WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

  1. Determination of trace amounts of cerium in paint by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    The determination of Ce in paint by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is described, and the detection limit of ICP-OES of 0.0004 ppM is compared with that of other methods. The effects of the major elemental components of paint, Si, Pb, Cr, and Na on the ICP-OES determination of Ce were studied. The interference of 400 ppM of the other ions on the determination of 10 ppM Ce was small (0 to 3% error). The method is applicable to the range of 0.2 to 700 ppM Ce

  2. Multielement determination of rare earth elements by liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawatari, Hideyuki; Asano, Takaaki; Hu, Xincheng; Saizuka, Tomoo; Itoh, Akihide; Hirose, Akio; Haraguchi, Hiroki

    1995-01-01

    The rapid determination of rare earth elements (REEs) has been investigated by an on-line system of high performance liquid chromatography/multichannel inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. In the present system, all REEs could be detected simultaneously in a single chromatographic measurement without spectral interferences. Utilizing a cation exchange column and 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanoic acid aqueous solution as the mobile phase, the detection limits of 0.4-30 ng ml -1 for all REEs were obtained. The system was applied to the determination of REEs in geological standard rock samples and rare earth impurities in high purity rare earth oxides. The REEs in standard rocks could be determined by the present HPLC/ICP-AES system without pretreatment after acid digestion, although the detection limits were not sufficient for the analysis of rare earth oxides. (author)

  3. Determination of rare earth elements by liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Haraguchi, H.

    1984-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) interfaced with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been applied to the determination of rare earth elements. ICP-AES was used as an element-selective detector for HPLC. The separation of rare earth elements with HPLC helped to avoid erroneous analytical results due to spectral interferences. Fifteen rare earth elements (Y and 14 lanthanides) were determined selectively with the HPLC/ICP-AES system using a concentration gradient method. The detection limits with the present HPLC/ICP-AES system were about 0.001-0.3 μg/mL with a 100-μL sample injection. The calibration curves obtained by the peak height measurements showed linear relationships in the concentration range below 500 μg/mL for all rare earth elements. A USGS rock standard sample, rare earth ores, and high-purity lanthanide reagents (>99.9%) were successfully analyzed without spectral interferences

  4. Inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectrometry: trace elements in oil matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Charlie Albert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1977-12-01

    The simultaneous determination of up to 20 trace elements in various oil matrices by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry is reported. The oil matrices investigated were lubricating oils (for wear metals), fuel oil, centrifuged coal liquefaction product, crude soybean oil, and commercial edible oils. The samples were diluted with appropriate organic solvents and injected into the plasma as an aerosol generated by a pneumatic nebulization technique. Detection limits of the 28 elements studied ranged from 0.0006 to 9 μg/g with the majority falling in the 0.01 to 0.1 μg/g range. Analytical calibration curves were linear over at least two orders of magnitude and for some elements this linearity extended over 4.5 orders of magnitude. Relevant data on precision and accuracy are included. Because metals often occur as particles in lubricating oil and coal liquefaction products, the effect of particles on the analytical results was examined. Wear metal particles in used oil did not appear to affect the analytical results. However, incomplete recovery relative to organometallic reference solutions was obtained for iron particles with a nominal mean diameter of 3.0 μm suspended in oil. It was shown that the following factors contributed to incomplete recovery for the particles: settling of the suspended particles in the flask, a difference in nebulization efficiency between particle suspensions and organometallic solutions, and indications of incomplete vaporization of the larger particles in the plasma.

  5. Methods for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, George C. Y. [Bloomington, IN; Hieftje, Gary M [Bloomington, IN

    2010-08-03

    A method for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). ICP-AES analysis is performed across a plurality of selected locations in the plasma on an unknown sample, collecting the light intensity at one or more selected wavelengths of one or more sought-for analytes, creating a first dataset. The first dataset is then calibrated with a calibration dataset creating a calibrated first dataset curve. If the calibrated first dataset curve has a variability along the location within the plasma for a selected wavelength, errors are present. Plasma-related errors are then corrected by diluting the unknown sample and performing the same ICP-AES analysis on the diluted unknown sample creating a calibrated second dataset curve (accounting for the dilution) for the one or more sought-for analytes. The cross-over point of the calibrated dataset curves yields the corrected value (free from plasma related errors) for each sought-for analyte.

  6. Elemental analysis using instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Sam; Choi, Kwang Soon; Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sun Ha; Lim, Jong Myoung; Kim, Young Jin; Quraishi, Shamshad Begum

    2003-05-01

    Elemental analyses for certified reference materials were carried out using instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Five Certified Reference Materials (CRM) were selected for the study on comparative analysis of environmental samples. The CRM are Soil (NIST SRM 2709), Coal fly ash (NIST SRM 1633a), urban dust (NIST SRM 1649a) and air particulate on filter media (NIST SRM 2783 and human hair (GBW 09101)

  7. Study of uranium matrix interference on ten analytes using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazi, A.A.; Qamar, S.; Atta, M.A. (A.Q. Khan Research Labs., Rawalpindi (Pakistan))

    1993-08-01

    Maximum allowable concentrations of 12 elements in uranium hexafluoride feed for enrichment to reactor grade material (about 3%), vary from 1 to 100 ppm ([mu]g/g). Using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer, 51 lines of tine of these elements (B, Cr, Mo, P, Sb, Si, Ta, Ti, V and W) has been studied with a uranium matrix to investigate the matrix interference on the basis of signal to background (SBR), and background to background ratios (BBR). Detection limits and limits of quantitative determination (LQDs) were calculated for these elements in a uranium matrix using SBR and relative standard deviation of the background signal (RSD[sub B]) approach. In almost all cases, the uranium matrix interference reduces the SBRs to the extent that direct trace analysis is impossible. A uranium sample having known concentrations of impurities (around LQDs) was directly analysed with results that showed reasonable accuracy and precision. (Author).

  8. Determination of daily intake of elements from Philippine total diet samples using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, G.C. de; Shiraishi, K.; Kawamura, H.; Igaraishi, Y.; Palattao, M.V.; Azanon, E.M.

    1990-10-01

    Total diet samples were analyzed for major elements (Na, K, Ca, Mg, P) and some minor trace elements (Fe, Zn, Mn, Al, Sr, Cu, Ba, Yt) using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Samples analyzed were classified into sex and age groups. Results for some elements (Na, K, Mg, Zn, Cu, Mn) were compared with values from Bataan dietary survey calculated using the Philippine composition table. Exceot for Na, analytical results were similar to calculated values. Analytical results for Ca and Fe were also compared with the values from Food and Nutrition Research Institute. In general, values obtained in the study were lower than the FNRI values. Comparison of the analytical and calculated results with the Japanese and ICRP data showed that Philippine values were lower than foreign values. (Auth.). 22 refs., 9 tabs

  9. Accuracy and Precision in Elemental Analysis of Environmental Samples using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quraishi, Shamsad Begum; Chung, Yong-Sam; Choi, Kwang Soon

    2005-01-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry followed by micro-wave digestion have been performed on different environmental Certified Reference Materials (CRMs). Analytical results show that accuracy and precision in ICP-AES analysis were acceptable and satisfactory in case of soil and hair CRM samples. The relative error of most of the elements in these two CRMs is within 10% with few exceptions and coefficient of variation is also less than 10%. Z-score as an analytical performance was also within the acceptable range (±2). ICP-AES was found as an inadequate method for Air Filter CRM due to incomplete dissolution, low concentration of elements and very low mass of the sample. However, real air filter sample could have been analyzed with high accuracy and precision by increasing sample mass during collection. (author)

  10. Semi-automatic determination of tin in marine materials by continuous flow hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yonglai; Narasaki, Hisataki; Chen Hongyuan; Tian Liching

    1997-01-01

    A semi-automated continuous flow hydride generation system with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used for the determination of tin in marine materials. The effects of acids (H 2 SO 4 and HCl) were studied. The analytical parameters were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit is 0.4 ng/ml. Interferences from transition elements were investigated and seven masking reagents were tested. L-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate (1%) was used to mask the interferences from foreign ions. Finally, the accuracy, checked with a marine standard reference material obtained from the National Research Council (NRC), was within the certified value. (orig.). With 6 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Experimental evidence of state-selective charge transfer in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2004-01-01

    State-selective charge-transfer behavior was observed for Fe, Cr, Mn and Cu in inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-atomic emission spectrometry. Charge transfer from Ar + to Fe, Cr and Mn is state-selective because of inefficient collisional mixing of the quasiresonant charge-transfer energy levels with nearby levels. This low efficiency is the consequence of differences in electronic configuration of the core electrons. The reason for state-selective charge-transfer behavior to Cu is not clear, although a tentative explanation based on efficiency of intramultiplet and intermultiplet mixing for this special case is offered

  12. Use of magnesium as a test element for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermet, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    To optimize atomization and ionization processes in an inductively coupled plasma used as a source in atomic emission spectrometry, the Mg II 280.270-nm/Mg I 285-213-nm line intensity ratio is used. A theoretic ratio is calculated assuming a local thermodynamic equilibrium.A review of previously published experimental values of the ratio is given as a function of the parameters influencing the energy transfer between the plasma and injected species. In particular, the effects of the power, the carrier gas flow-rate, the i.d. of the torch injector, the use of a sheathing gas and the presence of hydrogen are described. Values of the ratio close to the theoretical values are obtained with a high power (>1.4 kW), a lower carrier gas flow-rate ( -1 ) and a large i.d. of the injector (>2 mm). This optimization can also be applied to the minimization of interference effects due to the presence of sodium. (author). 64 refs.; 9 figs.; 1 tab

  13. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry — Critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bings, N.H., E-mail: bings@uni-mainz.de; Orlandini von Niessen, J.O.; Schaper, J.N.

    2014-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally

  14. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry — Critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bings, N.H.; Orlandini von Niessen, J.O.; Schaper, J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally

  15. Determination of the mineral compositions of in six beans by microwave digestion with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Q.; Yang, L.; Chen, S.; Liu, X.; Ma, X.

    2012-01-01

    In the study, microwave digestion procedure optimized was applied for digesting beans. Nineteen mineral element concentrations were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The result indicated detection limits for the 19 elements were less than 0.0998, and relative standard deviations were 1.01% - 5.02% for all the elements, and recoveries were 90.89% - 104.55% by adding standard recovery experiment. The study showed the beans selected were abundant in mineral element contents in human nutrition, determination mineral element contents by ICP-AES with microwave digestion technology were a lot of merits of small environmental pollution, fast and accurate determination result, which could satisfy the examination request of bean samples. The results provided evidence that the six beans were a good source of K, P, Mg and Ca. This study is to give important reference value to people due to individual differences by adjusting the dietary to complement the different mineral elements. (author)

  16. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Development of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for palladium and Rhodium determination in platinum-based alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacevic, R.; Todorovic, M.; Manojlovic, D.; Mutic, J.

    2008-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy with internal standardization was applied for the analysis of an in-house reference platinum alloy containing palladium and rhodium (approximately 5% by weight). In order to compensate for variations in signal recovery due to matrix interferences, and therefore to improve the precision, platinum. the major component, was chosen as an internal standard. Quantitative analysis was based on calibration using a set of matrix-matched calibration standards with and without employing the internal standard. These results were compared with those obtained by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The results for both techniques were in a good agreement, although the precision was slightly better in the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique, with or without the internal standard

  18. Major constituent quantitative determination in uranium alloys by coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and X ray fluorescence wavelength dispersive spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Luis Claudio de; Silva, Adriana Mascarenhas Martins da; Gomide, Ricardo Goncalves; Silva, Ieda de Souza

    2013-01-01

    A wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) spectrometric method for determination of major constituents elements (Zr, Nb, Mo) in Uranium/Zirconium/Niobium and Uranium/Molybdenum alloy samples were developed. The methods use samples taken in the form of chips that were dissolved in hot nitric acid and precipitate particles melted with lithium tetraborate and dissolved in hot nitric acid and finally analyzed as a solution. Studies on the determination by inductively coupled plasma optic emission spectrometry (ICP OES) using matched matrix in calibration curve were developed. The same samples solution were analyzed in both methods. The limits of detection (LOD), linearity of the calibrations curves, recovery study, accuracy and precision of the both techniques were carried out. The results were compared. (author)

  19. Use of oxidative and reducing vapor generation for reducing the detection limits of iodine in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vtorushina, Eh.A.; Saprykin, A.I.; Knapp, G.

    2009-01-01

    Procedures of microwave combustion in an oxygen flow and microwave acid decomposition of biological samples were optimized for the subsequent determination of iodine. A new method was proposed for the generation of molecular iodine from periodate iona using hydrogen peroxide as a reductant. Procedures were developed for determining iodine in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) using oxidative and reducing vapor generation; these allowed the detection limit for iodine to be lowered by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The developed procedures were used to analyze certified reference materials of milk (Skim Milk Powder BCR 150) and seaweed (Sea Lettuce BCR 279) and a Supradyn vitamin complex

  20. Flagging and correcting non-spectral matrix interferences with spatial emission profiles and gradient dilution in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix interference remains one of the most daunting challenges commonly encountered in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In the present study, a method is described that enables identification and correction of matrix interferences in axial-viewed ICP-AES through a combination of spatial mapping and on-line gradient dilution. Cross-sectional emission maps of the plasma are used to indicate the presence of non-spectral (plasma-related and sample-introduction-related) matrix interferences. In particular, apparent concentrations of an analyte species determined at various radial locations in the plasma differ in the presence of a matrix interference, which allows the interference to be flagged. To correct for the interference, progressive, on-line dilution of the sample, performed by a gradient high-performance liquid-chromatograph pump, is utilized. The spatially dependent intensities of analyte emission are monitored at different levels of sample dilution. As the dilution proceeds, the matrix-induced signal variation is reduced. At a dilution where the determined concentrations become independent of location in the plasma, the matrix interference is minimized. - Highlights: • Non-spectral matrix interference in ICP-AES is flagged and minimized. • Emission from different locations of the plasma are collected simultaneously. • Spatially dependent determined concentrations indicate the presence of interference. • Gradient dilution is performed on both calibration standards and sample. • Optimal dilution factor to minimize interference is found as dilution increases

  1. Flagging and correcting non-spectral matrix interferences with spatial emission profiles and gradient dilution in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M., E-mail: hieftje@indiana.edu

    2015-08-01

    Matrix interference remains one of the most daunting challenges commonly encountered in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In the present study, a method is described that enables identification and correction of matrix interferences in axial-viewed ICP-AES through a combination of spatial mapping and on-line gradient dilution. Cross-sectional emission maps of the plasma are used to indicate the presence of non-spectral (plasma-related and sample-introduction-related) matrix interferences. In particular, apparent concentrations of an analyte species determined at various radial locations in the plasma differ in the presence of a matrix interference, which allows the interference to be flagged. To correct for the interference, progressive, on-line dilution of the sample, performed by a gradient high-performance liquid-chromatograph pump, is utilized. The spatially dependent intensities of analyte emission are monitored at different levels of sample dilution. As the dilution proceeds, the matrix-induced signal variation is reduced. At a dilution where the determined concentrations become independent of location in the plasma, the matrix interference is minimized. - Highlights: • Non-spectral matrix interference in ICP-AES is flagged and minimized. • Emission from different locations of the plasma are collected simultaneously. • Spatially dependent determined concentrations indicate the presence of interference. • Gradient dilution is performed on both calibration standards and sample. • Optimal dilution factor to minimize interference is found as dilution increases.

  2. Comparison of a portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the ancient ceramics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulou, D.N.; Zachariadis, G.A.; Anthemidis, A.N.; Tsirliganis, N.C.; Stratis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Two multielement instrumental methods of analysis, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were applied for the analysis of 7th and 5th century B.C. ancient ceramic sherds in order to evaluate the above two methods and to assess the potential to use the current compact and portable micro-XRF instrument for the in situ analysis of ancient ceramics. The distinguishing factor of interest is that micro-XRF spectrometry offers the possibility of a nondestructive analysis, an aspect of primary importance in the compositional analysis of cultural objects. Micro-XRF measurements were performed firstly directly on the ceramic sherds with no special pretreatment apart from surface cleaning (micro-XRF on sherds) and secondly on pressed pellet disks which were prepared for each ceramic sherd (micro-XRF on pellet). For the ICP-AES determination of elements, test solutions were prepared by the application of a microwave-assisted decomposition procedure in closed high-pressure PFA vessels. Also, the standard reference material SARM 69 was used for the efficiency calibration of the micro-XRF instrument and was analysed by both methods. In order to verify the calibration, the standard reference materials NCS DC 73332 and SRM620 as well as the reference materials AWI-1 and PRI-1 were analysed by micro-XRF. Elemental concentrations determined by the three analytical procedures (ICP-AES, micro-XRF on sherds and micro-XRF on pellets) were statistically treated by correlation analysis and Student's t-test (at the 95% confidence level)

  3. Comparison of a portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the ancient ceramics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, D.N. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Zachariadis, G.A. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Anthemidis, A.N. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Tsirliganis, N.C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, Tsimiski 58, GR-67100, Xanthi (Greece); Stratis, J.A. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece)]. E-mail: jstratis@chem.auth.gr

    2004-12-01

    Two multielement instrumental methods of analysis, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were applied for the analysis of 7th and 5th century B.C. ancient ceramic sherds in order to evaluate the above two methods and to assess the potential to use the current compact and portable micro-XRF instrument for the in situ analysis of ancient ceramics. The distinguishing factor of interest is that micro-XRF spectrometry offers the possibility of a nondestructive analysis, an aspect of primary importance in the compositional analysis of cultural objects. Micro-XRF measurements were performed firstly directly on the ceramic sherds with no special pretreatment apart from surface cleaning (micro-XRF on sherds) and secondly on pressed pellet disks which were prepared for each ceramic sherd (micro-XRF on pellet). For the ICP-AES determination of elements, test solutions were prepared by the application of a microwave-assisted decomposition procedure in closed high-pressure PFA vessels. Also, the standard reference material SARM 69 was used for the efficiency calibration of the micro-XRF instrument and was analysed by both methods. In order to verify the calibration, the standard reference materials NCS DC 73332 and SRM620 as well as the reference materials AWI-1 and PRI-1 were analysed by micro-XRF. Elemental concentrations determined by the three analytical procedures (ICP-AES, micro-XRF on sherds and micro-XRF on pellets) were statistically treated by correlation analysis and Student's t-test (at the 95% confidence level)

  4. Standard practice for analysis of aqueous leachates from nuclear waste materials using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice is applicable to the determination of low concentration and trace elements in aqueous leachate solutions produced by the leaching of nuclear waste materials, using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). 1.2 The nuclear waste material may be a simulated (non-radioactive) solid waste form or an actual solid radioactive waste material. 1.3 The leachate may be deionized water or any natural or simulated leachate solution containing less than 1 % total dissolved solids. 1.4 This practice should be used by analysts experienced in the use of ICP-AES, the interpretation of spectral and non-spectral interferences, and procedures for their correction. 1.5 No detailed operating instructions are provided because of differences among various makes and models of suitable ICP-AES instruments. Instead, the analyst shall follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer of the particular instrument. This test method does not address comparative accuracy of different devices...

  5. Critical comparison of performances of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and neutron activation analysis for the determination of elements in human lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimonti, A.; Coni, E.; Caroli, S.; Sabbioni, E.; Nicolaou, G.E.; Pietra, R.

    1989-01-01

    A study was carried out to assess the performance of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques for determining reference values for Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mg, Mn, V and Zn in human lungs of urban non-smoking subjects. Experimental data were subjected to the usual basic statistical tests to evaluate the respective merits of the two basically different analytical techniques. Both approaches, if used under carefully optimised experimental conditions, can yield reliable results affected only minimally by systematic and random errors. On the other hand, on a more routine basis, particular attention should be paid to elements such as Al, Cd and V which may pose some problems with both techniques. (author)

  6. Curve resolution and figures of merit estimation for determination of trace elements in geological materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorber, A.; Harel, A.; Goldbart, Z.; Brenner, I.B.

    1987-01-01

    In geochemical analysis using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), spectral interferences and background enhancement in response to sample concomitants are the main cause of deterioration of the limit of detection (LOD) and inaccuracy of the determination at the trace and minor element levels. In this account, the authors describe the chemometric procedure of curve resolution for compensating for these sources of error. A newly developed method for calculating figures of merit is used to evaluate the correction procedure, test the statistical significance of the determined concentration, and determine LODs for each sample. The technique involves scanning the vicinity of the spectral line of the analyte. With prior knowledge of potential spectral interferences, deconvolution of the overlapped response is possible. Analytical data for a wide range of geological standard reference materials demonstrate the effectiveness of the chemometric techniques. Separation of 0.002 nm spectral coincidence, employing a 0.02 nm resolution spectrometer, is demonstrated

  7. Use of gradient dilution to flag and overcome matrix interferences in axial-viewing inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the undisputed power of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), its users still face serious challenges in obtaining accurate analytical results. Matrix interference is perhaps the most important challenge. Dilution of a matrix-containing sample is a common practice to reduce matrix interference. However, determining the optimal dilution factor requires tedious and time-consuming offline sample preparation, since emission lines and the effect of matrix interferences are affected differently by the dilution. The current study exploits this difference by employing a high-performance liquid chromatography gradient pump prior to the nebulizer to perform on-line mixing of a sample solution and diluent. Linear gradient dilution is performed on both the calibration standard and the matrix-containing sample. By ratioing the signals from two emission lines (from the same or different elements) as a function of dilution factor, the analyst can not only identify the presence of a matrix interference, but also determine the optimal dilution factor needed to overcome the interference. A ratio that does not change with dilution signals the absence of a matrix interference, whereas a changing ratio indicates the presence of an interference. The point on the dilution profile where the ratio stabilizes indicates the optimal dilution factor to correct the interference. The current study was performed on axial-viewing ICP-AES with o-xylene as the solvent

  8. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry: analytical assessment of the technique at the beginning of the 90's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Medel, A.

    1991-01-01

    The main application of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) today is in atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), as an excitation spectrochemical source, although uses of an ICP for fluorescence as just an atomizer, and specially for mass spectrometry, as an ionization source, are rocketing in the last few years. Since its inception, only a quarter of a century ago, ICP-AES has rapidly evolved to one of the preferred routine analytical techniques for convenient determination of many elements with high speed, at low levels and in the most varied samples. Perhaps its comparatively high kinetic temperature (capable of atomizing virtually every compound of any sample), its high excitation and ionization temperatures, and its favourable spatial structure at the core of the ICP success. By now, the ICP-AES can be considered as having achieved maturity in that a huge amount of analytical problems can be tackled with this technique, while no major or fundamental changes have been adopted for several years. Despite this fact, important driving forces are still in operation to further improve the ICP-AES sensitivity, selectivity, precision, sample throughput, etc. Moreover, proposals to extend the scope of the technique to traditionally elusive fields (e.g. non-metals and organic compound analysis) are also appearing in the recent literature. In this paper the 'state of the art', the last developments and the expectations in trying to circumvent the limitations of the ICP-AES (on the light of literature data and personal experience) are reviewed. (author)

  9. Preconcentration of uranium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, molybdenum and vanadium with oxine supported on microcrystalline naphthalene and their determinations by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveen Kumar, P.; Sanjay Kumar; Vijay Kumar; Nandakishore, S.S.; Bangroo, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid method for the determination of uranium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, molybdenum and vanadium by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after solid-liquid extraction with microcrystalline naphthalene is developed. Analytes were quantitatively adsorbed as their oxinate complexes on naphthalene and determined by ICP-AES after stripping with 2 M HCl. The effect of various experimental parameters such as pH, reagent amounts, naphthalene amount and stripping conditions on the determination of these elements was investigated in detail. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the detection limits of this method for U (VI), Th (IV), Zr (IV), Ti (IV), Mo (VI) and V (V) were 20.0 ng mL -1 and the relative standard deviations obtained for three replicate determinations at a concentration of 1.0 µg mL -1 were 1.5-3.0%. The proposed method has been applied in the analysis of SY-2, SY-3 and pre-analysed samples for U, Th, Zr, Ti, Mo and V the analytical results are in good agreement with recommended values. (author)

  10. Volatile organo-selenium speciation in biological matter by solid phase microextraction-moderate temperature multicapillary gas chromatography with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, C.; Sanz Landaluze, J.; Ximenez-Embun, P.; Madrid-Albarran, Y.; Camara, C

    2004-01-16

    Microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) in combination with multicapillary (MC) gas chromatography could be proven to be useful for element specific detection of volatile species. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used for preconcentration and sample-matrix separation. The fiber desorption unit as well as the heating control for the MC column were in-house developed and multicapillary column was operated at moderate temperatures (30-100 deg. C). The method was optimized for organo-selenium species (dimethylselenide (DMSe), diethylselenide (DEtSe) and dimethyldiselenide (DMDSe)), using a chemometric approach. Stationary phases for the separation column were optimized using a conventional GC and contrasted with the results obtained with the MC. Application was focussed on selenium accumulating biological matter, such as lupine, yeast, Indian mustard and garlic. These samples were grown in hydroponic solution containing inorganic selenium (Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}). SPME sampling was carried out in fixed volume flow boxes in headspace above the living plants and in vials using treated samples. Results demonstrate inorganic selenium transformation into volatile organic species during metabolism. Separation is fast, a chromatogram can be obtained in less than 3 min and detection limits were at sub-ppb level for all investigated species. The system is independent from the use of a conventional gas chromatographic oven and can be used as a versatile alternative to highly cost intensive methods such as GC-ICP-MS.

  11. Simultaneous Pre-Concentration of Cadmium and Lead in Environmental Water Samples with Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction and Determination by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salahinejad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction (DLLME method for determination of Pb+2 and Cd+2 ions in the environmental water samples was combined with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES. Ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC, chloroform and ethanol were used as chelating agent, extraction solvent and disperser solvent, respectively. Some effective parameters on the microextraction and the complex formation were selected and optimized. These parameters included extraction and disperser solvent type as well as their volume, extraction time, salt effect, pH, sample volume and amount of the chelating agent.   Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor of 75 and 105 for Cd+2 and Pb+2 ions respectively was obtained from only 5.00mL of water sample. The detection limit (S/N=3 was 12 and 0.8ngmL−1 for Pb and Cd respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSDs for five replicate measurements of 0.50 mgL−1 of lead and cadmium was 6.5 and 4.4 % respectively. Mineral, tap, river, sea, dam and spiked water samples were analyzed for Cd and Pb amount.

  12. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Problems, possibilities and limitations of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in samples with different matrix composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrova, P.; Velichkov, S. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str. bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Velitchkova, N. [Geological Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str., bl.24, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Havezov, I. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str. bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Daskalova, N., E-mail: das15482@svr.igic.bas.b [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str. bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-02-15

    The economic and geological importance of platinum group of elements has led to the development of analytical methods to quantify them in different types of samples. In the present paper the quantitative information for spectral interference in radial viewing 40.68 MHz inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in the presence of complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, P and Ti as matrix constituents was obtained. The database was used for optimum line selections. By using the selected analysis lines the following detection limits in ng g{sup -1} were obtained: Pt 1700, Pd-1440, Rh-900. The reached detection limits determine the possibilities and limitation of the direct ICP-AES method in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in geological and environmental materials. The database for spectral interferences in the presence of aluminum can be used for the determination of platinum group of elements in car catalysts. The accuracy of the analytical results was experimentally demonstrated by two certified reference materials that were analyzed: SARM 7, Pt ore and recycled auto-catalyst certified reference material SRM 2556.

  14. Microwave-assisted versus conventional decomposition procedures applied to a ceramic potsherd standard reference material by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, D.N.; Zachariadis, G.A.; Anthemidis, A.N.; Tsirliganis, N.C.; Stratis, J.A

    2004-03-03

    Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) is a powerful, sensitive analytical technique with numerous applications in chemical characterization including that of ancient pottery, mainly due to its multi-element character, and the relatively short time required for the analysis. A critical step in characterization studies of ancient pottery is the selection of a suitable decomposition procedure for the ceramic matrix. The current work presents the results of a comparative study of six decomposition procedures applied on a standard ceramic potsherd reference material, SARM 69. The investigated decomposition procedures included three microwave-assisted decomposition procedures, one wet decomposition (WD) procedure by conventional heating, one combined microwave-assisted and conventional heating WD procedure, and one fusion procedure. Chemical analysis was carried out by ICP-AES. Five major (Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg), three minor (Mn, Ba, Ti) and two trace (Cu, Co) elements were determined and compared with their certified values. Quantitation was performed at two different spectral lines for each element and multi-element matrix-matched calibration standards were used. The recovery values for the six decomposition procedures ranged between 75 and 110% with a few notable exceptions. Data were processed statistically in order to evaluate the investigated decomposition procedures in terms of recovery, accuracy and precision, and eventually select the most appropriate one for ancient pottery analysis.

  15. Plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectrometry by group I and group II matrix-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Chan, W.-T.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of Na, K, Ca and Ba matrices on the plasma excitation conditions in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were studied. Normalized relative intensity was used to indicate the extent of the plasma-related matrix effects. The group I matrices have no effects on the plasma excitation conditions. In contrast, the group II matrices depress the normalized relative intensities of some spectral lines. Specifically, the Group II matrices have no effects on the normalized relative intensity of atomic lines of low upper energy level (soft lines), but reduce the normalized relative intensity of some ionic lines and atomic lines of high energy level (hard lines). The Group II matrices seem to shift the Saha balance of the analytes only; no shift in the Boltzmann balance was observed experimentally. Moreover, for some ionic lines with sum of ionization and excitation potentials close to the ionization potential of argon (15.75 eV), the matrix effect is smaller than other ionic lines of the same element. The reduced matrix effects may be attributed qualitatively to charge transfer excitation mechanism of these ionic lines. Charge transfer reaction renders ionic emission lines from the quasi-resonant levels similar in characteristics of atomic lines. The contribution of charge transfer relative to excitation by other non-specific excitation mechanisms (via Saha balance and Boltzmann balance) determines the degree of atomic behavior of a quasi-resonant level. A significant conclusion of this study is that plasma-related matrix effect depends strongly on the excitation mechanism of a spectral line. Since, in general, more than one excitation mechanism may contribute to the overall excitation of an emission line, the observed matrix effects reflect the sum of the effects due to individual excitation mechanisms. Excitation mechanisms, in addition to the often-used total excitation energy, should be considered in matrix effect studies

  16. In-situ determination of cross-over point for overcoming plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2008-01-01

    A novel method is described for overcoming plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The method is based on measurement of the vertically resolved atomic emission of analyte within the plasma and therefore requires the addition of no reagents to the sample solution or to the plasma. Plasma-related matrix effects enhance analyte emission intensity low in the plasma but depress the same emission signal at higher positions. Such bipolar behavior is true for all emission lines and matrices that induce plasma-related interferences. The transition where the enhancement is balanced by the depression (the so-called cross-over point) results in a spatial region with no apparent matrix effects. Although it would be desirable always to perform determinations at this cross-over point, its location varies between analytes and from matrix to matrix, so it would have to be found separately for every analyte and for every sample. Here, a novel approach is developed for the in-situ determination of the location of this cross-over point. It was found that the location of the cross-over point is practically invariant for a particular analyte emission line when the concentration of the matrix was varied. As a result, it is possible to determine in-situ the location of the cross-over point for all analyte emission lines in a sample by means of a simple one-step sample dilution. When the original sample is diluted by a factor of 2 and the diluted sample is analyzed again, the extent of the matrix effect is identical (zero) between the original sample and the diluted sample at one and only one location - the cross-over point. This novel method was verified with several single-element matrices (0.05 M Na, Ca, Ba and La) and some mixed-element matrices (mixtures of Na-Ca, Ca-Ba, and a plant-sample digest). The inaccuracy in emission intensity due to the matrix effect could be as large as - 30% for conventional measurements in the

  17. High Precision Seawater Sr/Ca Measurements in the Florida Keys by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry: Analytical Method and Implications for Coral Paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, A.; Kilbourne, K. H.; Schijf, J.

    2017-12-01

    Standard methods of reconstructing past sea surface temperatures (SSTs) with coral skeletal Sr/Ca ratios assume the seawater Sr/Ca ratio is constant. However, there is little data to support this assumption, in part because analytical techniques capable of determining seawater Sr/Ca with sufficient accuracy and precision are expensive and time consuming. We demonstrate a method to measure seawater Sr/Ca using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry where we employ an intensity ratio calibration routine that reduces the self- matrix effects of calcium and cancels out the matrix effects that are common to both calcium and strontium. A seawater standard solution cross-calibrated with multiple instruments is used to correct for long-term instrument drift and any remnant matrix effects. The resulting method produces accurate seawater Sr/Ca determinations rapidly, inexpensively, and with a precision better than 0.2%. This method will make it easier for coral paleoclimatologists to quantify potentially problematic fluctuations in seawater Sr/Ca at their study locations. We apply our method to test for variability in surface seawater Sr/Ca along the Florida Keys Reef Tract. We are collecting winter and summer samples for two years in a grid with eleven nearshore to offshore transects across the reef, as well as continuous samples collected by osmotic pumps at four locations adjacent to our grid. Our initial analysis of the grid samples indicates a trend of decreasing Sr/Ca values offshore potentially due to a decreasing groundwater influence. The values differ by as much as 0.05 mmol/mol which could lead to an error of 1°C in mean SST reconstructions. Future work involves continued sampling in the Florida Keys to test for seasonal and interannual variability in seawater Sr/Ca, as well as collecting data from small reefs in the Virgin Islands to test the stability of seawater Sr/Ca under different geologic, hydrologic and hydrographic environments.

  18. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Peterson, V.J.; Floyd, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This atlas of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy records the spectra of the elements in a way that would reveal the general nature of the spectra, in all their simplicity or complexity; and offers a definitive summary of the most prominent spectral lines of the elements, i.e., those most likely to be useful for the determination of trace and ultratrace concentrations; it provides reliable estimates, based on the recorded experimental spectra, of the powers of detection of the listed prominent lines; and assesses the very important problem of spectral interferences. The atlas is composed of three main sections. Part I is concerned with the historical aspects of compilations of spectral information. Part II is based on 232 wavelength scans of 70 elements. Each of the wavelength scans covers an 80 nm spectral region. These scans allow a rapid comparison of the background and spectral line intensities emitted in the ICP and provide a ready means for identification of the most prominent lines of each element and for estimation of the trace element analytical capabilities of these lines. A listing of 973 prominent lines with associated detection limits is also presented. Part III addresses the problem of spectral interferences. On this topic a detailed collection of coincidence profiles is presented for 281 of the most prominent lines, each with profiles of ten of the most prevalent concomitants superimposed. (Auth.)

  19. Determination of the mineral compositions of some selected oil-bearing seeds and kernels using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Özcan, M.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to establish the mineral contents of oil-bearing seeds and kernels such as peanut, turpentine, walnut, hazelnut, sesame, corn, poppy, almond, sunflower etc., using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES. Significant differences in mineral composition were observed among crops. All seeds and kernels contained high amounts of Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P and Zn. B, Cr, Cu, Li, Ni, Sr, Ti while V contents of the crops were found to be very low. The levels of K and P of all crops in this study were found to be higher than those of other seeds and kernels. The results obtained from analyses of the crops showed that the mean levels of potassiumcontent ranged from 1701.08 mg/kg (corn to 20895.8 mg/kg (soybean, the average content of phosphorus ranged from 3076.9 mg/kg (turpentine to 12006,5 mg/kg to 2617.4 mg/kg (cotton seed, and Ca from 68.4 mg/kg (corn to 13195.7 mg/kg (poppy seed. The results show that these values may  be useful for the evaluation of dietary information. Particularly the obtained results provide evidence that soybean, pinestone and poppy seed are a good source of K, P and Ca, respectively. Whereas pinestone is a good source of zinc.La finalidad del trabajo es establecer el contenido en elementos minerales de semillas oleaginosas tales como cacahuetes, trementina, avellana, sesamo, maiz, almendras, girasol, utilizando ICP-AES. Se han observado diferencias significativas en la composición de minerales entre cosechas. Todas las semillas contienen cantidades elevadas de Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P y Zn. Los contenidos de B, Cr, Cu, Li, Ni, Sr, Ti y V, sin embargo, fueron bajos. Los contenidos de K y P en todas las semillas estudiadas fueron superiores a las de otras semillas. El contenido medio de K osciló entre 1.701,1 mg/kg (maiz a 20.895,8 mg/kg (soja, el P entre 3.076.9 mg/kg (trementina a 12.006.5 mg/kg o 2.617,4 mg/kg (semilla de algodón, y Ca de 68,4 mg/kg (maiz a 13.195,7 mg

  20. Comparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for the determination of rare earth elements in Greek bauxites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochsenkuehn-Petropoulou, Maria; Luck, Joachim

    1991-01-01

    Fore the determination of rare earth elements (REE) in bauxitic materials the techniques of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) were compared. In the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) bauxites SRM 697 Dominican, and SRM 69 b Arkansas, the concentration of some REEs were determined. With the reference bauxite BX-N of the ARNT (Association Nationale de la Recherche Technique) the precision and accuracy of ICP-AES for the determination of REEs in bauxites was tested. Furthermore, Greek bauxites of the Parnassos-Giona area were investigated. In a comparison of the three methods it was possible to calculate from the data series the precision of each method, which showed that the tendency found in the deviations for the different REEs is in accordance with published values. Also the limits of detection for REEs in bauxites were calculated and found to be in the same range as those in the literature. (author)

  1. Determination of hafnium at the 10−4% level (relative to zirconium content) using neutron activation analysis, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik, Marek; Polkowska-Motrenko, Halina; Hubicki, Zbigniew; Jakóbik-Kolon, Agata; Danko, Bożena

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We worked out ICP-MS method of Hf determination in Zr and Zr compounds. •We used NAA method as reference one. •We obtained pure zirconium matrix by ion exchange (Diphonix ® resin). •These permit to determine ≥1 × 10 −4 % Hf in Zr sample by ICP MS with good precision and accuracy. -- Abstract: Hafnium at the very low level of 1–8 ppm (in relation to zirconium) was determined in zirconium sulfate solutions (originating from investigations of the separation of ca. 44 ppm Hf from zirconium by means of the ion exchange method) by using three independent methods: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results of NAA and ICP MS determinations were consistent with each other across the entire investigated range (the RSD of both methods did not exceed 38%). The results of ICP-AES determination were more diverse, particularly at less than 5 ppm Hf (RSD was significantly higher: 29–253%). The ion exchange method exploiting Diphonix ® resin proved sufficient efficiency in Zr–Hf separation when the initial concentration ratio of the elements ([Zr] 0 /[Hf] 0 ) ranged from 1200 to ca. 143,000

  2. Flotation separation of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Tl from calcium minerals and their determination by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajkova-Paneva, Vesna; Stafilov, Trajche; Boev, Blazho

    2003-01-01

    The method of inductively coupled plasma-atomic spectrometry (ICP-AES), is developed for determination of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Tl in traces in calcite and gypsum. The interferences of Ca as matrix element on Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Tl intensities during their ICP-AES determination are investigated. The results reveal that Ca does not interfere on intensities of Cr, but tends to decrease the intensity of the other elements. To eliminate those matrix interferences of Ca on trace elements intensities a flotation separation method is proposed. Lead(II) hexamethylenedithiocarbamate, Pb(HMDTC) 2 , is applied as a collector for flotation of trace elements from acidic solutions of mineral samples. The most suitable concentrations of calcite and gypsum solutions for flotation are ascertained. The detection limits of ICP-AES method following flotation of elements present in calcite and gypsum as impurities are determined: 0.022 and 0.061 μg·g -1 for Cd, 0.071 and 0.042 μg·g -1 for Co, 0.026 and 0.132 μg·g -1 for Cr, 0.164 and 0.149 μg·g -1 for Cu, 0.289 and 0.095 μg·g -1 for Ni and 0.645 and 0.7666 μg·g -1 for Tl, respectively. (Original)

  3. Determination of methylmercury in fish tissue by gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry after derivatization with sodium tetraphenylborate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmieri, H.E.L.; Leonel, L.V. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2000-03-01

    The detection of methylmercury species (MeHg) in fish tissue was investigated. Samples were digested with KOH-methanol and acidified prior to extraction with methylene chloride. MeHg was back-extracted from the organic phase into water. An aliquot of this aqueous solution (buffered to pH 5) was subjected to derivatization with sodium tetraphenylborate (NaBPh{sub 4}) and then extracted with toluene. The organic phase containing MePhHg was injected into a gas chromatograph (GC) which is on-line with a microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometer (MIP-AED). The quantification limit was about 0.6 {mu}g/g and 0.1 {mu}g/g of MeHg (as Hg) for 0.08 g of freeze-dried fish powder and 0.5 g of fresh samples, respectively. Two certified reference materials, CRM 464 (tuna fish) from Community Bureau of Reference-BCR and DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) from National Research Council Canada-NRC were selected for checking the accuracy of the method. This methodology was applied to the determination of MeHg in some kinds of fish from the Carmo river with alluvial gold recovery activities (''garimpos'') in Mariana, Minas Gerais, Brazil. (orig.)

  4. Determination of methylmercury in fish tissue by gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry after derivatization with sodium tetraphenylborate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, H E; Leonel, L V

    2000-03-01

    The detection of methylmercury species (MeHg) in fish tissue was investigated. Samples were digested with KOH-methanol and acidified prior to extraction with methylene chloride. MeHg was back-extracted from the organic phase into water. An aliquot of this aqueous solution (buffered to pH 5) was subjected to derivatization with sodium tetraphenylborate (NaBPh4) and then extracted with toluene. The organic phase containing MePhHg was injected into a gas chromatograph (GC) which is on-line with a microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometer (MIP-AED). The quantification limit was about 0.6 microg/g and 0.1 microg/g of MeHg (as Hg) for 0.08 g of freeze-dried fish powder and 0.5 g of fresh samples, respectively. Two certified reference materials, CRM 464 (tuna fish) from Community Bureau of Reference-BCR and DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) from National Research Council Canada-NRC were selected for checking the accuracy of the method. This methodology was applied to the determination of MeHg in some kinds of fish from the Carmo river with alluvial gold recovery activities ("garimpos") in Mariana, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

  5. Multielement detection limits and sample nebulization efficiencies of an improved ultrasonic nebulizer and a conventional pneumatic nebulizer in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, K.W.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Fassel, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Two important aspects of the analytical performance of a newly developed ultrasonic nebulizer and a specially designed pneumatic nebulizer have been compared for use in inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The ultrasonic nebulizer, when combined with a conventional aerosol desolvation apparatus, provided an order of magnitude or more improvement in simultaneous multielement detection limits as compared to those obtained when the pneumatic nebulizer was used either with or without desolvation. Application of a novel method for direct measurement of the overall efficiency of nebulization to the two systems showed that an approximately tenfold greater rate of sample delivery to the plasma torch was primarily responsible for the superior detection limits afforded by the ultrasonic nebulizer. A unique feature of the ultrasonic nebulizer described is the protection against chemical attack which is achieved by completely enclosing the transducer in an acoustically coupled borosilicate glass cylinder. Direct sample introduction, convenient sample change, and rapid cleanout are other important characteristics of the system which make it an attractive alternate to pneumatic nebulizer systems

  6. Use of stirred tanks for studying matrix effects caused by inorganic acids, easily ionized elements and organic solvents in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, Eduardo [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Maestre, Salvador E. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Todoli, Jose L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.todoli@ua.es

    2006-03-15

    A stirred tank was used for the first time to elucidate the mechanism responsible for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) matrix effects caused by inorganic, acids and easily ionized elements (EIEs), as well as organic, ethanol and acetic acid, compounds. In order to gradually increase the matrix concentration, a matrix solution was introduced inside a stirred container (tank) initially filled with an aqueous multielement standard. PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (PTFE) tubing was used to deliver the resulting solution to the liquid sample introduction system. Matrix concentration ranged from 0 to 2 mol l{sup -1} in the case of inorganic acids (i.e., nitric, sulfuric, hydrochloric and a mixture of them), from 0 to about 2500 mg l{sup -1} for EIEs (i.e., sodium, calcium and mixtures of both) and from 0% to 15%, w/w for organic compounds. Up to 40-50 different solutions were prepared and measured in a period of time shorter than 6-7 min. This investigation was carried out in terms of emission intensity and tertiary aerosols characteristics. The experimental setup used in the present work allowed to thoroughly study the effect of matrix concentration on analytical signal. Generally speaking, the experiments concerning tertiary aerosol characterization revealed that, in the case of inorganic acids and EIEs, the mechanism responsible for changes in aerosol characteristics was the droplet fission. In contrast, for organic matrices it was found that the interference was caused by a change in both aerosol transport and plasma thermal characteristics. The extent of the interferences caused by organic as well as inorganic compounds was compared for a set of 14 emission lines through a wide range of matrix concentrations. With a stirred tank, it is possible to choose an efficient internal standard for any given matrix composition. The time required to complete this procedure was shorter than 7 min.

  7. Use of stirred tanks for studying matrix effects caused by inorganic acids, easily ionized elements and organic solvents in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador E.; Todoli, Jose L.

    2006-01-01

    A stirred tank was used for the first time to elucidate the mechanism responsible for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) matrix effects caused by inorganic, acids and easily ionized elements (EIEs), as well as organic, ethanol and acetic acid, compounds. In order to gradually increase the matrix concentration, a matrix solution was introduced inside a stirred container (tank) initially filled with an aqueous multielement standard. PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (PTFE) tubing was used to deliver the resulting solution to the liquid sample introduction system. Matrix concentration ranged from 0 to 2 mol l -1 in the case of inorganic acids (i.e., nitric, sulfuric, hydrochloric and a mixture of them), from 0 to about 2500 mg l -1 for EIEs (i.e., sodium, calcium and mixtures of both) and from 0% to 15%, w/w for organic compounds. Up to 40-50 different solutions were prepared and measured in a period of time shorter than 6-7 min. This investigation was carried out in terms of emission intensity and tertiary aerosols characteristics. The experimental setup used in the present work allowed to thoroughly study the effect of matrix concentration on analytical signal. Generally speaking, the experiments concerning tertiary aerosol characterization revealed that, in the case of inorganic acids and EIEs, the mechanism responsible for changes in aerosol characteristics was the droplet fission. In contrast, for organic matrices it was found that the interference was caused by a change in both aerosol transport and plasma thermal characteristics. The extent of the interferences caused by organic as well as inorganic compounds was compared for a set of 14 emission lines through a wide range of matrix concentrations. With a stirred tank, it is possible to choose an efficient internal standard for any given matrix composition. The time required to complete this procedure was shorter than 7 min

  8. Comparison of ultra-violet and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry for the on-line quantification of selenium species after their separation by reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsopelas, Fotios N.; Ochsenkuehn-Petropoulou, Maria Th.; Mergias, Ioannis G.; Tsakanika, Lambrini V.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical approach for selenium speciation using liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with ultra-violet (UV) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was developed. The separation of the investigated selenium species, selenites, selenates, selenomethionine, selenocystine, selenocystamine and dimethyldiselenide was accomplished in less than 6 min on a BIO Wide Pore RP-18 column using sodium salt of n-octanesulfonic acid as ion-pairing modifier. The on-line detection of the separated selenium species was performed using UV spectrometry at the optimum wavelength of 192 nm, obtained by the UV spectra of the investigated individual selenium species. ICP-AES was also used as element specific on-line detector, after its coupling with the chromatographic system. The UV and ICP-AES detectors were compared for their suitability, including sensitivity and detection limits, for the on-line quantification of the six selenium species. The developed LC-UV as well as LC-ICP-AES techniques were successfully applied to a selenized yeast candidate reference material, after its enzymatic extraction with protease XIV. It was found that the described LC-UV technique is suitable for the determination of selenomethionine, the main selenium compound in the yeast, with an accuracy of 5%, although the UV detector is not element specific and it is rarely used for selenium speciation. This finding can prove valuable for routine laboratories to perform selenium speciation in such materials

  9. Fully automated dissolution and separation methods for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry rock analysis. Application to the determination of rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindaraju, K.; Mevelle, G.

    1987-01-01

    In rock analysis laboratories, sample preparation is a serious problem, or even an enormous bottleneck. Because this laboratory is production-oriented, this problem was attacked by automating progressively, different steps in rock analysis for major, minor and trace elements. This effort has been considerably eased by the fact that all sample preparation schemes in this laboratory for the past three decades have been based on an initial lithium borate fusion of rock samples and all analytical methods based on multi-element atomic emission spectrometry, with switch-over from solid analysis by arc/spark excitation to solution analysis by plasma excitation in 1974. The sample preparation steps which have been automated are: weighing of samples and fluxes, lithium borate fusion, dissolution and dilution of fusion products and ion-exchange separation of difficult trace elements such as rare earth elements (REE). During 1985 and 1986, these different unit operations have been assembled together as peripheral units in the form of a workstation, called LabRobStation. A travelling robot is the master of LabRobStation, with all peripheral units at its reach in 10 m 2 workspace. As an example of real application, the automated determination of REE, based on more than 8000 samples analysed during 1982 and 1986, is presented. (author)

  10. Assessing oral bioaccessibility of trace elements in soils under worst-case scenarios by automated in-line dynamic extraction as a front end to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosende, María [FI-TRACE group, Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa, km 7.5, Palma de Mallorca, Illes Balears E-07122 (Spain); Magalhães, Luis M.; Segundo, Marcela A. [REQUIMTE, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, R. de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, Porto 4050-313 (Portugal); Miró, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.miro@uib.es [FI-TRACE group, Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa, km 7.5, Palma de Mallorca, Illes Balears E-07122 (Spain)

    2014-09-09

    Highlights: • Automatic oral bioaccessibility tests of trace metals under worst-case scenarios. • Use of intricate and realistic digestive fluids (UBM method). • Analysis of large amounts of soils (≥400 mg) in a flow-based configuration. • Smart interface to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. • Comparison of distinct flow systems mimicking physiological conditions. - Abstract: A novel biomimetic extraction procedure that allows for the in-line handing of ≥400 mg solid substrates is herein proposed for automatic ascertainment of trace element (TE) bioaccessibility in soils under worst-case conditions as per recommendations of ISO norms. A unified bioaccessibility/BARGE method (UBM)-like physiological-based extraction test is evaluated for the first time in a dynamic format for accurate assessment of in-vitro bioaccessibility of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in forest and residential-garden soils by on-line coupling of a hybrid flow set-up to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Three biologically relevant operational extraction modes mimicking: (i) gastric juice extraction alone; (ii) saliva and gastric juice composite in unidirectional flow extraction format and (iii) saliva and gastric juice composite in a recirculation mode were thoroughly investigated. The extraction profiles of the three configurations using digestive fluids were proven to fit a first order reaction kinetic model for estimating the maximum TE bioaccessibility, that is, the actual worst-case scenario in human risk assessment protocols. A full factorial design, in which the sample amount (400–800 mg), the extractant flow rate (0.5–1.5 mL min{sup −1}) and the extraction temperature (27–37 °C) were selected as variables for the multivariate optimization studies in order to obtain the maximum TE extractability. Two soils of varied physicochemical properties were analysed and no significant differences were found at the 0.05 significance level

  11. Assessing oral bioaccessibility of trace elements in soils under worst-case scenarios by automated in-line dynamic extraction as a front end to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosende, María; Magalhães, Luis M.; Segundo, Marcela A.; Miró, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Automatic oral bioaccessibility tests of trace metals under worst-case scenarios. • Use of intricate and realistic digestive fluids (UBM method). • Analysis of large amounts of soils (≥400 mg) in a flow-based configuration. • Smart interface to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. • Comparison of distinct flow systems mimicking physiological conditions. - Abstract: A novel biomimetic extraction procedure that allows for the in-line handing of ≥400 mg solid substrates is herein proposed for automatic ascertainment of trace element (TE) bioaccessibility in soils under worst-case conditions as per recommendations of ISO norms. A unified bioaccessibility/BARGE method (UBM)-like physiological-based extraction test is evaluated for the first time in a dynamic format for accurate assessment of in-vitro bioaccessibility of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in forest and residential-garden soils by on-line coupling of a hybrid flow set-up to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Three biologically relevant operational extraction modes mimicking: (i) gastric juice extraction alone; (ii) saliva and gastric juice composite in unidirectional flow extraction format and (iii) saliva and gastric juice composite in a recirculation mode were thoroughly investigated. The extraction profiles of the three configurations using digestive fluids were proven to fit a first order reaction kinetic model for estimating the maximum TE bioaccessibility, that is, the actual worst-case scenario in human risk assessment protocols. A full factorial design, in which the sample amount (400–800 mg), the extractant flow rate (0.5–1.5 mL min −1 ) and the extraction temperature (27–37 °C) were selected as variables for the multivariate optimization studies in order to obtain the maximum TE extractability. Two soils of varied physicochemical properties were analysed and no significant differences were found at the 0.05 significance level

  12. Influence of binders on infrared laser ablation of powdered tungsten carbide pressed pellets in comparison with sintered tungsten carbide hardmetals studied by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hola, Marketa; Otruba, Vitezslav; Kanicky, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    Laser ablation (LA) was studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of powdered and sintered tungsten carbides (WC/Co) by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The possibility to work with powdered and compact materials with close chemical composition provided the opportunity to compare LA sampling of similar substances in different forms that require different preparation procedures. Powdered WC/Co precursors of sintered hardmetals were prepared for the ablation as pressed pellets with and without powdered silver as a binder, while sintered hardmetal blocks were embedded into a resin to obtain discs, which were then smoothed and polished. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operated at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with a pulse frequency of 10 Hz and maximum pulse energy of 220 mJ was used. A single lens was used for the laser beam focusing. An ablation cell (14 cm 3 ) mounted on a PC-controlled XY-translator was connected to an ICP spectrometer Jobin Yvon 170 Ultrace (laterally viewed ICP, mono- and polychromator) using a 1.5-m tubing (4 mm i.d.). Ablation was performed in a circular motion (2 mm diameter). Close attention was paid to the study of the crater parametres depending on hardness, cohesion and Ag binder presence in WC/Co samples. The influence of the Co content on the depth and structure of the ablation craters of the binderless pellets was also studied. Linear calibration plots of Nb, Ta and Ti were obtained for cemented WC/Co samples, binderless and binder-containing pellets. Relative widths of uncertainty intervals about the centroids vary between ± 3% and ± 7%, and exceptionally reach a value above 10%. The lowest determinable quantities (LDQ) of Nb, Ta and Ti calculated from the calibration lines were less than 0.5% (m/m). To evaluate the possibility of quantitative elemental analysis by LA-ICP-OES, two real sintered WC/Co samples and two real samples of powdered WC/Co materials were analysed. The

  13. Influence of binders on infrared laser ablation of powdered tungsten carbide pressed pellets in comparison with sintered tungsten carbide hardmetals studied by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Otruba, Vitezslav [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: viktork@chemi.muni.cz

    2006-05-15

    Laser ablation (LA) was studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of powdered and sintered tungsten carbides (WC/Co) by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The possibility to work with powdered and compact materials with close chemical composition provided the opportunity to compare LA sampling of similar substances in different forms that require different preparation procedures. Powdered WC/Co precursors of sintered hardmetals were prepared for the ablation as pressed pellets with and without powdered silver as a binder, while sintered hardmetal blocks were embedded into a resin to obtain discs, which were then smoothed and polished. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operated at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with a pulse frequency of 10 Hz and maximum pulse energy of 220 mJ was used. A single lens was used for the laser beam focusing. An ablation cell (14 cm{sup 3}) mounted on a PC-controlled XY-translator was connected to an ICP spectrometer Jobin Yvon 170 Ultrace (laterally viewed ICP, mono- and polychromator) using a 1.5-m tubing (4 mm i.d.). Ablation was performed in a circular motion (2 mm diameter). Close attention was paid to the study of the crater parametres depending on hardness, cohesion and Ag binder presence in WC/Co samples. The influence of the Co content on the depth and structure of the ablation craters of the binderless pellets was also studied. Linear calibration plots of Nb, Ta and Ti were obtained for cemented WC/Co samples, binderless and binder-containing pellets. Relative widths of uncertainty intervals about the centroids vary between {+-} 3% and {+-} 7%, and exceptionally reach a value above 10%. The lowest determinable quantities (LDQ) of Nb, Ta and Ti calculated from the calibration lines were less than 0.5% (m/m). To evaluate the possibility of quantitative elemental analysis by LA-ICP-OES, two real sintered WC/Co samples and two real samples of powdered WC/Co materials were analysed

  14. Determination of trace amounts of lead, arsenic, nickel and cobalt in high-purity iron oxide pigment by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after iron matrix removal with extractant-contained resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yuyu; Zhou Jianfeng; Wang Guoxin; Zhou Jinfan; Tao Guanhong

    2007-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was applied to the determination of lead, arsenic, nickel and cobalt in high-purity iron oxide pigment. Samples were dissolved with hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The digest was passed through a column, which was packed with a polymer resin containing a neutral organophosphorus extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate. Iron was sorbed selectively on the resin and the analytes of interest passed through the column, allowing the effective separation of them from the iron matrix. Conditions of separation were optimized. The detection limits (3σ) in solution were 10, 40, 7 and 5 μg L -1 , and in pigment were 0.2, 0.8, 0.14 and 0.1 mg kg -1 for lead, arsenic, cobalt and nickel, respectively. The recoveries ranged from 95% to 107% when sample digests were spiked with 5 μg of the analytes of interest, and relative standard deviations (n = 6) were 1.5-17.6% for the determination of the spiked samples. The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of these elements in high-purity iron oxide pigment samples

  15. Investigation of plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry caused by matrices with low second ionization potentials-identification of the secondary factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma-related matrix effects induced by a comprehensive list of matrix elements (a total of fifty-one matrices) in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry were investigated and used to confirm that matrix effects caused by elements with a low second ionization potential are more severe than those from matrix elements having a low first ionization potential. Although the matrix effect is correlated unambiguously with the second ionization potential of a matrix, the correlation is not monotonic, which suggests that at least one other factor is operative. Through study of a large pool of matrix elements, it becomes possible to identify another critical parameter that defines the magnitude of the matrix effect; namely the presence of low-lying energy levels in the doubly charged matrix ion. Penning ionization by Ar excited states is proposed as the dominant mechanism for both analyte ionization/excitation and matrix effects; matrices with a low second ionization potential can effectively quench the population of Ar excited states through successive Penning ionization followed by ion-electron recombination and lead to more severe matrix effects

  16. An Investigation on the Extraction and Quantitation of a Hexavalent Chromium in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Copolymer (ABS) and Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by Ion Chromatography Coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Sang Ho; Kim, Yu Na [Mokpo National University, Muan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    A hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) is one of the hazardous substances regulated by the RoHS. The determination of Cr (VI) in various polymers and printed circuit board (PCB) has been very important. In this study, the three different analytical methods were investigated for the determination of a hexavalent chromium in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene copolymer (ABS) and PCB. The results by three analytical methods were obtained and compared. An analytical method by UV-Visible spectrometer has been generally used for the determination of Cr (VI) in a sample, but a hexavalent chromium should complex with diphenylcarbazide for the detection in the method. The complexation did make an adverse effect on the quantitative analysis of Cr (VI) in ABS. The analytical method using diphenylcarbazide was also not applicable to printed circuit board (PCB) because PCB contained lots of irons. The irons interfered with the analysis of hexavalent chromium because those also could complex with diphenylcarbazide. In this study, hexavalent chromiums in PCB have been separated by ion chromatography (IC), then directly and selectively detected by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The quantity of Cr (VI) in PCB was 0.1 mg/kg

  17. A new nebulization device with exchangeable aerosol generation mode as a useful tool to investigate sample introduction processes in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotti, Marco; Lagomarsino, Cristina; Frache, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    A new sample introduction device has been designed in order to differentiate between the effects of the aerosol production and its following desolvation on analytical performances of an inductively coupled plasma optical spectrometer. This research tool allows to easily switch between the pneumatic and ultrasonic aerosol generation mode and to use a joint desolvation chamber. In this way, a real comparison between aerosol production systems may be attained and the influence of aerosol generation process on analytical figures clearly distinguished from that of the desolvation process. In this work, the separate effects of the aerosol generation and desolvation processes on analytical sensitivity and tolerance towards matrix effects have been investigated. Concerning sensitivity, it was found that both the processes play an important role in determining emission intensities, being the increase in sensitivity due to desolvation higher than that due to the improved aerosol generation efficiency. Concerning the matrix effects, a predominant role of the desolvation system was found, while the influence of the aerosol generation mode was much less important. For nitric acid, the decreasing effect was mitigated by the presence of a desolvation system, due to partial removal of the acid. On the contrary, the depressive effect of sulfuric acid was enhanced by the presence of a desolvation system, due to degradation of the solvent removal efficiency and to further decrease in the analyte transport rate caused by clustering phenomena. Concerning the interferences due to sodium and calcium, a depressive effect was observed, which is enhanced by desolvation

  18. Simultaneous determination of carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, alcohols, and metals in foods by high-performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador E; Prats, Soledad; Todolí, José L

    2006-10-01

    The applicability of the HPLC-ICP-AES coupling for the simultaneous determination of carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, alcohols, and metals in a single chromatographic run has been demonstrated in the present work. Five saccharides, glucose, fructose, sucrose, sorbitol, and lactose; five carboxylic acids, citric, tartaric, malic, lactic, and acetic; and three alcohols, glycerol, ethanol, and methanol, have been determined. A H+ cation exchange column has been used to separate these compounds. The chromatograms have been obtained by monitoring the carbon emission signal at 193.09 nm. The results obtained by HPLC-ICP-AES have been compared against those found with conventional detection systems (i.e., refractive index, UV, and photodyode array detectors). The HPLC-ICP-AES method has shown the following features: (i) organic compounds and metals can be simultaneously determined; (ii) the detection method is universal; (iii) for nonvolatile organic compounds, a complete calibration line can be obtained from a single injection; and (iv) it provides absolute limits of detection similar to or lower than those found with conventional detection systems (i.e., on the order of several tens of nanograms of organic compound). The methodology has been validated through the analysis of food samples such as juices, isotonic beverages, wines, and a certified nonfat milk powder sample.

  19. Ultra-trace monitoring of copper in environmental and biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after separation and preconcentration by using octadecyl silica membrane disks modified by a new schiff's base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Ganjali

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-trace amounts of Cu(II were separated and preconcentrated by solid phase extraction on octadecyl-bonded silica membrane disks modified with a new Schiff,s base (Bis- (2-Hydroxyacetophenone -2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediimine (SBTD followed by elution and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric detection. The method was applied as a separation and detection method for copper(II in environmental and biological samples. Extraction efficiency and the influence of sample matrix, flow rate, pH, and type and minimum amount of stripping acid were investigated. The concentration factor and detection limit of the proposed method are 500 and 12.5 pg mL-1, respectively.

  20. Micro- and nano-volume samples by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction using removable, interchangeable and portable rhenium coiled-filament assemblies and axially-viewed inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; Lai, Bryant; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-11-15

    An electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction for micro- or nano-volume samples is described. Samples were pipetted onto coiled-filament assemblies that were purposely developed to be removable and interchangeable and were dried and vaporized into a small-volume vaporization chamber that clips onto any ICP torch with a ball joint. Interchangeable assemblies were also constructed to be small-size (e.g., less than 3 cm long with max diameter of 0.65 cm) and light-weight (1.4 g) so that they can be portable. Interchangeable assemblies with volume-capacities in three ranges (i.e., < 1 {mu}L, 1-10 {mu}L and 10-100 {mu}L) were fabricated and used. The horizontally-operated NTV sample introduction was interfaced to an axially-viewed ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry) system and NTV was optimized using ICP-AES and 8 elements (Pb, Cd, Zn, V, Ba, Mg, Be and Ca). Precision was 1.0-2.3% (peak height) and 1.1-2.4% (peak area). Detection limits (obtained using 5 {mu}L volumes) expressed in absolute-amounts ranged between 4 pg for Pb to 0.3 fg ({approx} 5 million atoms) for Ca. Detection limits expressed in concentration units (obtained using 100 {mu}L volumes of diluted, single-element standard solutions) were: 50 pg/mL for Pb; 10 pg/mL for Cd; 9 pg/mL for Zn; 1 pg/mL for V; 0.9 pg/mL for Ba; 0.5 pg/mL for Mg; 50 fg/mL for Be; and 3 fg/mL for Ca. Analytical capability and utility was demonstrated using the determination of Pb in pg/mL levels of diluted natural water Certified Reference Material (CRM) and the determination of Zn in 80 nL volumes of the liquid extracted from an individual vesicle. It is shown that portable and interchangeable assemblies with dried sample residues on them can be transported without analyte loss (for the concentrations tested), thus opening up the possibility for 'taking part of the lab to the sample' applications, such as testing for Cu concentration-compliance with the lead

  1. Sb(III) and Sb(V) separation and analytical speciation by a continuous tandem on-line separation device in connection with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menendez Garcia, A. [Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Phys. and Anal. Chem.; Perez Rodriguez, M.C. [Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Phys. and Anal. Chem.; Sanchez Uria, J.F. [Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Phys. and Anal. Chem.; Sanz-Medel, A. [Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Phys. and Anal. Chem.

    1995-09-01

    A sensitive, precise and automated non-chromatographic method for Sb(III) and Sb(V) analytical speciation based on a continuous tandem on-line separation device in connection with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission (ICP-AES) detection is proposed. Two on-line successive separation steps are included into this method: a continuous liquid-liquid extraction of Sb(III) with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) into methylisobuthylketone (MIBK), followed by direct stibine generation from the organic phase. Both separation steps are carried out in a continuous mode and on-line with the ICP-AES detector. Optimization of experimental conditions for the tandem separation and ICP-AES detection are investigated in detail. Detection limits for Sb(III) were 3 ng.mL{sup -1} and for Sb(V) 8 ng.mL{sup -1}. Precisions observed are in the range {+-} 5%. The proposed methodology has been applied to Sb(III) and Sb(V) speciation in sea-water samples. (orig.)

  2. A Magnetized Nanoparticle Based Solid-Phase Extraction Procedure Followed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry to Determine Arsenic, Lead and Cadmium in Water, Milk, Indian Rice and Red Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Salameh; Es'haghi, Zarrin

    2017-06-01

    A sensitive and simple method using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs-Fe 3 O 4 MNP), as the adsorbent, has been successfully developed for extraction and pre-concentration of arsenic, lead and cadmium with detection by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The nanosorbent was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The key factors affecting the signal intensity such as pH, adsorbent amount, etc. were investigated. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (three-time of signal to noise ratio, S/N 3) were 0.3, 0.6, 0.3 ng/mL for arsenic, lead and cadmium, respectively. Application of the adsorbent was investigated by the analysis of water, milk, Indian rice and red tea. The experimental data was analyzed and obeyed Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The kinetic data was fitted to the pseudo-second-order model. Thermodynamic studies revealed the feasibility and exothermic nature of the system.

  3. Determination of rare earth elements in aluminum by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanti, H.S.; Barnes, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy is evaluated for the determination of 14 rare earth elements in aluminum. Spectral line interference, limit of detection, and background equivalent concentration values are evaluated, and quantitative recovery is obtained from aluminum samples spiked with rare earth elements. The procedure is simple and suitable for routine process control analysis. 20 references, 5 tables

  4. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  5. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of tin in canned food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitani, H; Suekane, S; Nakatani, A; Tatsuka, K

    1993-01-01

    Various canned foods were digested sequentially with HNO3 and HCl, diluted to 100 mL, and filtered, and then tin was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP/AES). Samples of canned Satsuma mandarin, peach, apricot, pineapple, apple juice, mushroom, asparagus, evaporated milk, short-necked clam, spinach, whole tomato, meat, and salmon were evaluated. Sample preparations did not require time-consuming dilutions, because ICP/AES has wide dynamic range. The standard addition method was used to determine tin concentration. Accuracy of the method was tested by analyzing analytical standards containing tin at 2 levels (50 and 250 micrograms/g). The amounts of tin found for the 50 and 250 micrograms/g levels were 50.5 and 256 micrograms/g, respectively, and the repeatability coefficients of variation were 4.0 and 3.8%, respectively. Recovery of tin from 13 canned foods spiked at 2 levels (50 and 250 micrograms/g) ranged from 93.9 to 109.4%, with a mean of 99.2%. The quantitation limit for tin standard solution was about 0.5 microgram/g.

  6. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy glovebox assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ''cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  7. Bringing part of the lab to the field: On-site chromium speciation in seawater by electrodeposition of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) on portable coiled-filament assemblies and measurement in the lab by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; McEnaney, Jennifer; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-12-01

    A field-deployable electrochemical approach to preconcentration, matrix clean up and selective electrodeposition of Cr(III) and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) in seawater is described. Using portable, battery-operated electrochemical instrumentation, Cr species in seawater were electrodeposited in the field on portable coiled-filament assemblies made from Re. Assemblies with dried residues of Cr(III) or Cr(III) + Cr(VI) on them were transported to the lab for concentration determination by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Electrodeposition offers selective species deposition, preconcentration and matrix clean up from seawater samples. For selective deposition, free Cr(VI) was electrodeposited at - 0.3 V and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) at - 1.6 V (both vs Ag/AgCl). Interestingly, at 0 V (vs Ag/AgCl) and in the absence of an electrodeposition potential only Cr(VI) was spontaneously and selectively adsorbed on the coil and reasons for this are given. Due to preconcentration afforded by electrodeposition, the detection limits obtained after a 60 s electrodeposition at the voltages stated above using buffered (pH = 4.7) artificial seawater spiked with either Cr(III) or Cr(VI) were 20 pg/mL for Cr(III) and 10 pg/mL for Cr(VI). For comparison, the detection limit for Cr obtained by pipetting directly on the coil 5 μL of diluted standard solution was 500 pg/mL, thus it was concluded that electrodeposition offered 40 to 60 fold improvements. Matrix clean up is required due to the high salt content of seawater and this was addressed by simply rinsing the coil with 18.2 MΩ water without any loss of Cr species. Reasons for this are provided. The method was validated in the lab using buffered artificial seawater and it was used in the field for the first time by sampling seawater, buffering it and immediately electrodepositing Cr species on portable assemblies on-site. Electrodeposition in the

  8. Mineral distribution in rice: Measurement by Microwave Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (MP-AES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Nerissa C.; Ramos, R.G.A.; Quirit, L.L.; Arcilla, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Microwave Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (MP-AES) is a new technology with comparable performance and sensitivity to Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Both instrument use plasma as the energy source that produces atomic and ionic emission lines. However, MP-AES uses nitrogen as the plasma gas instead of argon which is an additional expense for ICP-OES. Thus, MP-AES is more economical. This study quantified six essential minerals (Se, Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn and K) in rice using MP-AES. Hot plate digestion was used for sample extraction and the detection limit for each instrument was compared with respect to the requirement for routine analysis in rice. Black, red and non-pigmented rice samples were polished in various intervals to determine the concentration loss of minerals. The polishing time corresponds to the structure of the rice grains such as outer bran layer (0 to 15), inner bran layer (15 to 30), outer endosperm layer (30 to 45), and middle endosperm layer (45 to 60). Results of MP-AES analysis showed that black rice had all essential materials (except K) in high concentration at the outer bran layer. The red and non-pigmented rice samples on the other hand, contained high levels of Se, Zn, Fe, and Mn in the whole bran portion. After 25 seconds, the mineral concentrations remained constant. The concentration of Cu however, gave consistent value in all polishing intervals, hence Cu might be located in the inner endosperm layer. Results also showed that K was uniformly distributed in all samples where 5% loss was consistently observed for every polishing interval. Therefore, the concentration of K was also affected by polishing time. Thus, the new MP-AES technology with comparable performance to ICP-OES is a promising tool for routine analysis in rice. (author)

  9. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perring, Loic; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija [Department of Quality and Safety Assurance, Nestle Research Centre, P.O. Box 44, Vers chez-les-Blanc, 1000, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99{+-}5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given. (orig.)

  10. Separation of gold, palladium and platinum in chromite by anion exchange chromatography for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwang Soon; Lee, Chang Heon; Park, Yeong Jae; Joe, Kih Soo; Kim, Won Ho

    2001-01-01

    A study has been carried out on the separation of gold, iridium, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium and platinum in chromite samples and their quantitative determination using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The dissolution condition of the minerals by fusion with sodium peroxide was optimized and chromatographic elution behavior of the rare metals was investigated by anion exchange chromatography. Spectral interference of chromium, a matrix of the minerals, was investigated on determination of gold. Chromium interfered on determination of gold at the concentration of 500 mg/L and higher. Gold plus trace amounts of iridium, palladium, rhodium and ruthenium, which must be preconcentrated before ICP-AES was separated by anion exchange chromatography after reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by H 2 O 2 . AuCl - 4 retained on the resin column was selectively eluted with acetone- HNO 3 -H 2 O as an eluent. In addition, iridium, palladium, rhodium and ruthenium remaining on the resin column were eluted as a group with concentrated HCl. However, platinum was eluted with concentrated HNO 3 . The recovery yield of gold with acetone-HNO 3 -H 2 O was 100.7 ± 2.0 % , and the yields of palladium and platinum with concentrated HCl and HNO 3 were 96.1 ± 1.8% and 96.6 ± 1.3%, respectively. The contents of gold and platinum in a Mongolian chromite sample were 32.6 ± 2.2 μg/g and 1.6 ± 0.14 μg/g, respectively. Palladium was not detected

  11. Bringing part of the lab to the field: On-site chromium speciation in seawater by electrodeposition of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) on portable coiled-filament assemblies and measurement in the lab by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; McEnaney, Jennifer; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-01-01

    A field-deployable electrochemical approach to preconcentration, matrix clean up and selective electrodeposition of Cr(III) and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) in seawater is described. Using portable, battery-operated electrochemical instrumentation, Cr species in seawater were electrodeposited in the field on portable coiled-filament assemblies made from Re. Assemblies with dried residues of Cr(III) or Cr(III) + Cr(VI) on them were transported to the lab for concentration determination by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Electrodeposition offers selective species deposition, preconcentration and matrix clean up from seawater samples. For selective deposition, free Cr(VI) was electrodeposited at − 0.3 V and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) at − 1.6 V (both vs Ag/AgCl). Interestingly, at 0 V (vs Ag/AgCl) and in the absence of an electrodeposition potential only Cr(VI) was spontaneously and selectively adsorbed on the coil and reasons for this are given. Due to preconcentration afforded by electrodeposition, the detection limits obtained after a 60 s electrodeposition at the voltages stated above using buffered (pH = 4.7) artificial seawater spiked with either Cr(III) or Cr(VI) were 20 pg/mL for Cr(III) and 10 pg/mL for Cr(VI). For comparison, the detection limit for Cr obtained by pipetting directly on the coil 5 μL of diluted standard solution was 500 pg/mL, thus it was concluded that electrodeposition offered 40 to 60 fold improvements. Matrix clean up is required due to the high salt content of seawater and this was addressed by simply rinsing the coil with 18.2 MΩ water without any loss of Cr species. Reasons for this are provided. The method was validated in the lab using buffered artificial seawater and it was used in the field for the first time by sampling seawater, buffering it and immediately electrodepositing Cr species on portable assemblies on-site. Electrodeposition in the

  12. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma atomizer for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry-Performance evaluation for selenium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duben, Ondřej; Boušek, J.; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 111, SEP (2015), s. 57-63 ISSN 0584-8547 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : dielectric barrier discharge * hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry * selenium Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.289, year: 2015

  13. A separation method to overcome the interference of aluminium on zinc determination by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Jesus, Djane S. de; Korn, Maria das Graças Andrade; Ferreira, Sergio Luis Costa; Carvalho, Marcelo Souza de

    2000-01-01

    Texto completo: acesso restrito. p.389–394 The use of polyurethane foam (PUF) to separate zinc from large amounts of aluminium and its determination by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique (ICP-AES) in aluminium matrices is described. The proposed method is based on the solid-phase extraction of the zinc(II) cation as a thiocyanate complex. Parameters such as effect of pH on zinc sorption, zinc desorption from the foam and analytical features of the procedure w...

  14. Extraction of butyltins from sediments and their determination by liquid chromatography interfaced to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivaro, P.; Frache, R.

    2000-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction of the butyltin compounds from sediment, suitable for their subsequent following determination by high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission detector system, is proposed. Recoveries of 86%, 80% and 42% for tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT) respectively were achieved. The relative detection limits of butyltin compounds by this method ranged from 27 to 62 ng of tin per gram of dry sediment. The method was applied to real sediment samples collected in the Venice lagoon (Italy). The results showed that, despite the restrictions on the use of butyltin contained in antifoulting paints, a considerable amount of organotin compounds is still present in Venice sediments [it

  15. Zinc, lead and copper in human teeth measured by induced coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, L.T.; Bradley, D.A. E-mail: D.A.Bradley@exeter.ac.uk; Mohd, Y.; Jamil, M

    2000-11-15

    Inductively Coupled Argon Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) has been used to determine Pb, Zn and Cu levels in 47 exfoliated human teeth (all of which required extraction for orthodontic reasons). Lead concentrations for the group were 1.7 {mu}g (g tooth mass){sup -1} to 40.5 {mu}g (g tooth mass){sup -1}, with a median of 9.8 {mu}g (g tooth mass){sup -1}. A median lead level in excess of the group value was found for the teeth of six lorry drivers who were included in the study. A more significant enhancement was found for the seven subjects whose age was in excess of 60 years. The median values for Zn and Cu were 123.0 and 0.6 {mu}g (g tooth mass){sup -1} respectively. Present values for tooth-Zn are lower than published data for other ethnic groups.

  16. Standard test method for determining elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the specimen. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and nonnuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable to process control within waste treatment facilities. This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels which do not require special personnel or environmental protection. A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is included

  17. Determination of some inorganic metals in edible vegetable oils by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Özcan, M.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Seventeen edible vegetable oils were analyzed spectrometrically for their metal (Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Zn contents. Toxic metals in edible vegetable oils were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES. The highest metal concentrations were measured as 0.0850, 0.0352, 0.0220, 0.0040, 0.0010, 0.0074, 0.0045, 0.0254 and 0.2870 mg/kg for copper in almond oil, for iron in corn oil-(c, for manganese in soybean oil, for cobalt in sunflower oil-(b and almond oil, for chromium in almond oil, for lead in virgin olive oil, for cadmium in sunflower oil-(e, for nickel almond oil and for zinc in almond oil respectively. The method for determining toxic metals in edible vegetable oils by using ICP-AES is discussed. The metals were extracted from low quantities of oil (2-3 g with a 10% nitric acid solution. The extracted metal in acid solution can be injected into the ICPAES. The proposed method is simple and allows the metals to be determined in edible vegetable oils with a precision estimated below 10% relative standard deviation (RSD for Cu, 5% for Fe, 15% for Mn, 8% for Co, 10% for Cr, 20% for Pb, 5% for Cd, 16% for Ni and 11% for Zn.En este estudio se analizó espectrométricamente el contenido en metales (Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Zn de 17 aceites vegetales comestibles mediante ICP-AES. Las concentaciones más elevadas se encontraron para el cobre en el aceite de almendra (0.0850 mg/kg, para el hierro en el aceite de maiz(c,(0.0352 mg/kg, para el manganeso en el aceite de soja (0.0220 mg/kg, para el cobalto en el aceite de girasol (b (0.0040 mg/kg, para el cromo en el aceite de almendra (0.0010 mg/kg, para el plomo en el aceite de oliva virgen (0.0074 mg/kg, para el cadmio en el aceite de girasol (e (0.0045 mg/kg, para el niquel en el aceite de almendra (0.0254 mg/kg y para el zincen el aceite de almendra (0.2870 mg/kg. Los metales se extrajeron a partir de bajas cantidades de aceite (2-3 g, con

  18. Comparative measurements of mineral elements in milk powders with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W Q; El Haddad, J; Motto-Ros, V; Gilon-Delepine, N; Stankova, A; Ma, Q L; Bai, X S; Zheng, L J; Zeng, H P; Yu, J

    2011-07-01

    Mineral elements contained in commercially available milk powders, including seven infant formulae and one adult milk, were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The purpose of this work was, through a direct comparison of the analytical results, to provide an assessment of the performance of LIBS, and especially of the procedure of calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS), to deal with organic compounds such as milk powders. In our experiments, the matrix effect was clearly observed affecting the analytical results each time laser ablation was employed for sampling. Such effect was in addition directly observed by determining the physical parameters of the plasmas induced on the different samples. The CF-LIBS procedure was implemented to deduce the concentrations of Mg and K with Ca as the internal reference element. Quantitative analytical results with CF-LIBS were validated with ICP-AES measurements and nominal concentrations specified for commercial milks. The obtained good results with the CF-LIBS procedure demonstrate its capacity to take into account the difference in physical parameters of the plasma in the calculation of the concentrations of mineral elements, which allows a significant reduction of the matrix effect related to laser ablation. We finally discuss the way to optimize the implementation of the CF-LIBS procedure for the analysis of mineral elements in organic materials.

  19. Standard test method for determining elements in waste Streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the sample. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable in process control within waste treatment facilities. 1.2 This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels that do not require special personnel or environmental protection. 1.3 A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is found in Table 1. 1.4 This test method has been used successfully for treatment of a large variety of waste solutions and industrial process liquids. The com...

  20. Fingerprinting of complex mixtures with the use of high performance liquid chromatography, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and chemometrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Yongnian; Peng Yunyan; Kokot, Serge

    2008-01-01

    The molecular and metal profile fingerprints were obtained from a complex substance, Atractylis chinensis DC-a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), with the use of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) techniques. This substance was used in this work as an example of a complex biological material, which has found application as a TCM. Such TCM samples are traditionally processed by the Bran, Cut, Fried and Swill methods, and were collected from five provinces in China. The data matrices obtained from the two types of analysis produced two principal component biplots, which showed that the HPLC fingerprint data were discriminated on the basis of the methods for processing the raw TCM, while the metal analysis grouped according to the geographical origin. When the two data matrices were combined into a one two-way matrix, the resulting biplot showed a clear separation on the basis of the HPLC fingerprints. Importantly, within each different grouping the objects separated according to their geographical origin, and they ranked approximately in the same order in each group. This result suggested that by using such an approach, it is possible to derive improved characterisation of the complex TCM materials on the basis of the two kinds of analytical data. In addition, two supervised pattern recognition methods, K-nearest neighbors (KNNs) method, and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), were successfully applied to the individual data matrices-thus, supporting the PCA approach

  1. Analysis of bauxite by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ramon M.; Mahanti, Himansu S.

    Methods are described for the analysis of bauxite by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectroscopy. Bauxite samples were dissolved either in HCl, HNO 3, and HF at 160°C in all-PTFE bomb or fused with NaOH. Spectral lines were selected after examination of experimental wavelength scans at each potential analyte wavelength. Limits of detection, background equivalent concentration, and analytical figures of merit were established. The accuracy of the method was confirmed by determining 17 elements in NBS-SRM bauxite samples. Silicon in HF solutions was analyzed using a modified ICP torch with a graphite injector tube, an inert nebulizer using PTFE capillary tubes, and a PTFE spray chamber.

  2. Revisiting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of magnesium with online inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkirskiy, Viacheslav; King, Andrew D; Gharbi, Oumaïma; Volovitch, Polina; Scully, John R; Ogle, Kevin; Birbilis, Nick

    2015-02-23

    The electrochemical impedance of reactive metals such as magnesium is often complicated by an obvious inductive loop with decreasing frequency of the AC polarising signal. The characterisation and ensuing explanation of this phenomenon has been lacking in the literature to date, being either ignored or speculated. Herein, we couple electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with online atomic emission spectroelectrochemistry (AESEC) to simultaneously measure Mg-ion concentration and electrochemical impedance spectra during Mg corrosion, in real time. It is revealed that Mg dissolution occurs via Mg(2+) , and that corrosion is activated, as measured by AC frequencies less than approximately 1 Hz approaching DC conditions. The result of this is a higher rate of Mg(2+) dissolution, as the voltage excitation becomes slow enough to enable all Mg(2+) -enabling processes to adjust in real time. The manifestation of this in EIS data is an inductive loop. The rationalisation of such EIS behaviour, as it relates to Mg, is revealed for the first time by using concurrent AESEC. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of biologically important arsenic species utilizing on-line inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectrometric detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spall, W.D.; Lynn, J.G.; Andersen, J.L.; Valdez, J.G.; Gurley, L.R.

    1986-06-01

    An anion exchange, high-performance liquid chromatography technique using a 15-min linear gradient from water to 0.5 M ammonium carbonate to separate arsenite, arsenate, methylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid from neutral arsenic containing compounds was developed for application to a study of arsenic metabolism in cultured cell suspensions. Arsenic detection was accomplished by the direct coupling of the column effluent to an inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICAP-AES) set to monitor the arsenic emission line at 197.19 nm. The analysis requires 20 min and is sensitive to as low as 60 ng of arsenic injected to the column.

  4. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockrem, L.L.; Owens, J.W.; Seidel, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  5. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, C.M.; Jain, J.; Owens, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  6. Determination of trace elements in Egyptian cane sugar (Deshna Factories) by neutron activation, atomic absorption spectrophotometric and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awadallah, R.M.; Sherif, M.K.; Mohamed, A.E.; Grass, F.

    1986-01-01

    Multielement instrumental neutron activation (INAA), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) and atomic absorption spectrophotometric (AAS) analyses were utilized for the determination of Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Eu, Fe, Ga, Hf, K, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Th, Ti, U, V, W and Zn in sugar cane plant, raw juice, juice in different stages, syrup, deposits, molasses, A, B and C sugar, refinery 1 and 2 sugar, and in soil samples picked up from the immediate vicinity of the cane plant roots at surface, 30 and 60 cm depth, respectively. (author)

  7. Collection of trace evidence of explosive residues from the skin in a death due to a disguised letter bomb. The synergy between confocal laser scanning microscope and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Monaci, Fabrizio; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Riezzo, Irene; Baroni, Davide; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2010-04-15

    In most deaths caused by explosive, the victim's body becomes a depot for fragments of explosive materials, so contributing to the collection of trace evidence which may provide clues about the specific type of device used with explosion. Improvised explosive devices are used which contain "homemade" explosives rather than high explosives because of the relative ease with which such components can be procured. Many methods such as chromatography-mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, stereomicroscopy, capillary electrophoresis are available for use in the identification of explosive residues on objects and bomb fragments. Identification and reconstruction of the distribution of explosive residues on the decedent's body may give additional hints in assessing the position of the victim in relation to the device. Traditionally these residues are retrieved by swabbing the body and clothing during the early phase, at autopsy. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and other analytical methods may be used to analyze the material swabbed from the victim body. The histological examination of explosive residues on skin samples collected during the autopsy may reveal significant details. The information about type, quantity and particularly about anatomical distribution of explosive residues obtained utilizing confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) together with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), may provide very significant evidence in the clarification and reconstruction of the explosive-related events. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, M; Todolí, J L; Hidalgo, M; Iglesias, M

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S(2-)) at low levels (microgL(-1)) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H(2)S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H(2)S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H(2)S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5microgL(-1) to 25mgL(-1) of sulfide. Detection limits of 5microgL(-1) and 6microgL(-1) were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters.

  9. Determination of Metals Present in Textile Dyes Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Cross-Validation Using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rehan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS was used for the quantitative analysis of elements present in textile dyes at ambient pressure via the fundamental mode (1064 nm of a Nd:YAG pulsed laser. Three samples were collected for this purpose. Spectra of textile dyes were acquired using an HR spectrometer (LIBS2000+, Ocean Optics, Inc. having an optical resolution of 0.06 nm in the spectral range of 200 to 720 nm. Toxic metals like Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn along with other elements like Al, Mg, Ca, and Na were revealed to exist in the samples. The %-age concentrations of the detected elements were measured by means of standard calibration curve method, intensities of every emission from every species, and calibration-free (CF LIBS approach. Only Sample 3 was found to contain heavy metals like Cr, Cu, and Ni above the prescribed limit. The results using LIBS were found to be in good agreement when compared to outcomes of inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES.

  10. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A. M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-01-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities (∼∼ 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs

  11. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-09-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. The plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. The light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 to 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0.2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sb alloys. To avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000K), electron densities (approx 10 ''16 cm''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained

  12. Comparison of digestion procedures used for the determination of boron in biological tissues by ICP-AES [inductively-coupled, plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.F.; Miller, D.L.; Steele, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was designed to identify the most accurate and reliable procedures for the digestion of biological tissues prior to the determination of boron by inductively-coupled, plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The four procedures used in this study were an acid bomb digestion and digestions performed in test tubes using perchloric acid and hydrogen peroxide, nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, and nitric acid alone. Digestions using nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid alone were performed in a manner analogous to the perchloric acid/hydrogen peroxide procedure. The tissues used in the study were from dogs that had been administered a boron compound (Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH) and included two brain tissues, a liver and a tongue. These tissues were selected in order to eliminate results that may be due to surface spiking only. None of the test tube procedures were successful in completely dissolving the samples, as was evidenced by residual color and a coagulated precipitate. The amount of precipitate was much larger for the brain tissues in all cases. The acid bomb digestion and the perchloric acid/hydrogen peroxide procedures gave comparable boron concentrations for all of the tissues in this study. 2 refs., 1 tab

  13. Elemental speciation via high-performance liquid chromatography combined with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopic detection: application of a direct injection nebulizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFreniere, K.E; Fassel, V.A.; Eckels, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of a direct injection nebulizer (DIN) interfaced to a high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopic (ICP-AES) detection for simultaneous multielement speciation. The limits of detection (LODs) obtained with the DIN interface in the HPLC mode were found to be comparable to those obtained by continuous-flow sample introduction into the ICP, or inferior by up to only a factor of 4. In addition, the DIN allowed for the direct injection into the ICP of a variety of common HPLC solvents (up to 100% methanol, acetonitrile, methyl isobutyl ketone, pyridine, and water). The HPLC-DIN-ICP-AES system was compared to other HPLC-atomic spectroscopic detection techniques and was found to offer substantial improvement over the alternative on-line, detection methods in terms of LODs. Representative applications of the HPLC-DIN-ICP-AES system to the elemental speciation of coal process streams, shale oil, solvent refined coal, and crude oil are presented

  14. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Todoli, J.L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Hidalgo, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Iglesias, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain)], E-mail: monica.iglesias@udg.es

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S{sup 2-}) at low levels ({mu}g L{sup -1}) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H{sub 2}S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669 nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H{sub 2}S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H{sub 2}S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} to 25 mg L{sup -1} of sulfide. Detection limits of 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 6 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters.

  15. Comparison of 4 analytical techniques based on atomic spectrometry for the determination of total tin in canned foodstuffs

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Different techniques for the determination of total tin in beverage and canned food by atomic spectrometry were compared. The performance characteristics of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Hydride Generation Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES), Electrothermal Atomization Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETA-AAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) were determined in term of linearity, ...

  16. Inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy: an evaluation of the use of nitrogen--argon admixtures as plasma discharge atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalewski, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the use of nitrogen in either the plasma coolant or aerosol carrier gas flows on the physical and spectrochemical properties of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were examined. While the plasma operated with nitrogen in the coolant flow exhibited a stability comparable to that of the argon plasma, the use of nitrogen in the aerosol carrier gas flow resulted in a plasma that was less stable. The detection limits obtained for the three plasmas exhibited a similar trend. In addition, the use of nitrogen--argon admixtures in the plasma coolant gas flow yielded an increase in both the net analyte and the background emission intensities when the corresponding argon and nitrogen--argon plasmas were operated under various conditions. Furthermore, the effect of aluminum on the Ca II (393.4 nm) spectral line was reported for the 1000/1 Al/Ca molar ratio. At an observation height of 15 mm, the signal depressions were 4 and 14% for the nitrogen--argon and the argon plasmas, respectively. The above experimental evidence suggested that the operation of the ICP with an Ar--N 2 coolant gas might be hotter than the argon plasma currently in use in this laboratory. The demountable plasma torch designed in collaboration with K. Olson yielded detection limits for 15 elements and 19 spectral lines that were approximately within a factor of two of those obtained with the torch of fused quartz design. The design also appeared to offer a more readily initiated plasma discharge. The experimental evidence presented supports the utilization of nitrogen--argon admixtures in the plasma coolant gas flow as alternate discharge atmospheres for inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy. In contrast, the experimental evidence shows that there is a deterioration in both physical and spectrochemical properties of plasmas operated with a nitrogen aerosol carrier gas

  17. Studies on the spectral interference of gadolinium on different analytes in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Arijit; Thulasidas, S.K.; Natarajan, V.; Airan, Yougant

    2015-01-01

    Due to the multi-electronic nature, rare earth elements are prone to exhibit spectral interference in ICP-AES, which leads to erroneous determination of analytes in presence of such matrix. This interference is very significant, when the analytes are to be determined at trace level in presence of emission rich matrix elements. An attempt was made to understand the spectral interference of Gd on 29 common analytes like Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Dy, Fe, Ga, Gd, In, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, Pb, Pr, Sr, Tl and Zn using ICP-AES with capacitive Charged Coupled Device (CCD) as detector. The present study includes identification of suitable interference free analytical lines of these analytes, evaluation of correction factor for each analytical line and determination of tolerance levels of these analytical lines along with the ICP-AES based methodology for simultaneous determination of Gd. Based on the spectral interference study, an ICP-AES based method was developed for the determination of these analytes at trace level in presence of Gd matrix without chemical separation. Further the developed methodology was validated using synthetic samples prepared from commercially available reference material solution of individual element; the results were found to be satisfactory. The method was also compared with other existing techniques

  18. Particle transport in a He-microchip plasma atomic emission system with an ultrasonic nebulizer for aqueous sample introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Joosuck [Department of Chemistry, Dankook University, 126 Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, H.B. [Department of Chemistry, Dankook University, 126 Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: plasma@dankook.ac.kr

    2008-11-15

    The transport efficiency of dried particles generated from an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) was studied to improve the analytical performance of a lab-made, He-microchip plasma system, in which a quartz tube ({approx} 1 mm i.d.) was positioned inside the central channel of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) polymer chip. The polymer microchip plasma has the advantages of low cost, small size, easy handling and design, and self-ignition with long stabilization (> 24 h). However, direct introduction of aqueous solution into the microplasma for the detection of metals remains problematic due to plasma instability. In addition, the much smaller size of the system can cause signal suppression due to low transport efficiency. Therefore, knowledge of particle transport efficiency in this microplasma system is required to enhance the sensitivity and stability. The weight of transported particles in the range of 0.02 to 10 mg m{sup -3} was measured using a piezobalance with a precision of 0.4-17.8%, depending on the operating conditions. The significant effects of the USN operating conditions and the physical properties of the tubing, namely, length, inner diameter and surface characteristics, on the number of particles transported from the nebulizer to the microplasma were studied. When selected metals, such as Na, Mg and Pb, at a concentration of 5 mg L{sup -1} were nebulized, transported particles were obtained with a mass range of 0.5-5 mg m{sup -3}, depending on atomic weights. For application of the He-rf-microplasma, the atomic emission system was optimized by changing both the radio frequency (rf) power (60-200 W) and cooling temperature of the USN (- 12-9 deg. C). The limits of detection obtained for K, Na and Cu were 0.26, 0.22, and 0.28 mg L{sup -1}, respectively. These results confirmed the suitable stability and sensitivity of the He-rf-PDMS microchip plasma for application as an atomization source.

  19. Matrix digestion of soil and sediment samples for extraction of lead, cadmium and antimony and their direct determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, P.; Fisher, A.S.; Henon, D.N.; Hill, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    An environmentally friendly and simple method has been developed for complete digestion of lead, cadmium and antimony from soil samples using a magnesium nitrate assisted dry ashing procedure. Statistical data for a series of experiments with standard reference materials are presented, and precision values are found to be comparable for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and for inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. From a single digest solution all analytes are quantified without involving any preconcentration routes. Inter-method comparison of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) shows that the probability of the results being different is less than 99 %. (author)

  20. Flame emission, atomic absorption and fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlick, G.

    1980-01-01

    Six hundred and thirty references are cited in this review. The information in the review is divided into 12 major areas: books, reviews, and bibliographies; fundamental studies in flames; developments in instrumentation; measurement techniques and procedure; flame emission spectrometry; flame atomic absorption spectrometry; flame molecular absorption spectrometry; electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectroscopy; hydride generation techniques; graphite furnace atomic emission spectrometry; atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and analytical comparisons

  1. Speciation analysis of organomercurial compounds in Fish Tissue by capillary gas chromatography coupled to microwave-induced plasma atomic emission detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorfe Díaz

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel approach for analysis of mercury speciation in fish using gas chromatography coupled with microwave-induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (GC-MIP-OES in surfatron resonant cavity. Sample treatment was based on quantitative leaching of mercury species from fish tissue with ultrasound-assisted acid-toluene extraction. The extracted mercury species analyzed with GC-MIP-OES attained detection limits of 5 and 9 pg for methylmercury (MeHg and ethylmercury (EtHg, respectively. A complete chromatogram could be completed in 1.5 min. MeHg values obtained with GC-MIP-OES were matched with organic mercury values obtained with selective reduction cold vapour- atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS.

  2. Building and analyzing models from data by stirred tank experiments for investigation of matrix effects caused by inorganic matrices and selection of internal standards in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotti, Marco [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova (Italy)], E-mail: grotti@chimica.unige.it; Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador; Todoli, Jose Luis [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, 03080, Alicante (Spain)

    2008-05-15

    Interfering effects caused by inorganic matrices (inorganic acids as well as easily ionized elements) in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy have been modeled by regression analysis of experimental data obtained using the 'stirred tank method'. The main components of the experimental set-up were a magnetically-stirred container and two peristaltic pumps. In this way the matrix composition was gradually and automatically varied, while the analyte concentration remained unchanged throughout the experiment. An inductively coupled plasma spectrometer with multichannel detection based on coupled charge device was used to simultaneously measure the emission signal at several wavelengths when the matrix concentration was modified. Up to 50 different concentrations were evaluated in a period of time of 10 min. Both single interfering species (nitric, hydrochloric and sulphuric acids, sodium and calcium) and different mixtures (aqua regia, sulfonitric mixture, sodium-calcium mixture and sodium-nitric acid mixture) were investigated. The dependence of the emission signal on acid concentration was well-fitted by logarithmic models. Conversely, for the easily ionized elements, 3-order polynomial models were more suitable to describe the trends. Then, the coefficients of these models were used as 'signatures' of the matrix-related signal variations and analyzed by principal component analysis. Similarities and differences among the emission lines were highlighted and discussed, providing a new insight into the interference phenomena, mainly with regards to the combined effect of concomitants. The combination of the huge amount of data obtained by the stirred tank method in a short period of time and the speed of analysis of principal component analysis provided a judicious means for the selection of the optimal internal standard in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

  3. Deuterium measurement by emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, E.G.; Heilig, K.; Dumke, I.

    1978-01-01

    The method makes it possible to determine the relative deuterium content of enriched water samples. For this, the relative intensities of the Hα and Dα lines are measured which are emitted by a high-frequency discharge in water vapour. Although the method is not as exact as mass spectrometry, it has the following advantages: - Easy sample preparation (no reduction necessary); - samples of highly different enrichment can be measured one after the other without the danger of memory effects; - much lower apparatus and cost expenditure. The necessary sample size is about the same in both methods. (orig.) [de

  4. Combination of the ionic-to-atomic line intensity ratios from two test elements for the diagnostic of plasma temperature and electron number density in Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tognoni, E. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: tognoni@ipcf.cnr.it; Hidalgo, M.; Canals, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia. Universidad de Alicante. Apdo. 99, 03080, Alicante (Spain); Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Salvetti, A.; Palleschi, V. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    In Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) spectrochemical analysis, the MgII(280.270 nm)/MgI(285.213 nm) ionic to atomic line intensity ratio is commonly used as a monitor of the robustness of operating conditions. This approach is based on the univocal relationship existing between intensity ratio and plasma temperature, for a pure argon atmospheric ICP in thermodynamic equilibrium. In a multi-elemental plasma in the lower temperature range, the measurement of the intensity ratio may not be sufficient to characterize temperature and electron density. In such a range, the correct relationship between intensity ratio and plasma temperature can be calculated only when the complete plasma composition is known. We propose the combination of the line intensity ratios of two test elements (double ratio) as an effective diagnostic tool for a multi-elemental low temperature LTE plasma of unknown composition. In particular, the variation of the double ratio allows us discriminating changes in the plasma temperature from changes in the electron density. Thus, the effects on plasma excitation and ionization possibly caused by introduction of different samples and matrices in non-robust conditions can be more accurately interpreted. The method is illustrated by the measurement of plasma temperature and electron density in a specific analytic case.

  5. Improvement of AOAC Official Method 984.27 for the determination of nine nutritional elements in food products by Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy after microwave digestion: single-laboratory validation and ring trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poitevin, Eric; Nicolas, Marine; Graveleau, Laetitia; Richoz, Janique; Andrey, Daniel; Monard, Florence

    2009-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation (SLV) and a ring trial (RT) were undertaken to determine nine nutritional elements in food products by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in order to improve and update AOAC Official Method 984.27. The improvements involved optimized microwave digestion, selected analytical lines, internal standardization, and ion buffering. Simultaneous determination of nine elements (calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, and zinc) was made in food products. Sample digestion was performed through wet digestion of food samples by microwave technology with either closed or open vessel systems. Validation was performed to characterize the method for selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, ruggedness, and uncertainty. The robustness and efficiency of this method was proved through a successful internal RT using experienced food industry laboratories. Performance characteristics are reported for 13 certified and in-house reference materials, populating the AOAC triangle food sectors, which fulfilled AOAC criteria and recommendations for accuracy (trueness, recovery, and z-scores) and precision (repeatability and reproducibility RSD and HorRat values) regarding SLV and RT. This multielemental method is cost-efficient, time-saving, accurate, and fit-for-purpose according to ISO 17025 Norm and AOAC acceptability criteria, and is proposed as an improved version of AOAC Official Method 984.27 for fortified food products, including infant formula.

  6. Quantitative determination of impurities in nuclear grade aluminum by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jat, J.R.; Nayak, A.K.; Balaji Rao, Y.; Ravindra, H.R.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with quantitative determination of impurity elements in nuclear grade aluminum, used as fin tubes in research reactors, by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (F-AAS). The results have been compared with those obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) method. Experimental conditions used in both the methods are given in the paper. (author)

  7. New developments in glow discharge optical emission and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Volker; Dorka, Roland; Wilken, Ludger; Wetzig, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes new developments in flow discharge optical emission (GD-OES) and mass spectrometry (GD-MS) at IFW and presents corresponding new applications (analysis of microelectronic multi-layer system by radio frequency glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (RF-GD-OES) and analysis of pure iron by a new Grimm-type GD-MS source)

  8. Tin Content Determination in Canned Fruits and Vegetables by Hydride Generation Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Rončević

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tin content in samples of canned fruits and vegetables was determined by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (HG-ICP-OES, and it was compared with results obtained by standard method of flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. Selected tin emission lines intensity was measured in prepared samples after addition of tartaric acid and followed by hydride generation with sodium borohydride solution. The most favorable line at 189.991 nm showed the best detection limit (1.9 μg L−1 and limit of quantification (6.4 μg kg−1. Good linearity and sensitivity were established from time resolved analysis and calibration tests. Analytical accuracy of 98–102% was obtained by recovery study of spiked samples. Method of standard addition was applied for tin determination in samples from fully protected tinplate. Tin presence at low-concentration range was successfully determined. It was shown that tenth times less concentrations of Sn were present in protected cans than in nonprotected or partially protected tinplate.

  9. Accurate determination of trace amounts of phosphorus in geological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with ion-exchange separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoh, Kazuya; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We set up an effective ICP-AES procedure for determining trace P in rock samples. •Some certified values of P for reference rock samples were proved to be doubtful. •Accurate and reliable data were presented for a suite of geological reference rocks. -- Abstract: In order to determine trace amounts of phosphorus in geological and cosmochemical rock samples, simple as well as reliable analytical schemes using an ICP-AES instrument were investigated. A (conventional) ICP-AES procedure could determine phosphorus contents at the level of several 100 μg g −1 with a reasonable reproducibility ( −1 ; 1σ). An ICP-AES procedure coupled with matrix-separation using cation and anion exchange resins could lower the quantification level down to 1 μg g −1 or even lower under the present experimental conditions. The matrix-separation ICP-AES procedure developed in this study was applied to twenty-one geological reference samples issued by Geological Survey of Japan. Obtained values vary from 1250 μg g −1 for JB-3 (basalt) to 2.07 μg g −1 for JCt-1 (carbonate). Matrix-separation ICP-AES yielded reasonable reproducibility (less than 8.3%; 1σ) of three replicate analyses for all the samples analyzed. In comparison of our data with certificate values as well as literature or reported values, there appear to be an apparent (and large) discrepancy between our values and certificate/reported values regardless of phosphorus contents. Based on the reproducibility of our data and the analytical capability of the matrix-separation ICP-AES procedure developed in this study (in terms of quantification limit, recovery, selectivity of an analyte through pre-concentration process, etc.), it is concluded that certified values for several reference standard rocks should be reevaluated and revised accordingly. It may be further pointed that some phosphorus data reported in literatures should be critically evaluated when they are to be referred in later publications

  10. Separation, preconcentration and estimation of rare earth and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) in thorium matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Prithwish; Kumar Vijay; Durani, Smeer; Satyanarayana, K.

    2007-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and efficient method is developed for the separation of Rare earth elements (REEs) La-Lu, and Y and some trace elements Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni,V, Zn from thorium matrix and their subsequent estimations by ICP-AES. In thorium-rich geological samples, the estimation of REE's by ICP-AES suffers from the spectral interferences due to the presence of excess of Th. In the proposed method, thorium is separated from the matrix by the solvent extraction. To optimize the separation, of REEs and trace elements from Th matrix, synthetic mixture solutions was prepared containing Th, REEs and trace elements maintaining different acidic conditions (1M, 2M, 4M, 6M, 8M and 10M HNO 3 and 2M, 4M, 6M and 8M HCl) and each solution was subjected to solvent extraction. The solvent extraction was carried out using a mixture of di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (in 30 % Toluene) and 1- pentanol in the ratio of 5:1. The aqueous phase containing the required elements was evaporated to dryness and an acidity of 5% HCl is maintained in final volume. Solutions were analysed by ICP-AES and the quantitative recovery of REEs and trace elements were obtained at 6M HNO 3 acidity. The developed method was applied to the certified standard reference material: IGS-36 and the values obtained were comparable with the certified values. The method was also applied to the real time monazite sample and the recovery was quantitative. Corrections have been applied for the REEs inter-elemental interferences in ICP-AES. (author)

  11. Study of mineral and essential trace elements in milk and dairy products by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kira, Carmen Silvia

    2002-01-01

    The importance of food composition related to nutritional and toxicological contents has been emphasized in recent years. Some chemical elements are needed for cell metabolism, while excess or deficiency may be responsible for disorders. Milk is considered the most important food during the first months of life, nutritional needs of children being satisfied by milk and dairy products. These foods provide the main trace elements for the good growth of different tissues as well as the functioning of several enzymatic systems. Important deficiencies in mineral during this period can interfere with children's development. Determination of mineral and trace elements by using spectroscopic techniques generally involves a pretreatment of sample. Sample preparation is the most critical part of the analysis because of the long preparation time and the possibilities for contamination and losses of the analyte associated with this step. Different procedures of sample preparation (dry ashing digestion, wet digestion using an open focused microwave and a hot plate) were evaluated for determining Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P and Zn in milk and dairy products by the ICP OES technique. In this work the concentrations obtained for the elements determined by the ICP OES technique after using the different treatments of sample were compared to the results obtained by the INAA technique, that does not require dissolution of sample. The partial digestion with diluted hydrochloric acid was found to be suitable for determining Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P and Zn in milk samples and dairy products. (author)

  12. 电感耦合等离子体发射光谱法测定纯银焊丝中杂质元素%Measuring the Impurity Elements in Sterling Silver Wire by the Method of Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雅丽; 李立东

    2014-01-01

    Continuous determination of impurity elements in sterling silver wire by the method of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric has been established to discuss the analysis of the selection of spectral line, not only optimizing the analytical conditions,but also checking the limit of detection and recovery of standard addition, which can meet the requirement of industrial analysis as well as has a simple method.%研究建立了电感耦合等离子体发射光谱法对纯银焊丝中杂质元素的连续测定方法,讨论了分析谱线的选择问题,优化了分析条件,对检出限与加标回收率进行了检验,方法简便、可满足工业分析要求。

  13. Chemical analysis of steel by optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, M.O.; Kajita, T.; Jeszensky, G.

    1981-01-01

    The development of the chemical analysis for special steels by optical emission spectrometry direct reading method with computer, at the Siderurgica N.S. Aparecida S.A. is presented. Results are presented for the low alloy steels and high speed steel. Also, the contribution of this method to the special steel preparation is commented. (Author) [pt

  14. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy; Probabilidades de transicion de algunos niveles de Cr II, Na II y Sb I medediante espectroscopia de plasma producidos por laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A. M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-07-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities ({approx}{approx} 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs.

  15. Lithium determination in whole blood by flame atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Khalid, N.; Nasimullah; Iqbal, M.Z.

    2003-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the determination of lithium in whole blood using Flame atomic emission spectrometry is described. No sample preparation was required apart from dilution with 0.02 N HNO/sub 3/. The reliability of the method was determined by analyzing Standard Reference Material (SRM) under identical experimental conditions and comparing the determined lithium concentration with the reported value. These were in good agreement with each other. The determined range of lithium in the whole blood of fifty-six healthy adult volunteers (28 males and 28 females) were 13.1 - 47.8 mg L-1. The determined average concentration of lithium in whole blood was compared with the reported values of other countries. The data was statistically analyzed with respect to sex and different age groups. (author)

  16. Whither spectrochemical analysis: Inductively coupled plasma - Atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassel, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of the seven proverbial ages of new physical analytical methodologies, ICP-AES has now passed through the initial five ages. Its present age may be characterized as mature, as represented by its general acceptance by the analytical community, by the evolution of standardized operating conditions and procedures, and by the automation of operations. Continuing evolutionary refinements and improvements in existing practices and theories can be expected, because intensive effort to achieve these goals is now underway. The driving forces behind these efforts will be enumerated and the problems being encountered will be summarized. In his closing remarks he comments on: (a) the impact that ICP-AES has had on the structure of the field of analytical chemistry and on the way trace elemental constituents are determined; and (b) where the action in ICP-AES is likely to be in the future

  17. 16. Hot dense plasma atomic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Dappen; Totsuji, H.; Nishii, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers 13 articles whose common feature is to deal with atomic processes in hot plasmas. Density functional molecular dynamics method is applied to the hydrogen plasma in the domain of liquid metallic hydrogen. The effects of the density gradient are taken into account in both the electronic kinetic energy and the exchange energy and it is shown that they almost cancel with each other, extending the applicability of the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac approximation to the cases where the density gradient is not negligible. Another article reports about space and time resolved M-shell X-ray measurements of a laser-produced gas jet xenon plasma. Plasma parameters have been measured by ion acoustic and electron plasma waves Thomson scattering. Photo-ionization becomes a dominant atomic process when the density and the temperature of plasmas are relatively low and when the plasma is submitted to intense external radiation. It is shown that 2 plasmas which have a very different density but have the same ionization parameters, are found in a similar ionization state. Most radiation hydrodynamics codes use radiative opacity data from available libraries of atomic data. Several articles are focused on the determination of one group Rosseland and Planck mean analytical formulas for several single elements used in inertial fusion targets. In another paper the plasma density effect on population densities, effective ionization, recombination rate coefficients and on emission lines from carbon and Al ions in hot dense plasma, is studied. The last article is devoted to a new atomic model in plasmas that considers the occupation probability of the bound state and free state density in the presence of the plasma micro-field. (A.C.)

  18. Mass and emission spectrometry in the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.H. (ed.)

    1978-11-01

    The capabilities of the Mass and Emission Spectrometry Section of the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described. Many different areas of mass spectrometric expertise are represented in the section: gas analysis, high abundance sensitivity measurements, high- and low-resolution organic analyses, spark source trace constituent analysis, and ion microprobe analysis of surfaces. These capabilities are complemented by emission spectrometry. The instruments are described along with a few applications, some of which are unique.

  19. Mass and emission spectrometry in the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.

    1978-11-01

    The capabilities of the Mass and Emission Spectrometry Section of the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described. Many different areas of mass spectrometric expertise are represented in the section: gas analysis, high abundance sensitivity measurements, high- and low-resolution organic analyses, spark source trace constituent analysis, and ion microprobe analysis of surfaces. These capabilities are complemented by emission spectrometry. The instruments are described along with a few applications, some of which are unique

  20. In-situ optical emission spectrometry during galvanostatic aluminum anodising

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, D.; Van Overmeere, Q.; Santoro, R.; Proost, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report on the use of optical emission spectrometry (OES) for the online detection of changes in the Al concentration ejected in a 1.0 mol dm -3 sulphuric acid electrolyte during galvanostatic anodising of Al thin film substrates. The technique relies on the coupling of an Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrometer to a specially designed electrochemical flow cell. This has allowed to correlate, for the first time, the kinetics of Al dissolution to well-established morphological changes related to porous anodic oxide formation and growth. A deconvolution algorithm was first developed in order to decompose the experimental ICP/OES signal into elementary distributions, each one characteristic for a specific kinetic regime. The highest dissolution rate systematically occurred during the first step, associated with barrier oxide formation. This is followed by a systematic decrease in the rate of Al dissolution during pore formation. During steady-state porous oxide growth, the Al dissolution rate increases again, but still remains below the level established during barrier oxide growth. In each of these three kinetic regimes, a linear variation of the Al dissolution rate with current density was observed in the range 0.5-5.0 mA cm -2 , with slope values of, respectively, 35 ± 2, 24 ± 2 and 28 ± 1 μg C -1 . Regarding the temporal transitions between the different regimes, a desynchronisation was observed between the kinetic (dissolution) and morphological transitions, the time offset going in opposite directions for barrier and steady-state porous oxide growth. Finally, using the measured Al dissolution rates, the current density dependence of the film formation efficiency for both porous and barrier oxide growth has been established.

  1. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  2. Determination of trace elements in soy milk using ICP atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoko; Chayama, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the optimal method for the multi-element quantification of 9 elements in soy milk: calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, and zinc. Results obtained using ICP atomic emission spectrometry were compared with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry, which is the standard method. The same sample was measured using both ICP atomic emission spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry. The percentage of minerals recovered by ICP atomic emission spectrometry ranged from 99.3% to 102%, which was equivalent to that by atomic absorption spectrometry. Therefore, a good result with standard deviation was obtained. The mineral contents of 16 samples of commercially-available soy milk products were measured. The Cu content was significantly proportional to the amount of soybean solids (P < 0.001). Moreover, although relation-ships did not attain statistical significance, the consents of Fe, Zn, K, Mg and P were proportional to the amount of soybean solids, and were highest in soy milk, followed by prepared soy milk and so milk beverage. The Ca content of modified soy milk was significantly higher than that of soy milk and soy milk-based beverages (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the Na content in soy milk was significantly lower. (author)

  3. The Determination of Composite Elements in Zircaloy-2 by X-Ray Fluorescence and Emission Spectrometry Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dian Anggraini; Rosika Kriswarini; Yusuf N

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of composing elements in zircaloy-2 has been done by Emission Spectrometry method and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). The aim of the analysis is to verify conformity between composing elements in zircaloy-2 and the material certificate. Spectrometry Emission method has higher sensitivity in element determination of a material than that of XRF method, so can be estimated that emission spectrometry method has higher accuracy than that of XRF method. The result of qualitative analysis by Emission Spectrometry indicate that the composing elements in zircaloy-2 were Sn, Cr and Ni. However, the qualitative analysis result by XRF method indicated that the composing elements in zircaloy 2 were Sn, Cr, Ni and Fe. Fe element can not be analysed by Emission Spectrometry method because Emission Spectrometer did not equipped with Fe detector. The quantitative analysis result of the composing elements in the material with both methods showed that Sn, Cr and Ni concentration of zircaloy 2 existed in concentration ranges of the material certificate. Result of statistical test (F and t-test) of analysis result of both methods can be used for analyzing composing elements in zircaloy 2. Emission Spectrometry method was more sensitive and accurate for determining Cr and Ni element in zircaloy 2 than that of emission Spectrometry method but both methods had same accuracy. The precision of measurement of Sn, Cr and Ni element using XRF method was better than that of Emission spectrometry method. (author)

  4. Comparison of 15N analysis by optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry for clinical studies during total parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragon, A.; Reynier, J.P.; Guiraud, G.

    1985-01-01

    During total and stable parenteral nutrition, a branched chain amino acid enriched solution containing [ 15 N]leucine was infused into a patient to determine the fate of the nitrogen administered through this formulation. Measurements of 15 N isotopic enrichments were performed on the same biological samples (urinary urea, total plasma proteins and albumin) by optical emission spectrometry (OES) and mass spectrometry (MS) to determine if OES with its specific advantages (cost, handling maintenance) constituted even with low enrichments a useful alternative technique to MS considered as the reference method. The results show that OES constituted a very useful analytical technique to obtain reliable information in clinical metabolic studies when low 15 N enrichments must be determined. (Auth.)

  5. Pulsed, atmospheric pressure plasma source for emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2004-05-11

    A low-power, plasma source-based, portable molecular light emission generator/detector employing an atmospheric pressure pulsed-plasma for molecular fragmentation and excitation is described. The average power required for the operation of the plasma is between 0.02 W and 5 W. The features of the optical emission spectra obtained with the pulsed plasma source are significantly different from those obtained with direct current (dc) discharge higher power; for example, strong CH emission at 431.2 nm which is only weakly observed with dc plasma sources was observed, and the intense CN emission observed at 383-388 nm using dc plasma sources was weak in most cases. Strong CN emission was only observed using the present apparatus when compounds containing nitrogen, such as aniline were employed as samples. The present apparatus detects dimethylsulfoxide at 200 ppb using helium as the plasma gas by observing the emission band of the CH radical. When coupled with a gas chromatograph for separating components present in a sample to be analyzed, the present invention provides an apparatus for detecting the arrival of a particular component in the sample at the end of the chromatographic column and the identity thereof.

  6. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1991-12-24

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a solid material (16, 42) by applying energy from an energy source (20, 70) top a surface region of the solid material sufficient to cause transient heating in a thin surface layer portion of the solid material (16, 42) so as to enable transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion, and by detecting with a spectrometer/detector (28, 58) substantially only the transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion of the solid material. The detected transient thermal emission of infrared radiation is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the solid material of emitted infrared radiation, so as to be indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the solid material.

  7. Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Kushner, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    The decrease in feature sizes in microelectronics fabrication will soon require plasma etching processes having atomic layer resolution. The basis of plasma atomic layer etching (PALE) is forming a layer of passivation that allows the underlying substrate material to be etched with lower activation energy than in the absence of the passivation. The subsequent removal of the passivation with carefully tailored activation energy then removes a single layer of the underlying material. If these goals are met, the process is self-limiting. A challenge of PALE is the high cost of specialized equipment and slow processing speed. In this work, results from a computational investigation of PALE will be discussed with the goal of demonstrating the potential of using conventional plasma etching equipment having acceptable processing speeds. Results will be discussed using inductively coupled and magnetically enhanced capacitively coupled plasmas in which nonsinusoidal waveforms are used to regulate ion energies to optimize the passivation and etch steps. This strategy may also enable the use of a single gas mixture, as opposed to changing gas mixtures between steps

  8. 134Cs emission probabilities determination by gamma spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, M. C. M.; Poledna, R.; Delgado, J. U.; Silva, R. L.; Araujo, M. T. F.; da Silva, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    The National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN) of Rio de Janeiro performed primary and secondary standardization of different radionuclides reaching satisfactory uncertainties. A solution of 134Cs radionuclide was purchased from commercial supplier to emission probabilities determination of some of its energies. 134Cs is a beta gamma emitter with 754 days of half-life. This radionuclide is used as standard in environmental, water and food control. It is also important to germanium detector calibration. The gamma emission probabilities (Pγ) were determined mainly for some energies of the 134Cs by efficiency curve method and the Pγ absolute uncertainties obtained were below 1% (k=1).

  9. {sup 134}Cs emission probabilities determination by gamma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, M.C.M. de, E-mail: candida@cnen.gov.br [Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DINOR/CNEN), Riode Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Poledna, R.; Delgado, J.U.; Silva, R.L.; Araujo, M.T.; Silva, C.J. da [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN) of Rio de Janeiro performed primary and secondary standardization of different radionuclides reaching satisfactory uncertainties. A solution of {sup 134}Cs radionuclide was purchased from commercial supplier to emission probabilities determination of some of its energies. {sup 134}Cs is a beta gamma emitter with 754 days of half-life. This radionuclide is used as standard in environmental, water and food control. It is also important to germanium detector calibration.The gamma emission probabilities (Pγ) were determined mainly for some energies of the {sup 134}Cs by efficiency curve method and the Pγ absolute uncertainties obtained were below 1% (k=1). (author)

  10. Analysis of iron-base alloys by low-wattage glow discharge emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagatsuma, K.; Hirokawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    Several iron-base alloys were investigated by low-wattage glow discharge emission spectrometry. The emission intensity principally depended on the sputtering parameters of constituent elements in the alloy. However, in the case of chromium, stable and firm oxides formed on the surface influencing the yield of ejected atoms. This paper discusses the relation between the sputtering parameters in Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr, and Fe-Co alloys and their relative emission intensities. Additionally, quantitative analysis was performed for some ternary iron-base alloys and commercial stainless steels with the calibration factors of binary alloy systems

  11. Analysis of zirconium alloys using inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, G.F.; Pickford, C.J.

    1982-06-01

    As part of an interlaboratory collaborative exercise, certain trace and minor elements have been determined in a proposed zircaloy reference material using inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrometry. A dissolution procedure involving hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids was used for determination of Hf, Cr, Fe and Sn. Data have also been obtained for Ni, Cu and Mn. Use of a high resolution monochromator in a scanning mode was found necessary for measurement of the emission intensities in order to resolve the spectral lines of interest from the intense and complex emission from the zirconium matrix. (author)

  12. Determination of aluminium, scandium and rare earth elements by emission flame spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otruba, V.; Sommer, L.

    1989-01-01

    Emission spectrometry in nitrous oxide-acetylene flames in combination with a highly resolving double monochromator and sensitive detecting system enables simple, sensitive and selective determinations of aluminium, scandium and all rare earth elements with exception of cerium in complicated matrices. Calibration plots are linear for a large concentration interval (≤ 100 μgxml -1 ), detection limits are in ngxml -1 level and RSD does not exceed 3% on the optimal concentration level of the particular element. The determination of Al, Sc, Eu and Yb showed particular advantages as to methods using ICP-spectrometry. (orig.)

  13. Direct isotope ratio measurement of uranium metal by emission spectrometry on a laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, W.; Petit, A.; Briand, A.

    1995-01-01

    The method of Optical Emission Spectrometry on a Laser-Produced Plasma (OES/LPP) at reduced pressure has been studied for the determination of the uranium isotope ratio ( 235 U/ 238 U). Spectral profiles of the investigated transition U-II 424.437 nm show the possibility to obtain an isotopic spectral resolution in a laser-produced plasma under exactly defined experimental conditions. Spectroscopic data and results are presented. (author)

  14. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montaser, A.

    1993-01-01

    In this research, new high-temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. During the period January 1993--December 1993, emphasis was placed on (a) analytical investigations of atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasma (He ICP) that are suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements possessing high excitation and ionization energies; (b) simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources to predict their structure and fundamental and analytical properties without incurring the enormous cost of experimental studies; (c) spectrosopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high-temperature plasmas; (d) fundamental studies of He ICP discharges and argon-nitrogen plasma by high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometry; and (e) fundamental and analytical investigation of new, low-cost devices as sample introduction systems for atomic spectrometry and examination of new diagnostic techniques for probing aerosols. Only the most important achievements are included in this report to illustrate progress and obstacles. Detailed descriptions of the authors' investigations are outlined in the reprints and preprints that accompany this report. The technical progress expected next year is briefly described at the end of this report

  15. Determination of trace elements in maifanite by outer cover electrode atomic emission spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jianqiang; LU Yiqiang; JIANG Wei

    2005-01-01

    Maifanite is a nature medicinal stone used in many fields for long time. The research on it showed that there are many trace elements in maifanite. In this paper, 36 trace elements in maifanite were determined by outer cover electrode atomic emission spectrometry, and the determination conditions were studied systematically. The results show that the concentrafions of elements, which are beneficial to human health, are higher, and the elements harmful to people health such as As, Cd, Hg, Cr, and Pb are tiny in maifanite. The precision and the accuracy were also discussed.

  16. X-ray fluorescence analysis and optical emission spectrometry of an roman mirror from Tomis, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belc, M.; Bogoi, M.; Ionescu, D.; Guita, D.; Caiteanu, S.; Caiteanu, D.

    2000-01-01

    The miscellaneous population of Roman Empire, their diverse cultural tradition, their ability to assimilate the roman civilization spirits, had determined a permanent reassessment superimposed upon the roman contribution. Analysis was undertaken using optical emission spectrometry and non-destructive X-ray fluorescence. X-ray fluorescence analysis is a well-established method and is often used in archaeometry and other work dealing with valuable objects pertaining to the history of art and civilization. Roman mirror analysed has been found not to be made of speculum (a high tin bronze). (authors)

  17. Simple, sensitive nitrogen analyzer based on pulsed miniplasma source emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Zhe; Duan Yixiang

    2003-01-01

    The development of pulsed miniplasma source emission spectrometry for trace nitrogen determination in inert gases is described in this article. The instrument consists of a pulsed miniplasma source generated by an in-house fabricated portable high-voltage supply, an optical beam collection system, an integrated small spectrometer with a charge-coupled-device detector, an interface card, and a notebook computer for controlling spectrometer parameters and signal processing. Trace nitrogen in the inert gases, such as helium and argon, was determined by monitoring the emission intensities from nitrogen molecules at 357 and 337 nm. The analytical performance was examined under various experimental conditions. The system has a detection limit of about 15 ppb (v/v) for nitrogen in helium with a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The newly developed instrument offers a simple, low-cost, and sensitive method for continuously monitoring trace nitrogen in high-purity inert gases

  18. Multi-elemental analysis of aqueous geological samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Todor I.; Wolf, Ruth E.; Adams, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Typically, 27 major, minor, and trace elements are determined in natural waters, acid mine drainage, extraction fluids, and leachates of geological and environmental samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). At the discretion of the analyst, additional elements may be determined after suitable method modifications and performance data are established. Samples are preserved in 1–2 percent nitric acid (HNO3) at sample collection or as soon as possible after collection. The aqueous samples are aspirated into the ICP-OES discharge, where the elemental emission signals are measured simultaneously for 27 elements. Calibration is performed with a series of matrix-matched, multi-element solution standards.

  19. Alpha-particle emission probabilities of ²³⁶U obtained by alpha spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouli, M; Pommé, S; Jobbágy, V; Van Ammel, R; Paepen, J; Stroh, H; Benedik, L

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry was performed with an ion-implanted silicon detector in vacuum on a homogeneously electrodeposited (236)U source. The source was measured at different solid angles subtended by the detector, varying between 0.8% and 2.4% of 4π sr, to assess the influence of coincidental detection of alpha-particles and conversion electrons on the measured alpha-particle emission probabilities. Additional measurements were performed using a bending magnet to eliminate conversion electrons, the results of which coincide with normal measurements extrapolated to an infinitely small solid angle. The measured alpha emission probabilities for the three main peaks - 74.20 (5)%, 25.68 (5)% and 0.123 (5)%, respectively - are consistent with literature data, but their precision has been improved by at least one order of magnitude in this work. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Cold excitation and determination of hydrogen sulfide by dielectric barrier discharge molecular emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongchen; Jiang, Jie; Li, Na

    2015-11-01

    A low-temperature microplasma generated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was used as a radiation source for the excitation of hydrogen sulfide and its determination by molecular emission spectrometry (MES). The excitation/emission chamber was enclosed to eliminate spectral interference from ambient air. The spectral emission lines of hydrogen sulfide were clearly discriminated from the background spectrum, and the emission line at 365.06 nm was selected for parameter optimization and quantitative analysis. The S(2-) ions in aqueous samples were reacted with acid to generate hydrogen sulfide and then determined. The experimental parameters affecting the determination of hydrogen sulfide and S(2-) were optimized. The limits of detection were 1.4 mg m(-3) for H2S and 11.2 mg L(-1) for S(2-). The repeatability of the method was satisfactory, as the RSD values were 2.3% for H2S and 1.8% for S(2-). The enclosed DBD-MES system was demonstrated to be a useful tool for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in gas samples and S(2-) in aqueous samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Urinary nickel: measurement of exposure by inductively coupled plasma argon emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Chisato; Usuda, Kan; Hayashi, Satsuki; Dote, Tomotaro; Kono, Koichi

    2004-09-01

    Nickel is a rare earth metal and is widely used in modern industry. Its overexposure in human beings can provoke significant effects including lung, cardiovascular and kidney diseases. As an index of occupational exposure, urine is widely used for the monitoring of nickel concentration because it is a minimally invasive method. Recent studies have used atomic absorption spectrometry to measure nickel concentration. In this study, we introduced novel inductively coupled plasma argon emission spectrometry (ICPAES) which enables us to measure multiple elements simultaneously with smaller volume and with lower detection limits compared to conventional atomic absorption emission spectrometry, and we established the new measuring method by determining the appropriate wavelengths for nickel concentration. Furthermore, using the established new measuring method, we investigated the correlation between a single oral administration of nickel and urine elimination in rats. As a result, different concentrations of nickel standard solutions were measured by ICPAES, and among five specific wavelengths of nickel, 221.647 and 231.604 nm were chosen because they had the highest inclines of both signal to background ratio and emission intensity in simple linear regression analysis. Next, by using healthy human urine samples that had not been exposed to nickel, 231.604 nm was determined to be the most appropriate wavelength because it did not present abnormal intensity due to obstacle wavelength. Male Wistar rats received an oral administration of nickel ranging from 0.025 to 250 mg/kg, which is equivalent to 0.0015 - 15% of LD50, and during the following 24 h, urine samples were collected and the nickel concentration was measured by ICPAES. With a single oral administration of nickel, there was an increase in urine nickel concentration in a dose-dependent manner and the appropriate equation was developed. Acute renal failure was not observed in this dosage of oral nickel

  2. Dielectric barrier discharge micro-plasma emission spectrometry for the detection of acetone in exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Dong-Xue; Yu, Yong-Liang; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is a predominant volatile organic compound (VOC) in the exhaled breath and a promising biomarker for diabetes and ketoacidosis. A non-thermal micro-plasma generated in a planar dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used as a radiation source for the excitation of gaseous acetone followed by its quantification with optical emission spectrometry (OES). Gaseous acetone can be directly sampled, while liquid acetone is evaporated by heated tungsten coil and then introduced into the DBD micro-plasma by a helium carrier flow for performing optical emission and detection at a 519 nm emission line. In the present study, the exhaled breath is collected and transferred into aqueous medium for sampling. With a sampling volume of 7 μL in a micro-drop, a linear range of 40-1600 mg L(-1) is obtained along with a detection limit of 44 ng and a precision of 5.7% RSD. The present system is successfully applied to the determination of breath acetone for both diabetic patients and healthy volunteers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Some metals determination in beers by atomic emission spectrometry of induced argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushige, I.

    1990-01-01

    It was made the identification and determination of metals in brazilian bottled and canned beer, using atomic emission spectrometry with d.c. are and argon coupled plasma excitation sources. The elements Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were determined in beer samples, after treatment with HNO sub(3) conc. /H sub(2) O sub(2) (30%). In the determination of Co, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn and alternative method using HNO sub(3) conc. /O sub(3) was proved be useful. The results obtained for Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were below the limits established by brazilian legislation, showing the good quality of the beer concerning the metals. The results of this work were requested by the previous Ministerio do Meio Ambiente e Urbanismo in order to contribute to review the brazilian legislation in foods and beverages about metals contents. (author)

  4. The Diagnosis of Plasma Parameters in Surface Alloying Technique by Optical Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Yabo; Zhang Yuefei; Chen Qiang; Zhang Guangqiu; Gao Yuan; Wang Jianzhong; Kui Xiaoyun

    2006-01-01

    Electron density (Ne) in a glow discharge plasma for the surface alloying technique is diagnosed by optical emission spectrometry (OES). With CH 4 as the feeding gas, Ne is obtained by comparing the Hβ spectrum according to the Stark broadening effect. It is noticed that Ne varies with the working pressures (30 Pa to 70 Pa) and cathode voltages (500 V to 1000 V), respectively. Due to an abnormal glow discharge, Ne is between 1.71x10 15 /cm 3 to 6.64x10 15 /cm 3 and increases rapidly with working gas pressures and cathode voltages. The results show that OES is a useful method to measure the plasma parameters in a surface alloying glow discharge plasma

  5. Simple procedure for nutrient analysis of coffee plant with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tezotto, Tiago; Favarin, Jose Laercio; Neto, Ana Paula; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes, E-mail: tiago.tezotto@usp.br [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Gratao, Priscila Lupino [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP/ FCAV), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Aplicada a Agropecuaria; Mazzafera, Paulo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP/IB), SP (Brazil). Dept. Biologia Vegetal

    2013-07-15

    Nutrient analysis is used to estimate nutrient content of crop plants to manage fertilizer application for sustained crop production. Direct solid analysis of agricultural and environmental samples by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) was chosen as alternative technique to evaluate the simultaneous multielemental quantification of the most important essential elements in coffee (Coffea arabica L.) plants. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and certified reference materials made from leaves were used to calibrate and check the trueness of EDXRF method for the determination of the concentration of several nutrients in coffee leaves and branches. Fluorescence spectrometry proved to be advantageous and presented low cost as loose powder samples could be used. Samples collected from a field experiment where coffee plants were treated with excess of Ni and Zn were used to verify the practical application of the method. Good relationships were achieved between certified values and data obtained by EDXRF, with recoveries ranging from 82 to 117 %.(author)

  6. Determination of Cr, Mn, Si, and Ni in carbon steels by optical emission spectrometry with spark source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Gonzalez, M.A.; Pomares Alfonso, M.; Mora Lopez, L.

    1995-01-01

    Elemental composition of steels determines some important of his characteristic moreover it is necessary to obtain their quality certification. Analytical procedure has performed for determination of Cr, Mn, Si and Ni in carbon steels by optical emission spectrometry with spark source. reproducibility of results is 5-11 %. Exactitude has tested with results that have obtained by internationally recognised methods-

  7. An improved microstrip plasma for optical emission spectrometry of gaseous species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schermer, Susanne; Bings, Nicolas H.; Bilgic, Attila M.; Stonies, Robert; Voges, Edgar; Broekaert, Jose A.C. E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de

    2003-09-26

    A modified compact 2.45 GHz microstrip plasma (MSP) operated with Ar as working gas at atmospheric pressure has been characterized and examined for its suitability for the determination of Hg as gaseous species by optical emission spectrometry. As a formerly described MSP the new device is provided on a sapphire substrate. The areas of plasma stability in terms of gas flow rates and microwave power for both MSPs with respect to plasma form and reflected power were investigated. Power levels of 5-40 W and Ar flow rates of 15-60 l/h were used. The modified MSP, which extends out of the channel in the sapphire substrate, was used for the recording of emission spectra for Hg vapor at different working conditions. Using optimized parameters a detection limit for Hg of less than 10 ng Hg/l Ar is obtained. The attainable excitation temperatures in the modified MSP at different microwave power were determined under the use of Fe as thermometric species and introducing ferrocene into the plasma. They were found to be at the order of 6000-7000 K for a power of 10-40 W and a gas flow of 15 l/h. It was shown that the modified MSP source can be combined with both a conventional monochromator with photomultiplier detection and a miniaturized spectrometer with CCD detection, whereby space-angle limitations are not stringent.

  8. Improved documentation of spectral lines for inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doidge, Peter S.

    2018-05-01

    An approach to improving the documentation of weak spectral lines falling near the prominent analytical lines used in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is described. Measurements of ICP emission spectra in the regions around several hundred prominent lines, using concentrated solutions (up to 1% w/v) of some 70 elements, and comparison of the observed spectra with both recent published work and with the output of a computer program that allows calculation of transitions between the known energy levels, show that major improvements can be made in the coverage of spectral atlases for ICP-OES, with respect to "classical" line tables. It is argued that the atomic spectral data (wavelengths, energy levels) required for the reliable identification and documentation of a large majority of the weak interfering lines of the elements detectable by ICP-OES now exist, except for most of the observed lines of the lanthanide elements. In support of this argument, examples are provided from a detailed analysis of a spectral window centered on the prominent Pb II 220.353 nm line, and from a selected line-rich spectrum (W). Shortcomings in existing analyses are illustrated with reference to selected spectral interferences due to Zr. This approach has been used to expand the spectral-line library used in commercial ICP-ES instruments (Agilent 700-ES/5100-ES). The precision of wavelength measurements is evaluated in terms of the shot-noise limit, while the absolute accuracy of wavelength measurement is characterised through comparison with a small set of precise Ritz wavelengths for Sb I, and illustrated through the identification of Zr III lines; it is further shown that fractional-pixel absolute wavelength accuracies can be achieved. Finally, problems with the wavelengths and classifications of certain Au I lines are discussed.

  9. Direct rare earth determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, Sergio; Cornejo, Silvia; Rojas, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    In the present work, the use of the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), for the sequential determination of Rare Earth elements in the metallurgical process samples is described. In the first place, the optimum parameters for the determination of the elements in study are established, like instrumental calibration, wavelengths spectral selection and interference of matrix. Next, the methodology for the digestion of solid samples (system of digestion with pressure) and the recovery of the interest elements are presented. Two material rocks as of reference Syenite SY3 are used. In order to assure the validity of the obtained data, the reference materials SY2 and SY3 were analyzed by means of two different techniques, ICP-OES and ICP-Mass, this last one was made by an international laboratory and a fusion with lithium metaborate was used with digestion method. Finally, the obtained results demonstrate that the reproducibility in the recovery of rare earth analyzed by both techniques is comparable, and that the methodology of digestion used for these elements is statistically valid (author)

  10. Composition of Renaissance paint layers: simultaneous particle induced X-ray emission and backscattering spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Viguerie, L; Beck, L; Salomon, J; Pichon, L; Walter, Ph

    2009-10-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE) is now routinely used in the field of cultural heritage. Various setups have been developed to investigate the elemental composition of wood/canvas paintings or of cross-section samples. However, it is not possible to obtain information concerning the quantity of organic binder. Backscattering spectrometry (BS) can be a useful complementary method to overcome this limitation. In the case of paint layers, PIXE brings the elemental composition (major elements to traces) and the BS spectrum can give access to the proportion of pigment and binder. With the use of 3 MeV protons for PIXE and BS simultaneously, it was possible to perform quantitative analysis including C and O for which the non-Rutherford cross sections are intense. Furthermore, with the use of the same conditions for PIXE and BS, the experiment time and the potential damage by the ion beam were reduced. The results obtained with the external beam of the Accélérateur Grand Louvre pour l'Analyse Elementaire (AGLAE) facility on various test painting samples and on cross sections from Italian Renaissance masterpieces are shown. Simultaneous combination of PIXE and BS leads to a complete characterization of the paint layers: elemental composition and proportion of the organic binder have been determined and thus provide useful information about ancient oil painting recipes.

  11. Isotopic Tracing of Fuel Components in Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Garbak, J.

    2001-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope-ratio measurement technique developed in the late 1970s for tracing long-lived radioisotopes (e.g., 14 C half life = 5760 y). The technique counts individual nuclei rather than waiting for their radioactive decay, allowing measurement of more than 100 low-level 14 C samples per day (Vogel et al, 1995). The LLNL AMS system is shown in Fig.1. The contemporary quantity of 14 C in living things ( 14 C/C = 1.2 x 10 -12 or 110 fmol 14 C/ g C) is highly elevated compared to the quantity of 14 C in petroleum-derived products. This isotopic elevation is sufficient to trace the fate of bio-derived fuel components in the emissions of an engine without the use of radioactive materials. If synthesis of a fuel component from biologically-derived source material is not feasible, another approach is to purchase 14 C-labeled material (e.g., dibutyl maleate (DBM)) and dilute it with petroleum-derived material to yield a contemporary level of 14 C. In each case, the virtual absence of 14 C in petroleum based fuels gives a very low 14 C background that makes this approach to tracing fuel components practical. Regulatory pressure to significantly reduce the particulate emissions from diesel engines is driving research into understanding mechanisms of soot formation. If mechanisms are understood, then combustion modeling can be used to evaluate possible changes in fuel formulation and suggest possible fuel components that can improve combustion and reduce PM emissions. The combustion paradigm assumes that large molecules break down into small components and then build up again during soot formation. AMS allows us to label specific fuel components, including oxygenates, trace the carbon atoms, and test this combustion modeling paradigm. Volatile and non-volatile organic fractions (VOF, NVOF) in the PM can be further separated. The VOF of the PM can be oxidized with catalysts in the exhaust stream to further decrease PM. The effectiveness

  12. Determination of silver in fresh water by atomic absorption spectrometry following flotation preconcentration by iron(III) collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cundeva, K.; Stafilov, T. [Institute of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, St. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje (Yugoslavia)

    1997-08-01

    Colloid precipitate flotation of silver from fresh water is applied for preconcentration and separation. Optimal conditions using hydrated iron(III) oxide and iron(III) tetramethylenedithiocarbamate as collectors were investigated. Various factors affecting the silver recovery, including collector mass, nature of the supporting electrolyte, pH of the working medium, electrokinetic potential of the collector particle surfaces, type of surfactant, induction time etc., were checked. Within the optimal pH range (5.5-6.5) silver was separated quantitatively (94.9- 100.0%) with 30 mg Fe(III) as collector. The content of silver was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and compared to that from inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The detection limit of silver by the method described is 0.01 {mu}g/L. (orig.) With 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Matrix separation by chelation to prepare biological materials for isotopic zinc analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrant, S.F.; Krushevska, A.; Amarasiriwardena, D.; Argentine, M.D.; Romon-Guesnier, S.; Barnes, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Following an evaluation of three chelating resins [Chelex-100, poly(dithiocarbamate) (PDTC) and carboxymethylated poly(ethyleneimine)-poly(methylenepolyphenylene) isocyanate (CPPI)], a procedure was established with the last of these for the separation of Zn from biological matrix elements prior to 70 Zn: 68 Zn isotopic analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method was verified by establishing Zn recoveries and by determining its effectiveness in removing Cl and Na from buffered test solutions. Calcium, Na, and Zn concentration data were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Chlorine was measured by electrothermal vaporization ICP-MS. The efficacy of the technique was demonstrated by the determination of zinc isotope ratios in bovine milk and human urine. (Author)

  14. ICP Mass and Optical Emission Spectrometry of Ore Samples Containing Rare Earth Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, A.E.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission and Mass Spectrometry (ICP-OES and ICPMS) are widely accepted as a rapid and sensitive techniques for Rare Earth Elements (REEs) analysis of geological samples. However, the achievable accuracy of these techniques are seriously limited by the problem of matrix interferences. In this study, matrix effects in ICP-AES were addressed using two approaches. In the first approach, the mechanisms of matrix interferences and analyte excitation were elucidated fundamentally. First, matrix effects from a comprehensive list of thirty-nine elements were investigated. It was confirmed that matrix elements with low second (instead of the widely reported first) ionization potentials (IP) produce a stronger matrix effect in all cases. Another critical parameter defining the severity of the matrix effect was found to be the availability of low-lying energy levels in the doubly charged matrix ion. Penning ionization followed by ion electron recombination through successive cycles is proposed as the mechanism for the more severe matrix effects caused by low second-IP matrices. In the second approach ICP-OES and ICP-MS are applied in this study for the analysis of Rare Earth Elements of two selected standard reference samples namely AGV-2 and BCR-2 beside a fluorspar geological sample (G-9 sample). Effective procedures are developed to avoid the spectral interference from matrix elements by using ion exchange resin Amberlite IR-120 before determination of REEs using ICP-OES and ICPMS. The potential of the method is evaluated by analysis of Certified Reference Materials (AGV-2 and BCR-2). Results obtained by ICP-MS show that experimental data are in agreement with the certified values and their values could be used as a quantitative data. The results obtained using ICP-OES were compared and discussed.

  15. Quantitative determination of total cesium in highly active liquid waste by using liquid electrode plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Van-Khoai; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Taguchi, Shigeo; Takamura, Yuzuru; Surugaya, Naoki; Kuno, Takehiko

    2018-06-01

    A sensitive analytical method for determination of total cesium (Cs) in highly active liquid waste (HALW) by using modified liquid electrode plasma optical emission spectrometry (LEP-OES) is developed in this study. The instrument is modified to measure radioactive samples in a glove box. The effects of important factors, including pulsed voltage sequence and nitric acid concentration, on the emission of Cs are investigated. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) are 0.005 mg/L and 0.02 mg/L, respectively. The achieved LOD is one order lower than that of recently developed spectroscopic methods using liquid discharge plasma. The developed method is validated by subjecting a simulated HALW sample to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The recoveries obtained from a spike-and-recovery test are 96-102%, implying good accuracy. The method is successfully applied to the quantification of Cs in a real HALW sample at the Tokai reprocessing plant in Japan. Apart from dilution and filtration of the HALW sample, no other pre-treatment process is required. The results agree well with the values obtained using gamma spectrometry. The developed method offers a reliable technique for rapid analysis of total Cs in HALW samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Phonon-assisted field emission in silicon nanomembranes for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonghoo; Aksamija, Zlatan; Shin, Hyun-Cheol; Kim, Hyunseok; Blick, Robert H

    2013-06-12

    Time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry has been considered as the method of choice for mass analysis of large intact biomolecules, which are ionized in low charge states by matrix-assisted-laser-desorption/ionization (MALDI). However, it remains predominantly restricted to the mass analysis of biomolecules with a mass below about 50,000 Da. This limitation mainly stems from the fact that the sensitivity of the standard detectors decreases with increasing ion mass. We describe here a new principle for ion detection in TOF mass spectrometry, which is based upon suspended silicon nanomembranes. Impinging ion packets on one side of the suspended silicon nanomembrane generate nonequilibrium phonons, which propagate quasi-diffusively and deliver thermal energy to electrons within the silicon nanomembrane. This enhances electron emission from the nanomembrane surface with an electric field applied to it. The nonequilibrium phonon-assisted field emission in the suspended nanomembrane connected to an effective cooling of the nanomembrane via field emission allows mass analysis of megadalton ions with high mass resolution at room temperature. The high resolution of the detector will give better insight into high mass proteins and their functions.

  17. Efficient high-resolution X-ray emission spectrometry using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unterumsberger, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to get access to high-resolution X-Ray Emission Spectrometry (XES) at nanoscaled materials, consisting of light elements and transition metals, by the increase of the sensitivity of a Wavelength-Dispersive Spectrometer (WDS) in the soft X-Ray range. The increase of the sensitivity was achieved by a refocusing of the incident radiation. With the increased sensitivity of the WDS, it was possible to determine the chemical species of different, nominal 100 nm thin titanium oxides. The combination of the refocusing optic and calibrated spectrometer enabled the detection and deconvolution of the L-fluorescence radiation of these nanoscaled titanium oxides. Due to the calibration of the spectrometer, a reliable determination of the transition probabilities of the titanium La- and Ll-fluorescence lines as a function of the chemical state is possible. To the best of my knowledge, the determination of the transition probabilities as a function of the chemical state in the soft X-Ray range has not been investigated yet. The quality of the refocusing was characterized using different diagnostic tools. Vertical full width at half maximum (FWHM) values of the focused beam between 10 μm to 20 μm and horizontal FWHM values between 12 μm and 25 μm could be achieved over an energy range of 180 eV to 1310 eV. Using calibrated photodiodes, it was possible to determine the absolute transmission of the used single bounce monocapillary as well as to monitor the absolute photon flux. By means of the refocusing, it was possible to increase the photon flux by a factor of 4.9 experimentally. The increase of the photon flux enables the analysis of nanoscaled materials with the used spectrometer. This could be shown based on the determination of the lower limit of detection of boron Ka and titanium La. In both cases, the lower limit of detection of 0.4 nm equivalent layer thickness was achieved (about 1.10 -7 g/cm 2 to 2.10 -7 g/cm 2 or 3.10 15 atoms/cm 2 to

  18. Classification of Antarctic algae by applying Kohonen neural network with 14 elements determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbinot, L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica-Instituto de Quimica-Unicamp, PO Box 6154, CEP: 13083-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Smichowski, P. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Unidad de Actividad Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Av. Gral Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Farias, S. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Unidad de Actividad Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Av. Gral Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Arruda, M.A.Z. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica-Instituto de Quimica-Unicamp, PO Box 6154, CEP: 13083-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Vodopivez, C. [Instituto Antartico Argentino, Cerrito 1010, C1248AAZ, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Poppi, R.J. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica-Instituto de Quimica-Unicamp, PO Box 6154, CEP: 13083-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: ronei@iqm.unicamp.br

    2005-06-30

    Optical emission spectrometers can generate results, which sometimes are not easy to interpret, mainly when the analyses involve classifications. To make simultaneous data interpretation possible, the Kohonen neural network is used to classify different Antarctic algae according to their taxonomic groups from the determination of 14 analytes. The Kohonen neural network architecture used was 5x5 neurons, thus reducing 14-dimension input data to two-dimensional space. The input data were 14 analytes (As, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Sr, Zn, Cd, Cr, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, V) with their concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry in 11 different species of algae. Three taxonomic groups (Rhodophyta, Phaeophyta and Cholorophyta) can be differentiated and classified through only their Cu content.

  19. Classification of Antarctic algae by applying Kohonen neural network with 14 elements determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbinot, L.; Smichowski, P.; Farias, S.; Arruda, M.A.Z.; Vodopivez, C.; Poppi, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Optical emission spectrometers can generate results, which sometimes are not easy to interpret, mainly when the analyses involve classifications. To make simultaneous data interpretation possible, the Kohonen neural network is used to classify different Antarctic algae according to their taxonomic groups from the determination of 14 analytes. The Kohonen neural network architecture used was 5x5 neurons, thus reducing 14-dimension input data to two-dimensional space. The input data were 14 analytes (As, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Sr, Zn, Cd, Cr, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, V) with their concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry in 11 different species of algae. Three taxonomic groups (Rhodophyta, Phaeophyta and Cholorophyta) can be differentiated and classified through only their Cu content

  20. Compositional characterisation of rare earth magnet materials by glow discharge quadrupole mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, M.A.; Shekhar, R.; Kumar, Sunil Jai

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, glow discharge quadrupole mass spectrometric (GD-QMS) studies on Sm-Pr-Co compound magnetic materials are reported. The composition of these magnetic materials produced from different manufacturing routes (imported, indigenous) was determined. The results are compared with the results obtained by an alternative analytic technique, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), after complete dissolution of the material in the appropriate acids. For perfectly homogeneous material both the wet chemical method and direct solid analysis method should give the same result. A close examination of both the results indicates that for imported materials the values obtained by wet chemical method and direct solid method are in close agreement. This indicates that the imported (solid) material is highly homogeneous. For indigenous materials, it shows a large difference in the values of Co and Sm. This reveals that the solid material prepared is not as homogenous as the imported materials

  1. Spectrochemical determination of tantalum in plutonium metal using direct current plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeff, S.K.; Morris, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Tantalum is determined by direct current plasma spectrometry after separation of plutonium from solution as PuF 3 . After centrifugation of the PuF 3 precipitate, a low level of plutonium remains in solution in sufficient quantity to cause spectral interferences. It is necessary to determine the plutonium by dc plasma spectrometry and apply a correction to determine low tantalum concentrations with good accuracy and precision. Tantalum can be determined down to 0.4 ppM in solution with a relative standard deviation of 10 percent. Better precision can be achieved at higher concentrations. The procedure is simple and convenient for glovebox work. 5 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  2. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: a tutorial review. Part II. Practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-07-23

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are increasingly used to carry out analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. The introduction of such matrices into ICP sources is particularly challenging and can be the cause of numerous drawbacks. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP sources. Part I provided theoretical considerations associated with the physico-chemical properties of such matrices, in an attempt to understand the induced phenomena. Part II of this tutorial review is dedicated to more practical considerations on instrumentation, instrumental and operating parameters, as well as analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices. Two important issues are addressed in this part: the first concerns the instrumentation and optimization of instrumental and operating parameters, pointing out (i) the description, benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of nebulization and desolvation devices and the impact of more specific instrumental parameters such as the injector characteristics and the material used for the cone; and, (ii) the optimization of operating parameters, for both ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Even if it is at the margin of this tutorial review, Electrothermal Vaporization and Laser Ablation will also be shortly described. The second issue is devoted to the analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices, with particular insight into the isotope dilution technique, particularly used in speciation analysis by ICP-coupled separation techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of direct current He-N{sub 2} mixture plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, O.; Castillo, F.; Martinez, H. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Villa, M.; Reyes, P. G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Estado de México (Mexico); Villalobos, S. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    This study analyses the glow discharge of He and N{sub 2} mixture at the pressure of 2.0 Torr, power of 10 W, and flow rate of 16.5 l/min, by using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The emission bands were measured in the wavelength range of 200–1100 nm. The principal species observed were N{sub 2}{sup +} (B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub u}→X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub g}), N{sub 2} (C{sup 3}Π{sub u}→B{sup 3}Π{sub g}), and He, which are in good agreement with the results of mass spectrometry. Besides, the electron temperature and ion density were determined by using a double Langmuir probe. Results indicate that the electron temperature is in the range of 1.55–2.93 eV, and the electron concentration is of the order of 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The experimental results of electron temperature and ion density for pure N{sub 2} and pure He are in good agreement with the values reported in the literature.

  4. An isotopic analysis process with optical emission spectrometry on a laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauchien, P.; Pietsch, W.; Petit, A.; Briand, A.

    1994-01-01

    The sample that is to be analyzed is irradiated with a laser beam to produce a plasma at the sample surface; the spectrum of the light emitted by the plasma is analyzed and the isotope composition of the sample is derived from the spectrometry. The process is preferentially applied to uranium and plutonium; it is rapid, simpler and cheaper than previous methods, and may be applied to 'in-situ' isotopic analysis in nuclear industry. 2 figs

  5. Uniform GaN thin films grown on (100) silicon by remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Huan-Yu; Chen, Miin-Jang; Lin, Ming-Chih; Chen, Liang-Yih

    2015-01-01

    The growth of uniform gallium nitride (GaN) thin films was reported on (100) Si substrate by remote plasma atomic layer deposition (RP-ALD) using triethylgallium (TEG) and NH 3 as the precursors. The self-limiting growth of GaN was manifested by the saturation of the deposition rate with the doses of TEG and NH 3 . The increase in the growth temperature leads to the rise of nitrogen content and improved crystallinity of GaN thin films, from amorphous at a low deposition temperature of 200 °C to polycrystalline hexagonal structures at a high growth temperature of 500 °C. No melting-back etching was observed at the GaN/Si interface. The excellent uniformity and almost atomic flat surface of the GaN thin films also infer the surface control mode of the GaN thin films grown by the RP-ALD technique. The GaN thin films grown by RP-ALD will be further applied in the light-emitting diodes and high electron mobility transistors on (100) Si substrate. (paper)

  6. Glow Discharge Emission Spectrometry (GDOES): Theoretical Introduction, General Aspects, and its Applications within the Framework of the Technofusion Programs; Glow Discharge Emission Spectrometry (GDOES): Introduccion Teorica, Aspectos Generales y Aplicabilidad en el Marco del Programa Technofusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Rojo, A. B.; Gonzalez, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2013-02-01

    The demand by material research groups for the direct composition analysis of solids is increasing as a solution to the time-consuming problems and errors inherent to classical chemical analysis, where the attack and solubilisation of the starting material is mandatory, often producing the introduction of impurities and component loss of the initial matrix. From the existing solid analysis techniques the present work is focused on the Glow Discharge Emission Spectrometry (GDOES), a fast, simply-executed technique, for which quantitative, high resolution depth profile determination of any element in the periodic table can be performed with a high sensibility and detection limit. The theoretical concepts, the required instrumentation and the basic analytic applications are revised, giving especial attention to the issues related to the analysis of materials for fusion applications. Finally, a comparative study with a more advanced spectroscopic technique (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS)) is performed and the concomitance of both techniques to correct limitations such as the spatial resolution and the quantification of the analysis, important factors that are required in the chemical analysis of the complex materials used in Fusion, is addressed. (Author) 41 refs.

  7. Spectrometry and dosimetric evaluation of the gamma-ray emissions of 241Am

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.A.; Chong, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    New, detailed measurements have been made of the photon spectrum of the radionuclide 241 Am. Observations, recorded for a 95% confidence level over local background, provide affirmation of a number of lines previously considered to be of equivocal existence. A number of hitherto unreported emissions are similarly observed. Peak areas, expressed as a percentage of that for the 59.54 keV emission, have been ascribed to all lines of the detailed spectrum. This leads to an estimated increase in the value of exposure calculated from the measured fluence spectrum, relative to that from the 59.54 keV line, of (3.1 ± 0.8)%, taking into account all emissions beyond the predominating 59.54 keV gamma-ray emission. (author)

  8. Simultaneous determination of Cr, Ga, In and V in soil and water samples by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donati, George L.; Kron, Benjamin E. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Jones, Bradley T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States)], E-mail: jonesbt@wfu.edu

    2009-06-15

    Tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry is employed for the simultaneous determination of Cr, Ga, In, and V. Both V and In are detected by this technique for the first time. The atomizer is a simple, inexpensive tungsten filament extracted from a mass-produced, commercially-available 150 W, 15 V microscope bulb. A 25 {mu}l sample aliquot is placed directly on the coil and a small constant-current power source is used to carefully dry, ash and atomize the sample. Analytical signals are detected with a Czerny-Turner spectrograph and a charge coupled device detector. Multiple emission lines from all 4 elements are monitored simultaneously in a 54 nm spectral window. Concentration limits of detection are in the {mu}g l{sup - 1} range for all elements, and the absolute limits of detection are 0.2, 2, 0.5, and 10 ng for Cr, Ga, In, and V, respectively. Even lower values may be obtained by combining the signals for the multiple emission lines of a single element. The method precision is typically better than 5.0% relative standard deviation, and sometimes as good as 0.95% (Ga). Standard reference materials of soil and water are used to check the method accuracy. After a simple acid extraction, the values determined by the method presented no significant difference from the reported values at the 95% confidence level.

  9. Characterizing Methane Emissions at Local Scales with a 20 Year Total Hydrocarbon Time Series, Imaging Spectrometry, and Web Facilitated Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Eliza Swan

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas for which uncertainty in local emission strengths necessitates improved source characterizations. Although CH4 plume mapping did not motivate the NASA Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) design and municipal air quality monitoring stations were not intended for studying marine geological seepage, these assets have capabilities that can make them viable for studying concentrated (high flux, highly heterogeneous) CH4 sources, such as the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field (˜0.015 Tg CH4 yr-1) offshore Santa Barbara, California. Hourly total hydrocarbon (THC) data, spanning 1990 to 2008 from an air pollution station located near COP, were analyzed and showed geologic CH4 emissions as the dominant local source. A band ratio approach was developed and applied to high glint AVIRIS data over COP, resulting in local-scale mapping of natural atmospheric CH4 plumes. A Cluster-Tuned Matched Filter (CTMF) technique was applied to Gulf of Mexico AVIRIS data to detect CH4 venting from offshore platforms. Review of 744 platform-centered CTMF subsets was facilitated through a flexible PHP-based web portal. This dissertation demonstrates the value of investigating municipal air quality data and imaging spectrometry for gathering insight into concentrated methane source emissions and highlights how flexible web-based solutions can help facilitate remote sensing research.

  10. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: A tutorial review. Part II. Practical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: This tutorial review is dedicated to the analysis of organic/hydro-organic matrices by ICP techniques. A state-of-the-art focusing on sample introduction, relevant operating parameters optimization and analytical strategies for elemental quantification is provided. - Highlights: • Practical considerations to perform analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Description, benefits and drawbacks of recent introduction devices. • Optimization to improve plasma tolerance towards organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Analytical strategies for elemental quantification in organic/hydro-organic matrices. - Abstract: Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are increasingly used to carry out analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. The introduction of such matrices into ICP sources is particularly challenging and can be the cause of numerous drawbacks. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP sources. Part I provided theoretical considerations associated with the physico-chemical properties of such matrices, in an attempt to understand the induced phenomena. Part II of this tutorial review is dedicated to more practical considerations on instrumentation, instrumental and operating parameters, as well as analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices. Two important issues are addressed in this part: the first concerns the instrumentation and optimization of instrumental and operating parameters, pointing out (i) the description, benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of nebulization and desolvation devices and the impact of more specific instrumental parameters such as the injector characteristics and the material used for the cone; and, (ii) the optimization of operating parameters, for both ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Even if it is at the margin of this tutorial review

  11. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: A tutorial review. Part I. Theoretical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tutorial review addressed to beginners or more experienced analysts. • Theoretical background of effects caused by organic matrices on ICP techniques. • Spatial distribution of carbon species and analytes in plasma. • Carbon spectroscopic and non-spectroscopic interferences in ICP. - Abstract: Due to their outstanding analytical performances, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are widely used for multi-elemental measurements and also for isotopic characterization in the case of ICP-MS. While most studies are carried out in aqueous matrices, applications involving organic/hydro-organic matrices become increasingly widespread. This kind of matrices is introduced in ICP based instruments when classical “matrix removal” approaches such as acid digestion or extraction procedures cannot be implemented. Due to the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices and their associated effects on instrumentation and analytical performances, their introduction into ICP sources is particularly challenging and has become a full topic. In this framework, numerous theoretical and phenomenological studies of these effects have been performed in the past, mainly by ICP-OES, while recent literature is more focused on applications and associated instrumental developments. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP-OES and ICP-MS. The present Part I, provides theoretical considerations in connection with the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices, in order to better understand the induced phenomena. This focal point is divided in four chapters highlighting: (i) the impact of organic/hydro-organic matrices from aerosol generation to atomization/excitation/ionization processes; (ii) the production of carbon molecular constituents and their spatial distribution in the

  12. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: A tutorial review. Part II. Practical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclercq, Amélie, E-mail: amelie.leclercq@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nonell, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.nonell@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Todolí Torró, José Luis, E-mail: jose.todoli@ua.es [Universidad de Alicante, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatología, Ap. de Correos, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Bresson, Carole, E-mail: carole.bresson@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vio, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vio@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vercouter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.vercouter@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chartier, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.chartier@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-07-23

    Graphical abstract: This tutorial review is dedicated to the analysis of organic/hydro-organic matrices by ICP techniques. A state-of-the-art focusing on sample introduction, relevant operating parameters optimization and analytical strategies for elemental quantification is provided. - Highlights: • Practical considerations to perform analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Description, benefits and drawbacks of recent introduction devices. • Optimization to improve plasma tolerance towards organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Analytical strategies for elemental quantification in organic/hydro-organic matrices. - Abstract: Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are increasingly used to carry out analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. The introduction of such matrices into ICP sources is particularly challenging and can be the cause of numerous drawbacks. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP sources. Part I provided theoretical considerations associated with the physico-chemical properties of such matrices, in an attempt to understand the induced phenomena. Part II of this tutorial review is dedicated to more practical considerations on instrumentation, instrumental and operating parameters, as well as analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices. Two important issues are addressed in this part: the first concerns the instrumentation and optimization of instrumental and operating parameters, pointing out (i) the description, benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of nebulization and desolvation devices and the impact of more specific instrumental parameters such as the injector characteristics and the material used for the cone; and, (ii) the optimization of operating parameters, for both ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Even if it is at the margin of this tutorial review

  13. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: a tutorial review. Part I. Theoretical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-07-23

    Due to their outstanding analytical performances, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are widely used for multi-elemental measurements and also for isotopic characterization in the case of ICP-MS. While most studies are carried out in aqueous matrices, applications involving organic/hydro-organic matrices become increasingly widespread. This kind of matrices is introduced in ICP based instruments when classical "matrix removal" approaches such as acid digestion or extraction procedures cannot be implemented. Due to the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices and their associated effects on instrumentation and analytical performances, their introduction into ICP sources is particularly challenging and has become a full topic. In this framework, numerous theoretical and phenomenological studies of these effects have been performed in the past, mainly by ICP-OES, while recent literature is more focused on applications and associated instrumental developments. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP-OES and ICP-MS. The present Part I, provides theoretical considerations in connection with the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices, in order to better understand the induced phenomena. This focal point is divided in four chapters highlighting: (i) the impact of organic/hydro-organic matrices from aerosol generation to atomization/excitation/ionization processes; (ii) the production of carbon molecular constituents and their spatial distribution in the plasma with respect to analytes repartition; (iii) the subsequent modifications of plasma fundamental properties; and (iv) the resulting spectroscopic and non spectroscopic interferences. This first part of this tutorial review is addressed either to beginners or to more experienced scientists who are interested in the

  14. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: A tutorial review. Part I. Theoretical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclercq, Amélie, E-mail: amelie.leclercq@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nonell, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.nonell@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Todolí Torró, José Luis, E-mail: jose.todoli@ua.es [Universidad de Alicante, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatología, Ap. de Correos, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Bresson, Carole, E-mail: carole.bresson@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vio, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vio@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vercouter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.vercouter@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chartier, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.chartier@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-07-23

    Highlights: • Tutorial review addressed to beginners or more experienced analysts. • Theoretical background of effects caused by organic matrices on ICP techniques. • Spatial distribution of carbon species and analytes in plasma. • Carbon spectroscopic and non-spectroscopic interferences in ICP. - Abstract: Due to their outstanding analytical performances, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are widely used for multi-elemental measurements and also for isotopic characterization in the case of ICP-MS. While most studies are carried out in aqueous matrices, applications involving organic/hydro-organic matrices become increasingly widespread. This kind of matrices is introduced in ICP based instruments when classical “matrix removal” approaches such as acid digestion or extraction procedures cannot be implemented. Due to the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices and their associated effects on instrumentation and analytical performances, their introduction into ICP sources is particularly challenging and has become a full topic. In this framework, numerous theoretical and phenomenological studies of these effects have been performed in the past, mainly by ICP-OES, while recent literature is more focused on applications and associated instrumental developments. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP-OES and ICP-MS. The present Part I, provides theoretical considerations in connection with the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices, in order to better understand the induced phenomena. This focal point is divided in four chapters highlighting: (i) the impact of organic/hydro-organic matrices from aerosol generation to atomization/excitation/ionization processes; (ii) the production of carbon molecular constituents and their spatial distribution in the

  15. Online Determination of Sm, Eu and Yb in Environmental Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dilip Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A procedure was developed for the determination of Sm, Eu and Yb in water samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES after preconcentration on synthesized 5-(4-pyridyl azo-8-quinolinol supported by Borassus flabellifer inflorescence (BFI. The sorbed element was subsequently eluted with 0.4 M HNO3 and the acid eluates were analyzed by ICP-OES. Under the optimal conditions, Sm, Eu and Yb in aqueous samples were concentrated 100-fold. Recoveries were obtained by the proposed method in the range of 98.6 -99.8%. This method was also applied for the analysis of spiked and natural water samples. The results provide strong evidence to support the hypothesis of an adsorption mechanism.

  16. Solid phase microextraction capillary gas chromatography combined with furnace atomization plasma emission spectrometry for speciation of mercury in fish tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinberg, Patricia; Campos, Reinaldo C.; Mester, Zoltan; Sturgeon, Ralph E.

    2003-01-01

    The use of solid phase microextraction in conjunction with tandem gas chromatography-furnace atomization plasma emission spectrometry (SPME-GC-FAPES) was evaluated for the determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in fish tissue. Samples were digested with methanolic potassium hydroxide, derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate and extracted by SPME. After the SPME extraction, species were separated by GC and detected by FAPES. All experimental parameters were optimized for best separation and analytical response. A repeatability precision of typically 2% can be achieved with long-term (3 months) reproducibility precision of 4.3%. Certified Reference Materials DORM-2, DOLT-2 and TORT-2 from the National Research Council of Canada were analyzed to verify the accuracy of this technique. Detection limits of 1.5 ng g -1 for methylmercury and 0.7 ng g -1 for inorganic mercury in biological tissues were obtained

  17. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry analysis of lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium oxides for rare earths impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reino, L.C.P.; Lordello, A.R.

    1990-09-01

    An inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry method is described for the determination of Sm, Eu, La, Gd, Dy, Pr, Ho, Nd, Tb and Y in purified oxides of lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium. The method enables a simple, precise and readily available determination. Dissolution of the samples is achieved with diluted hydrochloric acid (1:1). The solutions are diluted to volume for a concentration of 1mg/ml. The lowest determination limit is 0,01% for most elements and 0,05 or 0,1% for a few rare earths in samarium and gadolinium matrices. Lanthanum, Samarium and Gadolinium concentrates with purity grade of 99,9%, 99,6% and 99,8%, respectively, can be analysed by this procedure. (author)

  18. Proton Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) applied in the environmental sample analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Ion V.; Iordan, M.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Busuioc, G.; Ciupina, V.; Belc, M.; Badica, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the elemental composition of tree leaves using Proton-Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) methods. By PIXE Spectrometry we identified and determined the concentration of S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu Zn, As, Br, Sr and by AAS method the concentration of elements: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd. Pb was identified in only 2 samples from 29. For tree leave samples collected at a large distance to the polluting source the Sr concentration decreased and the Mg, Ca, Se, Zn and Fe concentrations increased. Also, we can observe a small affinity of these leaves for the environmental Pb which was detected for two samples at a small distance to polluting source. (authors)

  19. Glow Discharge Emission Spectrometry (GDOES): Theoretical Introduction, General Aspects, and its Applications within the Framework of the Technofusion Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Rojo, A. B.; Gonzalez, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2013-01-01

    The demand by material research groups for the direct composition analysis of solids is increasing as a solution to the time-consuming problems and errors inherent to classical chemical analysis, where the attack and solubilisation of the starting material is mandatory, often producing the introduction of impurities and component loss of the initial matrix. From the existing solid analysis techniques the present work is focused on the Glow Discharge Emission Spectrometry (GDOES), a fast, simply-executed technique, for which quantitative, high resolution depth profile determination of any element in the periodic table can be performed with a high sensibility and detection limit. The theoretical concepts, the required instrumentation and the basic analytic applications are revised, giving especial attention to the issues related to the analysis of materials for fusion applications. Finally, a comparative study with a more advanced spectroscopic technique (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS)) is performed and the concomitance of both techniques to correct limitations such as the spatial resolution and the quantification of the analysis, important factors that are required in the chemical analysis of the complex materials used in Fusion, is addressed. (Author) 41 refs.

  20. The microwave induced plasma with optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) in 23 elements determination in geological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, P; Kozak, L; Wachelka, M; Jakubowski, K; Wybieralska, J

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the optimisation, validation and application of the microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) dedicated for a routine determination of Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Tl, Zn, in the geological samples. The three procedures of sample preparation has been proposed: sample digestion with the use of hydrofluoric acid for determination of total concentration of elements, extraction by aqua regia for determination of the quasi-total element concentration and extraction by hydrochloric acid solution to determine contents of the elements in acid leachable fraction. The detection limits were on the level 0.001-0.121 mg L(-1) (from 0.010-0.10 to 1.2-12 mg kg(-1) depend on the samples preparation procedure); the precision: 0.20-1.37%; accuracy 85-115% (for recovery for certified standards materials analysis and parallel analysis by independent analytical techniques: X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and flame absorption spectrometry (FAAS)). The conformity of the results obtained by MIP-OES analytical procedures with the results obtained by XRF and FAAS analysis allows to propose the procedures for studies of elemental composition of the fraction of the geological samples. Additionally, the MIP-OES technique is much less expensive than ICP techniques and much less time-consuming than AAS techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Liquid electrode plasma-optical emission spectrometry combined with solid-phase preconcentration for on-site analysis of lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Suman; Rahman, Ismail M M; Alam, Iftakharul; Miyaguchi, Maho; Sawai, Hikaru; Maki, Teruya; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2017-08-15

    A relatively rapid and precise method is presented for the determination of lead in aqueous matrix. The method consists of analyte quantitation using the liquid electrode plasma-optical emission spectrometry (LEP-OES) coupled with selective separation/preconcentration by solid-phase extraction (SPE). The impact of operating variables on the retention of lead in SPEs such as pH, flow rate of the sample solution; type, volume, flow rate of the eluent; and matrix effects were investigated. Selective SPE-separation/preconcentration minimized the interfering effect due to manganese in solution and limitations in lead-detection in low-concentration samples by LEP-OES. The LEP-OES operating parameters such as the electrical conductivity of sample solution; applied voltage; on-time, off-time, pulse count for applied voltage; number of measurements; and matrix effects have also been optimized to obtain a distinct peak for the lead at λ max =405.8nm. The limit of detection (3σ) and the limit of quantification (10σ) for lead determination using the technique were found as 1.9 and 6.5ng mL -1 , respectively. The precision, as relative standard deviation, was lower than 5% at 0.1μg mL -1 Pb, and the preconcentration factor was found to be 187. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of lead contents in the natural aqueous matrix (recovery rate:>95%). The method accuracy was verified using certified reference material of wastewaters: SPS-WW1 and ERM-CA713. The results from LEP-OES were in good agreement with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry measurements of the same samples. The application of the method is rapid (≤5min, without preconcentration) with a reliable detection limit at trace levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A comparison of simultaneous plasma, atomic absorption, and iron colorimetric determinations of major and trace constituents in acid mine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three water samples collected during June to October 1982 from the Leviathan/Bryant Creek drainage basin were originally analyzed by simultaneous multielement direct-current plasma (DCP) atomic-emission spectrometry, flame atomic-absorption spectrometry, graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) (thallium only), ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry.Determinations were made for the following metallic and semi-metallic constituents: AI, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe(11), Fe(total), Li, Pb, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, K, Sb, Se, Si, Na, Sr, TI, V, and Zn. These samples were re-analyzed later by simultaneous multielement inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic-emission spectrometry and Zeeman-corrected GFAAS to determine the concentrations of many of the same constituents with improved accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. The result of this analysis has been the generation of comparative concentration values for a significant subset of the solute constituents. Many of the more recently determined values replace less-than-detection values for the trace metals; others constitute duplicate analyses for the major constituents. The multiple determinations have yielded a more complete, accurate, and precise set of analytical data. They also have resulted in an opportunity to compare the performance of the plasma-emission instruments operated in their respective simultaneous multielement modes. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for Na and K and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for As because of their lower detection limit and relative freedom from interelement spectral effects. Colorimetric determination using ferrozine as the color agent was judged most accurate, precise, and sensitive for Fe. Cadmium, lead, and vanadium concentrations were too low in this set of samples to enable a determination of whether ICP or DCP is a more suitable technique. Of

  3. Quantitative analysis of phosphosilicate glass films on silicon wafers for calibration of x-ray fluorescence spectrometry standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    The phosphorus and silicon contents of phosphosilicate glass films deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on silicon wafers were determined. These films were prepared for use as x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry standards. The thin films were removed from the wafer by etching with dilute hydrofluoric acid, and the P and Si concentrations in solution were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The calculated phosphorus concentration ranged from 2.2 to 12 wt %, with an uncertainty of 2.73 to 10.1 relative percent. Variation between the calculated weight loss (summation of P 2 O 5 and SiO 2 amounts as determined by ICP) and the measured weight loss (determined gravimetrically) averaged 4.9%. Results from the ICP method, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dispersive infrared spectroscopy, electron microprobe, and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for the same samples are compared

  4. Determination of rare-earth elements content in granitic rocks by argon plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merodio, J.C.; Martinez, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed that enables the rare-earth elements in granitic rocks to be measured sequentially, using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source spectrometer with medium spectral resolution (0,02nm). The rocks were dissolved in an open system with a mixture of nitric-hydrofluoric-perchloric acids. Any residues remaining at this stage were removed by filtration and digested using a mini-fusion method with lithium tetraborate. Prior to the excitation in the spectrometer the rare-earth group was separated from other constituents using cation-exchange chromatography. A detailed study of spectral interferences and the evaluation of the detection limits have been performed. Five geochemical reference sample (granitic rocks) were analyzed and the obtained results agree favourably with recommended values and with reported determinations, using high spectral resolution ICP spectrometry. (Author) [es

  5. Metal carbonyl vapor generation coupled with dielectric barrier discharge to avoid plasma quench for optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Li, Shao-Hua; Dou, Shuai; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-20

    The scope of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) microplasma as a radiation source for optical emission spectrometry (OES) is extended by nickel carbonyl vapor generation. We proved that metal carbonyl completely avoids the extinguishing of plasma, and it is much more suitable for matching the DBD excitation and OES detection with respect to significant DBD quenching by concomitant hydrogen when hydride generation is used. A concentric quartz UV reactor allows sample solution to flow through the central channel wherein to efficiently receive the uniformly distributed UV irradiation in the confined cylindrical space between the concentric tubes, which facilitates effective carbonyl generation in a nickel solution. The carbonyl is transferred into the DBD excitation chamber by an argon stream for nickel excitation, and the characteristic emission of nickel at 232.0 nm is detected by a charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. A 1.0 mL sample solution results in a linear range of 5-100 μg L(-1) along with a detection limit of 1.3 μg L(-1) and a precision of 2.4% RSD at 50 μg L(-1). The present DBD-OES system is validated by nickel in certified reference materials.

  6. Direct determination of sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium in biodiesel fuel by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dancsak, Stacia E. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Silva, Sidnei G.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Jones, Bradley T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Donati, George L., E-mail: georgedonati@yahoo.com.br [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States)

    2014-01-02

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Direct analysis of biodiesel on a tungsten coil atomizer. •Determination of Na, K, Cr and V by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry. •Sample dilution with methanol or ethanol. •Ten-microliter sample aliquots and limits of detection between 20 and 90 μg kg{sup −1}. •Low consumption of reagents, samples and gases in a 140 s per run procedure. -- Abstract: High levels of sodium and potassium can be present in biodiesel fuel and contribute to corrosion, reduced performance and shorter engine lifetime. On the other hand, trace amounts of chromium and vanadium can increase the emission of pollutants during biodiesel combustion. Sample viscosity, immiscibility with aqueous solutions and high carbon content can compromise biodiesel analyzes. In this work, tungsten filaments extracted from microscope light bulbs are used to successively decompose biodiesel's organic matrix, and atomize and excite the analytes to determine sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in methanol or ethanol is required. Direct analysis of 10-μL sample aliquots using heating cycles with less than 150 s results in limits of detection (LOD) as low as 20, 70, 70 and 90 μg kg{sup −1} for Na, K, Cr and V, respectively. The procedure's accuracy is checked by determining Na and K in a biodiesel reference sample and carrying out spike experiments for Cr and V. No statistically significant differences were observed between reference and determined values for all analytes at a 95% confidence level. The procedure was applied to three different biodiesel samples and concentrations between 6.08 and 95.6 mg kg{sup −1} for Na and K, and between 0.22 and 0.43 mg kg{sup −1} for V were obtained. The procedure is simple, fast and environmentally friendly. Small volumes of reagents, samples and gases are used and no residues are generated

  7. Direct determination of sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium in biodiesel fuel by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dancsak, Stacia E.; Silva, Sidnei G.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Jones, Bradley T.; Donati, George L.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Direct analysis of biodiesel on a tungsten coil atomizer. •Determination of Na, K, Cr and V by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry. •Sample dilution with methanol or ethanol. •Ten-microliter sample aliquots and limits of detection between 20 and 90 μg kg −1 . •Low consumption of reagents, samples and gases in a 140 s per run procedure. -- Abstract: High levels of sodium and potassium can be present in biodiesel fuel and contribute to corrosion, reduced performance and shorter engine lifetime. On the other hand, trace amounts of chromium and vanadium can increase the emission of pollutants during biodiesel combustion. Sample viscosity, immiscibility with aqueous solutions and high carbon content can compromise biodiesel analyzes. In this work, tungsten filaments extracted from microscope light bulbs are used to successively decompose biodiesel's organic matrix, and atomize and excite the analytes to determine sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in methanol or ethanol is required. Direct analysis of 10-μL sample aliquots using heating cycles with less than 150 s results in limits of detection (LOD) as low as 20, 70, 70 and 90 μg kg −1 for Na, K, Cr and V, respectively. The procedure's accuracy is checked by determining Na and K in a biodiesel reference sample and carrying out spike experiments for Cr and V. No statistically significant differences were observed between reference and determined values for all analytes at a 95% confidence level. The procedure was applied to three different biodiesel samples and concentrations between 6.08 and 95.6 mg kg −1 for Na and K, and between 0.22 and 0.43 mg kg −1 for V were obtained. The procedure is simple, fast and environmentally friendly. Small volumes of reagents, samples and gases are used and no residues are generated. Powers of detection are

  8. Flame emission spectrometry using atomic absorption apparatus. I. Determination of Sr in sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, S.; Yoshimura, E.; Hamachi, M.; Haraguchi, H.; Dokiya, Y.; Fuwa, K.

    1976-01-01

    Flame emission determination of Sr in seawater was studied using an ordinary atomic absorption apparatus. The analytical line 4607 A was used with a background correction at 4616 A. The ionization was negligible in an air acetylene flame with seawater, and the interference of H 2 SO 4 was eliminated using the higher part of the flame. Sr concentration of seawater of Tokyo Bay and Sagami Bay has been determined

  9. Comparison in the analytical performance between krypton and argon glow discharge plasmas as the excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2009-04-01

    The emission characteristics of ionic lines of nickel, cobalt, and vanadium were investigated when argon or krypton was employed as the plasma gas in glow discharge optical emission spectrometry. A dc Grimm-style lamp was employed as the excitation source. Detection limits of the ionic lines in each iron-matrix alloy sample were compared between the krypton and the argon plasmas. Particular intense ionic lines were observed in the emission spectra as a function of the discharge gas (krypton or argon), such as the Co II 258.033 nm for krypton and the Co II 231.707 nm for argon. The explanation for this is that collisions with the plasma gases dominantly populate particular excited levels of cobalt ion, which can receive the internal energy from each gas ion selectively, for example, the 3d(7)4p (3)G(5) (6.0201 eV) for krypton and the 3d(7)4p (3)G(4) (8.0779 eV) for argon. In the determination of nickel as well as cobalt in iron-matrix samples, more sensitive ionic lines could be found in the krypton plasma rather than the argon plasma. Detection limits in the krypton plasma were 0.0039 mass% Ni for the Ni II 230.299-nm line and 0.002 mass% Co for the Co II 258.033-nm line. However, in the determination of vanadium, the argon plasma had better analytical performance, giving a detection limit of 0.0023 mass% V for the V II 309.310-nm line.

  10. Quenching of the OH and nitrogen molecular emission by methane addition in an Ar capacitively coupled plasma to remove spectral interference in lead determination by atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentiu, T., E-mail: ftibi@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ponta, M., E-mail: mponta@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Mihaltan, A.I., E-mail: alinblaj2005@yahoo.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Darvasi, E., E-mail: edarvasi@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Frentiu, M., E-mail: frentiu.maria@yahoo.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordos, E., E-mail: emilcordos@gmail.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2010-07-15

    A new method is proposed to remove the spectral interference on elements in atomic fluorescence spectrometry by quenching of the molecular emission of the OH radical (A{sup 2{Sigma}+} {yields} X{sup 2{Pi}}) and N{sub 2} second positive system (C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} {yields} B{sup 3{Sigma}}{sub g}) in the background spectrum of medium power Ar plasmas. The experiments were carried out in a radiofrequency capacitively coupled plasma (275 W, 27.12 MHz) by CH{sub 4} addition. The quenching is the result of the high affinity of OH radical for a hydrogen atom from the CH{sub 4} molecule and the collisions of the second kind between nitrogen excited molecules and CH{sub 4}, respectively. The decrease of the emission of N{sub 2} second positive system in the presence of CH{sub 4} is also the result of the deactivation of the metastable argon atoms that could excite the nitrogen molecules. For flow rates of 0.7 l min{sup -1} Ar with addition of 7.5 ml min{sup -1} CH{sub 4}, the molecular emission of OH and N{sub 2} was completely removed from the plasma jet spectrum at viewing heights above 60 mm. The molecular emission associated to CH and CH{sub 2} species was not observed in the emission spectrum of Ar/CH{sub 4} plasma in the ultraviolet range. The method was experimented for the determination of Pb at 283.31 nm by atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrodeless discharge lamp and a multichannel microspectrometer. The detection limit was 35 ng ml{sup -1}, 2-3 times better than in atomic emission spectrometry using the same plasma source, and similar to that in hollow cathode lamp microwave plasma torch atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  11. Development of multilayer optics for X-ray broadband spectrometry of plasma emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emprin, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Within the framework of the research on inertial confinement fusion, the 'Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives' has studied and implemented an absolute calibrated time-Resolved broadband soft x-Ray spectrometer, called 'Diagnostic de Mesure du rayonnement X'. This diagnostic, composed of 20 measurement channels, measures the emitted radiant power from a laser created plasma in the range from 50 eV to 20 keV. We have developed additional measurement channels to obtain redundancy and an improvement in measurement accuracy. The principle of these new channels is based on an original concept to obtain spectral bounded flat-Responses. Two channels have been developed for the 2 - 4 keV and 4 - 6 keV spectral ranges, using aperiodic multilayer mirrors made at the 'Laboratoire Charles Fabry' with Cr/Sc and Ni/W/SiC/W layers respectively. These mirrors were characterized at synchrotron radiation facilities and integrated into the spectrometer. The two new channels were used during laser-Plasma experimental campaigns at the OMEGA laser facility in Rochester (USA). This allowed us to determine directly the radiant power with only one measurement within a certain spectral band, and with a better precision when compared with using standard channels. The results, in good agreement with the standard measurement channels, allowed us to validate the use of aperiodic multilayer mirrors for X-Ray broadband spectrometry. (author) [fr

  12. Trace metal analysis of road dust by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, M.J.; Liu, L.; Gnanalingham, N.; Peters, L.

    2000-01-01

    Dust from roads in an air impingement zone close to anthropogenic sources of air pollutants can be a concern for people living in the immediate vicinity. The Ministry of the Environment (MOE) has conducted a case study to monitor the concentration of uranium, strontium, thorium and arsenic in road dust from one such area. A method for the analysis of road dust by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been developed with detection limits in the ng/1 range. A digestion technique has been developed by conducting experiments using single and combinations of acids in open-vessel wet digestions. Accuracy has been determined by the use of matrix representative certified reference materials (CRMs). Digestion precision was determined by elemental concentration measurements of the most representative CRM through replicates. Spike recovery data were from 95% to 110% for all elements, and inter-method comparison studies between hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and ICP-MS for arsenic and strontium show good agreement. (author)

  13. Determination of boron in waters by using methyl borate generation and flame atomic-emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, J.R.; Mir, J.M.; Martinez, C.; Bendicho, C.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method is proposed for the determination of boron in waters. The esterification reaction between boric acid and methanol in a concentrated sulphuric acid medium and the vaporisation of the methyl borate formed (boiling-point, 68 C) are used in the determination by boron by measuring the emission of the BO 2 radical at 548 nm. This reaction is carried out in a simple and inexpensive generator, designed for this purpose, and the heat developed in it causes the rapid volatilisation of the methyl borate. Thus no collection systems or carrier gas are required. The proposed method gives an improved detection limit and it can be applied to the determination of boron in water samples. It is both rapid and highly selective. (author)

  14. Simultaneous determination of macronutrients, micronutrients and trace elements in mineral fertilizers by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Souza, Sidnei; da Costa, Silvânio Silvério Lopes; Santos, Dayane Melo; dos Santos Pinto, Jéssica; Garcia, Carlos Alexandre Borges; Alves, José do Patrocínio Hora; Araujo, Rennan Geovanny Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    An analytical method for simultaneous determination of macronutrients (Ca, Mg, Na and P), micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) and trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Pb and V) in mineral fertilizers was optimized. Two-level full factorial design was applied to evaluate the optimal proportions of reagents used in the sample digestion on hot plate. A Doehlert design for two variables was used to evaluate the operating conditions of the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer in order to accomplish the simultaneous determination of the analyte concentrations. The limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 2.0 mg kg- 1 for Mn to 77.3 mg kg- 1 for P. The accuracy and precision of the proposed method were evaluated by analysis of standard reference materials (SRMs) of Western phosphate rock (NIST 694), Florida phosphate rock (NIST 120C) and Trace elements in multi-nutrient fertilizer (NIST 695), considered to be adequate for simultaneous determination. Twenty-one samples of mineral fertilizers collected in Sergipe State, Brazil, were analyzed. For all samples, the As, Ca, Cd and Pb concentrations were below the LOQ values of the analytical method. For As, Cd and Pb the obtained LOQ values were below the maximum limit allowed by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento - MAPA). The optimized method presented good accuracy and was effectively applied to quantitative simultaneous determination of the analytes in mineral fertilizers by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES).

  15. Simultaneous determination of macronutrients, micronutrients and trace elements in mineral fertilizers by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Souza, Sidnei de; Silvério Lopes da Costa, Silvânio; Santos, Dayane Melo; Santos Pinto, Jéssica dos; Garcia, Carlos Alexandre Borges

    2014-01-01

    An analytical method for simultaneous determination of macronutrients (Ca, Mg, Na and P), micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) and trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Pb and V) in mineral fertilizers was optimized. Two-level full factorial design was applied to evaluate the optimal proportions of reagents used in the sample digestion on hot plate. A Doehlert design for two variables was used to evaluate the operating conditions of the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer in order to accomplish the simultaneous determination of the analyte concentrations. The limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 2.0 mg kg −1 for Mn to 77.3 mg kg −1 for P. The accuracy and precision of the proposed method were evaluated by analysis of standard reference materials (SRMs) of Western phosphate rock (NIST 694), Florida phosphate rock (NIST 120C) and Trace elements in multi-nutrient fertilizer (NIST 695), considered to be adequate for simultaneous determination. Twenty-one samples of mineral fertilizers collected in Sergipe State, Brazil, were analyzed. For all samples, the As, Ca, Cd and Pb concentrations were below the LOQ values of the analytical method. For As, Cd and Pb the obtained LOQ values were below the maximum limit allowed by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento — MAPA). The optimized method presented good accuracy and was effectively applied to quantitative simultaneous determination of the analytes in mineral fertilizers by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). - Highlights: • Determination of inorganic constituents in mineral fertilizers was proposed. • Experimental design methodology was used to optimize analytical method. • The sample preparation procedure using diluted reagents (HNO 3 and H 2 O 2 ) was employed. • The analytical method was satisfactorily to the determination of thirteen elements. • The ICP OES technique can be

  16. On-line preconcentration and determination of chromium in parenteral solutions by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, R.A.; Cerutti, S.; Gasquez, J.A.; Olsina, R.A.; Martinez, L.D.

    2005-01-01

    A method for the preconcentration and speciation of chromium was developed. On-line preconcentration and determination were obtained using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) coupled with flow injection. To determinate the chromium (III) present in parenteral solutions, chromium was retained on activated carbon at pH 5.0. On the other hand, a step of reduction was necessary in order to determine total chromium content. The Cr(VI) concentration was then determined by difference between the total chromium concentration and that of Cr(III). A sensitivity enrichment factor of 70-fold was obtained with respect to the chromium determination by ICP-OES without preconcentration. The detection limit for the preconcentration of 25 ml of sample was 29 ng l -1 . The precision for the 10 replicate determinations at the 5 μg l -1 Cr level was 2.3% relative standard deviation, calculated with the peak heights. The calibration graph using the preconcentration method for chromium species was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 60 μg l -1 . The method can be applied to the determination and speciation of chromium in parenteral solutions

  17. Preconcentration of heavy metals on activated carbon and their determination in fruits by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Barbara; Mikula, Barbara

    2014-03-15

    A method of separation and preconcentration of cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc at trace level using activated carbon is proposed. Activated carbon with the adsorbed trace metals was mineralised using a high-pressure microwave mineraliser. The heavy metals were determined after preconcentration by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The influence of several parameters, such as pH, sorbent mass, shaking time was examined. Moreover, effects of inorganic matrix on recovery of the determined elements were studied. The experiment shows that foreign ions did not influence recovery of the determined elements. The detection limits (DL) of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were 0.17, 0.19, 1.60, 2.60, 0.92 and 1.50 μg L(-)(1), respectively. The recovery of the method for the determined elements was better than 95% with relative standard deviation from 1.3% to 3.7%. The preconcentration factor was 80. The proposed method was applied for determination of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in fruits materials. Accuracy of the proposed method was verified using certified reference material (NCS ZC85006 Tomato). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Mihaltan, Alin I.; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Use of a miniaturized analytical system with microtorch plasma for Hg determination. → Determination of Hg in non- and biodegradable materials using cold vapor generation. → Figures of merit and advantages of the miniaturized system for Hg determination. - Abstract: A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min -1 Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl 2 reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO 3 -H 2 SO 4 mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml -1 or 0.08 μg g -1 in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg -1 , while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 ± 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  19. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Mihaltan, Alin I; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2011-10-15

    A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min(-1) Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl(2) reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4) mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml(-1) or 0.08 μg g(-1) in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg(-1), while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 ± 4.5% (95% confidence level). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu, E-mail: ftibi@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Mihaltan, Alin I., E-mail: alinblaj2005@yahoo.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ponta, Michaela, E-mail: mponta@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Darvasi, Eugen, E-mail: edarvasi@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Frentiu, Maria, E-mail: frentiu.maria@yahoo.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordos, Emil, E-mail: emilcordos@gmail.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Use of a miniaturized analytical system with microtorch plasma for Hg determination. {yields} Determination of Hg in non- and biodegradable materials using cold vapor generation. {yields} Figures of merit and advantages of the miniaturized system for Hg determination. - Abstract: A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min{sup -1} Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl{sub 2} reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml{sup -1} or 0.08 {mu}g g{sup -1} in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg{sup -1}, while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 {+-} 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  1. Nanometric resolution in glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry depth profiling of metal (Cr, Al) nitride multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Galindo, R.; Gago, R.; Fornies, E.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Climent Font, A.; Albella, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we address the capability of glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) for fast and accurate depth profiling of multilayer nitride coatings down to the nanometer range. This is shown by resolving the particular case of CrN/AlN structures with individual thickness ranging from hundreds to few nanometers. In order to discriminate and identify artefacts in the GDOES depth profile due to the sputtering process, the layered structures were verified by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfaces in the GDOES profiles for CrN/AlN structures are sharper than the ones measured for similar metal multilayers due to the lower sputtering rate of the nitrides. However, as a consequence of the crater shape, there is a linear degradation of the depth resolution with depth (approximately 40 nm/μm), saturating at a value of approximately half the thickness of the thinner layer. This limit is imposed by the simultaneous sputtering of consecutive layers. The ultimate GDOES depth resolution at the near surface region was estimated to be of 4-6 nm

  2. Possibilities of High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry in the Determination of Trace Elements in Environmental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaya Velitchkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new quantitative data for the spectral interferences obtained by high resolution 40.68 MHz radial viewing inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (HR-ICP-OES in the determination of Zn, Cd, Sb, Cu, Mn, Pb, Sn, Cr, U, and Ba in environmental materials in the presence of a complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Ti. The -concept for quantification of spectral interferences was used. The optimum line selection for trace analysis of a variety of multicomponent matrices requires the choice of prominent lines, which are free or negligibly influenced by line interference problems. The versatility of -concept as basic methodology was experimentally demonstrated in the determination of trace of elements in soil and drinking water. The detection limits are lower in comparison with corresponding threshold concentration levels for soil and drinking water in accordance with environmental regulations. This paper shows the possibilities of present day ICP-OES equipment in the direct determination of trace elements (without preconcentration of impurities in environmental samples.

  3. On-line system for preconcentration and determination of metals in vegetables by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Marcos A.; Santos, Walter N.L. dos; Lemos, Valfredo A.; Korn, Maria das Gracas A.; Ferreira, Sergio L.C.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for the simultaneous determination of trace amounts of cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel and lead in digested vegetable samples. The method involves solid-phase extraction of the metals using a minicolumn of Amberlite XAD-4 modified with dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and detection by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). The elution of the metals from minicolumn was performed with 1.0 mol L -1 hydrochloric acid. Variables associated with flow preconcentration system performance, such as pH, buffer concentration, eluent concentration and sampling flow rate, were optimized. The developed procedure provides enrichment factors of 100, 72, 16, 91 and 53, for cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel and lead, respectively. Detection limits (3σ B ) were 0.02 (Cd), 0.23 (Cu), 0.58 (Cr), 0.060 (Ni) and 0.54 (Pb) μg L -1 . The procedure was applied for determination of metals in samples of guarana and cabbage. The accuracy of the method was checked by the analysis of a certified reference material (NIST 1571, Orchard leaves). Results found were in agreement with certified values

  4. Internal standardization in atomic-emission spectrometry using inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The principle of internal standardization has been used in quantitative analytical emission spectroscopy since 1925 to minimize the errors arising from fluctuations in sample preparation, excitation-source conditions, and detection parameters. Although modern spectroscopic excitation sources are far more stable and electronic detection methods are more precise than before, the system for the introduction of the sample in spectrometric analysis using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) introduces significant errors, and internal standardization can still play a useful role in improving the overall precision of the analytical results. The criteria for the selection of the elements to be used as internal standards in arc and spark spectrographic analysis apply to a much lesser extent in ICP-spectrometric analysis. Internal standardization is recommended for use in routine ICP-simultaneous spectrometric analysis to improve its accuracy and precision and to provide a monitor for the reassurance of the analyst. However, the selection of an unsuitable reference element can result in misuse of the principle of internal standardization and, although internal standardization can be applied when a sequential monochromator is used, the main sources of error will not be minimized

  5. Rapid determination of uranium in natural waters by fthermal emission mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.R.; Caylor, J.D.; Rogers, E.R.; Cole, S.H.

    1977-03-01

    A method has been developed to rapidly analyze natural water samples for part-per-trillion (ng/l) concentrations of uranium using a custom-built thermal-emission mass spectrometer. The filtered water sample is spiked with 233 U as an internal standard and extracted with a 2 percent solution of TOPO (trioctylphosphine oxide) in carbon tetrachloride. An aliquot of the organic phase is evaporated and the uranium in the residue extracted with aqueous ammonium carbonate. A 5j-μl aliquot is taken and dried on a flat uranium concentration of 3 ng/l will yield a count rate greater than three times the standard deviation, plus the mean of the background, and is defined as the lowest determinable concentration. The standard deviation of the method is 3 percent at accuracy of the method has been evaluated by comparing the results with a fluorescence procedure. There is very good agreement for water samples with uranium concentrations from 200 to 1000 ng/l. The mass spectrometer is a 6-in. -radius, 60-degree-sector instrument equipped for ion counting and having a vacuum system allowing rapid sample changing while maintaining a high source vacuum. A multiplexer and high-voltage s witch provide synchronized peak switching and scaler gating for monitoring three isotopes of uranium 238, 235, and 233. With this instrument, an analyst can achieve an analysis rate in excess of 50 samples per eight-hour shift

  6. Spectrometry and emission tomographic image reconstruction stimulated by neutrons via EM algorithm and Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, Rodrigo Sartorelo Salemi

    2014-01-01

    The NSECT (Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography) figures as a new spectrographic technique able to evaluate in vivo the concentration of elements using the inelastic scattering reaction (n,n'). Since its introduction, several improvements have been proposed with the aim of investigating applications for clinical diagnosis and reduction of absorbed dose associated with CT acquisition. In this context, two new diagnostic applications are presented using spectroscopic and tomographic approaches from NSECT. A new methodology has also been proposed to optimize the sinogram sampling that is directly related to the quality of the reconstruction by the irradiation protocol. The studies were developed based on simulations with MCNP5 code. Diagnosis of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and the detection of breast microcalcifications were evaluated in studies conducted using a human phantom. The obtained results demonstrate the ability of the NSECT technique to detect changes in the composition of the modeled tissues as a function of the development of evaluated pathologies. The proposed method for optimizing sinograms was able to analytically simulate the composition of the irradiated medium allowing the assessment of quality of reconstruction and effective dose in terms of the sampling rate. However, future research must be conducted to quantify the sensitivity of detection according to the selected elements. (author)

  7. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Marcos S. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Schenk, Emily R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Santos, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Professor Arthur Riedel 275, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Almirall, José R., E-mail: almirall@fiu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K but were generally below 6 mg kg{sup −1} for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ∼ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ∼ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis. - Highlights: • An evaluation of LA-ICP-OES for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. • Orange citrus, soy and sugarcane plants were pressed into pellets and sampled directly. • The element menu consisted of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B. • LODs for the method ranged from 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K. • The precision ranged from 4% RSD for Mn to 17% RSD for Zn (∼ 6.5% RSD average)

  8. Partial microwave-assisted wet digestion of animal tissue using a baby-bottle sterilizer for analyte determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Wladiana O.; Menezes, Eveline A.; Gonzalez, Mario H.; Costa, Leticia M.; Trevizan, Lilian C.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.

    2009-01-01

    A procedure for partial digestion of bovine tissue is proposed using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) micro-vessels inside a baby-bottle sterilizer under microwave radiation for multi-element determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Samples were directly weighed in laboratory-made polytetrafluoroethylene vessels. Nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide were added to the uncovered vessels, which were positioned inside the baby-bottle sterilizer, containing 500 mL of water. The hydrogen peroxide volume was fixed at 100 μL. The system was placed in a domestic microwave oven and partial digestion was carried out for the determination of Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The single-vessel approach was used in the entire procedure, to minimize contamination in trace analysis. Better recoveries and lower residual carbon content (RCC) levels were obtained under the conditions established through a 2 4-1 fractional factorial design: 650 W microwave power, 7 min digestion time, 50 μL nitric acid and 50 mg sample mass. The digestion efficiency was ascertained according to the residual carbon content determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was checked against two certified reference materials.

  9. Effects of airflow on odorants' emissions in a model pig house — A laboratory study using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Chayan Kumer; Feilberg, Anders; Zhang, Guoqiang; Adamsen, Anders Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Identification of different factors that affect emissions of gasses, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is necessary to develop emission abatement technology. The objectives of this research were to quantify and study temporal variation of gas emissions from a model pig house under varying ventilation rates. The used model was a 1:12.5 scale of a section of a commercial finishing pig house. The VOC concentrations at inlet, outlet, and slurry pit of the model space were measured using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). PTR-MS can measure the temporal variations of odor compounds' emission from the slurry pit in real time. The emissions of H 2 S and 14 VOCs were lower compared to real pig buildings except for ammonia, which indicated possible other sources of those compounds than the slurry in the slurry pit. The ventilation rate affected significantly on ammonia and trimethylamine emission (p 2 S) emission was independent of the ventilation rate. VFAs' emission dependency on ventilation rate increased with the increase of carbon chain. Phenols, indoles and ketones showed the positive correlation with ventilation rate to some extent. Generally, compounds with high solubility (low Henry's constant) showed stronger correlation with ventilation rates than the compounds with high Henry's constant.

  10. Macro- and micro-element analysis in milk samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Sanja M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the determination of Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Tl and Zn, as well as total fat content of milk samples, originated from different sources. The analyzed milk samples were: human milk, fresh cow milk, pasteurized cow milk from a local market, and reconstituted powder milk. The milk samples were obtained from Jablanica District (Serbia territory. Preparation of samples for macro- and micro-analyses was done by wet digestion. Concentrations of the elements after digestion were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. Total fat content of milk samples was determinate by the Weibull and Stoldt method. The results showed that potassium and calcium concentrations were the highest in all samples: 1840.64 - 2993.26 mg/L and 456.05 - 1318.08 mg/L, respectively. Of all heavy metals from the examined milk samples (copper, zinc, manganese, nickel, cadmium, and lead, the most common were zinc and copper, with approximately similar content in the range of 5 - 12 mg/l, while cadmium nickel and manganese were not detected at all. Samples of fresh cow milk and human milk showed the highest fat content of 3.6 and 4.2 %, respectively. Results for total fat and macro- and micro-analyses showed that fresh cow milk has the highest contents of fat and calcium, making it the most nutritious. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34012

  11. Trace element determination using static high-sensitivity inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (SHIP-OES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, Carsten; Scheffer, Andy; Nowak, Sascha; Vielhaber, Torsten; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2007-02-05

    A low-flow air-cooled inductively coupled plasma (ICP) design for optical emission spectrometry (OES) with axial plasma viewing is described and an evaluation of its analytical capabilities in trace element determinations is presented. Main advantage is a total argon consumption of 0.6 L min(-1) in contrast to 15 L min(-1) using conventional ICP sources. The torch was evaluated in trace element determinations and studied in direct comparison with a conventional torch under the same conditions with the same OES system, ultrasonic nebulization (USN) and single-element optimization. A variety of parameters (x-y-position of the torch, rf power, external air cooling, gas flow rates and USN operation parameters) was optimized to achieve limits of detection (LOD) which are competitive to those of a conventional plasma source. Ionic to atomic line intensity ratios for magnesium were studied at different radio frequency (rf) power conditions and different sample carrier gas flows to characterize the robustness of the excitation source. A linear dynamic range of three to five orders of magnitude was determined under compromise conditions in multi-element mode. The accuracy of the system was investigated by the determination of Co, Cr, Mn, Zn in two certified reference materials (CRM): CRM 075c (Copper with added impurities), and CRM 281 (Trace elements in rye grass). With standard addition values of 2.44+/-0.04 and 3.19+/-0.21 microg g(-1) for Co and Mn in the CRM 075c and 2.32+/-0.09, 81.8+/-0.4, 32.2+/-3.9 for Cr, Mn and Zn, respectively, were determined in the samples and found to be in good agreement with the reported values; recovery rates in the 98-108% range were obtained. No influence on the analysis by the matrix load in the sample was observed.

  12. Determination of lead in bone tissues by axially viewed inductively coupled plasma multichannel-based emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotti, Marco; Abelmoschi, Maria Luisa; Dalla Riva, Simona; Soggia, Francesco; Frache, Roberto

    2005-04-01

    A new procedure for determining low levels of lead in bone tissues has been developed. After wet acid digestion in a pressurized microwave-heated system, the solution was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma multichannel-based emission spectrometry. Internal standardization using the Co 228.615 nm reference line was chosen as the optimal method to compensate for the matrix effects from the presence of calcium and nitric acid at high concentration levels. The detection limit of the procedure was 0.11 microg Pb g(-1) dry mass. Instrumental precision at the analytical concentration of approximately 10 microg l(-1) ranged from 6.1 to 9.4%. Precision of the sample preparation step was 5.4%. The concentration of lead in SRM 1486 (1.32+/-0.04 microg g(-1)) found using the new procedure was in excellent agreement with the certified level (1.335+/-0.014 microg g(-1)). Finally, the method was applied to determine the lead in various fish bone tissues, and the analytical results were found to be in good agreement with those obtained through differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. The method is therefore suitable for the reliable determination of lead at concentration levels of below 1 microg g(-1) in bone samples. Moreover, the multi-element capability of the technique allows us to simultaneously determine other major or trace elements in order to investigate inter-element correlation and to compute enrichment factors, making the proposed procedure particularly useful for investigating lead occurrence and pathways in fish bone tissues in order to find suitable biomarkers for the Antarctic marine environment.

  13. Direct multielement trace analyses of silicon carbide powders by spark ablation simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiera, Arne F.; Schmidt-Lehr, Sebastian; Song, Ming; Bings, Nicolas H.; Broekaert, Jose A.C.

    2008-01-01

    A procedure for the direct analysis of silicon carbide powders (SiC) by simultaneous detection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using a Spectro-CIROS TM spectrometer (CCD-ICP-OES) and a novel spark ablation system Spectro-SASSy (SA) as sample introduction technique is described. The sample preparation procedure for SA of non-conducting material is based on mixing the sample powders with a conducting matrix, in this case copper and briquetting pellets. Pressing time, pressure and mixing ratio are shown to be important parameters of the pelleting technique with respect to their mechanical stability for the reliability of the analysis results. A mixing ratio of 0.2 g +0.6 g for SiC and Cu, a pressure of 10 t cm -2 and a pressing time of 8 min have been found optimum. It has also been shown that the spark parameters selected are crucial for uniform volatilization. Electron probe micrographs of the burning spots and the analytical signal magnitude showed that a rather hard spark at 100 Hz was optimum. The determination of trace elements in silicon carbide powders is demonstrated using a calibration based on the addition of standard solutions. For Al, Ti, V, Mn and Fe detection limits in the lower μg g -1 range can be achieved. Internal standardization with Y in combination with the addition of standard solutions allows relative standard deviations in the range of 4 to 24% for concentration levels of the order of 3 to 350 μg g -1

  14. Direct multielement trace analyses of silicon carbide powders by spark ablation simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiera, Arne F.; Schmidt-Lehr, Sebastian; Song, Ming [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Bings, Nicolas H. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: bings@chemie.uni-hamburg.de; Broekaert, Jose A.C. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    A procedure for the direct analysis of silicon carbide powders (SiC) by simultaneous detection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using a Spectro-CIROS{sup TM} spectrometer (CCD-ICP-OES) and a novel spark ablation system Spectro-SASSy (SA) as sample introduction technique is described. The sample preparation procedure for SA of non-conducting material is based on mixing the sample powders with a conducting matrix, in this case copper and briquetting pellets. Pressing time, pressure and mixing ratio are shown to be important parameters of the pelleting technique with respect to their mechanical stability for the reliability of the analysis results. A mixing ratio of 0.2 g +0.6 g for SiC and Cu, a pressure of 10 t cm{sup -2} and a pressing time of 8 min have been found optimum. It has also been shown that the spark parameters selected are crucial for uniform volatilization. Electron probe micrographs of the burning spots and the analytical signal magnitude showed that a rather hard spark at 100 Hz was optimum. The determination of trace elements in silicon carbide powders is demonstrated using a calibration based on the addition of standard solutions. For Al, Ti, V, Mn and Fe detection limits in the lower {mu}g g{sup -1} range can be achieved. Internal standardization with Y in combination with the addition of standard solutions allows relative standard deviations in the range of 4 to 24% for concentration levels of the order of 3 to 350 {mu}g g{sup -1}.

  15. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 136 - Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometric Method for Trace Element Analysis of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., distilled water and dilute to 1,000 mL. 7.3.20Silica solution, stock, 1 mL=100 µg SiO2: Do not dry. Dissolve... Molybdenum 202.030 8 Nickel 231.604 15 Potassium 766.491 3 Selenium 196.026 75 Silica (SiO2) 288.158 58... filtered through a 0.45-µm membrane filter as soon as practical after collection. (Glass or plastic...

  16. An inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) determination of boron and other trace impurities in aluminium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.S.; Patil, P.B.; Karanjikar, N.P.

    2002-01-01

    The optimisation and use of ICP-AES technique for the analysis of aluminium metal for B, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Si, Ti, V and Zn in the concentration range 5.0 to 50.0 ppm is described. The method involves the dissolution of aluminium metal in acqua-regia. The matrix aluminium solution (2mg/ml) is mixed with composite impurity solution in proper proportions, for getting the required set of standards. JY 1 metre Czerny-Turner Scanning monochromator is used to measure peak intensities corresponding to each analyte wavelength selected. The mean relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method for various elements is found to be 4.0% -2.0% in the concentration range studied. (author)

  17. Cobalt as chemical modifier to improve chromium sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sidnei G. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil); Donati, George L., E-mail: georgedonati@yahoo.com.br [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Santos, Luana N. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil); Jones, Bradley T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Nóbrega, Joaquim A. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2013-05-30

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Charge transfer reactions increase the population of Cr{sup +}. •Chromium ions and electrons recombine to form excited-state Cr atoms. •A 10-fold improvement in LOD is observed for Cr emission measurements. •The two-step ionization/excitation mechanism improves sensitivity and accuracy. •High concentrations of Co also minimize matrix effects. -- Abstract: Cobalt is used as chemical modifier to improve sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in Cr determinations by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). The atomizer is a tungsten filament extracted from microscope light bulbs. A solid-state power supply and a handheld CCD-based spectrometer are also used in the instrumental setup. In the presence of 1000 mg L{sup −1} Co, WCAES limit of detection for Cr (λ = 425.4 nm) is calculated as 0.070 mg L{sup −1}; a 10-fold improvement compared to determinations without Co modifier. The mechanism involved in such signal enhancement is similar to the one observed in ICP OES and ICP-MS determinations of As and Se in the presence of C. Cobalt increases the population of Cr{sup +} by charge transfer reactions. In a second step, Cr{sup +}/e{sup −} recombination takes place, which results in a larger population of excited-state Cr atoms. This alternative excitation route is energetically more efficient than heat transfer from atomizer and gas phase to analyte atoms. A linear dynamic range of 0.25–10 mg L{sup −1} and repeatability of 3.8% (RSD, n = 10) for a 2.0 mg L{sup −1} Cr solution are obtained with this strategy. The modifier high concentration also contributes to improving accuracy due to a matrix-matching effect. The method was applied to a certified reference material of Dogfish Muscle (DORM-2) and no statistically significant difference was observed between determined and certified Cr values at a 95% confidence level. Spike experiments with bottled water samples resulted in recoveries between 93% and

  18. Simultaneous determination of macronutrients, micronutrients and trace elements in mineral fertilizers by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Souza, Sidnei de [Laboratório de Química Analítica Ambiental (LQA), Departamento de Química, Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), 49100-000, São Cristovão, SE (Brazil); Silvério Lopes da Costa, Silvânio [Laboratório de Química Analítica Ambiental (LQA), Departamento de Química, Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), 49100-000, São Cristovão, SE (Brazil); Coordenação de Química, Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Campus Arapiraca, 57309-005, Arapiraca, AL (Brazil); Santos, Dayane Melo; Santos Pinto, Jéssica dos; Garcia, Carlos Alexandre Borges [Laboratório de Química Analítica Ambiental (LQA), Departamento de Química, Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), 49100-000, São Cristovão, SE (Brazil); and others

    2014-06-01

    An analytical method for simultaneous determination of macronutrients (Ca, Mg, Na and P), micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) and trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Pb and V) in mineral fertilizers was optimized. Two-level full factorial design was applied to evaluate the optimal proportions of reagents used in the sample digestion on hot plate. A Doehlert design for two variables was used to evaluate the operating conditions of the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer in order to accomplish the simultaneous determination of the analyte concentrations. The limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 2.0 mg kg{sup −1} for Mn to 77.3 mg kg{sup −1} for P. The accuracy and precision of the proposed method were evaluated by analysis of standard reference materials (SRMs) of Western phosphate rock (NIST 694), Florida phosphate rock (NIST 120C) and Trace elements in multi-nutrient fertilizer (NIST 695), considered to be adequate for simultaneous determination. Twenty-one samples of mineral fertilizers collected in Sergipe State, Brazil, were analyzed. For all samples, the As, Ca, Cd and Pb concentrations were below the LOQ values of the analytical method. For As, Cd and Pb the obtained LOQ values were below the maximum limit allowed by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento — MAPA). The optimized method presented good accuracy and was effectively applied to quantitative simultaneous determination of the analytes in mineral fertilizers by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). - Highlights: • Determination of inorganic constituents in mineral fertilizers was proposed. • Experimental design methodology was used to optimize analytical method. • The sample preparation procedure using diluted reagents (HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was employed. • The analytical method was satisfactorily to the determination of thirteen elements. • The

  19. Determination of gold in geological samples - the present and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feriancik, E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews some analytical techniques which have been described for the gold analysis of geological materials: spectrophotometry; flame atomic absorption spectrometry; graphite coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry; inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry; inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry; neutron activation; electro-analysis methods and fire assay

  20. ALICE: A non-LTE plasma atomic physics, kinetics and lineshape package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E. G.; Pérez-Callejo, G.; Rose, S. J.

    2018-03-01

    All three parts of an atomic physics, atomic kinetics and lineshape code, ALICE, are described. Examples of the code being used to model the emissivity and opacity of plasmas are discussed and interesting features of the code which build on the existing corpus of models are shown throughout.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) single particle analysis of metallurgy plant emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, J; Deboudt, K; Anderson, A; Blondel, A; Eliet, S; Flament, P; Fourmentin, M; Healy, R M; Savary, V; Setyan, A; Wenger, J C

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition of single particles deposited on industrial filters located in three different chimneys of an iron-manganese (Fe-Mn) alloy manufacturing plant have been compared using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX). Very similar types of particles were observed using both analytical techniques. Calcium-containing particles dominated in the firing area of the sintering unit, Mn and/or Al-bearing particles were observed at the cooling area of the sintering unit, while Mn-containing particles were dominant at the smelting unit. SEM-EDX analysis of particles collected downstream of the industrial filters showed that the composition of the particles emitted from the chimneys is very similar to those collected on the filters. ATOFMS analysis of ore samples was also performed to identify particulate emissions that could be generated by wind erosion and manual activities. Specific particle types have been identified for each emission source (chimneys and ore piles) and can be used as tracers for source apportionment of ambient PM measured in the vicinity of the industrial site. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sequential cloud point extraction for the speciation of mercury in seafood by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yingjie [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hu Bin [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)], E-mail: binhu@whu.edu.cn

    2007-10-15

    A novel nonchromatographic speciation technique for the speciation of mercury by sequential cloud point extraction (CPE) combined with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was developed. The method based on Hg{sup 2+} was complexed with I{sup -} to form HgI{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and the HgI{sub 4}{sup 2-} reacted with the methyl green (MG) cation to form hydrophobic ion-associated complex, and the ion-associated complex was then extracted into the surfactant-rich phase of the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114), which are subsequently separated from methylmercury (MeHg{sup +}) in the initial solution by centrifugation. The surfactant-rich phase containing Hg(II) was diluted with 0.5 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} for ICP-OES determination. The supernatant is also subjected to the similar CPE procedure for the preconcentration of MeHg{sup +} by the addition of a chelating agent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), in order to form water-insolvable complex with MeHg{sup +}. The MeHg{sup +} in the micelles was directly analyzed after disposal as describe above. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction efficiency was 93.5% for Hg(II) and 51.5% for MeHg{sup +} with the enrichment factor of 18.7 for Hg(II) and 10.3 for MeHg{sup +}, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) were 56.3 ng L{sup -1} for Hg(II) and 94.6 ng L{sup -1} for MeHg{sup +} (as Hg) with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 3.6% for Hg(II) and 4.5% for MeHg{sup +} (C = 10 {mu}g L{sup -1}, n = 7), respectively. The developed technique was applied to the speciation of mercury in real seafood samples and the recoveries for spiked samples were found to be in the range of 93.2-108.7%. For validation, a certified reference material of DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) was analyzed and the determined values are in good agreement with the certified values.

  3. Determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in Brassica Napus using solid sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nischkauer, Winfried [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Division of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, Getreidemarkt 9/164-IAC, A-1060 Vienna (Austria); Herincs, Esther [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Division of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, Getreidemarkt 9/164-IAC, A-1060 Vienna (Austria); University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Soil Research, Konrad Lorenz Straße 24, A-3430 Tulln (Austria); Puschenreiter, Markus; Wenzel, Walter [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Soil Research, Konrad Lorenz Straße 24, A-3430 Tulln (Austria); Limbeck, Andreas, E-mail: A.Limbeck@tuwien.ac.at [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Division of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, Getreidemarkt 9/164-IAC, A-1060 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-11-01

    Conventional approaches for the analysis of platinum group elements (PGEs) in plant material suffer from sample digestion which results in sample dilution and therefore requires high sample intakes to maintain the sensitivity. The presented solid-sampling method avoids sample digestion while improving sensitivity when compared to digestion-based inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) methods and allows the analysis of sample masses of 5 mg or less. Detection limits of 0.38 μg g{sup −1}, 0.14 μg g{sup −1} and 0.13 μg g{sup −1} were obtained for Pt, Pd and Rh, respectively using a sample intake of 5 mg. The reproducibility of the procedure ranged between 4.7% (Pd) relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 7) and 7.1% (Rh) RSD for 25 ng analytes. For quantification, aqueous standards were applied on paper filter strips and dried. Only the dried filters were introduced into the electrothermal vaporization unit. This approach successfully removed memory-effects observed during analysis of platinum which occurred only if liquid standards came into contact with the graphite material of the furnace. The presented method for overcoming the Pt-memory-effects may be of further interest for the analysis of other carbide-forming analytes as it does not require any technical modification of the graphite furnace (e.g., metal inlays, pyrolytic coating). Owing to lack of suitable certified reference materials, the proposed method was compared with conventional ICP-OES analysis of digested samples and a good agreement was obtained. As a result of the low sample consumption, it was possible to determine the spatial distribution of PGEs within a single plant. Significant differences in PGE concentrations were observed between the shoots (stem, leaves) and the roots. Pd was mainly found in the roots, whereas Pt and Rh were also found in higher concentrations in the shoots. - Highlights: • The uptake of Pt, Pd and Rh by hydroponically grown plants was

  4. Determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in Brassica Napus using solid sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nischkauer, Winfried; Herincs, Esther; Puschenreiter, Markus; Wenzel, Walter; Limbeck, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Conventional approaches for the analysis of platinum group elements (PGEs) in plant material suffer from sample digestion which results in sample dilution and therefore requires high sample intakes to maintain the sensitivity. The presented solid-sampling method avoids sample digestion while improving sensitivity when compared to digestion-based inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) methods and allows the analysis of sample masses of 5 mg or less. Detection limits of 0.38 μg g −1 , 0.14 μg g −1 and 0.13 μg g −1 were obtained for Pt, Pd and Rh, respectively using a sample intake of 5 mg. The reproducibility of the procedure ranged between 4.7% (Pd) relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 7) and 7.1% (Rh) RSD for 25 ng analytes. For quantification, aqueous standards were applied on paper filter strips and dried. Only the dried filters were introduced into the electrothermal vaporization unit. This approach successfully removed memory-effects observed during analysis of platinum which occurred only if liquid standards came into contact with the graphite material of the furnace. The presented method for overcoming the Pt-memory-effects may be of further interest for the analysis of other carbide-forming analytes as it does not require any technical modification of the graphite furnace (e.g., metal inlays, pyrolytic coating). Owing to lack of suitable certified reference materials, the proposed method was compared with conventional ICP-OES analysis of digested samples and a good agreement was obtained. As a result of the low sample consumption, it was possible to determine the spatial distribution of PGEs within a single plant. Significant differences in PGE concentrations were observed between the shoots (stem, leaves) and the roots. Pd was mainly found in the roots, whereas Pt and Rh were also found in higher concentrations in the shoots. - Highlights: • The uptake of Pt, Pd and Rh by hydroponically grown plants was investigated

  5. Sequential cloud point extraction for the speciation of mercury in seafood by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yingjie; Hu Bin

    2007-01-01

    A novel nonchromatographic speciation technique for the speciation of mercury by sequential cloud point extraction (CPE) combined with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was developed. The method based on Hg 2+ was complexed with I - to form HgI 4 2- , and the HgI 4 2- reacted with the methyl green (MG) cation to form hydrophobic ion-associated complex, and the ion-associated complex was then extracted into the surfactant-rich phase of the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114), which are subsequently separated from methylmercury (MeHg + ) in the initial solution by centrifugation. The surfactant-rich phase containing Hg(II) was diluted with 0.5 mol L -1 HNO 3 for ICP-OES determination. The supernatant is also subjected to the similar CPE procedure for the preconcentration of MeHg + by the addition of a chelating agent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), in order to form water-insolvable complex with MeHg + . The MeHg + in the micelles was directly analyzed after disposal as describe above. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction efficiency was 93.5% for Hg(II) and 51.5% for MeHg + with the enrichment factor of 18.7 for Hg(II) and 10.3 for MeHg + , respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) were 56.3 ng L -1 for Hg(II) and 94.6 ng L -1 for MeHg + (as Hg) with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 3.6% for Hg(II) and 4.5% for MeHg + (C = 10 μg L -1 , n = 7), respectively. The developed technique was applied to the speciation of mercury in real seafood samples and the recoveries for spiked samples were found to be in the range of 93.2-108.7%. For validation, a certified reference material of DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) was analyzed and the determined values are in good agreement with the certified values

  6. Determination of Micro minerals in Milk from Farm and Pasture-reared Cow, Goat and Camel; using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    SirelkhatimBalla Elhardallou; Ashraf Yehia El-naggar

    2016-01-01

    This study covers raw fresh milk of cow, goat and camel (farm and pasture-reared),in addition to two brands of commercial milk samples, liquid milk of powder origin and drinking yoghurt samples. Camel milk showed a relatively lower pH range (6.15 - 6.46) compared cow, goat and commercial milk. The pH of drinking yoghurt was found (4.35 - 4.47).Microwave digestion, was selected followed by mineral analysis using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry. Micro minerals; Cd, Cr...

  7. Semi-automated technique for the separation and determination of barium and strontium in surface waters by ion exchange chromatography and atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, F.D.; Brown, H.R.

    1977-01-01

    A semi-automated method for the separation and the analysis of barium and strontium in surface waters by atomic emission spectrometry is described. The method employs a semi-automated separation technique using ion exchange and an automated aspiration-analysis procedure. Forty specimens can be prepared in approximately 90 min and can be analyzed for barium and strontium content in 20 min. The detection limits and sensitivities provided by the described technique are 0.003 mg/l and 0.01 mg/l respectively for barium and 0.00045 mg/l and 0.003 mg/l respectively for strontium

  8. Thermoluminescence emission spectrometry of glass display in mobile phones and resulting evaluation of the dosimetric properties of a specific type of display glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discher, Michael; Woda, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Glass displays of mobile phones are sensitive to ionizing radiation and can be used for retrospective dosimetry for the purpose of triage after a radiological accident or attack. In this study the two main types of glass display that are used in modern mobile phones were investigated using thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectrometry. A different TL spectrum was observed for the glass display of category A (lime-aluminosilicate glass) and category B (boron-silicate glass). Based on the spectral measurements an optimized detection window was chosen to re-evaluate the dosimetric properties (dose response, optical and long-term stability) of glass display category B. - Highlights: • Two display glass types show similar TL emission peaks but with strongly different relative intensities. • The intrinsic background TL signal peaks at similar wavelengths as the radiation induced signal. • Dosimetric properties of one display glass type were re-evaluated using an optimized detection window

  9. Speciation of mercury compounds by gas chromatography with atomic emission detection. Simultaneous optimization of a headspace solid-phase microextraction and derivatization procedure by use of chemometric techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carro, A.M.; Neira, I.; Rodil, R.; Lorenzo, R. A. [Univ. Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia

    2003-06-01

    A method is proposed for the extraction and determination of organomercury compounds and Hg(II) in seawater samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with capillary gas chromatography-microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The mercury species were derivatized with sodium tetraphenylborate, sorbed on a polydimethylsiloxane-coated fused-silica fibre, and desorbed in the injection port of the GC, in splitless mode. Experimental design methodology was used to evaluate the effect of six HS-SPME-derivatization variables: sample volume, NaBPh{sub 4} volume, pH, sorption time, extraction-derivatization temperature, and rate of stirring. Use of a multicriterion decision-making approach, with the desirability function, enabled determination of the optimum working conditions of the procedure for simultaneous analysis of three mercury species. (orig.)

  10. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombaba, Jackson M.

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The device exhibits a stable signal because the plasma is self-seeding and reignites itself every half cycle. A tesla coil is not required to commence generation of the plasma if the ac voltage applied is greater than the breakdown voltage of the plasma-supporting gas. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (Mvutilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienyl manganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer (common room humidifier) was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were also considered. Figures of merits of selected elements both in absorption and emission modes are reported. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using

  11. Gas chromatography--inductively coupled plasma--time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the speciation analysis of organolead compounds in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisterkamp, M; Adams, F C

    2001-07-01

    The application of inductively coupled plasma--time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the speciation analysis of organolead compounds in environmental waters is described. Construction of the transfer line was achieved by means of a relatively simple and rapid coupling procedure. Derivatization of the ionic lead species was achieved by in-situ propylation with sodium tetrapropylborate; simultaneous extraction of the derivatized compounds in hexane was followed by separation and detection by capillary gas chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Detection limits for the different organolead species ranged from 10 to 15 fg (as Pb), corresponding to procedural detection limits between 50 and 75 ng L(-1), on the basis of a 50 mL snow sample, extraction with 200 microL hexane, and subsequent injection of 1 microL of the organic extract on to the column. The accuracy of the system was confirmed by additional analysis of the water samples by capillary gas chromatography coupled with microwave-induced plasma-atomic-emission spectrometry and the analysis of a standard reference material CRM 605 (road dust) with a certified content of trimethyllead.

  12. Experimental benchmark of non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma atomic physics codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagels-Silvert, V.

    2004-09-01

    The main purpose of this thesis is to get experimental data for the testing and validation of atomic physics codes dealing with non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium plasmas. The first part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of xenon and krypton plasmas that have been produced by a nanosecond laser pulse interacting with a gas jet. A Thomson scattering diagnostic has allowed us to measure independently plasma parameters such as electron temperature, electron density and the average ionisation state. We have obtained time integrated spectra in the range between 5 and 10 angstroms. We have identified about one hundred xenon rays between 8.6 and 9.6 angstroms via the use of the Relac code. We have discovered unknown rays for the krypton between 5.2 and 7.5 angstroms. In a second experiment we have extended the wavelength range to the X UV domain. The Averroes/Transpec code has been tested in the ranges from 9 to 15 angstroms and from 10 to 130 angstroms, the first range has been well reproduced while the second range requires a more complex data analysis. The second part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of aluminium, selenium and samarium plasmas in femtosecond operating rate. We have designed an interferometry diagnostic in the frequency domain that has allowed us to measure the expanding speed of the target's backside. Via the use of an adequate isothermal model this parameter has led us to know the plasma electron temperature. Spectra and emission times of various rays from the aluminium and selenium plasmas have been computed satisfactorily with the Averroes/Transpec code coupled with Film and Multif hydrodynamical codes. (A.C.)

  13. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) single particle analysis of metallurgy plant emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, J.; Deboudt, K.; Anderson, A.; Blondel, A.; Eliet, S.; Flament, P.; Fourmentin, M.; Healy, R.M.; Savary, V.; Setyan, A.; Wenger, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of single particles deposited on industrial filters located in three different chimneys of an iron-manganese (Fe–Mn) alloy manufacturing plant have been compared using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) and scanning electron microscopy–energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX). Very similar types of particles were observed using both analytical techniques. Calcium-containing particles dominated in the firing area of the sintering unit, Mn and/or Al-bearing particles were observed at the cooling area of the sintering unit, while Mn-containing particles were dominant at the smelting unit. SEM-EDX analysis of particles collected downstream of the industrial filters showed that the composition of the particles emitted from the chimneys is very similar to those collected on the filters. ATOFMS analysis of ore samples was also performed to identify particulate emissions that could be generated by wind erosion and manual activities. Specific particle types have been identified for each emission source (chimneys and ore piles) and can be used as tracers for source apportionment of ambient PM measured in the vicinity of the industrial site. - Highlights: • Similar composition for emitted particles as those collected on the chimney filters. • Emitted particles dominated by Ca-, Mn and/or Al-containing particles. • Identification of specific particle types emitted by the different process units. - The particles emitted by metallurgy activities are fully described by ATOFMS and SEM-EDX, enabling the identification of specific particle types from the different units of the process.

  14. Forensic analysis of tempered sheet glass by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jisonna, L.J. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); DeYoung, P.A., E-mail: deyoung@hope.ed [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Ferens, J.; Hall, C.; Lunderberg, J.M.; Mears, P. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Padilla, D. [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1233 (United States); Peaslee, G.F. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Sampson, R. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: {yields} PIXE was found to give the same results for trace elements in glass as ICP. {yields} PIXE can non-destructively determine trace element concentrations in auto glass. {yields} Measured Ca, Fe, Ti, Mn, and Sr in auto glass with PIXE. -- Abstract: The elemental concentrations of five trace elements in tempered sheet glass fragments were determined using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectrometry. The trace element concentrations for calcium, iron, manganese, strontium, and titanium are compared to those obtained by inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) following complete digestion by hydrofluoric acid. For these five elements, the absolute concentrations obtained by both methods are shown to agree well over a wide range of concentrations. The limits of detection for trace elements are typically lower for the ICP-AES method. However, we show that the concentrations of these five elements can be accurately measured by the PIXE method. Since PIXE is an entirely non-destructive method, there exists a niche for this technique to be used as a complement to the more sensitive ICP-AES technique in the forensic analysis of sheet glass.

  15. Surface Passivation of Silicon Using HfO2 Thin Films Deposited by Remote Plasma Atomic Layer Deposition System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Hsu, Chia-Hsun; Lien, Shui-Yang; Chen, Song-Yan; Huang, Wei; Yang, Chih-Hsiang; Kung, Chung-Yuan; Zhu, Wen-Zhang; Xiong, Fei-Bing; Meng, Xian-Guo

    2017-12-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) thin films have attracted much attention owing to their usefulness in equivalent oxide thickness scaling in microelectronics, which arises from their high dielectric constant and thermodynamic stability with silicon. However, the surface passivation properties of such films, particularly on crystalline silicon (c-Si), have rarely been reported upon. In this study, the HfO 2 thin films were deposited on c-Si substrates with and without oxygen plasma pretreatments, using a remote plasma atomic layer deposition system. Post-annealing was performed using a rapid thermal processing system at different temperatures in N 2 ambient for 10 min. The effects of oxygen plasma pretreatment and post-annealing on the properties of the HfO 2 thin films were investigated. They indicate that the in situ remote plasma pretreatment of Si substrate can result in the formation of better SiO 2 , resulting in a better chemical passivation. The deposited HfO 2 thin films with oxygen plasma pretreatment and post-annealing at 500 °C for 10 min were effective in improving the lifetime of c-Si (original lifetime of 1 μs) to up to 67 μs.

  16. Measurement of non-enteric emission fluxes of volatile fatty acids from a California dairy by solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanis, Phillip; Sorenson, Mark; Beene, Matt; Krauter, Charles; Shamp, Brian; Hasson, Alam S.

    Dairies are a major source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in California's San Joaquin Valley; a region that experiences high ozone levels during summer. Short-chain carboxylic acids, or volatile fatty acids (VFAs), are believed to make up a large fraction of VOC emissions from these facilities, although there are few studies to substantiate this. In this work, a method using a flux chamber coupled to solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) fibers followed by analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed to quantify emissions of six VFAs (acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, pentanoic acid, hexanoic acid and 3-methyl butanoic acid) from non-enteric sources. The technique was then used to quantify VFA fluxes from a small dairy located on the campus of California State University Fresno. Both animal feed and animal waste are found to be major sources of VFAs, with acetic acid contributing 70-90% of emissions from the sources tested. Measured total acid fluxes during spring (with an average temperature of 20 °C) were 1.84 ± 0.01, 1.06 ± 0.08, (1.3 ± 0.5) × 10 -2, (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10 -2 and (1.2 ± 0.5) × 10 -2 g m -2 h -1 from silage, total mixed rations, flushing lane, open lot and lagoon sources, respectively. VFA emissions from the sources tested total 390 ± 80 g h -1. The data indicate high fluxes of VFAs from dairy facilities, but differences in the design and operation of dairies in the San Joaquin Valley as well as seasonal variations mean that additional measurements must be made to accurately determine emissions inventories for the region.

  17. Analysis of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in tungsten carbide by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Archer, M

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to measure the concentrations of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in solutions of tungsten carbide. The main advantage of the method described here lies...

  18. Analysis of non-regulated vehicular emissions by extractive FTIR spectrometry: tests on a hybrid car in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, F.; Grutter, M.; Jazcilevich, A.; González-Oropeza, R.

    2006-07-01

    A methodology to acquire valuable information on the chemical composition and evolution of vehicular emissions is presented. The analysis of the gases is performed by passing a constant flow of a sample gas from the tail-pipe into a 10 L multi-pass cell. The absorption spectra within the cell are obtained using an FTIR spectrometer at 0.5 cm-1 resolution along a 13.1 m optical path. Additionally, the total flow from the exhaust is continuously measured from a differential pressure sensor on a Pitot tube installed at the exit of the exhaust. This configuration aims to obtain a good speciation capability by coadding spectra during 30 s and reporting the emission (in g/km) of key and non-regulated pollutants, such as CO2, CO, NO, SO2, NH3, HCHO, NMHC, during predetermined driving routines. The advantages and disadvantages of increasing the acquisition frequency, as well as the effect of other parameters such as spectral resolution, cell volume and flow rate, are discussed. With the aim of testing and evaluating the proposed technique, experiments were performed on a dynamometer running FTP-75 and typical driving cycles of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) on a Toyota Prius hybrid vehicle. This car is an example of recent automotive technology to reach the market dedicated to reduce emissions and therefore pressing the need of low detection techniques. This study shows the potential of the proposed technique to measure and report in real time the emissions of a large variety of pollutants, even from a super ultra-low emission vehicle (SULEV). The emissions of HC's, NOx, CO and CO2 obtained here are similar to experiments performed in other locations with the same vehicle model. Some differences suggest that an inefficient combustion process and type of gasoline used in the MCMA may be partly responsible for lower CO2 and higher CO and NO emission factors. Also, a fast reduction of NO emission to very low values is observed after cold ignition, giving rise to

  19. Radiometric dating and quantitative analysis of elements in depth profiles of sediments by means of nuclear physical as well as X-ray fluorescence and atomic emission spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenburg, M.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement of heavy metal concentration in sediments is of great importance for the assessment of water quality. If dating of the different layers of sediment cores is possible, informations about the history of pollution can be inferred. This paper describes the development and practical test of a procedure suitable for the investigation of sediment cores. Both the element analysis and the dating are based on physical methods. For element concentration determination inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP), total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) are used. The techniques are described and compared. For dating radiometric measurements of 210 Pb and 137 Cs are carried out with a coaxial well-type germanium γ-ray detector in a special low-level arrangement. Results of the systematic investigations are presented and a few individual depth profiles are discussed. (orig.) With 34 figs., 20 tabs [de

  20. Analysis of metal-laden water via portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Delaina; Weindorf, David C.; Chakraborty, Somsubhra; Li, Bin; Koch, Jaco; Van Deventer, Piet; de Wet, Jandre; Kusi, Nana Yaw

    2018-06-01

    A rapid method for in-situ elemental composition analysis of metal-laden water would be indispensable for studying polluted water. Current analytical lab methods to determine water quality include flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (EAAS), and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopy. However only two field methods, colorimetry and absorptiometry, exist for elemental analysis of water. Portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometry is an effective method for elemental analysis of soil, sediment, and other matrices. However, the accuracy of PXRF is known to be affected while scanning moisture-laden soil samples. This study sought to statistically establish PXRF's predictive ability for various elements in water at different concentrations relative to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). A total of 390 metal-laden water samples collected from leaching columns of mine tailings in South Africa were analyzed via PXRF and ICP-AES. The PXRF showed differential effectiveness in elemental quantification. For the collected water samples, the best relationships between ICP and PXRF elemental data were obtained for K and Cu (R2 = 0.92). However, when scanning ICP calibration solutions with elements in isolation, PXRF results indicated near perfect agreement; Ca, K, Fe, Cu and Pb produced an R2 of 0.99 while Zn and Mn produced an R2 of 1.00. The utilization of multiple PXRF (stacked) beams produced stronger correlation to ICP relative to the use of a single beam in isolation. The results of this study demonstrated the PXRF's ability to satisfactorily predict the composition of metal-laden water as reported by ICP for several elements. Additionally this study indicated the need for a "Water Mode" calibration for the PXRF and demonstrates the potential of PXRF for future study of polluted or contaminated waters.

  1. Determination of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd by atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma in waters and sediments from San Juan Ecosystem, Santiago de Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argota Perez, George; Argota Coello, Humberto; Fernandez-Heredia, Angel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the levels of concentration of copper, zinc, lead and cadmium in waters and sediments from the ecosystem San Juan in the Santiago of Cuba province were evaluated. Two sampling of the ecosystem in two stations belonging to the high and middle part of the river, in rainy and little rainy periods were carried out. The conservation and treatment of the samples were developed according to established standards and the determinations of the elements were realized using atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. The concentrations intervals of the studied elements were established so much in the superficial waters like in the sediments and it was demonstrated that exists statistical significant differences for the factors station, period and type of sample, being the middle part of the river, the little rainy period and the sediments, where the grater concentrations of the pollutants appear

  2. An evaluation of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using electrothermal atomisation sample introduction and photographic plate detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khathing, D.T.; Pickford, C.J.

    1984-05-01

    A photographic radiation measurement approach has been used with an inductively coupled plasma source to evaluate and tabulate the more prominent optical emission lines of 66 elements. Compared with the more common sample introduction technique using nebulisation, increased sensitivity for multielement analysis of small samples was achieved by using a simple graphite electrothermal atomisation system. This was constructed to serve as a dual purpose atomiser ie both for Atomic Absorption and for Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission spectroscopy. The system offers the advantage of a wide multi-elemental coverage, but sensitivities achieved with photographic detection are poorer than those obtained photoelectrically. (author)

  3. Investigation of polyelectrolytes by total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, I.; Nagy, M.

    2000-01-01

    Water soluble polyelectrolyte samples containing mono-, bi- and trivalent metal ions were investigated without any pretreatment. Acid digestion of linear polymers may lead to a product insoluble in water so the digestion has to be avoided. The aim of this paper was the determination of analytical characteristics and limitations of the total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis for poly (vinylalcohol-vinylsulphate) salts and poly (acrylic acid, acrylamide) copolymers containing the following cations: K + , Cs + , Ba 2+ , Cu 2+ and La 3+ . On the basis of our results efficiency of ion-exchange during preparation of polyelectrolytes and stoichiometry of the end-product were determined. TXRF results were compared with data gained by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements except in the case of Cs + which has poor sensitivity in ICP-AES. Good agreement was found between the results of the two techniques and calculations from titrimetric data. Concentration of Li + and Mg 2+ in polymer samples was measured by ICP-AES. In majority of cases film-like dry residues of aqueous solutions of polyelectrolytes can be characterized by homogeneous spatial distribution of metal ions within the organic matrix. This is because the migration of the ions is hindered during drying process. Determination of metals in polyelectrolyte films by TXRF is quite ideal as model for analysis of plant, animal or human tissues which is a frequent task in environmental and inorganic biomedical analytical chemistry. (author)

  4. A Simple But Comprehensive Methodology To Determine Gas-Phase Emissions Of Motor Vehicles With Extractive FTIR Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, F. M.; Jaczilevich, A.; Grutter, M. A.; Huerta, M. A.; Rincón, P.; Rincón, R.; González, R.

    2004-12-01

    In this contribution, a methodology to acquire valuable information on the chemical composition and evolution of vehicular emissions is presented. With this innovative experimental set-up, it is possible to obtain real-time emissions of the combustion products without the need of dilution or sample collection. Key pollutants such as CO, CO2, H2CO, CH4, NO, N2O, NH3, SO2, CH3OH, acetylene, ethylene, ethane and total hydrocarbons, most of which are not regulated nor measured by current emissions control programs, can be accurately monitored with a single instrument. An FTIR spectrometer is used for the analysis of a constant flow of sample gas from the tail-pipe into a stainless-steel cylindrical cell of constant volume.(1) The cell is heated to 185 °C to avoid condensation, the pressure is kept constant and a multi-pass optical arrangement(2)is used to transmit the modulated infrared beam several times to improve the sensitivity. The total flow from the exhaust used for calculating the emission can be continuously determined from the differential pressure measurements from a "Pitot" tube calibrated against a hot-wire devise. This simple methodology is proposed for performing state-of-the-art evaluations on the emission behavior of new technologies, reformulated fuels and emission control devices. The results presented here were performed on a dynamometer running FTP-75 and driving cycles typical for Mexico City.(3,4) References 1. Grutter M. "Multi-Gas Analysis using FTIR Spectroscopy over Mexico City." Atmosfera 16, 1-16 (2003). 2. White J.U. "Long optical paths of large aperture. J. Opt. Soc. Am., 32, 285-288 (1942). 3. Santiago Cruz L. and P.I. Rincón. "Instrumentation of the Emission Control Laboratory at the Engineering School of the National Autonomous University of Mexico." Instrumentation and Development 4, 19-24, (2000). 4. González Oropeza R. and A. Galván Zacarías. "Desarrollo de ciclos de manejo característicos de la Ciudad de México." Memorias

  5. Gaseous and particulate composition of fresh and aged emissions of diesel, RME and CNG buses using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psichoudaki, Magda; Le Breton, Michael; Hallquist, Mattias; Watne, Ågot; Hallquist, Asa

    2016-04-01

    Urban air pollution is becoming a significant global problem, especially for large cities around the world. Traffic emissions contribute significantly to both elevated particle concentrations and to gaseous pollutants in cities. The latter also have the potential of forming more particulate mass via their photochemical oxidation in the atmosphere. The International Agency for Research on Cancer and the US EPA have characterised diesel exhausts as a likely human carcinogen that can also contribute to other health problems. In order to meet the challenges with increased transportation and enhanced greenhouse gas emissions, the European Union have decided on a 10% substitution of traditional fuels in the road transport sector by alternative fuels (e.g. biodiesel, CNG) before the year 2020. However, it is also important to study the influence of fuel switches on other primary pollutants as well as the potential to form secondary aerosol mass. This work focuses on the characterisation of the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase of fresh bus emissions during acceleration, in order to mimic the exhaust plume that humans would inhale under realistic conditions. In addition, photochemical aging of the exhaust emissions was achieved by employing a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor, allowing the characterization of the composition of the corresponding aged emissions. The PAM reactor uses UV lamps and high concentrations of oxidants (OH radicals and O3) to oxidize the organic species present in the chamber. The oxidation that takes place within the reactor can be equivalent to up to one week of atmospheric oxidation. Preliminary tests showed that the oxidation employed in these measurements corresponded to a range from 4 to 8 days in the atmosphere. During June and July 2015, a total of 29 buses, 5 diesel, 13 CNG and 11 RME (rapeseed methyl ester), were tested in two different locations with limited influence from other types of emissions and traffic

  6. Development of a high energy resolution magnetic bolometer for the determination of photon emission intensities by gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M.

    2007-12-01

    In this research thesis, a first chapter describes the metrological difficulties for the determination of radionuclide photon emission intensities. Then, it discusses the understanding and the required tools for the computing of a magnetic bolometer signal with respect to the different operation parameters and to the sensor geometry. The author describes the implementation of the experimental device and its validation with a first sensor. The new sensor is then optimised for the measurement of photon emission intensities with a good efficiency and a theoretical energy resolution less than 100 eV up to 200 keV. The sensor's detection efficiency and operation have been characterized with a 133 Ba source. The author finally presents the obtained results

  7. Analysis of nickel-base alloys by Grimm-type glow discharge emission and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, N.P.; Strauss, J.A.; Van Maarseveen, I.; Ivanfy, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel-base alloys can be analysed as satisfactorily as steels by XRF as well as by the Grimm-type source, in spite of problems caused by element combinations, spectral line overlap and the influence of the structure and heat conduction properties on sputtering in the glow discharge source. This extended abstract briefly discusses the use of Grimm-type glow discharge emission and XRF as techniques for the analysis of nickel-base alloys

  8. Reliability of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spectrometry as alternative method for trace analysis of ... Purpose: To evaluate the comparative efficiency of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry .... Methods comparison and validation .... plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

  9. Nature of unresolved complex mixture in size-distributed emissions from residential wood combustion as measured by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Michael D.; Smith, N. Dean; Dong, Yuanji

    2004-08-01

    Unresolved complex mixture (UCM) is an analytical artifact of gas chromatographs of combustion source-related fine aerosol extracts. In this study the UCM is examined in size-resolved fine aerosol emissions from residential wood combustion. The aerosols are sorted by size in an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) and subsequently analyzed by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS). A semiquantitative system for predicting the branched alkane, cycloalkane, alkylbenzene, C3-, C4-, C5-alkylbenzene, methylnaphthalene, C3-, C4-, C5-alkylnaphthalene, methylphenanthrene C2-, C3-alkylphenanthrene, and dibenzothiophene concentrations in the UCM is introduced. Analysis by TD/GS/MS detects UCM on each ELPI stage for all six combustion tests. The UCM baseline among the different fuel types is variable. In particular, the UCM of Pseudotsuga sp. is enriched in later-eluting compounds of lower volatility. A high level of reproducibility is achieved in determining UCM areas. UCM fractions (UCM ion area/total extracted ion chromatograph area) by individual ELPI stage return a mean relative standard deviation of 19.1% over the entire combustion test set, indicating a highly consistent UCM fraction across the ELPI size boundaries. Among the molecular ions investigated, branched alkane (m/z 57) and dibenzothiophene (m/z 212 and 226) constituents are most abundant in UCM emissions from RWC, collectively accounting for 64-95% of the targeted chemical species. The total UCM emissions span 446-756 mg/kg of dry biomass burned and correspond to an upper limit of 7.1% of the PM2.5 mass. The UCM emissions are primarily accumulation mode (0.1 μm ≤ aerodynamic diameter (da) ≤ 1 μm), with a geometric mean diameter (dg) range of 120.3-518.4 nm. UCM in PM2.5 is chemically asymmetric (shifted to finer da), typically clustering at da ≤ 1 μm. Measurable shifts in dg and changes in distribution widths (σg) on an intratest basis suggest that the particle density

  10. Extraction inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Determination of traces of phosphorus in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.; Wegscheider, W.; Mueller, K.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the separation and preconcentration of traces of phosphorus from tungsten was developed. Solid phase extraction of the phosphovanadomolybdate complex performed on a micro-column was applied. Phosphorus was determined by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) excitation. A limit of detection of 0,4 μg/g P with respect to the solid phase is obtained. By directly coupling the extraction/elution step to the ICP instrument a detection limit of 0,06 μg/g P in W was achieved. Besides, the complexity of spectral evaluation in ICP-OES determinations of traces in spectralline-rich matrices is discussed. (Authors)

  11. Determination of total fluorine in five coal reference materials by proton-induced gamma-ray emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelandts, I.; Robaye, G.; Delbrouck-Habaru, J.M.; Weber, G. [University of Liege, Sart (Belgium). Dept. of Geology, Petrology and Geochemistry

    1996-03-01

    The direct non-destructive proton-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) technique with a germanium detector was applied to the determination of total fluorine concentration in five coal reference materials (BCR 30, NIST 1632b, NIST 1635, SARM 20 and USGS CLB-1). Duplicate analyses were made from five randomly selected bottles of each coal. Individual data are presented and some problems (calibration, proton stopping power, effects of sample heating by the proton beam, background estimation) which were encountered during this study are discussed. Sensitivity and reproducibility of the determinations, and homogeneity of the coal samples with respect to fluorine contents by analysis of variance were investigated. The present data are also compared with the few published values for these reference samples, including other PIGE data. The use of synthetic standards and spiked samples in the present study suggested that the PIGE method was more accurate than other techniques.

  12. Evaluation of slurry preparation procedures for the determination of mercury by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using on-line cold vapor generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Eder Jose dos; Herrmann, Amanda Beatriz; Antunes Vieira, Mariana; Azzolin Frescura, Vera Lucia; Curtius, Adilson Jose

    2005-01-01

    Five different slurry preparation procedures were tested, after grinding the solid samples to a particle size ≤53 μm: (1) using aqua regia plus HF, 30 min of sonication, standing time of 24 h followed by another 30 min of sonication; (2) same as the previous one, except that the standing time and the second ultrasound treatment were omitted; (3) same as the previous one, except that HF was not used; (4) same as the previous one, except that the aqua regia was replaced by nitric acid; (5) same as the previous one, except that the acid nitric was replaced by tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). The Hg vapor was generated on-line, and the emission signal intensity measured at 253.652 nm by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Initially, four experimental conditions were optimized using a multivariate factorial analysis: the concentrations of HCl and of the reducing agent, NaBH 4 , used in the cold vapor generation, and two instrumental parameters, the plasma radiofrequency power and the carrier gas flow rate. The radiofrequency power was statistically significant, but limited to 1.2 kW for practical reasons. The procedures were applied to 11 biological and environmental materials. Both, the slurries and the filtrates were analyzed, using calibration solutions in the same medium as in the slurries. The first three procedures produced results in agreement with the certified values. The two last procedures, using nitric acid or TMHA could not be used for quantitative analysis. For practical reasons, Procedure 3, with a detection limit (3s, n=10) of 0.06 μg g -1 for a sample mass of 20 mg in a final volume of 15 mL is recommended. The relative standard deviations for mercury in the investigated materials, using the recommended procedure, were lower than 12.5%, indicating a good precision for slurry sampling. The recommended procedure is simple, rapid and robust

  13. Influence of Cu substitution on the structural ordering, photocatalytic activity and photoluminescence emission of Ag3-2xCuxPO4 powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Wyllamanney da S.; Sczancoski, Júlio C.; Calderon, Yormary N. C.; Mastelaro, Valmor R.; Botelho, Gleice; Machado, Thales R.; Leite, Edson R.; Longo, Elson

    2018-05-01

    Materials presenting high photocatalytic performance and interesting photoluminescence emissions are promising candidates for photodegradation of organic pollutants discharged into natural waters as well as for development of new electro-optical devices, respectively. In this study, Ag3-2xCuxPO4 (x = 0.00, 0.01, 0.02, 0.04 and 0.08) powders were synthesized by the precipitation method. The long- and short-range structural ordering was affected when the copper (Cu) content was increased in the lattice, as identified by X-ray diffraction patterns, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope revealed a particle system composed of irregular spherical-like microcrystals. The presence of Cu as well as its real amount in the samples were confirmed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, respectively. On increasing Cu level, a slight variation was noted on the photocatalytic activity of Ag3-2xCuxPO4 powders for degradation of rhodamine B under visible light irradiation. A photodegradation mechanism was proposed in details. The photoluminescence emissions were explained by electronic transitions involving intermediary energy levels in the band gap. The origin these energy levels was related to defects caused by the substitution of Ag by Cu in the crystalline structure.

  14. Determination of Pb in river water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation with manganese dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa Bispo, Marcia; Santos da Boa Morte, Elane; Korn das Gracas Andrade, Maria; Sena Gomes Teixeira, Leonardo; Korn, Mauro; Costa, Antonio Celso Spinola

    2005-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure for separation and pre-concentration using ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation with manganese dioxide was developed for Pb determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). The optimization process was carried out using a two-level factorial design and a Doehlert matrix. Three variables (i.e. concentration of oxidizing solution-KMnO 4 , concentration of MnSO 4 solution and time of ultrasonic irradiation) were used as factors in the optimization. The recoveries, based on the analysis of spiked samples, were between 90% and 105%, and the precision was ≤ 5%. The detection limit and quantification limit for Pb determination were 3.2 and 10.7 μg L -1 , respectively. The proposed method was applied for the determination of Pb in water samples from a river heavily polluted by industrial effluents. The recovery measured by analyte addition technique showed that the proposed pre-concentration method had good accuracy

  15. On-line digestion in a focused microwave-assisted oven for elements determination in orange juice by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fili Sabrina P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A flow injection system coupled to focused microwave-assisted oven was used for on-line orange juice sample digestion for determination of Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The reactor coil was a PTFE tube (4.0 m long and 1.6 mm i.d. positioned into the commercial glass tube of the focused microwave oven. Aliquots of 500 muL of sample and 1000 muL of reagent (80% v/v HNO3 were mixed in a confluence and carried out to the reactor coil by air carrier. The relative standard deviation for five replicates of sample was lower than 5.0%. Good recoveries varying from 91 to 111% were obtained for added concentrations of the interest elements. The results obtained using the proposed digestion system are in agreement with those obtained for total digestion at the 95% confidence level. With this on-line digestion system was possible to carry out 12 samples h-1, minimizing contamination, saving consumption of samples and reagent and low residue generation.

  16. Simultaneous determination of macro and trace elements in biological reference materials by microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry with slurry sample introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Golik, Bartosz

    2004-01-01

    A slurry sampling technique (SST) has been utilized for simultaneous multi-element analysis by microwave-induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES). Slurry samples from a spray chamber are fed directly into the microwave cavity-torch assembly (power 300 W) with no desolvation apparatus. The performance of SST-MIP-OES was demonstrated by the determination of macro (Na, K, Ca, Mg, P) and trace (Cd, Cu, Mn, Sr, Zn) elements in three biological certified reference materials using a V-groove, clog-free Babington-type nebulizer. Slurry concentrations up to 1% m/v (particles 3 (pH 1.2) containing 0.01% of Triton X-100, were used with calibration by the standard additions method. The method offers relatively good precision (R.S.D. ranged from 7 to 11%) with measured concentrations being in satisfactory agreement with certified values for NRCC TORT-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas), NRCC LUTS-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas) and IAEA-153 (Milk powder). The concentrations of Na, K, Ca, Mg, P and Cd, Cu, Mn, Sr, Zn were determined in the range 90-22 000 μg/g and 1-420 μg/g, respectively. The method could be useful as a routine procedure

  17. Simultaneous determination of macro and trace elements in biological reference materials by microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry with slurry sample introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk E-mail: Henryk.Matusiewicz@put.poznan.pl; Golik, Bartosz

    2004-05-21

    A slurry sampling technique (SST) has been utilized for simultaneous multi-element analysis by microwave-induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES). Slurry samples from a spray chamber are fed directly into the microwave cavity-torch assembly (power 300 W) with no desolvation apparatus. The performance of SST-MIP-OES was demonstrated by the determination of macro (Na, K, Ca, Mg, P) and trace (Cd, Cu, Mn, Sr, Zn) elements in three biological certified reference materials using a V-groove, clog-free Babington-type nebulizer. Slurry concentrations up to 1% m/v (particles <20 {mu}m), prepared in 10% HNO{sub 3} (pH 1.2) containing 0.01% of Triton X-100, were used with calibration by the standard additions method. The method offers relatively good precision (R.S.D. ranged from 7 to 11%) with measured concentrations being in satisfactory agreement with certified values for NRCC TORT-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas), NRCC LUTS-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas) and IAEA-153 (Milk powder). The concentrations of Na, K, Ca, Mg, P and Cd, Cu, Mn, Sr, Zn were determined in the range 90-22 000 {mu}g/g and 1-420 {mu}g/g, respectively. The method could be useful as a routine procedure.

  18. Imaging of elements in leaves of tobacco by solid sampling–electrothermal vaporization–inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masson, Pierre, E-mail: masson@bordeaux.inra.fr

    2014-12-01

    Plants take up and store elements according to the environment in which they are growing. Because plants are at the base of the food chain, the determination of essential elements or toxic elements in plant materials is of importance. However, it is assumed that the element content determined on selected tissues may provide more specific information than that derived from the whole plant analysis. In this work, we assessed the feasibility of solid sampling–electrothermal vaporization–inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry analyses for quantitative imaging of Cd and Mg in plant leaves. Leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) were selected to be used as samples. To produce a two dimensional image, sections cut from leaf samples were analyzed. Cellulose doped with multi-element solution standards was used as calibration samples. Two certified reference materials (NIST SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and NIST SRM 1573a Tomato leaves) were used to verify the accuracy of measurements with good agreement between the measured concentrations and the certified values. Quantitative imaging revealed the inhomogeneous distribution of the selected elements. Excess of Cd and Mg tended to be focused on peripheral regions and the tip of the leaf.

  19. Determination of boron content and isotopic composition in gypsum by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry using phase transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yun-Qi; Peng, Zhang-Kuang; Yang, Jian; Xiao, Ying-Kai; Zhang, Yan-Ling

    2017-12-01

    As a stable isotope, boron plays an important role in hydrogeology, environmental geochemistry, ore deposit geochemistry and marine paleoclimatology. However, there is no report of boron isotopic composition in gypsum. This is mainly confined to complete dissolution of Gypsum by water or acid. In this study, gypsum was converted to calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) with ammonium bicarbonate(NH 4 HCO 3 ) by two steps at 50°C. In every step, the mass ratio of NH 4 HCO 3 /CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O was twice, and conversion rate reached more than 98%. Converted CaCO 3 was totally dissolved with hydrochloric acid (the dissolution rate was over 99%). In order to overcome the difficulties of the matrix interference and the detection limit of Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES), we use Amberlite IRA 743 resin to purify and enrichment the boron at first, then eluting boron from the resin with 10mL 0.1mol/L hydrochloric acid at 75°C. The boron isotopic composition of natural gypsum samples was determined using positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry (P-TIMS). The boron isotopic composition of gypsum may be an excellent indicator for the formation environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of particle-induced X-ray emission, backscattering spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy in the evaluation of orthodontic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gihwala, D.; Mars, J.A.; Pineda-Vargas, C.

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this investigation was on orthodontic materials used in the manufacture of dental brackets. The properties of these dental materials are subjected to various physical parameters such as elongation, yield strength and elasticity that justify their application. In turn, these parameters depend on the quantitative elemental concentration distribution (QECD) in the materials used in the manufacture. For compositional analysis, proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), backscatter spectrometry (BS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied. QECD analysis was performed to correlate the physical parameters with the composition and to quantify imperfections in the materials. PIXE and BS analyses were performed simultaneously with a 3 MeV proton beam while electrons accelerated at 25 keV were used for the SEM analysis. From the QECDs it was observed that: (1) the major elements Cr, Fe and Ni were homogeneously distributed in the orthodontic plate; (2) the distribution of Mo and O correlated with one another; (3) there was a spread of Cr around regions of high C concentration; and, (4) areas of high concentrations of Mo and O corresponded to a decrease in C concentrations. Elemental concentration correlations are shown to indicate the similarities and differences in the ease of formation of phases, based on the tangent of linearity. (author)

  1. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for simultaneous determination of cadmium, cobalt, lead and nickel in water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos Silva, E.; Correia, L.O.; Dos Santos, L.O.; Dos Santos Vieira, E.V.; Lemos, V.A.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new method for the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of Cd(II), Co(II), Pb(II) and Ni (II) from water samples prior to their simultaneous determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The procedure is based on the injection of a ternary solvent system composed of appropriate quantities of extraction solvent (trichloroethylene), dispersive solvent (ethanol), and the chelating reagent 2-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-p-cresol into the sample solution. The solution turns turbid immediately after injection, and the analytes are extracted into the droplets of the organic phase which was dried and dissolved in a mixture of Triton X-114, nitric acid, and ethanol. The metal ions in this mixture were quantified by ICP-OES. The detection limits under optimized conditions are 0.2, 0.3, 0.2 and 0.7 μg L -1 for Cd(II), Co(II), Pb(II) and Ni(II), respectively. The enrichment factors were also calculated for Cd (13), Co (11), Pb (11) and Ni (8). The procedure was applied to the determination of cadmium, cobalt, lead and nickel in certified reference material (waterway sediment) and water samples. (author)

  2. Investigation into spatial distribution of macroelements in dried drops of albumins and proteins by the methods of atomic-emission multichannel spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin', N.Kh.; Zazhogin, A.P.; Bulojchik, Zh.I.; Tanin, A.L.; Pashkovskaya, I.D.; Nechipurenko, N.I.

    2011-01-01

    Based on local analysis of the line intensities of Al, Ca, Mg, and Zn in spectra for the samples of dried drops of egg albumin, the possibility for estimation of the spatial elemental distribution by the drop diameter was demonstrated using the atomic-emission multichannel spectrometry method. It was found that with an increase in the concentration of the elements with a high diffusion coefficient (Ca) diffusion counteracts their carry-over to the boundary of evaporating drops, simultaneously displacing the salts of other elements (Al, Fe, Zn) to the drop periphery. This work shows that excitation of the analyzed surface of a dried protein drop by double laser pulses enables a semi-quantitative estimation of the distribution of essential elements by the drop radius. Such investigations look very promising in search for markers of various diseases and in the development of methods revealing the pathological processes at the preclinical stage, making it possible to look for the causes of the elemental unbalance, to realize a targeted selection of preparations and active additives, to correct the treatment course. (authors)

  3. An ultrasound-assisted digestion method for the determination of toxic element concentrations in ash samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilander, Aki; Vaeisaenen, Ari

    2007-01-01

    A method of ultrasound-assisted digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) used for the determination of toxic element concentrations (arsenic, barium, cobalt, copper, lead, nickel, strontium, vanadium and zinc) in ash samples was developed. All the measurements were performed in robust plasma conditions which were tested by measuring the Mg(II) 280.270 nm/Mg(I) 285.213 nm line intensity ratios. The highest line intensity ratios were observed when a nebulizer gas flow of 0.6 L min -1 , auxiliary gas flow of 0.2 L min -1 and plasma power of 1400 W were used for radially viewed plasma. The analysis of SRM 1633b showed that the ultrasound-assisted method developed is highly comparable with the microwave digestion method standardized by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA-3052). The ultrasound-assisted digestion with a digestion solution of aqua regia and hydrofluoric acid (HF) resulted in recovery rates of over 81%. One exception is arsenic which resulted in recoveries of about 60% only; however, it could be digested with good recovery (>90%) using a digestion solution of 5 mL of water and 5 mL of aqua regia. The major advantage of the ultrasound-assisted digestion over microwave digestion is the high treatment rate (30 samples simultaneously with a sonication time of 18 min)

  4. Determination of Hg(2+) by on-line separation and pre-concentration with atmospheric-pressure solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Zheng

    2014-10-03

    A simple and sensitive method to determine Hg(2+) was developed by combining solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry (SCGD-AES) with flow injection (FI) based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE). We synthesized l-cysteine-modified mesoporous silica and packed it in an SPE microcolumn, which was experimentally determined to possess a good mercury adsorption capacity. An enrichment factor of 42 was achieved under optimized Hg(2+) elution conditions, namely, an FI flow rate of 2.0 mL min(-1) and an eluent comprised of 10% thiourea in 0.2 mol L(-1) HNO3. The detection limit of FI-SCGD-AES was determined to be 0.75 μg L(-1), and the precision of the 11 replicate Hg(2+) measurements was 0.86% at a concentration of 100 μg L(-1). The proposed method was validated by determining Hg(2+) in certified reference materials such as human hair (GBW09101b) and stream sediment (GBW07310). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Comparative study of injection into a pneumatic nebuliser and tungsten coil electrothermal vaporisation for the determination of rare earth elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, K.

    1988-01-01

    Injection into a pneumatic nebuliser and vaporisation using a tungsten coil electrothermal vaporisation system, with a 3-kW argon-nitrogen inductively coupled plasma (ICP), are compared for the determination of the rare earth elements. The sampling efficiency and thus also the absolute power of detection of the tungsten coil ICP optical emission spectrometric (ICP-OES) technique are better by two orders of magnitude, than the injection technique. The absolute detection limits for the rare earth elements are at the pg level; for the refractory rare earth elements (Er, La, Lu and Y), they are lower than those obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, whereas for the other rare earth elements (Eu, Sc, Tm and Yb), the detection limits are comparable. With injection of samples into a pneumatic nebuliser and ICP-OES, matrix effects are low and absolute amounts of the order of mg of the rare earth matrix can be tolerated, giving relative detection limits down to 1 μg g -1 . The amount of rare earth matrix that can be tolerated with the tungsten-coil atomiser is two orders of magnitude lower. Thus the relatively detection limits of the two methods are of the same order, although the matrix effects are considerably higher with the tungsten coil. (author)

  6. Development of a direct hydride generation nebulizer for the determination of selenium by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrion, Nereida; Murillo, Miguel; Montiel, Edie; Diaz, Dorfe

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a new direct hydride generation nebulizer system for determination of hydride forming elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. This system was designed and optimized to obtain the highest sensitivity. Several experimental designs were used for these purposes. To optimize the individual parameters of the system, and to study the interaction between these parameters for both direct hydride generation nebulizers, a central composite orthogonal design with eight factors was set up. Significant behavioral differences were observed in the two direct hydride generation nebulizers studied. Finally, a 70 μm gas orifice nebulizer exhibits a better detection limit than the 120 μm nebulizer. Generally, for determination of selenium, this new direct hydride generation nebulizer system exhibits a linear dynamic range and detection limit (3σb) of 3 orders of magnitude and 0.2 μg l -1 for selenium, respectively. This new hydride generator is much simpler system that conventional hydride generation systems, which does not need to be changed to work in normal mode with the inductively coupled plasma, since this system may be used for hydride forming elements and those that do not form them. It produces a rapid response with low memory effect. It reduces the interference level of Ni, Co and Cu to 600, 500 and 5 mg l -1 , respectively. The accuracy of the system was verified by the determination of selenium in several standard reference materials of ambient, food and clinical sample matrices. No statistically significant differences (95 confidence level) were obtained between our method and the reference values

  7. Establishing the link between health effects and tire pyrolysis emissions through X RF spectrometry of particulate matter in the 2.5 range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Flora L.; Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.; Bautista VII, Angel T.; Bucal, Camille Grace DL.

    2011-01-01

    In July 2009, several tire pyrolysis facility started operations in Angat, Bulacan. Very soon after the facility in Pulong Yantok started operations, nearby residents noted oily effluents contaminating the surrounding area including a nearby creek and adjacent rice fields; sacks of dark ash stacked close just outside the facility; dark layers of soot on the ground, foliage and rooftops. Residents complained that they could no longer save rainwater for drinking because their rain gutters were contaminated by soot. The residents also complained of foul odor emanating from the facility. many of them has to stay indoors and close their windows to keep away tire pyrolysis emissions. In January, 2010, people became alarmed on realizing that they were exhibiting a communal reaction to airborne substances which they suspected were coming from the tire pyrolysis facility. Symptoms experienced were: tightening of the chest, asthma, excessive phlegm formation, coughing, allergic rhinitis, eye and skin irritation, headaches, stomach ache and even fever. At the time the exact nature of the facility was not yet clear to stake holders. Assistance was sought from the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) for the conduct of air particulate monitoring, in order to generate preliminary information on the nature of airborne pollutants. PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 monitoring was undertaken with the Gent sampler and subsequent elemental analysis by X RF spectrometry, in an attempt to identify possible signature elements. PM2.5 and PM10 levels were much below the WHO guideline values. Elements present above one percent in PM2.5 were: Black C, Na, S, Si, K, Ca, Al and Mg. Those present below one percent in PM2.5 were: Fe, Zn, Pb, P, and Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Cu were below detection limits. A drop in concentration was noted for elements present in tires (Zn, S, Pb, Al, Si, Mg and Black C) when the facility stopped operations after the implementation of the Cease and Desist Order (CDO). Zn

  8. A SIMPLE SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TRACE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    proposed method is based on the reaction of vanadium(V) with potassium iodide in ... coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry [6], mass spectrometry [7] and atomic ..... Green, J.M. A Practical Guide to Analytical Method Validation, Anal.

  9. Comparison of the samples injection systems with ultrasonic nebulizer and with pneumatic nebulizer for the metal determination in water by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, Sergio R; Pismante, Paola A

    2005-01-01

    The natural waters, depending on their use, must fulfill the exigencies and requirements that fix national and international norms. These establish conditions with respect to the concentration levels that must be some metals. In this work the development of inductively coupled plasma emission optical spectrometry with ultrasonic injection system is presented. The determination of aluminum, arsenic, barium, cadmium, zinc, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, strontium and vanadium, at levels of ultra-trace in water samples is studied by this technique. The wavelengths that represented better sensitivity and minors spectral interferences, were selected from the Literature specialized in the analysis of this type of material. Also the conditions of work for the ultrasonic nebulization: temperature, pressure, flow speed of argon, and flow speed of sample was determined. The greater sensitivity of the injection system by ultrasonic nebulization forehead to the injection system by pneumatic nebulization, is verified when comparing the spectral intensity of the selected wavelengths. Also the limits of detection and quantification was obtained by both systems. The validity of the results obtained in this method is verified applying the test of Fisher, who determines the degree of homogeneity of the variances, and the test of Student, to determine the trazability obtained with these values. For these studies, the certified material of reference TM-24.2 of National Water Research Institute Environment Canada (NWRI), was used. The positive answer to the criteria of evaluation E and Z-Score, obtained by this technique, allows to verify that it fulfills the exigencies to be used in the determination of metals at the required levels (au)

  10. Application of cotton as a solid phase extraction sorbent for on-line preconcentration of copper in water samples prior to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Mohammad; Yamini, Yadollah; Shariati, Shahab

    2009-07-30

    Copper, as a heavy metal, is toxic for many biological systems. Thus, the determination of trace amounts of copper in environmental samples is of great importance. In the present work, a new method was developed for the determination of trace amounts of copper in water samples. The method is based on the formation of ternary Cu(II)-CAS-CTAB ion-pair and adsorption of it into a mini-column packed with cotton prior applying inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The experimental parameters that affected the extraction efficiency of the method such as pH, flow rate and volume of the sample solution, concentration of chromazurol S (CAS) and cethyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as well as type and concentration of eluent were investigated and optimized. The ion-pair (Cu(II)-CAS-CTAB) was quantitatively retained on the cotton under the optimum conditions, then eluted completely using a solution of 25% (v/v) 1-propanol in 0.5 mol L(-1) HNO(3) and directly introduced into the nebulizer of the ICP-OES. The detection limit (DL) of the method for copper was 40 ng L(-1) (V(sample)=100mL) and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for the determination of copper at 10 microg L(-1) level was found to be 1.3%. The method was successfully applied to determine the trace amounts of copper in tap water, deep well water, seawater and two different mineral waters, and suitable recoveries were obtained (92-106%).

  11. An evaluation of microwave-assisted fusion and microwave-assisted acid digestion methods for determining elemental impurities in carbon nanostructures using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Patole, Shashikant P.

    2015-10-21

    It is common for as-prepared carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene samples to contain remnants of the transition metals used to catalyze their growth; contamination may also leave other trace elemental impurities in the samples. Although a full quantification of impurities in as-prepared samples of carbon nanostructures is difficult, particularly when trace elements are intercalated or encapsulated within a protective layer of graphitic carbon, reliable information is essential for reasons such as quantifying the adulteration of physico-chemical properties of the materials and for evaluating environmental issues. Here, we introduce a microwave-based fusion method to degrade single- and double-walled CNTs and graphene nanoplatelets into a fusion flux thereby thoroughly leaching all metallic impurities. Subsequent dissolution of the fusion product in diluted hydrochloric and nitric acid allowed us to identify their trace elemental impurities using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Comparisons of the results from the proposed microwave-assisted fusion method against those of a more classical microwave-assisted acid digestion approach suggest complementarity between the two that ultimately could lead to a more reliable and less costly determination of trace elemental impurities in carbon nanostructured materials. Graphical abstract A method for the complete digestion of carbon nanostructures has been demonstrated. Photographs (on the left side) show zirconium crucibles containing SWCNTs with flux of Na2CO3 and K2CO3, before and after microwave fusion; (on the right side) the appearance of the final solutions containing dissolved samples, from microwave-assisted fusion and microwave-assisted acid digestion. These solutions were used for determining the trace elemental impurities by ICP‒OES.

  12. Investigations on the emission of fragrance allergens from scented toys by means of headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuck, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Luch, Andreas

    2010-04-30

    In the revised European toy safety directive 2009/48/EC the application of fragrance allergens in children's toys is restricted. The focus of the present work lies on the instrumental analytics of 13 banned fragrance allergens, as well as on 11 fragrance allergens that require declaration when concentrations surpass 100 microg per gram material. Applying a mixture of ethyl acetate and toluene solid/liquid extraction was performed prior to quantitative analysis of mass contents of fragrances in scented toys. In addition, an easy-to-perform method for the determination of emitted fragrances at 23 degrees C (handling conditions) or at 40 degrees C (worst case scenario) has been worked out to allow for the evaluation of potential risks originating from inhalation of these compounds during handling of or playing with toys. For this purpose a headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) technique was developed and coupled to subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Fragrance allergens were adsorbed (extracted) from the gas phase onto an 85 microm polyacrylate fiber while incubating pieces of the scented toys in sealed headspace vials at 23 degrees C and 40 degrees C. Quantification of compounds was performed via external calibration. The newly developed headspace method was subsequently applied to five perfumed toys. As expected, the emission of fragrance allergens from scented toys depends on the temperature and on the content of fragrance allergens present in those samples. In particular at conditions mimicking worst case (40 degrees C), fragrance allergens in toys may pose a risk to children since considerable amounts of compound might be absorbed by lung tissue via breathing of contaminated air. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of Hg{sup 2+} by on-line separation and pre-concentration with atmospheric-pressure solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qing [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Zhen [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Wang, Zheng, E-mail: wangzheng@mail.sic.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • A modified SBA-15 mesoporous silica (SH-SBA-15) was synthesized as a sorbent. • On-line SPE combined with SCGD-AES based on FIA was used to detect Hg{sup 2+} firstly. • A simple, low-cost Hg{sup 2+} analysis in a complex matrix was established. • The sensitive detection of Hg{sup 2+} was achieved with a detection limit of 0.75 μg L{sup −1}. - Abstract: A simple and sensitive method to determine Hg{sup 2+} was developed by combining solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry (SCGD-AES) with flow injection (FI) based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE). We synthesized L-cysteine-modified mesoporous silica and packed it in an SPE microcolumn, which was experimentally determined to possess a good mercury adsorption capacity. An enrichment factor of 42 was achieved under optimized Hg{sup 2+} elution conditions, namely, an FI flow rate of 2.0 mL min{sup −1} and an eluent comprised of 10% thiourea in 0.2 mol L{sup −1} HNO{sub 3}. The detection limit of FI–SCGD-AES was determined to be 0.75 μg L{sup −1}, and the precision of the 11 replicate Hg{sup 2+} measurements was 0.86% at a concentration of 100 μg L{sup −1}. The proposed method was validated by determining Hg{sup 2+} in certified reference materials such as human hair (GBW09101b) and stream sediment (GBW07310)

  14. Selective Iron(III ion uptake using CuO-TiO2 nanostructure by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Mohammed M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CuO-TiO2 nanosheets (NSs, a kind of nanomaterials is one of the most attracting class of transition doped semiconductor materials due to its interesting and important optical, electrical, and structural properties and has many technical applications, such as in metal ions detection, photocatalysis, Chemi-sensors, bio-sensors, solar cells and so on. In this paper the synthesis of CuO-TiO2 nanosheets by the wet-chemically technique is reported. Methods CuO-TiO2 NSs were prepared by a wet-chemical process using reducing agents in alkaline medium and characterized by UV/vis., FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM etc. Results The structural and optical evaluation of synthesized NSs were measured by XRD pattern, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and UV–vis spectroscopy, respectively which confirmed that the obtained NSs are well-crystalline CuO-TiO2 and possessing good optical properties. The morphological analysis of CuO-TiO2 NSs was executed by FE-SEM, which confirmed that the doped products were sheet-shaped and growth in large quantity. Here, the analytical efficiency of the NSs was applied for a selective adsorption of iron(III ion prior to detection by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. The selectivity of NSs towards various metal ions, including Au(III, Cd(II, Co(II, Cr(III, Fe(III, Pd(II, and Zn(II was analyzed. Conclusions Based on the selectivity study, it was confirmed that the selectivity of doped NSs phase was the most towards Fe(III ion. The static adsorption capacity for Fe(III was calculated to be 110.06 mgg−1. Results from adsorption isotherm also verified that the adsorption process was mainly monolayer-adsorption onto a surface containing a finite number of CuO-TiO2 NSs adsorption sites.

  15. Sample Preprocessing For Atomic Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Tae

    2004-08-01

    This book gives descriptions of atomic spectrometry, which deals with atomic absorption spectrometry such as Maxwell-Boltzmann equation and Beer-Lambert law, atomic absorption spectrometry for solvent extraction, HGAAS, ETASS, and CVAAS and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer, such as basic principle, generative principle of plasma and device and equipment, and interferences, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry like device, pros and cons of ICP/MS, sample analysis, reagent, water, acid, flux, materials of experiments, sample and sampling and disassembling of sample and pollution and loss in open system and closed system.

  16. Effects of air exchange, temperature and slurry management on odorant emissions from pig production units and slurry tanks studied by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feilberg, A.; Adamsen, A.P.S.; Liu, D.; Hansen, M.J.; Bildsoe, P. [Aarhus Univ., Tjele (Denmark). Dept. of Biosystems Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The factors affecting the variability of odorant emissions from intensive pig production facilities were examined using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to monitor emissions of odorants. Quantitative and time-resolved results for protonated ions representing hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S), volatile organic sulphur compounds, organic amines, volatile carboxylic acids, carbonyls, phenols and indoles can be obtained. This study presented the results from PTRMS measurements of odorant emissions from finisher pig houses and finisher manure storage tanks. The measurements were performed at an experimental full-scale pig section with mechanical ventilation and at an experimental manure storage facility with controlled air exchange. Field measurements were taken during variable air exchange rates and temperatures, during finisher growth, and during emptying of the slurry pit. The results revealed a pronounced diurnal variation in emissions of odorants from the pig section with peaks in daytime coinciding with the highest ventilation rates and highest room temperatures. The highest emission rates were observed for H{sub 2}S and carboxylic acids. Based on odour threshold values, methanethiol and 4-methylphenol were estimated to contribute considerably to the odour nuisance. Discharging of the slurry pit led to reduced H{sub 2}S emissions, but peaks of H{sub 2}S were observed during manure handling.

  17. Total sulfur determination in gasoline, kerosene and diesel fuel using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after direct sample introduction as detergent emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santelli, Ricardo Erthal; Padua Oliveira, Eliane; Batista de Carvalho, Maria de Fatima; Almeida Bezerra, Marcos; Soares Freire, Aline

    2008-01-01

    Herein, we present the development of a procedure for the determination of total sulfur in petroleum-derived products (gasoline, kerosene and diesel fuel) employing inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). For this procedure, samples were prepared as emulsions that were made using concentrated nitric acid, Triton X-100, sample, and ultra pure water in proportions of 5/10/7/78% (v/v), respectively. Sample volumes were weighed because of the density differences, and oxygen was added to the sheat gas entrance of the ICP OES in order to decrease carbon deposition in the torch and to minimize background effects. A Doehlert design was applied as an experimental matrix to investigate the flow ratios of argon (sheat and plasma gas) and oxygen in relation to the signal-to-background ratio. A comparative study among the slopes of the analytical curves built in aqueous media, surfactant/HNO 3 , and by spike addition for several sample emulsions indicates that a unique solution of surfactant in acidic media can be employed to perform the external calibration for analysis of the emulsions. The developed procedure allows for the determination of the total sulfur content in petroleum derivatives with a limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of 0.72 and 2.4 μg g -1 , respectively. Precision values, expressed as the relative standard deviations (% RSD, n = 10) for 12 and 400 μg g -1 , were 2.2% and 1.3%, respectively. The proposed procedure was applied toward the determination of total sulfur in samples of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel commercialized in the city of Niteroi/RJ, Brazil. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by the determination of the total sulfur in three different standard reference materials (SRM): NIST 2723a (sulfur in diesel fuel oil), NIST 1616b (sulfur in kerosene), and NIST 2298 (sulfur in gasoline). The data indicate that the methodology can be successfully applied to these types of samples

  18. Plants as biomarkers for monitoring heavy metal contaminants on landfill sites using sequential extraction and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry (ICP-AES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, A P; Coudert, M; Barker, J

    2000-12-01

    There have been a number of studies investigating metal uptake in plants on contaminated landfill sites, but little on their role as biomarkers to identify metal mobility for continuous monitoring purposes. Vegetation can be used as a biomonitor of site pollution, by identifying the mobilisation of heavy metals and by providing an understanding of their bioavailability. Plants selected were the common nettle (Uritica Dioica), bramble (Rubus Fruticosa) and sycamore (Acer Pseudoplatanus). A study of the soil fractionation was made to investigate the soil properties that are likely to influence metal mobility and a correlation exercise was undertaken to investigate if variations in concentration of metals in vegetation can reflect variations in concentration of the metals in soil. The soil was digested using aqua regia in a microwave closed vessel. The vegetation was digested using both microwave and a hydrogen peroxide-nitric acid mixture, refluxed on a heating block and a comparison made. The certified reference materials (CRMs) used were Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1547, peach leaves for vegetation (NIST) and for soil CRM 143R, sewage sludge-amended soil (BCR). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2-6% for the analyses. Our findings show evidence of phytoextraction by some plants, (especially bramble and nettle), with certain plants, (sycamore) exhibiting signs of phytostabilisation. The evidence suggests that there is a degree of selectivity in metal uptake and partitioning within the plant compartments. It was also possible to correlate mobility phases of certain metals (Pb, Cu and Zn) using the soil and plant record. Zn and Cu exhibited the greatest potential to migrate from the roots to the leaves, with Pb found principally in the roots of ground vegetation. Our results suggest that analysis of bramble leaves, nettle leaves and roots can be used to monitor the mobility of Pb in the soil with nettle, bramble and sycamore leaves to monitor Cu and Zn.

  19. [Determination of ru, rh and Pd in 30% trialkyl phosphine oxide (TRPO)-kerosene by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrum (ICP-AES)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Chen; Zhang, Lin

    2013-07-01

    The determination method of Ru, Rh and Pd in 30% TRPO-kerosene ICP-AES was studied by using aqueous calibration reference solution and choosing ethanol as diluent. The effects of the contents of 30% TRPO-kerosene and aqueous solution and the concentration of HNO3 in 30% TRPO-kerosene on the intensities of Ru, Rh and Pd were described. The optimized condition for preparing samples and calibration solutions was chosen as follows: The contents of 30% TRPO-kerosene and aqueous phase were 10% (V/V) and 5% (V/V) respectively and the concentration of HNO3 30% TRPO-kerosene was 0.20 mol x L(-1). The determination method of Au, Ru and Pd was set up according to the above condition. The detection limit, precision and recovery ratio of Ru, Rh and Pd are well. The method is not only used in determination of Au, Ru and Pd in 30% TRPO-kerosene, but also used in other organic phases.

  20. Determination of trace elements of some Egyptian crops by instrumental neutron activation, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometric and flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awadallah, R.M.; Sherif, M.K.; Amrallah, A.H.; Grass, F.

    1986-01-01

    INAA was used for the determination of Al, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Ti, Th, V and Zn, ICP-AES for the determination of Al, Ag, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Sc, Sr, Ti, V and Zn, and flameless AAS for the determination of Cd, Hg and Pb in egg plant, potatoes, green pepper (Leguminosae), vegetable marrow (Cucurbitaceae), pears, apple (Rosaceae), castor oil plant (Euphorbiaceae), lettuce (compositae), dill, parsley, coriander (Umbelliferae), and in some soil samples collected from Aswan province. (author)

  1. Standard test method for determination of impurities in plutonium: acid dissolution, ion exchange matrix separation, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic (ICP/AES) analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers blended uranium trioxide (UO3), U3O8, or mixtures of the two, powders that are intended for conversion into a sinterable uranium dioxide (UO2) powder by means of a direct reduction process. The UO2 powder product of the reduction process must meet the requirements of Specification C 753 and be suitable for subsequent UO2 pellet fabrication by pressing and sintering methods. This specification applies to uranium oxides with a 235U enrichment less than 5 %. 1.2 This specification includes chemical, physical, and test method requirements for uranium oxide powders as they relate to the suitability of the powder for storage, transportation, and direct reduction to UO2 powder. This specification is applicable to uranium oxide powders for such use from any source. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for preventing criticality accidents, for health and safety, or for shipping. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of th...

  2. Speciation analysis of organomercurial compounds in Fish Tissue by capillary gas chromatography coupled to microwave-induced plasma atomic emission detection

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Dorfe; Murillo, Miguel; Carrión, Nereida; Ríos, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    El presente trabajo describe una metodología para la determinación de especies de mercurio en tejido de peces mediante Cromatografía de Gases utilizando como detección la Espectrometría de Emisión Óptica con Plasma Inducido por Microondas (GC-MIP-OES) utilizando un surfatron como cavidad resonante. Las especies de mercurio fueron extraídas cuantitativamente por lixiviación con ultrasonido utilizando una mezcla ácido-tolueno. Los límites de detección obtenidos fueron de 5 y 9 pg para metilmerc...

  3. Complementary Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ Thin-Film Photovoltaic Cells Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, Auger Electron Spectroscopy, and Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yun Jung; Lee, Jihye; Jeong, Jeung-Hyun; Lee, Kang-Bong; Kim, Donghwan; Lee, Yeonhee

    2018-05-01

    To enhance the conversion performance of solar cells, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is required. In this study, we determined the average concentration of the major elements (Cu, In, Ga, and Se) in fabricated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films, using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and wavelengthdispersive electron probe microanalysis. Depth profiling results for CIGS thin films with different cell efficiencies were obtained using secondary ion mass spectrometry and Auger electron spectroscopy to compare the atomic concentrations. Atom probe tomography, a characterization technique with sub-nanometer resolution, was used to obtain three-dimensional elemental mapping and the compositional distribution at the grain boundaries (GBs). GBs are identified by Na increment accompanied by Cu depletion and In enrichment. Segregation of Na atoms along the GB had a beneficial effect on cell performance. Comparative analyses of different CIGS absorber layers using various analytical techniques provide us with understanding of the compositional distributions and structures of high efficiency CIGS thin films in solar cells.

  4. 77 FR 29757 - Guidelines Establishing Test Procedures for the Analysis of Pollutants Under the Clean Water Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ...: Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy ICP/MS: Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry...): ``Determination of Trace Elements in Drinking Water by Axially Viewed Inductively Coupled Plasma--Atomic Emission... Committee, and ASTM International. Standard Methods and ASTM are available in printed or electronic...

  5. A combined accelerator mass spectrometry-positron emission tomography human microdose study with 14C- and 11C-labelled verapamil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Claudia C; Simpson, Marie; Zeitlinger, Markus; Bauer, Martin; Karch, Rudolf; Abrahim, Aiman; Feurstein, Thomas; Schütz, Matthias; Kletter, Kurt; Müller, Markus; Lappin, Graham; Langer, Oliver

    2011-02-01

    In microdose studies, the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug in blood after administration of a dose up to 100 μg is measured with sensitive analytical techniques, such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). As most drugs exert their effect in tissue rather than blood, methodology is needed for extending pharmacokinetic analysis to different tissue compartments. In the present study, we combined, for the first time, AMS analysis with positron emission tomography (PET) in order to determine the pharmacokinetic profile of the model drug verapamil in plasma and brain of humans. In order to assess pharmacokinetic dose linearity of verapamil, data were acquired and compared after administration of an intravenous microdose and after an intravenous microdose administered concomitantly with an oral therapeutic dose. Six healthy male subjects received an intravenous microdose [0.05 mg] (period 1) and an intravenous microdose administered concomitantly with an oral therapeutic dose [80 mg] of verapamil (period 2) in a randomized, crossover, two-period study design. The intravenous dose was a mixture of (R/S)-[14C]verapamil and (R)-[11C]verapamil and the oral dose was unlabelled racaemic verapamil. Brain distribution of radioactivity was measured with PET whereas plasma pharmacokinetics of (R)- and (S)-verapamil were determined with AMS. PET data were analysed by pharmacokinetic modelling to estimate the rate constants for transfer (k) of radioactivity across the blood-brain barrier. Most pharmacokinetic parameters of (R)- and (S)-verapamil as well as parameters describing exchange of radioactivity between plasma and brain (influx rate constant [K(1)] = 0.030 ± 0.003 and 0.031 ± 0.005 mL/mL/min and efflux rate constant [k(2)] = 0.099 ± 0.006 and 0.095 ± 0.008 min-1 for period 1 and 2, respectively) were not statistically different between the two periods although there was a trend for nonlinear pharmacokinetics for the (R)-enantiomer. On the other hand, all

  6. Odor and odorous chemical emissions from dairy and swine facilities: Part 5-Simultaneous chemical and sensory analysis with Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry - Olfactometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (GC-MS-O) for air samples collected at barn exhaust fans were used for quantification and ranking of odor impact of target odorous gases. Fifteen target odorous VOCs (odorants) were selected. Air sampl...

  7. Arsenic speciation in edible alga samples by microwave-assisted extraction and high performance liquid chromatography coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Salgado, S.; Quijano, M.A.; Bonilla, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Total As and As species were analyzed in edible marine algae. ► A microwave-assisted extraction method with deionized water was applied. ► As compounds identified comprised DMA, As(V) and four arsenosugars ► Considerably high As(V) concentrations were found in the most of the algae studied. - Abstract: Twelve commercially available edible marine algae from France, Japan and Spain and the certified reference material (CRM) NIES No. 9 Sargassum fulvellum were analyzed for total arsenic and arsenic species. Total arsenic concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after microwave digestion and ranged from 23 to 126 μg g −1 . Arsenic species in alga samples were extracted with deionized water by microwave-assisted extraction and showed extraction efficiencies from 49 to 98%, in terms of total arsenic. The presence of eleven arsenic species was studied by high performance liquid chromatography–ultraviolet photo-oxidation–hydride generation atomic–fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC–(UV)–HG–AFS) developed methods, using both anion and cation exchange chromatography. Glycerol and phosphate sugars were found in all alga samples analyzed, at concentrations between 0.11 and 22 μg g −1 , whereas sulfonate and sulfate sugars were only detected in three of them (0.6-7.2 μg g −1 ). Regarding arsenic toxic species, low concentration levels of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) ( −1 ) and generally high arsenate (As(V)) concentrations (up to 77 μg g −1 ) were found in most of the algae studied. The results obtained are of interest to highlight the need to perform speciation analysis and to introduce appropriate legislation to limit toxic arsenic species content in these food products.

  8. Arsenic speciation in edible alga samples by microwave-assisted extraction and high performance liquid chromatography coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Salgado, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Civil: Tecnologia Hidraulica y Energetica, Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria Tecnica de Obras Publicas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Alfonso XII 3 y 5, 28014 Madrid (Spain); Quijano, M.A., E-mail: marian.quijano@upm.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Civil: Tecnologia Hidraulica y Energetica, Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria Tecnica de Obras Publicas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Alfonso XII 3 y 5, 28014 Madrid (Spain); Bonilla, M.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Civil: Tecnologia Hidraulica y Energetica, Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria Tecnica de Obras Publicas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Alfonso XII 3 y 5, 28014 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Total As and As species were analyzed in edible marine algae. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A microwave-assisted extraction method with deionized water was applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As compounds identified comprised DMA, As(V) and four arsenosugars Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerably high As(V) concentrations were found in the most of the algae studied. - Abstract: Twelve commercially available edible marine algae from France, Japan and Spain and the certified reference material (CRM) NIES No. 9 Sargassum fulvellum were analyzed for total arsenic and arsenic species. Total arsenic concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after microwave digestion and ranged from 23 to 126 {mu}g g{sup -1}. Arsenic species in alga samples were extracted with deionized water by microwave-assisted extraction and showed extraction efficiencies from 49 to 98%, in terms of total arsenic. The presence of eleven arsenic species was studied by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet photo-oxidation-hydride generation atomic-fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-(UV)-HG-AFS) developed methods, using both anion and cation exchange chromatography. Glycerol and phosphate sugars were found in all alga samples analyzed, at concentrations between 0.11 and 22 {mu}g g{sup -1}, whereas sulfonate and sulfate sugars were only detected in three of them (0.6-7.2 {mu}g g{sup -1}). Regarding arsenic toxic species, low concentration levels of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) (<0.9 {mu}g g{sup -1}) and generally high arsenate (As(V)) concentrations (up to 77 {mu}g g{sup -1}) were found in most of the algae studied. The results obtained are of interest to highlight the need to perform speciation analysis and to introduce appropriate legislation to limit toxic arsenic species content in these food products.

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of whole-water recoverable arsenic, boron, and vanadium using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of in-bottle digestate by using the inductively coupled plasma?mass spectrometric (ICP?MS) method has been expanded to include arsenic, boron, and vanadium. Whole-water samples are digested by using either the hydrochloric acid in-bottle digestion procedure or the nitric acid in-bottle digestion procedure. When the hydrochloric acid in-bottle digestion procedure is used, chloride must be removed from the digestate by subboiling evaporation before arsenic and vanadium can be accurately determined. Method detection limits for these elements are now 10 to 100 times lower than U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) methods using hydride generation? atomic absorption spectrophotometry (HG? AAS) and inductively coupled plasma? atomic emission spectrometry (ICP?AES), thus providing lower variability at ambient concentrations. The bias and variability of the methods were determined by using results from spike recoveries, standard reference materials, and validation samples. Spike recoveries in reagent-water, surface-water, ground-water, and whole-water recoverable matrices averaged 90 percent for seven replicates; spike recoveries were biased from 25 to 35 percent low for the ground-water matrix because of the abnormally high iron concentration. Results for reference material were within one standard deviation of the most probable value. There was no significant difference between the results from ICP?MS and HG?AAS or ICP?AES methods for the natural whole-water samples that were analyzed.

  10. Radio frequency plasma power dependence of the moisture permeation barrier characteristics of Al2O3 films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyunsoo; Choi, Hagyoung; Lee, Sanghun; Jeon, Heeyoung; Jeon, Hyeongtag

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the gas and moisture permeation barrier properties of Al 2 O 3 films deposited on polyethersulfone films (PES) by capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) type Remote Plasma Atomic Layer Deposition (RPALD) at Radio Frequency (RF) plasma powers ranging from 100 W to 400 W in 100 W increments using Trimethylaluminum [TMA, Al(CH 3 ) 3 ] as the Al source and O 2 plasma as the reactant. To study the gas and moisture permeation barrier properties of 100-nm-thick Al 2 O 3 at various plasma powers, the Water Vapor Transmission Rate (WVTR) was measured using an electrical Ca degradation test. WVTR decreased as plasma power increased with WVTR values for 400 W and 100 W of 2.6 × 10 −4 gm −2 day −1 and 1.2 × 10 −3 gm −2 day −1 , respectively. The trends for life time, Al-O and O-H bond, density, and stoichiometry were similar to that of WVTR with improvement associated with increasing plasma power. Further, among plasma power ranging from 100 W to 400 W, the highest power of 400 W resulted in the best moisture permeation barrier properties. This result was attributed to differences in volume and amount of ion and radical fluxes, to join the ALD process, generated by O 2 plasma as the plasma power changed during ALD process, which was determined using a plasma diagnosis technique called the Floating Harmonic Method (FHM). Plasma diagnosis by FHM revealed an increase in ion flux with increasing plasma power. With respect to the ALD process, our results indicated that higher plasma power generated increased ion and radical flux compared with lower plasma power. Thus, a higher plasma power provides the best gas and moisture permeation barrier properties

  11. The annealing effect on work function variation of WN{sub x}C{sub y} films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunjung; Shin, Changhee; Lim, Heewoo; Kim, Manseok [Department of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Woochool; Lee, Kunyoung [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yuh, Junhan [Division of Steel Solution, POSCO, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyeongtag [Department of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Tungsten-nitrogen-carbide (WN{sub x}C{sub y}) thin films were investigated as the metal gate of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. WN{sub x}C{sub y} thin films were deposited by employing the remote plasma atomic layer deposition (RPALD) using a bis(tert-butylimido) bis (dimethylamido) tungsten (BTBMW) precursor and hydrogen plasma as a reactant. The growth rate of the WN{sub x}C{sub y} films was about 0.12 nm/cycle. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the films consisted of a mixture of tungsten carbide and tungsten nitride phases. The atomic force microscope (AFM) analysis further confirmed that the WN{sub x}C{sub y} film surfaces deposited by RPALD were smooth. In addition, the chemical bonding state analysis showed that the WN{sub x}C{sub y} films consisted of WN, WC, and WO phases. To measure the work function of the WN{sub x}C{sub y} film, a MOSCAP (metal oxide semiconductor capacitor) stack was fabricated and the flat band voltage was measured by current-voltage (C-V) measurements. A WN{sub x}C{sub y} work function value of 4.91 eV was suitable for p-MOS and the work function of the WN{sub x}C{sub y} films varied depending on the annealing treatment, and was higher than the work function of the as-deposited WN{sub x}C{sub y} film. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Improvement of the detection limits in radio-frequency-powered glow discharge optical emission spectrometry associated with bias-current conduction method; Jiko bias denryu donyuho ni yoru koshuha glow hoden hakko bunseki ni okeru kenshutsu genkai no kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagatsuma, K. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Research Institute for Materials

    1999-01-01

    A d.c. bias current driven by the self-bias voltage which is conducted through the r.f.-powered glow discharge plasma varies the emission characteristics drastically, leading to improvement of the detection power in the optical emission spectrometry. By conducting the bias currents of 20-30 mA, the emission intensities of the atomic resonance lines were 10-20 times larger than those obtained with conventional r.t.- powered plasmas. The detection limits for determination of alloyed elements in the re-based binary alloy samples were estimated to be l.6 x 10{sup -3}% Cr for CrI 425.43nm, 7 x 10{sup -4}% Mn for MnI 403.10nm, 1.9>10{sup -3}% Cu for CuI 327.40nm, 1.1 x 10{sup -3}% Al for AlI 396.16nm, and 6.6 x 10{sup -3}% Ni for NiI 352.45 nm. (author)

  13. Tecnical Note: Analysis of non-regulated vehicular emissions by extractive FTIR spectrometry: tests on a hybrid car in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, F.; Grutter, M.; Jazcilevich, A.; González-Oropeza, R.

    2006-11-01

    A methodology to acquire valuable information on the chemical composition and evolution of vehicular emissions is presented. The analysis of the gases is performed by passing a constant flow of a sample gas from the tail-pipe into a 10 L multi-pass cell. The absorption spectra within the cell are obtained using an FTIR spectrometer at 0.5 cm-1 resolution along a 13.1 m optical path. Additionally, the total flow from the exhaust is continuously measured from a differential pressure sensor on a textit{Pitot} tube installed at the exit of the exhaust. This configuration aims to obtain a good speciation capability by coadding spectra during 30 s and reporting the emission (in g/km) of both criteria and non-regulated pollutants, such as CO2, CO, NO, SO2, NH3, HCHO and some NMHC, during predetermined driving cycles. The advantages and disadvantages of increasing the measurement frequency, as well as the effect of other parameters such as spectral resolution, cell volume and flow rate, are discussed. To test and evaluate the proposed technique, experiments were performed on a dynamometer running FTP-75 and typical driving cycles for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) on a Toyota Prius hybrid vehicle. This car is an example of recent marketed automotive technology dedicated to reduced emissions, increasing the need for sensitive detection techniques. This study shows the potential of the proposed technique to measure and report in real time the emissions of a large variety of pollutants, even from a super ultra-low emission vehicle (SULEV). The emissions of HC's, NOx, CO and CO2 obtained here were compared to experiments performed in other locations with the same model vehicle. The proposed technique provides a tool for future studies comparing in detail the emissions of vehicles using alternative fuels and emission control systems.

  14. Tecnical Note: Analysis of non-regulated vehicular emissions by extractive FTIR spectrometry: tests on a hybrid car in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Reyes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology to acquire valuable information on the chemical composition and evolution of vehicular emissions is presented. The analysis of the gases is performed by passing a constant flow of a sample gas from the tail-pipe into a 10 L multi-pass cell. The absorption spectra within the cell are obtained using an FTIR spectrometer at 0.5 cm−1 resolution along a 13.1 m optical path. Additionally, the total flow from the exhaust is continuously measured from a differential pressure sensor on a extit{Pitot} tube installed at the exit of the exhaust. This configuration aims to obtain a good speciation capability by coadding spectra during 30 s and reporting the emission (in g/km of both criteria and non-regulated pollutants, such as CO2, CO, NO, SO2, NH3, HCHO and some NMHC, during predetermined driving cycles. The advantages and disadvantages of increasing the measurement frequency, as well as the effect of other parameters such as spectral resolution, cell volume and flow rate, are discussed. To test and evaluate the proposed technique, experiments were performed on a dynamometer running FTP-75 and typical driving cycles for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA on a Toyota Prius hybrid vehicle. This car is an example of recent marketed automotive technology dedicated to reduced emissions, increasing the need for sensitive detection techniques. This study shows the potential of the proposed technique to measure and report in real time the emissions of a large variety of pollutants, even from a super ultra-low emission vehicle (SULEV. The emissions of HC's, NOx, CO and CO2 obtained here were compared to experiments performed in other locations with the same model vehicle. The proposed technique provides a tool for future studies comparing in detail the emissions of vehicles using alternative fuels and emission control systems.

  15. Recent trends in atomic spectrometry with microwave-induced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekaert, Jose A.C.; Siemens, Volker

    2004-01-01

    The state-of-the-art and trends of development in atomic spectrometry with microwave-induced plasmas (MIPs) since the 1998s are presented and discussed. This includes developments in devices for producing microwave plasma discharges, with reference also to miniaturized systems as well as to progress in sample introduction for microwave-induced plasmas, such as pneumatic and ultrasonic nebulization using membrane desolvation, to the further development of gaseous analyte species generation systems and to both spark and laser ablation (LA). The features of microwave-induced plasma mass spectrometry (MIP-MS) as an alternative to inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-MS are discussed. Recent work on the use of microwave-induced plasma atomic spectrometry for trace element determinations and monitoring, their use as tandem sources and for particle sizing are discussed. Recent applications of the coupling of gas chromatography and MIP atomic spectrometry for the determination of organometallic compounds of heavy metals such as Pb, Hg, Se and Sn are reviewed and the possibilities of trapping for sensitivity enhancement, as required for many applications especially in environmental work, are showed at the hand of citations from the recent literature

  16. A rapid and practical strategy for the determination of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, iridium and gold in large amounts of ultrabasic rock by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry combined with ultrasound extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gai; Tian, Min

    2015-04-01

    This proposed method regulated the determination of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, iridium and gold in platinum-group ores by nickel sulfide fire assay—inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) combined with ultrasound extraction for the first time. The quantitative limits were 0.013-0.023μg/g. The samples were fused to separate the platinum-group elements from matrix. The nickel sulfide button was then dissolved with hydrochloric acid and the insoluble platinum-group sulfide residue was dissolved with aqua regia by ultrasound bath and finally determined by ICP-OES. The proposed method has been applied into the determination of platinum-group element and gold in large amounts of ultrabasic rocks from the Great Dyke of Zimbabwe.

  17. Acquired acid resistance of human enamel treated with laser (Er:YAG laser and Co 2 laser and acidulated phosphate fluoride treatment: An in vitro atomic emission spectrometry analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Mathew

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is essentially a process of diffusion and dissolution. If the aspect of dissolution can be curtailed some degree of prevention can be achieved. Aims: The present study was carried out to evaluate and compare the effect of Er:YAG laser and Co 2 laser irradiation combined with acidulated phosphate fluoride treatment on in vitro acid resistance of human enamel. Design: An in vitro study was carried out on 30 human premolars to evaluate the enamel′s acid resistance using an atomic emission spectrometry analysis. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 enamel specimens were prepared from 30 human premolars and were randomly assigned to 6 groups: (1 Untreated (control; (2 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF gel application alone for 4 min; (3 Er:YAG laser treatment alone; (4 Co 2 laser treatment alone; (5 Er:YAG laser + APF gel application; (6 Co 2 laser + APF gel application. The specimens were then individually immersed in 5 ml of acetate buffer solution (0.1 mol/L, pH 4.5 and incubated at 37°C for 24 h, and the acid resistance was evaluated by determining the calcium ion concentration using the atomic emission spectrometry. Statistical Analysis: An ANOVA model was constructed (P value of 0.05, followed by Tukey′s test for multiple pair wise comparisons of mean values. Results: Significant differences were found between the control group and the test groups ( P < 0.001. Conclusions: Combining acidulated phosphate fluoride with either Er:YAG or Co 2 laser had a synergistic effect in decreasing the enamel demineralization more than either fluoride treatment or laser treatment alone.

  18. The effects of oxides of carbon and nitrogen emissions on the isotope and element abundances in foliage of C3 plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucgang, Raymond; Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon; Petrache, Cristina; Bulanhagui, Jaika Faye; Legaspi, Charmaine; Niegas, Elaine; Enerva, Lorna; Luces, Arnicole

    2014-01-01

    The carbon and nitrogen stable isotope abundance of C3 plants mango (Magnifera indica L), molave (Vitex parviflora Juss), talisay (Terminalia catappa L.) leaves harvested from sites with ambient air conditions and sites receiving air pollution contributions from coal-fired power plants were determined and compared. Isotope Ratio Mass Spectroscopy, IRMS was used to determine 13 C and 15 N in the samples. The elemental composition of the samples was determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry, ICP-AES. The 13 C of the leaves grown in ambient air were found to fall within the range of -25.0 to -22.0 per mill and a close agreement with the literature values for the natural abundance of 13 C in C3 plants (-27.0 to -21.0 per mill). The 13 C abundance of plants obtained from sites polluted by coal-fired plants were sporadic from -35 to 24.0 per mille. The 15 N abundance in leaves grown under ambient air condition (-1.0 to 2.0 per mille) were way below the 15 N abundance of plants from coal-fired plant-polluted regions (16.0 to 17.5 per mille). Elemental exposition indicated no differences in element concentrations in leaves from ambient and polluted sites. Differences exist in the Ca, Mg, K ratios across species and are affected by seasonal variation. (author)

  19. Speciation of organotin compounds in waters and marine sediments using purge-and-trap capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campillo, Natalia; Aguinaga, Nerea; Vin-tilde as, Pilar; Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    A procedure for the simultaneous determination of six organotin compounds, including methyl-, butyl- and phenyltins, in waters and marine sediments is developed. The analytes were leached from the solid samples into an acetic acid:methanol mixture by using an ultrasonic probe. The organotins were derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate (NaBEt 4 ) in the aqueous phase, stripped by a flow of helium, pre-concentrated in a trap and thermally desorbed. This was followed by capillary gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry as the detection system (GC-AED). Each chromatographic run took 22 min, including the purge time. Calibration curves were obtained by plotting peak area versus concentration and the correlation coefficients for linear calibration were at least 0.9991. Detection limits ranged from 11 to 50 ng Sn l -1 for tributyltin and tetramethyltin, respectively. The seawater samples analyzed contained variable concentrations of mono-, di- and tributyl- and monophenyltin, ranging from 0.05 to 0.48 μg Sn l -1 , depending on the compound. Some of the sediments analyzed contained concentrations of dibutyl- and tributyltin of between 6.0 and 13.0 ng Sn g -1 . Analysis of the certified reference material PACS-2, as well as of spiked water and sediment samples showed the accuracy of the method. The proposed method is selective and reproducible, and is considered suitable for monitoring organotin compounds in water and sediment samples

  20. Speciation of organotin compounds in waters and marine sediments using purge-and-trap capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campillo, Natalia [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Aguinaga, Nerea [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Vin-tilde as, Pilar [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain)]. E-mail: hcordoba@um.es

    2004-11-08

    A procedure for the simultaneous determination of six organotin compounds, including methyl-, butyl- and phenyltins, in waters and marine sediments is developed. The analytes were leached from the solid samples into an acetic acid:methanol mixture by using an ultrasonic probe. The organotins were derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate (NaBEt{sub 4}) in the aqueous phase, stripped by a flow of helium, pre-concentrated in a trap and thermally desorbed. This was followed by capillary gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry as the detection system (GC-AED). Each chromatographic run took 22 min, including the purge time. Calibration curves were obtained by plotting peak area versus concentration and the correlation coefficients for linear calibration were at least 0.9991. Detection limits ranged from 11 to 50 ng Sn l{sup -1} for tributyltin and tetramethyltin, respectively. The seawater samples analyzed contained variable concentrations of mono-, di- and tributyl- and monophenyltin, ranging from 0.05 to 0.48 {mu}g Sn l{sup -1}, depending on the compound. Some of the sediments analyzed contained concentrations of dibutyl- and tributyltin of between 6.0 and 13.0 ng Sn g{sup -1}. Analysis of the certified reference material PACS-2, as well as of spiked water and sediment samples showed the accuracy of the method. The proposed method is selective and reproducible, and is considered suitable for monitoring organotin compounds in water and sediment samples.

  1. Spatially and temporally resolved detection of arsenic in a capillary dielectric barrier discharge by hydride generation high-resolved optical emission spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burhenn, S.; Kratzer, Jan; Svoboda, Milan; Klute, F. D.; Michels, A.; Veža, D.; Franzke, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 90, MAR (2018), s. 3424-3429 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-04329S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : dielectric barrier discharge * optical emission spectroscopy * arsenic hydride Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 6.320, year: 2016

  2. Spatially and temporally resolved detection of arsenic in a capillary dielectric barrier discharge by hydride generation high-resolved optical emission spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burhenn, S.; Kratzer, Jan; Svoboda, Milan; Klute, F. D.; Michels, A.; Veža, D.; Franzke, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 90, MAR (2018), s. 3424-3429 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-04329S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : dielectric barrier discharge * optical emission spectroscopy * arsenic hydride Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 6.320, year: 2016

  3. Spectrometry techniques for radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anilkumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    The energy of the radiation emission following the nuclear decay is unique and the characteristic of the radio nuclide which undergoes decay. Thus measurement of the energy of the radiation offers a method of identifying the radio nuclides. The prime requirement of the energy measurement is a suitable detector which shows response proportional to the energy of the radiation rather than the presence of the radiation. The response from such detectors are suitably processed and distributed with respect to the signal strength which is proportional to incident energy. This distribution is normally referred as energy spectrum and is recorded in the multichannel analyser. The measurement of energy and intensity of radiation from the spectrum is called radiation spectrometry. Thus the radiation spectrometry allows the identification and quantification of radioactive isotopes in variety of matrices. The radiation spectrometry has now become a popular radioanalytical technique in wide area of nuclear fuel cycle programs. The popular spectrometry techniques commonly used for the radioactivity measurement and analysis are Alpha spectrometry, Gamma ray spectrometry and Beta spectrometry

  4. Analysis of enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric monoterpenes in plant emissions using portable dynamic air sampling/solid-phase microextraction (PDAS-SPME) and chiral gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Williams, Jonathan

    A portable dynamic air sampler (PDAS) using a porous polymer solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibre has been validated for the determination of biogenic enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric monoterpenes in air. These compounds were adsorbed in the field, and then thermally desorbed at 250 °C in a gas chromatograph injector port connected via a β-cyclodextrin capillary separating column to a mass spectrometer. The optimized method has been applied for investigating the emissions of enantiomeric monoterpenes from Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir), Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosemary) and Lavandula lanata (Lavender) which were selected as representative of coniferous trees and aromatic plants, respectively. The enantiomers of α-pinene, sabinene, camphene, δ-3-carene, β-pinene, limonene, β-phellandrene, 4-carene and camphor were successfully determined in the emissions from the three plants. While Douglas-fir showed a strong predominance toward (-)-enantiomers, Rosemary and Lavender demonstrated a large variation in enantiomeric distribution of monoterpenes. The simplicity, rapidity and sensitivity of dynamic sampling with porous polymer coated SPME fibres coupled to chiral capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) makes this method potentially useful for in-field investigations of atmosphere-biosphere interactions and studies of optically explicit atmospheric chemistry.

  5. Mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvang Hartmeyer, Gitte; Jensen, Anne Kvistholm; Böcher, Sidsel

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is currently being introduced for the rapid and accurate identification of bacteria. We describe 2 MALDI-TOF MS identification cases - 1 directly on spinal fluid and 1 on grown bacteria. Rapidly obtained...

  6. Real-time analysis of organic compounds in ship engine aerosol emissions using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation and proton transfer mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radischat, Christian; Sippula, Olli; Stengel, Benjamin; Klingbeil, Sophie; Sklorz, Martin; Rabe, Rom; Streibel, Thorsten; Harndorf, Horst; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Organic combustion aerosols from a marine medium-speed diesel engine, capable to run on distillate (diesel fuel) and residual fuels (heavy fuel oil), were investigated under various operating conditions and engine parameters. The online chemical characterisation of the organic components was conducted using a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (REMPI TOF MS) and a proton transfer reaction-quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-QMS). Oxygenated species, alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons were characterised. Especially the aromatic hydrocarbons and their alkylated derivatives were very prominent in the exhaust of both fuels. Emission factors of known health-hazardous compounds (e.g. mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons) were calculated and found in higher amounts for heavy fuel oil (HFO) at typical engine loadings. Lower engine loads lead in general to increasing emissions for both fuels for almost every compound, e.g. naphthalene emissions varied for diesel fuel exhaust between 0.7 mg/kWh (75 % engine load, late start of injection (SOI)) and 11.8 mg/kWh (10 % engine load, late SOI) and for HFO exhaust between 3.3 and 60.5 mg/kWh, respectively. Both used mass spectrometric techniques showed that they are particularly suitable methods for online monitoring of combustion compounds and very helpful for the characterisation of health-relevant substances. Graphical abstract Three-dimensional REMPI data of organic species in diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil exhaust.

  7. Characterization of primary organic aerosol emissions from meat cooking, trash burning, and motor vehicles with high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry and comparison with ambient and chamber observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Claudia; Huffman, Alex; Cubison, Michael J; Aiken, Allison C; Docherty, Kenneth S; Kimmel, Joel R; Ulbrich, Ingrid M; Hannigan, Michael; Jimenez, Jose L

    2009-04-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) emissions from motor vehicles, meat-cooking and trash burning are analyzed here using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). High resolution data show that aerosols emitted by combustion engines and plastic burning are dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic compounds. Meat cooking and especially paper burning emissions contain significant fractions of oxygenated organic compounds; however, their unit-resolution mass spectral signatures are very similar to those from ambient hydrocarbon-like OA, and very different from the mass spectra of ambient secondary or oxygenated OA (OOA). Thus, primary OA from these sources is unlikelyto be a significant direct source of ambient OOA. There are significant differences in high-resolution tracer m/zs that may be useful for differentiating some of these sources. Unlike in most ambient spectra, all of these sources have low total m/z 44 and this signal is not dominated by the CO2+ ion. All sources have high m/z 57, which is low during high OOA ambient periods. Spectra from paper burning are similar to some types of biomass burning OA, with elevated m/z 60. Meat cooking aerosols also have slightly elevated m/z 60, whereas motor vehicle emissions have very low signal at this m/z.

  8. Determination of rare-earth elements, yttrium and scandium in manganese nodules by inductively-coupled argon-plastma emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, T.; Lamothe, P.J.; Pesek, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    A sequential-scanning, inductively-coupled argon plasma emission spectrometer is used for the determination of the rare-earth elements, plus yttrium and scandium, in manganese nodules. Wavelength selection is optimized to minimize spectral interferences from manganese nodule components. Samples are decomposed with mixed acids in a sealed polycarbonate vessel, and elements are quantified without further treatment. Results for U.S. Geological Survey manganese nodule standards A-1 and P-1 had average relative standard deviations of 6.8% and 8.1%, respectively, and results were in good agreement with those obtained by other methods. ?? 1984.

  9. Determination of fluorine by proton induced gamma ray emission (PIGE) spectrometry in igneous and metamorphic charnockitic rocks from Rogaland (S.W. Norway)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelandts, I.; Robaye, G.; Weber, G.; Delbrouck, J.M.; Duchesne, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    More than 200 specimens from different occurrences of the Rogaland igneous complex and surrounding granulite facies metamorphic rocks (S.W. Norway) have been analysed by a direct non-destructive proton induced gamma ray emission (PIGE) technique. The fluorine contents vary from < 25 ppm to 3500 ppm. There is a good correlation between the concentration of fluorine and that of phosphorus for igneous rocks, suggesting a control of apatite on the F content. In metamorphic rocks, amphibole and biotite besides apatite are the principal concentrations of fluorine indicating that fluorine in the system is controlled by granulite facies metamorphism conditions. (author)

  10. Flow Injection Photochemical Vapor Generation Coupled with Miniaturized Solution-Cathode Glow Discharge Atomic Emission Spectrometry for Determination and Speciation Analysis of Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jiamei; Li, Qing; Guo, Xiaohong; Zhang, Guoxia; Wang, Zheng

    2017-10-03

    A novel, compact, and green method was developed for the determination and speciation analysis of mercury, based on flow injection photochemical vapor generation (PVG) coupled with miniaturized solution cathode glow discharge-atomic emission spectroscopy (SCGD-AES). The SCGD was generated between a miniature hollow titanium tube and a solution emerging from a glass capillary. Cold mercury vapor (Hg(0)) was generated by PVG and subsequently delivered to the SCGD for excitation, and finally the emission signals were recorded by a miniaturized spectrograph. The detection limits (DLs) of Hg(II) and methylmercury (MeHg) were both determined to be 0.2 μg L -1 . Moreover, mercury speciation analysis could also be performed by using different wavelengths and powers from the UV lamp and irradiation times. Both Hg(II) and MeHg can be converted to Hg(0) for the determination of total mercury (T-Hg) with 8 W/254 nm UV lamp and 60 s irradiation time; while only Hg(II) can be reduced to Hg(0) and determined selectively with 4 W/365 nm UV lamp and 20 s irradiation time. Then, the concentration of MeHg can be calculated by subtracting the Hg(II) from the T-Hg. Because of its similar sensitivity and DL at 8 W/254 nm, the simpler and less toxic Hg(II) was used successfully as a primary standard for the quantification of T-Hg. The novel PVG-SCGD-AES system provides not only a 365-fold improvement in the DL for Hg(II) but also a nonchromatographic method for the speciation analysis of mercury. After validating its accuracy, this method was successfully used for mercury speciation analysis of water and biological samples.

  11. Evaluation of analytical procedures for the determination of cadmium, boron and lithium in UALx samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz; Kakazu, Mauricio H.; Cotrim, Marycel Elena Barboza; Pires, Maria Aparecida Faustino; Souza, Alexandre Luiz de

    2013-01-01

    Used in over 80% of the worldwide diagnostic procedures, Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), which is obtained from the decay of molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo), is the most important radioisotope in nuclear medicine. IPEN/CNEN-SP has been developing technologies in order to produce Mo-99 by the irradiation of low-enriched uranium (LEU < 20% of 235U) targets in its research reactor IEA-R1 (IPEN, Sao Paulo/Brazil). These targets consist of low enriched uranium dispersed in a matrix of aluminum (UAlx-Al). Several impurities may be incorporated during the target's production process, such as boron, cadmium and lithium, which have a high capture cross section that may reduce the irradiation's efficiency. This study describes a simple and rapid inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometric method for the determination of cadmium, boron and lithium in uranium aluminum (UAlx) dispersion targets. The method involves a previous separation step, in which uranium gets removed from the matrix by chromatographic extraction with the use of a divinylbenzene resin Amberlite XAD - 4 doped with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP). TBP selectively separates the uranium, leaving behind the impurities in an aqueous medium for a further quantification by ICP OES. Possible spectroscopic interferences are also discussed in this article, because of the high amount of aluminum in the remaining solution. Experimental and instrumental conditions, such as initial mass, acid solution ratio and amount, resin mass, emission lines and interfering concentrations are carefully established. This method is to be applied for the determination of several others impurities in UAlx in the future, providing means to verify the UAlx targets' compliance to the current established specifications through routine laboratory analysis. (author)

  12. Simultaneous detection of selenium by atomic fluorescence and sulfur by molecular emission by flow-injection hydride generation with on-line reduction for the determination of selenate, sulfate and sulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyson, J.F., E-mail: tyson@chem.umass.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Palmer, C.D. [Lead Poisoning Trace Elements Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, P.O. Box 509, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States)

    2009-10-12

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ICP-AFS) instrument, was modified so that it was capable of monitoring transient chromatographic or flow-injection profiles and that sulfur molecular emission and selenium atomic fluorescence could be monitored simultaneously in an argon-hydrogen diffusion flame on a glass burner. The analytes were introduced as hydrogen selenide and hydrogen sulfide, generated on a flow-injection manifold. Selenate was reduced to hydride-forming selenite by microwave-assisted on-line reaction with hydrochloric acid, and sulfate, or sulfite, was reduced to hydride-forming sulfide by a mixture of hydriodic acid, acetic acid and sodium hypophosphite. The effects of the nature of reducing agent, flow rate, microwave power and coil length were studied. The limit of detection (3 s) for selenium was 10 {mu}g L{sup -1}, and for sulfide was 70 {mu}g L{sup -1} (200-{mu}L injection volume). The calibration was linear for selenium up to 2 mg L{sup -1} and to 10 mg L{sup -1} for sulfide. The throughput was 180 h{sup -1}. The three sulfur species could be differentiated on the basis of reactivity at various microwave powers.

  13. Application of neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to the determination of toxic and essential elements in Australian foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fardy, J.J.; McOrist, G.D.; Farrar, Y.J.; Bowles, C.J.; Warner, I.M.; Tan Mingguang

    1994-01-01

    Current Australian Legislation specifies the maximum permitted levels of nine toxic elements in food while the National Health and Medical Research Council (NH and MRC) has listed recommended daily intake figures for seven essential elements. This investigation examined the compliance of Australian foods with both these requirements. Australia-wide samples of representative foods from the diets of Australians were used in this study after the NH and MRC kindly permitted us to join their Market Basket (Noxious Substance) Survey. Both toxic and essential element concentrations in these foods were determined using the advanced analytical techniques of instrumental (INAA) and radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). With very few exceptions, foods do not exceed the maximum permitted levels for toxic substances. Daily intake figures for essential elements generally lie close to the maximum recommended values listed by NH and MRC. Since another source of toxic element intake is drinking water, samples from different locations were analyzed by NAA and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). They were extremely low in trace elements with the exception of copper, iron, zinc and lead which approached the maximum permitted concentrations. The performance of NAA and ICP-MS for analyzing biological materials were compared. NAA cannot match the superior sensitivity for a wider range of elements obtained by ICP-MS. This has been verified for a wide range of food materials. While NAA is an inconvenient and time-consuming technique for many applications, it does not suffer from blank problems after irradiation of the sample and becomes the preferred technique where low limits of detection are required for trace concentrations in solid samples. (author). 22 refs, 27 figs, 21 tabs

  14. Deviation from Boltzmann distribution in excited energy levels of singly-ionized iron in an argon glow discharge plasma for atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lei; Kashiwakura, Shunsuke; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki, E-mail: wagatuma@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2012-01-15

    A Boltzmann plot for many iron ionic lines having excitation energies of 4.7-9.1 eV was investigated in an argon glow discharge plasma when the discharge parameters, such as the voltage/current and the gas pressure, were varied. A Grimm-style radiation source was employed in a DC voltage range of 400-800 V at argon pressures of 400-930 Pa. The plot did not follow a linear relationship over a wide range of the excitation energy, but it yielded a normal Boltzmann distribution in the range of 4.7-5.8 eV and a large overpopulation in higher-lying excitation levels of iron ion. A probable reason for this phenomenon is that excitations for higher excited energy levels of iron ion would be predominantly caused by non-thermal collisions with argon species, the internal energy of which is received by iron atoms for the ionization. Particular intense ionic lines, which gave a maximum peak of the Boltzmann plot, were observed at an excitation energy of ca. 7.7 eV. They were the Fe II 257.297-nm and the Fe II 258.111-nm lines, derived from the 3d{sup 5}4s4p {sup 6}P excited levels. The 3d{sup 5}4s4p {sup 6}P excited levels can be highly populated through a resonance charge transfer from the ground state of argon ion, because of good matching in the excitation energy as well as the conservation of the total spin before and after the collision. An enhancement factor of the emission intensity for various Fe II lines could be obtained from a deviation from the normal Boltzmann plot, which comprised the emission lines of 4.7-5.8 eV. It would roughly correspond to a contribution of the charge transfer excitation to the excited levels of iron ion, suggesting that the charge-transfer collision could elevate the number density of the corresponding excited levels by a factor of ca.10{sup 4}. The Boltzmann plots give important information on the reason why a variety of iron ionic lines can be emitted from glow discharge plasmas.

  15. Beta spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryak, P.; Zderadicka, J.; Plch, J.; Kokta, L.; Novotna, P.

    1977-01-01

    For the purpose of beta spectrometry, a semiconductor spectrometer with one Si(Li) detector cooled with liquid nitrogen was designed. Geometrical detection efficiency is about 10% 4 sr. The achieved resolution for 624 keV conversion electrons of sup(137m)Ba is 2.6 keV (FWHM). A program was written in the FORTRAN language for the correction of the deformation of the measured spectra by backscattering in the analysis of continuous beta spectra. The method permits the determination of the maximum energy of the beta spectrum with an accuracy of +-5 keV. (author)

  16. Simultaneous preconcentration of copper, zinc, cadmium, and nickel in water samples by cloud point extraction using 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol and their determination by inductively coupled plasma optic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Edson Luiz; Santos Roldan, Paulo dos; Gine, Maria Fernanda

    2009-01-01

    A procedure for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of copper, zinc, cadmium, and nickel in water samples, based on cloud point extraction (CPE) as a prior step to their determination by inductively coupled plasma optic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), has been developed. The analytes reacted with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR) at pH 5 to form hydrophobic chelates, which were separated and preconcentrated in a surfactant-rich phase of octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114). The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the proposed method, such as sample pH, complexing agent concentration, buffer amount, surfactant concentration, temperature, kinetics of complexation reaction, and incubation time were optimized and their respective values were 5, 0.6 mmol L -1 , 0.3 mL, 0.15% (w/v), 50 deg. C, 40 min, and 10 min for 15 mL of preconcentrated solution. The method presented precision (R.S.D.) between 1.3% and 2.6% (n = 9). The concentration factors with and without dilution of the surfactant-rich phase for the analytes ranged from 9.4 to 10.1 and from 94.0 to 100.1, respectively. The limits of detection (L.O.D.) obtained for copper, zinc, cadmium, and nickel were 1.2, 1.1, 1.0, and 6.3 μg L -1 , respectively. The accuracy of the procedure was evaluated through recovery experiments on aqueous samples.

  17. The determination of trace elements in commercial human serum albumin solutions by proton-induced X-ray emission spectrometry and neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenhaut, W.; De Reu, L.; Tomza, U.; Versieck, J.

    1982-01-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (p.i.x.e.) and neutron activation analysis (n.a.a.) are proposed for determining the trace element content of human serum albumin. Application of these methods to some commercial albumin solutions provided concentration data for up to 19 elements, most of which were present at a level below a few μg ml -1 . The precision of the p.i.x.e. technique, as determined by irradiating up to 20 targets from one sample, was about 3% for those elements where counting statistics were good. A comparison between the p.i.x.e. and n.a.a. results showed close agreement, indicating that p.i.x.e. can yield data which are accurate to within 10%. Neutron activation showed very good sensitivity for the elements producing long-lived nuclides (tsub(1/2) >= 3 days), but had rather high detection limits for the other elements, unless radiochemical separations were used. (Auth.)

  18. Multielemental Determination of As, Bi, Ge, Sb, and Sn in Agricultural Samples Using Hydride Generation Coupled to Microwave-Induced Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Raquel C; Amaral, Clarice D B; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Araujo Nogueira, Ana Rita

    2017-06-14

    A microwave-induced plasma optical emission spectrometer with N 2 -based plasma was combined with a multimode sample introduction system (MSIS) for hydride generation (HG) and multielemental determination of As, Bi, Ge, Sb, and Sn in samples of forage, bovine liver, powdered milk, agricultural gypsum, rice, and mineral fertilizer, using a single condition of prereduction and reduction. The accuracy of the developed analytical method was evaluated using certified reference materials of water and mineral fertilizer, and recoveries ranged from 95 to 106%. Addition and recovery experiments were carried out, and the recoveries varied from 85 to 117% for all samples evaluated. The limits of detection for As, Bi, Ge, Sb, and Sn were 0.46, 0.09, 0.19, 0.46, and 5.2 μg/L, respectively, for liquid samples, and 0.18, 0.04, 0.08, 0.19, and 2.1 mg/kg, respectively, for solid samples. The method proposed offers a simple, fast, multielemental, and robust alternative for successful determination of all five analytes in agricultural samples with low operational cost without compromising analytical performance.

  19. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  20. Characterization of rapidly-prototyped, battery-operated, argon-hydrogen microplasma on a hybrid chip for elemental analysis of microsamples by portable optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weagant, Scott; Dulai, Gurjit; Li, Lu; Karanassios, Vassili, E-mail: vkaranassios@uwaterloo.ca

    2015-04-01

    A rapidly-prototyped, battery-operated, atmospheric-pressure, self-igniting Ar-H{sub 2} microplasma was interfaced to a portable fiber-optic spectrometer. The microplasma-spectrometer combination was used to document the spectral lines emitted when μL of dilute solutions of single element standards of Ag, Ba, Ca, Eu, Pd, Rb and Sr were first dried and then vaporized into the microplasma. A small-size, electrothermal vaporization system was used for microsample introduction. Identification of the prominent spectral lines for these elements is reported. It was found that the most prominent spectral line for Ba, Ca and Sr was different than that emitted from an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). In general, prominent spectral lines with low excitation energy were dominating, thus resulting in spectra simpler than those emitted from an ICP. Detection limits were between 45 and 180 pg (expressed in absolute amounts). When expressed in relative concentration units, they ranged between 15 and 60 μg/L (obtained using 3 μL diluted standards). Calibration curves were linear (on the average) for 1.5 orders-of-magnitude. Average precision was 15%. Analytical capability and utility was demonstrated using the determination of Ca and Mg in (medicinal) thermal spring water. - Highlights: • Microplasma emission spectra for Ag, Ba, Ca, Eu, Pd, Rb and Sr are reported. • Absolute amount detection limits ranged between 45 pg and 180 pg. • Relative unit detection limits ranged between 15 and 60 μg/L (using 3 μL). • The effect of vaporization temperature on analyte signals is reported. • Ca and Mg concentrations in (medicinal) thermal spring water were determined.

  1. Characterization of rapidly-prototyped, battery-operated, argon-hydrogen microplasma on a hybrid chip for elemental analysis of microsamples by portable optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weagant, Scott; Dulai, Gurjit; Li, Lu; Karanassios, Vassili

    2015-01-01

    A rapidly-prototyped, battery-operated, atmospheric-pressure, self-igniting Ar-H 2 microplasma was interfaced to a portable fiber-optic spectrometer. The microplasma-spectrometer combination was used to document the spectral lines emitted when μL of dilute solutions of single element standards of Ag, Ba, Ca, Eu, Pd, Rb and Sr were first dried and then vaporized into the microplasma. A small-size, electrothermal vaporization system was used for microsample introduction. Identification of the prominent spectral lines for these elements is reported. It was found that the most prominent spectral line for Ba, Ca and Sr was different than that emitted from an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). In general, prominent spectral lines with low excitation energy were dominating, thus resulting in spectra simpler than those emitted from an ICP. Detection limits were between 45 and 180 pg (expressed in absolute amounts). When expressed in relative concentration units, they ranged between 15 and 60 μg/L (obtained using 3 μL diluted standards). Calibration curves were linear (on the average) for 1.5 orders-of-magnitude. Average precision was 15%. Analytical capability and utility was demonstrated using the determination of Ca and Mg in (medicinal) thermal spring water. - Highlights: • Microplasma emission spectra for Ag, Ba, Ca, Eu, Pd, Rb and Sr are reported. • Absolute amount detection limits ranged between 45 pg and 180 pg. • Relative unit detection limits ranged between 15 and 60 μg/L (using 3 μL). • The effect of vaporization temperature on analyte signals is reported. • Ca and Mg concentrations in (medicinal) thermal spring water were determined

  2. Chemical characterization of long-range transport biomass burning emissions to the Himalayas: insights from high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinghua; Xu, Jianzhong; Kang, Shichang; Liu, Yanmei; Zhang, Qi

    2018-04-01

    An intensive field measurement was conducted at a remote, background, high-altitude site (Qomolangma Station, QOMS, 4276 m a.s.l.) in the northern Himalayas, using an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) along with other collocated instruments. The field measurement was performed from 12 April to 12 May 2016 to chemically characterize the high time-resolved submicron particulate matter (PM1) and obtain the dynamic processes (emissions, transport, and chemical evolution) of biomass burning (BB), frequently transported from South Asia to the Himalayas during pre-monsoon season. Overall, the average (±1σ) PM1 mass concentration was 4.44 (±4.54) µg m-3 for the entire study, which is comparable with those observed at other remote sites worldwide. Organic aerosol (OA) was the dominant PM1 species (accounting for 54.3 % of total PM1 on average) followed by black carbon (BC) (25.0 %), sulfate (9.3 %), ammonium (5.8 %), nitrate (5.1 %), and chloride (0.4 %). The average size distributions of PM1 species all peaked at an overlapping accumulation mode (˜ 500 nm), suggesting that aerosol particles were internally well-mixed and aged during long-range transport. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis on the high-resolution organic mass spectra identified three distinct OA factors, including a BB-related OA (BBOA, 43.7 %), a nitrogen-containing OA (NOA, 13.9 %) and a more-oxidized oxygenated OA (MO-OOA, 42.4 %). Two polluted episodes with enhanced PM1 mass loadings and elevated BBOA contributions from the west and southwest of QOMS during the study were observed. A typical BB plume was investigated in detail to illustrate the chemical evolution of aerosol characteristics under distinct air mass origins, meteorological conditions, and atmospheric oxidation processes.

  3. Chemical characterization of long-range transport biomass burning emissions to the Himalayas: insights from high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An intensive field measurement was conducted at a remote, background, high-altitude site (Qomolangma Station, QOMS, 4276 m a.s.l. in the northern Himalayas, using an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS along with other collocated instruments. The field measurement was performed from 12 April to 12 May 2016 to chemically characterize the high time-resolved submicron particulate matter (PM1 and obtain the dynamic processes (emissions, transport, and chemical evolution of biomass burning (BB, frequently transported from South Asia to the Himalayas during pre-monsoon season. Overall, the average (±1σ PM1 mass concentration was 4.44 (±4.54 µg m−3 for the entire study, which is comparable with those observed at other remote sites worldwide. Organic aerosol (OA was the dominant PM1 species (accounting for 54.3 % of total PM1 on average followed by black carbon (BC (25.0 %, sulfate (9.3 %, ammonium (5.8 %, nitrate (5.1 %, and chloride (0.4 %. The average size distributions of PM1 species all peaked at an overlapping accumulation mode (∼ 500 nm, suggesting that aerosol particles were internally well-mixed and aged during long-range transport. Positive matrix factorization (PMF analysis on the high-resolution organic mass spectra identified three distinct OA factors, including a BB-related OA (BBOA, 43.7 %, a nitrogen-containing OA (NOA, 13.9 % and a more-oxidized oxygenated OA (MO-OOA, 42.4 %. Two polluted episodes with enhanced PM1 mass loadings and elevated BBOA contributions from the west and southwest of QOMS during the study were observed. A typical BB plume was investigated in detail to illustrate the chemical evolution of aerosol characteristics under distinct air mass origins, meteorological conditions, and atmospheric oxidation processes.

  4. Understanding the effects of potassium ferricyanide on lead hydride formation in tetrahydroborate system and its application for determination of lead in milk using hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Biyang; Xu, Xiangshu; Xiao, Yan; Zhu, Pingchuan; Wang, Yingzi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposed a novel explanation for plumbane generation. • Expounded the role of K 3 Fe(CN) 6 in plumbane generation. • Clarified the controversial aspects in the mechanism of K 3 Fe(CN) 6 enhancement. • Used X-ray diffractometry to analyze the intermediates. • Developed a method to analyze lead in milk using K 3 Fe(CN) 6 and K 4 Fe(CN) 6 as new additives. - Absract: To understand the formation of plumbane in the Pb II -NaBH 4 -K 3 Fe(CN) 6 system, the intermediate products produced in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH 4 in the presence of K 3 Fe(CN) 6 were studied. The produced plumbane and elemental lead were measured through continuous flow hydride generation (HG)-inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and X-ray diffraction spectrometry techniques, respectively. Based on the experimental results, the explanations can be depicted in the following steps: (1) plumbane and black lead sediment (black Pb) are formed in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH 4 ; (2) the black Pb is oxidized by K 3 Fe(CN) 6 to form Pb 2 [Fe(CN) 6 ], which further reacts with NaBH 4 to form more plumbane and black Pb; and (3) another round starts in which the produced black Pb from the step 2 is then oxidized continuously by K 3 Fe(CN) 6 to form more Pb 2 [Fe(CN) 6 ] complex, which would produce more plumbane. In short, the black Pb and Pb 2 [Fe(CN) 6 ] complex are the key intermediate products for the formation of plumbane in the Pb II -NaBH 4 -K 3 Fe(CN) 6 system. Based on the enhancement effect of potassium ferricyanide and potassium ferrocyanide, a method was developed to analyze lead in milk with HG-ICP OES technique. The detection limit of the method was observed as 0.081 μg L −1 . The linearity range of lead was found between 0.3 and 50,000 μg L −1 with correlation coefficient of 0.9993. The recovery of lead was determined as 97.6% (n = 5) for adding 10 μg L −1 lead into the milk sample

  5. Application of factorial designs and Doehlert matrix in optimization of experimental variables associated with the preconcentration and determination of vanadium and copper in seawater by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Sergio L.C.; Queiroz, Adriana S.; Fernandes, Marcelo S.; Santos, Hilda C. dos

    2002-01-01

    In the present paper a procedure for preconcentration and determination of vanadium and copper in seawater using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) is proposed, which is based on solid-phase extraction of vanadium (IV), vanadium (V) and copper (II) ions as 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) complexes by active carbon. The optimization process was carried out using two-level full factorials and Doehlert matrix designs. Four variables (PAN mass, pH, active carbon mass and shaking time) were regarded as factors in the optimization. Results of the two-level full factorial design 2 4 with 16 runs for vanadium extraction, based on the variance analysis (ANOVA), demonstrated that the factors pH and active carbon mass, besides the interaction (pHxactive carbon mass), are statistically significant. For copper, the ANOVA revealed that the factors PAN mass, pH and active carbon mass and the interactions (PAN massxpH) and (pHxactive carbon mass) are statistically significant. Doehlert designs were applied in order to determine the optimum conditions for extraction. The procedure proposed allowed the determination of vanadium and copper with detection limits (3σ/S) of 73 and 94 ng l -1 , respectively. The precision, calculated as relative standard deviation (R.S.D.), was 1.22 and 1.37% for 12.50 μg l -1 of vanadium and copper, respectively. The preconcentration factor was 80. The recovery achieved for determination of vanadium and copper in the presence of several cations demonstrated that this procedure improved the selectivity required for seawater analysis. The procedure was applied to the determination of vanadium and copper in seawater samples collected in Salvador City, Brazil. Results showed good agreement with other data reported in the literature

  6. Determination of cadmium(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), lead(II), zinc(II), and copper(II) in water samples using dual-cloud point extraction and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingling; Zhong, Shuxian; Fang, Keming; Qian, Zhaosheng; Chen, Jianrong

    2012-11-15

    A dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) procedure has been developed for simultaneous pre-concentration and separation of heavy metal ions (Cd2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ ion) in water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The procedure is based on forming complexes of metal ion with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) into the as-formed Triton X-114 surfactant rich phase. Instead of direct injection or analysis, the surfactant rich phase containing the complexes was treated by nitric acid, and the detected ions were back extracted again into aqueous phase at the second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by ICP-OES. Under the optimum conditions (pH=7.0, Triton X-114=0.05% (w/v), 8-HQ=2.0×10(-4) mol L(-1), HNO3=0.8 mol L(-1)), the detection limits for Cd2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ ions were 0.01, 0.04, 0.01, 0.34, 0.05, and 0.04 μg L(-1), respectively. Relative standard deviation (RSD) values for 10 replicates at 100 μg L(-1) were lower than 6.0%. The proposed method could be successfully applied to the determination of Cd2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ ion in water samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of metals and phosphorus in biodiesel B100 from different feedstock using a Flow Blurring® multinebulizer in inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila Orozco, Francisco D. [Lab. FIA, Sección Química Analítica, INQUISUR (UNS-CONICET), Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, B8000CPB, Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Kovachev, Nikolay; Aguirre Pastor, Miguel Ángel [Dpto. Química Analítica, Nutrición y Bromatología e Instituto Universitario de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. 99, Alicante (Spain); Domini, Claudia E.; Fernández Band, Beatriz S. [Lab. FIA, Sección Química Analítica, INQUISUR (UNS-CONICET), Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, B8000CPB, Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Canals Hernández, Antonio, E-mail: a.canals@ua.es [Dpto. Química Analítica, Nutrición y Bromatología e Instituto Universitario de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. 99, Alicante (Spain)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • The elemental analysis of biodiesel by the proposed method is simple and fast. • Two-nozzles Flow Blurring® nebulizer allow to reduce the spectral interferences. • Two-nozzles Flow Blurring® nebulizer avoid the formation of carbon deposits. • The analysis may be carried out without any sample pretreatment. Abstract: A simple and fast method for determining the content of Na, K, Ca, Mg, P, and 20 heavy metals in biodiesel samples with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) using a two-nozzle Flow Blurring® multinebulizer prototype and on-line internal standard calibration, are proposed. The biodiesel samples were produced from different feedstock such as sunflower, corn, soybean and grape seed oils, via a base catalyst transesterification. The analysis was carried out without any sample pretreatment. The standards and samples were introduced through one of the multinebulizer nozzles, while the aqueous solution containing yttrium as an internal standard was introduced through the second nozzle. Thus, the spectral interferences were compensated and the formation of carbon deposits on the ICP torch was prevented. The determination coefficients (R²) were greater than 0.99 for the studied analytes, in the range 0.21–14.75 mg kg⁻¹. Short-term and long-term precisions were estimated as relative standard deviation. These were acceptable, their values being lower than 10%. The LOQ for major components such as Ca, K, Mg, Na, and P, were within a range between 4.9 ng g⁻¹ for Mg (279.553 nm) and 531.1 ng g⁻¹ for Na (588.995 nm), and for the other 20 minor components they were within a range between 1.1 ng g⁻¹ for Ba (455.403 nm) and 2913.9 ng g⁻¹ for Pb (220.353 nm). Recovery values ranged between 95% and 106%.

  8. Investigations on the use of pneumatic cross-flow nebulizers with dual solution loading including the correction of matrix effects in elemental determinations by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Mathieu; Broekaert, Jose A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The use of a so-called trihedral and a T-shaped cross-flow pneumatic nebulizer with dual solution loading for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry has been studied. By these devices analyte clouds from two solutions can be mixed during the aerosol generation step. For both nebulizers the correction of matrix effects using internal standardization and standard addition calibration in an on-line way was investigated and compared to elemental determinations using a conventional cross-flow nebulizer and calibration with synthetic standard solutions without matrix matching. A significant improvement of accuracy, both for calibration with internal standardization and standard addition, was obtained in the case of four synthetic solutions containing each 40 mmol L -1 Na, K, Rb and Ba as matrix elements and 300 μg L -1 Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Pb as analytes. Calibration by standard addition in the case of dual solution loading has been shown to be very useful in the determination of elements at minor and trace levels in steel and alumina reference materials. The results of analysis for minor concentrations of Cr, Cu and Ni in steel as well as for Ca, Fe, Ga, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Si and Zn in alumina powder certified reference materials subsequent to sample dissolution were found to be in good agreement with the certificates. Limits of detection were found to be only slightly above those for a conventional cross-flow nebulizer and a precision better than 3% was realized with both novel nebulizers

  9. 40 CFR 63.14 - Incorporations by reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... from Coal Utilization Processes by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry, Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, and Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, IBR approved for... Engineers at 1791 Tullie Circle, NE., Atlanta, GA 30329 or by electronic mail at [email protected]: (1...

  10. Understanding the effects of potassium ferricyanide on lead hydride formation in tetrahydroborate system and its application for determination of lead in milk using hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Biyang, E-mail: dengby16@163.com; Xu, Xiangshu; Xiao, Yan; Zhu, Pingchuan; Wang, Yingzi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposed a novel explanation for plumbane generation. • Expounded the role of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} in plumbane generation. • Clarified the controversial aspects in the mechanism of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} enhancement. • Used X-ray diffractometry to analyze the intermediates. • Developed a method to analyze lead in milk using K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} and K{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6} as new additives. - Absract: To understand the formation of plumbane in the Pb{sup II}-NaBH{sub 4}-K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} system, the intermediate products produced in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH{sub 4} in the presence of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} were studied. The produced plumbane and elemental lead were measured through continuous flow hydride generation (HG)-inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and X-ray diffraction spectrometry techniques, respectively. Based on the experimental results, the explanations can be depicted in the following steps: (1) plumbane and black lead sediment (black Pb) are formed in the reaction of lead(II) and NaBH{sub 4}; (2) the black Pb is oxidized by K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} to form Pb{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 6}], which further reacts with NaBH{sub 4} to form more plumbane and black Pb; and (3) another round starts in which the produced black Pb from the step 2 is then oxidized continuously by K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} to form more Pb{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 6}] complex, which would produce more plumbane. In short, the black Pb and Pb{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 6}] complex are the key intermediate products for the formation of plumbane in the Pb{sup II}-NaBH{sub 4}-K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} system. Based on the enhancement effect of potassium ferricyanide and potassium ferrocyanide, a method was developed to analyze lead in milk with HG-ICP OES technique. The detection limit of the method was observed as 0.081 μg L{sup −1}. The linearity range of lead was found between 0.3 and 50,000 μg L{sup −1} with correlation coefficient of 0

  11. Determination of cadmium(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), lead(II), zinc(II), and copper(II) in water samples using dual-cloud point extraction and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Lingling; Zhong, Shuxian; Fang, Keming; Qian, Zhaosheng; Chen, Jianrong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) procedure was firstly developed for simultaneous pre-concentration and separation of trace metal ions combining with ICP-OES. ► The developed d-CPE can significantly eliminate the surfactant of Triton X-114 and successfully extend to the determination of water samples with good performance. ► The designed method is simple, high efficient, low cost, and in accordance with the green chemistry concept. - Abstract: A dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) procedure has been developed for simultaneous pre-concentration and separation of heavy metal ions (Cd 2+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ , Pb 2+ , Zn 2+ , and Cu 2+ ion) in water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The procedure is based on forming complexes of metal ion with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) into the as-formed Triton X-114 surfactant rich phase. Instead of direct injection or analysis, the surfactant rich phase containing the complexes was treated by nitric acid, and the detected ions were back extracted again into aqueous phase at the second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by ICP-OES. Under the optimum conditions (pH = 7.0, Triton X-114 = 0.05% (w/v), 8-HQ = 2.0 × 10 −4 mol L −1 , HNO 3 = 0.8 mol L −1 ), the detection limits for Cd 2+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ , Pb 2+ , Zn 2+ , and Cu 2+ ions were 0.01, 0.04, 0.01, 0.34, 0.05, and 0.04 μg L −1 , respectively. Relative standard deviation (RSD) values for 10 replicates at 100 μg L −1 were lower than 6.0%. The proposed method could be successfully applied to the determination of Cd 2+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ , Pb 2+ , Zn 2+ , and Cu 2+ ion in water samples.

  12. Routine Isotopic Analysis of 235U by Emission Spectrometry. 1. Interferometry using electrode-less discharge lamps 2. determination of the 235U/238U ratio using a spectrograph and electrode-less lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitini, R.; Ceccaldi, M.; Leicknam, J.P.; Rabec, J.

    1968-01-01

    I. A 'HYPEAC' interferometric apparatus has been used for routine determination of uranium 235. In order to facilitate the examination of non-metallic samples and to reduce the time required for analysis it has been necessary to replace the hollow-cathode light sources usually used by electrode-less discharge lamps. The preparation outside the apparatus of such lamps containing uranium tetrachloride is described; the process is simple and rapid: about ninety minutes for each, and several lamps can be built simultaneously, thus reducing still further the total time required for each analysis. The amount of sample required is about a few milligrams. In order to counteract any spontaneous optical dis-adjustment which could prevent the application of the usual isotopic abundance method, it is necessary to compare the sample spectra with those of standards, all these spectra being recorded successively and alternately. A series of examples of determinations involving over 150 measurements is presented and discussed. For samples with abundances similar to that of natural uranium and up to 5 per cent of the 235 isotope., the reproducibility is of the order of 2 per cent, the relative accuracy being ± 2 to 3 per cent; for samples enriched in uranium 235 (5 to 93 per cent) the relative accuracy can attain ± 0.5 per cent. II. In spite of the large amount of research into the improvement of the accuracy of uranium isotope analyses using optical methods, it has not been possible up to the present to develop a method as good as mass spectrometry. When it is not necessary to have a high accuracy, however, emission spectroscopy which has no memory effect can constitute a complementary method of analysis if it is sufficiently fast and economical; for this to happen it seems to us that it should be possible to apply such a method in laboratories equipped with all the usual spectrochemical analysis equipment. In the present work we have therefore set out to obtain an acceptable

  13. Determination of cadmium(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), lead(II), zinc(II), and copper(II) in water samples using dual-cloud point extraction and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lingling; Zhong, Shuxian; Fang, Keming; Qian, Zhaosheng [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Chen, Jianrong, E-mail: cjr@zjnu.cn [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); College of Geography and Environmental Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) procedure was firstly developed for simultaneous pre-concentration and separation of trace metal ions combining with ICP-OES. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The developed d-CPE can significantly eliminate the surfactant of Triton X-114 and successfully extend to the determination of water samples with good performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The designed method is simple, high efficient, low cost, and in accordance with the green chemistry concept. - Abstract: A dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) procedure has been developed for simultaneous pre-concentration and separation of heavy metal ions (Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} ion) in water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The procedure is based on forming complexes of metal ion with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) into the as-formed Triton X-114 surfactant rich phase. Instead of direct injection or analysis, the surfactant rich phase containing the complexes was treated by nitric acid, and the detected ions were back extracted again into aqueous phase at the second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by ICP-OES. Under the optimum conditions (pH = 7.0, Triton X-114 = 0.05% (w/v), 8-HQ = 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}, HNO{sub 3} = 0.8 mol L{sup -1}), the detection limits for Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} ions were 0.01, 0.04, 0.01, 0.34, 0.05, and 0.04 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. Relative standard deviation (RSD) values for 10 replicates at 100 {mu}g L{sup -1} were lower than 6.0%. The proposed method could be successfully applied to the determination of Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} ion in water samples.

  14. Experimental benchmark of non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma atomic physics codes; Validation experimentale des codes de physique atomique des plasmas hors equilibre thermodynamique local

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagels-Silvert, V

    2004-09-15

    The main purpose of this thesis is to get experimental data for the testing and validation of atomic physics codes dealing with non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium plasmas. The first part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of xenon and krypton plasmas that have been produced by a nanosecond laser pulse interacting with a gas jet. A Thomson scattering diagnostic has allowed us to measure independently plasma parameters such as electron temperature, electron density and the average ionisation state. We have obtained time integrated spectra in the range between 5 and 10 angstroms. We have identified about one hundred xenon rays between 8.6 and 9.6 angstroms via the use of the Relac code. We have discovered unknown rays for the krypton between 5.2 and 7.5 angstroms. In a second experiment we have extended the wavelength range to the X UV domain. The Averroes/Transpec code has been tested in the ranges from 9 to 15 angstroms and from 10 to 130 angstroms, the first range has been well reproduced while the second range requires a more complex data analysis. The second part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of aluminium, selenium and samarium plasmas in femtosecond operating rate. We have designed an interferometry diagnostic in the frequency domain that has allowed us to measure the expanding speed of the target's backside. Via the use of an adequate isothermal model this parameter has led us to know the plasma electron temperature. Spectra and emission times of various rays from the aluminium and selenium plasmas have been computed satisfactorily with the Averroes/Transpec code coupled with Film and Multif hydrodynamical codes. (A.C.)

  15. Experimental benchmark of non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma atomic physics codes; Validation experimentale des codes de physique atomique des plasmas hors equilibre thermodynamique local

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagels-Silvert, V

    2004-09-15

    The main purpose of this thesis is to get experimental data for the testing and validation of atomic physics codes dealing with non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium plasmas. The first part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of xenon and krypton plasmas that have been produced by a nanosecond laser pulse interacting with a gas jet. A Thomson scattering diagnostic has allowed us to measure independently plasma parameters such as electron temperature, electron density and the average ionisation state. We have obtained time integrated spectra in the range between 5 and 10 angstroms. We have identified about one hundred xenon rays between 8.6 and 9.6 angstroms via the use of the Relac code. We have discovered unknown rays for the krypton between 5.2 and 7.5 angstroms. In a second experiment we have extended the wavelength range to the X UV domain. The Averroes/Transpec code has been tested in the ranges from 9 to 15 angstroms and from 10 to 130 angstroms, the first range has been well reproduced while the second range requires a more complex data analysis. The second part is dedicated to the spectroscopic study of aluminium, selenium and samarium plasmas in femtosecond operating rate. We have designed an interferometry diagnostic in the frequency domain that has allowed us to measure the expanding speed of the target's backside. Via the use of an adequate isothermal model this parameter has led us to know the plasma electron temperature. Spectra and emission times of various rays from the aluminium and selenium plasmas have been computed satisfactorily with the Averroes/Transpec code coupled with Film and Multif hydrodynamical codes. (A.C.)

  16. Reactor gamma spectrometry: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Kaiser, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    Current work is described for Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry including developments in experimental technique as well as recent reactor spectrometry measurements. The current status of the method is described concerning gamma spectromoetry probe design and response characteristics. Emphasis is given to gamma spectrometry work in US LWR and BR programs. Gamma spectrometry in BR environments are outlined by focussing on start-up plans for the Fast Test Reactor (FTR). Gamma spectrometry results are presented for a LWR pressure vessel mockup in the Poolside Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  17. Charge trapping characteristics of Au nanocrystals embedded in remote plasma atomic layer-deposited Al2O3 film as the tunnel and blocking oxides for nonvolatile memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaesang; Kim, Hyungchul; Park, Taeyong; Ko, Youngbin; Ryu, Jaehun; Jeon, Heeyoung; Park, Jingyu; Jeon, Hyeongtag

    2012-01-01

    Remote plasma atomic layer deposited (RPALD) Al 2 O 3 films were investigated to apply as tunnel and blocking layers in the metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor memory utilizing Au nanocrystals (NCs) for nonvolatile memory applications. The interface stability of an Al 2 O 3 film deposited by RPALD was studied to observe the effects of remote plasma on the interface. The interface formed during RPALD process has high oxidation states such as Si +3 and Si +4 , indicating that RPALD process can grow more stable interface which has a small amount of fixed oxide trap charge. The significant memory characteristics were also observed in this memory device through the electrical measurement. The memory device exhibited a relatively large memory window of 5.6 V under a 10/-10 V program/erase voltage and also showed the relatively fast programming/erasing speed and a competitive retention characteristic after 10 4 s. These results indicate that Al 2 O 3 films deposited via RPALD can be applied as the tunnel and blocking oxides for next-generation flash memory devices.

  18. Ion detection in mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolbach, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    This course aims at providing some elements for a better understanding of ion detectors used in mass spectrometers, of their operations, and of their limitations. A first part addresses the functions and properties of an ideal detector, how to detect ions in gas phase, and particle detectors and ion detectors used in mass spectrometry. The second part proposes an overview of currently used detectors with respect to their operation principle: detection from the ion charge (Faraday cylinder), detection by inductive effects (FTICR, Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance), and detection by secondary electron emission. The third part discusses the specificities of secondary electron emission. The fourth one addresses operating modes and parameters related to detectors. The sixth part proposes a prospective view on future detectors by addressing the following issues: cryo-detector, inductive effect and charge detectors, ion detection and nano materials

  19. Considerations of particle vaporization and analyte diffusion in single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Koon-Sing; Lui, Kwok-On; Lee, Kin-Ho; Chan, Wing-Tat

    2013-01-01

    empirical equation is formulated for the estimation of the position of complete vaporization of a particle in the ICP. The equation takes into account the particle properties (diameter, density, boiling point, and molecular weight of the constituents of the particle) and the ICP operating parameters (ICP forward power and central channel gas flow rate). The proportional constant and exponents of the variables in the equation were solved using literature values of ICP operating conditions for single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of 6 kinds of particles in 12 studies. The calculated position is a useful guide for the selection of sampling depth or observation height for ICP-MS and ICP-AES measurements of single particles as well as discrete particles in a flow, such as laser-ablated materials and airborne particulates. - Highlights: • Calibration curve constructed from ICPMS intensity and particle mass distributions • Degree of vaporization and analyte diffusion determine calibration curve linearity. • Single-particle ICPMS requires standard particle/solution droplet for calibration. • Empirical equation to estimate complete vaporization position of particle in ICP

  20. The evaluation of the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique for process monitoring of vitreous slag from thermal waste treatment systems: A comparative study of the analysis of Plasma Hearth slag for Ce, Fe and Cr by XRF and inductively coupled plasma spectrometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, M.A.H.; Crane, P.J.; Cummings, D.G.; Carney, K.P.

    1995-05-01

    Slag material produced by the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) varies in chemical composition due to the heterogeneous nature of the input sample feed. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a spectroscopic technique which has been evaluated to perform elemental analyses on surrogate slag material for process control. Vitreous slag samples were ground to a fine powder in an impact ball mill and analyzed directly using laboratory prepared standards. The fluorescent intensities of Si, Al and Fe in the slag samples was utilized to determine the appropriate matrix standard set for the determination of Ce. The samples were analyzed for Cr, Ni, Fe and Ce using a wavelength dispersive XRF polychromator. Split samples were dissolved and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The precision of the XRF technique was better than 5% RSD. The limit of detection for Ce varied with sample matrix and was typically below 0.01% by weight. The linear dynamic range for the technique was evaluated over two orders of magnitude. Typical calibration standards ranged from 0.01% Ce to 1% Ce. The Ce determinations performed directly on ground slag material by the XRF techniques were similar to ICP-AES analyses. Various chemical dissolution and sample preparation techniques were evaluated for the analysis of Ce in slag samples. A fusion procedure utilizing LiBO 2 was found to provide reliable analyses for the actinide surrogate in a variety of slag matrices. The use of the XRF technique reduced the time of analysis for Ce and Cr from three days to one day for five samples. No additional waste streams were created from the analyses by the XRF technique, while the ICP technique generated several liters of liquid waste

  1. Measurement of Iron in Egg Yolk: An Instrumental Analysis Experiment Using Biochemical Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Kevin M.; Quiazon, Emmanuel M.; Indralingam, Ramee

    2008-01-01

    The generally accepted method to determine iron content in food is by acid digestion or dry ashing and subsequent flame atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. We have developed an experiment that chemically extracts the iron from an egg yolk and quantifies it using UV-vis absorption…

  2. Methods of neutron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.

    1981-01-01

    The different methods of neutron spectrometry are based on the direct measurement of neutron velocity or on the use of suitable energy-dependent interaction processes. In the latter case the measuring effect of a detector is connected with the searched neutron spectrum by an integral equation. The solution needs suitable unfolding procedures. The most important methods of neutron spectrometry are the time-of-flight method, the crystal spectrometry, the neutron spectrometry by use of elastic collisions with hydrogen nuclei, and neutron spectrometry with the aid of nuclear reactions, especially of the neutron-induced activation. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are contrasted considering the resolution, the measurable energy range, the sensitivity, and the experimental and computational efforts. (author)

  3. Determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in urine and dextrose by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mianzhi, Zhuang; Barnes, Ramon M.

    The determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in human urine and in commercial dextrose solution is performed by induclively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy after selective preconcentration of the chromium species at different pH values by poly(dithiocarbamate) and poly(acrylamidoxime) chelating resins. The chelating properties of these resins with chromium, including the kinetics of uptake and removal of Cr(III), and the influence of matrix concentrations were evaluated. Chromium in human urine was found to exist exclusively as Cr(III).

  4. Comparison of methods for the determination of boron in heavy water moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, L.W.; Davey, E.C.; Gulens, J.; Longhurst, T.H.; Mislan, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Five analysis methods were compared for the determination of boron in heavy water moderator: isotope dilution mass spectrometry, spectrophotometry, neutron activation, inductively coupled plasma -atomic emission spectrometry, and ion selective electrode potentiometry. Ten samples were analysed by each method; the results showed close agreement between all of the methods. Only mass spectrometry achieved the required precision ( 10 B concentration must be determined, only mass spectrometry and neutron activation are applicable

  5. Flow injection analysis in inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosias, Maria F.G.G.

    1995-10-01

    The main features of flow injection analysis (FIA) as contribution to the inductively coupled plasma (Icp) spectrometry are described. A systematic review of researches using the combined FIA-Icp and the benefits of this association are presented. Flow systems were proposed to perform on-line Icp solution management for multielemental determination by atomic emission spectrometry (Icp-AES) or mass spectrometry. The inclusion of on-line ion exchangers in flow systems for matrix separation and/or analyte preconcentration are presented. Together with those applications the new advent of instruments with facilities for multielement detection on flow injection signals are described. (author). 75 refs., 19 figs

  6. X-ray spectrometry with synchrotron radiation; Roentgenspektrometrie mit Synchrotronstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Matthias [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Roentgen- und IR-Spektrometrie' ; Gerlach, Martin; Holfelder, Ina; Hoenicke, Philipp; Lubeck, Janin; Nutsch, Andreas; Pollakowski, Beatrix; Streeck, Cornelia; Unterumsberger, Rainer; Weser, Jan; Beckhoff, Burkhard

    2014-12-15

    The X-ray spectrometry of the PTB at the BESSY II storage ring with radiation in the range from 78 eV to 10.5 keV is described. After a description of the instrumentation development reference-sample free X-ray fluorescence analysis, the determination of fundamental atomic parameters, X-ray fluorescence analysis under glance-angle incidence, highly-resolving absorption spectrometry, and emission spectrometry are considered. Finally liquid cells and in-situ measurement techniques are described. (HSI)

  7. Atomic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Medel, A.

    1997-01-01

    The elemental inorganic analysis seems to be dominated today by techniques based on atomic spectrometry. After an evaluation of advantages and limitations of using mass analysers (ion detectors) versus conventional photomultipliers (photon detector) a brief review of the more popular techniques of the emerging Atomic Mass spectrometry is carried out. Their huge potential for inorganic trace analysis is such that in the future we could well witness how this end of the century and millennium marked the fall of the photons empire in Analytical Atomic Spectrometry. (Author)

  8. Software for nuclear spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    The Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on Software for Nuclear Spectrometry was dedicated to review the present status of software for nuclear spectrometry and to advise on future activities in this field. Because similar AGM and consultant's meetings had been held in the past; together with an attempt to get more streamlined, this AGM was devoted to the specific field of software for gamma ray spectrometry. Nevertheless, many of the issues discussed and the recommendations made are of general concern for any software on nuclear spectrometry. The report is organized by sections. The 'Summary' gives conclusions and recommendations adopted at the AGM. These conclusions and recommendations resulted from the discussions held during and after presentations of the scientific and technical papers. These papers are reported here in their integral form in the following Sections

  9. Glycomics using mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Wuhrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays an increasingly important role in structural glycomics. This review provides an overview on currently used mass spectrometric approaches such as the characterization of glycans, the analysis of glycopeptides obtained by proteolytic cleavage of proteins and the analysis of glycosphingolipids. The given examples are demonstrating the application of mass spectrometry to study glycosylation changes associated with congenital disorders of glycosylation, lysosomal storage di...

  10. Ion mobility spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  11. Time-resolved analysis of the emission of sidestream smoke (SSS) from cigarettes during smoking by photo ionisation/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PI-TOFMS): towards a better description of environmental tobacco smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streibel, T; Mitschke, S; Adam, T; Zimmermann, R

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the chemical composition of sidestream smoke (SSS) emissions of cigarettes are characterised using a laser-based single-photon ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometer. SSS is generated from various cigarette types (2R4F research cigarette; Burley, Oriental and Virginia single-tobacco-type cigarettes) smoked on a single-port smoking machine and collected using a so-called fishtail chimney device. Using this setup, a puff-resolved quantification of several SSS components was performed. Investigations of the dynamics of SSS emissions show that concentration profiles of various substances can be categorised into several groups, either depending on the occurrence of a puff or uninfluenced by the changes in the burning zone during puffing. The SSS emissions occurring directly after a puff strongly resemble the composition of mainstream smoke (MSS). In the smouldering phase, clear differences between MSS and SSS are observed. The changed chemical profiles of SSS and MSS might be also of importance on environmental tobacco smoke which is largely determined by SSS. Additionally, the chemical composition of the SSS is strongly affected by the tobacco type. Hence, the higher nitrogen content of Burley tobacco leads to the detection of increased amounts of nitrogen-containing substances in SSS.

  12. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The volume contains six papers which together provide an overall review of the inspection technique known as acoustic emission or stress wave emission. The titles are: a welder's introduction to acoustic emission technology; use of acoustic emission for detection of defects as they arise during fabrication; examples of laboratory application and assessment of acoustic emission in the United Kingdom; (Part I: acoustic emission behaviour of low alloy steels; Part II: fatigue crack assessment from proof testing and continuous monitoring); inspection of selected areas of engineering structures by acoustic emission; Japanese experience in laboratory and practical applications of acoustic emission to welded structures; and ASME acoustic emission code status. (U.K.)

  13. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  14. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  15. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, A T

    2015-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references

  16. Velocity-space sensitivity of neutron spectrometry measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Eriksson, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron emission spectrometry (NES) measures the energies of neutrons produced in fusion reactions. Here we present velocity-space weight functions for NES and neutron yield measurements. Weight functions show the sensitivity as well as the accessible regions in velocity space for a given range...

  17. Trends in tungsten coil atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, George L.

    Renewed interest in electrothermal atomic spectrometric methods based on tungsten coil atomizers is a consequence of a world wide increasing demand for fast, inexpensive, sensitive, and portable analytical methods for trace analysis. In this work, tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometry (WCAAS) and tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES) are used to determine several different metals and even a non-metal at low levels in different samples. Improvements in instrumentation and new strategies to reduce matrix effects and background signals are presented. Investigation of the main factors affecting both WCAAS and WCAES analytical signals points to the importance of a reducing, high temperature gas phase in the processes leading to atomic cloud generation. Some more refractory elements such as V and Ti were determined for the first time by double tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (DWCAES). The higher temperatures provided by two atomizers in DWCAES also allowed the detection of Ag, Cu and Sn emission signals for the first time. Simultaneous determination of several elements by WCAES in relatively complex sample matrices was possible after a simple acid extraction. The results show the potential of this method as an alternative to more traditional, expensive methods for fast, more effective analyses and applications in the field. The development of a new metallic atomization cell is also presented. Lower limits of detection in both WCAAS and WCAES determinations were obtained due to factors such as better control of background signal, smaller, more isothermal system, with atomic cloud concentration at the optical path for a longer period of time. Tungsten coil-based methods are especially well suited to applications requiring low sample volume, low cost, sensitivity and portability. Both WCAAS and WCAES have great commercial potential in fields as diverse as archeology and industrial quality control. They are simple, inexpensive, effective

  18. Miniaturization and Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Gac, S.; le Gac, Severine; van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.; Unknown, [Unknown

    2009-01-01

    With this book we want to illustrate how two quickly growing fields of instrumentation and technology, both applied to life sciences, mass spectrometry and microfluidics (or microfabrication) naturally came to meet at the end of the last century and how this marriage impacts on several types of

  19. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  20. Analytical mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  1. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  2. Routine Isotopic Analysis of {sup 235}U by Emission Spectrometry. 1. Interferometry using electrode-less discharge lamps 2. determination of the {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratio using a spectrograph and electrode-less lamps; Contribution a l'analyse isotopique de routine de l'uranium 235 par spectrometrie d'emission. 1. interferometrie avec des lampes a decharge sans electrode. 2. determination du rapport {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U a l'aide d'un spectrographe et avec des lampes sans electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capitini, R; Ceccaldi, M; Leicknam, J P; Rabec, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    I. A 'HYPEAC' interferometric apparatus has been used for routine determination of uranium 235. In order to facilitate the examination of non-metallic samples and to reduce the time required for analysis it has been necessary to replace the hollow-cathode light sources usually used by electrode-less discharge lamps. The preparation outside the apparatus of such lamps containing uranium tetrachloride is described; the process is simple and rapid: about ninety minutes for each, and several lamps can be built simultaneously, thus reducing still further the total time required for each analysis. The amount of sample required is about a few milligrams. In order to counteract any spontaneous optical dis-adjustment which could prevent the application of the usual isotopic abundance method, it is necessary to compare the sample spectra with those of standards, all these spectra being recorded successively and alternately. A series of examples of determinations involving over 150 measurements is presented and discussed. For samples with abundances similar to that of natural uranium and up to 5 per cent of the 235 isotope., the reproducibility is of the order of 2 per cent, the relative accuracy being {+-} 2 to 3 per cent; for samples enriched in uranium 235 (5 to 93 per cent) the relative accuracy can attain {+-} 0.5 per cent. II. In spite of the large amount of research into the improvement of the accuracy of uranium isotope analyses using optical methods, it has not been possible up to the present to develop a method as good as mass spectrometry. When it is not necessary to have a high accuracy, however, emission spectroscopy which has no memory effect can constitute a complementary method of analysis if it is sufficiently fast and economical; for this to happen it seems to us that it should be possible to apply such a method in laboratories equipped with all the usual spectrochemical analysis equipment. In the present work we have therefore set out to obtain an

  3. Determination of As, Cr, Mo, Sb, Se and V in agricultural soil samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after simple and rapid solvent extraction using choline chloride-oxalic acid deep eutectic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matong, Joseph M; Nyaba, Luthando; Nomngongo, Philiswa N

    2017-01-01

    A rapid, simple and green ultrasound-assisted extraction method using deep eutectic solvents (DES) for extraction of As, Cr, Mo, Sb, Se and V in soil samples, has been developed. Choline chloride-oxalic acid based DES was used as a solvent. The target analytes were subsequently quantified using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP OES). The parameters that affect the extraction of the target analytes was optimized using standard reference material of San Joaquin soil (SRM 2709a). In the optimization step, a two-level full factorial experimental design was used. The factors under investigation include extraction time, sample mass and acid concentration. Under optimized conditions, limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.009 to 0.1 and 0.03-0.3µgg -1 , respectively. The repeatability (n=20) estimated in terms of relative standard deviation (%RSD) ranged from 0.9% to 3.7%. The accuracy of the proposed method was carried out using SRM 2709a. The obtained and certified/ indicative values were statistically in good agreement at 95% confidence level. The proposed method applied for quantification of As, Cr, Mo, Sb, Se and V in real soil samples. For comparison, the analytes of interest were also determined using a conventional acid digestion method. According to the paired t-test, the analytical results were not significant differences at 95% confidence level. The method was found to be accurate, precise and environmentally friendly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neutron activation analysis and ICP-AES to determine metal traces in antarctic krill. CNEA laboratories participation in the certification of a reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smichowski, Patricia N.; Farias, Silvia S.; Resnizky, Sara M.; Marrero, Julieta G.

    1999-01-01

    For the international certification of a reference material based on krill, As and Hg were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis and Br, Co and Se by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. Inductive coupling plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn. The results, which are in good agreement with those obtained by other laboratories, are discussed

  5. Analysis of Essential and Toxic Elements in Jujube Fruits Collected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a simple and precise method for the determination of the levels of both essential and toxic elements in jujube collected from different locations in China. Methods: Dried jujube fruits collected were digested by optimized microwave procedure. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry ...

  6. Mass spectrometry in oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    2000-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays an important role in oceanography for various applications. Different types of inorganic as well as organic mass spectrometric techniques are being exploited world-wide to understand the different aspects of marine science, for palaeogeography, palaeoclimatology and palaeoecology, for isotopic composition and concentrations of different elements as well as for speciation studies. The present paper reviews some of the applications of atomic mass spectrometric techniques in the area of oceanography

  7. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Leland

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) methods can reveal much about the structure, energetics, and dynamics of proteins. The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) to an earlier fragmentation-separation HX analysis now extends HX studies to larger proteins at high structural resolution and can provide information not available before. This chapter discusses experimental aspects of HX labeling, especially with respect to the use of MS and the analysis of MS data. PMID:26791986

  8. Determination of uranium in seawater by fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Toshi; Kawakubo, Senkichi; Minegishi, Hisako.

    1984-01-01

    A Fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of uranium in seawater has been developed. Anion exchange separation of uranium from seawater followed by preparation of NaF-carbonate cake and by spectrometry for ultraviolet ray excited fluorescence of uranium on the fluoride host provide the trace determinaton of uranium at the subnano gram level. Anion exchange behavior, excitation-emission behavior of the uranium on the host and effects of foreign ions to the fluorescence have been presented. Appling the method to 1 ml of seawater 3 ppb of uranium has been determined. (author)

  9. Methodology for determination of activity of radionuclides by gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de Farias; Oliveira, Victor Rogerio S. de; Oliveira, Mercia L.; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Due to the growth in the number of procedures that make use of the positron emission tomography (PET), there is a need for standard solutions for the calibration of the systems used for the measurement of the PET radiopharmaceutical (activimeter) in radiopharmacies and in nuclear medicine services. Among the existing alternatives for the standardization of radioactive sources, the method known as gamma spectrometry is widely used for short-lived radionuclides. The purpose of this study was to implement the methodology for standardization of the 18 F solutions by gamma spectrometry at the Regional Center for Nuclear Sciences of the Northeast (CRCN-NE/CNEN-NE), Brazil. (author)

  10. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH 2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative

  11. Emissions Trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdman, Edwin; Backhaus, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Emissions trading is a market-based instrument to achieve environmental targets in a cost-effective way by allowing legal entities to buy and sell emission rights. The current international dissemination and intended linking of emissions trading schemes underlines the growing relevance of this

  12. Emission Facilities - Air Emission Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Represents the Primary Facility type Air Emission Plant (AEP) point features. Air Emissions Plant is a DEP primary facility type related to the Air Quality Program....

  13. Emission inventory; Inventaire des emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontelle, J.P. [CITEPA, Centre Interprofessionnel Technique d`Etudes de la Pollution Atmospherique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    Statistics on air pollutant (sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and ammonium) emissions, acid equivalent emissions and their evolution since 1990 in the various countries of Europe and the USA, are presented. Emission data from the industrial, agricultural, transportation and power sectors are given, and comparisons are carried out between countries based on Gnp and population, pollution import/export fluxes and compliance to the previous emission reduction objectives

  14. Mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersen, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    A brief description is given of the functional elements of a mass spectrometer and of some currently employed mass spectrometric techniques, such as combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, mass chromatography, and selected ion monitoring. Various areas of application of mass spectrometry in clinical chemistry are discussed, such as inborn errors of metabolism and other metabolic disorders, intoxications, quantitative determinations of drugs, hormones, gases, and trace elements, and the use of isotope dilution mass spectrometry as a definitive method for the establishment of true values for concentrations of various compounds in reference sera. It is concluded that mass spectrometry is of great value in clinical chemistry. (Auth.)

  15. Radio-frequency glow discharge spectrometry: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winchester, Michael R.; Payling, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a critical review of analytical radio frequency glow discharge spectrometry (rf-GDS). The historical foundations of rf-GDS are described, and current knowledge of the fundamental physics of analytical rf glow discharges is discussed. Additionally, instrumentation, methodologies, and applications of rf glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (rf-GDOES) and mass spectrometry (rf-GDMS) are reviewed. Although other rf-GDS techniques have appeared [e.g. rf glow discharge atomic absorption spectrophotometry (rf-GDAAS)], the emphasis is placed upon rf-GDOES and rf-GDMS, because they have received by far the most interest from analytical chemical metrologists. This review also provides explanations of some developments that are needed for further progress in the field of analytical rf-GDS

  16. Alpha spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strisovska, Jana; Kuruc, Jozef; Galanda, Dusan; Matel, Lubomir; Velic, Dusan; Aranyosiova, Monika

    2009-01-01

    A sample of thorium content on steel discs was prepared by electrodeposition with a view to determining the natural thorium isotope. Thorium was determined by alpha spectrometry and by secondary ion mass spectrometry and the results of the two methods were compared

  17. Nanoscience, nanotechnology and spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Freddy C.; Barbante, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscience has outgrown its infancy, and nanotechnology has found important applications in our daily life — with many more to come. Although the central concepts of the nano world, namely the changes of particular physical properties on the length scale of individual atoms and molecules, have been known and developed for quite some time already, experimental advances since the 1980s and recognition of the potential of nanomaterials led to a genuine breakthrough of the inherently multidisciplinary nanoscience field. Analytical nanoscience and nanotechnology and especially the use of micro and nano electro mechanical systems, of the quantum dots and of mass spectrometry, currently provide one of the most promising avenues for developments in analytical science, derived from their two main fields of action, namely (a) the analysis of nano-structured materials and (b) their use as new tools for analysis. An overview is given of recent developments and trends in the field, highlighting the importance and point out future directions, while also touching drawbacks, such as emerging concerns about health and environmental issues. - Highlights: • We review the analysis of nano-structured materials. • Nano-structured materials can be used as new tools for analysis. • Use of nano electro mechanical systems, of quantum dots and of mass spectrometry • Nanotechnologies are among the most promising tools in analytical science

  18. Nanoscience, nanotechnology and spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Freddy C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Barbante, Carlo, E-mail: barbante@unive.it [Institute for the Dynamics of Environmental Processes — CNR, Venice (Italy); Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, Ca' Foscari University, Venice (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Nanoscience has outgrown its infancy, and nanotechnology has found important applications in our daily life — with many more to come. Although the central concepts of the nano world, namely the changes of particular physical properties on the length scale of individual atoms and molecules, have been known and developed for quite some time already, experimental advances since the 1980s and recognition of the potential of nanomaterials led to a genuine breakthrough of the inherently multidisciplinary nanoscience field. Analytical nanoscience and nanotechnology and especially the use of micro and nano electro mechanical systems, of the quantum dots and of mass spectrometry, currently provide one of the most promising avenues for developments in analytical science, derived from their two main fields of action, namely (a) the analysis of nano-structured materials and (b) their use as new tools for analysis. An overview is given of recent developments and trends in the field, highlighting the importance and point out future directions, while also touching drawbacks, such as emerging concerns about health and environmental issues. - Highlights: • We review the analysis of nano-structured materials. • Nano-structured materials can be used as new tools for analysis. • Use of nano electro mechanical systems, of quantum dots and of mass spectrometry • Nanotechnologies are among the most promising tools in analytical science.

  19. Preface Miniaturization and Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; le Gac, Severine; le Gac, S.; van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.

    2009-01-01

    Miniaturization and Mass Spectrometry illustrates this trend and focuses on one particular analysis technique, mass spectrometry whose popularity has "dramatically" increased in the last two decades with the explosion of the field of biological analysis and the development of two "soft" ionization

  20. Negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, A.L.C.

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes some aspects of Negative Chemical Ionization (NCI) mass spectrometry. The reasons for the growing interest in NCI are: (i) to extend the basic knowledge of negative ions and their reactions in the gas phase; (ii) to investigate whether or not this knowledge of negative ions can be used successfully to elucidate the structure of molecules by mass spectrometry. (Auth.)

  1. Laboratory of acceleration mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybler, P.; Chrapan, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper authors describe the principle of the method of acceleration mass spectrometry and the construction plans of this instrument at the Faculty of ecology and environmental sciences in Banska Stiavnica. Using of this instrument for radiocarbon dating is discussed. A review of laboratories with acceleration mass spectrometry is presented

  2. Mass spectrometry of submicrogram quantities of lead and cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Noemia M.P. de; Kakazu, M.H.; Iyer, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    Isotope analyses of submicrogram quantities of lead and cadmium are carried out by single filament solid source mass spectrometry. Thermionic emission of Pb and Cd is enhanced using silica gel as an emitter. Details of the chemical and mass spectrometric techniques are described. The low blank levels are maintained by extra purification of the reagents. The applications of isotope ratios of Pb and Cd in environmental sciences and geochemistry are discussed. (Author) [pt

  3. Accelerator-based ultrasensitive mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gove, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter describes a new mass spectrometry technique involving charged particle accelerators normally used for basic research in nuclear science. Topics considered include the limitations of conventional mass spectrometry, the limitations of the direct measurement of radioactive decay, mass spectrometry using a tandem electrostatic accelerator, mass spectrometry using a cyclotron, how accelerator mass spectrometry circumvents the limitations of conventional mass spectrometry, measurements of stable isotopes, nuclear physics and astrophysics applications, modifications to existing accelerators, descriptions of dedicated systems, and future applications

  4. Spectral interferences in atomic absorption spectrometry, (5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daidoji, Hidehiro

    1979-01-01

    Spectral interferences were observed in trace element analysis of concentrated solutions by atomic absorption spectrometry. Molecular absorption and emission spectra for strontium chloride and nitrate, barium chloride and nitrate containing 12 mg/ml of metal ion in airacetylene flame were measured in the wavelength range from 200 to 700 nm. The absorption and emission spectra of SrO were centered near 364.6 nm. The absorption spectra of SrOH around 606.0, 671.0 and 682.0 nm were very strong. And, emission spectrum of BaOH in the wavelength range from 480 to 550 nm was stronger. But, the absorption of this band spectrum was very weak. In the wavelength range from 200 to 400 nm, some unknown bands of absorption were observed for strontium and barium. Absorption spectra of SrCl and BaCl were observed in the argon-hydrogen flame. Also, in the carbon tube atomizer, the absorption spectra of SrCl and BaCl were detected clearly in the wavelength range from 185 to 400 nm. (author)

  5. Trends in preconcentration procedures for metal determination using atomic spectrometry techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoi Pereira, M. de; Arruda, M.A.Z.

    2003-01-01

    Methods for metal preconcentration are often described in the literature. However, purposes are often different, depending on whether the methods are applied in environmental, clinical or technological fields. The respective method needs to be efficient, give high sensitivity, and ideally also is selective which is useful when used in combination with atomic spectroscopy. This review presents the actual tendencies in metal preconcentration using techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Procedures based on related to electrochemical, coprecipitation/precipitation, liquid-liquid and solid-liquid extraction and atom trapping mechanisms are presented. (author)

  6. Spectrochemical analysis of plutonium using direct current plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, W.F.; Fadeff, S.K.; Torres, S.

    1983-01-01

    One year ago, LLNL was just completing the installation of a Direct Current Plasma (DCP) spectrometer for the analysis of Pu and Pu alloys. The installation was completed in December 1982 and has been utilized regularly for Pu analysis since then. This paper discusses the experience with the instrument and some data demonstrating its performance

  7. Inductively coupled plasma as atomization, excitation and ionization sources in analytical atomic spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    Studies on inductively coupled plasma (ICP) for atomic emission and mass spectrometry accomplished in our laboratory since 1978 are reviewed. In emission spectrometry, the characteristics of the plasma are studied concerning the spatial profiles of spectral line intensity, axial profiles of gas and excitation temperatures, spectral line widths and matrix effect. The studies are particularly emphasized on the instrumentation such as developments of plasma generator, emission spectrometers, water-cooled torches and sample introduction methods. A slew-scan type spectrometer developed in these works represents a predecessor of the current commercial spectrometers. An ICP mass spectrometer was first developed in Japan in this laboratory in 1984. Non-spectroscopic interference of this method was found to have the correlation with the atomic weight of the matrix element. Plasma gases other than argon such as nitrogen and oxygen were used for the ICP to evaluate their performance in mass spectrometry as for the sensitivity and interferences. (author). 63 refs

  8. Imaging mass spectrometry statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emrys A; Deininger, Sören-Oliver; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Deelder, André M; McDonnell, Liam A

    2012-08-30

    Imaging mass spectrometry is increasingly used to identify new candidate biomarkers. This clinical application of imaging mass spectrometry is highly multidisciplinary: expertise in mass spectrometry is necessary to acquire high quality data, histology is required to accurately label the origin of each pixel's mass spectrum, disease biology is necessary to understand the potential meaning of the imaging mass spectrometry results, and statistics to assess the confidence of any findings. Imaging mass spectrometry data analysis is further complicated because of the unique nature of the data (within the mass spectrometry field); several of the assumptions implicit in the analysis of LC-MS/profiling datasets are not applicable to imaging. The very large size of imaging datasets and the reporting of many data analysis routines, combined with inadequate training and accessible reviews, have exacerbated this problem. In this paper we provide an accessible review of the nature of imaging data and the different strategies by which the data may be analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the assumptions of the data analysis routines to ensure that the reader is apprised of their correct usage in imaging mass spectrometry research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multi-element analyses of Vietnamese environmental samples for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, T.H.; Nguyen, T.B.; Nguyen, T.N.; Yoshida, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used for measuring 8 major and 27 trace elements in food and soil samples collected in Vietnam. The concentration of elements in food samples was different from different locations and also from different food groups. Depth profiles of the elements were discussed for soil samples. (author)

  10. Essential and toxic elements in meat of wild birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Carla; Desideri, Donatella; Meli, Maria Assunta; Fagiolino, Ivan; Feduzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Essential and toxic elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), mass spectrometry (MS), and atomic absorption (AS) in meat of 14 migratory birds originating from central and northern Europe to provide baseline data regarding game meat consumed in central Italy. In all samples analyzed, cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) (total) levels were meat. These findings indicate that elevated Pb concentrations in game ingested by humans may be a cause for concern.

  11. X-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowicz, A.A.; Van Grieken, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the period under review, i.e, through 1984 and 1985, some 600 articles on XRS (X-ray spectrometry) were published; most of these have been scanned and the most fundamental ones are discussed. All references will refer to English-language articles, unless states otherwise. Also general books have appeared on quantitative EPXMA (electron-probe X-ray microanalysis) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as well as an extensive review on the application of XRS to trace analysis of environmental samples. In the period under review no radically new developments have been seen in XRS. However, significant improvements have been made. Gain in intensities has been achieved by more efficient excitation, higher reflectivity of dispersing media, and better geometry. Better understanding of the physical process of photon- and electron-specimen interactions led to complex but more accurate equations for correction of various interelement effects. Extensive use of micro- and minicomputers now enables fully automatic operation, including qualitative analysis. However, sample preparation and presentation still put a limit to further progress. Although some authors find XRS in the phase of stabilization or even stagnation, further gradual developments are expected, particularly toward more dedicated equipment, advanced automation, and image analysis systems. Ways are outlined in which XRS has been improved in the 2 last years by excitation, detection, instrumental, methodological, and theoretical advances. 340 references

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and its use are described. AMS is a highly sensitive method of counting atoms. It is used to detect very low concentrations of natural isotopic abundances (typically in the range between 10(-12) and 10(-16)) of both radionuclides and stable nuclides. The main advantages of AMS compared to conventional radiometric methods are the use of smaller samples (mg and even sub-mg size) and shorter measuring times (less than 1 hr). The equipment used for AMS is almost exclusively based on the electrostatic tandem accelerator, although some of the newest systems are based on a slightly different principle. Dedicated accelerators as well as older "nuclear physics machines" can be found in the 80 or so AMS laboratories in existence today. The most widely used isotope studied with AMS is 14C. Besides radiocarbon dating this isotope is used in climate studies, biomedicine applications and many other fields. More than 100,000 14C samples are measured per year. Other isotopes studied include 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59Ni, 129I, U, and Pu. Although these measurements are important, the number of samples of these other isotopes measured each year is estimated to be less than 10% of the number of 14C samples. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaize, S.; Ailloud, J.; Mariani, J.; Millot, J.P.

    1958-01-01

    We have studied fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry through the recoil protons they produce in hydrogenated samples. In spectrometric, we used nuclear emulsions, in dosimetric, we used polyethylene coated with zinc sulphide and placed before a photomultiplier. (author) [fr

  14. Mass Spectrometry of Halopyrazolium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Elfinn; Egsgaard, Helge; Pande, U. C.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven halogen substituted 1-methyl-2-phenylpyrazolium bromides or chlorides were investigated by field desorption, field ionization, and electron impact mass spectrometry. Dealkylation was found to be the predominant thermal decomposition. An exchange between covalent and ionic halogen prior...

  15. Ultra-sensitive radionuclide spectrometry. Radiometrics and mass spectrometry synergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments in radiometrics and mass spectrometry techniques for ultra-sensitive analysis of radionuclides in the marine environment are reviewed. In the radiometrics sector the dominant development has been the utilization of large HPGe detectors in underground laboratories with anti-cosmic or anti-Compton shielding for the analysis of short and medium-lived radionuclides in the environment. In the mass spectrometry sector, applications of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for the analysis of long-lived radionuclides in the environment are the most important recent achievements. The recent developments do not only considerably decrease the detection limits for several radionuclides (up to several orders of magnitude), but they also enable to decrease sample volumes so that sampling, e.g., of the water column can be much easier and more effective. A comparison of radiometrics and mass spectrometry results for the analysis of radionuclides in the marine environment shows a reasonable agreement - within quoted uncertainties, for wide range of activities and different sample matrices analyzed. (author)

  16. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy for accurate and well resolved analysis of coatings and thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Wilke, Marcus; Teichert, Gerd; Gemma, Ryota; Pundt, Astrid; Kirchheim, Reiner; Romanus, Henry; Schaaf, Peter

    2011-01-01

    overview on new developments in instrument design for accurate and well resolved thin film analyses is presented. The article focuses on the analytical capabilities of glow discharge optical emission spectrometry in the analysis of metallic coatings

  18. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straus, A.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Di Gaetano, J.O.; D'Atellis, C.E.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  19. Rapid analysis of mixed waste samples via the optical emission from laser initiated microplasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barefield, J.E. II; Ferran, M.D.; Cremers, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Wavelength resolved optical emission from laser initiated microplasmas in samples containing Pu, Am, Pb, Cr, and Be was used to determine elemental compositions. Traditionally, samples of this type are analyzed by neutron activation, X-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption (AA), inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Analysis via the traditional analytical spectroscopic techniques involves extensive sample separation and preparation which results in the generation of significant quantities of additional waste. In the laser based method, little to no sample preparation is required. The method is essentially waste free since only a few micrograms of material is removed from the sample in the generation of the microplasma. Detection limits of the laser based method typically range between subppm to tens of ppM. In this report, the optical emission from samples containing Pu, Am, Pb, Cr, and Be will be discussed. we will also discuss the essential elements of the analysis method

  20. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base

  1. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  2. New trends in nuclear spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westmeier, W.; Siemon, K.

    2013-01-01

    An overview on the status and function of current spectrometry hardware, of detectors having energy-dispersive (spectrometric) properties as well as of the latest developments in quantitative spectrometry software is presented. Making extensive use of modern computing power, new strategies in high-precision spectrum analysis have been developed which enhance the quality of results and also open new fields of spectrometric applications. Three principles have been newly introduced to spectrum analysis software: -use no approximations in modelling (Physics, no numerology) -apply all available models to find a solution (Fuzzy Logic) -repeat complete analyses for iterative improvement (Learn from results). -- Highlights: ► We present an overview of MCA hardware and detectors for nuclear spectrometry. ► Physics-oriented descriptions, Fuzzy Logic and multiple repetitive analyses lead to improved results in spectrum analysis. ► New strategies allow the successful deconvolution of spectra that could not be analysed before

  3. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  4. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  5. Coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Nikola; Roos, Per; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2017-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors is often the technique of choice in an environmental radioactivity laboratory. When measuring environmental samples associated activities are usually low so an important parameter that describes the performance of the spectrometer...... for a nuclide of interest is the minimum detectable activity (MDA). There are many ways for lowering the MDAs in gamma spectrometry. Recently, developments of fast and compact digital acquisition systems have led to growing number of multiple HPGe detector spectrometers. In these applications all detected...

  6. The research of sub-picogram plutonium's quantitative analysis by isotope mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lei; Long Kaiming; Yang Tianli; Liu Xuemei

    2005-10-01

    By using active carbon powder as emission matter, the detect sensitivity of 239 Pu was 0.5 pg (1 ± 0.15, 95% confidence level), improved 20 times compared with the sensitivity 10 pg (1 ± 0.5) of the tradition method. The sub-picogram plutonium sample was determined quantatively by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). (authors)

  7. Mobile environment for an emission spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziak, Kamil; Litwin, Dariusz; Galas, Jacek; Tyburska-Staniewska, Anna; Ramsza, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    The paper describes a mobile application to be used in a chemical analytical laboratory. The program running under the control of Android operating system allows for preview of measurements recorded by the emission spectrometer. Another part of the application monitors operational and configuration parameters of the device in real time. The first part of this paper includes an overview of the atomic spectrometry. The second part contains a description of the application and its further potential development direction.

  8. Surface ionization mass spectrometry of opiates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmanov, D.T.

    2009-07-01

    Key words: surface ionization, adsorption, heterogeneous reactions, surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy, thermoemitter, opiates, extracts of biosamples. Subjects of study. The mass - spectrometric study of thermal - ion emission: surface ionization of opiates by on the surface of oxidized refractory metals. Purpose of work is to establish the regularities of surface ionization (SI) of multi-atomic molecule opiates and their mixtures develop the scientific base of SI methods for high sensitive and selective detection and analysis of these substances in the different objects, including biosamples. Methods of study: surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy. The results obtained and their novelty. For the first time, SI of molecule opiates on the oxidized tungsten surface has been studied and their SI mass-spectra and temperature dependences of ion currents have been obtained, the characteristic heterogeneous reactions of an adsorbed molecules and the channels of monomolecular decays vibrationally-excited ions on their way in mass-spectrometry have been revealed, sublimation energy has been defined, the activation energy of E act , of these decays has been estimated for given period of time. Additivity of the SI mass-spectra of opiate mixtures of has been established under conditions of joint opiate adsorption. High selectivity of SI allows the extracts of biosamples to be analyzed without their preliminary chromatographic separation. The opiates are ionized by SI with high efficiency (from 34 C/mol to 112 C/mol), which provides high sensitivity of opiate detection by SI/MS and APTDSIS methods from - 10 -11 g in the samples under analysis. Practical value. The results of these studies create the scientific base for novel SI methods of high sensitive detection and analysis of the trace amounts of opiates in complicated mixtures, including biosamples without their preliminary

  9. N-15 analysis by emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-12-31

    The stable isotope of nitrogen, N-15, has become widely used as tracer in agriculture, medicine and biology research. The film gives an overview of the sample preparation and analytical procedures followed in the analysis of the nitrogen isotopic composition (14N/15N ratio) by optical emission spectrometry at the Seibersdorf Laboratory. The subsampling of plant material and the several steps of chemical pretreatment such as Kjeldahl digestion, distillation, titration and adjustment of the proper N concentration in the extract are demonstrated. The preparation of the discharge tubes is shown in detail. Final measurement of the 14N/15N ratio is carried out with the NOI-5 and JASCO emission spectrometers

  10. Comparison of methods for the determination of boron in heavy water moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, L.W.; Davey, E.C.; Gulens, J.; Longhurst, T.H.; Mislan, J.P. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario. Chalk River Nuclear Labs.)

    1984-08-01

    Five analysis methods were compared for the determination of boron in heavy water moderator: isotope dilution mass spectrometry, spectrophotometry, neutron activation, inductively coupled plasma -atomic emission spectrometry, and ion selective electrode potentiometry. Ten samples were analysed by each method; the results showed close agreement between all of the methods. Only mass spectrometry achieved the required precision (<1 percent rsd) for samples taken during initial reactor operation, but all of the methods achieved sufficient precision (<10 percent rsd) for samples taken during normal operation. For samples for which the /sup 10/B concentration must be determined, only mass spectrometry and neutron activation are applicable.

  11. Some analytical aspects of the Moessbauer spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, W.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical applications of Moessbauer spectrometry are reviewed. Various methods of analysis (qualitative, semiquantitative and quantitative) using the Moessbauer effect are dealt with. Sensitivity and accuracy of Moessbauer spectrometry in analytical applications are discussed. (Z.S.)

  12. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of Literature on x-ray fluorescence spectrometry starts with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. It is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is subdivided according to spectra, equipment, applications and absorption analysis

  13. Mass spectrometry in epigenetic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian

    2010-01-01

    cancers has gained tremendous interest in recent years, and many of these inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical trials. Despite intense research, however, the exact molecular mechanisms of action of these molecules remain, to a wide extent, unclear. The recent application of mass spectrometry...

  14. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, N.B.

    1977-01-01

    The principle, instrument and procedure of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry are described. It is a rapid, simple and sensitive method for the trace analysis of elements from sodium to uranium in powder, liquid or metal samples. (M.G.B.)

  15. Mass spectrometry of large molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchetti, S.

    1985-01-01

    The lectures in this volume were given at a course on mass spectrometry of large molecules, organized within the framework of the Training and Education programme of the Joint Research Centre of the European Communities. Although first presented in 1983, most of the lectures have since been updated by their authors. (orig.)

  16. Gamma and X 93 spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Meetings of Gamma and X 93 Spectrometry were held on 12-14 October 1993. The symposium was organized into six sessions: Instrumentation development, Nuclear matter measurement, Method and calibration, Medical applications, Environment survey (radioactive traces measurement), other applications (spent fuels analysis, various techniques). Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers in this volume. (TEC)

  17. Mass spectrometry with particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator use is renewing the ultrasensitive mass spectrometry in extending the detection limits. These new devices allow the measurement of rare isotope ratio, as 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl or 41 Ca, from the earth natural reservoirs [fr

  18. Eleventh ISMAS workshop on mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Jaison, P.G.

    2004-10-01

    This volume deals with the latest developments in this field, exposing the innumerable applications of mass spectrometry. The topics covered include basic fundamentals of mass spectrometry, qualitative and quantitative aspects and data interpretation, maintenance of mass spectrometers, selection of a mass spectrometer, its applications in various branches of science as well as recent advances in mass spectrometry. Emphasis is also laid on the practical aspects of mass spectrometry. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  19. Determination of Ra-226 by gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Lobo, A.

    1988-01-01

    This work deals with the method of determination of 226 Ra by low energy photon spectrometry. For this purpose, the interference due to 235 U, that emits a photon with a close energy, has to be considered. The contribution of 235 U to the 186 KeV photopeak is studied through the 63 KeV 234 Th and the 144 KeV 235 U emissions. From the minimum detectable activity of 226 Ra it is discussed the applicability of this method to several kind of samples. (Author)

  20. A novel ion imager for secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuya; Miyata, Kenji; Nakamura, Tsutomu

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new area detector for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) ion microscope, and its performance. The operational principle is based on detecting the change in potential of a floating photodiode caused by the ion-induced secondary-electron emission and the incoming ion itself. The experiments demonstrated that 10 1 -10 5 aluminum ions per pixel can be detected with good linear response. Moreover, relative ion sensitivities from hydrogen to lead were constant within a factor of 2. The performance of this area detector provides the potential for detection of kiloelectronvolt ion images with current ion microscopy

  1. Ninth ISMAS workshop on mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.

    2000-12-01

    Mass spectrometry has wide-ranging applications in such diverse areas as nuclear industry, agriculture, drugs, environment, petroleum and lentils. There is an urgent need to absorb and assimilate state-of-the-art technological developments in the field. Emerging trends in atomic mass spectrometry, advances in organic mass spectrometry, qualitative and quantitative analyses by mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry in oceanography are some of the areas that need to be expeditiously examined and are covered in this volume. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  2. Alpha spectrometry and the secondary ion mass spectrometry of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strisovska, J.; Kuruc, J.; Galanda, D.; Matel, L.; Aranyosiova, M.; Velic, D.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this master thesis was preparation of samples with thorium content on the steel discs by electrodeposition for determination of natural thorium isotope by alpha spectrometry and the secondary ion mass spectrometry and finding out their possible linear correlation between these methods. The samples with electrolytically excluded isotope of 232 Th were prepared by electrodeposition from solution Th(NO 3 ) 4 ·12 H2 O on steel discs in electrodeposition cell with use of solutions Na 2 SO 4 , NaHSO 4 , KOH and (NH 4 ) 2 (C 2 O 4 ) by electric current 0.75 A. Discs were measured by alpha spectrometer. Activity was calculated from the registered impulses for 232 Th and surface's weight. After alpha spectrometry measurements discs were analyzed by TOF-SIMS IV which is installed in the International Laser Centre in Bratislava. Intensities of isotope of 232 Th and ions of ThO + , ThOH + , ThO 2 H + , Th 2 O 4 H + , ThO 2 - , ThO 3 H - , ThH 3 O 3 - and ThN 2 O 5 H - were identified. The linear correlation is between surface's weights of Th and intensities of ions of Th + from SIMS, however the correlation coefficient has relatively low value. We found out with SIMS method that oxidized and hydride forms of thorium are significantly represented in samples with electroplated thorium. (authors)

  3. Determination of As in tree-rings of poplar (Populus alba L.) by U-shaped DC arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, D M; Novović, I; Vilotić, D; Ignjatović, Lj

    2009-04-01

    An argon-stabilized U-shaped DC arc with a system for aerosol introduction was used for determination of As in poplar (Populus alba L.) tree-rings. After optimization of the operating parameters and selection of the most appropriate signal integration time (30 s), the limit of detection for As was reduced to 15.0 ng/mL. This detection limit obtained with the optimal integration time was compared with those for other methods: inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), direct coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES), microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) and improved thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS). Arsenic is toxic trace element which can adversely affect plant, animal and human health. As an indicator of environment pollution we collected poplar tree-rings from two locations. The first area was close to the "Nikola Tesla" (TENT-A) power plant, Obrenovac, while the other was in the urban area of Novi Sad. In all cases elevated average concentrations of As were registered in poplar tree-rings from the Obrenovac location.

  4. Application of inorganic mass spectrometry to problems in atmospheric chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of isotopes by thermal ionization mass spectrometry is a highly sensitive and accurate technique which can be used to determine the concentration of specific nuclides as well as the isotopic composition in environmental samples. The first application uses isotope dilution which makes possible the determination of all elements with two or more stable isotopes in all types of matrices. The second application is a very powerful and useful application in atmospheric chemistry because it permits the use of stable isotopes as definitive intentional tracers of emissions from high temperature combustion sources. The use of stable isotopes of S, Nd, Sm, and U in the study of visibility, deposition, and definitive tracing of emissions will be presented

  5. Liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis of pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macasek, F.

    2003-01-01

    The drugs represent mostly non-volatile and thermally labile solutes, often available only in small amounts like it is in case of radiopharmaceuticals. Therefor, the favourable separation techniques for such compounds are HPLC, capillary electrophoresis and also TLC 1. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detector (LC/MS) is especially powerful for their microanalysis. Mass spectrometry separating the ions in high vacuum was presumably used as detector for gas chromatography effluent but the on-line coupling with liquid eluant flow 0.1-1 mL/min is far more challenging. New types of ion sources were constructed for simultaneous removal of solvent and ionisation of solutes at atmospheric pressure (API). At present, a relatively wide choice of successfully designed commercial equipment is available either for small organic molecules and larger biomolecules (Perkin-Elmer, Agilent, Jeol, Bruker Daltonics, ThermoQuest, Shimadzu). The features of the LC/MS systems are presented. LC/MS as a new quality control tool for [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) radiopharmaceutical, which has became the most spread radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET), was proposed. Other applications of the LC/MS are reviewed. (author)

  6. Mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of citrus limonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qingguo; Schwartz, Steven J

    2003-10-15

    Methods for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) of citrus limonoid aglycones and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of limonoid glucosides are reported. The fragmentation patterns of four citrus limonoid aglycones (limonin, nomilin, obacunone, and deacetylnomilin) and six limonoid glucosides, that is, limonin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (LG), nomilin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NG), nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (NAG), deacetyl nomilinic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (DNAG), obacunone 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG), and obacunoic acid 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OAG) were investigated using a quadruple mass spectrometer in low-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD). The four limonoid aglycones and four limonoid glucosides (LG, OG, NAG, and DNAG) were purified from citrus seeds; the other two limonoid glucosides (NG and OAG) were tentatively identified in the crude extract of grapefruit seeds by ESI mass spectrometry in both positive and negative ion analysis. Ammonium hydroxide or acetic acid was added to the mobile phase to facilitate ionization. During positive ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, protonated molecular ion, [M + H]+, or adduct ion, [M + NH3 + H]-, was formed as base peaks when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. Molecular anions or adduct ions with acetic acid ([M + HOAc - H] and [M + HOAc]-) or a deprotonated molecular ion were produced during negative ion APCI analysis of limonoid aglycones, depending on the mobile-phase modifier used. Positive ion ESI-MS of limonoid glucosides produced adduct ions of [M + H + NH3]+, [M + Na]+, and [M + K]+ when ammonium hydroxide was added to the mobile phase. After collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of the limonoid aglycone molecular ions in negative ion APCI analysis, fragment ions indicated structural information of the precursor ions, showing the presence of methyl, carboxyl, and oxygenated ring

  7. X-ray emission spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despujols, J.

    1992-01-01

    Principles of X-ray emission spectrometry are first recalled, then wave-length dispersive and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer are described. They are essentially designed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements (Z>10). Sample preparation, calibration, corrections, interferences, accuracy are reviewed. Examples of use in different industries are given. (71 refs.)

  8. Experimental study of radiative energy transport in dense plasmas by emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozieres, Maylis

    2016-01-01

    This PhD work is an experimental study, based on emission and absorption spectroscopy of hot and dense nanosecond laser-produced plasmas. Atomic physics in such plasmas is a complex subject and of great interest especially in the fields of astrophysics or inertial confinement fusion. On the atomic physics point of view, this means determining parameters such as the average ionization or opacity in plasmas at given electronic temperature and density. Atomic physics codes then need of experimental data to improve themselves and be validated so that they can be predictive for a wide range of plasmas. With this work we focus on plasmas whose electronic temperature varies from 10 eV to more than a hundred and whose density range goes from 10 -5 ato10 -2 g/cm 3 . In this thesis, there are two types of spectroscopic data presented which are both useful and necessary to the development of atomic physics codes because they are both characteristic of the state of the studied plasma: 1) some absorption spectra from Cu, Ni and Al plasmas close to local thermodynamic equilibrium; 2) some emission spectra from non local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas of C, Al and Cu. This work highlights the different experimental techniques and various comparisons with atomic physics codes and hydrodynamics codes. (author) [fr

  9. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  10. Automatic gamma spectrometry analytical apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamargot, J.-P.; Wanin, Maurice.

    1980-01-01

    This invention falls within the area of quantitative or semi-quantitative analysis by gamma spectrometry and particularly refers to a device for bringing the samples into the counting position. The purpose of this invention is precisely to provide an automatic apparatus specifically adapted to the analysis of hard gamma radiations. To this effect, the invention relates to a gamma spectrometry analytical device comprising a lead containment, a detector of which the sensitive part is located inside the containment and additionally comprising a transfer system for bringing the analyzed samples in succession to a counting position inside the containment above the detector. A feed compartment enables the samples to be brought in turn one by one on to the transfer system through a duct connecting the compartment to the transfer system. Sequential systems for the coordinated forward feed of the samples in the compartment and the transfer system complete this device [fr

  11. Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation in Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard Remko; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has evolved into a crucial technology for the field of proteomics, enabling the comprehensive study of proteins in biological systems. Innovative developments have yielded flexible and versatile mass spectrometric tools, including quadrupole time-of-flight, linear ion trap......, Orbitrap and ion mobility instruments. Together they offer various and complementary capabilities in terms of ionization, sensitivity, speed, resolution, mass accuracy, dynamic range and methods of fragmentation. Mass spectrometers can acquire qualitative and quantitative information on a large scale...

  12. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Mbughuni, Michael M.; Jannetto, Paul J.; Langman, Loralie J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used i...

  13. The history of radiation spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kunishiro

    2007-01-01

    Recently combination of charge sensitive amplifier, pulse shape amplifier and multi-channel PHA (MCA) is regarded as standard configuration of radiation spectrometry. PHA history shows various kinds of MCA devices before we have obtained original digital ADC technology based MCA in 1960s. Those MCAs include interesting ones such as photographic type, which still keep fresh ideas even today. Room temperature preamplifiers are classified to low, medium range, and large capacitance (over 10000pF) detectors keeping ultra low noise. (author)

  14. Gamma-emissions of some meteorites and terrestrial rocks. Evaluation of lunar soil radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordemann, D.

    1966-01-01

    The gamma-emissions of some terrestrial rocks and of the following meteorites: Bogou, Eagle-Station, Granes, and Dosso were studied by quantitative low background gamma spectrometry. These measurements and their interpretation lead to the evaluation of the possible gamma-emissions of several models of lunar soils. (author) [fr

  15. Instrumentation for mass spectrometry: 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-08-01

    All mass spectrometry experiments involve the manipulation of material, an interface with the mass spectrometer, ionization, ion manipulation/analysis, detection and data collection/reduction. Each of these elements involve instrumentation. The wide range of species now amenable to mass spectrometry and the diverse areas of physical science in which it plays a role have led to a seemingly unlimited array of instrumental combinations. However, only a limited number of mass analyzers, and their combinations, dominate. The dominant analyzers include time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, the Paul trap, the mass filter, and the sector mass spectrometer. Why there are so few (or so many, depending upon one`s point of view) can be understood upon consideration of a set of mass analyzer figures of merit. These include mass resolution, mass accuracy, mass range, dynamic range, abundance sensitivity, precision, efficiency, speed, MS{sup n} capability, compatibility with the ionizer, cost, and size. The most appropriate form of mass spectrometry is determined by the priorities of the particular measurement placed on the various mass analyzer characteristics and the relative strengths of the analyzers in meeting the requirements. Each of the analyzer types has a unique set of figures of merit that makes it optimally suited for particular applications. This paper discusses these figures of merit, provides data illustrating recent developments for each analyzer type, and gives the figures of merit of each type of analyzer as they stand in 1997. 101 refs., 24 figs.

  16. Detection of negative ions in glow discharge mass spectrometry for analysis of solid specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Molchan, Igor S.; Tauziede, C.

    2010-01-01

    A new method is presented for elemental and molecular analysis of halogen-containing samples by glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry, consisting of detection of negative ions from a pulsed RF glow discharge in argon. Analyte signals are mainly extracted from the afterglow regime...... be used to study the distribution of a tantalum fluoride layer within the anodized tantala layer. Further, comparison is made with data obtained using glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy, where elemental fluorine can only be detected using a neon plasma. The ionization mechanisms responsible...... for the formation of negative ions in glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry are briefly discussed....

  17. single photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography - Part 1 (October 2012), Part 2 (October 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this lecture is to present the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. Part 1 Content: 1 - Introduction: anatomic, functional and molecular imaging; 2 - Radiotracers: chemical and physical constraints, gamma photon emitters, positon emitters, radioisotopes production, emitters type and imaging techniques; 3 - Gamma cameras; 4 - Quantification in emission tomography: attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion. Part 2 content: 1 - Positon emitters; 2 - Positons detection: Coincidence detection (electronic collimation, PET detectors with gamma cameras, dedicated PET detectors, spectrometry); PET detectors type; time-of-flight PET; 2D PET; 3D PET; 3 - Quantification in emission tomography: detected events, attenuation, scattering, fortuitous coincidences, standardisation; 4 - Common SPECT and PET problems: partial volume effect, movement, tomographic reconstruction, calibration, dead time; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion

  18. Urban gamma spectrometry. Report 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aage, H.K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Kuukankorpi, S.; Moring, M.; Smolander, P.; Toivonen, H. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-06-15

    Urban gamma spectrometry has been given only minor attention with the focus being on rural gamma spectrometry. However, in recent years the Nordic emergency management authorities have turned focus towards border control and lost or stolen sources. Gamma spectra measured in urban areas are characterized by a wide variety of spectrum shapes and very fast changes in environmental background. In 2004 a Danish CGS (Carborne Gamma Spectrometry) survey took place in Copenhagen. It was found that gamma spectrometry in urban areas is far more complicated to interpret than had previously been thought and a new method 'Fitting with Spectral Components', FSC, based on NASVD, was tested with some success. In Finland, a database 'LINSSI' has been developed for spectral data management. In CGS search mode a 'peak hypothesis test' is applied to the measured spectra. This system was tested during the Helsinki 2005 Athletics World Championship and it provides fast and reliable automated alarms for intermediate and high level signals. In Sweden mobile detector systems are used for border controls and problems are encountered when making measurement in harbour, container areas. The methods for handling data and for interpretation of urban gamma spectrometry measurements were compared and tested on the same data sets from Copenhagen and Helsinki. Software tools were developed for converting data between the Finnish LINSSI database and the binary file formats used in Denmark and Sweden. The Processing methods used at DTU and STUK have different goals. The ASSS and FSC methods are designed to optimize the overall detection capability of the system, while sacrificing speed, usability and to a certain level robustness. These methods cannot always be used for real time analysis. The Peak Significance method is designed to give robust alarms in real time, while sacrificing some of the detection capability. Thus these methods are not interchangeable, but rather

  19. Urban gamma spectrometry. Report 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aage, H.K.; Kuukankorpi, S.; Moring, M.; Smolander, P.; Toivonen, H.

    2009-06-01

    Urban gamma spectrometry has been given only minor attention with the focus being on rural gamma spectrometry. However, in recent years the Nordic emergency management authorities have turned focus towards border control and lost or stolen sources. Gamma spectra measured in urban areas are characterized by a wide variety of spectrum shapes and very fast changes in environmental background. In 2004 a Danish CGS (Carborne Gamma Spectrometry) survey took place in Copenhagen. It was found that gamma spectrometry in urban areas is far more complicated to interpret than had previously been thought and a new method 'Fitting with Spectral Components', FSC, based on NASVD, was tested with some success. In Finland, a database 'LINSSI' has been developed for spectral data management. In CGS search mode a 'peak hypothesis test' is applied to the measured spectra. This system was tested during the Helsinki 2005 Athletics World Championship and it provides fast and reliable automated alarms for intermediate and high level signals. In Sweden mobile detector systems are used for border controls and problems are encountered when making measurement in harbour, container areas. The methods for handling data and for interpretation of urban gamma spectrometry measurements were compared and tested on the same data sets from Copenhagen and Helsinki. Software tools were developed for converting data between the Finnish LINSSI database and the binary file formats used in Denmark and Sweden. The Processing methods used at DTU and STUK have different goals. The ASSS and FSC methods are designed to optimize the overall detection capability of the system, while sacrificing speed, usability and to a certain level robustness. These methods cannot always be used for real time analysis. The Peak Significance method is designed to give robust alarms in real time, while sacrificing some of the detection capability. Thus these methods are not interchangeable, but rather complementary. An ideal system

  20. Gamma-emissions of some meteorites and terrestrial rocks. Evaluation of lunar soil radioactivity; Emissions gamma de quelques meteorites et roches terrestres. Evaluation de la radioactivite du sol lunaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordemann, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-07-01

    The gamma-emissions of some terrestrial rocks and of the following meteorites: Bogou, Eagle-Station, Granes, and Dosso were studied by quantitative low background gamma spectrometry. These measurements and their interpretation lead to the evaluation of the possible gamma-emissions of several models of lunar soils. (author) [French] Les emissions gamma des meteorites Bogou, Eagle-Station, Granes et Dosso et de quelques roches terrestres ont ete etudiees par spectrometrie gamma quantitative a faible mouvement propre. Ces mesures et leur interpretation permettent d'evaluer les principales contributions des emissions gamma du sol lunaire pour des modeles de compositions possibles variees. (auteur)

  1. Gamma-emissions of some meteorites and terrestrial rocks. Evaluation of lunar soil radioactivity; Emissions gamma de quelques meteorites et roches terrestres. Evaluation de la radioactivite du sol lunaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordemann, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-07-01

    The gamma-emissions of some terrestrial rocks and of the following meteorites: Bogou, Eagle-Station, Granes, and Dosso were studied by quantitative low background gamma spectrometry. These measurements and their interpretation lead to the evaluation of the possible gamma-emissions of several models of lunar soils. (author) [French] Les emissions gamma des meteorites Bogou, Eagle-Station, Granes et Dosso et de quelques roches terrestres ont ete etudiees par spectrometrie gamma quantitative a faible mouvement propre. Ces mesures et leur interpretation permettent d'evaluer les principales contributions des emissions gamma du sol lunaire pour des modeles de compositions possibles variees. (auteur)

  2. ICP-AES method for metals in air. Pt 2 - analysis; final report on project R48113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.; Howe, A.

    2002-04-01

    An ICP-AES instrument operating procedure has been drafted and incorporated in ISO 15202-3 Workplace air - Determination of metals and metalloids in airborne particulate matter by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry: Part 3 - Analysis. It is expected that this International Standard will be published during 2003. The performance of the analytical method described ISO 15202-3 was evaluated by carrying out laboratory experiments to determine analytical precision. The uncertainty associated with analytical variability was then combined with other sources of uncertainty arising from the sampling method described in ISO 15202-1. A first draft of a proposed new MDHS on Metals and metalloids in workplace air by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry has been prepared based on ISO 15202-1, ISO 15202-2 and ISO 15202-3. It is expected that this will be published in late 2002 or early 2003

  3. Regulation of Floral Terpenoid Emission and Biosynthesis in Sweet Basil (Ocimum basilicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yifan; Ye, Jiayan; Li, Shuai; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-12-01

    Past studies have focused on the composition of essential oil of Ocimum basilicum leaves, but data on composition and regulation of its aerial emissions, especially floral volatile emissions are scarce. We studied the chemical profile, within-flower spatial distribution (sepals, petals, pistils with stamina and pedicels), diurnal emission kinetics and effects of exogenous methyl jasmonate (MeJA) application on the emission of floral volatiles by dynamic headspace collection and identification using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We observed more abundant floral emissions from flowers compared with leaves. Sepals were the main emitters of floral volatiles among the flower parts studied. The emissions of lipoxygenase compounds (LOX) and monoterpenoids, but not sesquiterpene emissions, displayed a diurnal variation driven by light. Response to exogenous MeJA treatment of flowers consisted of a rapid stress response and a longer-term acclimation response. The initial response was associated with enhanced emissions of fatty acid derivatives, monoterpenoids, and sesquiterpenoids without variation of the composition of individual compounds. The longer-term response was associated with enhanced monoterpenoid and sesquiterpenoid emissions with profound changes in the emission spectrum. According to correlated patterns of terpenoid emission changes upon stress, highlighted by a hierarchical cluster analysis, candidate terpenoid synthases responsible for observed diversity and complexity of released terpenoid blends were postulated. We conclude that flower volatile emissions differ quantitatively and qualitatively from leaf emissions, and overall contribute importantly to O. basilicum flavor, especially under stress conditions.

  4. Regulation of Floral Terpenoid Emission and Biosynthesis in Sweet Basil (Ocimum basilicum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yifan; Ye, Jiayan; Li, Shuai; Niinemets, Ülo

    2018-01-01

    Past studies have focused on the composition of essential oil of Ocimum basilicum leaves, but data on composition and regulation of its aerial emissions, especially floral volatile emissions are scarce. We studied the chemical profile, within-flower spatial distribution (sepals, petals, pistils with stamina and pedicels), diurnal emission kinetics and effects of exogenous methyl jasmonate (MeJA) application on the emission of floral volatiles by dynamic headspace collection and identification using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We observed more abundant floral emissions from flowers compared with leaves. Sepals were the main emitters of floral volatiles among the flower parts studied. The emissions of lipoxygenase compounds (LOX) and monoterpenoids, but not sesquiterpene emissions, displayed a diurnal variation driven by light. Response to exogenous MeJA treatment of flowers consisted of a rapid stress response and a longer-term acclimation response. The initial response was associated with enhanced emissions of fatty acid derivatives, monoterpenoids, and sesquiterpenoids without variation of the composition of individual compounds. The longer-term response was associated with enhanced monoterpenoid and sesquiterpenoid emissions with profound changes in the emission spectrum. According to correlated patterns of terpenoid emission changes upon stress, highlighted by a hierarchical cluster analysis, candidate terpenoid synthases responsible for observed diversity and complexity of released terpenoid blends were postulated. We conclude that flower volatile emissions differ quantitatively and qualitatively from leaf emissions, and overall contribute importantly to O. basilicum flavor, especially under stress conditions. PMID:29367803

  5. Development of a novel methodology for indoor emission source identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, K.H.; Zhang, J.S.; Knudsen, H.N.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a methodology to identify individual sources of emissions based on the measurements of mixed air samples and the emission signatures of individual materials previously determined by Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS), an on......-line analytical device. The methodology based on signal processing principles was developed by employing the method of multiple regression least squares (MRLS) and a normalization technique. Samples of nine typical building materials were tested individually and in combination, including carpet, ceiling material...... experiments and investigation are needed for cases where the relative emission rates among different compounds may change over a long-term period....

  6. Mobile instrumentation platform and robotic accessory for real-time screening of hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.S.; Jaselskis, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    An innovative mobile laboratory for real-time field screening of soils for inorganic hazardous waste using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry sampling and analysis technique is being developed at Ames Laboratory. This sampling technique as well as the concept for installing, monitoring, and controlling the instrumentation and utilities in the mobile laboratory, the robotic sampling accessory, and manual sampling method are discussed. Benefits of this mobile configuration and future development plans also are described

  7. Application of Solid Phase Extraction on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes of Some Heavy Metal Ions to Analysis of Skin Whitening Cosmetics Using ICP-AES

    OpenAIRE

    ALqadami, Ayoub; Abdalla, Mohammad; ALOthman, Zeid; Omer, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    A novel and highly sensitive method for the determination of some heavy metals in skin whitening cosmetics creams using multiwalled carbon nanotubes MWCNTs as solid phase extraction sorbent for the preconcentration of these heavy metals prior to their determination by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry is described. Different practical parameters have been thoroughly investigated and the optimum experimental conditions were employed. The developed method was then applied ...

  8. Toxic and trace elements in foodstuffs in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Sumiya, M.; Ohmomo, Y.

    1988-01-01

    From the viewpoint of environmental safety assessment it is important to have information on the levels of toxic and trace elements in foodstuffs. It is also essential to develop suitable analytical methods for these elements in order to obtain accurate analytical data. In this paper, two analytical methods were used, inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and neutron activation analysis (NAA), for analysing toxic and trace elements in several food samples. 3 tabs

  9. Multielement Determination of Major-to Ultratrace Elements in a Cabbage, Spinach, and the Japanese Radish by ICP-AES After Acid Digestion

    OpenAIRE

    畑山, 友紀; 奴田原, 杏奈; 藤井, 和美; 西島, 基弘; ハタヤマ, ユキ; ヌタハラ, アンナ; フジイ, カズミ; ニシジマ, モトヒロ; Yuki, Hatayama; anna, Nutahara; Kazumi, Fujii; Motohiro, Nishijima

    2011-01-01

    A multi-element determination in a cabbage, spinach, and the Japanese radish was carried out by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP). We investigated whether there was a difference in content according to the part of the vegetables. The dried vegetables (0.5g) were digested with nitric acid and with hydrogen peroxide acid in a resolution device As a result, about 9 elements were successfully determined. The values of the coefficient of variance for part interval by ea...

  10. A comprehensive evaluation of physical and environmental performances for wet-white leather manufacture

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Jiabo; Puig Vidal, Rita; Sang, Jun; Lin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the comprehensive evaluation results of physical and environmental performances for a novel wet-white (chrome-free) leather manufacturing. The tanning process is optimized as 15 wt% tannic acid (TA) combination with 4 wt% Laponite nanoclay, giving the leather with shrinkage temperature (Ts) above 86 °C. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements indicate that Laponite can be evenly and tightly bound within the leather matrix, which is fu...

  11. Applied gamma-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dams, R; Crouthamel, Carl E

    1970-01-01

    Applied Gamma-Ray Spectrometry covers real life application of the gamma-ray and the devices used in their experimental studies. This book is organized into 9 chapters, and starts with discussions of the various decay processes, the possible interaction mechanisms of gamma radiation with matter, and the intrinsic and extrinsic variables, which affect the observed gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. The subsequent chapters deal with the properties and fabrication of scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and proportional gas counters. These chapters present some of the most widely utilized

  12. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  13. Functional genomics by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M

    2000-01-01

    Systematic analysis of the function of genes can take place at the oligonucleotide or protein level. The latter has the advantage of being closest to function, since it is proteins that perform most of the reactions necessary for the cell. For most protein based ('proteomic') approaches to gene f...... numbers of intact proteins by mass spectrometry directly. Examples from this laboratory illustrate biological problem solving by modern mass spectrometric techniques. These include the analysis of the structure and function of the nucleolus and the analysis of signaling complexes....

  14. Principle of accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    The principle of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is described mainly on technical aspects: hardware construction of AMS, measurement of isotope ratio, sensitivity of measurement (measuring limit), measuring accuracy, and application of data. The content may be summarized as follows: rare isotope (often long-lived radioactive isotope) can be detected by various use of the ion energy obtained by the acceleration of ions, a measurable isotope ratio is one of rare isotope to abundant isotopes, and a measured value of isotope ratio is uncertainty to true one. Such a fact must be kept in mind on the use of AMS data to application research. (M.H.)

  15. Role of Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketha, Siva S; Singh, Ravinder J; Ketha, Hemamalini

    2017-09-01

    The advent of mass spectrometry into the clinical laboratory has led to an improvement in clinical management of several endocrine diseases. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry found some of its first clinical applications in the diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism, in quantitative steroid analysis, and in drug analysis laboratories. Mass spectrometry assays offer analytical sensitivity and specificity that is superior to immunoassays for many analytes. This article highlights several areas of clinical endocrinology that have witnessed the use of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to improve clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A review of modern instrumental methods of elemental analysis of petroleum related material. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadkarni, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a review is presented of the state of the art in elemental analysis of petroleum-related materials (crude oil, gasoline, additives, and lubricants) using modern instrumental analysis techniques. The major instrumental techniques used for elemental analysis of petroleum products include atomic absorption spectrometry (both with flame and with graphite furnace atomizer), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, ion chromatography, microelemental methods, neutron activation, spark source mass spectrometry, and x-ray fluorescence. Each of these techniques is compared for its advantages, disadvantages, and typical applications in the petroleum field

  17. Quantitative mass spectrometry: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Pawel L.

    2016-10-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a mainstream chemical analysis technique in the twenty-first century. It has contributed to numerous discoveries in chemistry, physics and biochemistry. Hundreds of research laboratories scattered all over the world use MS every day to investigate fundamental phenomena on the molecular level. MS is also widely used by industry-especially in drug discovery, quality control and food safety protocols. In some cases, mass spectrometers are indispensable and irreplaceable by any other metrological tools. The uniqueness of MS is due to the fact that it enables direct identification of molecules based on the mass-to-charge ratios as well as fragmentation patterns. Thus, for several decades now, MS has been used in qualitative chemical analysis. To address the pressing need for quantitative molecular measurements, a number of laboratories focused on technological and methodological improvements that could render MS a fully quantitative metrological platform. In this theme issue, the experts working for some of those laboratories share their knowledge and enthusiasm about quantitative MS. I hope this theme issue will benefit readers, and foster fundamental and applied research based on quantitative MS measurements. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  18. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbughuni, Michael M; Jannetto, Paul J; Langman, Loralie J

    2016-12-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MS n ) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology.

  19. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbughuni, Michael M.; Jannetto, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MSn) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology. PMID:28149262

  20. Emission Inventory for Fugitive Emissions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Nielsen, Malene

    This report presents the methodology and data used in the Danish inventory of fugitive emissions from fuels for the years until 2007. The inventory of fugitive emissions includes CO2, CH4, N2O, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2, dioxin, PAH and particulate matter. In 2007 the total Danish emission of greenhouse...

  1. Selection of an analytical line for determining lithium in aluminum alloys by laser induced breakdown spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lednev, V.N.; Yakovlev, A.V.; Labutin, T.A.; Popov, A.M.; Zorov, N.B.

    2007-01-01

    Possibilities for determining lithium in aluminum alloys by laser spark spectrometry are studied. The optimum conditions for registering the emission signal of lithium at which the effect of the continuous background radiation of the laser plasma attains a minimum are found. The possibility of determining lithium by laser spark spectrometry using the spectral line at 610 nm is studied for the first time. A comparison of the detection limits and sensitivities of determining lithium by emission its lines at 610 and 671 nm has indicated the advisability of using the line 610 nm for the studied alloys. The detection limit calculated using the 3σ test was found to be 230 ppm (610 nm) and 870 ppm (671 nm) [ru

  2. Comparison of mass-spectrometry and α-counting in analysis of uranium and plutonium isotopes in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irleweck, K.; Pichlmayer, F.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of trace amounts of U and Pu isotopes is of interest in environmental and personal monitoring programmes. Commonly after preconcentration and separation of the radionuclides a proper sample is prepared electrolytically and the measurements are performed by alpha spectrometry. Some investigations on uranium isotopic abundances and on plutonium fallout deposition in soil have been carried out in this way. It is impossible to distinguish between the isotopes 239 Pu and 240 Pu by alpha spectrometry, however, because their α-energies are too close together. Such determinations can only be carried out by mass spectrometry. Specific Pu emissions, e.g. from nuclear production plants, can be discriminated from the global fallout level. Mass spectrometry is the more sensitive method for measuring long-lived nuclides compared with α-spectrometry. In the case of soil analysis, however, Pu detection is obstructed by the high natural uranium content, usually in the range 0.2 to 2.0 ppm which exceeds the trace amounts of plutonium by several orders of magnitude. This work describes a chemical procedure which separates U/Pu sufficiently for alpha spectrometry as well as for mass spectrometry, and compares results of environmental analysis applying both methods. (author)

  3. Handbook on Mobile Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing......Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing...

  4. Mass spectrometry-assisted protease substrate screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlüter, Hartmut; Rykl, Jana; Thiemann, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    -phase chromatography they are analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry and the substrates identified by database searching. The proof of principle in this study is demonstrated by incubating immobilized human plasma proteins with thrombin and by identifying by tandem mass spectrometry the fibrinopeptides, released...

  5. Inorganic mass spectrometry of solid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.; Vertes, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this review some recent developments in the field of inorganic mass spectrometry of solids are described with special emphasis on the actual state of understanding of the ionization processes. It concentrates on the common characteristics of methods such as spark source-, laser-, secondary ion-, inductively coupled plasma- and glow discharge mass spectrometry. (orig.)

  6. Surface analysis by imaging mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vidová, Veronika; Volný, Michael; Lemr, Karel; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 74, 7-8 (2009), s. 1101-1116 ISSN 0010-0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : secondary ion mass spectrometry * matrix assisted laser desorption ionization * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.856, year: 2009

  7. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, R.; Bunkenborg, J.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive informati...

  8. Gamma spectrometry of infinite 4Π geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordemann, D.J.R.

    1987-07-01

    Owing to the weak absorption og gamma radiation by matter, gamma-ray spectrometry may be applied to samples of great volume. A very interesting case is that of the gamma-ray spectrometry applied with 4Π geometry around the detector on a sample assumed to be of infinite extension. The determination of suitable efficiencies allows this method to be quantitative. (author) [pt

  9. Use of proportional counter in X-Ray spectrometry between 5 and 100 keV. Application to the detection of fission products and to the determination of absolute X-Ray disintegration rates; Utilisation d'un compteur proportionnel en spectrometrie de rayons X entre 5 et 100 keV. Application a la detection des produits de fission et a la determination des taux d'emission X absolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerf, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Cadarache (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    'un melange d'argon et de methane a la pression de trois atmospheres environ dans un domaine d'energie de 5 100 kev. Utilise dans ces conditions, ce compteur nous a permis de mesurer le taux d'emission absolu de rayonnements X du {sup 133}Ba et du {sup 75}Se, et de proceder a l'etude d'un echantillon de produits de fission. De meme, nous avons egalement utilise des melanges gazeux a base de xenon, afin d'augmenter le rendement du detecteur; dans ce dernier cas, nous avons particulierement examine les limitations introduites par la presence de nombreuses raies parasites issues du gaz. C'est ainsi que nous avons mis en evidence, outre les pics d'echappement, la raie de fluorescence du gaz dont l'origine est difficilement explicable. (auteur)

  10. Quantification of elemental mapping of heterogeneous geological sample by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaculovič, T.; Breiter, Karel; Korbelová, Zuzana; Venclová, Natalie; Tomková, Kateřina; Jonášová, Šárka; Kanický, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 133, JUL 2017 (2017), s. 200-207 ISSN 0026-265X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13600S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:67985912 Keywords : LA-ICP-MS * induced breakdown spectroscopy * atomic emission spectrometry * in-situ analysis * trace-metals Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation; AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology (ARU-G) OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry; Archaeology (ARU-G) Impact factor: 3.034, year: 2016

  11. Target characterization by PIXE, alpha spectrometry and X-ray absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheswa, N.Y.; Papka, P.; Pineda-Vargas, C.A.; Newman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the thickness and homogeneity characterization of thin metallic targets of Zr-96 by means of alpha absorption spectrometry, Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and X-ray absorption. The target thicknesses determined by means of the above mentioned methods are critically compared. The thicknesses were determined before and after irradiation with a 70 MeV beam of 14 N ions.

  12. Triazolobithiophene Light Absorbing Self-Assembled Monolayers: Synthesis and Mass Spectrometry Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Séraphin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of five light absorbing triazolobithiophenic thiols, which were utilized for producing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs on gold surfaces, is presented. The monolayer formation was monitored by cyclic voltammetry, indicating excellent surface coverage. The new triazolobithiophenic compounds exhibited an absorption maximum around 340 nm, which is close to the emission wavelength of a standard nitrogen laser. Consequently these compounds could be used to aid ionization in laser desorption mass spectrometry (MS.

  13. Initial Gamma Spectrometry Examination of the AGR-3/4 Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Stempien, John D.

    2016-11-01

    The initial results from gamma spectrometry examination of the different components from the combined third and fourth US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development TRISO-coated particle fuel irradiation tests (AGR-3/4) have been analyzed. This experiment was designed to provide information about in-pile fission product migration. In each of the 12 capsules, a single stack of four compacts with designed-to-fail particles surrounded by two graphitic diffusion rings (inner and outer) and a graphite sink were irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory’s Advanced Test Reactor. Gamma spectrometry has been used to evaluate the gamma-emitting fission product inventory of compacts from the irradiation and evaluate the burnup of these compacts based on the activity of the radioactive cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) in the compacts. Burnup from gamma spectrometry compares well with predicted burnup from simulations. Additionally, inner and outer rings were also examined by gamma spectrometry both to evaluate the fission product inventory and the distribution of gamma-emitting fission products within the rings using gamma emission computed tomography. The cesium inventory of the scanned rings compares acceptably well with the expected inventory from fission product transport modeling. The inventory of the graphite fission product sinks is also being evaluated by gamma spectrometry.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry in NIPNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivascu, M; Marinescu, L.; Dima, R.; Cata-Danil, D.; Petrascu, M.; Popescu, I.; Stan-Sion, C.; Radulescu, M.; Plostinaru, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is today the method capable to measure the lowest concentration of a particular nuclide in sample materials. The method has applications in environmental physics, medicine, measurements of cosmic-ray or nuclear power plant produced radionuclides in the earth's atmosphere. All over the world, more than 40 charged particles and heavy ion accelerators are performing such analyses concerning the research interest of a huge number of laboratories. The Romanian Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest has initiated a construction project for the AMS facility at the FN - Van de Graaff Tandem accelerator. This program benefits of technical and financial assistance provided by IAEA in the frame of the IAEA-TC Project ROM 8014-265C. A general lay-out of the AMS project is presented. The construction work has begun and first tests of the AMS injector will take place between July - September this year. (authors)

  15. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B V; Clarke, M; Hu, H; Betz, [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.V.; Clarke, M.; Hu, H.; Betz [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Emissions from burning of softwood pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Maria; Kjaellstrand, Jennica

    2004-01-01

    Softwood pellets from three different Swedish manufacturers were burnt in laboratory scale to determine compounds emitted. The emissions were sampled on Tenax cartridges and assessed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. No large differences in the emissions from pellets from different manufacturers were observed. The major primary semi-volatile compounds released during flaming burning were 2-methoxyphenols from lignin. The methoxyphenols are of interest due to their antioxidant effect, which may counteract health hazards of aromatic hydrocarbons. Glowing combustion released the carcinogenic benzene as the predominant aromatic compound. However, the benzene emissions were lower than from flaming burning. To relate the results from the laboratory burnings to emissions from pellet burners and pellet stoves, chimney emissions were determined for different burning equipments. The pellet burner emitted benzene as the major aromatic compound, whereas the stove and boiler emitted phenolic antioxidants together with benzene. As the demand for pellets increases, different biomass wastes will be considered as raw materials. Ecological aspects and pollution hazards indicate that wood pellets should be used primarily for residential heating, whereas controlled large-scale combustion should be preferred for pellets made of most other types of biomass waste. (Author)

  18. Inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Part II: applications and fundamentals. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boumans, P.W.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second part of the two-volume treatise by this well-known and respected author. This volume reviews applications of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), summarizes fundamental studies, and compares ICP-AES methods with other methods of analysis. The first six chapters are devoted to specific fields of application, including the following: metals and other industrial materials, geology, the environment, agriculture and food, biology and clinical analysis, and organic materials. The chapter on the analysis of organic materials also covers the special instrumental considerations required when organic solvents are introduced into an inductively coupled plasma. A chapter on the direct analysis of solids completes the first part of this volume. Each of the applications chapters begins with a summary of the types of samples that are encountered in that field, and the kinds of problems that an elemental analysis can help to solve. This is followed by a tutorial approach covering applicability, advantages, and limitations of the methods. The coverage is thorough, including sample handling, storage, and preparation, acid, and fusion dissolution, avoiding contamination, methods of preconcentration, the types of interferences that can be expected and ways to reduce them, and the types of ICP plasmas that are used. The second half of the volume covers fundamental studies of ICP-AES: basic processes of aerosol generation, plasma modeling and computer simulation, spectroscopic diagnostics, excitation mechanisms, and discharge characteristics. This section introduces the experimental and modeling methods that have been used to obtain fundamental information about ICPs

  19. Analytical applications of atomic spectroscopy, with particular reference to inductively coupled plasma emission analysis of coal and fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pougnet, M.A.B.

    1983-08-01

    This thesis outlines the analytical applications of atomic emission and absorption spectroscopy to a variety of materials. Special attention was directed to the analysis of coal and coal ashes. A simple slurry sampling technique was developed and used to determine V, Ni, Co, Mo and Mn in the National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials (NBS-SRM) coals 1632a and 1635 by furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). Coal and fly ash were analysed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The determination of B, Be, Li, C, K and other trace elements by ICP-AES was investigated. Analytical methods were developed for the analysis of coal, fly ash and water samples. Fusion with sodium carbonate and a digestion bomb dissolution method were compared for the determination of boron in a South African boron-rich mineral (Kornerupine). Eight elements were determined in 10 industrial water samples from a power plant. Ca, Mg, Si and B were determined by ICP-AES and V, Ni, Co and Mo by FAAS. Various problems encountered during the course of the work and interferences in ICP-AES analysis are discussed. Some recommendations concerning method development and routine analysis by this technique are suggested

  20. Evaluation of field-portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of lead contamination on small-arms firing ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J.F.; Taylor, J.D.; Bass, D.A.; Zellmer, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rieck, M. [U.S. Army, Grafenwoehr Training Area (Germany)

    1995-02-01

    Field analytical methods for the characterization of lead contamination in soil are being developed. In this study, the usefulness of a commercially available, field-portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) is evaluated for determining the extent of lead contamination in soils on small-arms firing ranges at a military installation. This field screening technique provides significant time and cost savings for the study of sites with lead-contaminated soil. Data obtained with the XRF unit in the field are compared with data obtained from soil samples analyzed in an analytical laboratory by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Results indicate that the field-portable XRF unit evaluated in this study provides data that are useful in determining the extent and relative magnitude of lead contamination. For the commercial unit used in this study, improvements in the spectral resolution and in the limit of detection would be required to make the unit more than just a screening tool.

  1. Arctic emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds – from plants, litter and soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Sarah Hagel

    -terpenoid BVOCs were dominating the emission profile from the soils and the magnitude of the soil emissions depended greatly on the soil water content and temperature. A warmer arctic climate will likely alter the composition of plant species, cause a thawing of permafrost soil and change soil characteristics...... in adsorbent cartridges and analyzed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Ecosystem BVOC emissions were highly dominated by terpenoids but the composition of terpenoids differed between different plant species. Litter emissions were less dominated by terpenoids than the ecosystem emissions, however...... they still constituted approximately 50 % of the total emissions. I suggested that the litter emissions derived both from microbial soil processes and from stores inside the litter tissue and that the relative importance of these two sources were plant species specific. Furthermore, emissions of non...

  2. Gas chromatography of organic microcontaminants using atomic emission and mass spectrometric detection combined in one instrument (GC-AED/MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, H.G.J.; Hankemeier, T.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    This study describes the coupling of an atomic-emission detector and mass-spectrometric detector to a single gas chromatograph. Splitting of the column effluent enables simultaneous detection by atomic-emission detection (AED) and mass spectrometry (MS) and yields a powerful system for the target

  3. Plasma emission mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melrose, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Only three emission processes are thought to play a role in solar radio emission: plasma emission, gyromagnetic emission and bremsstrahlung. In this chapter plasma emission is discussed and the processes involved in its production are treated, namely, the generation of Langmuir turbulence, the partial conversion into fundamental transverse radiation, production of secondary Langmuir waves and the generation of second-harmonic transverse radiation. (U.K.)

  4. Water Vapor Remote Sensing Techniques: Radiometry and Solar Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somieski, A.; Buerki, B.; Cocard, M.; Geiger, A.; Kahle, H.-G.

    The high variability of atmospheric water vapor content plays an important role in space geodesy, climatology and meteorology. Water vapor has a strong influence on transatmospheric satellite signals, the Earth's climate and thus the weather forecasting. Several remote sensing techniques have been developed for the determination of inte- grated precipitable water vapor (IPWV). The Geodesy and Geodynamics Lab (GGL) utilizes the methods of Water Vapor Radiometry and Solar Spectrometry to quantify the amount of tropospheric water vapor and its temporal variations. The Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR) measures the radiation intensity of the atmosphere in a frequency band ranging from 20 to 32 GHz. The Solar Atmospheric MOnitoring Spectrome- ter (SAMOS) of GGL is designed for high-resolution measurements of water vapor absorption lines using solar radiation. In the framework of the ESCOMPTE (ExpÊrience sur Site pour COntraindre les Mod- Éles de Pollution atmosphÊrique et de Transport d'Emissions) field campaign these instruments have been operated near Marseille in 2001. They have aquired a long time series of integrated precipitable water vapor content (IPWV). The accuracy of IPWV measured by WVR and SAMOS is 1 kg/m2. Furthermore meteorological data from radiosondes were used to calculate the IPWV in order to provide comparisons with the results of WVR and SAMOS. The methods of Water Vapor Radiometry and So- lar Spectrometry will be discussed and first preliminary results retrieved from WVR, SAMOS and radiosondes during the ESCOMPTE field campaign will be presented.

  5. Ion cyclotron emission by spontaneous emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Costa, O [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Gresillon, D [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    1994-07-01

    The goal of the study is to examine whether the spontaneous emission can account for ICE (ion cyclotron emission) experimental results, or part of them. A straightforward approach to plasma emission is chosen, investigating the near equilibrium wave radiation by gyrating ions, and thus building from the majority and fast fusion ions the plasma fluctuations and emission on the fast magnetoacoustic or compressional Alfven wave mode in the IC frequency range. Similarities with the ICE experiments are shown: the emission temperature in the presence of fast ions (even in a very small amount), the strong fast ion emission increase with the harmonic, the fine double-line splitting of each peak, the linear but not proportional increase of the peak width with the harmonic. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Ion cyclotron emission by spontaneous emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Costa, O.; Gresillon, D.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the study is to examine whether the spontaneous emission can account for ICE (ion cyclotron emission) experimental results, or part of them. A straightforward approach to plasma emission is chosen, investigating the near equilibrium wave radiation by gyrating ions, and thus building from the majority and fast fusion ions the plasma fluctuations and emission on the fast magnetoacoustic or compressional Alfven wave mode in the IC frequency range. Similarities with the ICE experiments are shown: the emission temperature in the presence of fast ions (even in a very small amount), the strong fast ion emission increase with the harmonic, the fine double-line splitting of each peak, the linear but not proportional increase of the peak width with the harmonic. 3 refs., 2 figs

  7. Wireless Data Acquisition of Transient Signals for Mobile Spectrometry Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzcinski, Peter; Weagant, Scott; Karanassios, Vassili

    2016-05-01

    Wireless data acquisition using smartphones or handhelds offers increased mobility, it provides reduced size and weight, it has low electrical power requirements, and (in some cases) it has an ability to access the internet. Thus, it is well suited for mobile spectrometry applications using miniaturized, field-portable spectrometers, or detectors for chemical analysis in the field (i.e., on-site). There are four main wireless communications standards that can be used for wireless data acquisition, namely ZigBee, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and UWB (ultra-wide band). These are briefly reviewed and are evaluated for applicability to data acquisition of transient signals (i.e., time-domain) in the field (i.e., on-site) from a miniaturized, field-portable photomultiplier tube detector and from a photodiode array detector installed in a miniaturized, field-portable fiber optic spectrometer. These are two of the most widely used detectors for optical measurements in the ultraviolet-visible range of the spectrum. A miniaturized, 3D-printed, battery-operated microplasma-on-a-chip was used for generation of transient optical emission signals. Elemental analysis from liquid microsamples, a microplasma, and a handheld or a smartphone will be used as examples. Development and potential applicability of wireless data acquisition of transient optical emission signals for taking part of the lab to the sample types of mobile, field-portable spectrometry applications will be discussed. The examples presented are drawn from past and ongoing work in the authors' laboratory. A handheld or a smartphone were used as the mobile computing devices of choice. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Mass spectrometry at the Pittsburgh conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borman, S.

    1987-01-01

    Each year analytical chemists flock to the Pittsburgh Conference to learn about the latest trends in analytical instrumentation. In this Focus, a number of prominent mass spectroscopists who attended this year's meeting in Atlantic City, NJ, discuss their perceptions of current developments in the field of mass spectrometry (MS). In the June 1 issue of Analytical Chemistry, the authors coverage of the Pittsburgh Conferences continues with a follow-up article on specific developments in hyphenated mass spectrometry - primarily liquid chromatography - MS (LC/MS) and gas chromatography - infrared spectrometry MS (GC/IR/MS)

  9. A REVIEW ON MASS SPECTROMETRY DETECTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Khatri Neetu; Gupta Ankit; Taneja Ruchi; Bilandi Ajay; Beniwal Prashant

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is an analytical technique for "weighing" molecules. Obviously, this is not done with a conventional scale or balance. Instead, mass spectrometry is based upon the principle of the motion of a charged particle that is called an ion, in an electric or magnetic field. The mass to charge ratio (m/z) of the ion affects particles motion. Since the charge of an electron is known, the mass to charge ratio (m/z) is a measurement of mass of an ion. Mass spectrometry research focuses ...

  10. Chromatography–mass spectrometry in aerospace industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buryak, Alexey K; Serduk, T M

    2013-01-01

    The applications of chromatography–mass spectrometry in aerospace industry are considered. The primary attention is devoted to the development of physicochemical grounds of the use of various chromatography–mass spectrometry procedures to solve topical problems of this industry. Various methods for investigation of the composition of rocket fuels, surfaces of structural materials and environmental media affected by aerospace activities are compared. The application of chromatography–mass spectrometry for the development and evaluation of processes for decontaminations of equipment, industrial wastes and soils from rocket fuel components is substantiated. The bibliography includes 135 references.

  11. Protein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindic, M.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Soft ionization techniques, electrospray (ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI make the analysis of biomolecules by mass spectrometry (MS possible. MS is used for determination of the molecular weight of peptides and protein, sequence analysis, characterization of protein-ligand interactions etc. The detection limit, resolution and mass accuracy depend on instrument used (Table 1. Impurities (buffers, salts, detergents can reduce the ion intensities or even totally suppress them, so a separation method (chromatography, 2D-gel electrophoresis must be used for purification of the sample.Molecular mass of intact protein can be determined by ESI or MALDI MS. Multiply charged ions are produced by ESI MS, while singly charged ions are predominant in MALDI spectra (Fig. 2.Sequence analysis of proteins by MS can be performed using peptide mass fingerprint. In this method, proteins are separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis and digested with specific protease (Table 2 or digested and then separated by two-dimensional chromatography (Fig. 1. The obtained peptide mixtures are analyzed by MS or MALDI-TOF technique. The masses determined by MS are compared with calculated masses from database entries. Different algorithms have been developed for protein identification. Example of posttranslational modifications (N- and O-glycosylation and protein sequence complex analysis after dual digestion (endoproteinase digestion followed by endoglycosidase digestion is shown in Fig. 3.It is known that detection of peptides by MS is influenced by intrinsic properties like amino acid composition, the basicity of the C-terminal amino acid, hydrophobicity, etc. Arginine-containing peptides dominate in MS spectra of tryptic digest, so the chemical derivatization of lysine terminal residue by O-methilisourea or 2-methoxy-4,5-1H-imidazole was suggested (Fig. 4.The peptide mass fingerprint method can be improved further by peptide fragmentation using tandem

  12. Environmental atmospheric impact assessment by the emission of particles in an industrial area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Dario R.; Ledesma, Ariel G.; Vazquez, Cristina; Smichowski, Patricia N.; Romero, Carlos A.; Dawidowski, Laura E.; Ortiz, Maria; Marrero, Julieta G.

    1999-01-01

    The content of metals present in suspended particulate matter was evaluated using analytical related nuclear techniques, in order to discriminate the contribution of different emission sources to the atmospheric concentration in the area of Campana, located in the Province of Buenos Aires. The levels of Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ag, Cd y Pb were quantified by Wave Dispersion X-Ray Florescence spectrometry (WDXRF), Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometry (TRXRF) and Inducted Coupled Plasma Absorption Emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). (author)

  13. Vehicle Emissions Risk Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahem, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Vehicle emissions are considered as a main source for air pollution. Emissions regulation is now well developed in most countries to meet cleaner air quality. Reducing emissions by using cleaner fuels, which meet certain specification, is not enough to get cleaner air, yet the vehicle technology is not improved. Here we will outline the following: - development in fuel specification and emissions regulation. main facts linking vehicle emissions, fuel properties and air quality. catalytic converter technology. Emissions sources: In modem cities, vehicle traffic is potentially a major source of emissions. However sometimes other sources of emissions from industry and other stationary sources can be equally important and include emissions that are of greater toxicity than those from vehicles

  14. Difraction spectrometry by laser beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frías, M.

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available The advances in laser technology have permitted the development of numerous applications, in particular diffraction spectrometry by laser beams for the determination of the distribution curve of the particle sizes of different materials; this permits one to obtain the distribution of particle size in both wet and dry materials. In the present paper a brief description of the technique and its principles is offered. The results obtained with different materials-limestone clay, gypsum, Portland cement and siliceous materials are given.

    Los avances en la tecnología laser han permitido el desarrollo de múltiples aplicaciones, en concreto la espectrometría de difracción de rayos laser para la determinación de la curva de distribución del tamaño de partícula de diferentes materiales, y que permite la obtención de la misma tanto en seco como en húmedo. En este trabajo se hace una descripción breve de la técnica y de sus fundamentos. Se presentan resultados con diferentes materiales: caliza, arcilla, yeso, cemento Portland y materiales silíceos.

  15. Liquid scintillation alpha spectrometry techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKlveen, J.W.; McDowell, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate, quantitative determinations of alpha emitting nuclides by conventional plate counting methods are difficult, because of sample self-absorption problems in counting and because of non-reproducible losses in conventional sample separation methods. Liquid scintillation alpha spectrometry offers an attractive alternative with no sample self-absorption or geometry problems and with 100% counting efficiency. Sample preparation may include extraction of the alpha emitter of interest by a specific organic phase-soluble compound directly into the liquid scintillation counting medium. Detection electronics use energy and pulse-shape discrimination, to yield alpha spectra without beta and gamma background interference. Specific procedures have been developed for gross alpha, uranium, plutonium, thorium and colonium assay. Possibilities for a large number of other applications exist. Accuracy and reproducibility are typically in the 1% range. Backgrounds of the order of 0.01 cpm are readily achievable. The paper will present an overview of liquid scintillation alpha counting techniques and some of the results achieved for specific applications. (orig.)

  16. Ionizing radiations, detection, dosimetry, spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, D.

    1997-10-01

    A few works in French language are devoted to the detection of radiations. The purpose of this book is to fill a gap.The five first chapters are devoted to the properties of ionizing radiations (x rays, gamma rays, leptons, hadrons, nuclei) and to their interactions with matter. The way of classification of detectors is delicate and is studied in the chapter six. In the chapter seven are studied the statistics laws for counting and the spectrometry of particles is treated. The chapters eight to thirteen study the problems of ionization: charges transport in a gas, ionization chambers (theory of Boag), counters and proportional chambers, counters with 'streamers', chambers with derive, spark detectors, ionization chambers in liquid medium, Geiger-Mueller counters. The use of a luminous signal is the object of the chapters 14 to 16: conversion of a luminous signal in an electric signal, scintillators, use of the Cerenkov radiation. Then, we find the neutron detection with the chapter seventeen and the dosimetry of particles in the chapter eighteen. This book does not pretend to answer to specialists questions but can be useful to physicians, engineers or physics teachers. (N.C.)

  17. Photon spectrometry utilizing neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, R.; Benevides, C.; Lima, F.; Vilela, E.

    2015-01-01

    Having in mind the time spent on the uneventful work of characterization of the radiation beams used in a ionizing radiation metrology laboratory, the Metrology Service of the Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste - CRCN-NE verified the applicability of artificial intelligence (artificial neural networks) to perform the spectrometry in photon fields. For this, was developed a multilayer neural network, as an application for the classification of patterns in energy, associated with a thermoluminescent dosimetric system (TLD-700 and TLD-600). A set of dosimeters was initially exposed to various well known medium energies, between 40 keV and 1.2 MeV, coinciding with the beams determined by ISO 4037 standard, for the dose of 10 mSv in the quantity Hp(10), on a chest phantom (ISO slab phantom) with the purpose of generating a set of training data for the neural network. Subsequently, a new set of dosimeters irradiated in unknown energies was presented to the network with the purpose to test the method. The methodology used in this work was suitable for application in the classification of energy beams, having obtained 100% of the classification performed. (authors)

  18. Pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of lignins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F; Saiz-Jimenez, C; Gonzalez-Vila, F J

    1979-01-01

    Milled wood lignins from spruce, beech and bamboo were pyrolysed. The high-boiling products of pyrolysis were studied by GLC and mass spectrometry. The forty-three products identified provide information on the structural units of lignin.

  19. Stable isotope mass spectrometry in petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Manju

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope mass spectrometry plays an important role to evaluate the stable isotopic composition of hydrocarbons. The isotopic ratios of certain elements in petroleum samples reflect certain characteristics which are useful for petroleum exploration

  20. Mass Spectrometry-Based Biomarker Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weidong; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Longo, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of candidate biomarkers within the entire proteome is one of the most important and challenging goals in proteomic research. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a modern and promising technology for semiquantitative and qualitative assessment of proteins, enabling protein sequencing and identification with exquisite accuracy and sensitivity. For mass spectrometry analysis, protein extractions from tissues or body fluids and subsequent protein fractionation represent an important and unavoidable step in the workflow for biomarker discovery. Following extraction of proteins, the protein mixture must be digested, reduced, alkylated, and cleaned up prior to mass spectrometry. The aim of our chapter is to provide comprehensible and practical lab procedures for sample digestion, protein fractionation, and subsequent mass spectrometry analysis.