other factors such as mechanical interlocking and fiber morphology interfere with the effects of fiber surface chemistry. - Abstract: Because wood–plastic composites (WPC) strength relies on fiber-matrix interaction at fiber surface, it is likely that fiber surface chemistry plays an important role in WPC strength development. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationships between fiber surface chemical characteristics and WPC mechanical properties. Different fibers were selected and characterized for surface chemical characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). WPC samples were manufactured at 40% fiber content and with six different fibers. High density polyethylene was used as matrix and maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was used as compatibility agent. WPC samples were tested for mechanical properties and fiber-matrix interface was observed with scanning electron microscope. It was found WPC strength decreases as the amount of unoxidized carbon (assigned to lignin and extractives) measured with XPS on fiber surface increases. In the opposite case, WPC strength increases with increasing level of oxidized carbon (assigned to carbohydrates) on fiber surface. The same

  11. Composite Material Hazard Assessment at Crash Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    polymer matrix composites, ceramic matrix composites, and metal matrix composites. Advanced composites use various resin systems including polyester...intensity, and its growth rate. Broadly classified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene), nitrogen-containing aromatics (aniline), and phenol...detect. aNIOSH Method 7400 reported Total Dusts and Inhalable results using a 0.8-um mixed cellulose ester filter . bNIOSH Method 600 reported Respirable

  12. Rapid discrimination of plastic packaging materials using MIR spectroscopy coupled with independent components analysis (ICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassouf, Amine; Maalouly, Jacqueline; Rutledge, Douglas N; Chebib, Hanna; Ducruet, Violette

    2014-11-01

    Plastic packaging wastes increased considerably in recent decades, raising a major and serious public concern on political, economical and environmental levels. Dealing with this kind of problems is generally done by landfilling and energy recovery. However, these two methods are becoming more and more expensive, hazardous to the public health and the environment. Therefore, recycling is gaining worldwide consideration as a solution to decrease the growing volume of plastic packaging wastes and simultaneously reduce the consumption of oil required to produce virgin resin. Nevertheless, a major shortage is encountered in recycling which is related to the sorting of plastic wastes. In this paper, a feasibility study was performed in order to test the potential of an innovative approach combining mid infrared (MIR) spectroscopy with independent components analysis (ICA), as a simple and fast approach which could achieve high separation rates. This approach (MIR-ICA) gave 100% discrimination rates in the separation of all studied plastics: polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS) and polylactide (PLA). In addition, some more specific discriminations were obtained separating plastic materials belonging to the same polymer family e.g. high density polyethylene (HDPE) from low density polyethylene (LDPE). High discrimination rates were obtained despite the heterogeneity among samples especially differences in colors, thicknesses and surface textures. The reproducibility of the proposed approach was also tested using two spectrometers with considerable differences in their sensitivities. Discrimination rates were not affected proving that the developed approach could be extrapolated to different spectrometers. MIR combined with ICA is a promising tool for plastic waste separation that can help improve performance in this field; however further technological improvements and developments are required before it can be applied

  13. A model for rate-dependent but time-independent material behavior in cyclic plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dafalias, Y.F.; Ramey, M.R.; Sheikh, I.

    1977-01-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to present a model for rate-dependent but time independent material behavior under cyclic loading in the plastic range. What is referred to as time independent behavior here, is the absence of creep and relaxation phenomena from the behavior of the model. The notion of plastic internal variables (piv) is introduced, as properly invariant scalars or second order tensors, whose constitutive relations are rate-type equations not necessarily homogeneous of oder one in the rates, as it would be required for independent plasticity. The concept of a yield surface in the strain space and a loading function in terms of the total strain rate is introduced, where the sign of the loading function defines zero or non-zero value of the rate of piv. Thus rate dependence is achieved without time dependent behavior (no creep or relaxation). In addition, discrete memory parameters associated with the most recent event of unloading-reloading in different directions enter the constitutive relations for the piv. A particular form of the constitutive relations is assumed, where the rate of piv is a linear combination of the strain rate components, with coefficients depending on the second invariant of the strain rate tensor, which can be viewed as a scalar measure of the rate of deformation in the multiaxial case and a direct generalization of the uniaxial strain rate. This leads to a particularly simple form of the constitutive relations resembling the ones for rate independent plasticity. The uniaxial counterpart would be a relation between the plastic strain rate (as one of the piv) and the total strain rate through a plastic modulus which depends on the strain rate, the piv, and the discrete memory parameters

  14. Analysis and Characterization of Damage Utilizing an Orthotropic Generalized Composite Material Model Suitable for Use in Impact Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; DuBois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    The need for accurate material models to simulate the deformation, damage and failure of polymer matrix composites under impact conditions is becoming critical as these materials are gaining increased usage in the aerospace and automotive communities. In order to address a series of issues identified by the aerospace community as being desirable to include in a next generation composite impact model, an orthotropic, macroscopic constitutive model incorporating both plasticity and damage suitable for implementation within the commercial LS-DYNA computer code is being developed. The plasticity model is based on extending the Tsai-Wu composite failure model into a strain hardening-based orthotropic plasticity model with a non-associative flow rule. The evolution of the yield surface is determined based on tabulated stress-strain curves in the various normal and shear directions and is tracked using the effective plastic strain. To compute the evolution of damage, a strain equivalent semi-coupled formulation is used in which a load in one direction results in a stiffness reduction in multiple material coordinate directions. A detailed analysis is carried out to ensure that the strain equivalence assumption is appropriate for the derived plasticity and damage formulations that are employed in the current model. Procedures to develop the appropriate input curves for the damage model are presented and the process required to develop an appropriate characterization test matrix is discussed

  15. Plastic material investment in load-bearing silk attachments in spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jonas O; Jones, Braxton; Herberstein, Marie E

    2018-05-17

    The nature and size of attachments is a fundamental element of animal constructions. Presumably, these adhesive structures are plastically deployed to balance material investment and attachment strength. Here we studied plasticity in dragline anchorages of the golden orb web spider, Nephila plumipes. Specifically, we predict that spiders adjust the size and structure of dragline anchorages with load, i.e. spider mass. Mass was manipulated by attaching lead pieces to the spider's abdomen resulting in a 50 percent increase in mass. Loaded spiders spun larger but structurally similar thread anchorages than unloaded spiders. Thus, the spinning program that determines the overall anchor structure is highly stereotypic, and flexibility is introduced through varying the anchor size by increasing material investment. Our study showcases substrate attachments as suitable models to investigate the interplay between innate and changeable elements in the economy of building behaviours. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Performance ratio hardness characteristics polystyrene-metal composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepikov, V.F.; Prokhorenko, E.M.; Lytvynenko, V.V.; Zakharchenko, A.A.; Hazhmuradov, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The methods of measuring the hardness of layered polystyrene-metallic composite materials. It is proposed to use powder-like tungsten and powder-like steel as radiation-protective layer. A measurement of the hardness of composites of different composition, and given its dependence on the particle size and their form. The possibility of increasing the hardness of the composites reinforced with metallic additives. Radiation-protective characteristics were calculated for the studied species of composite materials. Influence of the quantitative composition of the metal components is studied on the change of the absorbed dose of gamma radiation

  17. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eberle, Cliff C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pastore, Christopher M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sudbury, Thomas Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xiong, Fue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hartman, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  18. Environmental and health hazard ranking and assessment of plastic polymers based on chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lithner, Delilah, E-mail: delilah.lithner@gmail.com; Larsson, Ake; Dave, Goeran

    2011-08-15

    Plastics constitute a large material group with a global annual production that has doubled in 15 years (245 million tonnes in 2008). Plastics are present everywhere in society and the environment, especially the marine environment, where large amounts of plastic waste accumulate. The knowledge of human and environmental hazards and risks from chemicals associated with the diversity of plastic products is very limited. Most chemicals used for producing plastic polymers are derived from non-renewable crude oil, and several are hazardous. These may be released during the production, use and disposal of the plastic product. In this study the environmental and health hazards of chemicals used in 55 thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers were identified and compiled. A hazard ranking model was developed for the hazard classes and categories in the EU classification and labelling (CLP) regulation which is based on the UN Globally Harmonized System. The polymers were ranked based on monomer hazard classifications, and initial assessments were made. The polymers that ranked as most hazardous are made of monomers classified as mutagenic and/or carcinogenic (category 1A or 1B). These belong to the polymer families of polyurethanes, polyacrylonitriles, polyvinyl chloride, epoxy resins, and styrenic copolymers. All have a large global annual production (1-37 million tonnes). A considerable number of polymers (31 out of 55) are made of monomers that belong to the two worst of the ranking model's five hazard levels, i.e. levels IV-V. The polymers that are made of level IV monomers and have a large global annual production (1-5 million tonnes) are phenol formaldehyde resins, unsaturated polyesters, polycarbonate, polymethyl methacrylate, and urea-formaldehyde resins. This study has identified hazardous substances used in polymer production for which the risks should be evaluated for decisions on the need for risk reduction measures, substitution, or even phase out

  19. Non-Catalytic Self Healing Composite Material Solution, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fiber reinforce polymer (FRP) composite materials are seeing increasing use in the construction of a wide variety of aerospace structures. However, uncertainties...

  20. On the use of elastic-plastic material characteristics for linear-elastic component assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Silcher, H.; Eisele, U.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the procedure of safety assessment of components by fracture mechanics analysis as recommended in TECDOC 717 is applied to two standard specimens of ductile cast iron. It is shown that the use of a pseudo-elastic K IJ -value in linear elastic safety analysis may lead to non-conservative results, when elastic-plastic material behaviour can be expected. (author)

  1. Determination of plasticity and strength under long-term rupture of refractory materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trunin, I.I.

    1981-01-01

    A possibility to obtain the equations of temperature- strength dependence of high-heat characteristics on the basis of previously obtained mechanical equation of state is studied, taking account of the accumulation of creep plastic strain. The calculation method of the resource of the material safe work with an account of fracture resistance and deformability at long-term rupture is considered. The 03Kh16N9M2 type steel used in power engeneering industry is examined [ru

  2. Research of the biodegradability of degradable/biodegradable plastic material in various types of environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Adamcová

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Research was carried out in order to assess biodegradability of degradable/biodegradable materials made of HDPE and mixed with totally degradable plastic additive (TDPA additive or made of polyethylene (PE with the addition of pro-oxidant additive (d2w additive, advertised as 100% degradable or certifi ed as compostable within various types of environments. Research conditions were: (i controlled composting environment – laboratory-scale, (ii real composting conditions – domestic compost bin, (iii real composting conditions – industrial composting plant and (iv landfill conditions. The results demonstrate that the materials made of HDPE and mixed with totally degradable plastic additive (TDPA additive or made of polyethylene (PE with the addition of pro-oxidant additive (d2w additive or advertised as 100% degradable did not biodegrade in any of the above-described conditions and remained completely intact at the end of the tests. Biodegradation of the certified compostable plastic bags proceeded very well in laboratory-scale conditions and in real composting conditions – industrial composting plant, however, these materials did not biodegrade in real composting conditions – domestic compost bin and landfill conditions.

  3. Supervisory control of drilling of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Motoyoshi

    Composite materials have attractive features, such as high ratios of strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight. However, they are easily damaged when they are machined. A typical damage is delamination, which can occur when fiber reinforced composite laminates are drilled. The objective of this research is to study the drilling processes of carbon fiber reinforced laminates, and to develop and test a supervisory control strategy for their delamination-free drilling. Characterization of thrust force and torque is achieved through constant feedrate drilling experiments. The average values of thrust force and torque during the full engagement of the drill are utilized to obtain the Shaw's equations' parameters. The thrust force profile just before exit is given special attention. The Hocheng-Dharan equations, which give conservative values of delamination at the entrance and at the exit, are modified to express the influence of one lamina thickness explicitly. They are utilized not only for the characterization of thrust force but also for the determination of the thrust force reference for force control. In the design of the controllers of thrust force and torque, both thrust force and torque are assumed to be proportional to FPHR (Feed Per Half Revolution). A discrete-time dynamic model is established for the case when the time interval for a half revolution of the drill is divided by the sampling time, and the model is extended to the case of general spindle speeds. PI controllers are designed for the dynamic models of thrust force and torque. Root-locus techniques are used in the analysis. The phases of the drilling process are introduced and the control strategy at each phase is explained. The supervisory controller chooses not only the best control strategy for each phase, but also the reference value and the controller gain that are suitable at each drill position. Drilling experiments are conducted to show the usefulness of the concepts introduced in this

  4. Magical Engineering Plastic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwang Ung

    1988-01-15

    This book introduces engineering plastic about advantage of engineering plastic, plastic material from processing method, plastic shock, plastic until now, background of making of engineering plastic, wonderful engineering plastic science such as a high molecule and molecule, classification of high molecule, difference between metal and high molecule, heat and high molecule materials, and property of surface, engineering plastic of dream like from linseed oil to aramid, small dictionary of engineering plastic.

  5. Magical Engineering Plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ung

    1988-01-01

    This book introduces engineering plastic about advantage of engineering plastic, plastic material from processing method, plastic shock, plastic until now, background of making of engineering plastic, wonderful engineering plastic science such as a high molecule and molecule, classification of high molecule, difference between metal and high molecule, heat and high molecule materials, and property of surface, engineering plastic of dream like from linseed oil to aramid, small dictionary of engineering plastic.

  6. In line wood plastic composite pyrolyses and HZSM-5 conversion of the pyrolysis vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Xiaona; Zhang, Zhijun; Tan, Shun; Wang, Fengqiang; Song, Yongming; Wang, Qingwen; Pittman, Charles U.

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: HZSM-5 can be used to catalytic convert Wood Fiber-Polypropylene or Wood Fiber-Polypropylene pyrolysis vapors into aromatic compounds in reasonable selectivities. This provides a recycling utilization WPCs wastes method. - Highlights: • Converting wood/plastic composites (WPC) wastes into aromatics. • Recycling WPC by fast pyrolysis coupled with vapor catalytic cracking. • Selective production of aromatics from WPCs and their components over HZSM-5. • Acid site concentration inside zeolite was critical for maximizing aromatic yield. • Synergistic effects between wood and plastics enhanced aromatics production. - Abstract: Wood powder-high density polyethylene (WPE) and wood powder-polypropylene (WPP) composites were pyrolyzed at 550 °C in the presence of HZSM-5 catalysts using analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Immediately passing the pyrolysis vapors through the HZSM-5 changed the product distribution by producing aromatic hydrocarbons and eliminating tar formation. Zeolite HZSM-5 was employed with three different silica-to-alumina ratios (25, 50, 260). The influence of catalysts on the yields of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, furan derivatives, lignin-derived compounds and acetic acid was studied. High yields of aliphatic hydrocarbons formed in WPE or WPP pyrolysis alone. The highest yields of aromatic hydrocarbons from WPE or WPP pyrolysis vapors over HZSM-5 occurred with a zeolite framework Si/Al ratio of 25 (more acid sites), suggesting that the concentration of acid sites inside the zeolite was critical for maximizing aromatic yield. Exposing vapors to HZSM-5 increased the hydrocarbon yields and reduced the amount of acetic acid produced, resulting in increased calorific value. The yields of typical aromatics from catalytic pyrolysis of WPP mixture and composites were higher than those of the calculated values of poplar wood and PP catalytic pyrolysis individually, indicating that a

  7. Design and Fabrication of Aerospace-Grade Digital Composite Materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project aims to advance design rules and fabrication approaches to create aerospace-grade structures from digital composite materials. Digital materials are...

  8. Some functional properties of composite material based on scrap tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesuma, Renate; Malers, Laimonis

    2013-09-01

    The utilization of scrap tires still obtains a remarkable importance from the aspect of unloading the environment from non-degradable waste [1]. One of the most prospective ways for scrap tires reuse is a production of composite materials [2] This research must be considered as a continuation of previous investigations [3, 4]. It is devoted to the clarification of some functional properties, which are considered important for the view of practical applications, of the composite material. Some functional properties of the material were investigated, for instance, the compressive stress at different extent of deformation of sample (till 67% of initial thickness) (LVS EN 826) [5] and the resistance to UV radiation (modified method based on LVS EN 14836) [6]. Experiments were realized on the purposefully selected samples. The results were evaluated in the correlation with potential changes of Shore C hardness (Shore scale, ISO 7619-1, ISO 868) [7, 8]. The results showed noticeable resistance of the composite material against the mechanical influence and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The correlation with the composition of the material, activity of binder, definite technological parameters, and the conditions supported during the production, were determined. It was estimated that selected properties and characteristics of the material are strongly dependent from the composition and technological parameters used in production of the composite material, and from the size of rubber crumb. Obtained results show possibility to attain desirable changes in the composite material properties by changing both the composition and technological parameters of examined material.

  9. IMAGING WOOD PLASTIC COMPOSITES (WPCs: X-RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY, A FEW OTHER PROMISING TECHNIQUES, AND WHY WE SHOULD PAY ATTENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Muszyński

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wood plastic composites are complex, anisotropic, and heterogeneous materials. A key to increasing the share of the WPC materials in the market is developing stronger, highly engineered WPCs characterized by greater structural performance and increased durability. These are achieved by enhanced manufacturing processes, more efficient profile designs, and new formulations providing better interaction between the wood particles and the plastic matrix. Significant progress in this area is hard to imagine without better understanding of the composite performance and internal bond durability on the micro-mechanical level, and reliable modeling based on that understanding. The objective of this paper is to present a brief review of promising material characterization techniques based on advanced imaging technologies and inverse problem methodology, which seem particularly suitable for complex heterogeneous composites. Full-field imaging techniques and specifically X-ray computed tomography (CT combined with numerical modeling tools have a potential to advance the fundamental knowledge on the effect of manufacturing parameters on the micromechanics of such materials and their response to loads and environmental exposure.

  10. Inkjet printing metals on flexible materials for plastic and paper electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Shamery, K.; Raut, N. C.

    2018-01-01

    Inorganic printed electronics is now recognized as an area of tremendous commercial, potential and technical progress. Many research groups are actively involved worldwide in developing metal nanoparticle inks and precursors for printing inorganic/organic materials using different printing....... Besides some examples demonstrating aspects on ink formulation via patterning solid surfaces such as glass and silicon oxide, special emphasis will be placed on compatibility for usage in plastic and paper electronics. Printing of nanoparticles of copper, silver, gold etc. will be discussed...... and will be compared to printing of a variety of metal-organic precursor inks. Finally, a brief account on exemplary applications using the printed inorganic nanoparticles/materials is provided....

  11. Instability analysis of a fully plastic center-cracked strip of a power hardening material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Paris, P.C.

    1978-01-01

    An approach for predicting unstable crack growth in a power hardening material is discussed. A fully plastic center-cracked strip of finite width under plane strain conditions, which involves J-controlled crack growth, is analyzed. The conditions for unstable crack growth are identified in terms of a non-dimensional parameter, the Tearing Modulus, T, which incorporates the effect of elastic system compliance on the cracked structure as well as the influence of hardening. Numerical results also illustrate the strong influences on stability of both the strain hardening characteristics of the material and certain geometrical proportions which greatly influence the system compliance. (author)

  12. Compatibility Study for Plastic, Elastomeric, and Metallic Fueling Infrastructure Materials Exposed to Aggressive Formulations of Ethanol-blended Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

    2012-07-01

    components of the elastomers (by the solvent). This extraction of additives can negatively change the properties of the elastomer, leading to reduced performance and durability. For a seal application, some level of volume swell is acceptable, since the expansion will serve to maintain a seal. However, the acceptable level of swell is dependent on the particular application of the elastomer product. It is known that excessive swell can lead to unacceptable extrusion of the elastomer beyond the sealed interface, where it becomes susceptible to damage. Also, since high swell is indicative of high solubility, there is a heightened potential for fluid to seep through the seal and into the environment. Plastics, on the other hand, are used primarily in structural applications, such as solid components, including piping and fluid containment. Volume change, especially in a rigid system, will create internal stresses that may negatively affect performance. In order to better understand and predict the compatibility for a given polymer type and fuel composition, an analysis based on Hansen solubility theory was performed for each plastic and elastomer material. From this study, the solubility distance was calculated for each polymer material and test fuel combination. Using the calculated solubility distance, the ethanol concentration associated with peak swell and overall extent of swell can be predicted for each polymer. The bulk of the material discussion centers on the plastic materials, and their compatibility with Fuel C, CE25a, CE50a, and CE85a. The next section of this paper focuses on the elastomer compatibility with the higher ethanol concentrations with comparison to results obtained previously for the lower ethanol levels. The elastomers were identical to those used in the earlier study. Hansen solubility theory is also applied to the elastomers to provide added interpretation of the results. The final section summarizes the performance of the metal coupons.

  13. Formulation and computational aspects of plasticity and damage models with application to quasi-brittle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.; Schreyer, H.L. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The response of underground structures and transportation facilities under various external loadings and environments is critical for human safety as well as environmental protection. Since quasi-brittle materials such as concrete and rock are commonly used for underground construction, the constitutive modeling of these engineering materials, including post-limit behaviors, is one of the most important aspects in safety assessment. From experimental, theoretical, and computational points of view, this report considers the constitutive modeling of quasi-brittle materials in general and concentrates on concrete in particular. Based on the internal variable theory of thermodynamics, the general formulations of plasticity and damage models are given to simulate two distinct modes of microstructural changes, inelastic flow and degradation of material strength and stiffness, that identify the phenomenological nonlinear behaviors of quasi-brittle materials. The computational aspects of plasticity and damage models are explored with respect to their effects on structural analyses. Specific constitutive models are then developed in a systematic manner according to the degree of completeness. A comprehensive literature survey is made to provide the up-to-date information on prediction of structural failures, which can serve as a reference for future research.

  14. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  15. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  16. Marketing and materiality in the popular music transmedia of Gorillaz’ Plastic Beach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex JEFFERY

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The entertainment complexes of narrative transmedia contain few instances based in popular music. However, those that exist provide intriguing case studies, highly distinct from those based in film and television. The most fully realized of these, Gorillaz’ Plastic Beach (2010, is rich in visual media typical of popular music culture, including sleeve art, animated music videos. The tangible materiality foregrounded in these visuals stems from the main ecological theme of the album: the disposability of plastic waste. Using methods of analysis of the original texts, and a survey of the networked fan practices that respond to them, the essay theorizes that the material and haptic invitation in these visuals is at odds with the diminishing presence of physical consumables within popular music culture. It then argues that fans enter into this gap with their own creative practices, making and playing with hand-made or customized objects inspired by Plastic Beach, activating unexploited, marketing potential within the album. Although current applications of this research are limited due to the low frequency of popular music transmedia case studies, it points the way forward to theoretically more successful marketing strategies in the future.

  17. Development of crayfish bio-based plastic materials processed by small-scale injection moulding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Manuel; Romero, Alberto; Cordobes, Felipe; Guerrero, Antonio

    2015-03-15

    Protein has been investigated as a source for biodegradable polymeric materials. This work evaluates the development of plastic materials based on crayfish and glycerol blends, processed by injection moulding, as a fully biodegradable alternative to conventional polymer-based plastics. The effect of different additives, namely sodium sulfite or bisulfite as reducing agents, urea as denaturing agent and L-cysteine as cross-linking agent, is also analysed. The incorporation of any additive always yields an increase in energy efficiency at the mixing stage, but its effect on the mechanical properties of the bioplastics is not so clear, and even dampened. The additive developing a greater effect is L-cysteine, showing higher Young's modulus values and exhibiting a remnant thermosetting potential. Thus, processing at higher temperature yields a remarkable increase in extensibility. This work illustrates the feasibility of crayfish-based green biodegradable plastics, thereby contributing to the search for potential value-added applications for this by-product. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Metal-Carbon-CNF Composites Obtained by Catalytic Pyrolysis of Urban Plastic Residues as Electro-Catalysts for the Reduction of CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesica Castelo-Quibén

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal–carbon–carbon nanofibers composites obtained by catalytic pyrolysis of urban plastic residues have been prepared using Fe, Co or Ni as pyrolitic catalysts. The composite materials have been fully characterized from a textural and chemical point of view. The proportion of carbon nanofibers and the final content of carbon phases depend on the used pyrolitic metal with Ni being the most active pyrolitic catalysts. The composites show the electro-catalyst activity in the CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons, favoring all the formation of C1 to C4 hydrocarbons. The tendency of this activity is in accordance with the apparent faradaic efficiencies and the linear sweep voltammetries. The cobalt-based composite shows high selectivity to C3 hydrocarbons within this group of compounds.

  19. Evaluation of Composite Materials for Use on Launch Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finchum, A.; Welch, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    Commercially available composite structural shapes were evaluated for use. These composites, fiberglass-reinforced polyester and vinylester resin materials are being used extensively in the fabrication and construction of low maintenance, corrosion resistant structures. The evaluation found that in many applications these composite materials can be successfully used at the space center. These composite materials should not be used where they will be exposed to the hot exhaust plume/cloud of the launch vehicle during the liftoff, and caution should be taken in their use in areas where electrostatic discharge and hypergolic propellant compatibility are primary concerns.

  20. Mechanical properties of wood-based composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiyong Cai; Robert J. Ross

    2010-01-01

    The term composite is used to describe any wood material bonded together with adhesives. The current product mix ranges from fiberboard to laminated beams and components. In this chapter, wood-based composite materials are classified into the following categories: panel products (plywood, oriented strandboard (OSB), particleboard, fiberboard, medium-density fiberboard...

  1. Advanced organic composite materials for aircraft structures: Future program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Revolutionary advances in structural materials have been responsible for revolutionary changes in all fields of engineering. These advances have had and are still having a significant impact on aircraft design and performance. Composites are engineered materials. Their properties are tailored through the use of a mix or blend of different constituents to maximize selected properties of strength and/or stiffness at reduced weights. More than 20 years have passed since the potentials of filamentary composite materials were identified. During the 1970s much lower cost carbon filaments became a reality and gradually designers turned from boron to carbon composites. Despite progress in this field, filamentary composites still have significant unfulfilled potential for increasing aircraft productivity; the rendering of advanced organic composite materials into production aircraft structures was disappointingly slow. Why this is and research and technology development actions that will assist in accelerating the application of advanced organic composites to production aircraft is discussed.

  2. Plasticizers used in food-contact materials affect adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomatto, Valentina; Cottone, Erika; Cocci, Paolo; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Mosconi, Gilberto; Nelson, Erik Russel; Palermo, Francesco Alessandro; Bovolin, Patrizia

    2018-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that exposure to some plasticizers, such as Bisphenol A (BPA), play a role in endocrine/metabolic dispruption and can affect lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Here, we investigated the adipogenic activity and nuclear receptor interactions of four plasticizers approved for the manufacturing of food-contact materials (FCMs) and currently considered safer alternatives. Differentiating 3T3-L1 mouse preadipocytes were exposed to scalar concentrations (0.01-25 μM) of DiNP (Di-iso-nonyl-phthalate), DiDP (Di-iso-decyl-phthalate), DEGDB (Diethylene glycol dibenzoate), or TMCP (Tri-m-cresyl phosphate). Rosiglitazone, a well-known pro-adipogenic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonist, and the plasticizer BPA were included as reference compounds. All concentrations of plasticizers were able to enhance lipid accumulation, with TMCP being the most effective one. Accordingly, when comparing in silico the ligand binding efficiencies to the nuclear receptors PPARγ and retinoid-X-receptor-alpha (RXRα), TMPC displayed the highest affinity to both receptors. Differently from BPA, the four plasticizers were most effective in enhancing lipid accumulation when added in the mid-late phase of differentiation, thus suggesting the involvement of different intracellular signalling pathways. In line with this, TMCP, DiDP, DiNP and DEGDB were able to activate PPARγ in transient transfection assays, while previous studies demonstrated that BPA acts mainly through other nuclear receptors. qRT-PCR studies showed that all plasticizers were able to increase the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (Cebpβ) in the early steps of adipogenesis, and the adipogenesis master gene Pparγ2 in the middle phase, with very similar efficacy to that of Rosiglitazone. In addition, TMCP was able to modulate the expression of both Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4/Adipocyte Protein 2 (Fabp4/Ap2) and Lipoprotein Lipase (Lpl) transcripts in the late phase

  3. The J-integral concept for elastic-plastic material behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, W.; Kienzler, R.

    1987-03-01

    A simple analytical extension of the J integral has been presented which extends the J concept to apply for materials described by an incremental theory of plasticity. The stress work density replacing the strain energy density is load-history dependent. The J integral may be made path independent by virtue of an additional volume integral and may be understood as work dissipation rate. The discussion of the consequences for the applicability of the J concept to describe fracture processes showed that validity criteria proposed in the standards are not sufficient to yield configuration-independent J-resistance curves. However, a possibility is sketched to assess those structure-dependent resistance curves based on plastic-collapse considerations. With 6 figs., 33 refs

  4. Numerical modelling of reinforced concrete beams with fracture-plastic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Sucharda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of models of fracture-plastic materials for reinforced concrete in numerical modelling of beams made from reinforced concrete. The purpose of the paper is to use of a model of concrete for modelling of a behaviour of reinforced concrete beams which have been tested at the University of Toronto within re-examination of classic concrete beam tests. The original tests were performed by Bresler- Scordelis. A stochastic modelling based on LHS (Latin Hypercube Sampling has been performed for the reinforced concrete beam. An objective of the modelling is to evaluate the total bearing capacity of the reinforced concrete beams depending on distribution of input data. The beams from the studied set have longitudinal reinforcement only. The beams do not have any shear reinforcement. The software used for the fracture-plastic model of the reinforced concrete is the ATENA.

  5. HOW DO DEGRADABLE/BIODEGRADABLE PLASTIC MATERIALS DECOMPOSE IN HOME COMPOSTING ENVIRONMENT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Vaverková

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides information about biodegradability of polymeric (biodegradable/degradable materials advertised as 100%-degradable or certified as compostable, which may be a part of biodegradable waste, in home composting conditions. It describes an experiment that took place in home wooden compost bins and contained 9 samples that are commonly available in retail chains in the Czech Republic and Poland. The experiment lasted for the period of 12 weeks. Based on the results thereof it can be concluded that polyethylene samples with additive (samples 2, 4, 7 have not decomposed, their color has not changed and that no degradation or physical changes have occurred. Samples 1, 3 and 5 certified as compostable have not decomposed. Sample 6 exhibited the highest decomposition rate. Samples 8, 9 (tableware exhibited high degree of decomposition. The main conclusion from this study is that degradable/biodegradable plastics or plastics certified as compostable are not suitable for home composting.

  6. Microbes on a Bottle: Substrate, Season and Geography Influence Community Composition of Microbes Colonizing Marine Plastic Debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbeckmann, Sonja; Osborn, A Mark; Duhaime, Melissa B

    2016-01-01

    Plastic debris pervades in our oceans and freshwater systems and the potential ecosystem-level impacts of this anthropogenic litter require urgent evaluation. Microbes readily colonize aquatic plastic debris and members of these biofilm communities are speculated to include pathogenic, toxic, invasive or plastic degrading-species. The influence of plastic-colonizing microorganisms on the fate of plastic debris is largely unknown, as is the role of plastic in selecting for unique microbial communities. This work aimed to characterize microbial biofilm communities colonizing single-use poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) drinking bottles, determine their plastic-specificity in contrast with seawater and glass-colonizing communities, and identify seasonal and geographical influences on the communities. A substrate recruitment experiment was established in which PET bottles were deployed for 5-6 weeks at three stations in the North Sea in three different seasons. The structure and composition of the PET-colonizing bacterial/archaeal and eukaryotic communities varied with season and station. Abundant PET-colonizing taxa belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes (e.g. Flavobacteriaceae, Cryomorphaceae, Saprospiraceae-all known to degrade complex carbon substrates) and diatoms (e.g. Coscinodiscophytina, Bacillariophytina). The PET-colonizing microbial communities differed significantly from free-living communities, but from particle-associated (>3 μm) communities or those inhabiting glass substrates. These data suggest that microbial community assembly on plastics is driven by conventional marine biofilm processes, with the plastic surface serving as raft for attachment, rather than selecting for recruitment of plastic-specific microbial colonizers. A small proportion of taxa, notably, members of the Cryomorphaceae and Alcanivoraceae, were significantly discriminant of PET but not glass surfaces, conjuring the possibility that these groups may directly interact with the PET

  7. Microbes on a Bottle: Substrate, Season and Geography Influence Community Composition of Microbes Colonizing Marine Plastic Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, A. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Plastic debris pervades in our oceans and freshwater systems and the potential ecosystem-level impacts of this anthropogenic litter require urgent evaluation. Microbes readily colonize aquatic plastic debris and members of these biofilm communities are speculated to include pathogenic, toxic, invasive or plastic degrading-species. The influence of plastic-colonizing microorganisms on the fate of plastic debris is largely unknown, as is the role of plastic in selecting for unique microbial communities. This work aimed to characterize microbial biofilm communities colonizing single-use poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) drinking bottles, determine their plastic-specificity in contrast with seawater and glass-colonizing communities, and identify seasonal and geographical influences on the communities. A substrate recruitment experiment was established in which PET bottles were deployed for 5–6 weeks at three stations in the North Sea in three different seasons. The structure and composition of the PET-colonizing bacterial/archaeal and eukaryotic communities varied with season and station. Abundant PET-colonizing taxa belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes (e.g. Flavobacteriaceae, Cryomorphaceae, Saprospiraceae—all known to degrade complex carbon substrates) and diatoms (e.g. Coscinodiscophytina, Bacillariophytina). The PET-colonizing microbial communities differed significantly from free-living communities, but from particle-associated (>3 μm) communities or those inhabiting glass substrates. These data suggest that microbial community assembly on plastics is driven by conventional marine biofilm processes, with the plastic surface serving as raft for attachment, rather than selecting for recruitment of plastic-specific microbial colonizers. A small proportion of taxa, notably, members of the Cryomorphaceae and Alcanivoraceae, were significantly discriminant of PET but not glass surfaces, conjuring the possibility that these groups may directly interact with the

  8. Microbes on a Bottle: Substrate, Season and Geography Influence Community Composition of Microbes Colonizing Marine Plastic Debris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Oberbeckmann

    Full Text Available Plastic debris pervades in our oceans and freshwater systems and the potential ecosystem-level impacts of this anthropogenic litter require urgent evaluation. Microbes readily colonize aquatic plastic debris and members of these biofilm communities are speculated to include pathogenic, toxic, invasive or plastic degrading-species. The influence of plastic-colonizing microorganisms on the fate of plastic debris is largely unknown, as is the role of plastic in selecting for unique microbial communities. This work aimed to characterize microbial biofilm communities colonizing single-use poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET drinking bottles, determine their plastic-specificity in contrast with seawater and glass-colonizing communities, and identify seasonal and geographical influences on the communities. A substrate recruitment experiment was established in which PET bottles were deployed for 5-6 weeks at three stations in the North Sea in three different seasons. The structure and composition of the PET-colonizing bacterial/archaeal and eukaryotic communities varied with season and station. Abundant PET-colonizing taxa belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes (e.g. Flavobacteriaceae, Cryomorphaceae, Saprospiraceae-all known to degrade complex carbon substrates and diatoms (e.g. Coscinodiscophytina, Bacillariophytina. The PET-colonizing microbial communities differed significantly from free-living communities, but from particle-associated (>3 μm communities or those inhabiting glass substrates. These data suggest that microbial community assembly on plastics is driven by conventional marine biofilm processes, with the plastic surface serving as raft for attachment, rather than selecting for recruitment of plastic-specific microbial colonizers. A small proportion of taxa, notably, members of the Cryomorphaceae and Alcanivoraceae, were significantly discriminant of PET but not glass surfaces, conjuring the possibility that these groups may directly interact

  9. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  10. Fiber-reinforced composites materials, manufacturing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, P K

    2007-01-01

    The newly expanded and revised edition of Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing, and Design presents the most up-to-date resource available on state-of-the-art composite materials. This book is unique in that it not only offers a current analysis of mechanics and properties, but also examines the latest advances in test methods, applications, manufacturing processes, and design aspects involving composites. This third edition presents thorough coverage of newly developed materials including nanocomposites. It also adds more emphasis on underlying theories, practical methods, and problem-solving skills employed in real-world applications of composite materials. Each chapter contains new examples drawn from diverse applications and additional problems to reinforce the practical relevance of key concepts. New in The Third Edition: Contains new sections on material substitution, cost analysis, nano- and natural fibers, fiber architecture, and carbon-carbon composites Provides a new chapter on poly...

  11. Thermo-stimulated current and dielectric loss in composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, S.; Hagihara, T.; Okada, T.

    1986-01-01

    Thermo-stimulated current and dielectric loss measurements have been performed on five kinds of commercially available composite materials in order to study the electric properties of composite materials at low temperatures. Thermo-stimulated current measurements have been made on the composite materials in which the matrix quality was changed intentionally. The changes in the matrices were introduced by gamma irradiation or different curing conditions. Thermo-stimulated current and dielectric loss measurements revealed the number and the molecular weight of dipolar molecules. The different features of thermo-stimulated current and dielectric losses were determined for different composite materials. The gamma irradiation and the curing conditions especially affect the thermo-stimulated current features. The changes in macroscopic mechanical properties reflect those of thermo-stimulated current. It was found that the change in quality and/or degradation of the composite materials could be detected by means of thermo-stimulated current and/or dielectric loss measurements

  12. Parameter determination of hereditary models of deformation of composite materials based on identification method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayumov, R. A.; Muhamedova, I. Z.; Tazyukov, B. F.; Shakirzjanov, F. R.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, based on the analysis of some experimental data, a study and selection of hereditary models of deformation of reinforced polymeric composite materials, such as organic plastic, carbon plastic and a matrix of film-fabric composite, was pursued. On the basis of an analysis of a series of experiments it has been established that organo-plastic samples behave like viscoelastic bodies. It is shown that for sufficiently large load levels, the behavior of the material in question should be described by the relations of the nonlinear theory of heredity. An attempt to describe the process of deformation by means of linear relations of the theory of heredity leads to large discrepancies between the experimental and calculated deformation values. The use of the theory of accumulation of micro-damages leads to much better description of the experimental results. With the help of the hierarchical approach, a good approximation of the experimental values was successful only in the first three sections of loading.

  13. Mapping the coupled role of structure and materials in mechanics of platelet-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanian, Shafee; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2018-03-01

    Despite significant progresses on understanding and mimicking the delicate nano/microstructure of biomaterials such as nacre, decoding the indistinguishable merger of materials and structures in controlling the tradeoff in mechanical properties has been long an engineering pursuit. Herein, we focus on an archetype platelet-matrix composite and perform ∼400 nonlinear finite element simulations to decode the complex interplay between various structural features and material characteristics in conferring the balance of mechanical properties. We study various combinatorial models expressed by four key dimensionless parameters, i.e. characteristic platelet length, matrix plasticity, platelet dissimilarity, and overlap offset, whose effects are all condensed in a new unifying parameter, defined as the multiplication of strength, toughness, and stiffness over composite volume. This parameter, which maximizes at a critical characteristic length, controls the transition from intrinsic toughening (matrix plasticity driven without crack growths) to extrinsic toughening phenomena involving progressive crack propagations. This finding, combined with various abstract volumetric and radar plots, will not only shed light on decoupling the complex role of structure and materials on mechanical performance and their trends, but provides important guidelines for designing lightweight staggered platelet-matrix composites while ensuring the best (balance) of their mechanical properties.

  14. INFLUENCE OF COCONUT SHELL ADDITION ON PHYSICO-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WOOD PLASTIC COMPOSITES1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éverton Hillig

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this study, composites with three types of thermoplastic matrix and cellulosic material in a proportion of 40% were produced. The three thermoplastic matrices were high density polyethylene (HDPE, polypropylene (PP and low density polyethylene (LDPE, and the cellulosic materials were pure wood flour (Pinus taeda L or a mixture of wood flour and coconut shell flour (Cocus nucifera L in equal ratios. The objective was to evaluate the influence of addition of coconut shell on the physico-mechanical properties (density, strength and rigidity and the distribution of the cellulosic material in the thermoplastic matrix of the manufactured composites. It was found that the composites had a satisfactory distribution of wood flour in thermoplastic matrices, but the addition of coconut shell promoted bubble formation in the resulting pieces and, thus, interfered with the material properties. The use of a coupling agent promoted interfacial adhesion (cellulose - thermoplastic matrix, which was better in high density polyethylene composites, followed by polypropylene and low density polyethylene. In general, the coconut shell addition caused a decrease of all properties compared to composites made with Loblolly Pine. In addition, the interactions between thermoplastic type and cellulosic matrix type have been statistically confirmed, which caused variations in the studied properties

  15. ECODESIGN CRITERIA FOR COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    into mechanical characterization tests, in advanced composite formulations and ... of aerospace & automobile, marine construction, renewable energy, modern ... These eco-coefficients are to be inserted into the classical lamination theory.

  16. Enhancement of Moisture Protective Properties and Stability of Pectin through Formation of a Composite Film: Effects of Shellac and Plasticizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangtana-Anan, Manee; Soradech, Sitthiphong; Saengsod, Suthep; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop the high moisture protective ability and stable pectin through the design of composite films based on varying shellac concentrations. A film casting method was applied to prepare a free film. The moisture protective properties and mechanical properties were investigated. The findings was the composite films exhibited the reductions in the hydrophilicity, water vapor permeability, and the moisture content compared with pectin films. The single and composite films were then study for their stability at 40 °C and 75% RH for 90 d. Among the concentrations of shellac, 50% (w/w) could improve stability in terms of moisture protection after 90 d of storage, whereas lower concentrations of shellac (10% to 40%) could not achieve this. However, the higher shellac content also contributed to weaker mechanical properties. The mechanical improvement and stability of composite films with the incorporation of plasticizers were further investigated. Polyethylene glycol 400 and diethyl phthalate at a concentration of 10% were used. The results indicated that both plasticizers could enhance the mechanical characteristics and had a slight effect on moisture protection. The stability of pectin in terms of moisture protective properties could, therefore, be modified through the fabrication of composite films with hydrophobic polymers, that is, shellac and the addition of proper plasticizers to enhance mechanical properties, which could offer wide applications for edible film in food, agro, and pharmaceutical industries. The composite film with 50% shellac could improve moisture protective properties of pectin film. Adding a plasticizer could build up the higher mechanical characteristics of composite film. Stability of pectin could be modified by fabrication of composite films with proper content of shellac and plasticizer. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  17. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  18. Multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling of a person employs an evaporative cooling liquid that changes phase from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The evaporative cooling liquid is absorbed into a superabsorbent material enclosed within the multilayer composite material. The multilayer composite material has a high percentage of the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix. The cooling effect can be sustained for an extended period of time because of the high percentage of phase change liquid that can be absorbed into the superabsorbent. Such a composite can be used for cooling febrile patients by evaporative cooling as the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix changes from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The composite can be made with a perforated barrier material around the outside to regulate the evaporation rate of the phase change liquid. Alternatively, the composite can be made with an imperveous barrier material or semipermeable membrane on one side to prevent the liquid from contacting the person's skin. The evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix can be recharged by soaking the material in the liquid. The multilayer composite material can be fashioned into blankets, garments and other articles.

  19. On the Effect of Unit-Cell Parameters in Predicting the Elastic Response of Wood-Plastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Alavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the effect of unit-cell geometrical parameters in predicting elastic properties of a typical wood plastic composite (WPC. The ultimate goal was obtaining the optimal values of representative volume element (RVE parameters to accurately predict the mechanical behavior of the WPC. For each unit cell, defined by a given combination of the above geometrical parameters, finite element simulation in ABAQUS was carried out, and the corresponding stress-strain curve was obtained. A uniaxial test according to ASTM D638-02a type V was performed on the composite specimen. Modulus of elasticity was determined using hyperbolic tangent function, and the results were compared to the sets of finite element analyses. Main effects of RVE parameters and their interactions were demonstrated and discussed, specially regarding the inclusion of two adjacent wood particles within one unit cell of the material. Regression analysis was performed to mathematically model the RVE parameter effects and their interactions over the modulus of elasticity response. The model was finally employed in an optimization analysis to arrive at an optimal set of RVE parameters that minimizes the difference between the predicted and experimental moduli of elasticity.

  20. GREEN PLASTIC: A NEW PLASTIC FOR PACKAGING

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. Pankaj Kumar*, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a brief idea about a new type of plastic called as bio-plastic or green plastic. Plastic is used as a packaging material for various products, but this plastic is made up of non renewable raw materials. There are various disadvantages of using conventional plastic like littering, CO2 production, non-degradable in nature etc. To overcome these problems a new type of plastic is discovered called bio-plastic or green plastic. Bio-plastic is made from renewable resources and also...

  1. Composite materials with ionic conductivity: from inorganic composites to hybrid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaroslavtsev, Andrei B [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-30

    Information on composite materials with ionic conductivity including inorganic composites and hybrid polymeric ion exchange membranes containing inorganic or polymeric nanoparticles is generalized. The nature of the effect of increase in the ionic conductivity in this type of materials and the key approaches used for theoretical estimation of the conductivity are considered. Data on the ionic conductivity and some other important properties of composites and membrane materials are presented. Prospects for utilization of composite materials and hybrid membranes in hydrogen power engineering are briefly outlined.

  2. Standard Guide for Testing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the application of ASTM standard test methods (and other supporting standards) to continuous-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite materials. The most commonly used or most applicable ASTM standards are included, emphasizing use of standards of Committee D30 on Composite Materials. 1.2 This guide does not cover all possible standards that could apply to polymer matrix composites and restricts discussion to the documented scope. Commonly used but non-standard industry extensions of test method scopes, such as application of static test methods to fatigue testing, are not discussed. A more complete summary of general composite testing standards, including non-ASTM test methods, is included in the Composite Materials Handbook (MIL-HDBK-17). Additional specific recommendations for testing textile (fabric, braided) composites are contained in Guide D6856. 1.3 This guide does not specify a system of measurement; the systems specified within each of the referenced standards shall appl...

  3. Discussion on the Standardization of Shielding Materials — Sensitivity Analysis of Material Compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogata Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overview of standardization activities for shielding materials is described. We propose a basic approach for standardizing material composition used in radiation shielding design for nuclear and accelerator facilities. We have collected concrete composition data from actual concrete samples to organize a representative composition and its variance data. Then the sensitivity analysis of the composition variance has been performed through a simple 1-D dose calculation. Recent findings from the analysis are summarized.

  4. Plasticity of Streptomyces coelicolor membrane composition under different growth conditions and during development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eSandoval-Calderón

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces coelicolor is a model actinomycete that is well known for the diversity of its secondary metabolism and its complex life cycle. As a soil inhabitant, it is exposed to heterogeneous and frequently changing environmental circumstances. In the present work, we studied the effect of diverse growth conditions and phosphate depletion on its lipid profile and the relationship between membrane lipid composition and development in S. coelicolor. The lipid profile from cultures grown on solid media, which is closer to the natural habitat of this microorganism, does not resemble the previously reported lipid composition from liquid grown cultures of S. coelicolor. Wide variations were also observed across different media, growth phases, and developmental stages indicating active membrane remodeling. Ornithine lipids (OL are phosphorus-free polar lipids that were accumulated mainly during sporulation stages, but were also major components of the membrane under phosphorus limitation. In contrast, phosphatidylethanolamine, which had been reported as one of the major polar lipids in the genus Streptomyces, is almost absent under these conditions. We identified one of the genes responsible for the synthesis of OL (SCO0921 and found that its inactivation causes the absence of OL, precocious morphological development and actinorhodin production. Our observations indicate a remarkable plasticity of the membrane composition in this bacterial species, reveal a higher metabolic complexity than expected, and suggest a relationship between cytoplasmic membrane components and the differentiation programs in S. coelicolor.

  5. Fatigue damage characterization in plain-wave carbon-carbon fabric reinforced plastic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.; Al-sulaiman, F.S.; Farooqi, J.K.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper fatigue damage mechanisms in 8 ply Carbon-Carbon Fabric reinforced Plastic Laminates obtained from polyester resin-prepreg plain weave carbon-carbon fabric layers have been investigated. Enhanced dye penetrant, X-ray radiography, optical microscopy, edge replication, and scanning electron fractography have been employed to examine the fatigue damage in three classes of laminates having the unidirectional (O)/sub delta/, the angle-plied (0,0,45,-45)/sub s/ fiber orientations. It is shown the laminates that have off axis plies, i.e.,0,0,45,-45), and (45,-45,0,0) /sub s/, the fatigue damage is initiated through matrix cracking. This matrix cracking induces fiber fracture in adjacent plies near the matrix crack tip. This event is followed by the man damage event of delamination of the stacked plies. It is shown that the delamination was the major damage mode, which caused the eventual fatigue failure in the angle-plied composites. The unidirectional composite (O)/sub delta/ laminates failed predominantly by lateral fracture instead of delamination. Fiber fracture was observed in the prime damage mode in unidirectional (O)/sub delta/ composite laminates. (author)

  6. Interlaminar fracture toughness for composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Yong; Kwon, Soon Man

    1991-01-01

    The new equation of energy release rate for a double cantilever beam specimen is proposed within the framework of the higher order shear deformable plate theory. The interlaminar fracture toughnesses by present theory, ASTM round robin test method and acoustic emission method are compared for thermoset Graphite/Epoxy and thermoplastic AS4/PEEK composites. As a result, the interlaminar fracture toughness values by present theory show good agreement within 5% when compared with ones by ASTM method and it is shown that ones by acoustic emission method yield the lower values than ones by ASTM method. It is observed that the interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic AS4/PEEK composite is about ten times larger than one of thermoset Graphite/Epoxy composite. (Author)

  7. Testing plastic deformations of materials in the introductory undergraduate mechanics laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo-Kröger, C M

    2012-01-01

    Normally, a mechanics laboratory at the undergraduate level includes an experiment to verify compliance with Hooke's law in materials, such as a steel spring and an elastic rubber band. Stress-strain curves are found for these elements. Compression in elastic bands is practically impossible to achieve due to flaccidity. A typical experiment for the complete loading-unloading cycle is to subject a tubular object to torsion. This paper suggests simple experiments for studying properties concerning elasticity and plasticity in elements of common use, subjected to stretching or compression, and also torsion reinforcing. The experiments use plastic binders, rubber bands and metal springs under a moderate load. This paper discusses an experiment with an original device to measure torsion deformations as a function of applied torques, which permitted construction of the hysteresis cycle for a rubber hose and various tubes. Another experiment was designed to define the temporal recovery of a plastic spring with initial stretching. A simple mathematical model was developed to explain this phenomenon. (paper)

  8. A model for rate-dependent but time-independent material behavior in cyclic plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dafalias, Y.F.; Ramey, M.R.; Sheikh, I.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a model for rate-dependent but time independent material behavior under cyclic loading in the plastic range. What is referred to as time independent behavior here, is the absence of creep and relaxation phenomena from the behavior of the model. The notion of plastic internal variables (piv) is introduced, as properly invariant scalars or second order tensors, whose constitutive relations are rate-type equations not necessarily homogeneous of order one in the rates, as it would be required for independent plasticity. The concept of a yield surface in the strain space and a loading function in terms of the total strain rate is introduced, where the sign of the loading function defines zero or non-zero value of the rate of piv. Thus rate dependence is achieved without time dependent behaviour (no creep or relaxation). In addition, discrete memory parameters associated with the most recent event of unloading-reloading in different directions enter the constitutive relations for the piv. (Auth.)

  9. Repeated research of biodegradability of plastics materials in real composting conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Adamcová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to verify information obtained by repeated research provide in 2011 and 2012 in real composting conditions and check information about biodegradability of plastics bags in real composting conditions. In both cases samples were placed into frames and inserted into one clamp within the compost pile to investigate the biodegradation. The plastics bags were obtained from chain stores in the Czech Republic and Poland. The shopping bags were made of HDPE with the TDPA additive (sample 2, PP with an addition of pro-oxidants (d2w (sample 1, 3 and materials certified as compostable (starch, polycaprolactone (sample 4, 5, 6, 7. Control sample (cellulose filtering paper, sample 8 was to check the potential of biological decomposition in the tested environment. At the end of the 15-week experimental period it was found that the polyethylene samples with the additive (sample 1, 2, 3 had not been decomposed, their colour had not changed and that no degradation neither physical changes had occurred (did not biodegrade. Samples certified as compostable (sample 4, 5, 6, 7 were decomposed. The results at the municipal compost facility demonstrate that the compostable plastics biodegrade and polyethylene samples with the additive did not biodegrade in compost.

  10. Effect of matrix cracking and material uncertainty on composite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayathri, P.; Umesh, K.; Ganguli, R.

    2010-01-01

    A laminated composite plate model based on first order shear deformation theory is implemented using the finite element method. Matrix cracks are introduced into the finite element model by considering changes in the A, B and D matrices of composites. The effects of different boundary conditions, laminate types and ply angles on the behavior of composite plates with matrix cracks are studied. Finally, the effect of material property uncertainty, which is important for composite material on the composite plate, is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. Probabilistic estimates of damage detection reliability in composite plates are made for static and dynamic measurements. It is found that the effect of uncertainty must be considered for accurate damage detection in composite structures. The estimates of variance obtained for observable system properties due to uncertainty can be used for developing more robust damage detection algorithms.

  11. Verification and Validation of a Three-Dimensional Orthotropic Plasticity Constitutive Model Using a Unidirectional Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canio Hoffarth

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional constitutive model has been developed for modeling orthotropic composites subject to impact loads. It has three distinct components—a deformation model involving elastic and plastic deformations; a damage model; and a failure model. The model is driven by tabular data that is generated either using laboratory tests or via virtual testing. A unidirectional composite—T800/F3900, commonly used in the aerospace industry, is used in the verification and validation tests. While the failure model is under development, these tests indicate that the implementation of the deformation and damage models in a commercial finite element program, LS-DYNA, is efficient, robust and accurate.

  12. Wood plastic composites based on microfibrillar blends of high density polyethylene/poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong; Wu, Qinglin

    2010-05-01

    High-melting-temperature poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was successfully introduced into wood plastic composites through a two-step reactive extrusion technology. Wood flour was added into pre-prepared PET/high density polyethylene (HDPE) microfibrillar blends (MFBs) in the second extrusion at the temperature for processing HDPE. Addition of 25% in situ formed PET microfibers obviously increased the mechanical properties of HDPE, and more significant enhancement by the in situ formed recycled PET microfibers was observed for the recycled HDPE. Adding 2% E-GMA improved the compatibility between matrix and microfibers in MFBs, resulting further enhanced mechanical properties. The subsequent addition of 40% wood flour did not influence the size and morphology of PET microfibers, and improved the comprehensive mechanical properties of MFBs. The wood flour increased the crystallinity level of HDPE in the compatibilized MFB in which PET phase did not crystallize. The storage modulus of MFB was greatly improved by wood flour. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Analysis of a ceramic filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib Ullah, M.; Islam, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    Design and analysis of a ceramic-filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure is presented. This proposed high-dielectric structure is used as a substrate for patch antennas. A meandered-strip line-fed fractal-shape patch antenna is designed and fabricated on a copper-laminated sandwich-structured substrate. Measurement results of this antenna show 44% and 20% of bandwidths with maximum gains of 3.45 dBi and 5.87 dBi for the lower and upper bands, respectively. The half-power beam widths of 104° and 78° have been observed from the measured radiation pattern at the two resonance frequencies 0.9 GHz and 2.5 GHz

  14. Analysis of a ceramic filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib Ullah, M. [Institute of Space Science (ANGKASA), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi Selangor 43600 (Malaysia); Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600 (Malaysia); Islam, M. T. [Institute of Space Science (ANGKASA), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi Selangor 43600 (Malaysia)

    2013-11-25

    Design and analysis of a ceramic-filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure is presented. This proposed high-dielectric structure is used as a substrate for patch antennas. A meandered-strip line-fed fractal-shape patch antenna is designed and fabricated on a copper-laminated sandwich-structured substrate. Measurement results of this antenna show 44% and 20% of bandwidths with maximum gains of 3.45 dBi and 5.87 dBi for the lower and upper bands, respectively. The half-power beam widths of 104° and 78° have been observed from the measured radiation pattern at the two resonance frequencies 0.9 GHz and 2.5 GHz.

  15. Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert and mesic nestling house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Williams, Joseph B

    2008-10-07

    Intercellular lipids of the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis, form a barrier to water vapor diffusion through the skin. Previously, we measured cutaneous water loss (CWL) and lipid composition of the SC of adult house sparrows from two populations, one living in the deserts of Saudi Arabia and another living in mesic Ohio. Adult desert house sparrows had a lower CWL, a lower proportion of free fatty acids, and a higher proportion of ceramides and cerebrosides in the SC compared with mesic sparrows. In this study, we investigated developmental plasticity of CWL and lipid composition of the SC in desert and mesic nestling house sparrows reared in low and high humidity and compared our results with previous work on adults. We measured CWL of nestlings and analyzed the lipid composition of the SC using thin-layer chromatography. We showed that nestling house sparrows from both localities had higher CWL than adults in their natural environment, a result of major modifications of the lipid composition of the SC. The expression of plasticity in CWL seems to be a response to opposed selection pressures, thermoregulation and water conservation, at different life stages, on which regulation of CWL plays a crucial role. Desert nestlings showed a greater degree of plasticity in CWL and lipid composition of the SC than did mesic nestlings, a finding consistent with the idea that organisms exposed to more environmental stress ought to be more plastic than individuals living in more benign environments.

  16. Mechanics of composite material subjected to eigenstress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang Nielsen, L.

    In this SBI Bulletin a theory is presented dealing with the mechanical behavior of composites subjected to hygro-thermal actions such as shrinkage caused by moisture variations and expansion caused by temperature variations of freezing of water in pore systems. Special attention is given to the t......In this SBI Bulletin a theory is presented dealing with the mechanical behavior of composites subjected to hygro-thermal actions such as shrinkage caused by moisture variations and expansion caused by temperature variations of freezing of water in pore systems. Special attention is given...

  17. A simple method for the investigation of the high temperature plasticity of metallic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinh, N.Q. (Inst. for General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary)); Juhasz, A. (Inst. for General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary)); Tasnadi, P. (Inst. for General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary)); Kovacs, I. (Inst. for General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary))

    1993-11-01

    The indentation creep test is a powerful and quick method for the investigation of the high temperature plasticity of various materials. During creep test a small cylindrical punch is pressed at constant loads into the surface of the sample and the penetration depth is registered as a function of testing time. On the basis of the creep curves taken at various temperatures and loads the strain rate sensitivity and the activation energy of the steady-state creep process can be determined. The main advantage of this test is that it needs only a small amount of testing material. In this paper the usefullness of this method illustrated by some results obtained on superplastic and non superplastic Al alloys. The indentation results are compared with tensile data obtained on the same materials. (orig.).

  18. Methods for an investigation of the effect of material components on the mechanical characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willax, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    The materials used in the production of glass reinforced plastics are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to matrix polyester materials, the reinforcing glass materials, and aspects of specimen preparation. Various methods of investigation are described, giving attention to optical impregnation and wetting measurements and the gravimetric determination of the angle of contact. Deformation measurements and approaches utilizing a piezoelectric device are also considered.

  19. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The composite material can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The composite may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the PCM composite also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, ,gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  20. Optimization of sensor introduction into laminated composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Kristin; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2008-03-01

    This work seeks to extend the functionality of the composite material beyond that of simply load-bearing and to enable in situ sensing, without compromising the structural integrity of the host composite material. Essential to the application of smart composites is the issue of the mechanical coupling of the sensor to the host material. Here we present various methods of embedding sensors within the host composite material. In this study, quasi-static three-point bending (short beam) and fatigue three-point bending (short beam) tests are conducted in order to characterize the effects of introducing the sensors into the host composite material. The sensors that are examined include three types of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) thin film sensors: silver ink with a protective coating of urethane, silver ink without a protective coating, and nickel-copper alloy without a protective coating. The methods of sensor integration include placement at the midplane between the layers of prepreg material as well as a sandwich configuration in which a PVDF thin film sensor is placed between the first and second and nineteenth and twentieth layers of prepreg. Each PVDF sensor is continuous and occupies the entire layer, lying in the plane normal to the thickness direction in laminated composites. The work described here is part of an ongoing effort to understand the structural effects of integrating microsensor networks into a host composite material.

  1. Dictionary materials engineering, materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This dictionary contains about 9,500 entries in each part of the following fields: 1) Materials using and selection; 2) Mechanical engineering materials -Metallic materials - Non-metallic inorganic materials - Plastics - Composites -Materials damage and protection; 3) Electrical and electronics materials -Conductor materials - Semiconductors - magnetic materials - Dielectric materials - non-conducting materials; 4) Materials testing - Mechanical methods - Analytical methods - Structure investigation - Complex methods - Measurement of physical properties - Non-destructive testing. (orig.) [de

  2. Smart Natural Fiber Reinforced Plastic (NFRP) Composites Based On Recycled Polypropylene in The Presence Kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharty, N. S.; Ismail, H.; Diharjo, K.; Handayani, D. S.; Lestari, W. A.

    2017-07-01

    Composites contain double filler material which act as reinforcement and flame retardants of recycled polypropylene (rPP)/kaolin(Kao)/palm oil empty bunch fiber (PEBF) have been succesfully prepared. The composites were synthesized through reactively solution method, using coupling agent PP-g-AA and compatibilizer DVB. The effect of double filler [Kao/PEBF] were investigated flexural strength (FS), inflammability, and morphology. Mechanical testing result in accordance to ASTM D790, the FS of rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/Kao+ZB/PEBF composite was 48% higher than that of rPP matrix. Moreover, flexural modulus (FM) was significantly improved by 56% as compared to that of rPP matrix. The scanning electron images (SEM) shown good dispersion of [Ka/PEBF] and good filler-matrix interaction. The inflammability testing result which is tested using ASTM D635, showed that the flame resistance of rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/Kao+ZB/PEBF composite was improve by increasing of time to ignition (TTI) about 857% and burning rate (BR) decreasing to 66% compared to the raw material rPP matrix. In the same time, the addition of 20% (w/w) PEBF as a second filler to form rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/Kao+ZB/PEBF composites (F5) is able to increase: the FS by 17.5%, the FM by 19%, the TTI by 7.6% and the BR by 3.7% compared to the composite without PEBF (F2).

  3. Experimental Studies on Improved Plastic Bonded Explosives Materials (PBXs for Controlled Fragmentation Warheads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsharkawy Karim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes formulations of plastic bonded explosives (PBXs based on three highly brisant explosives, namely 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX and pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN with polyurethane (PU based on Glycidyl azide polymer (GAP as an energetic binder in comparison with composition-B, which used in the fragmentation warheads. The sensitivity and performance properties of different types of PBXs were evaluated by experimental results of prepared selected PBX compositions. Casting technique was used to prepare the selected compositions containing 14% PU based on GAP. It has been observed that the brisance of the PBX based on HMX was higher than that of comp-B by 21.3 %, the detonation velocity showed a remarkable increase of the order of 8480 (m/s while that of comp-B was 7638 (m/s. A controlled fragmentation warhead with an outer grooving warhead case of dimensions 100x35x4 mm was used and arena test was carried out to determine the lethal zone of the fragmentation warhead. The lethal zone obtained from arena test for PBX composition based on HMX named PBXHG4 was higher than that based on RDX or PETN, and than that of comp-B by 40%.

  4. Structured Piezoelectric Composites : Materials and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Ende, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The piezoelectric effect, which causes a material to generate a voltage when it deforms, is very suitable for making integrated sensors, and (micro-) generators. However, conventional piezoelectric materials are either brittle ceramics or certain polymers with a low thermal stability, which limits

  5. The explosive cathode on the base of carbon-fibrous plastic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Baranov, A.M.; Kostyuchenko, S.V.; Chernenko, N.M.

    1988-01-01

    Production process of exploseve cathodes on the base of carbon-fibrous plastic material of any geometric form and size is discussed. Experimental study of current take-off from cathodes with diameter 2 cm of 10 kV and 150-250 kV voltage are given. It is shown that ignition voltage of cathode plasma is 2 kV with 5 mm gap electrode of diode and 5 ·10 -5 Tor pressure of residual gas. It is shown that carbon-fibrous cathode, made by this technology, provides more stable current take-off electron beam (withoud oscillations) in comparison with other cathodes

  6. Quantitative Evaluation of Delamination Inside of Composite Materials by ESPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Koung Suk; Yang, Kwang Young; Kang, Ki Soo; Ji, Chang June

    2004-01-01

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) for quantitative evaluation of delaminations inside of a composite material plate is described. Delaminations caused by the impact on composite materials are difficult to detect visual inspection and ultrasonic testing due to non-homeogenous structure. This paper proposes the quantitative evaluation technique of the defects made in the composite plates by impact load. Artificial defects are introduced inside of the composite plate for the development of a reliable ESPI inspection technique. Real defects produced by impact tester are inspected and compared with the results of visual inspection which shows a good agreement within 5% error

  7. Thermo-visco-plasticity and creep in structural-material response of folded-plate structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milašinović Dragan D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many structural parts are exposed to high temperatures and loading. It is then important to have data about material inelastic behaviour under such exploiting conditions. Influence of temperature on mechanical characteristics of a material may be inserted via the creep coefficient in the range of visco-elasto-plastic (VEP strains. This damage parameter is implemented in this paper in conjunction with mathematical material modelling approach named rheological-dynamical analogy (RDA in order to address structural stiffness reduction due to inelastic material behaviour. The aim of this paper is to define structural-material internal damping based on both the RDA dynamic modulus and modal damping ratio, by modelling critically damped dynamic systems in the steady-state response. These systems are credible base for explanation of the phenomenon of thermo-visco-plasticity and creep in structural-material response due to high temperatures and loading. Though elastic buckling information for folded-plate structures is not a direct predictor of capacity or collapse behaviour on its own, both the mode and the load (moment are important proxies for the actual behaviour. In current design codes, such as AISI S100, New Zealand/Australia, and European Union, the design formulae are calibrated through the calculation of elastic critical buckling loads (or moments to predict the ultimate strength, thus the ability to calculate the associated elastic buckling loads (or moments has great importance. Moreover, the buckling mode shapes are commonly employed into non-linear collapse modelling as initial geometric imperfections and thermal performance of folded-plate structures in fire. To examine the buckling behaviour of folded-plate structures, the main numerical solution methods are used such as the finite element method (FEM and finite strip method (FSM. This paper aims at providing a unified frame for quasi-static inelastic buckling and thermal loading of

  8. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Brent J.; Antoniak, Zen I.; Prater, John T.; DeSteese, John G.

    1992-01-01

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed.

  9. The stress analysis method for three-dimensional composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Kanehiro; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Maekawa, Zen'ichiro; Hamada, Hiroyuki

    1994-05-01

    This study proposes a stress analysis method for three-dimensionally fiber reinforced composite materials. In this method, the rule-of mixture for composites is successfully applied to 3-D space in which material properties would change 3-dimensionally. The fundamental formulas for Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio are derived. Also, we discuss a strength estimation and an optimum material design technique for 3-D composite materials. The analysis is executed for a triaxial orthogonally woven fabric, and their results are compared to the experimental data in order to verify the accuracy of this method. The present methodology can be easily understood with basic material mechanics and elementary mathematics, so it enables us to write a computer program of this theory without difficulty. Furthermore, this method can be applied to various types of 3-D composites because of its general-purpose characteristics.

  10. Introduction of damage in an elasto-plastic model for unsaturated geo-materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pense, S.; Pouya, A.; Gatmiri, B.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. During the excavation of nuclear waste repository galleries, the surrounding soil is suspected to undergo structural changes as well as modification of its stress state. The desaturation due to ventilation of galleries during this stage makes it necessary to consider the unsaturated state of the host geo-material. The decompression occurring after the excavation leads to a modification of the stress state. The purpose of our work is to develop a mechanical model to simulate the non-linear stress-strain behaviour of geo-materials which will have to contain radioactivity of nuclear waste for a very long time. Two irreversible phenomena can explain the non-linear behaviour of geo-materials. Plasticity leads to irrecoverable strains. Damage, linked to the appearance and extension of microcracks, results in a deterioration of elastic and hydraulic properties. We will present here the bases of a new model coupling damage and plasticity for the stress-strain behaviour of unsaturated geo-materials. This model should be thermodynamically consistent and use only a reasonable number of parameters. Based on the work of Houlsby, (Houlsby 1997), we choose to use as constitutive variables for unsaturated soils Bishop's stress and suction. This choice as the advantage to allow for continuity at the transition between saturated and unsaturated states. Damage is taken into account by defining a damaged constitutive stress, which is similar to the effective stress principle defined by Kachanov (Kachanov 1958). A simple damage criterion is proposed and an associative flow rule is assumed. We choose to follow the principle of strain equivalence defined by Lemaitre (Lemaitre 1996). This leads to the following elasticity law giving the damaged constitutive stress as a function of elastic strain. If non-linear elasticity is considered, a pressure-dependent bulk modulus and a constant shear modulus can be chosen in order to fit

  11. [Application of individual light-curing resin tray as edge plastic material in complete denture modulo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Mei; Tang, Xuyan; Liang, Guangku

    2015-12-01

    To investigate clinical effect of individual light-curing resin tray as edge plastic material in complete denture modulo.
 A total of 30 patients with poor condition for alveolar ridge of mandible were chosen individual tray with individual light-curing resin tray for material edge shaping or traditional individual impression tray for edge shaping cream to produce complete denture. The operability, questionnaire about denture retention, comfort, mucosal cases and chewing function in the process of shaping the edge were investigated three months later after wearing dentures.
 There was no significant difference in retention, comfort, mucosa and the chewing function between the two mandibular denture impression methods. However, the patients with individual light-curing resin tray as edge shaping material felt better in the process than that in the patients with die-cream as the edge shaping material (P<0.05). Furthermore, the manipulation with individual light-curing resin tray as edge shaping material is easy for doctor.
 Although the clinical effect of Individual light-curing resin tray material as the edge shaping material is equal to that of impression cream, it saves time and human resource. Moreover, it is more acceptable for the patients and thus it can be spread in clinics.

  12. Microwave Absorbent Packaging Material from Composites Chitosan-Polyvinyl Alcohol Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang - Riyanto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microwave absorbent packaging materials currently tend to biomaterial. Chitosan is a dielectric biomaterial with polycationic properties. The aim of this study was to analyze characteristics of microwave absorbing packaging material made from composite chitosan-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA polymer. The ability of the packaging material to absorb microwave was determined by reflection loss measurement. Formed packaging prototype resembles as a thin transparent yellowish plastic with thickness (0.11-0.22 mm and the tensile strength (106.33±2.82-143.00±2.59 kPa. SEM analysis showed homogenous structure characterized by interaction between chitosan and PVA. Optimum absorption value was obtained from chitosan concentration of 1%, with average value of reflection loss was (-31.9289±4.0094 dB.Keywords: chitosan, material packaging, microwave, reflection loss

  13. Microwave Absorbent Packaging Material from Composites Chitosan-Polyvinyl Alcohol Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang - Riyanto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Microwave absorbent packaging materials currently tend to biomaterial. Chitosan is a dielectric biomaterial with polycationic properties. The aim of this study was to analyze characteristics of microwave absorbing packaging material made from composite chitosan-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA polymer. The ability of the packaging material to absorb microwave was determined by reflection loss measurement. Formed packaging prototype resembles as a thin transparent yellowish plastic with thickness (0.11-0.22 mm and the tensile strength (106.33±2.82-143.00±2.59 kPa. SEM analysis showed homogenous structure characterized by interaction between chitosan and PVA. Optimum absorption value was obtained from chitosan concentration of 1%, with average value of reflection loss was (-31.9289±4.0094 dB.Keywords: chitosan, material packaging, microwave, reflection loss

  14. A Study on AE Signal Analysis of Composite Materials Using Matrix Piezo Electric Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yeun Ho; Choi, Jin Ho; Kweon, Jin Hwe

    2007-01-01

    As fiber reinforced composite materials are widely used in aircraft, space structures and robot arms, the study on non-destructive testing methods has become an important research area for improving their reliability and safety. AE (acoustic emission) can evaluate the defects by detecting the emitting strain energy when elastic waves are generated by the initiation and growth of crack, plastic deformation, fiber breakage, matrix cleavage, or delamination. In the paper, AE signals generated under uniaxial tension were measured and analyzed using the 8x8 matrix piezo electric sensor. The electronic circuit to control the transmitting distance of AE signals was designed and constructed. The optical data storage system was also designed to store the AE signal of 64 channels using LED (light emitting diode) elements. From the tests, it was shown that the source location and propagation path of AE signals in composite materials could be detected effectively by the 8x8 matrix piezo electric sensor

  15. Microbiological destruction of composite polymeric materials in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legonkova, O. A.; Selitskaya, O. V.

    2009-01-01

    Representatives of the same species of microscopic fungi developed on composite materials with similar polymeric matrices independently from the type of soils, in which the incubation was performed. Trichoderma harzianum, Penicillium auranthiogriseum, and Clonostachys solani were isolated from the samples of polyurethane. Fusarium solani, Clonostachys rosea, and Trichoderma harzianum predominated on the surface of ultrathene samples. Ulocladium botrytis, Penicillium auranthiogriseum, and Fusarium solani predominated in the variants with polyamide. Trichoderma harzianum, Penicillium chrysogenum, Aspergillus ochraceus, and Acremonium strictum were isolated from Lentex-based composite materials. Mucor circinelloides, Trichoderma harzianum, and Penicillium auranthiogriseum were isolated from composite materials based on polyvinyl alcohol. Electron microscopy demonstrated changes in the structure of polymer surface (loosening and an increase in porosity) under the impact of fungi. The physicochemical properties of polymers, including their strength, also changed. The following substances were identified as primary products of the destruction of composite materials: stearic acid for polyurethane-based materials; imide of dithiocarbonic acid and 1-nonadecen in variants with ultrathene; and tetraaminopyrimidine and isocyanatodecan in variants with polyamide. N,N-dimethyldodecan amide, 2-methyloximundecanon and 2-nonacosane were identified for composites on the base of Lentex A4-1. Allyl methyl sulfide and imide of dithiocarbonic acid were found in variants with the samples of composites based on polyvinyl alcohol. The identified primary products of the destruction of composite materials belong to nontoxic compounds.

  16. Insensitive high-energy energetic structural material of tungsten-polytetrafluoroethylene-aluminum composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Energetic structural material is a kind of materials that are inert under normal conditions but could produce exothermic chemical reaction when subjected to impact. This report shows a kind of energetic structural material of tungsten (W-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-aluminum (Al with density of 4.12 g/cm3, excellent ductility and dynamic compressive strength of 96 MPa. Moreover, 50W-35PTFE-15Al (wt% can exhibit a high reaction energy value of more than 2 times of TNT per unit mass and 5 times of TNT per unit volume, respectively, but with excellent insensitivity compared with traditional explosives. Under thermal conditions, the W-PTFE-Al composite can keep stable at 773 K. Under impact loading, when the strain rate up to ∼4820 s−1 coupled with the absorbed energy per unit volume of 120 J/cm3, deflagration occurs and combustion lasts for 500 μs. During impact compressive deformation, the PTFE matrix is elongated into nano-fibers, thus significantly increases the reaction activity of W-PTFE-Al composites. The nano-fiber structure is necessary for the reaction of W-PTFE-Al composites. The formation of PTFE nano-fibers must undergo severe plastic deformation, and therefore the W-PTFE-Al composites exhibit excellent insensitivity and safety. Furthermore, the reaction mechanisms of W-PTFE-Al composites in argon and in air are revealed.

  17. End plates made of a composite material for the revolving drum of a centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, T.; Onishi, H.; Fujiwara, M.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention relates to improvement of the end plates of centrifuges, especially those for centrifugal gas separators. End plates made of a composite material for the revolving drum of a centrifuge consists of a carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic layer. This layer consists of carbon fibers either wound helically at an angle greater than 75 0 and less than 90 0 to the center line of revolution, or wound in a hoop, and a matrix of a thermosetting resin in which the carbon fibers are buried, which [matrix] is laminated with metal layers

  18. Mechanical behaviour of composite materials made by resin film infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casavola C.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Innovative composite materials are frequently used in designing aerospace, naval and automotive components. In the typical structure of composites, multiple layers are stacked together with a particular sequence in order to give specific mechanical properties. Layers are organized with different angles, different sequences and different technological process to obtain a new and innovative material. From the standpoint of engineering designer it is useful to consider the single layer of composite as macroscopically homogeneous material. However, composites are non homogeneous bodies. Moreover, layers are not often perfectly bonded together and delamination often occurs. Other violations of lamination theory hypotheses, such as plane stress and thin material, are not unusual and in many cases the transverse shear flexibility and the thickness-normal stiffness should be considered. Therefore the real behaviour of composite materials is quite different from the predictions coming from the traditional lamination theory. Due to the increasing structural performance required to innovative composites, the knowledge of the mechanical properties for different loading cases is a fundamental source of concern. Experimental characterization of materials and structures in different environmental conditions is extremely important to understand the mechanical behaviour of these new materials. The purpose of the present work is to characterize a composite material developed for aerospace applications and produced by means of the resin film infusion process (RFI. Different tests have been carried out: tensile, open-hole and filled-hole tensile, compressive, openhole and filled-hole compressive. The experimental campaign has the aim to define mechanical characteristics of this RFI composite material in different conditions: environmental temperature, Hot/Wet and Cold.

  19. Evaluation of radiation-shielding properties of the composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlenko, V.I.; Chekashina, N.I.; Yastrebinskij, R.N.; Sokolenko, I.V.; Noskov, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the evaluation of radiation-shielding properties of composite materials with respect to gamma-radiation. As a binder for the synthesis of radiation-shielding composites we used lead boronsilicate glass matrix. As filler we used nanotubular chrysotile filled with lead tungstate PbWO4. It is shown that all the developed composites have good physical-mechanical characteristics, such as compressive strength, thermal stability and can be used as structural materials. On the basis of theoretical calculation we described the graphs of the gamma-quanta linear attenuation coefficient depending on the emitted energy for all investigated composites. We founded high radiation-shielding properties of all the composites on the basis of theoretical and experimental data compared to materials conventionally used in the nuclear industry - iron, concrete, etc

  20. Neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination in plastic scintillators: Preparation and characterization of various compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, Pauline; Hamel, Matthieu; Dehé-Pittance, Chrystèle; Rocha, Licinio; Pansu, Robert B.; Normand, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the preparation and evaluation of plastic scintillators for neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination (PSD). We succeeded in developing a plastic scintillator with good neutron/gamma discrimination properties in the range of what is already being commercialized. Several combinations of primary and secondary fluorophores were implemented in chemically modified polymers. These scintillators were fully characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy and under neutron irradiation. The materials proved to be stable for up to 5 years without any degradation of PSD properties. They were then classified in terms of their PSD capabilities and light yield. Our best candidate, 28.6 wt% of primary fluorophore with a small amount of secondary fluorophore, shows promising PSD results and is particularly suited to industrial development, because its preparation does not involve the use of expensive or exotic compounds. Furthermore, even at the highest prepared concentration, high stability over time was observed. As a proof of concept, one sample with dimensions 109 mm ∅×114 mm height (≈1 L) was prepared