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Sample records for plasma transport theories

  1. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.W.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives are: (1) to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for TEXT-Upgrade. Recent reports, publications, and conference presentations of the Fusion Research Center are listed.

  2. Transport phenomena in a plasma quasilinear theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enos D'Ambrogio

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available Making use of a recently developed quasi-linear formulation of 1D Vlasov equation, we derive the balance relations for the space-averaged distribution function and spectral power density. The validity-range in the short-time behaviour as well as in the time asymptotic limit is discussed. The formalism is perturbative but non-markovian in character, as it formally generalizes, and in the appropriate limit reproduces, Pocobelli's kinetic theory.

  3. Effective Potential Theory: A Practical Way to Extend Plasma Transport Theory to Strong Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Baalrud, Scott D; Daligault, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    The effective potential theory is a physically motivated method for extending traditional plasma transport theories to stronger coupling. It is practical in the sense that it is easily incorporated within the framework of the Chapman-Enskog or Grad methods that are commonly applied in plasma physics and it is computationally efficient to evaluate. The extension is to treat binary scatterers as interacting through the potential of mean force, rather than the bare Coulomb or Debye-screened Coulomb potential. This allows for aspects of many-body correlations to be included in the transport coefficients. Recent work has shown that this method accurately extends plasma theory to orders of magnitude stronger coupling when applied to the classical one-component plasma model. The present work shows that similar accuracy is realized for the Yukawa one-component plasma model and it provides a comparison with other approaches.

  4. Theory of nonlocal heat transport in fully ionized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maximov, A.V. (Tesla Labs., Inc., La Jolla, CA (United States)); Silin, V.P. (P.N. Lebedev Inst., Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russia))

    1993-01-25

    A new analytic solution of the electron kinetic equation describing the interacting of the electromagnetic heating field with plasma is obtained in the region of plasma parameters where the Spitzer-Harm classical theory is invalid. A novel expression for the nonlocal electron thermal conductivity is derived. (orig.).

  5. Theory of self-organized critical transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Y.; Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; LeBrun, M.J.; Kim, J.Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment]|[Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1995-07-01

    A theoretical and computational study of the ion temperature gradient and {eta}{sub i} instabilities in tokamak plasmas has been carried out. In toroidal geometry the modes have a radially extended structure and their eigenfrequencies are constant over many rational surfaces that are coupled through toroidicity. These nonlocal properties of the ITG modes impose strong constraint on the drift mode fluctuations and the amciated transport, showing a self-organized characteristic. As any significant deviation away from marginal stability causes rapid temperature relaxation and intermittent bursts, the modes hover near marginality and exhibit strong kinetic characteristics. As a result, the temperature relaxation is self-semilar and nonlocal, leading to a radially increasing heat diffusivity. The nonlocal transport leads to the Bohm-like diffusion scaling. The heat input regulates the deviation of the temperature gradient away from marginality. The obtained transport scalings and properties are globally consistent with experimental observations of L-mode charges.

  6. Transport formulas for multi-component plasmas within the effective potential theory framework

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    The recently proposed effective potential theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 235001 (2013)] allows evaluating transport in coupled plasmas with the well-developed formalisms for systems with binary collisions. To facilitate practical implementation of this concept in fluid models of multi-component plasmas, compact expressions for the transport coefficients in terms the generalized Coulomb logarithms are summarized from existing prescriptions. For weakly coupled plasmas, characterized by Debye-shielded Coulomb interaction potential, expressions become fully analytical. In coupled plasmas the generalized Coulomb logarithms need to be evaluated numerically. Routines implementing the described formalisms are included as supplemental material.

  7. Kinetic theory of transport processes in partially ionized reactive plasma, II: Electron transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The previously obtained in (Zhdanov and Stepanenko, 2016) general transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma are employed for analysis of electron transport properties in molecular and atomic plasmas. We account for both elastic and inelastic interaction channels of electrons with atoms and molecules of plasma and also the processes of electron impact ionization of neutral particles and three-body ion-electron recombination. The system of scalar transport equations for electrons is discussed and the expressions for non-equilibrium corrections to electron ionization and recombination rates and the diagonal part of the electron pressure tensor are derived. Special attention is paid to analysis of electron energy relaxation during collisions with plasma particles having internal degrees of freedom and the expression for the electron coefficient of inelastic energy losses is deduced. We also derive the expressions for electron vector and tensorial transport fluxes and the corresponding transport coefficients for partially ionized reactive plasma, which represent a generalization of the well-known results obtained by Devoto (1967). The results of numerical evaluation of contribution from electron inelastic collisions with neutral particles to electron transport properties are presented for a series of molecular and atomic gases.

  8. Turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Horton, Wendell

    2012-01-01

    This book explains how magnetized plasmas self-organize in states of electromagnetic turbulence that transports particles and energy out of the core plasma faster than anticipated by the fusion scientists designing magnetic confinement systems in the 20th century. It describes theory, experiments and simulations in a unified and up-to-date presentation of the issues of achieving nuclear fusion power.

  9. Theory of gas discharge plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the theory of gas discharge plasmas in a didactical way. It explains the processes in gas discharge plasmas. A gas discharge plasma is an ionized gas which is supported by an external electric field. Therefore its parameters are determined by processes in it. The properties of a gas discharge plasma depend on its gas component, types of external fields, their geometry and regimes of gas discharge. Fundamentals of a gas discharge plasma include elementary, radiative and transport processes which are included in its kinetics influence. They are represented in this book together with the analysis of simple gas discharges. These general principles are applied to stationary gas discharge plasmas of helium and argon. The analysis of such plasmas under certain conditions is theoretically determined by numerical plasma parameters for given regimes and conditions.

  10. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

  11. Kinetic theory and transport phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Soto, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    This textbook presents kinetic theory, which is a systematic approach to describing nonequilibrium systems. The text is balanced between the fundamental concepts of kinetic theory (irreversibility, transport processes, separation of time scales, conservations, coarse graining, distribution functions, etc.) and the results and predictions of the theory, where the relevant properties of different systems are computed. The book is organised in thematic chapters where different paradigmatic systems are studied. The specific features of these systems are described, building and analysing the appropriate kinetic equations. Specifically, the book considers the classical transport of charges, the dynamics of classical gases, Brownian motion, plasmas, and self-gravitating systems, quantum gases, the electronic transport in solids and, finally, semiconductors. Besides these systems that are studied in detail, concepts are applied to some modern examples including the quark–gluon plasma, the motion of bacterial suspen...

  12. RELATIVISTIC TRANSPORT-THEORY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MALFLIET, R

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the present status of relativistic transport theory. Special emphasis is put on problems of topical interest: hadronic features, thermodynamical consistent approximations and spectral properties.

  13. Equations of state, transport properties, and compositions of argon plasma: combination of self-consistent fluid variation theory and linear response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, W L; Chen, Q F; Fu, Z J; Sun, X W; Zheng, J; Gu, Y J

    2015-02-01

    A consistent theoretical model that can be applied in a wide range of densities and temperatures is necessary for understanding the variation of a material's properties during compression and heating. Taking argon as an example, we show that the combination of self-consistent fluid variational theory and linear response theory is a promising route for studying warm dense matter. Following this route, the compositions, equations of state, and transport properties of argon plasma are calculated in a wide range of densities (0.001-20 g/cm(3)) and temperatures (5-100 kK). The obtained equations of state and electrical conductivities are found in good agreement with available experimental data. The plasma phase transition of argon is observed at temperatures below 30 kK and density about 2-6g/cm(3). The minimum density for the metallization of argon is found to be about 5.8 g/cm(3), occurring at 30-40 kK. The effects of many-particle correlations and dynamic screening on the electrical conductivity are also discussed through the effective potentials.

  14. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation. Technical progress report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.W.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives are: (1) to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for TEXT-Upgrade. Recent reports, publications, and conference presentations of the Fusion Research Center are listed.

  15. Kinetic Theory of the Inner Magnetospheric Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Khazanov, George V

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a broad introduction to the kinetic theory of space plasma physics with the major focus on the inner magnetospheric plasma. It is designed to provide a comprehensive description of the different kinds of transport equations for both plasma particles and waves with an emphasis on the applicability and limitations of each set of equations. The major topics are: Kinetic Theory of Superthermal Electrons, Kinetic Foundation of the Hydrodynamic Description of Space Plasmas (including wave-particle interaction processes), and Kinetic Theory of the Terrestrial Ring Current. Distinguishable features of this book are the analytical solutions of simplified transport equations. Approximate analytic solutions of transport phenomena are very useful because they help us gain physical insight into how the system responds to varying sources of mass, momentum and energy and also to various external boundary conditions. They also provide us a convenient method to test the validity of complicated numerical mod...

  16. Theory and simulation of quasilinear transport from external magnetic field perturbations in a DIII-D plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, R. E.; Ferraro, N. M.

    2015-04-01

    The linear response profiles for the 3D perturbed magnetic fields, currents, ion velocities, plasma density, pressures, and electric potential from low-n external resonant magnetic field perturbations (RMPs) are obtained from the collisional two-fluid M3D-C1 code [N. M. Ferraro and S. C. Jardin, J. Comput. Phys. 228, 7742 (2009)]. A newly developed post-processing RMPtran code computes the resulting quasilinear E×B and magnetic (J×B) radial transport flows with respect to the unperturbed flux surfaces in all channels. RMPtran simulations focus on ion (center of mass) particle and transient non-ambipolar current flows, as well as the toroidal angular momentum flow. The paper attempts to delineate the RMP transport mechanisms that might be responsible for the RMP density pump-out seen in DIII-D [M. A. Mahdavi and J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)]. Experimentally, the starting high toroidal rotation does not brake to a significantly lower rotation after the pump-out suggesting that convective and E×B transport mechanisms dominate. The direct J×B torque from the transient non-ambipolar radial current expected to accelerate plasma rotation is shown to cancel much of the Maxwell stress J×B torque expected to brake the plasma rotation. The dominant E×B Reynolds stress accelerates rotation at the top of the pedestal while braking rotation further down the pedestal.

  17. Radial plasma transport in Saturn's magnetosphere (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. W.

    2010-12-01

    Radial plasma transport in the magnetosphere of Saturn, like that of Jupiter, is driven by the centrifugal force of (partial) corotation acting on internally generated plasma. A significant difference is that the internal plasma source is evidently broadly distributed throughout the inner magnetosphere of Saturn (4 CAPS and MAG), and reproduced in numerical simulations (RCM) that contain a distributed plasma source, although it has not, to my knowledge, been explained by an analytical theory containing an active plasma source. Both planets exhibit strong magnetospheric modulations near the planetary spin period, probably indicating a persistent longitudinal asymmetry of the radial plasma transport process. At Jupiter such an asymmetry is readily understood as a consequence of the dramatic asymmetry of the intrinsic planetary magnetic field. This is not so at Saturn, where any such field asymmetry is known to be very modest at best. In neither case has the precise nature of the asymmetry been identified either observationally or theoretically.

  18. Transport coefficients of a relativistic plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, O. J.; Rose, S. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a self-consistent transport theory for a relativistic plasma is developed. Using the notation of Braginskii [S. I. Braginskii, in Reviews of Plasma Physics, edited by M. A. Leontovich (Consultants Bureau, New York, 1965), Vol. 1, p. 174], we provide semianalytical forms of the electrical resistivity, thermoelectric, and thermal conductivity tensors for a Lorentzian plasma in a magnetic field. This treatment is then generalized to plasmas with arbitrary atomic number by numerically solving the linearized Boltzmann equation. The corresponding transport coefficients are fitted by rational functions in order to make them suitable for use in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations and transport calculations. Within the confines of linear transport theory and on the assumption that the plasma is optically thin, our results are valid for temperatures up to a few MeV. By contrast, classical transport theory begins to incur significant errors above kBT ˜10 keV, e.g., the parallel thermal conductivity is suppressed by 15% at kBT =20 keV due to relativistic effects.

  19. Intermittent transport in edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.; Juul Rasmussen, J. [Association EURATOM-Riso National Laboratory, Optics and Plasma Research, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2004-07-01

    The properties of low-frequency convective fluctuations and transport are investigated for the boundary region of magnetized plasmas. We employ a two-dimensional fluid model for the evolution of the global plasma quantities in a geometry and with parameters relevant to the scrape-off layer of confined toroidal plasmas. Strongly intermittent plasma transport is regulated by self-consistently generated sheared poloidal flows and is mediated by burst ejection of particles and heat from the bulk plasma in the form of blobs. Coarse grained probe signals reveal a highly skewed and flat distribution on short time scales, but tends towards a normal distribution at large time scales. Conditionally averaged signals are in perfect agreement with experimental measurements. (authors)

  20. Electronic transport in partially ionized water plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Martin; Redmer, Ronald

    2017-09-01

    We use ab initio simulations based on density functional theory to calculate the electrical and thermal conductivities of electrons in partially ionized water plasmas at densities above 0.1 g/cm3. The resulting conductivity data are then fitted to analytic expressions for convenient application. For low densities, we develop a simple and fully analytic model for electronic transport in low-density plasmas in the chemical picture using the relaxation-time approximation. In doing so, we derive a useful analytic expression for electronic transport cross sections with neutral particles, based on a model potential. In the regime of thermal ionization, electrical conductivities from the analytic model agree with the ab initio data within a factor of 2. Larger deviations are observed for the thermal conductivity, and their origin is discussed. Our results are relevant for modeling the interior and evolution of water-rich planets as well as for technical plasma applications.

  1. The Lunar dusty plasmas -levitation and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamaniuk, Barbara; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    Lunar dust can exhibit unusual behavior -due to electron photoemission via solar-UV radiation the lunar surface represents a complex plasma -"dusty plasma". The dust grains and lunar surface are electrostatically charged by the Moon's interaction with the local plasma environ-ment and the photoemission of electrons due to solar UV and X-rays. This effect causes the like-charged surface and dust particles to repel each other, and creates a near-surface electric field. Lunar dust must be treated as a dusty plasma. Using analytic (kinetic (Vlasov) and magnetohydrodynamic theory ) and numerical modeling we show physical processes related to levitation and transport dusty plasma on the Moon. These dust grains could affect the lunar environment for radio wave and plasma diagnostics and interfere with exploration activities. References: 1. Wilson T.L. (1992), in Analysis of Interplanetary Dust, M. Zolensky et al. AIP Conf.Proc. 310, 33-44 (AIP, NY), 2.Wilson T.L."LUNAR DUST AND DUSTY PLASMA PHYSICS".40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (2009), 3. Grün E., et al.(1993),Nature 363, 144. 4. Morfill G. and Grün E.(1979), Planet. Space Sci.. 27, 1269, 1283, 5. Manka R. and Michel F. (1971), Proc. 2nd Lun. Sci. Conf. 2, 1717 (MIT Press, Cambridge). 6. Manka R. et al.(1973), Lun. Sci.-III, 504. 7. Barbara Atamaniuk "Kinetic Description of Localized Plasma Structure in Dusty Plasmas". Czechoslovak Journal of Physics Vol.54 C 2004

  2. Plasma Theory and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-31

    expan- sion of a warm plasma; launching and propagation and decay of very large amplitude waves (8GK, solitons, etc.); thermal barriers (really...25.373.1981. ION-10N TWO-STREAM IN THERMAL BARRIERS : Vincent-lhonal,U.C.Berkeley. We present stu- dies or the eleclroTatic ion-ion two-stream instability as

  3. Plasma Theory and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-30

    William Nevins L439 LLL (422-7032) Lecturers , UCB; Physicists -LLL Dr. William Fawley Guest, UCB; Physicist LLL L321 LLL (422-9272) Yu-Jiuan Chen, Douglas... MHD - Particle Codes." Three abstracts of papers prepared for the APS Division of Plasma Physics Meeting, November 10-14, 1980, at San Diego, follow

  4. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, J.A.

    1994-11-30

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (10{sup 8} K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called `tokamak` this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high `fusion` temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This `anomalous transport` of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL).

  5. Analysis of pedestal plasma transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callen, J. D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Groebner, R. [General Atomics, San Diego; Osborne, T.H. [General Atomics, San Diego; Canik, John [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Pankin, A. Y. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Rafiq, T. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Stacey, W. M. [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    An H-mode edge pedestal plasma transport benchmarking exercise was undertaken for a single DIII-D pedestal. Transport modelling codes used include 1.5D interpretive (ONETWO, GTEDGE), 1.5D predictive (ASTRA) and 2D ones (SOLPS, UEDGE). The particular DIII-D discharge considered is 98889, which has a typical low density pedestal. Profiles for the edge plasma are obtained from Thomson and charge-exchange recombination data averaged over the last 20% of the average 33.53 ms repetition time between type I edge localized modes. The modelled density of recycled neutrals is largest in the divertor X-point region and causes the edge plasma source rate to vary by a factor similar to 10(2) on the separatrix. Modelled poloidal variations in the densities and temperatures on flux surfaces are small on all flux surfaces up to within about 2.6 mm (rho(N) > 0.99) of the mid-plane separatrix. For the assumed Fick's-diffusion-type laws, the radial heat and density fluxes vary poloidally by factors of 2-3 in the pedestal region; they are largest on the outboard mid-plane where flux surfaces are compressed and local radial gradients are largest. Convective heat flows are found to be small fractions of the electron (less than or similar to 10%) and ion (less than or similar to 25%) heat flows in this pedestal. Appropriately averaging the transport fluxes yields interpretive 1.5D effective diffusivities that are smallest near the mid-point of the pedestal. Their 'transport barrier' minima are about 0.3 (electron heat), 0.15 (ion heat) and 0.035 (density) m(2) s(-1). Electron heat transport is found to be best characterized by electron-temperature-gradient-induced transport at the pedestal top and paleoclassical transport throughout the pedestal. The effective ion heat diffusivity in the pedestal has a different profile from the neoclassical prediction and may be smaller than it. The very small effective density diffusivity may be the result of an inward pinch flow nearly

  6. Comparing Theory and Experiment for Analyte Transport in the First Vacuum Stage of the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachreson, Matthew R.

    The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been used in laboratories for many years. The majority of the improvements to the instrument have been done empirically through trial and error. A few fluid models have been made, which have given a general description of the flow through the mass spectrometer interface. However, due to long mean free path effects and other factors, it is very difficult to simulate the flow details well enough to predict how changing the interface design will change the formation of the ion beam. Towards this end, Spencer et al. developed FENIX, a direct simulation Monte Carlo algorithm capable of modeling this transitional flow through the mass spectrometer interface, the transitional flow from disorganized plasma to focused ion beam. Their previous work describes how FENIX simulates the neutral ion flow. While understanding the argon flow is essential to understanding the ICP-MS, the true goal is to improve its analyte detection capabilities. In this work, we develop a model for adding analyte to FENIX and compare it to previously collected experimental data. We also calculate how much ambipolar fields, plasma sheaths, and electron-ion recombination affect the ion beam formation. We find that behind the sampling interface there is no evidence of turbulent mixing. The behavior of the analyte seems to be described simply by convection and diffusion. Also, ambipolar field effects are small and do not significantly affect ion beam formation between the sampler and skimmer cones. We also find that the plasma sheath that forms around the sampling cone does not significantly affect the analyte flow downstream from the skimmer. However, it does thermally insulate the electrons from the sampling cone, which reduces ion-electron recombination. We also develop a model for electron-ion recombination. By comparing it to experimental data, we find that significant amounts of electron-ion recombination occurs just downstream from the

  7. Instabilities, turbulence and transport in a magnetized plasma; Instabilites, turbulence et transport dans un plasma magnetise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbet, X

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce the main processes that occur in a magnetized plasma. During the last 2 decades, the understanding of turbulence has made great progress but analytical formulas and simulations are far to produce reliable predictions. The values of transport coefficients in a tokamak plasma exceed by far those predicted by the theory of collisional transport. This phenomenon is called abnormal transport and might be due to plasma fluctuations. An estimation of turbulent fluxes derived from the levels of fluctuations, is proposed. A flow description of plasma allows the understanding of most micro-instabilities. The ballooning representation deals with instabilities in a toric geometry. 3 factors play an important role to stabilize plasmas: density pinch, magnetic shear and speed shear. The flow model of plasma gives an erroneous value for the stability threshold, this is due to a bad description of the resonant interaction between wave and particle. As for dynamics, flow models can be improved by adding dissipative terms so that the linear response nears the kinetic response. The kinetic approach is more accurate but is complex because of the great number of dimensions involved. (A.C.)

  8. Cosmic ray transport in astrophysical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlickeiser, R. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- & Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität, Bochum (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Since the development of satellite space technology about 50 years ago the solar heliosphere is explored almost routinely by several spacecrafts carrying detectors for measuring the properties of the interplanetary medium including energetic charged particles (cosmic rays), solar wind particle densities, and electromagnetic fields. In 2012, the Voyager 1 spacecraft has even left what could be described as the heliospheric modulation region, as indicated by the sudden disappearance of low energy heliospheric cosmic ray particles. With the available in-situ measurements of interplanetary turbulent electromagnetic fields and of the momentum spectra of different cosmic ray species in different interplanetary environments, the heliosphere is the best cosmic laboratory to test our understanding of the transport and acceleration of cosmic rays in space plasmas. I review both the historical development and the current state of various cosmic ray transport equations. Similarities and differences to transport theories for terrestrial fusion plasmas are highlighted. Any progress in cosmic ray transport requires a detailed understanding of the electromagnetic turbulence that is responsible for the scattering and acceleration of these particles.

  9. Fluid theory and simulations of instabilities, turbulent transport and coherent structures in partially-magnetized plasmas of \\mathbf{E}\\times \\mathbf{B} discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyakov, A. I.; Chapurin, O.; Frias, W.; Koshkarov, O.; Romadanov, I.; Tang, T.; Umansky, M.; Raitses, Y.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Lakhin, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    Partially-magnetized plasmas with magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions are common in Hall thrusters for electric propulsion and magnetron material processing devices. These plasmas are usually in strongly non-equilibrium state due to presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields, inhomogeneities of plasma density, temperature, magnetic field and beams of accelerated ions. Free energy from these sources make such plasmas prone to various instabilities resulting in turbulence, anomalous transport, and appearance of coherent structures as found in experiments. This paper provides an overview of instabilities that exist in such plasmas. A nonlinear fluid model has been developed for description of the Simon-Hoh, lower-hybrid and ion-sound instabilities. The model also incorporates electron gyroviscosity describing the effects of finite electron temperature. The nonlinear fluid model has been implemented in the BOUT++ framework. The results of nonlinear simulations are presented demonstrating turbulence, anomalous current and tendency toward the formation of coherent structures.

  10. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics transport

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics: Tranpsort develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma transport to the modern treatment of the Chapman-Enskog method for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The book invites the reader to consider actual problems of the transport of thermal plasmas with particular attention to the derivation of diffusion- and viscosity-type transport cross sections, stressing the role of resonant charge-exchange processes in affecting the diffusion-type collision calculation of viscosity-type collision integrals. A wide range of topics is then discussed including (1) the effect of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions on the transport of vibrational energy, (2) the role of electronically excited states in the transport properties of thermal plasmas, (3) the dependence of transport properties on the multitude of Saha equations for multi-temperature plasmas, and (4) the effect of the magnetic field on transport properties. Throughout the book, worked examples ...

  11. Plasma transport simulation modeling for helical confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K.; Amano, T.

    1991-08-01

    New empirical and theoretical transport models for helical confinement systems are developed based on the neoclassical transport theory including the effect of radial electric field and multi-helicity magnetic components, and the drift wave turbulence transport for electrostatic and electromagnetic modes, or the anomalous semi-empirical transport. These electron thermal diffusivities are compared with CHS (Compact Helical System) experimental data, which indicates that the central transport coefficient of the ECH plasma agrees with the neoclassical axi-symmetric value and the transport outside the half radius is anomalous. On the other hand, the transport of NBI-heated plasmas is anomalous in the whole plasma region. This anomaly is not explained by the electrostatic drift wave turbulence models in these flat-density-profile discharges. For the detailed prediction of plasma parameters in LHD (Large Helical Device), 3-D(dimensional) equilibrium/1-D transport simulations including empirical or drift wave turbulence models are carried out, which suggests that the global confinement time of LHD is determined mainly by the electron anomalous transport near the plasma edge region rather than the helical ripple transport in the core region. Even if the ripple loss can be eliminated, the increase of the global confinement is 10%. However, the rise in the central ion temperature is more than 20%. If the anomalous loss can be reduced to the half level of the present scaling, like so-called `H-mode` of the tokamak discharge, the neoclassical ripple loss through the ion channel becomes important even in the plasma core. The 5% radial inward shift of the plasma column with respect to the major radius is effective for improving plasma confinement and raising more than 50% of the fusion product by reducing this neoclassical asymmetric ion transport loss and increasing 10% in the plasma radius. (author).

  12. The theory of toroidally confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    White, Roscoe B

    2014-01-01

    This graduate level textbook develops the theory of magnetically confined plasma, with the aim of bringing the reader to the level of current research in the field of thermonuclear fusion. It begins with the basic concepts of magnetic field description, plasma equilibria and stability, and goes on to derive the equations for guiding center particle motion in an equilibrium field. Topics include linear and nonlinear ideal and resistive modes and particle transport. It is of use to workers in the field of fusion both for its wide-ranging account of tokamak physics and as a kind of handbook or formulary. This edition has been extended in a number of ways. The material on mode-particle interactions has been reformulated and much new information added, including methodology for Monte Carlo implementation of mode destabilization. These results give explicit means of carrying out mode destabilization analysis, in particular for the dangerous fishbone mode. A new chapter on cyclotron motion in toroidal geometry has ...

  13. Turbulent transport and structural transition in confined plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1996-10-01

    Theory of the far-nonequilibrium transport of plasmas is described. Analytic as well as simulation studies are developed. The subcritical nature of turbulence and the mechanism for self-sustaining are discussed. The transport coefficient is obtained. The pressure gradient is introduced as an order parameter, and the bifurcation from the collisional transport to the turbulent one is shown. The generation of the electric field and its influence on the turbulent transport are analyzed. The bifurcation of the radial electric field structure is addressed. The hysteresis appears in the flux-gradient relation. This bifurcation causes the multifold states in the plasma structure, driving the transition in transport coefficient or the self-generating oscillations in the flux. Structural formation and dynamics of plasma profiles are explained. (author)

  14. Nondiffusive plasma transport at tokamak edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2000-10-01

    Recent findings show that cross field edge plasma transport at tokamak edge does not necessarily obey a simple diffusive law [1], the only type of a transport model applied so far in the macroscopic modeling of edge plasma transport. Cross field edge transport is more likely due to plasma filamentation with a ballistic motion of the filaments towards the first wall. Moreover, it so fast that plasma recycles on the main chamber first wall rather than to flow into divertor as conventional picture of edge plasma fluxes suggests. Crudely speaking particle recycling wise diverted tokamak operates in a limiter regime due to fast anomalous non-diffusive cross field plasma transport. Obviously that this newly found feature of edge plasma anomalous transport can significantly alter a design of any future reactor relevant tokamaks. Here we present a simple model describing the motion of the filaments in the scrape off layer and discuss it implications for experimental observations. [1] M. Umansky, S. I. Krasheninnikov, B. LaBombard, B. Lipschultz, and J. L. Terry, Phys. Plasmas 6 (1999) 2791; M. Umansky, S. I. Krasheninnikov, B. LaBombard and J. L. Terry, Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 3373.

  15. Perturbative Transport Studies in Fusion Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Studies of transport in fusion plasmas using perturbations of an equilibrium state reviewed. Essential differences between steady-state and perturbative transport studies are pointed out. Important transport issues that can be addressed with perturbative experiments are identified as: (i) Are the tr

  16. Modified Enskog Kinetic Theory for Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Baalrud, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Concepts underlying the Enskog kinetic theory of hard-spheres are applied to include short-range correlation effects in a model for transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas. The approach is based on an extension of the effective potential transport theory [S.~D.~Baalrud and J.~Daligault, Phys.~Rev.~Lett.~{\\bf 110}, 235001 (2013)] to include an exclusion radius surrounding individual charged particles that is associated with Coulomb repulsion. This is obtained by analogy with the finite size of hard spheres in Enskog's theory. Predictions for the self-diffusion and shear viscosity coefficients of the one-component plasma are tested against molecular dynamics simulations. The theory is found to accurately capture the kinetic contributions to the transport coefficients, but not the potential contributions that arise at very strong coupling ($\\Gamma \\gtrsim 30$). Considerations related to a first-principles generalization of Enskog's kinetic equation to continuous potentials are also discussed.

  17. Modified Enskog kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott D; Daligault, Jérôme

    2015-06-01

    Concepts underlying the Enskog kinetic theory of hard-spheres are applied to include short-range correlation effects in a model for transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas. The approach is based on an extension of the effective potential transport theory [S. D. Baalrud and J. Daligault, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 235001 (2013)] to include an exclusion radius surrounding individual charged particles that is associated with Coulomb repulsion. This is obtained by analogy with the finite size of hard spheres in Enskog's theory. Predictions for the self-diffusion and shear viscosity coefficients of the one-component plasma are tested against molecular dynamics simulations. The theory is found to accurately capture the kinetic contributions to the transport coefficients, but not the potential contributions that arise at very strong coupling (Γ≳30). Considerations related to a first-principles generalization of Enskog's kinetic equation to continuous potentials are also discussed.

  18. Transport properties of inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issanova, M.K.; Kodanova, S.K.; Ramazanov, T.S. [IETP, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper the transport properties of non-isothermal dense deuterium-tritium plasmas were studied. Based on the effective interaction potentials between particles, the Coulomb logarithm for a two-temperature nonisothermal dense plasma was obtained. These potentials take into consideration long-range multi-particle screening effects and short-range quantum-mechanical effects in two-temperature plasmas. Transport processes in such plasmas were studied using the Coulomb logarithm. The obtained results were compared with the theoretical works of other authors and with the results of molecular dynamics simulations. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Turbulent transport and structural transition in confined plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Fukuyama, Atsushi [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Engineering

    1997-05-01

    The theory of far-nonequilibrium transport of plasmas is described. Analytic as well as simulation studies are developed. The subcritical nature coefficient is obtained. The pressure gradient is introduced as an order parameter, and the bifurcation from collisional to turbulent transport is shown. The generation of the electric field and its influence on the turbulent transport are analysed. The bifurcation of the radial electric field structure is addressed. Hysteresis appears in the flux-gradient relation. This bifurcation causes the multifold states in the plasma structure, driving the transition in the transport coefficient or the self-generating oscillations in the flux. The structural formation and dynamics of plasma profiles are explained. (Author).

  20. Effective potential kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-11-01

    The effective potential theory (EPT) is a recently proposed method for extending traditional plasma kinetic and transport theory into the strongly coupled regime. Validation from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have shown it to be accurate up to the onset of liquid-like correlation parameters (corresponding to Γ ≃ 10-50 for the one-component plasma, depending on the process of interest). Here, this theory is briefly reviewed along with comparisons between the theory and molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusivity and viscosity of the one-component plasma. A number of new results are also provided, including calculations of friction coefficients, energy exchange rates, stopping power, and mobility. The theory is also cast in the Landau and Fokker-Planck kinetic forms, which may prove useful for enabling efficient kinetic computations.

  1. Final technical report on studies of plasma transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neil, T.M.; Driscoll, C.F.; Malmberg, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    This document gives an overview of the scientific results obtained under the DOE grant, and references the journal articles which give more complete descriptions of the various topics. Recently, the research has been focused on 2-dimensional vortices and turbulence: experiments using a new camera-diagnosed electron plasma apparatus have given surprising results which both clarify and challenge theories. Here, the crossfield E x B flow of the electron plasma is directly analogous to the 2-d flow of an ideal fluid such as water, and may also give insight into more complicated poloidal flows exhibited in toroidal plasmas. The shear-flow instabilities, turbulence, and vortices can be accurately observed, and the free relaxation of this turbulence has been characterized. The physical processes underlying the complicated turbulent evolution can also be studied in more controlled near-linear regimes. The original experimental focus of this program was on radial particle transport from applied external field asymmetries. Here, this research program clearly identified the importance of the collective response of the plasma, giving smaller fields from shielding, or enhanced fields from resonant modes. Experiments and theory work have also elucidated the flow of a plasma along the magnetic field. Finally, some theory was pursued for direct application to fusion plasmas, and to gravitating gas clouds in astrophysics. This program was highly successful in clarifying basic plasma transport processes.

  2. Sulfate transport in Penicillium chrysogenum plasma membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hillenga, Dirk J.; Versantvoort, Hanneke J.M.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1996-01-01

    Transport studies with Penicillium chrysogenum plasma membranes fused with cytochrome c oxidase liposomes demonstrate that sulfate uptake is driven by the transmembrane pH gradient and not by the transmembrane electrical potential. Ca2+ and other divalent cations are not required. It is concluded that the sulfate transport system catalyzes the symport of two protons with one sulfate anion.

  3. Inverse Transport Theory of Photoacoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, Guillaume; Jugnon, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    We consider the reconstruction of optical parameters in a domain of interest from photoacoustic data. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) radiates high frequency electromagnetic waves into the domain and measures acoustic signals emitted by the resulting thermal expansion. Acoustic signals are then used to construct the deposited thermal energy map. The latter depends on the constitutive optical parameters in a nontrivial manner. In this paper, we develop and use an inverse transport theory with internal measurements to extract information on the optical coefficients from knowledge of the deposited thermal energy map. We consider the multi-measurement setting in which many electromagnetic radiation patterns are used to probe the domain of interest. By developing an expansion of the measurement operator into singular components, we show that the spatial variations of the intrinsic attenuation and the scattering coefficients may be reconstructed. We also reconstruct coefficients describing anisotropic scattering of ...

  4. Plasma transport in a simulated magnetic-divertor configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strawitch, C. M.

    1981-03-01

    The transport properties of plasma on magnetic field lines that intersect a conducting plate are studied experimentally in the Wisconsin internal ring D.C. machine. The magnetic geometry is intended to simulate certain aspects of plasma phenomena that may take place in a tokamak divertor. It is found by a variety of measurements that the cross field transport is non-ambipolar; this may have important implications in heat loading considerations in tokamak divertors. The undesirable effects of nonambipolar flow make it preferable to be able to eliminate it. However, we find that though the non-ambipolarity may be reduced, it is difficult to eliminate entirely. The plasma flow velocity parallel to the magnetic field is found to be near the ion acoustic velocity in all cases. The experimental density and electron temperature profiles are compared to the solutions to a one dimensional transport model that is commonly used in divertor theory.

  5. Ion sampling and transport in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative accuracy and high sensitivity in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) depend on consistent and efficient extraction and transport of analyte ions from an inductively coupled plasma to a mass analyzer, where they are sorted and detected. In this review we examine the fundamental physical processes that control ion sampling and transport in ICP-MS and compare the results of theory and computerized models with experimental efforts to characterize the flow of ions through plasma mass spectrometers' vacuum interfaces. We trace the flow of ions from their generation in the plasma, into the sampling cone, through the supersonic expansion in the first vacuum stage, through the skimmer, and into the ion optics that deliver the ions to the mass analyzer. At each stage we consider idealized behavior and departures from ideal behavior that affect the performance of ICP-MS as an analytical tool.

  6. Transport properties of cascading gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, A

    2005-01-01

    Cascading gauge theories of Klebanov et.al. provide a model within a framework of gauge theory/string theory duality for a four dimensional non-conformal gauge theory with a spontaneously generated mass scale. Using the dual supergravity description we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled cascading gauge theory plasma. We analytically compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of cascading gauge theory plasma at a temperature much larger than the strong coupling scale of the theory. The sound wave dispersion relation is obtained from the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. The speed of sound extracted from the pole of the correlation function agrees with its value computed in [hep-th/0506002] using the equation of state. We find that the bulk viscosity of the hot cascading gauge theory plasma is non-zero at the leading order in the deviation from conformality.

  7. Transport Theory from the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio Lagrangian

    CERN Document Server

    Marty, R; Bratkovskaya, E; Aichelin, J

    2015-01-01

    Starting from the (Polyakov-) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio Lagrangian, (P)NJL, we formulate a transport theory which allows for describing the expansion of a quark-antiquark plasma and the subsequent transition to the hadronic world --without adding any new parameter to the standard (P)NJL approach, whose parameters are fixed to vacuum physics. This transport theory can be used to describe ultrarelativistic heavy-ion reaction data as well as to study the (first-order) phase transition during the expansion of the plasma. (P)NJL predicts such a phase transition for finite chemical potentials. In this contribution we give an outline of the necessary steps to obtain such a transport theory and present first results.

  8. KINETIC THEORY OF PLASMA WAVES: Part II: Homogeneous Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  9. Kinetic theory of plasma waves: Part II homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  10. Kinetic theory of plasma waves - Part II: Homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves axe discussed in the limit of the cold

  11. Kinetic theory of plasma waves: Part II homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  12. KINETIC THEORY OF PLASMA WAVES: Part II: Homogeneous Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  13. Kinetic theory of plasma waves - Part II: Homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves axe discussed in the limit of the cold

  14. Theory and simulation of laser plasma coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruer, W.L.

    1979-08-09

    The theory and simulation of these coupling processes are considered. Particular emphasis is given to their nonlinear evolution. First a brief introduction to computer simulation of plasmas using particle codes is given. Then the absorption of light via the generation of plasma waves is considered, followed by a discussion of stimulated scattering of intense light. Finally these calculations are compared with experimental results.

  15. Saturn Plasma Sources and Associated Transport Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, M.; Andrews, D. J.; Coates, A. J.; Hamilton, D. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kotova, A.; Morooka, M.; Smith, H. T.; Westlake, J. H.

    2015-10-01

    This article reviews the different sources of plasma for Saturn's magnetosphere, as they are known essentially from the scientific results of the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan. At low and medium energies, the main plasma source is the H2O cloud produced by the "geyser" activity of the small satellite Enceladus. Impact ionization of this cloud occurs to produce on the order of 100 kg/s of fresh plasma, a source which dominates all the other ones: Titan (which produces much less plasma than anticipated before the Cassini mission), the rings, the solar wind (a poorly known source due to the lack of quantitative knowledge of the degree of coupling between the solar wind and Saturn's magnetosphere), and the ionosphere. At higher energies, energetic particles are produced by energy diffusion and acceleration of lower energy plasma produced by the interchange instabilities induced by the rapid rotation of Saturn, and possibly, for the highest energy range, by contributions from the CRAND process acting inside Saturn's magnetosphere. Discussion of the transport and acceleration processes acting on these plasma sources shows the importance of rotation-induced radial transport and energization of the plasma, and also shows how much the unexpected planetary modulation of essentially all plasma parameters of Saturn's magnetosphere remains an unexplained mystery.

  16. Plasma transport in an Eulerian AMR code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vold, E. L.; Rauenzahn, R. M.; Aldrich, C. H.; Molvig, K.; Simakov, A. N.; Haines, B. M.

    2017-04-01

    A plasma transport model has been implemented in an Eulerian AMR radiation-hydrodynamics code, xRage, which includes plasma viscosity in the momentum tensor, viscous dissipation in the energy equations, and binary species mixing with consistent species mass and energy fluxes driven by concentration gradients, ion and electron baro-diffusion terms and temperature gradient forces. The physics basis, computational issues, numeric options, and results from several test problems are discussed. The transport coefficients are found to be relatively insensitive to the kinetic correction factors when the concentrations are expressed with the molar fractions and the ion mass differences are large. The contributions to flow dynamics from plasma viscosity and mass diffusion were found to increase significantly as scale lengths decrease in an inertial confinement fusion relevant Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mix layer. The mixing scale lengths in the test case are on the order of 100 μm and smaller for viscous effects to appear and 10 μm or less for significant ion species diffusion, evident over durations on the order of nanoseconds. The temperature gradient driven mass flux is seen to deplete a high Z tracer ion at the ion shock front. The plasma transport model provides the generation of the atomic mix per unit of interfacial area between two species with no free parameters. The evolution of the total atomic mix then depends also on an accurate resolution or estimate of the interfacial area between the species mixing by plasma transport. High resolution simulations or a more Lagrangian-like treatment of species interfaces may be required to distinguish plasma transport and numerical diffusion in an Eulerian computation of complex and dynamically evolving mix regions.

  17. On Plasma Theory and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    SHEATH REGION INCLUDING ION REFLECTION Lou Ann Schwager (Prof. C. K. Birdsall, Dr. I. Roth ) A low temperature plasma interacts with a collector plate...Hitchcock. Katz. Lankford. Nelson. Barnes. Borovsky. Forslund. Kwan. Sadowski Lindemuth. Mason . Mostrom. Nielson, Oliphant. Sgro. Thode Department of

  18. Sulfate transport in Penicillium chrysogenum plasma membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillenga, Dirk J.; Versantvoort, Hanneke J.M.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1996-01-01

    Transport studies with Penicillium chrysogenum plasma membranes fused with cytochrome c oxidase liposomes demonstrate that sulfate uptake is driven by the transmembrane pH gradient and not by the transmembrane electrical potential. Ca2+ and other divalent cations are not required. It is concluded th

  19. Transport Studies in Fusion Plasmas - Perturbative Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. J. L.

    1994-01-01

    By subjecting a plasma in steady state to small perturbations and measuring the response, it is possible to determine elements of the matrix of transport coefficients. Experimentally this is difficult, and results are mainly limited to tranpsport driven by the pressure and temperature gradients. Imp

  20. Transport studies in fusion plasmas: Perturbative experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. J. L.

    1996-01-01

    By subjecting a plasma in steady state to small perturbations and measuring the response, it is possible to determine elements of the matrix of transport coefficients. Experimentally this is difficult, and results are mainly limited to tranpsport driven by the pressure and temperature gradients. Imp

  1. Exact collisional moments for plasma fluid theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Hirvijoki, E.; Lingam, M.

    2017-04-01

    The velocity-space moments of the often troublesome nonlinear Landau collision operator are expressed exactly in terms of multi-index Hermite-polynomial moments of distribution functions. The collisional moments are shown to be generated by derivatives of two well-known functions, namely, the Rosenbluth-MacDonald-Judd-Trubnikov potentials for a Gaussian distribution. The resulting formula has a nonlinear dependency on the relative mean flow of the colliding species normalised to the root-mean-square of the corresponding thermal velocities and a bilinear dependency on densities and higher-order velocity moments of the distribution functions, with no restriction on temperature, flow, or mass ratio of the species. The result can be applied to both the classic transport theory of plasmas that relies on the Chapman-Enskog method, as well as to derive collisional fluid equations that follow Grad's moment approach. As an illustrative example, we provide the collisional ten-moment equations with exact conservation laws for momentum- and energy-transfer rates.

  2. The kinetic theory of a dilute ionized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    García-Colin, L S

    2008-01-01

    This book results from recent studies aimed at answering questions raised by astrophycists who use values of transport coefficients that are old and often unsatisfactory. The few books dealing with the rigorous kinetic theory of a ionized plasma are based on the so called Landau (Fokker-Planck) equation and they seldom relate the microscopic results with their macroscopic counterpart provided by classical non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In this book both issues are thoroughly covered. Starting from the full Boltzmann equation for inert dilute plasmas and using the Hilbert-Chapman-Enskog method to solve the first two approximations in Knudsen´s parameter, we construct all the transport properties of the system within the framework of linear irreversible thermodynamics. This includes a systematic study of all possible cross effects (which, except for a few cases, were never treated in the literature) as well as the famous H-theorem. The equations of magneto-hydrodynamics for dilute plasmas, including the rathe...

  3. Stability theory of Knudsen plasma diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, V. I., E-mail: victor.kuznetsov@mail.ioffe.ru; Ender, A. Ya. [Ioffe Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    A stability theory is developed for a plasma diode in which an electron beam supplied from the emitter propagates without collisions in the self-consistent electric field against the immobile ion background. An integral equation for the amplitude of the perturbed field is deduced using the Q,G method for the regime without electron reflection from a potential barrier. Analytic solutions to this equation are obtained for a number of important particular cases, and the plasma dispersion properties are examined.

  4. Broad resonances in transport theory

    CERN Document Server

    Leupold, S

    2003-01-01

    The extension of the transport theoretical framework to include states with a broad mass distribution is discussed. The proper life-time and cross sections for a state with an arbitrarily given invariant mass is discussed in detail. (author)

  5. Nonlinear closure relations theory for transport processes in nonequilibrium systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Giorgio

    2009-05-01

    A decade ago, a macroscopic theory for closure relations has been proposed for systems out of Onsager's region. This theory is referred to as the thermodynamic field theory (TFT). The aim of this work was to determine the nonlinear flux-force relations that respect the thermodynamic theorems for systems far from equilibrium. We propose a formulation of the TFT where one of the basic restrictions, namely, the closed-form solution for the skew-symmetric piece of the transport coefficients, has been removed. In addition, the general covariance principle is replaced by the De Donder-Prigogine thermodynamic covariance principle (TCP). The introduction of TCP requires the application of an appropriate mathematical formalism, which is referred to as the entropy-covariant formalism. By geometrical arguments, we prove the validity of the Glansdorff-Prigogine universal criterion of evolution. A new set of closure equations determining the nonlinear corrections to the linear ("Onsager") transport coefficients is also derived. The geometry of the thermodynamic space is non-Riemannian. However, it tends to be Riemannian for high values of the entropy production. In this limit, we recover the transport equations found by the old theory. Applications of our approach to transport in magnetically confined plasmas, materials submitted to temperature, and electric potential gradients or to unimolecular triangular chemical reactions can be found at references cited herein. Transport processes in tokamak plasmas are of particular interest. In this case, even in the absence of turbulence, the state of the plasma remains close to (but, it is not in) a state of local equilibrium. This prevents the transport relations from being linear.

  6. Lagrangian coherent structures and plasma transport processes

    CERN Document Server

    Falessi, M V; Schep, T J

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical system framework is used to describe transport processes in plasmas embedded in a magnetic field. For periodic systems with one degree of freedom the Poincar\\'e map provides a splitting of the phase space into regions where particles have different kinds of motion: periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic. The boundaries of these regions are transport barriers; i.e., a trajectory cannot cross such boundaries during the whole evolution of the system. Lagrangian Coherent Structure (LCS) generalize this method to systems with the most general time dependence, splitting the phase space into regions with different qualitative behaviours. This leads to the definition of finite-time transport barriers, i.e. trajectories cannot cross the barrier for a finite amount of time. This methodology can be used to identify fast recirculating regions in the dynamical system and to characterize the transport between them.

  7. Vesicular and Plasma Membrane Transporters for Neurotransmitters

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The regulated exocytosis that mediates chemical signaling at synapses requires mechanisms to coordinate the immediate response to stimulation with the recycling needed to sustain release. Two general classes of transporter contribute to release, one located on synaptic vesicles that loads them with transmitter, and a second at the plasma membrane that both terminates signaling and serves to recycle transmitter for subsequent rounds of release. Originally identified as the target of psychoacti...

  8. A theory of fluctuations in plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felderhof, B.U.

    1964-01-01

    A theory of thermal fluctuations in plasmas is developed based on a probability ensemble for one-particle distribution functions ƒ(r, ν). The probability for a specific ƒ(r, ν) is obtained from the canonical ensemble with the aid of the continuum approximation. Subsequently the probability distribut

  9. Validation metrics for turbulent plasma transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, C.

    2016-06-01

    Developing accurate models of plasma dynamics is essential for confident predictive modeling of current and future fusion devices. In modern computer science and engineering, formal verification and validation processes are used to assess model accuracy and establish confidence in the predictive capabilities of a given model. This paper provides an overview of the key guiding principles and best practices for the development of validation metrics, illustrated using examples from investigations of turbulent transport in magnetically confined plasmas. Particular emphasis is given to the importance of uncertainty quantification and its inclusion within the metrics, and the need for utilizing synthetic diagnostics to enable quantitatively meaningful comparisons between simulation and experiment. As a starting point, the structure of commonly used global transport model metrics and their limitations is reviewed. An alternate approach is then presented, which focuses upon comparisons of predicted local fluxes, fluctuations, and equilibrium gradients against observation. The utility of metrics based upon these comparisons is demonstrated by applying them to gyrokinetic predictions of turbulent transport in a variety of discharges performed on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)], as part of a multi-year transport model validation activity.

  10. Validation metrics for turbulent plasma transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, C., E-mail: chholland@ucsd.edu [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Developing accurate models of plasma dynamics is essential for confident predictive modeling of current and future fusion devices. In modern computer science and engineering, formal verification and validation processes are used to assess model accuracy and establish confidence in the predictive capabilities of a given model. This paper provides an overview of the key guiding principles and best practices for the development of validation metrics, illustrated using examples from investigations of turbulent transport in magnetically confined plasmas. Particular emphasis is given to the importance of uncertainty quantification and its inclusion within the metrics, and the need for utilizing synthetic diagnostics to enable quantitatively meaningful comparisons between simulation and experiment. As a starting point, the structure of commonly used global transport model metrics and their limitations is reviewed. An alternate approach is then presented, which focuses upon comparisons of predicted local fluxes, fluctuations, and equilibrium gradients against observation. The utility of metrics based upon these comparisons is demonstrated by applying them to gyrokinetic predictions of turbulent transport in a variety of discharges performed on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)], as part of a multi-year transport model validation activity.

  11. Quantum Transport Theory for Photonic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Chan U

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a quantum transport theory to describe photonic transport in photonic networks. The photonic networks concerned in the paper consist of all-optical circuits incorporating photonic bandgap waveguides and driven resonators. The photoncurrents flowing through waveguides are entirely determined from the exact master equation of the driven resonators. The master equation of the driven resonators is obtained by explicitly eliminating all the waveguide degrees of freedom while the back-reactions between resonators and waveguides are fully taken into account. The relations between the driven photonic dynamics and photoncurrents are obtained. The quantum dissipation and quantum noise effects in photonic transport are also fully addressed. As an illustration, the theory is applied to the transport phenomena of a driven nanocavity coupled to two waveguides in photonic crystals. The controllability of photonic transport through the driven resonator is demonstrated.

  12. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, P.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  13. Classical transport equations for burning gas-metal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molvig, Kim; Simakov, Andrei N.; Vold, Erik L.

    2014-09-01

    Thermonuclear inertial confinement fusion plasmas confined by a heavy metal shell may be subject to the mixing of metal into the gas with a resulting degradation of fusion yield. Classical plasma diffusion driven by a number of gradients can provide a physical mechanism to produce atomic mix, possibly in concert with complex hydrodynamic structures and/or turbulence. This paper gives a derivation of the complete dissipative plasma hydrodynamics equations from kinetic theory, for a binary ionic mixture plasma consisting of electrons, e, a light (hydrogenic gas) ion species, i, and a heavy, high ZI plasma metal species, I. A single mean ionization state for the heavy metal, ZI, is assumed to be provided by some independent thermodynamic model of the heavy metal Z I = Z I ( n i , n I , T e ). The kinetic equations are solved by a generalized Chapman-Enskog expansion that assumes small Knudsen numbers for all species: N K e ≡ λ e / L ≪ 1 , N K i ≡ λ i / L ≪ 1. The small electron to ion mass ratio, m e / m i ≪ 1, is utilized to account for electron-ion temperature separation, T e ≠ T i, and to decouple the electron and ion transport coefficient calculations. This produces a well ordered perturbation theory for the electrons, resulting in the well known "Spitzer" problem of Spitzer and collaborators and solved independently by Braginskii. The formulation in this paper makes clear the inherent symmetry of the transport and gives an analytic solution for all values of the effective charge Z eff, including Z eff replaces the Z eff of the electron problem, but has an extended domain, 0≤ Δ I < ∞, to cover all mixture fractions from the pure gas to the pure metal plasma. The extension of the Spitzer problem to include this extended domain is given in this work. The resulting transport equations for the binary gas-metal plasma mixture are complete and accurate through second order. All transport coefficients are provided in analytic form.

  14. Macroscopic spin and charge transport theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Da-Fang; Shi Jun-Ren

    2009-01-01

    According to the general principle of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, we propose a set of macroscopic transport equations for the spin transport and the charge transport. In particular, the spin torque is introduced as a generalized 'current density' to describe the phenomena associated with the spin non-conservation in a unified framework. The Einstein relations and the Onsager relations between different transport phenomena are established. Specifically, the spin transport properties of the isotropic non-magnetic and the isotropic magnetic two-dimensional electron gases are fully described by using this theory, in which only the macroscopic-spin-related transport phenomena allowed by the symmetry of the system are taken into account.

  15. Theory and Simulations of Solar System Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    "Theory and simulations of solar system plasmas" aims to highlight results from microscopic to global scales, achieved by theoretical investigations and numerical simulations of the plasma dynamics in the solar system. The theoretical approach must allow evidencing the universality of the phenomena being considered, whatever the region is where their role is studied; at the Sun, in the solar corona, in the interplanetary space or in planetary magnetospheres. All possible theoretical issues concerning plasma dynamics are welcome, especially those using numerical models and simulations, since these tools are mandatory whenever analytical treatments fail, in particular when complex nonlinear phenomena are at work. Comparative studies for ongoing missions like Cassini, Cluster, Demeter, Stereo, Wind, SDO, Hinode, as well as those preparing future missions and proposals, like, e.g., MMS and Solar Orbiter, are especially encouraged.

  16. Geometry changes transient transport in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Role of ballooning effect in toroidal plasmas on the transient transport problems is investigated. Due to the mode localization along the magnetic field line, a meso scale appears in a radial correlation length of fluctuating fields. This scale length introduces the interference of the gradient and flux in different radial locations. For the fluctuation which gives the gyro-Bohm-like diffusion in a stationary state, this long radial correlation of the fluctuating field causes a fast propagation of response against a rapid transient perturbation. Upper bound of transient thermal diffusivity is derived. (author)

  17. Modelling and analysis of particles transport in a tokamak plasma; Modelisation et analyse du transport des particules dans un plasma de Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laporte Patrice, M.

    1996-02-22

    The results developed in this thesis describe the ions and neutral atoms transport in a tokamak plasma. The effort is especially made on modelling of neutral particles transport. The presentation of the two computer codes Trap and Neli take the first part of the thesis. This study shows that heat and matter transport anomaly present some real characteristics of an electrostatic turbulence. Then, if particles diffusivity stays abnormal on the whole discharge of a tore supra plasma, in revenge in the central part of the discharge, the convective flux value is compatible with neoclassical theory. (N.C.). 67 refs., 67 figs., 6 appends.

  18. Kinetic theory of nonideal gases and nonideal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Klimontovich, Yu L

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic Theory of Nonideal Gases and Nonideal Plasmas presents the fundamental aspects of the kinetic theory of gases and plasmas. The book consists of three parts, which attempts to present some of the ideas, methods and applications in the study of the kinetic processes in nonideal gases and plasmas. The first part focuses on the classical kinetic theory of nonideal gases. The second part discusses the classical kinetic theory of fully ionized plasmas. The last part is devoted to the quantum kinetic theory of nonideal gases and plasmas. A concluding chapter is included, which presents a shor

  19. The shear viscosity of gauge theory plasma with chemical potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, P; Naryshkin, R; Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Naryshkin, Roman

    2007-01-01

    We consider strongly coupled gauge theory plasma with conserved global charges that allow for a dual gravitational description. We study the shear viscosity of the gauge theory plasma in the presence of chemical potentials for these charges. Using gauge theory/string theory correspondence we prove that at large 't Hooft coupling the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density is universal.

  20. The shear viscosity of gauge theory plasma with chemical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Naryshkin, Roman

    2007-02-01

    We consider strongly coupled gauge theory plasma with conserved global charges that allow for a dual gravitational description. We study the shear viscosity of the gauge theory plasma in the presence of chemical potentials for these charges. Using gauge theory/string theory correspondence we prove that at large 't Hooft coupling the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density is universal.

  1. Problems of linear electron (polaron) transport theory in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, M I

    1979-01-01

    Problems of Linear Electron (Polaron) Transport Theory in Semiconductors summarizes and discusses the development of areas in electron transport theory in semiconductors, with emphasis on the fundamental aspects of the theory and the essential physical nature of the transport processes. The book is organized into three parts. Part I focuses on some general topics in the theory of transport phenomena: the general dynamical theory of linear transport in dissipative systems (Kubo formulae) and the phenomenological theory. Part II deals with the theory of polaron transport in a crystalline semicon

  2. Nonlinear Transport Processes in Tokamak Plasmas. Part I: The Collisional Regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnino, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    An application of the thermodynamic field theory (TFT) to transport processes in L-mode tokamak plasmas is presented. The nonlinear corrections to the linear (Onsager) transport coefficients in the collisional regimes are derived. A quite encouraging result is the appearance of an asymmetry between the Pfirsch-Schlueter (P-S) ion and electron transport coefficients: the latter presents a nonlinear correction, which is absent for the ions, and makes the radial electron coefficients much larger than the former. Explicit calculations and comparisons between the neoclassical results and the TFT predictions for JET plasmas are also reported. We found that the nonlinear electron P-S transport coefficients exceed the values provided by neoclassical theory by a factor, which may be of the order 100. The nonlinear classical coefficients exceed the neoclassical ones by a factor, which may be of order 2. The expressions of the ion transport coefficients, determined by the neoclassical theory in these two regimes, remain...

  3. Improved Multi-Mode anomalous transport module for tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, L.; Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.

    2013-10-01

    The Multi-Mode anomalous transport module version 7.1 (MMM7.1) is a theory-based transport model that is used to predict temperature, density and rotation profiles for tokamak plasmas in integrated whole device modeling codes. The theoretical foundation of the current version, MMM7.1, has been significantly advanced since the first released version in 1995, MMM95. The latest version of the Multi-Mode model, MMM7.1, includes an improved Weiland model for the ITG, TEM, and MHD modes, the Horton model for short wavelength ETG modes and the Rafiq model for the drift resistive inertial ballooning modes (DRIBMs). The ETG transport threshold in the Horton model is refined by using the threshold obtained from toroidal gyrokinetic ETG turbulence simulations. The different components of the MMM7.1 model provide contributions to transport in the different regions of plasma discharge. To facilitate the implementation of the latest version of the Multi-Mode module in integrated predictive modeling codes, a clearly specified interface is described and a test program is provided in order to examine the predictions provided by MMM7.1. MMM7.1 is documented and organized as a standalone module, which fully complies with the National Transport Code Collaboration (NTCC) standards. The MMM7.1 module has been used both with a standalone driver program as well as within the PTRANSP code. Results are presented to illustrate the extent to which the various component models contribute to transport in both L-mode and H-mode discharges.

  4. Calculation of transport coefficients in an axisymmetric plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumaker, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of calculating the transport coefficient in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma is presented. This method is useful in calculating the transport coefficients in a Tokamak plasma confinement device. The particle density and temperature are shown to be a constant on a magnetic flux surface. Transport equations are given for the total particle flux and total energy flux crossing a closed toroidal surface. Also transport equations are given for the toroidal magnetic flux. A computer code was written to calculate the transport coefficients for a three species plasma, electrons and two species of ions. This is useful for calculating the transport coefficients of a plasma which contains impurities. It was found that the particle and energy transport coefficients are increased by a large amount, and the transport coefficients for the toroidal magnetic field are reduced by a small amount.

  5. Techniques of Proton Radiotherapy: Transport Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gottschalk, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    These are notes for the lecture on Transport Theory in a one-week intensive course, "Techniques of Proton Radiotherapy". Topics are: Phase space diagrams: model beam line-effect of a scatterer-effect of a drift-the beam ellipse-phase space diagrams for the model beam line-emittance change in a drift-emittance change in a scatterer-phase space for a more realistic beam line-summary Miscellaneous topics: review of Gaussians-the Gaussian approximation to multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS)-relativistic single particle kinematics-completing the square-scattering power Fermi-Eyges theory: history-the basic theory-the beam ellipse-drawing the ellipse given the moments-ellipse examples-transporting the beam ellipse through a slab-emittance change in a drift-emittance change in a scatterer-differential form of the transport equations-equivalent sources-beam contained in the beam ellipse-summary Beam spreading in matter: theory of Preston and Koehler-generalization to heavy ions-experimental tests (Preston and Koehler, ...

  6. Transport Bifurcation in a Rotating Tokamak Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Highcock, E G; Schekochihin, A A; Parra, F I; Roach, C M; Cowley, S C

    2010-01-01

    The effect of flow shear on turbulent transport in tokamaks is studied numerically in the experimentally relevant limit of zero magnetic shear. It is found that the plasma is linearly stable for all non-zero flow shear values, but that subcritical turbulence can be sustained nonlinearly at a wide range of temperature gradients. Flow shear increases the nonlinear temperature gradient threshold for turbulence but also increases the sensitivity of the heat flux to changes in the temperature gradient, except over a small range near the threshold where the sensitivity is decreased. A bifurcation in the equilibrium gradients is found: for a given input of heat, it is possible, by varying the applied torque, to trigger a transition to significantly higher temperature and flow gradients.

  7. Transport Bifurcation in Plasma Interchange Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Transport bifurcation and mean shear flow generation in plasma interchange turbulence are explored with self-consistent two-fluid simulations in a flux-driven system with both closed and open field line regions. The nonlinear evolution of interchange modes shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by the low and high mean flow shear. By increasing the input heat flux above a certain threshold, large-amplitude oscillations in the turbulent and mean flow energy are induced. Both clockwise and counter-clockwise types of oscillations are found before the transition to the second regime. The fluctuation energy is decisively transferred to the mean flows by large-amplitude Reynolds power as turbulent intensity increases. Consequently, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which strong mean shear flows are generated in the plasma edge. The peak of the spectrum shifts to higher wavenumbers as the large-scale turbulent eddies are suppressed by the mean shear flow. The transition back to the first regime is then triggered by decreasing the input heat flux to a level much lower than the threshold for the forward transition, showing strong hysteresis. During the back transition, the mean flow decreases as the energy transfer process is reversed. This transport bifurcation, based on a field-line-averaged 2D model, has also been reproduced in our recent 3D simulations of resistive interchange turbulence, in which the ion and electron temperatures are separated and the parallel current is involved. Supported by the MOST of China Grant No. 2013GB112006, US DOE Contract No. DE-FC02-08ER54966, US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734.

  8. Transport coefficients in Chiral Perturbation Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Fraile, D.; Gomez Nicola, A. [Universidad Complutense, Departamentos de Fisica Teorica I y II, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-03-15

    We present recent results on the calculation of transport coefficients for a pion gas at zero chemical potential in Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) using the Linear Response Theory (LRT). More precisely, we show the behavior of DC conductivity and shear viscosity at low temperatures. To compute transport coefficients, the standard power counting of ChPT has to be modified. The effects derived from imposing unitarity are also analyzed. As physical applications in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, we show the relation of the DC conductivity to soft-photon production and phenomenological effects related to a non-zero shear viscosity. In addition, our values for the shear viscosity to entropy ratio satisfy the KSS bound. (orig.)

  9. Transport Theory for Propagation and Reverberation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    accounting for surface forward scattering and the directional nature of the wave field in reverberation modeling is evident in the measured reverberation...our most recent project, and as implemented it can accurately account for the effects of forward scattering from the sea surface in both propagation...kHz the effects of surface forward scattering can be quite significant, and without a method such as transport theory that accounts for effects of

  10. Transport Physics in Reversed Shear Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Beer, M.A.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Efthimion, P.C.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Von Goeler, S.; Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton University, NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Laboratory; Bush, C.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Reversed magnetic shear is considered a good candidate for improving the tokamak concept because it has the potential to stabilize MHD instabilities and reduce particle and energy transport. With reduced transport the high pressure gradient would generate a strong off-axis bootstrap current and could sustain a hollow current density profile. Such a combination of favorable conditions could lead to an attractive steady-state tokamak configuration. Indeed, a new tokamak confinement regime with reversed magnetic shear has been observed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) where the particle, momentum, and ion thermal diffusivities drop precipitously, by over an order of magnitude. The particle diffusivity drops to the neoclassical level and the ion thermal diffusivity drops to much less than the neoclassical value in the region with reversed shear. This enhanced reversed shear (ERS) confinement mode is characterized by an abrupt transition with a large rate of rise of the density in the reversed shear region during neutral beam injection, resulting in nearly a factor of three increase in the central density to 1.2 X 10(exp 20) cube m. At the same time the density fluctuation level in the reversed shear region dramatically decreases. The ion and electron temperatures, which are about 20 keV and 7 keV respectively, change little during the ERS mode. The transport and transition into and out of the ERS mode have been studied on TFTR with plasma currents in the range 0.9-2.2 MA, with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.7-4.6 T, and the radius of the q(r) minimum, q{sub min}, has been varied from r/a = 0.35 to 0.55. Toroidal field and co/counter neutral beam injection toroidal rotation variations have been used to elucidate the underlying physics of the transition mechanism and power threshold of the ERS mode.

  11. Effect of impurities on kinetic transport processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Stefanie

    2010-12-10

    Within the framework of this thesis, different problems arising in connection with impurities have been investigated. Collisional damping of zonal flows in tokamaks: Since the Coulomb collision frequency increases with increasing ion charge, heavy, highly charged impurities play an important role in this process. The effect of such impurities on the linear response of the plasma to an external potential perturbation, as caused by zonal flows, is calculated with analytical methods. In comparison with a pure plasma, the damping of the flows occurs, as expected, considerably faster; for experimentally relevant parameters, the enhancement exceeds the effective charge Z{sub eff} of the plasma. Impurity transport driven by microturbulence in tokamaks: With regard to impurities, it is especially important whether the resulting flows are directed inwards or outwards, since they are deleterious for core energy confinement on the one hand, but on the other hand help protecting plasma-facing components from too high energy fluxes in the edge region. A semi-analytical model is presented describing the resulting impurity fluxes and the stability boundary of the underlying mode. The main goal is to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, costly numerical simulations, which are applicable to a broad range of problems but yield scarcely traceable results, and, on the other hand, analytical theory, which might ease the interpretation of the results but is so far rather rudimentary. The model is based on analytical formulae whenever possible but resorts to a numerical treatment when the approximations necessary for an analytical solution would lead to a substantial distortion of the results. Both the direction of the impurity flux and the stability boundary are found to depend sensitively on the plasma parameters such as the impurity density and the temperature gradient. Pfirsch-Schlueter transport in stellarators: Due to geometry effects, collisional transport plays a much more

  12. 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connor, J.W.; Fasoli, A.; Hidalgo, C.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-4 September 2008. There were sessions on core heat and particle transport; core and edge momentum transport; edge and scrape-off-layer ......This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-4 September 2008. There were sessions on core heat and particle transport; core and edge momentum transport; edge and scrape...

  13. Quantum kinetic theories in degenerate plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Gert; Ekman, Robin; Zamanian, Jens

    2017-01-01

    In this review we give an overview of the recent work on quantum kinetic theories of plasmas. We focus, in particular, on the case where the electrons are fully degenerate. For such systems, perturbation methods using the distribution function can be problematic. Instead we present a model that considers the dynamics of the Fermi surface. The advantage of this model is that, even though the value of the distribution function can be greatly perturbed outside the equilibrium Fermi surface, deformation of the Fermi surface is small up to very large amplitudes. Next, we investigate the short-scale dynamics for which the Wigner-Moyal equation replaces the Vlasov equation. In particular, we study wave-particle interaction, and deduce that new types of wave damping can occur due to the simultaneous absorption (or emission) of multiple wave quanta. Finally, we consider exchange effects within a quantum kinetic formalism to find a model that is more accurate than those using exchange potentials from density functional theory. We deduce the exchange corrections to the dispersion relations for Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves. In comparison to results based on exchange potentials deduced from density functional theory we find that the latter models are reasonably accurate for Langmuir waves, but rather inaccurate for ion acoustic waves.

  14. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, Chi Yung; Chen, GuanHua

    2013-04-28

    A dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory is developed to treat the transient current through molecular or nanoscopic devices in presence of electron-phonon interaction. The dissipation via phonon is taken into account by introducing a self-energy for the electron-phonon coupling in addition to the self-energy caused by the electrodes. Based on this, a numerical method is proposed. For practical implementation, the lowest order expansion is employed for the weak electron-phonon coupling case and the wide-band limit approximation is adopted for device and electrodes coupling. The corresponding hierarchical equation of motion is derived, which leads to an efficient and accurate time-dependent treatment of inelastic effect on transport for the weak electron-phonon interaction. The resulting method is applied to a one-level model system and a gold wire described by tight-binding model to demonstrate its validity and the importance of electron-phonon interaction for the quantum transport. As it is based on the effective single-electron model, the method can be readily extended to time-dependent density functional theory.

  15. Theory and Transport of Nearly Incompressible Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; Adhikari, L.; Hunana, P.; Shiota, D.; Bruno, R.; Telloni, D.

    2017-02-01

    The theory of nearly incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (NI MHD) was developed largely in the early 1990s, together with an important extension to inhomogeneous flows in 2010. Much of the focus in the earlier work was to understand the apparent incompressibility of the solar wind and other plasma environments, and the relationship of density fluctuations to apparently incompressible manifestations of turbulence in the solar wind and interstellar medium. Further important predictions about the “dimensionality” of solar wind turbulence and its relationship to the plasma beta were made and subsequently confirmed observationally. However, despite the initial success of NI MHD in describing fluctuations in the solar wind, a detailed application to solar wind turbulence has not been undertaken. Here, we use the equations of NI MHD to describe solar wind turbulence, rewriting the NI MHD system in terms of Elsässer variables. Distinct descriptions of 2D and slab turbulence emerge naturally from the Elsässer formulation, as do the nonlinear couplings between 2D and slab components. For plasma beta order 1 or less regions, predictions for 2D and slab spectra result from the NI MHD description, and predictions for the spectral characteristics of density fluctuations can be made. We conclude by presenting a NI MHD formulation describing the transport of majority 2D and minority slab turbulence throughout the solar wind. A preliminary comparison of theory and observations is presented.

  16. The shear viscosity of gauge theory plasma with chemical potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benincasa, Paolo [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Buchel, Alex [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada) and Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2J 2W9 (Canada)]. E-mail: abuchel@perimeterinstitute.ca; Naryshkin, Roman [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Physics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kiev National University, Prosp. Glushkova 6, Kiev 03022 (Ukraine)

    2007-02-08

    We consider strongly coupled gauge theory plasma with conserved global charges that allow for a dual gravitational description. We study the shear viscosity of the gauge theory plasma in the presence of chemical potentials for these charges. Using gauge theory/string theory correspondence we prove that at large 't Hooft coupling the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density is universal.

  17. Inelastic transport theory for nanoscale systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes theoretical and numerical investigations of inelastic scat- tering and energy dissipation in electron transport through nanoscale sys- tems. A computational scheme, based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green’s functions (NEGF), has been...... the conductance. The methods have been applied to a number of specific systems, includ- ing monatomic gold chains, atomic point contacts, and metal-molecule-metal configurations. These studies have clarified the inelastic effects in the elec- tron transport and characterized the vibrational modes that couple...... to the current. For instance, the dominant scattering for gold chains could be traced back to the longitudinal “alternating bond-length” mode. Furthermore, the results have been compared critically with experimental measurements for the different systems, and provided a microscopic understanding for the im...

  18. Hadronic Transport Coefficients from Effective Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Torres-Rincon, Juan M

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the calculation of transport coefficients in the matter created in a relativistic heavy-ion collision after the chemical freeze-out. This matter can be well approximated by a pion gas out of equilibrium. We describe the theoretical framework to obtain the shear and bulk viscosities, the thermal and electrical conductivities and the flavor diffusion coefficients of a meson gas at low temperatures. To describe the interactions of the degrees of freedom, we use effective field theories with chiral and heavy quark symmetries. We introduce the unitarization methods in order to obtain a scattering amplitude that satisfies the unitarity condition exactly. We perform the calculation of the transport properties of the low temperature phase of quantum chromodynamics -the hadronic medium- that can be used in the hydrodynamic simulations of a relativistic heavy-ion collision and its subsequent evolution. We show that the shear viscosity over entropy density exhibits a minimum in a phase trans...

  19. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B

    2010-08-01

    Although biochemical studies suggested a high permeability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for small molecules, proteomics identified few specialized ER transporters. To test functionality of transporters during ER passage, we tested whether glucose transporters (GLUTs, SGLTs) destined for the plasma membrane are active during ER transit. HepG2 cells were characterized by low-affinity ER transport activity, suggesting that ER uptake is protein mediated. The much-reduced capacity of HEK293T cells to take up glucose across the plasma membrane correlated with low ER transport. Ectopic expression of GLUT1, -2, -4, or -9 induced GLUT isoform-specific ER transport activity in HEK293T cells. In contrast, the Na(+)-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 mediated efficient plasma membrane glucose transport but no detectable ER uptake, probably because of lack of a sufficient sodium gradient across the ER membrane. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GLUTs are sufficient for mediating ER glucose transport en route to the plasma membrane. Because of the low volume of the ER, trace amounts of these uniporters contribute to ER solute import during ER transit, while uniporters and cation-coupled transporters carry out export from the ER, together potentially explaining the low selectivity of ER transport. Expression levels and residence time of transporters in the ER, as well as their coupling mechanisms, could be key determinants of ER permeability.

  20. Multiscale Gyrokinetics for Rotating Tokamak Plasmas: Fluctuations, Transport and Energy Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, I G; Wang, E; Barnes, M; Cowley, S C; Dorland, W; Schekochihin, A A

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a complete theoretical framework for plasma turbulence and transport in tokamak plasmas. The fundamental scale separations present in plasma turbulence are codified as an asymptotic expansion in the ratio of the gyroradius to the equilibrium scale length. Proceeding order-by-order in this expansion, a framework for plasma turbulence is developed. It comprises an instantaneous equilibrium, the fluctuations driven by gradients in the equilibrium quantities, and the transport-timescale evolution of mean profiles of these quantities driven by the fluctuations. The equilibrium distribution functions are local Maxwellians with each flux surface rotating toroidally as a rigid body. The magnetic equillibrium is obtained from the Grad-Shafranov equation for a rotating plasma and the slow (resistive) evolution of the magnetic field is given by an evolution equation for the safety factor q. Large-scale deviations of the distribution function from a Maxwellian are given by neoclassical theory. The flu...

  1. An introduction to the theory of plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tsytovich, V N

    1972-01-01

    An Introduction to the Theory of Plasma Turbulence is a collection of lectures given by the author at Culham laboratory. The book deals with developments on the theory of plasma turbulence. The author describes plasma properties in the turbulent regions as mostly non-linear in nature, and notes that these properties can be regarded as a universal spectrum independent of any type of instability. The text then discusses the general problems of the theory of plasma turbulence. The author also shows that elementary excitation of """"dressed"""" particles have a finite lifetime associated with non

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Transport and Structural Formation in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagaraja, A.

    1999-06-01

    tokamak can be taken as an illustrative example) are clearly dissipative open systems, which are invariably driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium by means of a suitable set of external particle, momentum, energy and current sources. In this sense, such plasmas are analogous to the Earth's atmosphere and many other fluid dynamic systems one encounters in engineering and physics. It is well known that the transport processes in such systems are describable by strictly collisional, kinetically derived models such as neoclassical theory or laminar fluid flow equations only in exceptional circumstances. The generic case is one in which the system acquires `structure' in the sense that symmetry-breaking spatio-temporal turbulent micro/mesoscale fluctuations `spontaneously' occur, and in their turn influence the macroscale evolution of the system. Thus, given typical values of density, temperature, magnetic field and current, the tokamak plasma does not automatically reach a steady state consistent with the sources, symmetry and neoclassical equations. Rather, one finds a more or less turbulent state which often (but not always!) involves much worse thermal and particle insulation than expected on the grounds of Coulomb collisional processes alone. The authors seek to promulgate a particular model which does not require the existence (in principle) of any linear instability of the `equilibrium'. This is a well-known state of affairs in fluid dynamics (e.g. pipe flow) when turbulence can occur in spite of the fact that linear theory predicts the equilibrium to be stable. While this is indeed a welcome clarification of the relatively limited role of linear theory in describing plasma turbulence in any detailed predictive sense, it is not clear why the authors elevate `subcritical turbulence' to a fundamental principle. While it may well be present, it is in general neither necessary nor sufficient to explain turbulent transport in plasmas. In this reviewer's opinion, at the

  3. Hyper-resistivity Theory in a Cylindrical Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, H L; Fowler, T K; LoDestro, L L; Pearlstein, L D

    2001-02-27

    A model is presented for determining the hyper-resistivity coefficient that arises due to the presence of magnetic structures that appear in plasma configurations such as the reversed field pinch and spheromak. Emphasis is placed on modeling cases where magnetic islands pass from non-overlap to overlap regimes. Earlier works have shown that a diffusion-based model can give realistic transport scalings when magnetic islands are isolated, and this formalism is extended to apply to the hyper-resistivity problem. In this case electrons may either be in long or short mean-free-path regimes and intuitively-based arguments are presented of how to extend previous theories to incorporate this feature in the presence of magnetic structures that pass from laminar to moderately chaotic regimes.

  4. Collisionality dependent transport in TCV SOL plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Odd Erik; Pitts, R.A.; Horacek, J.

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented from probe measurements in the low field side scrape-off layer (SOL) region of TCV during plasma current scan experiments. It is shown that with decreasing plasma current the radial particle density profile becomes broader and the fluctuation levels and turbulence driven...... radial particle flux increase. In the far SOL the fluctuations exhibit a high degree of statistical similarity and the particle density and flux at the wall radius scale inversely with the plasma current. Together with previous TCV density scan experiments, this indicates that plasma fluctuations...

  5. Transport studies in fusion plasmas: Perturbative experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, N. L.

    1998-01-01

    By inducing in a small temperature perturbation in a plasma in a steady state one can determine the conductive and convective components of the heat flux, and the associated thermal diffusivity and convection velocity. The same can be done for the density, and in principle also other plasma paramete

  6. Theory of Fast Electron Transport for Fast Ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, A P L; Davies, J R; Gremillet, L; Honrubia, J J; Johzaki, T; Kingham, R J; Sherlock, M; Solodov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion is a variant of inertial fusion in which DT fuel is first compressed to high density and then ignited by a relativistic electron beam generated by a fast (< 20 ps) ultra-intense laser pulse, which is usually brought in to the dense plasma via the inclusion of a re-entrant cone. The transport of this beam from the cone apex into the dense fuel is a critical part of this scheme, as it can strongly influence the overall energetics. Here we review progress in the theory and numerical simulation of fast electron transport in the context of Fast Ignition. Important aspects of the basic plasma physics, descriptions of the numerical methods used, a review of ignition-scale simulations, and a survey of schemes for controlling the propagation of fast electrons are included. Considerable progress has taken place in this area, but the development of a robust, high-gain FI `point design' is still an ongoing challenge.

  7. Plasma Transport at the Magnetospheric Flank Boundary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Antonius

    2012-04-23

    Progress is highlighted in these areas: 1. Model of magnetic reconnection induced by three-dimensional Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes at the magnetospheric flank boundary; 2. Quantitative evaluation of mass transport from the magnetosheath onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 3. Comparison of mass transfer by cusp reconnection and Flank Kelvin Helmholtz modes; 4. Entropy constraint and plasma transport in the magnetotail - a new mechanism for current sheet thinning; 5. Test particle model for mass transport onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 6. Influence of density asymmetry and magnetic shear on (a) the linear and nonlinear growth of 3D Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes, and (b) three-dimensional KH mediated mass transport; 7. Examination of entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail; 8. Entropy change and plasma transport by KH mediated reconnection - mixing and heating of plasma; 9. Entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail - tail reconnection; and, 10. Wave coupling at the magnetospheric boundary and generation of kinetic Alfven waves.

  8. Lagrangian neoclassical transport theory applied to the region near the magnetic axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satake, Shinsuke [The Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Dept. of Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Okamoto, Masao; Sugama, Hideo [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Neoclassical transport theory around the magnetic axis of a tokamak is studied, in which relatively wide ''potato'' orbits play an important role in transport. Lagrangian formulation of transport theory, which has been investigated to reflect finiteness of guiding-center orbit widths to transport equations, is developed in order to analyze neoclassical transport near the axis for a low-collisionality plasma. The treatment of self-collision term in Lagrangian formulation is revised to retain momentum conservation property of it. With directly reflecting the orbital properties of all the types of orbits in calculation, the ion thermal conductivity around the axis is found to decrease than from that predicted by conventional neoclassical theory. This result supports recent numerical simulations which show the reduction of thermal conductivity near the magnetic axis. (author)

  9. On turbulent transport in burning plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Fukuyama, A. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2000-03-01

    The change of the transport coefficient due to the fusion energy source is studied. The scale invariance property of the reduced set of equations is investigated in the presence of the self-heating term due to the fusion reaction. The pressure gradient as well as the fusion power are the free energy sources that dictate the turbulent transport. It is shown that the burning transport coefficient can have a form with much wider variety, and that the transport property could be different owing to the self-heating by the fusion reactions. (author)

  10. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  11. Two-dimensional transport study of scrape off layer plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Nobuyuki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Advanced Energy Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, Sanae-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1999-09-01

    Two-dimensional transport code is developed to analyzed the heat pulse propagation in the scrape-off layer plasma. The classical and anomalous transport models are considered as a thermal diffusivity perpendicular to the magnetic field. On the other hand, the classical transport model is chosen as a thermal diffusivity parallel to the magnetic field. The heat deposition profiles are evaluated for various kinds of transport models. It is found that the heat pulse which arrives at the divertor plate due to the classical transport is largest compared with other models. The steady state temperate profiles of the electron and ion are also discussed. (author)

  12. Electrostatic fluctuations and turbulent plasma transport in low-β plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Pécseli, H.L.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1995-01-01

    Low frequency electrostatic fluctuations are studied experimentally in a low-beta plasma, with particular attention to their importance for the anomalous plasma transport across magnetic field lines. The presence of large coherent structures in a turbulent background is demonstrated by a conditio......Low frequency electrostatic fluctuations are studied experimentally in a low-beta plasma, with particular attention to their importance for the anomalous plasma transport across magnetic field lines. The presence of large coherent structures in a turbulent background is demonstrated...

  13. Interchange instability and transport in matter-antimatter plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kendl, Alexander; Wiesenberger, Matthias; Held, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Symmetric electron-positron plasmas in inhomogeneous magnetic fields are intrinsically subject to interchange instability and transport. Scaling relations for the propagation velocity of density blob perturbations relevant to transport in isothermal magnetically confined electron-positron plasmas are deduced, including damping effects when Debye lengths are large compared to Larmor radii. The relations are verified by nonlinear full-F gyrofluid computations. Results are in favour of sufficient magnetic confinement for planned electron-positron plasma experiments. The model is generalised to other matter-antimatter plasmas. Magnetised electron-positron-proton-antiproton plasmas are susceptible to interchange driven local matter-antimatter separation, which can be expected to impede (so far unrealised) sustained laboratory magnetic confinement.

  14. Plasma Viscosity with Mass Transport in Spherical ICF Implosion Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Vold, Erik L; Ortega, Mario I; Moll, Ryan; Fenn, Daniel; Molvig, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrange hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduc...

  15. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beiersdorfer, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chernov, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Magee, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  16. Transport properties of partially ionized and unmagnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Thierry E.; Degrez, Gérard

    2004-10-01

    This work is a comprehensive and theoretical study of transport phenomena in partially ionized and unmagnetized plasmas by means of kinetic theory. The pros and cons of different models encountered in the literature are presented. A dimensional analysis of the Boltzmann equation deals with the disparity of mass between electrons and heavy particles and yields the epochal relaxation concept. First, electrons and heavy particles exhibit distinct kinetic time scales and may have different translational temperatures. The hydrodynamic velocity is assumed to be identical for both types of species. Second, at the hydrodynamic time scale the energy exchanged between electrons and heavy particles tends to equalize both temperatures. Global and species macroscopic fluid conservation equations are given. New constrained integral equations are derived from a modified Chapman-Enskog perturbative method. Adequate bracket integrals are introduced to treat thermal nonequilibrium. A symmetric mathematical formalism is preferred for physical and numerical standpoints. A Laguerre-Sonine polynomial expansion allows for systems of transport to be derived. Momentum, mass, and energy fluxes are associated to shear viscosity, diffusion coefficients, thermal diffusion coefficients, and thermal conductivities. A Goldstein expansion of the perturbation function provides explicit expressions of the thermal diffusion ratios and measurable thermal conductivities. Thermal diffusion terms already found in the Russian literature ensure the exact mass conservation. A generalized Stefan-Maxwell equation is derived following the method of Kolesnikov and Tirskiy. The bracket integral reduction in terms of transport collision integrals is presented in Appendix for the thermal nonequilibrium case. A simple Eucken correction is proposed to deal with the internal degrees of freedom of atoms and polyatomic molecules, neglecting inelastic collisions. The authors believe that the final expressions are

  17. Pseudo-classical transport in a sheared magnetic field: Theory and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevins, W.M.; Harte, J.; Gell, Y.

    1979-11-01

    The cross-field transport due to the trapping of electrons in a finite amplitude wave (pseudo-classical transport) is investigated. Both finite wave frequencies and magnetic shear are included. The single particle orbit equations are solved to obtain the trapping criterion as well as the trapped particle orbit width and bounce frequency. Using a random walk model, the scaling of the pseudo-classical transport coefficients with the parameters of the plasma and wave are deduced. This scaling is employed to extend a previous calculation of the transport coefficients to include magnetic shear which is found to reduce these transport coefficients. Computer simulations of this transport process are presented. The measured transport rates are in very good agreement with the previous kinetic calculation in the absence of magnetic shear and with this extension of pseudo-classical transport theory which includes magnetic shear.

  18. Plasma scattering of electromagnetic radiation theory and measurement techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Froula, Dustin H; Luhmann, Neville C Jr; Sheffield, John

    2011-01-01

    This work presents one of the most powerful methods of plasma diagnosis in exquisite detail to guide researchers in the theory and measurement techniques of light scattering in plasmas. Light scattering in plasmas is essential in the research and development of fusion energy, environmental solutions, and electronics.Referred to as the "Bible" by researchers the work encompasses fusion and industrial applications essential in plasma research. It is the only comprehensive resource specific to the plasma scattering technique. It provides a wide-range of experimental examples and discussion of the

  19. Surface transport in plasma-balls

    CERN Document Server

    Armas, Jay; Kundu, Nilay

    2015-01-01

    We study the surface transport properties of stationary localized configurations of relativistic fluids to the first two non-trivial orders in a derivative expansion. By demanding that these finite lumps of relativistic fluid are described by a thermal partition function with arbitrary stationary background metric and gauge fields, we are able to find several constraints among surface transport coefficients. At leading order, besides recovering the surface thermodynamics, we obtain a generalization of the Young-Laplace equation for relativistic fluid surfaces, by considering a temperature dependence in the surface tension, which is further generalized in the context of superfluids. At the next order, for uncharged fluids in 3+1 dimensions, we show that besides the 3 independent bulk transport coefficients previously known, a generic localized configuration is characterized by 3 additional surface transport coefficients, one of which may be identified with the surface modulus of rigidity. Finally, as an applic...

  20. Statistical properties of transport in plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Garcia, O.E.; Nielsen, A.H.;

    2004-01-01

    The statistical properties of the particle flux in different types of plasma turbulence models are numerically investigated using probability distribution functions (PDFs). The physics included in the models range from two-dimensional drift wave turbulence to three-dimensional MHD dynamics...

  1. Final Report on The Theory of Fusion Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven C. Cowley

    2008-06-17

    Report describes theoretical research in the theory of fusion plasmas funded under grant DE-FG02-04ER54737. This includes work on: explosive instabilities, plasma turbulence, Alfven wave cascades, high beta (pressure) tokamaks and magnetic reconnection. These studies have lead to abetter understanding of fusion plasmas and in particular the future behavior of ITER. More than ten young researchers were involved in this research -- some were funded under the grant.

  2. Relativistic quantum transport theory for electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuang, P; Zhuang, P; Heinz, U

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between the covariant and the three-dimensional (equal-time) formulations of quantum kinetic theory. We show that the three-dimensional approach can be obtained as the energy average of the covariant formulation. We illustrate this statement in scalar and spinor QED. For scalar QED we derive Lorentz covariant transport and constraint equations directly from the Klein-Gordon equation rather than through the previously used Feshbach-Villars representation. We then consider pair production in a spatially homogeneous but time-dependent electric field and show that the pair density is derived much more easily via the energy averaging method than in the equal-time representation. Proceeding to spinor QED, we derive the covariant version of the equal-time equation derived by Bialynicki-Birula et al. We show that it must be supplemented by another self-adjoint equation to obtain a complete description of the covariant spinor Wigner operator. After spinor decomposition and energy averag...

  3. Modeling of far SOL plasma transport in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergei Krasheninnikov; Alexander Pigarov

    2005-11-02

    For better understanding and characterization of non-diffusive transport occurring in the NSTX tokamak edge plasma, we performed extensive simulations of NSTX edge plasmas with the multi-fluid two-dimensional UEDGE code by using realistic model for impurity sputtering sources and hybrid model for anomalous cross-field transport. Our cross-field transport model incorporates the effects of non-diffusive intermittent transport by introducing anomalous convective velocities whose spatial profile is adjusted for each ion charge state to match available experimental data. The research in 2002-2005 financial years was focused on the following areas: (i) development of capabilities for UEDGE simulation of NSTX spectroscopy data (i.e., the 3D real-geometry postprocessor UEDGE tools for comparison between UEDGE and experimental data), (ii) simulation of multi-diagnostic data from NSTX with UEDGE, (iii) study of anomalous cross-field convective transport of impurity ions, (iv) analysis of divertor plasma opacity to resonance radiation, and (v) study the effects of ballooning-like anomalous cross-field transport and spherical-torus magnetic configuration on parallel plasma flows in the SOL.

  4. A quasi-linear gyrokinetic transport model for tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The development of a quasi-linear gyrokinetic transport model for tokamak plasmas, ultimately designed to provide physically comprehensive predictions of the time evolution of the thermodynamic relevant quantities, is a task that requires tight links among theoretical, experimental and numerical studies. The framework of the model here proposed, which operates a reduction of complexity on the nonlinear self-organizing plasma dynamics, allows in fact multiple validations of the current understanding of the tokamak micro-turbulence. The main outcomes of this work stem from the fundamental steps involved by the formulation of such a reduced transport model, namely: (1) the verification of the quasi-linear plasma response against the nonlinearly computed solution, (2) the improvement of the turbulent saturation model through an accurate validation of the nonlinear codes against the turbulence measurements, (3) the integration of the quasi-linear model within an integrated transport solver.

  5. Plasma transport driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Delamere, P. A.; Otto, A.

    2016-06-01

    Two important differences between the giant magnetospheres (i.e., Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres) and the terrestrial magnetosphere are the internal plasma sources and the fast planetary rotation. Thus, there must be a radially outward flow to transport the plasma to avoid infinite accumulation of plasma. This radial outflow also carries the magnetic flux away from the inner magnetosphere due to the frozen-in condition. As such, there also must be a radial inward flow to refill the magnetic flux in the inner magnetosphere. Due to the similarity between Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability and the centrifugal instability, we use a three-dimensional RT instability to demonstrate that an interchange instability can form a convection flow pattern, locally twisting the magnetic flux, consequently forming a pair of high-latitude reconnection sites. This process exchanges a part of the flux tube, thereby transporting the plasma radially outward without requiring significant latitudinal convection of magnetic flux in the ionosphere.

  6. The Anisotropic Transport Effects On The Dilute Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Devlen, Ebru

    2012-01-01

    We examine the linear stability analysis of a hot, dilute and differentially rotating plasma by considering anisotropic transport effects. In the dilute plasmas, the ion Larmor radius is small compared with its collisional mean free path. In this case, the transport of heat and momentum along the magnetic field lines become important. This paper presents a novel linear instability that may more powerful and greater than ideal magnetothermal instability (MTI) and ideal magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the dilute astrophysical plasmas. This type of plasma is believed to be found in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters and radiatively ineffective accretion flows around black holes. We derive the dispersion relation of this instability and obtain the instability condition. There is at least one unstable mode that is independent of the temperature gradient direction for a helical magnetic field geometry. This novel instability is driven by the gyroviscosity coupled with differential rotation. Therefore...

  7. Transport properties of partially ionized hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T S [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole bi, 96a, 480012, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Galiyev, K Zh [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole bi, 96a, 480012, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Dzhumagulova, K N [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole bi, 96a, 480012, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Roepke, G [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Redmer, R [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2003-06-06

    We have considered partially ionized hydrogen plasma for the density region n{sub e} = (10{sup 18}-10{sup 22}) cm{sup -3}. Charged particles in the system (electrons, protons) interact via an effective potential taking into account three-particle correlations. We use the Buckingham polarization potential to describe electron-atom and proton-atom interactions. The electrical and thermal conductivity is determined using the Chapman-Enskog method. We compare the obtained results with other available data.

  8. Plasma transport induced by the stochastic magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Tetsuyuki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-10-01

    The anomalous plasma transport induced by the stochastic magnetic field is studied to understand the disruption phenomena in the tokamak plasma. At first, the transport matrix which indicate the plasma transport in the stochastic magnetic field is formulated. For the formulation, the quasi-linear approximation for the diffusivity of the stochastic magnetic field is used and the shifted Maxwellian is assumed to the particle distribution. Using this transport matrix the radial electric field formation, which is generated by the ambipolar condition, and the associated temperature profile is obtained. The temperature profile in the stochastic magnetic field becomes flat because of the rapid temperature diffusion. Next the temperature crash, i.e., the sawtooth oscillation and the giant ELM, is analyzed using the turbulence-turbulence transition model, which describes the transition between the state of the electrostatic turbulence and that of the electromagnetic turbulence. This transition has a hysteresis characteristics. When the state changes to the electromagnetic mode, the stochastic magnetic field appears and the temperature transport is enhanced. This transition model is included in the 1-D transport equation. To calculate this transport equation numerically the crash of the temperature profile and the propagation of the crash front (avalanche) are realized by this model. The collapse without a precursor oscillation is revealed. (author)

  9. The Gaussian radial basis function method for plasma kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvijoki, E.; Candy, J.; Belli, E.; Embréus, O.

    2015-10-01

    Description of a magnetized plasma involves the Vlasov equation supplemented with the non-linear Fokker-Planck collision operator. For non-Maxwellian distributions, the collision operator, however, is difficult to compute. In this Letter, we introduce Gaussian Radial Basis Functions (RBFs) to discretize the velocity space of the entire kinetic system, and give the corresponding analytical expressions for the Vlasov and collision operator. Outlining the general theory, we also highlight the connection to plasma fluid theories, and give 2D and 3D numerical solutions of the non-linear Fokker-Planck equation. Applications are anticipated in both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  10. Surface transport in plasma-balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas, Jay [Physique Théorique et Mathématique, Université Libre de Bruxelles andInternational Solvay Institutes,ULB-Campus Plaine CP231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy [Centre for Particle Theory & Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Kundu, Nilay [Harish-Chandra Research Institute,Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India)

    2016-06-06

    We study the surface transport properties of stationary localized configurations of relativistic fluids to the first two non-trivial orders in a derivative expansion. By demanding that these finite lumps of relativistic fluid are described by a thermal partition function with arbitrary stationary background metric and gauge fields, we are able to find several constraints among surface transport coefficients. At leading order, besides recovering the surface thermodynamics, we obtain a generalization of the Young-Laplace equation for relativistic fluid surfaces, by considering a temperature dependence in the surface tension, which is further generalized in the context of superfluids. At the next order, for uncharged fluids in 3+1 dimensions, we show that besides the 3 independent bulk transport coefficients previously known, a generic localized configuration is characterized by 3 additional surface transport coefficients, one of which may be identified with the surface modulus of rigidity. Finally, as an application, we study the effect of temperature dependence of surface tension on some explicit examples of localized fluid configurations, which are dual to certain non-trivial black hole solutions via the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  11. Surface transport in plasma-balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jay; Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Kundu, Nilay

    2016-06-01

    We study the surface transport properties of stationary localized configurations of relativistic fluids to the first two non-trivial orders in a derivative expansion. By demanding that these finite lumps of relativistic fluid are described by a thermal partition function with arbitrary stationary background metric and gauge fields, we are able to find several constraints among surface transport coefficients. At leading order, besides recovering the surface thermodynamics, we obtain a generalization of the Young-Laplace equation for relativistic fluid surfaces, by considering a temperature dependence in the surface tension, which is further generalized in the context of superfluids. At the next order, for uncharged fluids in 3+1 dimensions, we show that besides the 3 independent bulk transport coefficients previously known, a generic localized configuration is characterized by 3 additional surface transport coefficients, one of which may be identified with the surface modulus of rigidity. Finally, as an application, we study the effect of temperature dependence of surface tension on some explicit examples of localized fluid configurations, which are dual to certain non-trivial black hole solutions via the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  12. Transport studies in high-performance field reversed configuration plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Barnes, D. C.; Dettrick, S. A.; Trask, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Hubbard, K.; Korepanov, S.; Thompson, M. C.; Zhai, K.; Tajima, T.

    2016-05-01

    A significant improvement of field reversed configuration (FRC) lifetime and plasma confinement times in the C-2 plasma, called High Performance FRC regime, has been observed with neutral beam injection (NBI), improved edge stability, and better wall conditioning [Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)]. A Quasi-1D (Q1D) fluid transport code has been developed and employed to carry out transport analysis of such C-2 plasma conditions. The Q1D code is coupled to a Monte-Carlo code to incorporate the effect of fast ions, due to NBI, on the background FRC plasma. Numerically, the Q1D transport behavior with enhanced transport coefficients (but with otherwise classical parametric dependencies) such as 5 times classical resistive diffusion, classical thermal ion conductivity, 20 times classical electron thermal conductivity, and classical fast ion behavior fit with the experimentally measured time evolution of the excluded flux radius, line-integrated density, and electron/ion temperature. The numerical study shows near sustainment of poloidal flux for nearly 1 ms in the presence of NBI.

  13. Collisional transport in a plasma with steep gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Murakami, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    The validity is given to the newly proposed two {delta}f method for neoclassical transport calculation, which can be solve the drift kinetic equation considering effects of steep plasma gradients, large radial electric field, finite banana width, and an orbit topology near the axis. The new method is applied to the study of ion transport with steep plasma gradients. It is found that the ion thermal diffusivity decreases as the scale length of density gradient decreases, while the ion particle flux due to ion-ion self collisions increases with increasing gradient. (author)

  14. Plasma membrane electron transport in frog blood vessels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rashmi P Rao; K Nalini; J Prakasa Rao

    2009-12-01

    In an attempt to see if frog blood vessels possess a plasma membrane electron transport system, the postcaval vein and aorta isolated from Rana tigrina were tested for their ability to reduce ferricyanide, methylene blue, and 2,6-dichloroindophenol. While the dyes remained unchanged, ferricyanide was reduced to ferrocyanide. This reduction was resistant to inhibition by cyanide and azide. Heptane extraction or formalin fixation of the tissues markedly reduced the capability to reduce ferricyanide. Denuded aortas retained only 30% of the activity of intact tissue. Our results indicate that the amphibian postcaval vein and aorta exhibit plasma membrane electron transport

  15. Testing THEMIS wave measurements against the cold plasma theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolik, Ondrej; Le Contel, Olivier; Bonnell, John

    2016-04-01

    The THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) mission records a multitude of electromagnetic waves inside Earth's magnetosphere and provides data in the form of high-resolution electric and magnetic waveforms. We use multi-component measurements of whistler mode waves and test them against the theory of wave propagation in a cold plasma. The measured ratio cB/E (c is speed of light in vacuum, B is magnetic wave amplitude, E is electric wave amplitude) is compared to the same quantity calculated from cold plasma theory over linearized Faraday's law. The aim of this study is to get estimates for measurement uncertainties, especially with regard to the electric field and the cold plasma density, as well as evaluating the validity of cold plasma theory inside Earth's radiation belts.

  16. Computations of intermittent transport in scrape-off layer plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    Two-dimensional fluid simulations of interchange turbulence for geometry and parameters relevant for the scrape-off layer of magnetized plasmas are presented. The computations, which have distinct plasma production and loss regions, reveal bursty ejection of particles and heat from the bulk plasma...... in the form of blobs. These structures propagate far into the scrape-off layer where they are dissipated due to transport along open magnetic field lines. From single-point recordings it is shown that the blobs have asymmetric conditional wave forms and lead to positively skewed and flattened probability...

  17. Hydrodynamization and transient modes of expanding plasma in kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Michal P; Spalinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    We study the transition to hydrodynamics in a weakly-coupled model of quark-gluon plasma given by kinetic theory in the relaxation time approximation. Our studies uncover qualitative similarities to the results on hydrodynamization in strongly coupled gauge theories. In particular, we demonstrate that the gradient expansion in this model has vanishing radius of convergence. The asymptotic character of the hydrodynamic gradient expansion is crucial for the recently discovered applicability of hydrodynamics at large gradients. Furthermore, the analysis of the resurgent properties of the series provides, quite remarkably, indication for the existence of a novel transient, damped oscillatory mode of expanding plasmas in kinetic theory.

  18. Drift Mode Growth Rate and Associated Ion Thermal Transport in Reversed Magnetic Shear Tokamak Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ai-Ke; QIU Xiao-Ming

    2001-01-01

    Drift mode linear growth rate and quasi-linear ion thermal transport in the reversed magnetic shear plasma are investigated by using the two-fluid theory, previously developed by Weiland and the Chalmers group [J. Nucl.Fusion, 29 (1989) 1810; ibid. 30 (1990) 983]. The theory is here extended to include both the radial electrical field shear (dEr/dr) and the electron fluid velocity (Ve) in the sheared coordinate system. Here, Ve describes the coupling between the safety factor q and the Er × B velocity V E. Their influences on the growth rate and associated ion thermal transport are obtained numerically. In addition, the ion heat pinch in the reversed shear plasma is observed. Qualitatively, the present conclusions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Behaviors of Electron Heat Transportation in HT-7 Sawtoothing Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Liqun; Xu Yi; Wan Baonian; Shi Yuejiang; Zhen Xiangjun; Chen Zhongyong; Lin Shiyao; HT-7 Team

    2005-01-01

    It is found that in HT-7 ohmic plasma, main energy loss comes from electron heat conduction, hence quantitative data of electron heat diffusivity is a very important issue for investigation of electron heat transportation behavior in different target plasmas so as to get high performance plasma. A time-to-peak method of the heat pulse propagation originating from the sawtooth activity on the soft x-ray intensity signal has been adopted to experimentally determine electron heat diffusivity XHPe on the HT-7 tokamak. Aiming to improve the signal-to-noise (S/N)ratio of the original signal to get a stable and reasonable electron heat diffusivity XHDe value, some data processing methods, including average of tens of sawteeth, is discussed. The electron heat diffusivity XHPe is larger than XPBe which is determined from the balance of background plasma power. Based on variation of the measured electron heat diffusivity XHPe, performances of different high confinement plasmas are analyzed.

  20. Fractional Transport in Strongly Turbulent Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isliker, Heinz; Vlahos, Loukas; Constantinescu, Dana

    2017-07-01

    We analyze statistically the energization of particles in a large scale environment of strong turbulence that is fragmented into a large number of distributed current filaments. The turbulent environment is generated through strongly perturbed, 3D, resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, and it emerges naturally from the nonlinear evolution, without a specific reconnection geometry being set up. Based on test-particle simulations, we estimate the transport coefficients in energy space for use in the classical Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, and we show that the latter fails to reproduce the simulation results. The reason is that transport in energy space is highly anomalous (strange), the particles perform Levy flights, and the energy distributions show extended power-law tails. Newly then, we motivate the use and derive the specific form of a fractional transport equation (FTE), we determine its parameters and the order of the fractional derivatives from the simulation data, and we show that the FTE is able to reproduce the high energy part of the simulation data very well. The procedure for determining the FTE parameters also makes clear that it is the analysis of the simulation data that allows us to make the decision whether a classical FP equation or a FTE is appropriate.

  1. Role of Plasma Elongation on Turbulent Transport in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelino, P.; Garbet, X.; Villard, L.; Bottino, A.; Jolliet, S.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; McMillan, B. F.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Tran, T. M.

    2009-05-01

    The theoretical study of plasma turbulence is of central importance to fusion research. Experimental evidence indicates that the confinement time results mainly from the turbulent transport of energy, the magnitude of which depends on the turbulent state resulting from nonlinear saturation mechanisms, in particular, the self-generation of coherent macroscopic structures and large scale flows. Plasma geometry has a strong impact on the structure and magnitude of these flows and also modifies the mode linear growth rates. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations in realistic tokamak magnetohydrodynamic equilibria show how plasma shape can control the turbulent transport. Results are best described in terms of an effective temperature gradient. With increasing plasma elongation, the nonlinear critical effective gradient is not modified while the stiffness of transport is decreasing.

  2. Analysis of electron transport in the plasma of thermionic converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoenescu, M.L.; Heinicke, P.H.

    1980-03-01

    Electron transport coefficients of a gaseous ensemble are expressed analytically as function of density, and are expressed analytically as function of temperature up to an unknown function which has to be evaluated for each specific electron-neutral atom cross section. In order to complete the analytical temperature dependence one may introduce a polynomial expansion of the function or one may derive the temperature dependence of a set of coefficients, numbering thirteen for a third approximation transport evaluation, which completely determine the transport coefficients. The latter approach is used for determining the electron transport coefficients of a cesium plasma for any ion neutral composition and any temperature between 500/sup 0/K and 3500/sup 0/K. The relation between the transport coefficients of a fully and partly ionized gas is readily available and shows that, in the classical formalism, electron-ion and electron-neutral resistivities are not additive. The present form of the transport coefficients makes possible an accurate numerical integration of transport equations eliminating lengthy computations which are frequently inaccessible. It thus provides a detailed knowledge of spatial distribution of particle and energy transport and makes possible the determination of one of the three internal voltage drops, surface barrier, sheath and plasma, which are linked together experimentally by current density versus voltage characteristics of thermionic converters.

  3. Transport Theory for Metals with Excitonic Instabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Breitkreiz, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    Metals with excitonic instabilities are multiband systems with significant electron-electron interaction. The electronic transport in such systems is affected by collective fluctuations of the electrons, leading to anomalous features in the measured transport coefficients. Many of these anomalies have not been well understood because the transport mechanisms in these systems tend to be rather complex. The complexity arises, on the one hand, from the multiband nature and, on the other, fro...

  4. Transportation optimization with fuzzy trapezoidal numbers based on possibility theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dayi; Li, Ran; Huang, Qi; Lei, Ping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a parametric method is introduced to solve fuzzy transportation problem. Considering that parameters of transportation problem have uncertainties, this paper develops a generalized fuzzy transportation problem with fuzzy supply, demand and cost. For simplicity, these parameters are assumed to be fuzzy trapezoidal numbers. Based on possibility theory and consistent with decision-makers' subjectiveness and practical requirements, the fuzzy transportation problem is transformed to a crisp linear transportation problem by defuzzifying fuzzy constraints and objectives with application of fractile and modality approach. Finally, a numerical example is provided to exemplify the application of fuzzy transportation programming and to verify the validity of the proposed methods.

  5. Consistent theory of turbulent transport in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-jin

    2006-03-03

    A theory of turbulent transport is presented in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics with background shear and magnetic fields. We provide theoretical predictions for the transport of magnetic flux, momentum, and particles and turbulent intensities, which show stronger reduction compared with the hydrodynamic case, with different dependences on shearing rate, magnetic field, and values of viscosity, Ohmic diffusion, and particle diffusivity. In particular, particle transport is more severely suppressed than momentum transport, effectively leading to a more efficient momentum transport. The role of magnetic fields in quenching transport without altering the amplitude of flow velocity and in inhibiting the generation of shear flows is elucidated. Implications of the results are discussed.

  6. Ion transport barriers triggered by plasma polarization in gyrokinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, A.; Sarazin, Y.; Zarzoso, D.; Abiteboul, J.; Brun, A. S.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.; Thomine, O.

    2013-07-01

    The creation of ion transport barriers by externally induced sheared E × B flows is investigated with the global, full-f and flux-driven gyrokinetic code GYSELA. A gyrokinetic source of vorticity is designed and proves to be efficient in polarizing the plasma. Induced sheared electric fields develop in the turbulent core and are accompanied by the creation of a transport barrier. The barrier and the sheared flow relax quasi-periodically because of zonal flow activity and a destabilizing temperature anisotropy induced by the vorticity source. A new cyclic mechanism leading to the relaxation of transport barriers in tokamaks is discovered.

  7. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-04-04

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a question about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no ad hoc elements. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A new type of attractor is defined which attracts both forward and backward in time and is shown to occur in infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with dissipative behavior. The theory of Smale horseshoes is applied to gyromotion in the neighborhood of a magnetic field reversal and the phenomenon of reinsertion in area-preserving horseshoes is introduced. The central limit theorem is proved by renormalization group techniques. A natural symplectic structure for thermodynamics is shown to arise asymptotically from the maximum entropy formalism.

  8. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang

    for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa- Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa......-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron......Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important...

  9. Structure and function of thyroid hormone plasma membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Ulrich; Johannes, Jörg; Bayer, Dorothea; Braun, Doreen

    2014-09-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) cross the plasma membrane with the help of transporter proteins. As charged amino acid derivatives, TH cannot simply diffuse across a lipid bilayer membrane, despite their notorious hydrophobicity. The identification of monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8, SLC16A2) as a specific and very active TH transporter paved the way to the finding that mutations in the MCT8 gene cause a syndrome of psychomotor retardation in humans. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current model of transmembrane transport and highlight the diversity of TH transmembrane transporters. The interactions of TH with plasma transfer proteins, T3 receptors, and deiodinase are summarized. It is shown that proteins may bind TH owing to their hydrophobic character in hydrophobic cavities and/or by specific polar interaction with the phenolic hydroxyl, the aminopropionic acid moiety, and by weak polar interactions with the iodine atoms. These findings are compared with our understanding of how TH transporters interact with substrate. The presumed effects of mutations in MCT8 on protein folding and transport function are explained in light of the available homology model.

  10. Optimal transportation networks models and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bernot, Marc; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    The transportation problem can be formalized as the problem of finding the optimal way to transport a given measure into another with the same mass. In contrast to the Monge-Kantorovitch problem, recent approaches model the branched structure of such supply networks as minima of an energy functional whose essential feature is to favour wide roads. Such a branched structure is observable in ground transportation networks, in draining and irrigation systems, in electrical power supply systems and in natural counterparts such as blood vessels or the branches of trees. These lectures provide mathematical proof of several existence, structure and regularity properties empirically observed in transportation networks. The link with previous discrete physical models of irrigation and erosion models in geomorphology and with discrete telecommunication and transportation models is discussed. It will be mathematically proven that the majority fit in the simple model sketched in this volume.

  11. Fast ions and momentum transport in JET tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmi, A.

    2012-07-01

    Fast ions are an inseparable part of fusion plasmas. They can be generated using electromagnetic waves or injected into plasmas as neutrals to heat the bulk plasma and to drive toroidal rotation and current. In future power plants fusion born fast ions deliver the main heating into the plasma. Understanding and controlling the fast ions is of crucial importance for the operation of a power plant. Furthermore, fast ions provide ways to probe the properties of the thermal plasma and get insight of its confinement properties. In this thesis, numerical code packages are used and developed to simulate JET experiments for a range of physics issues related to fast ions. Namely, the clamping fast ion distribution at high energies with RF heating, fast ion ripple torque generation and the toroidal momentum transport properties using NBI modulation technique are investigated. Through a comparison of numerical simulations and the JET experimental data it is shown that the finite Larmor radius effects in ion cyclotron resonance heating are important and that they can prevent fast ion tail formation beyond certain energy. The identified mechanism could be used for tailoring the fast ion distribution in future experiments. Secondly, ASCOT simulations of NBI ions in a ripple field showed that most of the reduction of the toroidal rotation that has been observed in the JET enhanced ripple experiments could be attributed to fast ion ripple torque. Finally, fast ion torque calculations together with momentum transport analysis have led to the conclusion that momentum transport in not purely diffusive but that a convective component, which increases monotonically in radius, exists in a wide range of JET plasmas. Using parameter scans, the convective transport has been shown to be insensitive to collisionality and q-profile but to increase strongly against density gradient. (orig.)

  12. On the non-stiffness of edge transport in L-mode tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, O.; Brunner, S.; Kim, D.; Merlo, G.; Behn, R.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Federspiel, L.; Goodman, T. P.; Karpushov, A.; Merle, A.; Team, TCV, E-mail: olivier.sauter@epfl.ch [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confédération Suisse, EPFL, PPB-Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Camenen, Y. [CNRS, UMR 7345, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille (France)

    2014-05-15

    Transport analyses using first-principle turbulence codes and 11/2 -D transport codes usually study radial transport properties between the tokamak plasma magnetic axis and a normalized minor radius around 0.8. In this region, heat transport shows significantly stiff properties resulting in temperature scalelength values (R∕L{sub T}) that are relatively independent of the level of the radial heat flux. We have studied experimentally in the tokamak à configuration variable [F. Hofmann et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 36, B277 (1994)] the radial electron transport properties of the edge region, close to the last closed flux surface, namely, between ρ{sub V}=√(V/V{sub edge})=0.8 to 1. It is shown that electron transport is not stiff in this region and high R∕L{sub Te} values (∼20–40) can be attained even for L-mode confinement. We can define a “pedestal” location, already in L-mode regimes, where the transport characteristics change from constant logarithmic gradient, inside ρ{sub V} = 0.8, to constant gradient between 0.8 and 1.0. In particular, we demonstrate, with well resolved T{sub e} and n{sub e} profiles, that the confinement improvement with plasma current I{sub p}, with or without auxiliary heating, is due to this non-stiff edge region. This new result is used to explain the significant confinement improvement observed with negative triangularity, which could not be explained by theory to date. Preliminary local gyrokinetic simulations are now consistent with an edge, less stiff, region that is more sensitive to triangularity than further inside. We also show that increasing the electron cyclotron heating power increases the edge temperature inverse scalelength, in contrast to the value in the main plasma region. The dependence of confinement on density in ohmic plasmas is also studied and brings new insight in the understanding of the transition between linear and saturated confinement regimes, as well as of the density limit and

  13. The Gaussian radial basis function method for plasma kinetic theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvijoki, E., E-mail: eero.hirvijoki@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Candy, J.; Belli, E. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Embréus, O. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-10-30

    Description of a magnetized plasma involves the Vlasov equation supplemented with the non-linear Fokker–Planck collision operator. For non-Maxwellian distributions, the collision operator, however, is difficult to compute. In this Letter, we introduce Gaussian Radial Basis Functions (RBFs) to discretize the velocity space of the entire kinetic system, and give the corresponding analytical expressions for the Vlasov and collision operator. Outlining the general theory, we also highlight the connection to plasma fluid theories, and give 2D and 3D numerical solutions of the non-linear Fokker–Planck equation. Applications are anticipated in both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. - Highlights: • A radically new method to address the velocity space discretization of the non-linear kinetic equation of plasmas. • Elegant and physically intuitive, flexible and mesh-free. • Demonstration of numerical solution of both 2-D and 3-D non-linear Fokker–Planck relaxation problem.

  14. Theory of magnetic reconnection in solar and astrophysical plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontin, David I

    2012-07-13

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process in a plasma that facilitates the release of energy stored in the magnetic field by permitting a change in the magnetic topology. In this paper, we present a review of the current state of understanding of magnetic reconnection. We discuss theoretical results regarding the formation of current sheets in complex three-dimensional magnetic fields and describe the fundamental differences between reconnection in two and three dimensions. We go on to outline recent developments in modelling of reconnection with kinetic theory, as well as in the magnetohydrodynamic framework where a number of new three-dimensional reconnection regimes have been identified. We discuss evidence from observations and simulations of Solar System plasmas that support this theory and summarize some prominent locations in which this new reconnection theory is relevant in astrophysical plasmas.

  15. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Giampaolo Cicogna; Francesco Ceccherini; Francesco Pegoraro

    2006-01-01

    The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-...

  16. Plasma transport in the Scrape-off-Layer of magnetically confined plasma and the plasma exhaust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    An overview of the plasma dynamics in the Scrape-off-Layer (SOL) of magnetically confined plasma is presented. The SOL is the exhaust channel of the warm plasma from the core, and the understanding of the SOL plasma dynamics is one of the key issues in contemporary fusion research. It is essential...

  17. Transport properties of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at finite coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, P; Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex

    2006-01-01

    Gauge theory-string theory duality describes strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric SU(n) Yang-Mills theory at finite temperature in terms of near extremal black 3-brane geometry in type IIB string theory. We use this correspondence to compute the leading correction in inverse 't Hooft coupling to the shear diffusion constant, bulk viscosity and the speed of sound in the large-n N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory plasma. The transport coefficients are extracted from the dispersion relation for the shear and the sound wave lowest quasinormal modes in the leading order alpha'-corrected black D3 brane geometry. We find the shear viscosity extracted from the shear diffusion constant to agree with result of [hep-th/0406264]; also, the leading correction to bulk viscosity and the speed of sound vanishes. Our computation provides a highly nontrivial consistency check on the hydrodynamic description of the alpha'-corrected nonextremal black branes in string theory.

  18. Formation of plasma around a small meteoroid: 1. Kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dimant, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Every second millions of small meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere producing dense plasmas. Radars easily detect these plasmas and researchers use this data to characterize both the meteoroids and the atmosphere. This paper develops a first-principle kinetic theory describing the behavior of particles, ablated from a fast-moving meteoroid, that colliside with the atmospheric molecules. This theory produces analytic expressions describing the spatial structure and velocity distributions of ions and neutrals near the ablating meteoroid. This analytical model will serve as a basis for a more accurate quantitative interpretation of radar measurements and should help calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations.

  19. Theory of a beam-driven plasma antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Volchok, E. P.; Annenkov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a theory describing generation of electromagnetic waves in a thin beam-plasma system with a characteristic transverse size comparable with the radiation wavelength. In fact, a thin plasma column with a longitudinal density modulation works like a plasma antenna in which an electron beam can excite a superluminal wave of electric current. It has previously been shown that, if the period of this modulation coincides with the wavelength of the most unstable beam-driven mode, radiation at a frequency slightly below the plasma frequency is emitted transversely to the plasma column and generated in thin boundary layers. For the plasma thickness comparable with the skin-depth, generation of the terahertz radiation can reach high efficiency ( ˜10 % ) in such a scheme, but the absolute power of this radiation cannot be increased by increasing the transverse plasma size. In this paper, we study whether the power of such an antenna can be increased in the regime of oblique emission when the magnetized plasma is transparent to the radiated electromagnetic waves and the whole plasma volume may be involved in their generation.

  20. Cross-scale energy transport in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. W.; Nykyri, K.; Dimmock, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    The solar wind is a supersonic magnetized plasma streaming far into the heliosphere. Although cooling as it flows, it is rapidly heated upon encountering planetary obstacles. At Earth, this interaction forms the magnetosphere and its sub-regions. The present paper focuses on particle heating across the boundary separating the shocked solar wind and magnetospheric plasma, which is driven by mechanisms operating on fluid, ion and electron scales. The cross-scale energy transport between these scales is a compelling and fundamental problem of plasma physics. Here, we present evidence of the energy transport between fluid and ion scales: free energy is provided in terms of a velocity shear generating fluid-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. We show the unambiguous observation of an ion-scale magnetosonic wave packet, inside a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex, with sufficient energy to account for observed ion heating. The present finding has universal consequences in understanding cross-scale energy transport, applicable to environments experiencing velocity shears during comparable plasma regimes.

  1. Heat Transport Effects in Rotating Gases and Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmes, Elijah; Geyko, Vasily; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    In some contexts, rotating gases and plasmas exhibit heat transport effects that are substantially different from what would be found in the absence of rotation. For instance, a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is a device which separates an input stream of (neutral) gas into hot and cold streams by setting up a rotating flow in a specially designed cylindrical chamber. One class of vortex tube models involves radial motion that carries gas up and down the pressure gradients set up by the centrifugal potential inside the tube and which results in adiabatic heating and cooling of the radially moving material. The approach of producing heat transport in a rotating flow using pressure gradients and motion along those gradients may have applications in plasma systems. We discuss possible applications for rotational heat transport effects in plasma systems, including Z-pinch configurations. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory; U.S. Defense Reduction Agency Grant No. HDTRA1-11-1-0037; and the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-NA0002948.

  2. A First-Principle Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2015-11-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to observe visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo. Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for more accurate quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements. Work supported by NSF Grant 1244842.

  3. A new model for plasma transport and chemistry at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, John D.

    1992-01-01

    A model of plasma transport and chemistry is described which calculates the evolution of a plasma population in latitude and radial distance. This model is applied to the magnetosphere of Saturn, where it is used to fit the density profile of the heavy ions assuming both satellite and ring sources of plasma. Use of an extended source region is found to significantly alter the resulting plasma profile. Water ions cannot fit the observed density profile inside L = 6 even with a large ring source. Oxygen ions can fit the density profile throughout the region inside L = 12 given a suitable profile of neutral hydrogen; a suitable profile contains up to 5 H/cu cm outside L = 4 with the number increasing inside this. Preferred values of K are 1-3 x 10 exp -10 R(S)2/s, but any value K less than 10 exp -9 R(S)2/s can be accommodated. The temperature profile is shown to favor models invoking in situ plasma formation and loss as opposed to models where transport is important.

  4. Hydrodynamic transport functions from quantum kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetta, E A; Ramsey, S

    2000-01-01

    Starting from the quantum kinetic field theory [E. Calzetta and B. L. Hu, Phys. Rev. D37, 2878 (1988)] constructed from the closed-time-path (CTP), two-particle-irreducible (2PI) effective action we show how to compute from first principles the shear and bulk viscosity functions in the hydrodynamic-thermodynamic regime. For a real scalar field with $\\lambda \\Phi ^{4}$ self-interaction we need to include 4 loop graphs in the equation of motion. This work provides a microscopic field-theoretical basis to the ``effective kinetic theory'' proposed by Jeon and Yaffe [S. Jeon and L. G. Yaffe, Phys. Rev. D53, 5799 (1996)], while our result for the bulk viscosity reproduces their expression derived from linear response theory and the imaginary-time formalism of thermal field theory. Though unavoidably involved in calculations of this sort, we feel that the approach using fundamental quantum kinetic field theory is conceptually clearer and methodically simpler than the effective kinetic theory approach, as the success...

  5. Transport and chemical loss rates in Saturn's inner plasma disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, M. K. G.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Vigren, E.; Cassidy, T. A.; Andrews, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    The Kronian moon Enceladus is constantly feeding its surrounding with new gas and dust, from cryovolcanoes located in its south polar region. Through photoionization and impact ionization of these neutrals, a plasma disk is created, which mainly contains hydrogen ions and water group ions. This paper investigates the importance of ion loss by outward radial transport and ion loss by dissociative recombination, which is the dominant chemical loss process in the inner plasma disk. We use plasma densities derived from several years of measurements by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science electric field power spectral density and Langmuir probe to calculate the total flux tube content NL2. Our calculation shows that NL2 agrees well with earlier estimates within dipole L shell 8. We also show that loss by transport dominates chemical loss between L shells 4 and 10. Using extrapolation of available measurements, we extend the study to include L shells 2.5 to 4. The results indicate that loss by transport dominates chemical loss also between L shells 2.5 and 4. The loss rate by transport is around five times larger at L shell 5, and the difference increases as L7.7 beyond L = 5, for the net ion population. Chemical loss may still be important for the structure of the plasma disk in the region closest to Enceladus (around ±0.5 RS) at 3.95 RS (1 RS = Saturn's equatorial radius = 60,268 km), since the transport and chemical loss rates only differ by a factor of ˜2 in this region. We also derive the total plasma content of the plasma disk between L shells 4 and 10 to be 1.9 × 1033 ions and the total ion source rate for the same region to be 5.8 × 1027 s-1. The estimated equatorial ion production rate P ranges from 2.6 × 10-5 cm-3 s-1 (at L = 10) to 1.1 × 10-4 cm-3 s-1 (at L = 4.8). The net mass loading rate is derived to be 123 kg/s for L shells 4 to 10.

  6. Study on impurity radiation and transport of JT-60U plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishijima, Tatsuo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    exchange recombination spectroscopy). The core radiation was evaluated with the spectroscopic method in the reversed shear regime. 97% of the main plasma radiation was Bremsstrahlung and this estimation agreed with the bolometric measurement within 10%. During high performance discharges with reversed shear, the radiation profile strongly peaked inside the ITB radius. The increment of carbon density is explained by neoclassical transport of banana-banana collision regime. However, n{sub c}/n{sub e} is flat inside the ITB radius during the electron density increase implying that the discharge has not reached a steady state. If the impurity keeps accumulating at the center as predicted by neoclassical transport theory, the carbon accumulation may pose a problem to the core plasma performance. (author)

  7. Hydrodynamic transport coefficients for the non-conformal quark-gluon plasma from holography

    CERN Document Server

    Finazzo, Stefano I; Marrochio, Hugo; Noronha, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we obtain holographic formulas for the transport coefficients $\\kappa$ and $\\tau_\\pi$ present in the second-order derivative expansion of relativistic hydrodynamics in curved spacetime associated with a non-conformal strongly coupled plasma described holographically by an Einstein+Scalar action in the bulk. We compute these coefficients as functions of the temperature in a bottom-up non-conformal model that is tuned to reproduce lattice QCD thermodynamics at zero baryon chemical potential. We directly compute, besides the speed of sound, 6 other transport coefficients that appear at second-order in the derivative expansion. We also give an estimate for the temperature dependence of 11 other transport coefficients taking into account the simplest contribution from non-conformal effects that appear near the QCD crossover phase transition. Using these results, we construct an Israel-Stewart-like theory in flat spacetime containing 13 of these 17 transport coefficients that should be suitable for ph...

  8. A Selected Library of Transport Coefficients for Combustion and Plasma Physics Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L.D.

    2000-08-01

    COYOTE and similar combustion programs based on the multicomponent Navier-Stokes equations require the mixture viscosity, thermal conductivity, and species transport coefficients as input. This report documents a model of these molecular transport coefficients that is simpler than the general theory, but which provides adequate accuracy for many purposes. This model leads to a computationally convenient, self-contained, and easy-to-use source of such data in a format suitable for use by such programs. We present the data for various neutral species in two forms. The first form is a simple functional fit to the transport coefficients. The second form is the use of tabulated Lennard-Jones parameters in simple theoretical expressions for the gas-phase transport coefficients. The model then is extended to the case of a two-temperature plasma. Lennard-Jones parameters are given for a number of chemical species of interest in combustion research.

  9. The mathematical theory of reduced MHD models for fusion plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Guillard, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    The derivation of reduced MHD models for fusion plasma is here formulated as a special instance of the general theory of singular limit of hyperbolic system of PDEs with large operator. This formulation allows to use the general results of this theory and to prove rigorously that reduced MHD models are valid approximations of the full MHD equations. In particular, it is proven that the solutions of the full MHD system converge to the solutions of an appropriate reduced model.

  10. Ablation plasma transport using multicusp magnetic field for laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K.; Umezawa, M.; Uchino, T.; Ikegami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, N.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a plasma guiding method using multicusp magnetic field to transport the ablation plasma keeping the density for developing laser ion sources. To investigate the effect of guiding using the magnetic field on the ablation plasma, we demonstrated the transport of the laser ablation plasma in the multicusp magnetic field. The magnetic field was formed with eight permanent magnets and arranged to limit the plasma expansion in the radial direction. We investigated the variation of the plasma ion current density and charge distribution during transport in the magnetic field. The results indicate that the plasma is confined in the radial direction during the transport in the multicusp magnetic field.

  11. Scaling theory for percolative charge transport in disordered molecular semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cottaar, J.; Koster, L.J.A; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a scaling theory for charge transport in molecular semiconductors with Gaussian energy disorder, which extends standard percolation theory by including bonds with conductances close to the percolating one in the random-resistor network of bonds representing charge hopping. A general and c

  12. Scaling Theory for Percolative Charge Transport in Disordered Molecular Semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cottaar, J.; Koster, L. J. A.; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a scaling theory for charge transport in disordered molecular semiconductors that extends percolation theory by including bonds with conductances close to the percolating one in the random-resistor network representing charge hopping. A general and compact expression is given for the char

  13. Ab-Initio Theory of Charge Transport in Organic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannewald, K.; Bobbert, P. A.

    2005-06-01

    A theory of charge transport in organic crystals is presented. Using a Holstein-Peierls model, an explicit expression for the charge-carrier mobilities as a function of temperature is obtained. Calculating all material parameters from ab initio calculations, the theory is applied to oligo-acene crystals and a brief comparison to experiment is given.

  14. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. II. Kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    In Paper I [T. Lafleur et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 053502 (2016)], we demonstrated (using particle-in-cell simulations) the definite correlation between an anomalously high cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs), and the presence of azimuthal electrostatic instabilities leading to enhanced electron scattering. Here, we present a kinetic theory that predicts the enhanced scattering rate and provides an electron cross-field mobility that is in good agreement with experiment. The large azimuthal electron drift velocity in HETs drives a strong instability that quickly saturates due to a combination of ion-wave trapping and wave-convection, leading to an enhanced mobility many orders of magnitude larger than that expected from classical diffusion theory. In addition to the magnetic field strength, B0, this enhanced mobility is a strong function of the plasma properties (such as the plasma density) and therefore does not, in general, follow simple 1 /B02 or 1 /B0 scaling laws.

  15. CONFERENCE DESCRIPTION Theory of Fusion Plasmas: Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbet, X.; Sauter, O.

    2010-12-01

    The Joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas takes place every other year in a place particularly favourable for informal and in-depth discussions. Invited and contributed papers present state-of-the-art research in theoretical plasma physics, covering all domains relevant to fusion plasmas. This workshop always welcomes a fruitful mix of experienced researchers and students, to allow a better understanding of the key theoretical physics models and applications. Theoretical issues related to burning plasmas Anomalous Transport (Turbulence, Coherent Structures, Microinstabilities) RF Heating and Current Drive Macroinstabilities Plasma-Edge Physics and Divertors Fast particles instabilities Further details: http://Varenna-Lausanne.epfl.ch The conference is organized by: Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Association EURATOM - Confédération Suisse 'Piero Caldirola' International Centre for the Promotion of Science and International School of Plasma Physics Istituto di Fisica del Plasma del CNR, Milano Editors: X Garbet (CEA, Cadarache, France) and O Sauter (CRPP-EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland)

  16. Carboxylic Acids Plasma Membrane Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Margarida; Queirós, Odília; Talaia, Gabriel; Ribas, David; Paiva, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This chapter covers the functionally characterized plasma membrane carboxylic acids transporters Jen1, Ady2, Fps1 and Pdr12 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, addressing also their homologues in other microorganisms, as filamentous fungi and bacteria. Carboxylic acids can either be transported into the cells, to be used as nutrients, or extruded in response to acid stress conditions. The secondary active transporters Jen1 and Ady2 can mediate the uptake of the anionic form of these substrates by a H(+)-symport mechanism. The undissociated form of carboxylic acids is lipid-soluble, crossing the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. Furthermore, acetic acid can also be transported by facilitated diffusion via Fps1 channel. At the cytoplasmic physiological pH, the anionic form of the acid prevails and it can be exported by the Pdr12 pump. This review will highlight the mechanisms involving carboxylic acids transporters, and the way they operate according to the yeast cell response to environmental changes, as carbon source availability, extracellular pH and acid stress conditions.

  17. Turbulent transport of impurities in a magnetized plasma; Transport turbulent d'impuretes dans un plasma magnetise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubuit, N

    2006-10-15

    This work deals with the transport of impurities in magnetically confined thermonuclear plasmas. The accumulation of impurities in the core of the plasma would imply dramatic losses of energy that may lead to the extinction of the plasma. On the opposite, the injection of impurities in the plasma edge is considered as an efficient means to extract heat without damaging the first wall. The balance between these 2 contradictory constraints requires an accurate knowledge of the impurity transport inside the plasma. The effect of turbulence, the main transport mechanism for impurities is therefore a major issue. In this work, the complete formula of a turbulent flow of impurities for a given fluctuation spectrum has been inferred. The origin and features of the main accumulation processes have been identified. The main effect comes from the compressibility of the electrical shift speed in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. This compressibility appears to be linked to the curvature of the magnetic field. A less important effect is a thermal-diffusion process that is inversely proportional to the number of charges and then disappears for most type of impurities except the lightest. This effect implies an impurity flux proportional to the temperature gradient and its direction can change according to the average speed of fluctuations. A new version of the turbulence code TRB has been developed. This new version allows the constraints of the turbulence not by the gradients but by the flux which is more realistic. The importance of the processes described above has been confirmed by a comparison between calculation and experimental data from Tore-supra and the Jet tokamak. The prevailing role of the curvature of the magnetic field in the transport impurity is highlighted. (A.C.)

  18. Glycine transporter dimers: evidence for occurrence in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholomäus, Ingo; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Nicke, Annette

    2008-01-01

    membrane based on hydrodynamic and native gel electrophoretic studies. Here, we used cysteine substitution and oxidative cross-linking to show that of GlyT1 and GlyT2 also form dimeric complexes within the plasma membrane. GlyT oligomerization at the cell surface was confirmed for both GlyT1 and GlyT2......Different Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6a family have been shown to form dimers or oligomers in both intracellular compartments and at the cell surface. In contrast, the glycine transporters (GlyTs) GlyT1 and -2 have been reported to exist as monomers in the plasma...

  19. Arrestin-mediated endocytosis of yeast plasma membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikko, Elina; Pelham, Hugh R B

    2009-12-01

    Many plasma membrane transporters in yeast are endocytosed in response to excess substrate or certain stresses and degraded in the vacuole. Endocytosis invariably requires ubiquitination by the HECT domain ligase Rsp5. In the cases of the manganese transporter Smf1 and the amino acid transporters Can1, Lyp1 and Mup1 it has been shown that ubiquitination is mediated by arrestin-like adaptor proteins that bind to Rsp5 and recognize specific transporters. As yeast contains a large family of arrestins, this has been suggested as a general model for transporter regulation; however, analysis is complicated by redundancy amongst the arrestins. We have tested this model by removing all the arrestins and examining the requirements for endocytosis of four more transporters, Itr1 (inositol), Hxt6 (glucose), Fur4 (uracil) and Tat2 (tryptophan). This reveals functions for the arrestins Art5/Ygr068c and Art4/Rod1, and additional roles for Art1/Ldb19, Art2/Ecm21 and Art8/Csr2. It also reveals functional redundancy between arrestins and the arrestin-like adaptors Bul1 and Bul2. In addition, we show that delivery to the vacuole often requires multiple additional ubiquitin ligases or adaptors, including the RING domain ligase Pib1, and the adaptors Bsd2, Ear1 and Ssh4, some acting redundantly. We discuss the similarities and differences in the requirements for regulation of different transporters.

  20. Ion transport from plasma ion source at ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Steinsberger, Timo Pascal

    2017-01-01

    In this report, my work as CERN Summer Student at the ISOLTRAP experiment at ISOLDE is described. A new plasma ion source used as oine source for calibration and implemented before my arrival was commissioned and transportation settings for the produced ions to the ion traps were found. The cyclotron frequencies of 40Ar and the xenon isotopes 129-132Xe were measured using time-of-flight and phase-imaging ion-cyclotron-resonance mass spectroscopy.

  1. Users manual for the UEDGE edge-plasma transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E; Smith, G R

    2000-01-10

    Operational details are given for the two-dimensional UEDGE edge-plasma transport code. The model applies to nearly fully-ionized plasmas in a strong magnetic field. Equations are solved for the plasma density, velocity along the magnetic field, electron temperature, ion temperature, and electrostatic potential. In addition, fluid models of neutrals species are included or the option to couple to a Monte Carlo code description of the neutrals. Multi-species ion mixtures can be simulated. The physical equations are discretized by a finite-difference procedure, and the resulting system of algebraic equations are solved by fully-implicit techniques. The code can be used to follow time-dependent solutions or to find steady-state solutions by direct iteration.

  2. Nonlinear magnetic field transport in opening switch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. J.; Auer, P. L.; Sudan, R. N.; Oliver, B. V.; Seyler, C. E.; Greenly, J. B.

    1993-04-01

    The nonlinear transport of magnetic field in collisionless plasmas, as present in the plasma opening switch (POS), using the implicit multifluid simulation code anthem [J. Comput. Phys. 71, 429 (1987)] is studied. The focus is on early time behavior in the electron-magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) limit, with the ions fixed, and the electrons streaming as a fluid under the influence of ve×B Hall forces. Through simulation, magnetic penetration and magnetic exclusion waves are characterized, due to the Hall effect in the presence of transverse density gradients, and the interaction of these Hall waves with nonlinear diffusive disturbances from electron velocity advection, (veṡ∇)ve, is studied. It is shown how these mechanisms give rise to the anode magnetic insulation layer, central diffusion, and cathode potential hill structures seen in earlier opening switch plasmas studies.

  3. Studies of instability and transport in tokamak plasmas with very weak magnetic shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.Q.; Zhang, Y.Z. [Southwestern Inst. of Physics, Chengdu (China)]|[International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Mahajan, S.M. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1997-04-01

    Ion temperature gradient (ITG or {eta}{sub i}) driven microinstabilities are studied, using kinetic theory, for tokamak plasmas with very weak (positive or negative) magnetic shear (VWS). The gradient of magnetic shear as well as the effects of parallel and perpendicular velocity shear (v{prime}{sub {parallel}} and v{prime}{sub E}) are included in the defining equations. Two eigenmodes: the double (D) and the global (G) are found to coexist. Parametric dependence of these instabilities, and of the corresponding quasilinear transport is systematically analyzed. It is shown that, in VWS plasmas, a parallel velocity shear (PVS) may stabilize or destabilize the modes, depending on the individual as well as the relative signs of PVS and of the gradient of magnetic shear. The quasilinear transport induced by the instabilities may be significantly reduced with PVS in VWS plasmas. The v{prime}{sub E} values required to completely suppress the instabilities are much lower in VWS plasmas than they are in normal plasmas. Possible correlations with tokamak experiments are discussed.

  4. Study of negative ion transport phenomena in a plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riz, D.; Pamela, J. [Departement de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee C. E., Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    1996-07-01

    NIETZSCHE (Negative Ions Extraction and Transport ZSimulation Code for HydrogEn species) is a negative ion (NI) transport code developed at Cadarache. This code calculates NI trajectories using a 3D Monte-Carlo technique, taking into account the main destruction processes, as well as elastic collisions (H{sup {minus}}/H{sup +}) and charge exchanges (H{sup {minus}}/H{sup 0}). It determines the extraction probability of a NI created at a given position. According to the simulations, we have seen that in the case of volume production, only NI produced close to the plasma grid (PG) can be extracted. Concerning the surface production, we have studied how NI produced on the PG and accelerated by the plasma sheath backward into the source could be extracted. We demonstrate that elastic collisions and charge exchanges play an important role, which in some conditions dominates the magnetic filter effect, which acts as a magnetic mirror. NI transport in various conditions will be discussed: volume/surface production, high/low plasmas density, tent filter/transverse filter. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Hybrid formulation of radiation transport in optically thick divertor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.; Bufferand, H.; Stamm, R. [PIIM, UMR 7345 Aix-Marseille Universite / CNRS, Centre de St-Jerome, Marseille (France); Reiter, D. [IEK-4 Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of coupled atom-radiation transport in optically thick divertor plasmas can be computationally very demanding, in particular in ITER relevant conditions or even larger devices, e.g. for power plant divertor studies. At high (∝ 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) atomic densities, it can be shown that sufficiently large divertors behave in certain areas like a black body near the first resonance line of hydrogen (Lyman α). This suggests that, at least in part, the use of continuum model (radiation hydrodynamics) can be sufficiently accurate, while being less time consuming. In this work, we report on the development of a hybrid model devoted to switch automatically between a kinetic and a continuum description according to the plasma conditions. Calculations of the photo-excitation rate in a homogeneous slab are performed as an illustration. The outlined hybrid concept might be also applicable to neutral atom transport, due to mathematical analogy of transport equations for neutrals and radiation. (copyright 2016 The Authors. Contributions to Plasma Physics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA Weinheim. This)

  6. Study of negative ion transport phenomena in a plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riz, D.; Paméla, J.

    1996-07-01

    NIETZSCHE (Negative Ions Extraction and Transport ZSimulation Code for HydrogEn species) is a negative ion (NI) transport code developed at Cadarache. This code calculates NI trajectories using a 3D Monte-Carlo technique, taking into account the main destruction processes, as well as elastic collisions (H-/H+) and charge exchanges (H-/H0). It determines the extraction probability of a NI created at a given position. According to the simulations, we have seen that in the case of volume production, only NI produced close to the plasma grid (PG) can be extracted. Concerning the surface production, we have studied how NI produced on the PG and accelerated by the plasma sheath backward into the source could be extracted. We demonstrate that elastic collisions and charge exchanges play an important role, which in some conditions dominates the magnetic filter effect, which acts as a magnetic mirror. NI transport in various conditions will be discussed: volume/surface production, high/low plasmas density, tent filter/transverse filter.

  7. New aspects of plasma sheet dynamics - MHD and kinetic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wiechen

    Full Text Available Magnetic reconnection is a process of fundamental importance for the dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet. In this context, the development of thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet is a topic of special interest because they could be a possible cause of microscopic fluctuations acting as collective non-idealness from a macroscopic point of view. Simulations of the near-Earth plasma sheet including boundary perturbations due to localized inflow through the northern (or southern plasma sheet boundary show developing thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet about 810 RE tailwards of the Earth. This location is largely independent from the localization of the perturbation. The second part of the paper deals with the problem of the macroscopic non-ideal consequences of microscopic fluctuations. A new model is presented that allows the quantitative calculation of macroscopic non-idealness without considering details of microscopic instabilities or turbulence. This model is only based on the assumption of a strongly fluctuating, mixing dynamics on microscopic scales in phase space. The result of this approach is an expression for anomalous non-idealness formally similar to the Krook resistivity but now describing the macroscopic consequences of collective microscopic fluctuations, not of collisions.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma sheet · Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory; magnetic reconnection

  8. DoE Plasma Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Self-Organization in Plasmas: Non-linear Emergent Structure Formation in magnetized Plasmas and Rotating Magnetofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forest, Cary B. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-11-10

    This report covers the UW-Madison activities that took place within a larger DoE Center Administered and directed by Professor George Tynan at the University of California, San Diego. The work at Wisconsin will also be covered in the final reporting for the entire center, which will be submitted by UCSD. There were two main activities, one experimental and one that was theoretical in nature, as part of the Center activities at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. First, the Center supported an experimentally focused postdoc (Chris Cooper) to carry out fundamental studies of momentum transport in rotating and weakly magnetized plasma. His experimental work was done on the Plasma Couette Experiment, a cylindrical plasma confinement device, with a plasma flow created through electromagnetically stirring plasma at the plasma edge facilitated by arrays of permanent magnets. Cooper's work involved developing optical techniques to measure the ion temperature and plasma flow through Doppler-shifted line radiation from the plasma argon ions. This included passive emission measurements and development of a novel ring summing Fabry-Perot spectroscopy system, and the active system involved using a diode laser to induce fluorescence. On the theoretical side, CMTFO supported a postdoc (Johannes Pueschel) to carry out a gyrokinetic extension of residual zonal flow theory to the case with magnetic fluctuations, showing that magnetic stochasticity disrupts zonal flows. The work included a successful comparison with gyrokinetic simulations. This work and its connection to the broader CMTFO will be covered more thoroughly in the final CMTFO report from Professor Tynan.

  9. MSTS - Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator theory manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.D.; Nichols, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, through the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, has designated the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada for detailed study as the candidate US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Site characterization will determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential waste repository. If the site is determined suitable, subsequent studies and characterization will be conducted to obtain authorization from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct the potential waste repository. A principal component of the characterization and licensing processes involves numerically predicting the thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment of the Yucca Mountain site to the potential repository over a 10,000-year period. The thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment to the repository is anticipated to include complex processes of countercurrent vapor and liquid migration, multiple-phase heat transfer, multiple-phase transport, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulators based on mathematical descriptions of these subsurface phenomena are required to make numerical predictions of the thermal and hydrologic response of the Yucca Mountain subsurface environment The engineering simulator called the Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator (MSTS) was developed at the request of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office to produce numerical predictions of subsurface flow and transport phenomena at the potential Yucca Mountain site. This document delineates the design architecture and describes the specific computational algorithms that compose MSTS. Details for using MSTS and sample problems are given in the {open_quotes}User`s Guide and Reference{close_quotes} companion document.

  10. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, A.; Palade, D. I.; Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the \\boldsymbol{E}× \\boldsymbol{B} diffusion of fusion born α particles in tokamak plasmas. We determine the transport regimes for a realistic model that has the characteristics of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) or of the trapped electron mode (TEM) driven turbulence. It includes a spectrum of potential fluctuations that is modeled using the results of the numerical simulations, the drift of the potential with the effective diamagnetic velocity and the parallel motion. Our semi-analytical statistical approach is based on the decorrelation trajectory method (DTM), which is adapted to the gyrokinetic approximation. We obtain the transport coefficients as a function of the parameters of the turbulence and of the energy of the α particles. According to our results, significant turbulent transport of the α particles can appear only at energies of the order of 100 KeV. We determine the corresponding conditions.

  11. The plasma membrane transport systems and adaptation to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Mohamed Magdy F

    2014-11-15

    Salt stress represents one of the environmental challenges that drastically affect plant growth and yield. Evidence suggests that glycophytes and halophytes have a salt tolerance mechanisms working at the cellular level, and the plasma membrane (PM) is believed to be one facet of the cellular mechanisms. The responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in contrasting species/cultivars were discussed. The review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent advances describing the crucial roles that the PM transport systems have in plant adaptation to salt. Several lines of evidence were presented to demonstrate the correlation between the PM transport proteins and adaptation of plants to high salinity. How alterations in these transport systems of the PM allow plants to cope with the salt stress was also addressed. Although inconsistencies exist in some of the information related to the responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in different species/cultivars, their key roles in adaptation of plants to high salinity is obvious and evident, and cannot be precluded. Despite the promising results, detailed investigations at the cellular/molecular level are needed in some issues of the PM transport systems in response to salinity to further evaluate their implication in salt tolerance.

  12. Non-LTE Radiation Transport in High Radiation Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, H A

    2005-01-07

    A primary goal of numerical radiation transport is obtaining a self-consistent solution for both the radiation field and plasma properties. Obtaining such a solution requires consideration of the coupling between the radiation and the plasma. The different characteristics of this coupling for continuum and line radiation have resulted in two separate sub-disciplines of radiation transport with distinct emphases and computational techniques. LTE radiation transfer focuses on energy transport and exchange through broadband radiation, primarily affecting temperature and ionization balance. Non-LTE line transfer focuses on narrowband radiation and the response of individual level populations, primarily affecting spectral properties. Many high energy density applications, particularly those with high-Z materials, incorporate characteristics of both these regimes. Applications with large radiation fields including strong line components require a non-LTE broadband treatment of energy transport and exchange. We discuss these issues and present a radiation transport treatment which combines features of both types of approaches by explicitly incorporating the dependence of material properties on both temperature and radiation fields. The additional terms generated by the radiation dependence do not change the character of the system of equations and can easily be added to a numerical transport implementation. A numerical example from a Z-pinch application demonstrates that this method improves both the stability and convergence of the calculations. The information needed to characterize the material response to radiation is closely related to that used by the Linear Response Matrix (LRM) approach to near-LTE simulation, and we investigate the use of the LRM for these calculations.

  13. Hydrodynamic theory of diffusion in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Detailed numerical simulations of multicomponent plasmas require tractable expressions for species diffusion fluxes, which must be consistent with the given plasma current density J{sub q} to preserve local charge neutrality. The common situation in which J{sub q} = 0 is referred to as ambipolar diffusion. The use of formal kinetic theory in this context leads to results of formidable complexity. We derive simple tractable approximations for the diffusion fluxes in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas by means of a generalization of the hydrodynamical approach used by Maxwell, Stefan, Furry, and Williams. The resulting diffusion fluxes obey generalized Stefan-Maxwell equations that contain driving forces corresponding to ordinary, forced, pressure, and thermal diffusion. The ordinary diffusion fluxes are driven by gradients in pressure fractions rather than mole fractions. Simplifications due to the small electron mass are systematically exploited and lead to a general expression for the ambipolar electric field in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity. We present a self-consistent effective binary diffusion approximation for the diffusion fluxes. This approximation is well suited to numerical implementation and is currently in use in our LAVA computer code for simulating multicomponent thermal plasmas. Applications to date include a successful simulation of demixing effects in an argon-helium plasma jet, for which selected computational results are presented. Generalizations of the diffusion theory to finite electrical conductivity and nonzero magnetic field are currently in progress.

  14. Magnetic Yang-Mills Theory of the Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, M

    2009-01-01

    We propose magnetic SU(N) pure gauge theory as an effective field theory describing the long distance nonperturbative magnetic response of the deconfined phase of Yang-Mills theory. The magnetic non-Abelian Lagrangian, unlike that of electrodynamics where there is exact electromagnetic duality, is not known explicitly, but here we regard the magnetic SU(N) Yang-Mills Lagrangian as the leading term in the long distance effective gauge theory of the plasma phase. In this treatment, which is applicable for a range of temperatures in the interval T_c < T < 3 T_c accessible in heavy ion experiments, formation of the magnetic energy profile around a spatial Wilson loop in the deconfined phase parallels the formation of an electric flux tube in the confined phase. We use the effective theory to calculate spatial Wilson loops and the magnetic charge density induced in the plasma by the corresponding color electric current loops. These calculations suggest that the deconfined phase of Yang-Mills theory has the p...

  15. Theory of self-sustained turbulence in confined plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1996-02-01

    This article overviews some aspect of the recent theoretical activities in Japan on the problem of turbulent transport in confined plasmas. The method of self-sustained turbulence is discussed. The process of the renormalization is shown and the turbulent Prandtl number is introduced. Nonlinear destabilization by the electron momentum diffusion is explained. The nonlinear eigenmode equation is derived for the dressed-test-mode for the inhomogeneous plasma in the shear magnetic field. The eigenvalue equation is solved, and the least stable mode determines the anomalous transport coefficient. Formula of thermal conductivity is presented for the system of bad average magnetic curvature (current diffusive interchange mode (CDIM) turbulence) and that for the average good magnetic curvature (current diffusive ballooning mode (CDBM) turbulence). The transport coefficient, scale length of fluctuations and fluctuation level are shown to be the increasing function of the pressure gradient. Verification by use of the nonlinear simulation is shown. The bifurcation of the electric field and improved confinement is addressed, in order to explain the H-mode physics. Improved confinement and the dynamics such as ELMs are explained. Application to the transport analysis of tokamaks is also presented, including the explanations of the L-mode confinement, internal transport barrier as well as the role of current profile control. (author). 102 refs.

  16. Hybrid Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Fast Electron Transport in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B I; Kemp, A; Divol, L

    2009-05-27

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogenous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  17. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Cicogna

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-invariant solutions, and the symmetry classification of a nonlinear PDE.

  18. Kappa distributions: theory and applications in space plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Pierrard, V

    2010-01-01

    Particle velocity distribution functions (VDF) in space plasmas often show non Maxwellian suprathermal tails decreasing as a power law of the velocity. Such distributions are well fitted by the so-called Kappa distribution. The presence of such distributions in different space plasmas suggests a universal mechanism for the creation of such suprathermal tails. Different theories have been proposed and are recalled in this review paper. The suprathermal particles have important consequences concerning the acceleration and the temperature that are well evidenced by the kinetic approach where no closure requires the distributions to be nearly Maxwellians. Moreover, the presence of the suprathermal particles take an important role in the wave-particle interactions.

  19. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  20. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-15

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  1. Perturbative momentum transport in MAST L-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenfelder, W.; Field, A. R.; Lupelli, I.; Tala, T.; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.; Solomon, W. M.

    2017-05-01

    Non-axisymmetric magnetic fields are used to perturbatively probe momentum transport physics in MAST L-mode plasmas. The low beta L-mode target was chosen to complement previous experiments conducted in high beta NSTX H-mode plasmas (β N  =  3.5-4.6) where an inward momentum pinch was measured. In those cases quasi-linear gyrokinetic simulations of unstable ballooning micro-instabilities predict weak or outward momentum convection, in contrast to the measurements. The weak pinch was predicted to be due to both electromagnetic effects at high beta and low aspect ratio minimizing the symmetry-breaking of the instabilities responsible for momentum transport. In an attempt to lessen these electromagnetic effects at low aspect ratio, perturbative experiments were run in MAST L-mode discharges at lower beta (β N  =  2). The perturbative transport analysis used the time-dependent response following the termination of applied 3D fields that briefly brake the plasma rotation (similar to the NSTX H-mode experiments). Assuming time-invariant diffusive (χ φ ) and convective (V φ ) transport coefficients, an inward pinch is inferred with magnitudes, (RV φ /χ φ )  =  (-1)-(-9), similar to those found in NSTX H-modes and in conventional tokamaks. However, if experimental uncertainties due to non-stationary conditions during and after the applied 3D field are considered, a weak pinch or even outward convection is inferred, (RV φ /χ φ )  =  (-1)-(+5). Linear gyrokinetic simulations indicate that for these lower beta L-modes, the predicted momentum pinch is predicted to be relatively small, (RV φ /χ φ )sim  ≈  -1. While this falls within the experimentally inferred range, the uncertainties are practically too large to quantitatively validate the predictions. Challenges and implications for this particular experimental technique are discussed, as well as additional possible physical mechanisms that may be important in

  2. Neutron transport with anisotropic scattering: theory and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Eynde, Gert

    2005-01-01

    This thesis is a blend of neutron transport theory and numerical analysis. We start with the study of the problem of the Mika/Case eigenexpansion used in the solution process of the homogeneous one-speed Boltzmann neutron transport equation with anisotropic scattering for plane symmetry. The anisotropic scattering is expressed as a finite Legendre series in which the coefficients are the ``scattering coefficients'. This eigenexpansion consists of a discrete spectrum of eigenvalues with its co...

  3. Transport theory for a two-flavor color superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F; Litim, Daniel F.; Manuel, Cristina

    2001-01-01

    QCD with two light quark flavors at high baryonic density and low temperature is a color superconductor. The diquark condensate partially breaks the SU(3) gauge symmetry down to an SU(2) subgroup. We study thermal fluctuations of the superconductor for temperatures below the gap. These are described by a simple transport equation, linked to a quasiparticle behavior of the thermal excitations of the condensate. When solved in the collisionless limit and close to equilibrium, it gives rise to the ``hard superconducting loop'' (HSL) effective theory for the unbroken SU(2) gauge fields with momenta much smaller than the gap. This theory describes Debye screening and Landau damping of the gauge fields in the presence of the diquark condensate. We also explain how our effective theory follows to one-loop order from quantum field theory. Our approach provides a convenient starting point for the computation of transport coefficients of the two-flavor color superconductor.

  4. Density Functional Theory with Dissipation: Transport through Single Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieron Burke

    2012-04-30

    A huge amount of fundamental research was performed on this grant. Most of it focussed on fundamental issues of electronic structure calculations of transport through single molecules, using density functional theory. Achievements were: (1) First density functional theory with dissipation; (2) Pseudopotential plane wave calculations with master equation; (3) Weak bias limit; (4) Long-chain conductance; and (5) Self-interaction effects in tunneling.

  5. Modeling of negative ion transport in a plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riz, David; Paméla, Jérôme

    1998-08-01

    A code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ion transport in a plasma source, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The ion trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3-D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collision H-/H+ and of charge exchange H-/H0 are handled at each time step by a Monte-Carlo procedure. This code can be used to calculate the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at any location inside the source. Calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have allowed to explain, either quantitatively or qualitatively, several phenomena observed in negative ion sources, such as the isotopic H-/D- effect, and the influence of the plasma grid bias or of the magnetic filter on the negative ion extraction. The code has also shown that in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, which operate at large arc power densities (>1 W cm-3), negative ions can reach the extraction region provided if they are produced at a distance lower than 2 cm from the plasma grid in the case of «volume production» (dissociative attachment processes), or if they are produced at the plasma grid surface, in the vicinity of the extraction holes.

  6. Modeling of negative ion transport in a plasma source (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riz, David; Paméla, Jérôme

    1998-02-01

    A code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ion transport in a plasma source, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The H-/D- trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collision with H+/D+ and of charge exchange with H0/D0 are handled at each time step by a Monte Carlo procedure. This code can be used to calculate the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at any location inside the source. Calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have been allowed to explain, either quantitatively or qualitatively, several phenomena observed in negative ion sources, such as the isotopic H-/D- effect, and the influence of the plasma grid bias or of the magnetic filter on the negative ion extraction. The code has also shown that, in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, which operate at large arc power densities (>1 W cm-3), negative ions can reach the extraction region provided they are produced at a distance lower than 2 cm from the plasma grid in the case of volume production (dissociative attachment processes), or if they are produced at the plasma grid surface, in the vicinity of the extraction holes.

  7. Resonance broadening modification of weak plasma turbulence theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanssen, A. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Aeronomie, Katlenburg-Lindau (West Germany))

    1991-02-01

    The author examines the effects on energy spectra of weak Langmuir turbulence when he includes a nonlinear damping due to the perturbation of electron orbits. The physical mechanism under consideration is usually known as a resonance broadening effect. The calculations show that the inclusion of this additional damping reduces the number of cascades predicted from weak turbulence theory for waves detectable with the EISCAT UHF (933 MHz) radar in Tromso, Norway, during RF modification of the ionospheric plasma.

  8. Plant Phosphoproteomics: Analysis of Plasma Membrane Transporters by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Juanying; Rudashevskaya, Elena; Young, Clifford

    important physiological functions, such as stomata aperture, cell elongation, or cellular pH regulation. It is known that the activity of plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase is regulated by phosphorylation. Therefore, we first investigated the phosphorylation profile of plant H+-ATPase by enriching...... the phosphopeptides with optimized TiO2 and IMAC enrichment methods prior to MS analysis. We further investigated the global phosphorylation profile of the whole plant plasma membrane proteins using the combination of our recently established phosphopeptide enrichment method, Calcium phosphate precipitation......  Phosphorylation is a key regulatory factor in all aspects of eukaryotic biology including the regulation of plant membrane-bound transport proteins. To date, mass spectrometry (MS) has been introduced as powerful technology for study of post translational modifications (PTMs), including protein...

  9. Particle model for nonlocal heat transport in fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufferand, H; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Lepri, S; Livi, R

    2013-02-01

    We present a simple stochastic, one-dimensional model for heat transfer in weakly collisional media as fusion plasmas. Energies of plasma particles are treated as lattice random variables interacting with a rate inversely proportional to their energy schematizing a screened Coulomb interaction. We consider both the equilibrium (microcanonical) and nonequilibrium case in which the system is in contact with heat baths at different temperatures. The model exhibits a characteristic length of thermalization that can be associated with an interaction mean free path and one observes a transition from ballistic to diffusive regime depending on the average energy of the system. A mean-field expression for heat flux is deduced from system heat transport properties. Finally, it is shown that the nonequilibrium steady state is characterized by long-range correlations.

  10. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Liang; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N. [Center for Plasma-Materials Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Yu, He [Center for Plasma-Materials Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2014-06-14

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (n{sub e}) and temperature (T{sub e}) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high n{sub e} peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, n{sub e} increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped n{sub e} and T{sub e} data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (V{sub p}) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower T{sub e} and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  11. Calculation of a plasma HgDyI{sub 3} transport coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajji, S.; HadjSalah, S.; Benhalima, A.; Charrada, K. [IPEIM, Unité d' Etude des Milieux Ionisés et Réactifs, 5019 route de Kairouan Monastir (Tunisia); Zissis, G. [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Énergie, 118 rte Narbonne, Bât3R2, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2015-05-15

    This work is devoted to the calculation of the chemical composition and transport coefficients of HgDyI{sub 3} plasmas in thermal equilibrium. These calculations are performed for pressures equal to 2MP and for temperatures varying from 1000 to 10 000 K. The thermal and electrical conductivity as well as viscosity have been computed as a function of temperature at different atomic ratios. The computational method proposed by Devoto from the classical formalism described by Hirschfelder et al. [Molecular Theory of Gases and Liquids (John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1954)] is used.

  12. Nonlocally of plasma fluctuations and transport in magnetically confined plasmas theoretical background of nonlocality in fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    2002-09-01

    Nonlocal properties of fluctuations in confined plasmas are briefly surveyed. Contributions to understanding the bifurcation phenomena, improved confinement, and transient transport problem are explained. The theoretical progress in this aspect is addressed: Namely, the fluctuations are not excited by linear instabilities but are dressed with other turbulent fluctuations or fluctuations of meso-scale. Nonlinear interactions of fluctuations with different scale lengths are essential in dictating the dynamics of turbulence and turbulent transport. There are activators and suppressers in global inhomogeneities for evolution of turbulence. Turbulent fluctuations, on the other hand, induce or destroy these global inhomogeneities. Finally, statistical nature of turbulence is addressed. (author)

  13. Transport of electron-hole plasma in germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, S. J.; Wolfe, J. P.

    1986-08-01

    Time-resolved luminescence imaging techniques are used to observe the spectral and spatial evolution of laser-generated electron-hole plasma in Ge. Both pulsed and cw excitation conditions are examined above and below the critical temperature for electron-hole liquid formation, Tc(LG). For Q-switched Nd-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser excitation, the transport behavior is qualitatively similar above and below Tc(LG), although the luminescence spectrum undergoes significant changes in this temperature range. A rapid initial expansion (v~105 cm/s) is followed by a period of slower growth which gradually reduces as the carriers recombine. The initial velocity for pulsed excitation increases monotonically as the crystal temperature is lowered and saturates near the phonon sound velocity for high-energy excitation. These observations are consistent with phonon-wind driven transport. For intense Q-switched excitation, the motion is characterized by three regimes: (1) During the laser pulse the plasma expands as a large drop with near-unity filling fraction. (2) Expansion at near-sonic velocity continues after the peak of the laser pulse due to a ``prompt'' pulse of ballistic phonons produced by the carrier thermalization process. (3) After this intense phonon wind passes the carrier distribution, the expansion velocity abruptly decreases, but the plasma continues to expand more slowly under the influence of a ``hot spot'' produced at the excitation point. The sound barrier observed on these time scales (>=30 ns) can be explained in terms of nonlinear damping of the plasma motion near the sound velocity. For cw excitation, the expansion is observed to occur at much lower velocities (v~104 cm/s). These expansion rates are much too low to require the inclusion of a drifted Fermi distribution in the spectral analysis as has been previously suggested. Instead, based upon a careful study of corresponding spectral data, an alternative explanation for these spectra is

  14. Local Transport Barrier Formation and Relaxation in Reversed Shear Plasmas on TFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synakowski, E. J.

    1996-11-01

    Central to discussions of transport barrier formation and sustainment in the plasma core or edge is E× B shear stabilization of plasma turbulence. It has also been suggested that the low core current densities in TFTR reversed shear plasmas yield large gradients in the Shafranov shift that in themselves stabilize the dominant modes in the core of these plasmas without the benefit of E× B shear. (M. Beer, invited presentation, this meeting) Examined here are the possibilities that one, both, or neither mechanism is responsible for the improved core confinement of TFTR Enhanced Reversed Shear (ERS) plasmas. The difficulty in separating the influence of both effects centers in part on the fact that large Shafranov shifts are accompanied by large pressure gradients, implying that shift-induced stabilization will always be favorable when pressure-gradient-driven E× B shear is expected to be large. The roles of these two mechanisms are separated on TFTR by varying the local radial electric field through changes in the velocity shear induced by different combinations of co- and counter-injection of neutral beams at constant heating power. Co- and counter-injection provide the opportunity of generating V_φ-driven contributions to the E× B shear that add both destructively and constructively to the nabla p-driven term in the radial force balance equation. Significant variations in the E× B shear at and near the transport barrier region can thus be realized, permitting detailed examinations of the response of local transport to changes in the local radial electric field with small variations in the Shafranov shift. The relation between shearing rates, predicted growth rates, and the threshold behavior of local barrier formation and losses in confinement will be discussed. Changes in local fluctuation behavior across the transition into and out of ERS confinement will also be examined for these experiments. The characteristics and power thresholds of barrier formation

  15. Probabilistic transport models for plasma transport in the presence of critical thresholds: Beyond the diffusive paradigma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, R.; van Milligen, B. Ph.; Carreras, B. A.

    2005-05-01

    It is argued that the modeling of plasma transport in tokamaks may benefit greatly from extending the usual local paradigm to accommodate scale-free transport mechanisms. This can be done by combining Lévy distributions and a nonlinear threshold condition within the continuous time random walk concept. The advantages of this nonlocal, nonlinear extension are illustrated by constructing a simple particle density transport model that, as a result of these ideas, spontaneously exhibits much of nondiffusive phenomenology routinely observed in tokamaks. The fluid limit of the system shows that the kind of equations that are appropriate to capture these dynamics are based on fractional differential operators. In them, effective diffusivities and pinch velocities are found that are dynamically set by the system in response to the specific characteristics of the fueling source and external perturbations. This fact suggests some dramatic consequences for the extrapolation of these transport properties to larger size systems.

  16. A quantum transport model for atomic line radiation in plasmas*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Joël

    2017-02-01

    Emission and absorption lines in plasmas are investigated theoretically using a phase space formulation of quantum electrodynamics. A transport equation for the one-photon Wigner function is derived and formulated in terms of the noncommutative Moyal product. This equation reduces to the standard radiative transfer equation at the large spectral band limit, when the characteristic spectral band of the emission and absorption coefficients is larger than the inverse photon absorption length and time. We examine deviations to this limit. An ideal slab geometry is considered. The Wigner function relative to hydrogen Lyman α in stellar atmospheric conditions is calculated.

  17. Transport Bifurcation Induced by Sheared Toroidal Flow in Tokamak Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Highcock, E G; Parra, F I; Schekochihin, A A; Roach, C M; Cowley, S C

    2011-01-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear, where the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence, than one of finite magnetic shear. Where the magnetic shear is zero, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the transient growth of modes driven by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and the parallel velocity gradient (PVG). Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gr...

  18. Modeling of plasma transport and negative ion extraction in a magnetized radio-frequency plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fubiani, G.; Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G.; Kohen, N.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Negative ion sources for fusion are high densities plasma sources in large discharge volumes. There are many challenges in the modeling of these sources, due to numerical constraints associated with the high plasma density, to the coupling between plasma and neutral transport and chemistry, the presence of a magnetic filter, and the extraction of negative ions. In this paper we present recent results concerning these different aspects. Emphasis is put on the modeling approach and on the methods and approximations. The models are not fully predictive and not complete as would be engineering codes but they are used to identify the basic principles and to better understand the physics of the negative ion sources.

  19. Linear kinetic theory and particle transport in stochastic mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomraning, G.C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We consider the formulation of linear transport and kinetic theory describing energy and particle flow in a random mixture of two or more immiscible materials. Following an introduction, we summarize early and fundamental work in this area, and we conclude with a brief discussion of recent results.

  20. Single channel atmospheric pressure transporting plasma and plasma stream demultiplexing: physical characterization and application to E. coli bacteria inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valinataj Omran, A.; Sohbatzadeh, F.; Siadati, S. N.; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, A.; Akishev, Y.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we developed transporting plasma sources that operate at atmospheric pressure. The effect of electrode configuration on plasma transporting was investigated. In order to increase the transporting plasma cross-section, we converted a plasma stream into four plasma channels by a cylindrical housing. Electron excitation and rotational temperatures were estimated using optical emission spectroscopy. Furthermore, the electrical and temporal characteristics of the plasma, discharge power and charge deposition on the target were investigated. The propagation characteristics of single and multi-channel transporting plasma were compared with the same cross-sectional area. Two configurations for multi-channels were designed for this purpose. Escherichia coli bacteria were exposed to the single and multi-channel transporting discharge for different time durations. After exposure, the results indicated that the inactivation zones were significantly increased by a multi-channel transporting plasma. Finally, E. coli inactivation by those plasma apparatuses was compared with that of several standard antimicrobial test discs such as Gentamicin, Tetracycline, Amoxicillin and Cefixime.

  1. Basic Studies of Non-Diffusive Transport in Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, George J. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Maggs, James E. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-10-25

    The project expanded and developed mathematical descriptions, and corresponding numerical modeling, of non-diffusive transport to incorporate new perspectives derived from basic transport experiments performed in the LAPD device at UCLA, and at fusion devices throughout the world. By non-diffusive it is meant that the transport of fundamental macroscopic parameters of a system, such as temperature and density, does not follow the standard diffusive behavior predicted by a classical Fokker-Planck equation. The appearance of non-diffusive behavior is often related to underlying microscopic processes that cause the value of a system parameter, at one spatial position, to be linked to distant events, i.e., non-locality. In the LAPD experiments the underlying process was traced to large amplitude, coherent drift-waves that give rise to chaotic trajectories. Significant advances were made in this project. The results have lead to a new perspective about the fundamentals of edge transport in magnetically confined plasmas; the insight has important consequences for worldwide studies in fusion devices. Progress was also made in advancing the mathematical techniques used to describe fractional diffusion.

  2. Momentum dissipation and effective theories of coherent and incoherent transport

    CERN Document Server

    Davison, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    We study heat transport in two systems without momentum conservation: a hydrodynamic system, and a holographic system with spatially dependent, massless scalar fields. When momentum dissipates slowly, there is a well-defined, coherent collective excitation in the AC heat conductivity, and a crossover between sound-like and diffusive transport at small and large distance scales. When momentum dissipates quickly, there is no such excitation in the incoherent AC heat conductivity, and diffusion dominates at all distance scales. For a critical value of the momentum dissipation rate, we compute exact expressions for the Green's functions of our holographic system due to an emergent gravitational self-duality, similar to electric/magnetic duality, and SL(2,R) symmetries. We extend the coherent/incoherent classification to examples of charge transport in other holographic systems: probe brane theories and neutral theories with non-Maxwell actions.

  3. Plasma membrane microdomains regulate turnover of transport proteins in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Guido; Malinsky, Jan; Stahlschmidt, Wiebke; Loibl, Martin; Weig-Meckl, Ina; Frommer, Wolf B.; Opekarová, Miroslava; Tanner, Widmar

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate whether the stable segregation of proteins and lipids within the yeast plasma membrane serves a particular biological function. We show that 21 proteins cluster within or associate with the ergosterol-rich membrane compartment of Can1 (MCC). However, proteins of the endocytic machinery are excluded from MCC. In a screen, we identified 28 genes affecting MCC appearance and found that genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and vesicle transport are significantly overrepresented. Deletion of Pil1, a component of eisosomes, or of Nce102, an integral membrane protein of MCC, results in the dissipation of all MCC markers. These deletion mutants also show accelerated endocytosis of MCC-resident permeases Can1 and Fur4. Our data suggest that release from MCC makes these proteins accessible to the endocytic machinery. Addition of arginine to wild-type cells leads to a similar redistribution and increased turnover of Can1. Thus, MCC represents a protective area within the plasma membrane to control turnover of transport proteins. PMID:19064668

  4. Momentum transport in strongly coupled anisotropic plasmas in the presence of strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Finazzo, Stefano Ivo; Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We present a holographic perspective on momentum transport in strongly coupled, anisotropic non-Abelian plasmas in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We compute the anisotropic heavy quark drag forces and Langevin diffusion coefficients and also the anisotropic shear viscosities for two different holographic models, namely, a top-down deformation of strongly coupled $\\mathcal{N} = 4$ Super-Yang-Mills (SYM) theory triggered by an external Abelian magnetic field, and a bottom-up Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton (EMD) model which is able to provide a quantitative description of lattice QCD thermodynamics with $(2+1)$-flavors at both zero and nonzero magnetic fields. We find that, in general, energy loss and momentum diffusion through strongly coupled anisotropic plasmas are enhanced by a magnetic field being larger in transverse directions than in the direction parallel to the magnetic field. Moreover, the anisotropic shear viscosity coefficient is smaller in the direction of the magnetic field than in the plane pe...

  5. Quasilinear Carbon Transport In An Impurity Hole Plasma In LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, David R. [PPPL; Tanaka, K. [NIFS; Nunami, M. [NIFS; Watanabe, T-H. [Nagoya University; Sugama, H. [NIFS; Yoshinuma, M. [NIFS; Suzuki, Y. [NIFS; Goto, M. [NIFS; Morita, S. [NIFS; Wieland, B. [NIFS; Yamada, I. [NIFS; Yashura, R. [NIFS; Akiyama, T. [NIFS; Pablant, Novimir A. [PPPL

    2014-04-01

    Comprehensive electrostatic gyrokinetic linear stability calculations for ion-scale microinstabilities in an LHD plasma with an ion-ITB and carbon "impurity hole" are used to make quasilinear estimates of particle flux to explore whether microturbulence can explain the observed outward carbon fluxes that flow "up" the impurity density gradient. The ion temperature is not stationary in the ion-ITB phase of the simulated discharge, during which the core carbon density decreases continuously. To fully sample these varying conditions the calculations are carried out at three radial locations and four times. The plasma parameter inputs are based on experimentally measured profiles of electron and ion temperature, as well as electron and carbon density. The spectroscopic line-average ratio of hydrogen and helium densities is used to set the density of these species. Three ion species (H,He,C) and the electrons are treated kinetically, including collisions. Electron instability drive does enhance the growth rate significantly, but the most unstable modes have characteristics of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in all cases. As the carbon density gradient is scanned between the measured value and zero, the quasilinear carbon flux is invariably inward when the carbon density profile is hollow, so turbulent transport due to the instabilities considered here does not explain the observed outward flux of impurities in impurity hole plasmas. The stiffness of the quasilinear ion heat flux is found to be 1.7-2.3, which is lower than several estimates in tokamaks.

  6. The Mochi project: a field theory approach to plasma dynamics and self-organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Setthivoine; von der Linden, Jens; Lavine, Eric Sander; Card, Alexander; Carroll, Evan

    2016-10-01

    The Mochi project is designed to study the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields from the point-of-view of canonical flux tubes. The Mochi Labjet experiment is being commissioned after achieving first plasma. Analytical and numerical tools are being developed to visualize canonical flux tubes. One analytical tool described here is a field theory approach to plasma dynamics and self-organization. A redefinition of the Lagrangian of a multi-particle system in fields reformulates the single-particle, kinetic, and fluid equations governing fluid and plasma dynamics as a single set of generalized Maxwell's equations and Ohm's law for canonical force-fields. The Lagrangian includes new terms representing the coupling between the motion of particle distributions, between distributions and electromagnetic fields, with relativistic contributions. The formulation shows that the concepts of self-organization and canonical helicity transport are applicable across single-particle, kinetic, and fluid regimes, at classical and relativistic scales. The theory gives the basis for comparing canonical helicity change to energy change in general systems. This work is supported by by US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  7. Theory of quantum transport at nanoscale an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ryndyk, Dmitry A

    2016-01-01

    This book is an introduction to a rapidly developing field of modern theoretical physics – the theory of quantum transport at nanoscale. The theoretical methods considered in the book are in the basis of our understanding of charge, spin and heat transport in nanostructures and nanostructured materials and are widely used in nanoelectronics, molecular electronics, spin-dependent electronics (spintronics) and bio-electronics. The book is based on lectures for graduate and post-graduate students at the University of Regensburg and the Technische Universität Dresden (TU Dresden). The first part is devoted to the basic concepts of quantum transport: Landauer-Büttiker method and matrix Green function formalism for coherent transport, Tunneling (Transfer) Hamiltonian and master equation methods for tunneling, Coulomb blockade, vibrons and polarons. The results in this part are obtained as possible without sophisticated techniques, such as nonequilibrium Green functions, which are considered in detail in the...

  8. Relativistic warm plasma theory of nonlinear laser-driven electron plasma waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E

    2010-05-01

    A relativistic, warm fluid model of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed and applied to examine nonlinear Langmuir waves excited by relativistically intense, short-pulse lasers. Closure of the covariant fluid theory is obtained via an asymptotic expansion assuming a nonrelativistic plasma temperature. The momentum spread is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field and shown to be intrinsically anisotropic. Coupling between the transverse and longitudinal momentum variances is enabled by the laser field. A generalized dispersion relation is derived for Langmuir waves in a thermal plasma in the presence of an intense laser field. Including thermal fluctuations in three-velocity-space dimensions, the properties of the nonlinear electron plasma wave, such as the plasma temperature evolution and nonlinear wavelength, are examined and the maximum amplitude of the nonlinear oscillation is derived. The presence of a relativistically intense laser pulse is shown to strongly influence the maximum plasma wave amplitude for nonrelativistic phase velocities owing to the coupling between the longitudinal and transverse momentum variances.

  9. Progress in theory of instabilities in a rotating plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Lominadze, J. G.; Churikov, A. P.; Pustovitov, V. D.

    2009-04-01

    A review is given of the basic results of modern theory of instabilities in a rotating plasma. Both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations are considered. Main attention is given to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), discovered earlier by Velikhov, and the rotational-convective instability (RCI) discussed in a number of papers of astrophysical trend. For qualitative explanation of the results, a local approach is used which, with equilibrium plasma pressure gradient and/or nonsymmetry of perturbations, requires operation with nonlocal azimuthal perturbed magnetic field. The gravity and effects of pressure anisotropy are taken into account. In addition to hydrodynamic, the electrodynamic approach is formulated. The drift effects are considered. Analyzed are the ideal instabilities and those depending on the dissipative effects: viscosity and heat conductivity. The MRI is considered at presence of the charged dust particles. Besides the local approach, the nonlocal approach is formulated for the plasma model with a steplike profile of angular rotation frequency. Alongside with perturbations which frequencies are small compared to the ion cyclotron frequency, the perturbations are analyzed with frequencies larger than the ion cyclotron frequency. The latter corresponds to the Hall regime and subregime of nonmagnetized plasma.

  10. Vectorial transport processes in a magnetized and non-magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    García-Colin, L S; Sandoval-Villalbazo, A

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that magnetic fields affect heat conduction in a different way in the direction parallel and perpendicular to the field. In this paper we present a formal derivation of this phenomenon and an analytical expression for the transport coefficients based in the Boltzmann equation. Moreover, the Dufour effect or thermo diffusion is usually ignored in plasma transport theory. This effect is here shown to be not only relevant but also the most important source of heat conduction for weak magnetic fields. In this work we formally derive analytic expressions for the parallel and perpendicular thermal conductivities as well as the coefficients for the thermal diffusion cross-effect. We show how the heat conduction in the perpendicular direction decreases with increasing magnetic fields and how in both directions thermal diffusion is far more important than thermal conduction, leading to a new effective thermal conductiviy coefficient. Other aspects of this work are also emphasized.

  11. Intracellular transport mechanisms: a critique of diffusion theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Malone, P C; Wheatley, D N

    1995-09-21

    It is argued that Brownian motion makes a less significant contribution to the movements of molecules and particles inside cells than is commonly believed, and that the numbers of similar molecules and particles within any near-homogeneous subcompartment of the cell internum are insufficient to justify the statistical assumptions implicit in the derivation of the diffusion equation. For these reasons, it is contended that, contrary to accepted opinion, diffusion theory cannot provide an explanation for intracellular transport at the molecular level. Although attempts have been made to adapt diffusion theory to complex media, the conclusion is that none satisfactorily overcomes the problem of applying the theory to cell biology. However, the heuristic influence of the theory on cellular biophysics and physiology is noted, and possible alternative frameworks for interpreting the valuable experimental data obtained from such studies are outlined.

  12. Recent progresses in relativistic beam-plasma instability theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bret

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Beam-plasma instabilities are a key physical process in many astrophysical phenomena. Within the fireball model of Gamma ray bursts, they first mediate a relativistic collisionless shock before they produce upstream the turbulence needed for the Fermi acceleration process. While non-relativistic systems are usually governed by flow-aligned unstable modes, relativistic ones are likely to be dominated by normally or even obliquely propagating waves. After reviewing the basis of the theory, results related to the relativistic kinetic regime of the poorly-known oblique unstable modes will be presented. Relevant systems besides the well-known electron beam-plasma interaction are presented, and it is shown how the concept of modes hierarchy yields a criterion to assess the proton to electron mass ratio in Particle in cell simulations.

  13. Particle Transport in ECRH Plasmas of the TJ-II; Transporte de Particulas en Plasmas ECRH del TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, V. I.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Estrada, T.; Guasp, J.; Reynolds, J. M.; Velasco, J. L.; Herranz, J.

    2007-07-01

    We present a systematic study of particle transport in ECRH plasmas of TJ-II with different densities. The goal is to fi nd particle confinement time and electron diffusivity dependence with line-averaged density. The experimental information consists of electron temperature profiles, T{sub e} (Thomson Scattering TS) and electron density, n{sub e}, (TS and reflectometry) and measured puffing data in stationary discharges. The profile of the electron source, Se, was obtained by the 3D Monte-Carlo code EIRENE. The analysis of particle balance has been done by linking the results of the code EIRENE with the results of a model that reproduces ECRH plasmas in stationary conditions. In the range of densities studied (0.58 {<=}n{sub e}> (10{sup 1}9m{sup -}3) {<=}0.80) there are two regions of confinement separated by a threshold density, {approx}0.65 10{sup 1}9m{sup -}3. Below this threshold density the particle confinement time is low, and vice versa. This is reflected in the effective diffusivity, D{sub e}, which in the range of validity of this study, 0.5 <{rho}<0.9 being {rho} normalized plasma radius, decreased significantly above the threshold density. The profiles of D{sub e} are flat for {>=}0,63(10{sup 1}9m{sup -}3). (Author) 35 refs.

  14. Plasma transport in stochastic magnetic fields. I. General considerations and test particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krommes, J.A.; Kleva, R.G.; Oberman, C.

    1978-05-01

    A systematic theory is developed for the computation of electron transport in stochastic magnetic fields. Small scale magnetic perturbations arising, for example, from finite-..beta.. micro-instabilities are assumed to destroy the flux surfaces of a standard tokamak equilibrium. Because the magnetic lines then wander in a volume, electron radial flux is enhanced due to the rapid particle transport along as well as across the lines. By treating the magnetic lines as random variables, it is possible to develop a kinetic equation for the electron distribution function. This is solved approximately to yield the diffusion coefficient.

  15. Quark-gluon plasma and topological quantum field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, M. J.

    2017-03-01

    Based on an analogy with topologically ordered new state of matter in condensed matter systems, we propose a low energy effective field theory for a parity conserving liquid-like quark-gluon plasma (QGP) around critical temperature in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) system. It shows that below a QCD gap which is expected several times of the critical temperature, the QGP behaves like topological fluid. Many exotic phenomena of QGP near the critical temperature discovered at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collision (RHIC) are more readily understood by the suggestion that QGP is a topologically ordered state.

  16. Scaling Theory for Percolative Charge Transport in Disordered Molecular Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottaar, J.; Koster, L. J. A.; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P. A.

    2011-09-01

    We present a scaling theory for charge transport in disordered molecular semiconductors that extends percolation theory by including bonds with conductances close to the percolating one in the random-resistor network representing charge hopping. A general and compact expression is given for the charge mobility for Miller-Abrahams and Marcus hopping on different lattices with Gaussian energy disorder, with parameters determined from numerically exact results. The charge-concentration dependence is universal. The model-specific temperature dependence can be used to distinguish between the hopping models.

  17. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  18. Simulation study of scalings in scrape-off layer plasma by two-dimensional transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Ueda, Noriaki; Itoh, Kimitaka (National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan))

    1990-07-01

    Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma and divertor plasma in Tokamaks were numerically analyzed using a two-dimensional time-dependent transport code (UEDA code). Plasma transport in the SOL and the divertor region was studied for given particle and heat sources from the main plasma. A scaling study of the density, the temperature and their fall-off lengths was carried out for the JFT-2M Tokamak. The results show the inter-relations between the divertor plasma parameters and core plasma confinement. The operational conditions of the core necessary to guarantee the divertor performance are discussed. (author).

  19. Possibility of internal transport barrier formation and electric field bifurcation in LHD plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanuki, H.; Itoh, K.; Yokoyama, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Ida, K.; Toda, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    1999-05-01

    Theoretical analysis of the electric field bifurcation is made for the LHD plasma. For given shapes of plasma profiles, a region of bifurcation is obtained in a space of the plasma parameters. In this region of plasma parameters, the electric field domain interface is predicted to appear in the plasma column. The reduction of turbulent transport is expected to occur in the vicinity of the interface, inducing a internal transport barrier. Within this simple model, the plasma with internal barriers is predicted to be realized for the parameters of T{sub e}(0) {approx} 2 keV and n(0) {approx_equal} 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}. (author)

  20. Finite-frequency counting statistics of electron transport: Markovian theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, D; Aguado, R [Departamento de Teoria y Simulacion de Materiales, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Emary, C; Brandes, T, E-mail: david.marcos@icmm.csic.es [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Hardenbergstrasse 36, TU Berlin, D-10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    We present a theory of frequency-dependent counting statistics of electron transport through nanostructures within the framework of Markovian quantum master equations. Our method allows the calculation of finite-frequency current cumulants of arbitrary order, as we explicitly show for the second- and third-order cumulants. Our formulae generalize previous zero-frequency expressions in the literature and can be viewed as an extension of MacDonald's formula beyond shot noise. When combined with an appropriate treatment of tunneling using, e.g., the Liouvillian perturbation theory in Laplace space, our method can deal with arbitrary bias voltages and frequencies, as we illustrate with the paradigmatic example of transport through a single resonant level model. We discuss various interesting limits, including the recovery of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem near linear response, as well as some drawbacks inherent to the Markovian description arising from the neglect of quantum fluctuations.

  1. Assessment of Plasma Transport and Convection at High Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The high-latitude ionosphere is strongly coupled to the thermosphere and magnetosphere. The magnetospheric coupling occurs via electric fields, field-aligned currents, and particle precipitation. Owing to the interaction of the shocked solar wind with the geomagnetic field, an electric potential difference is generated across the tail of the magnetosphere, with the resulting electric field pointing from dawn to dusk. Energetic particle precipitation from the magnetosphere in the auroral region leads to the creation of ionization and to electron, ion, and neutral gas heating. In order to assess the current understanding of plasma transport and convection at high latitudes, it is necessary to take account of the strong coupling between the ionosphere, thermosphere, and magnetosphere.

  2. Comparison of transport equations based on Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian distributions for anisotropic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    A wide variety of plasma flow conditions is found in aeronomy and space plasma physics. Transport equations based on an isotropic Maxwellian vilecity distribution function can be used to describe plasma flows which contain 'small' temperature anisotropies. However, for plasma flows characterized by large temperature anisotropies, transport equations based on an anisotropic bi-Maxwellian (or two-temperature) velocity distribution function are expected to provide a much better description of the plasma transport properties. The present investigation is concerned with the extent to which transport equations based on both Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian series expansions can describe plasma flows characterized by non-Maxwellian velocity distributions, giving particular attention to a modelling of the anisotropic character of the distribution function. The obtained results should provide clues as to the extent to which a given series expansion can account for the anisotropic character of a plasma.

  3. A quantitative account of electron energy transport in an NSTX plasma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Dave

    2007-11-01

    Anomalous electron transport in magnetized plasmas can be a major obstacle in the way toward practical nuclear fusion power, and it has been an outstanding problem for almost half a century. Here we report the first successful quantitative accounting of the electron thermal conductivity χe in a tokamak experiment due to imperfect magnetic surfaces^1 caused by the microtearing instabilities. The unstable spectrum is calculated with the GS2 code for a well-behaved H-mode plasma in NSTX (R/a=0.85m/0.67m) with 6 MW deuterium neutral beam heating at Ip=0.75 MA, Bt=0.5 T. The application of existing nonlinear theory^2 showed that the unstable modes can produce overlapping resistive layers and stochastic magnetic fields. The calculated χe based on the theory^1 is in good agreement with the values from transport analysis of the experimental data over the entire region (0.4 magnetic shear and an L-mode edge, microtearing modes are found to be stable. The central electron temperature is 50% higher (2 keV vs 1.3 keV) than in the comparison shot with the microtearing instability and the same controlled tokamak parameters like plasma current, density, magnetic field, plasma shape, position and neutral beam heating power. This is a strong indication that this instability may be the dominant mechanism responsible for the electron transport in this type of plasma. Since the microtearing mode is difficult to stabilize with velocity shear, this instability is an important limit^3 on the electron temperature in spherical tokamak configurations where the usual long wavelength instabilities are not present. *This work is carried out in collaboration with Drs. S. Kaye, D. R. Mikkelsen, J. Krommes, K. Hill, R. Bell, and B. LeBlanc. It is supported by USDoE contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03073. ^1A. B. Rechester, M. N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 38 (1978). ^2J. F. Drake et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 44, 994 (1980). ^3M. Kotschenreuther, W. Dorland et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 677 (2000).

  4. Thermal Transport in Crystals as a Kinetic Theory of Relaxons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cepellotti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal conductivity in dielectric crystals is the result of the relaxation of lattice vibrations described by the phonon Boltzmann transport equation. Remarkably, an exact microscopic definition of the heat carriers and their relaxation times is still missing: Phonons, typically regarded as the relevant excitations for thermal transport, cannot be identified as the heat carriers when most scattering events conserve momentum and do not dissipate heat flux. This is the case for two-dimensional or layered materials at room temperature, or three-dimensional crystals at cryogenic temperatures. In this work, we show that the eigenvectors of the scattering matrix in the Boltzmann equation define collective phonon excitations, which are termed here “relaxons”. These excitations have well-defined relaxation times, directly related to heat-flux dissipation, and they provide an exact description of thermal transport as a kinetic theory of the relaxon gas. We show why Matthiessen’s rule is violated, and we construct a procedure for obtaining the mean free paths and relaxation times of the relaxons. These considerations are general and would also apply to other semiclassical transport models, such as the electronic Boltzmann equation. For heat transport, they remain relevant even in conventional crystals like silicon, but they are of the utmost importance in the case of two-dimensional materials, where they can revise, by several orders of magnitude, the relevant time and length scales for thermal transport in the hydrodynamic regime.

  5. Thermal Transport in Crystals as a Kinetic Theory of Relaxons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepellotti, Andrea; Marzari, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    Thermal conductivity in dielectric crystals is the result of the relaxation of lattice vibrations described by the phonon Boltzmann transport equation. Remarkably, an exact microscopic definition of the heat carriers and their relaxation times is still missing: Phonons, typically regarded as the relevant excitations for thermal transport, cannot be identified as the heat carriers when most scattering events conserve momentum and do not dissipate heat flux. This is the case for two-dimensional or layered materials at room temperature, or three-dimensional crystals at cryogenic temperatures. In this work, we show that the eigenvectors of the scattering matrix in the Boltzmann equation define collective phonon excitations, which are termed here "relaxons". These excitations have well-defined relaxation times, directly related to heat-flux dissipation, and they provide an exact description of thermal transport as a kinetic theory of the relaxon gas. We show why Matthiessen's rule is violated, and we construct a procedure for obtaining the mean free paths and relaxation times of the relaxons. These considerations are general and would also apply to other semiclassical transport models, such as the electronic Boltzmann equation. For heat transport, they remain relevant even in conventional crystals like silicon, but they are of the utmost importance in the case of two-dimensional materials, where they can revise, by several orders of magnitude, the relevant time and length scales for thermal transport in the hydrodynamic regime.

  6. Thermodynamic transport theory of spin waves in ferromagnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Vittorio; Ferraro, Elena; Piazzi, Marco

    2016-10-01

    We use the Boltzmann transport theory in the relaxation time approximation to describe the thermal transport of spin waves in a ferromagnet. By treating spin waves as magnon excitations we are able to compute analytically and numerically the coefficients of the constitutive thermomagnetic transport equations. As a main result, we find that the absolute thermomagnetic power coefficient ɛM, relating the gradient of the potential of the magnetization current and the gradient of the temperature, in the limit of low temperature and low field, is a constant ɛM=-0.6419 kB/μB . The theory correctly describes the low-temperature and magnetic-field dependencies of spin Seebeck experiments. Furthermore, the theory predicts that in the limit of very low temperatures the spin Peltier coefficient ΠM, relating the heat and the magnetization currents, tends to a finite value which depends on the amplitude of the magnetic field. This indicates the possibility to exploit the spin Peltier effect as an efficient cooling mechanism in cryogenics.

  7. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Wang, W.; Horton, W.; Klasky, S.; Decyk, V.; Ma, K.-L.; Chames, J.; Adams, M.

    2011-09-21

    The three-year project GPS-TTBP resulted in over 152 publications and 135 presentations. This summary focuses on the scientific progress made by the project team. A major focus of the project was on the physics intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Progress included the first ever flux driven study of net intrinsic spin-up, mediated by boundary effects (in collaboration with CPES), detailed studies of the microphysics origins of the Rice scaling, comparative studies of symmetry breaking mechanisms, a pioneering study of intrinsic torque driven by trapped electron modes, and studies of intrinsic rotation generation as a thermodynamic engine. Validation studies were performed with C-Mod, DIII-D and CSDX. This work resulted in very successful completion of the FY2010 Theory Milestone Activity for OFES, and several prominent papers of the 2008 and 2010 IAEA Conferences. A second major focus was on the relation between zonal flow formation and transport non-locality. This culminated in the discovery of the ExB staircase - a conceptually new phenomenon. This also makes useful interdisciplinary contact with the physics of the PV staircase, well-known in oceans and atmospheres. A third topic where progress was made was in the simulation and theory of turbulence spreading. This work, now well cited, is important for understanding the dynamics of non-locality in turbulent transport. Progress was made in studies of conjectured non-diffusive transport in trapped electron turbulence. Pioneering studies of ITB formation, coupling to intrinsic rotation and hysteresis were completed. These results may be especially significant for future ITER operation. All told, the physics per dollar performance of this project was quite good. The intense focus was beneficial and SciDAC resources were essential to its success.

  8. Hydrodynamic transport in strongly coupled disordered quantum field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We compute direct current (dc) thermoelectric transport coefficients in strongly coupled quantum field theories without long lived quasiparticles, at finite temperature and charge density, and disordered on long wavelengths compared to the length scale of local thermalization. Many previous transport computations in strongly coupled systems are interpretable hydrodynamically, despite formally going beyond the hydrodynamic regime. This includes momentum relaxation times previously derived by the memory matrix formalism, and non-perturbative holographic results; in the latter case, this is subject to some important subtleties. Our formalism may extend some memory matrix computations to higher orders in the perturbative disorder strength, as well as give valuable insight into non-perturbative regimes. Strongly coupled metals with quantum critical contributions to transport generically transition between coherent and incoherent metals as disorder strength is increased at fixed temperature, analogous to mean field...

  9. Comparison of scrape-off layer transport in inner and outer wall limited JET plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, C., E-mail: csilva@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica Lisboa (Portugal); Arnoux, G.; Devaux, S. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Frigione, D. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla fusione, CR Frascati, Roma (Italy); Groth, M. [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Otakaari 4, 02015 Espoo (Finland); Horacek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Lomas, P.J. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Matthews, G. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-07-15

    The JET scrape-off layer has been characterized with a reciprocating probe in inner wall, IW, and outer wall, OW, limited plasmas. Broad SOL profiles are observed for IW limited plasmas with power e-folding length substantially larger (by a factor of ∼5–7.5) than in OW limited plasmas. The properties of the fluctuations in the SOL parameters indicate larger turbulent transport for IW limited plasmas. The striking differences observed between IW and OW limited plasmas on the power e-folding length, parallel flow, turbulent transport as well as the characteristics of the fluctuations support the existence of a poloidally localized region of enhanced radial transport near the outboard midplane. The dependence of the SOL power e-folding length on the main plasma parameters was also investigated for IW limited plasmas and a modest negative dependence on both the plasma current and the line-averaged density found.

  10. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. Some improvements in the theory of plasma relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hameiri, Eliezer, E-mail: hameiri@cims.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Taylor's relaxation theory is extended to plasmas with mass flow by using the cross helicity as a conserved quantity, similar to the magnetic helicity. Indeed, it is shown that the conservation of the cross helicity in magnetohydrodynamics is the result of the conservation of two magnetic-like helicities in two-fluid plasmas. In addition, the usually ignored toroidal flux is also held to be conserved. We also view plasma relaxation as attaining a maximum entropy state rather than Taylor's minimum energy state, but prove that maximizing the entropy subject to a given amount of energy is equivalent to minimizing the energy subject to a given amount of entropy. The resulting relaxed state is similar to the one discussed by Finn and Antonsen [Phys. Fluids 26, 3540 (1983)], and involves flow parallel to the magnetic field and constant temperature, but non-constant pressure. We show how to construct an asymptotic solution to the relaxed state based on the smallness of the Alfven Mach number of the flow.

  12. Simple predictive electron transport models applied to sawtoothing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D.; Merle, A.; Sauter, O.; Goodman, T. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we introduce two simple transport models to evaluate the time evolution of electron temperature and density profiles during sawtooth cycles (i.e. over a sawtooth period time-scale). Since the aim of these simulations is to estimate reliable profiles within a short calculation time, two simplified ad-hoc models have been developed. The goal for these models is to rely on a few easy-to-check free parameters, such as the confinement time scaling factor and the profiles’ averaged scale-lengths. Due to the simplicity and short calculation time of the models, it is expected that these models can also be applied to real-time transport simulations. We show that it works well for Ohmic and EC heated L- and H-mode plasmas. The differences between these models are discussed and we show that their predictive capabilities are similar. Thus only one model is used to reproduce with simulations the results of sawtooth control experiments on the TCV tokamak. For the sawtooth pacing, the calculated time delays between the EC power off and sawtooth crash time agree well with the experimental results. The map of possible locking range is also well reproduced by the simulation.

  13. STOMP, Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases, theory guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.D.; Oostrom, M.

    1996-10-01

    This guide describes the simulator`s governing equations, constitutive functions and numerical solution algorithms of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator, a scientific tool for analyzing multiple phase subsurface flow and transport. The STOMP simulator`s fundamental purpose is to produce numerical predictions of thermal and hydrologic flow and transport phenomena in variably saturated subsurface environments, which are contaminated with volatile or nonvolatile organic compounds. Auxiliary applications include numerical predictions of solute transport processes including radioactive chain decay processes. In writing these guides for the STOMP simulator, the authors have assumed that the reader comprehends concepts and theories associated with multiple-phase hydrology, heat transfer, thermodynamics, radioactive chain decay, and nonhysteretic relative permeability, saturation-capillary pressure constitutive functions. The authors further assume that the reader is familiar with the computing environment on which they plan to compile and execute the STOMP simulator. The STOMP simulator requires an ANSI FORTRAN 77 compiler to generate an executable code. The memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. One-dimensional problems of moderate complexity can be solved on conventional desktop computers, but multidimensional problems involving complex flow and transport phenomena typically require the power and memory capabilities of workstation or mainframe type computer systems.

  14. Organic Anion Transporter 4-Mediated Transport of Olmesartan at Basal Plasma Membrane of Human Placental Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Saki; Nishimura, Tomohiro; Fujibayashi, Ayasa; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Tomi, Masatoshi; Nakashima, Emi

    2015-09-01

    Mechanisms regulating fetal transfer of olmesartan, an angiotensin-II receptor type 1 antagonist, are important as potential determinants of life-threatening adverse fetal effects. The purpose of this study was to examine the olmesartan transport mechanism through the basal plasma membrane (BM) of human syncytiotrophoblasts forming the placental barrier. Uptake of olmesartan by human placental BM vesicles was potently inhibited by dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), estrone 3-sulfate, and bromosulfophthalein, which are all typical substrates of organic anion transporter (OAT) 4 localized at the BM of syncytiotrophoblasts, and was increased in the absence of chloride. In tetracycline-inducible OAT4-expressing cells, [(3) H]olmesartan uptake was increased by tetracycline treatment. Olmesartan uptake via OAT4 was concentration dependent with a Km of 20 μM, and was increased in the absence of chloride. [(3) H]Olmesartan efflux via OAT4 was also observed and was trans-stimulated by extracellular chloride and DHEAS. Thus, OAT4 mediates bidirectional transport of olmesartan and appears to regulate fetal transfer of olmesartan at the BM of syncytiotrophoblasts. Efflux transport of olmesartan via OAT4 from syncytiotrophoblasts to the fetal circulation might be facilitated in the presence of an inwardly directed physiological chloride gradient and extracellular DHEAS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  15. Stochastic Theory of Dust-Grain Charging in Low-Pressure Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Abolmasov, S N; Cabarrocas, P Roca i

    2013-01-01

    Charging of dust grains in low-pressure plasmas is reviewed critically. A theory based on the Fokker-Planck equation and orbital motion limited approximation is proposed. The theory predicts that dust grains can acquire a positive charge in low-pressure electropositive plasmas having a sufficiently high plasma potential, in agreement with experimental observations. It is also shown that variations in the plasma potential (electron temperature) can lead to spatial regions in which grains have opposite charges.

  16. Transport properties of N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at finite coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benincasa, Paolo [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, Middlesex College, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Buchel, Alex [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, Middlesex College, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2006-01-15

    Gauge theory-string theory duality describes strongly coupled N = 4 supersymmetric SU(n{sub c}) Yang-Mills theory at finite temperature in terms of near extremal black 3-brane geometry in type IIB string theory. We use this correspondence to compute the leading correction in the inverse 't Hooft coupling to the shear diffusion constant, bulk viscosity and the speed of sound in the large-n{sub c} N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory plasma. The transport coefficients are extracted from the dispersion relation of the shear and the sound wave lowest quasinormal modes in the leading order {alpha}'-corrected black D3 brane geometry. We find the shear viscosity extracted from the shear diffusion constant to agree with result of [hep-th/0406264]; also, the leading correction to bulk viscosity and the speed of sound vanishes. Our computation provides a highly nontrivial consistency check on the hydrodynamic description of the {alpha}'-corrected nonextremal black branes in string theory.

  17. Transport properties of Script N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at finite coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex

    2006-01-01

    Gauge theory-string theory duality describes strongly coupled Script N = 4 supersymmetric SU(nc) Yang-Mills theory at finite temperature in terms of near extremal black 3-brane geometry in type IIB string theory. We use this correspondence to compute the leading correction in the inverse 't Hooft coupling to the shear diffusion constant, bulk viscosity and the speed of sound in the large-nc Script N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory plasma. The transport coefficients are extracted from the dispersion relation of the shear and the sound wave lowest quasinormal modes in the leading order α'-corrected black D3 brane geometry. We find the shear viscosity extracted from the shear diffusion constant to agree with result of [hep-th/0406264]; also, the leading correction to bulk viscosity and the speed of sound vanishes. Our computation provides a highly nontrivial consistency check on the hydrodynamic description of the α'-corrected nonextremal black branes in string theory.

  18. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Mark Allen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-05

    Turbulence, and turbulence-driven transport are ubiquitous in magnetically confined plasmas, where there is an intimate relationship between turbulence, transport, instability driving mechanisms (such as gradients), plasma flows, and flow shear. Though many of the detailed physics of the interrelationship between turbulence, transport, drive mechanisms, and flow remain unclear, there have been many demonstrations that transport and/or turbulence can be suppressed or reduced via manipulations of plasma flow profiles. This is well known in magnetic fusion plasmas [e.g., high confinement mode (H-mode) and internal transport barriers (ITB’s)], and has also been demonstrated in laboratory plasmas. However, it may be that the levels of particle transport obtained in such cases [e.g. H-mode, ITB’s] are actually lower than is desirable for a practical fusion device. Ideally, one would be able to actively feedback control the turbulent transport, via manipulation of the flow profiles. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using both advanced model-based control algorithms, as well as non-model-based algorithms, to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles. The University of New Mexico was responsible for the experimental portion of the project, while our collaborators at the University of Montana provided plasma transport modeling, and collaborators at Lehigh University developed and explored control methods.

  19. Crossed contributions to electron and heavy-particle transport fluxes for magnetized plasmas in the continuum regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoggins, James B.; Knisely, Carleton P.; Magin, Thierry E.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a unified fluid model for multicomponent plasmas in thermal nonequilibrium accounting for the influence of the electromagnetic field. In a previous work, this model was derived from kinetic theory based on a generalized Chapman-Enskog perturbative solution of the Boltzmann equation, scaled using the ratio of electron to heavy-particle masses. Anisotropic transport properties were derived in terms of bracket integrals. In this work, explicit expressions for asymptotic solutions of the transport properties are derived using a spectral Galerkin projection supplied with Laguerre-Sonine polynomial basis functions, and we analyze the crossed contributions to electron and heavy particle mass and energy fluxes, known as the Kolesnikov effect.

  20. Plasma instabilities and turbulence in non-Abelian gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffler, Sebastian Herwig Juergen

    2010-02-17

    Several aspects of the thermalisation process in non-Abelian gauge theories are investigated. Both numerical simulations in the classical statistical approximation and analytical computations in the framework of the two-particle-irreducible effective action are carried out and their results are compared to each other. The physical quantities of central importance are the correlation functions of the gauge field in Coulomb and temporal axial gauge as well as the gauge invariant energy-momentum tensor. Following a general introduction, the theoretical framework of the ensuing investigations is outlined. In doing so, the range of validity of the employed approximation schemes is discussed as well. The first main part of the thesis is concerned with the early stage of the thermalisation process where particular emphasis is on the role of plasma instabilities. These investigations are relevant to the phenomenological understanding of present heavy ion collision experiments. First, an ensemble of initial conditions motivated by the ''colour glass condensate'' is developed which captures characteristic properties of the plasma created in heavy ion collisions. Here, the strong anisotropy and the large occupation numbers of low-momentum degrees of freedom are to be highlighted. Numerical calculations demonstrate the occurrence of two kinds of instabilities. Primary instabilities result from the specific initial conditions. Secondary instabilities are caused by nonlinear fluctuation effects of the preceding primary instabilities. The time scale associated with the instabilities is of order 1 fm/c. It is shown that the plasma instabilities isotropize the initially strongly anisotropic ensemble in the domain of low momenta (

  1. The Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) simulation of turbulent transport in the core plasma: A grand challenge in plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The long-range goal of the Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) is the reliable prediction of tokamak performance using physics-based numerical tools describing tokamak physics. The NTP is accomplishing the development of the most advanced particle and extended fluid model`s on massively parallel processing (MPP) environments as part of a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary numerical study of tokamak core fluctuations. The NTP is a continuing focus of the Office of Fusion Energy`s theory and computation program. Near-term HPCC work concentrates on developing a predictive numerical description of the core plasma transport in tokamaks driven by low-frequency collective fluctuations. This work addresses one of the greatest intellectual challenges to our understanding of the physics of tokamak performance and needs the most advanced computational resources to progress. We are conducting detailed comparisons of kinetic and fluid numerical models of tokamak turbulence. These comparisons are stimulating the improvement of each and the development of hybrid models which embody aspects of both. The combination of emerging massively parallel processing hardware and algorithmic improvements will result in an estimated 10**2--10**6 performance increase. Development of information processing and visualization tools is accelerating our comparison of computational models to one another, to experimental data, and to analytical theory, providing a bootstrap effect in our understanding of the target physics. The measure of success is the degree to which the experimentally observed scaling of fluctuation-driven transport may be predicted numerically. The NTP is advancing the HPCC Initiative through its state-of-the-art computational work. We are pushing the capability of high performance computing through our efforts which are strongly leveraged by OFE support.

  2. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  3. Wakes in complex plasmas: A self-consistent kinetic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompaneets, Roman; Morfill, Gregor E; Ivlev, Alexei V

    2016-06-01

    In ground-based experiments with complex (dusty) plasmas, charged microparticles are levitated against gravity by an electric field, which also drives ion flow in the parent gas. Existing analytical approaches to describe the electrostatic interaction between microparticles in such conditions generally ignore the field and ion-neutral collisions, assuming free ion flow with a certain approximation for the ion velocity distribution function (usually a shifted Maxwellian). We provide a comprehensive analysis of our previously proposed self-consistent kinetic theory including the field, ion-neutral collisions, and the corresponding ion velocity distribution. We focus on various limiting cases and demonstrate how the interplay of these factors results in different forms of the shielding potential.

  4. Wakes in complex plasmas: A self-consistent kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompaneets, Roman; Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-06-01

    In ground-based experiments with complex (dusty) plasmas, charged microparticles are levitated against gravity by an electric field, which also drives ion flow in the parent gas. Existing analytical approaches to describe the electrostatic interaction between microparticles in such conditions generally ignore the field and ion-neutral collisions, assuming free ion flow with a certain approximation for the ion velocity distribution function (usually a shifted Maxwellian). We provide a comprehensive analysis of our previously proposed self-consistent kinetic theory including the field, ion-neutral collisions, and the corresponding ion velocity distribution. We focus on various limiting cases and demonstrate how the interplay of these factors results in different forms of the shielding potential.

  5. Some applications of thermal field theory to quark-gluon plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Munshi G Mustafa

    2006-04-01

    We briefly introduce the thermal field theory within imaginary time formalism, the hard thermal loop perturbation theory and some of its applications to the physics of the quark-gluon plasma, possibly created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  6. Transport properties of multicomponent thermal plasmas: Grad method versus Chapman-Enskog method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porytsky, P. [Institute for Nuclear Research, 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Krivtsun, I.; Demchenko, V. [Paton Welding Institute, 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Reisgen, U.; Mokrov, O.; Zabirov, A. [RWTH Aachen University, ISF-Welding and Joining Institute, 52062 Aachen (Germany); Gorchakov, S.; Timofeev, A.; Uhrlandt, D. [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Transport properties (thermal conductivity, viscosity, and electrical conductivity) for multicomponent Ar-Fe thermal plasmas at atmospheric pressure have been determined by means of two different methods. The transport coefficients set based on Grad's method is compared with the data obtained when using the Chapman-Enskog's method. Results from both applied methods are in good agreement. It is shown that the Grad method is suitable for the determination of transport properties of the thermal plasmas.

  7. Does hindered transport theory apply to desalination membranes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dražević, Emil; Košutić, Krešimir; Kolev, Vesselin; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2014-10-07

    As reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration polyamide membranes become increasingly used for water purification, prediction of pollutant transport is required for membrane development and process engineering. Many popular models use hindered transport theory (HTT), which considers a spherical solute moving through an array of fluid-filled rigid cylindrical pores. Experiments and molecular dynamic simulations, however, reveal that polyamide membranes have a distinctly different structure of a "molecular sponge", a network of randomly connected voids widely distributed in size. In view of this disagreement, this study critically examined the validity of HTT by directly measuring diffusivities of several alcohols within a polyamide film of commercial RO membrane using attenuated total reflection-FTIR. It is found that measured diffusivities deviate from HTT predictions by as much as 2-3 orders of magnitude. This result indicates that HTT does not adequately describe solute transport in desalination membranes. As a more adequate alternative, the concept of random resistor networks is suggested, with resistances described by models of activated transport in "soft" polymers without a sharp size cutoff and with a proper address of solute partitioning.

  8. Toward the Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav [University of Wisconsin - Madison

    2013-07-26

    The goal of the project was to develop a theory of turbulence in magnetized plasmas at large scales, that is, scales larger than the characteristic plasma microscales (ion gyroscale, ion inertial scale, etc.). Collisions of counter-propagating Alfven packets govern the turbulent cascade of energy toward small scales. It has been established that such an energy cascade is intrinsically anisotropic, in that it predominantly supplies energy to the modes with mostly field-perpendicular wave numbers. The resulting energy spectrum of MHD turbulence, and the structure of the fluctuations were studied both analytically and numerically. A new parallel numerical code was developed for simulating reduced MHD equations driven by an external force. The numerical setting was proposed, where the spectral properties of the force could be varied in order to simulate either strong or weak turbulent regimes. It has been found both analytically and numerically that weak MHD turbulence spontaneously generates a “condensate”, that is, concentration of magnetic and kinetic energy at small k{sub {parallel}}. A related topic that was addressed in the project is turbulent dynamo action, that is, generation of magnetic field in a turbulent flow. We were specifically concentrated on the generation of large-scale magnetic field compared to the scales of the turbulent velocity field. We investigate magnetic field amplification in a turbulent velocity field with nonzero helicity, in the framework of the kinematic Kazantsev-Kraichnan model.

  9. Plasma stability theory including the resistive wall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2015-12-01

    > Plasma stabilization due to a nearby conducting wall can provide access to better performance in some scenarios in tokamaks. This was proved by experiments with an essential gain in and demonstrated as a long-lasting effect at sufficiently fast plasma rotation in the DIII-D tokamak (see, for example, Strait et al., Nucl. Fusion, vol. 43, 2003, pp. 430-440). The rotational stabilization is the central topic of this review, though eventually the mode rotation gains significance. The analysis is based on the first-principle equations describing the energy balance with dissipation in the resistive wall. The method emphasizes derivation of the dispersion relations for the modes which are faster than the conventional resistive wall modes, but slower than the ideal magnetohydrodynamics modes. Both the standard thin wall and ideal-wall approximations are not valid in this range. Here, these are replaced by an approach incorporating the skin effect in the wall. This new element in the stability theory makes the energy sink a nonlinear function of the complex growth rate. An important consequence is that a mode rotating above a critical level can provide a damping effect sufficient for instability suppression. Estimates are given and applications are discussed.

  10. A Quark Transport Theory to describe Nucleon--Nucleon Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kalmbach, U; Biro, T S; Mosel, U

    1993-01-01

    On the basis of the Friedberg-Lee model we formulate a semiclassical transport theory to describe the phase-space evolution of nucleon-nucleon collisions on the quark level. The time evolution is given by a Vlasov-equation for the quark phase-space distribution and a Klein-Gordon equation for the mean-field describing the nucleon as a soliton bag. The Vlasov equation is solved numerically using an extended testparticle method. We test the confinement mechanism and mean-field effects in 1+1 dimensional simulations.

  11. Time-dependent density functional theory for quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Chen, GuanHua; Mo, Yan; Koo, SiuKong; Tian, Heng; Yam, ChiYung; Yan, YiJing

    2010-09-21

    Based on our earlier works [X. Zheng et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 195127 (2007); J. S. Jin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234703 (2008)], we propose a rigorous and numerically convenient approach to simulate time-dependent quantum transport from first-principles. The proposed approach combines time-dependent density functional theory with quantum dissipation theory, and results in a useful tool for studying transient dynamics of electronic systems. Within the proposed exact theoretical framework, we construct a number of practical schemes for simulating realistic systems such as nanoscopic electronic devices. Computational cost of each scheme is analyzed, with the expected level of accuracy discussed. As a demonstration, a simulation based on the adiabatic wide-band limit approximation scheme is carried out to characterize the transient current response of a carbon nanotube based electronic device under time-dependent external voltages.

  12. Proceedings of the second Asian Pacific plasma theory conference APPTC'97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Yuji; Hayashi, Takaya [eds.

    1998-08-01

    This issue is the proceedings of the second Asian Pacific Plasma Theory Conference (APPTC'97), which was held on September 24-26, 1997 at National Institute for Fusion Science (Toki, Japan) under the auspices of the Japan Society of Plasma Science and Nuclear Fusion Research and the National Institute of Fusion Science. A part of APPTC'97 was a joint session with Japan-Australia fusion theory workshop and US-Japan JIFT workshop on Theoretical Study for Helical Plasmas. The conference covers all plasma theory areas including magnetic confinement, inertial fusion, space plasmas, astrophysical plasma, industrial processing plasmas, and dusty plasma, etc. The 43 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. Self-organization of hot plasmas the canonical profile transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Dnestrovskij, Yu N

    2015-01-01

    In this monograph the author presents the Canonical Profile Transport Model or CPTM as a rather general mathematical framework to simulate plasma discharges.The description of hot plasmas in a magnetic fusion device is a very challenging task and many plasma properties still lack a physical explanation. One important property is plasma self-organization.It is very well known from experiments that the radial profile of the plasma pressure and temperature remains rather unaffected by changes of the deposited power or plasma density. The attractiveness of the CPTM is that it includes the effect o

  14. Some New Properties in Fredholm Theory, Schechter Essential Spectrum, and Application to Transport Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulbeba Abdelmoumen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The theory of measures of noncompactness has many applications on topology, functional analysis, and operator theory. In this paper, we consider one axiomatic approach to this notion which includes the most important classical definitions. We give some results concerning a certain class of semi-Fredholm and Fredholm operators via the concept of measures of noncompactness. Moreover, we establish a fine description of the Schechter essential spectrum of a closed densely defined operators. These results are exploited to investigate the Schechter essential spectrum of a multidimensional neutron transport operator.

  15. Some New Properties in Fredholm Theory, Schechter Essential Spectrum, and Application to Transport Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehici Abdelkader

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The theory of measures of noncompactness has many applications on topology, functional analysis, and operator theory. In this paper, we consider one axiomatic approach to this notion which includes the most important classical definitions. We give some results concerning a certain class of semi-Fredholm and Fredholm operators via the concept of measures of noncompactness. Moreover, we establish a fine description of the Schechter essential spectrum of a closed densely defined operators. These results are exploited to investigate the Schechter essential spectrum of a multidimensional neutron transport operator.

  16. Density Dependence of Particle Transport in ECH Plasmas of the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, V. I.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Guasp, J.; Herranz, J.; Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.A.; Velasco, J.L.; Reynolds, J.M.; Ferreira, J.A.; Tafalla, D.; Castejon, F.; Salas, A.

    2009-05-21

    We present the experimental dependence of particle transport on average density in electron cyclotron heated (ECH) hydrogen plasmas of the TJ-II stellarator. The results are based on: (I) electron density and temperature data from Thomson Scattering and reflectometry diagnostics; (II) a transport model that reproduces the particle density profiles in steady state; and (III) Eirene, a code for neutrals transport that calculates the particle source in the plasma from the particle confinement time and the appropriate geometry of the machine/plasma. After estimating an effective particle diffusivity and the particle confinement time, a threshold density separating qualitatively and quantitatively different plasma transport regimes is found. The poor confinement times found below the threshold are coincident with the presence of ECH-induced fast electron losses and a positive radial electric field all over the plasma. (Author) 40 refs.

  17. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-01-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current (DC) glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self excited dust acoustic waves and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust par...

  18. Predictions on heat transport and plasma rotation from global gyrokinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Abiteboul, J.; Allfrey, S.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Latu, G.; Strugarek, A.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Diamond, P. H.; Ku, S.; Chang, C. S.; McMillan, B. F.; Tran, T. M.; Villard, L.; Jolliet, S.; Bottino, A.; Angelino, P.

    2011-10-01

    Flux-driven global gyrokinetic codes are now mature enough to make predictions in terms of turbulence and transport in tokamak plasmas. Some of the recent breakthroughs of three such codes, namely GYSELA, ORB5 and XGC1, are reported and compared wherever appropriate. In all three codes, turbulent transport appears to be mediated by avalanche-like events, for a broad range of ρ* = ρi/a values, ratio of the gyro-radius over the minor radius. Still, the radial correlation length scales with ρi, leading to the gyro-Bohm scaling of the effective transport coefficient below ρ* ≈ 1/300. The possible explanation could be due to the fact that avalanches remain meso-scale due to the interaction with zonal flows, whose characteristic radial wavelength appears to be almost independent of the system size. As a result of the radial corrugation of the turbulence driven zonal and mean flows, the shear of the radial electric field can be significantly underestimated if poloidal rotation is assumed to be governed by the neoclassical theory, especially at low collisionality. Indeed, the turbulence contribution to the poloidal rotation increases when collisionality decreases. Finally, the numerical verification of toroidal momentum balance shows that both neoclassical and turbulent contributions to the Reynolds' stress tensor play the dominant role. The phase space analysis further reveals that barely passing supra-thermal particles mostly contribute to the toroidal flow generation, consistently with quasi-linear predictions.

  19. Transport and micro-instability analysis of JET H-mode plasma during pellet fueling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaywittaphat, P.; Onjun, T.

    2017-02-01

    Transport and micro-instability analysis in a JET H-mode plasma discharge 53212 during the pellet fueling operation is carried out using the BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code with a combination of the NCLASS neoclassical transport model and an anomalous core transport model (either Mixed B/gB or MMM95 model). In this work, the evolution of plasma current, plasma density and temperature profiles is carried out and, consequently, the plasma’s behaviors during the pellet operation can be observed. The NGS pellet model with the Grad-B drift effect included is used to describe pellet ablation and its behaviors when a pellet is launched into hot plasma. The simulation shows that after each pellet enters the plasma, there is a strong perturbation on the plasma causing a sudden change of both thermal and particle profiles, as well as the thermal and particle transports. For the simulation using MMM95 transport model, the change of both thermal and particle transports during pellet injection are found to be dominated by the transport due to the resistive ballooning modes due to the increase of collisionality and resistivity near the plasma edge. For the simulation based on mixed B/gB transport model, it is found that the change of transport during the pellet injection is dominated by the Bohm term. Micro-instability analysis of the plasma during the time of pellet operation is also carried out for the simulations based on MMM95 transport model. It is found that the ion temperature gradient mode is destabilized due to an increase of temperature gradient in the pellet effective region, while the trapped electron mode is stabilized due to an increase of collisionality in that region.

  20. Effect of radial plasma transport at the magnetic throat on axial ion beam formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2016-08-01

    Correlation between radial plasma transport and formation of an axial ion beam has been investigated in a helicon plasma reactor implemented with a convergent-divergent magnetic nozzle. The plasma discharge is sustained under a high magnetic field mode and a low magnetic field mode for which the electron energy probability function, the plasma density, the plasma potential, and the electron temperature are measured at the magnetic throat, and the two field modes show different radial parametric behaviors. Although an axial potential drop occurs in the plasma source for both field modes, an ion beam is only observed in the high field mode while not in the low field mode. The transport of energetic ions is characterized downstream of the plasma source using the delimited ion current and nonlocal ion current. A decay of ion beam strength is also observed in the diffusion chamber.

  1. Transport hysteresis of core plasma, isotope effect, and H-mode physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Inagaki, S.

    2017-02-01

    This article assesses the understanding of and impact by the hysteresis in transport relation. The rapid changes of fluxes compared to slow changes of plasma parameters are overviewed for both edge barrier and core plasmas. The theoretical approaches to understanding the direct influence of heating power on turbulent transport are addressed. Based on this new theoretical framework, the ‘isotope effect’ of plasma confinement time is discussed. A trial explanation is given for this unresolved mystery in plasma confinement. The advanced data analysis method to research the hysteresis in gradient-flux relation is explained.

  2. Turbulent transport and heating of trace heavy ions in hot, magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M; Dorland, W

    2012-01-01

    Scaling laws for the transport and heating of trace heavy ions in low-frequency, magnetized plasma turbulence are derived and compared with direct numerical simulations. The predicted dependences of turbulent fluxes and heating on ion charge and mass number are found to agree with numerical results for both stationary and differentially rotating plasmas. Heavy ion momentum transport is found to increase with mass, and heavy ions are found to be preferentially heated, implying a mass-dependent ion temperature for very weakly collisional plasmas and for partially-ionized heavy ions in strongly rotating plasmas.

  3. The applications of Complexity Theory and Tsallis Non-extensive Statistics at Solar Plasma Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlos, George

    2015-04-01

    theories, based on the classical central limit theorem (CLT), to explain the complexity of the solar wind dynamics, since these theories include smooth and differentiable spatial-temporal functions (MHD theory) or Gaussian statistics (Boltzmann-Maxwell statistical mechanics). On the contrary, the results of this study indicate the presence of non-Gaussian non-extensive statistics with heavy tails probability distribution functions, which are related to the q-extension of CLT. Finally, the results of this study can be understood in the framework of modern theoretical concepts such as non-extensive statistical mechanics (Tsallis, 2009), fractal topology (Zelenyi and Milovanov, 2004), turbulence theory (Frisch, 1996), strange dynamics (Zaslavsky, 2002), percolation theory (Milovanov, 1997), anomalous diffusion theory and anomalous transport theory (Milovanov, 2001), fractional dynamics (Tarasov, 2013) and non-equilibrium phase transition theory (Chang, 1992). References 1. T. Arimitsu, N. Arimitsu, Tsallis statistics and fully developed turbulence, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 33 (2000) L235. 2. T. Arimitsu, N. Arimitsu, Analysis of turbulence by statistics based on generalized entropies, Physica A 295 (2001) 177-194. 3. T. Chang, Low-dimensional behavior and symmetry braking of stochastic systems near criticality can these effects be observed in space and in the laboratory, IEEE 20 (6) (1992) 691-694. 4. U. Frisch, Turbulence, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1996, p. 310. 5. L.P. Karakatsanis, G.P. Pavlos, M.N. Xenakis, Tsallis non-extensive statistics, intermittent turbulence, SOC and chaos in the solar plasma. Part two: Solar flares dynamics, Physica A 392 (2013) 3920-3944. 6. A.V. Milovanov, Topological proof for the Alexander-Orbach conjecture, Phys. Rev. E 56 (3) (1997) 2437-2446. 7. A.V. Milovanov, L.M. Zelenyi, Fracton excitations as a driving mechanism for the self-organized dynamical structuring in the solar wind, Astrophys. Space Sci. 264 (1-4) (1999) 317

  4. Numerical investigation of plasma edge transport and limiter heat fluxes in Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas with EMC3-EIRENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberg, F.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Bozhenkov, S. A.; Hölbe, H.; König, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Reiter, D.; Stephey, L.; W7-X Team

    2017-03-01

    The results of a first systematic assessment of plasma edge transport processes for the limiter startup configuration at Wendelstein 7-X are presented. This includes an investigation of transport from intrinsic and externally injected impurities and their impact on the power balance and limiter heat fluxes. The fully 3D coupled plasma fluid and kinetic neutral transport Monte Carlo code EMC3-EIRENE is used. The analysis of the magnetic topology shows that the poloidally and toroidally localized limiters cause a 3D helical scrape-off layer (SOL) consisting of magnetic flux tubes of three different connection lengths L C. The transport in the helical SOL is governed by L C as topological scale length for the parallel plasma loss channel to the limiters. A clear modulation of the plasma pressure with L C is seen. The helical flux tube topology results in counter streaming sonic plasma flows. The heterogeneous SOL plasma structure yields an uneven limiter heat load distribution with localized peaking. Assuming spatially constant anomalous transport coefficients, increasing plasma density yields a reduction of the maximum peak heat loads from 12 MWm-2 to 7.5 MWm-2 and a broadening of the deposited heat fluxes. The impact of impurities on the limiter heat loads is studied by assuming intrinsic carbon impurities eroded from the limiter surfaces with a gross chemical sputtering yield of 2 % . The resulting radiative losses account for less than 10% of the input power in the power balance with marginal impact on the limiter heat loads. It is shown that a significant mitigation of peak heat loads, 40-50%, can be achieved with controlled impurity seeding with nitrogen and neon, which is a method of particular interest for the later island divertor phase.

  5. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-20

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  6. Possibility of electric field bifurcation and internal transport barrier formation in LHD plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanuki, Heiji; Itoh, Kimitaka; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Fujisawa, Akihide; Ida, Katsumi; Toda, Shin-ichiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Fukuyama, Atsushi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2000-02-01

    Theoretical analysis of the electric field bifurcation is made for the LHD plasma. For given shapes of plasma profiles, a region of bifurcation is obtained in a space of the plasma parameters. In this region of plasma parameters, the electric field domain interface is predicted to appear in the plasma column. The reduction of turbulent transport is expected to occur in the vicinity of the interface, inducing internal transport barrier. Within the present simple model, the electric field bifurcation associated with the internal transport barrier is predicted to be realized for the parameter of T{sub e}(0) {approx_equal} 2 keV and n(0) {approx_equal} 10{sup 18} (m{sup -3}). The boundary of the region of multiple solution is characterized by a scaling T{sub e}(0) {approx} [n(0)]{sup 0.4}. (author)

  7. Advancing the understanding of plasma transport in mid-size stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Carlos; Talmadge, Joseph; Ramisch, Mirko; TJ-II, the; HXS; TJ-K Teams

    2017-01-01

    The tokamak and the stellarator are the two main candidate concepts for magnetically confining fusion plasmas. The flexibility of the mid-size stellarator devices together with their unique diagnostic capabilities make them ideally suited to study the relation between magnetic topology, electric fields and transport. This paper addresses advances in the understanding of plasma transport in mid-size stellarators with an emphasis on the physics of flows, transport control, impurity and particle transport and fast particles. The results described here emphasize an improved physics understanding of phenomena in stellarators that complements the empirical approach. Experiments in mid-size stellarators support the development of advanced plasma scenarios in Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and, in concert with better physics understanding in tokamaks, may ultimately lead to an advance in the prediction of burning plasma behaviour.

  8. Microscopic theory on charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    Current vertex correction (CVC), the backflowlike correction to the current, comes from conservation laws, and the CVC due to electron correlation contains information about many-body effects. However, it has been little understood how the CVC due to electron correlation affects the charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system. To improve this situation, I studied the in-plane resistivity ρa b and the Hall coefficient in the weak-field limit RH, in addition to the magnetic properties and the electronic structure, for a t2 g-orbital Hubbard model on a square lattice in a paramagnetic state away from or near an antiferromagnetic (AF) quantum-critical point (QCP) in the fluctuation-exchange (FLEX) approximation with the CVCs arising from the self-energy (Σ ), the Maki-Thompson (MT) irreducible four-point vertex function, and the main terms of the Aslamasov-Larkin (AL) one. Then, I found three main results about the CVCs. First, the main terms of the AL CVC do not qualitatively change the results obtained in the FLEX approximation with the Σ CVC and the MT CVC. Second, ρa b and RH near the AF QCP have a high-temperature region, governed mainly by the Σ CVC, and a low-temperature region, governed mainly by the Σ CVC and the MT CVC. Third, in case away from the AF QCP, the MT CVC leads to a considerable effect on only RH at low temperatures, although RH at high temperatures and ρa b at all temperatures considered are sufficiently described by including only the Σ CVC. Those findings reveal several aspects of many-body effects on the charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system. I also achieved the qualitative agreement with several experiments of Sr2RuO4 or Sr2Ru0.975Ti0.025O4 . Moreover, I showed several better points of this theory than other theories.

  9. Turbulence theories and modelling of fluids and plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Yokoi, Nobumitsu [Institute of Industrial Science, Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    Theoretical and heuristic modelling methods are reviewed for studying turbulence phenomena of fluids and plasmas. Emphasis is put on understanding of effects on turbulent characteristics due to inhomogeneities of field and plasma parameters. The similarity and dissimilarity between the methods for fluids and plasmas are sought in order to shed light on the properties that are shared or not by fluid and plasma turbulence. (author)

  10. Turbulence theories and modelling of fluids and plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Yokio, Nobumitsu [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 87, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    Theoretical and heuristic modelling methods are reviewed for studying turbulence phenomena of fluids and plasmas. Emphasis is placed on understanding of effects on turbulence characteristics due to inhomogeneities of field and plasma parameters. The similarity and dissimilarity between the methods for fluids and plasmas are sought in order to shed light on the properties that are shared or not by fluid and plasma turbulence. (author)

  11. Statistical theory and transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale-lengths coexist. Nonlinear interactions in the same kind of fluctuations as well as nonlinear interplay between different classes of fluctuations are kept in the analysis. Nonlinear interactions are modelled as turbulent drag, nonlinear noise and nonlinear drive, and a set of Langevin equations is formulated. With the help of an Ansatz of a large number of degrees of freedom with positive Lyapunov number, Langevin equations are solved and the fluctuation dissipation theorem in the presence of strong plasma turbulence has been derived. A case where two driving mechanisms (one for micro mode and the other for semi-micro mode) coexist is investigated. It is found that there are several states of fluctuations: in one state, the micro mode is excited and the semi-micro mode is quenched; in the other state, the semi-micro mode is excited, and the micro mode remains at finite but suppressed level. New type of turbulence transition is obtained, and a cusp type catastrophe is revealed. A phase diagram is drawn for turbulence which is composed of multiple classes of fluctuations. Influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. Finally, the nonlocal heat transport due to the long-wave-length fluctuations, which are noise-pumped by shorter-wave-length ones, is analyzed and the impact on transient transport problems is discussed. (author)

  12. Statistical theory and transition in multiple-scale-length turbulence in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale lengths coexist. Nonlinear interactions in the same kind of fluctuations as well as nonlinear interplay between different classes of fluctuations are kept in the analysis. Nonlinear interactions are modelled as turbulent drag, nonlinear noise and nonlinear drive, and a set of Langevin equations is formulated. With the help of an Ansatz of a large number of degrees of freedom with positive Lyapunov number, Langevin equations are solved and the fluctuation dissipation theorem in the presence of strong plasma turbulence has been derived. A case where two driving mechanisms (one for the micro mode and the other for semi-micro mode) coexist is investigated. It is found that there are several states of fluctuations: in one state, the micro mode is excited and the semi-micro mode is quenched; in the other state, the semi-micro mode is excited, and the micro mode remains at finite but at a suppressed level. A new type of turbulence transition is obtained, and a cusp-type catastrophe is revealed. A phase diagram is drawn for turbulence which is composed of multiple classes of fluctuations. The influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of the internal transport barrier. Finally, the non-local heat transport due to the long-wavelength fluctuations, which are noise-pumped by shorter-wavelength fluctuations, is analysed and its impact on transient transport problems is discussed. (author)

  13. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  14. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, X., E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Naidis, G.V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Laroussi, M. [Plasma Engineering & Medicine Institute, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Reuter, S. [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Felix-Hausdorff-Strasse 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Graves, D.B. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ostrikov, K. [Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); School of Physics, Chemistry, and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P.O.Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-05-04

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors’ vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  15. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, indicates that there are more-than-two stable points in a given condition, and it has been considered to one of the most important topics in fundamental physics. Recently, the hysteresis of plasma has become a focus of research because stable plasma operation is very important for fusion reactors, bio-medical plasmas, and industrial plasmas for nano-device fabrication process. Interestingly, the bi-stability characteristics of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop have been observed in inductive discharge plasmas Because hysteresis study in such plasmas can provide a universal understanding of plasma physics, many researchers have attempted experimental and theoretical studies. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. This research was partially supported by Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science.

  16. Integral Transport Theory in One-dimensional Geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlvik, I.

    1966-06-15

    A method called DIT (Discrete Integral Transport) has been developed for the numerical solution of the transport equation in one-dimensional systems. The characteristic features of the method are Gaussian integration over the coordinate as described by Kobayashi and Nishihara, and a particular scheme for the calculation of matrix elements in annular and spherical geometry that has been used for collision probabilities in earlier Flurig programmes. The paper gives a general theory including such things as anisotropic scattering and multi-pole fluxes, and it gives a brief description of the Flurig scheme. Annular geometry is treated in some detail, and corresponding formulae are given for spherical and plane geometry. There are many similarities between DIT and the method of collision probabilities. DIT is in many cases faster, because for a certain accuracy in the fluxes DIT often needs fewer space points than the method of collision probabilities needs regions. Several computer codes using DIT, both one-group and multigroup, have been written. It is anticipated that experience gained in calculations with these codes will be reported in another paper.

  17. Analytical theory of oxygen transport in the human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, A S; Salafia, C M; Filoche, M; Grebenkov, D S

    2015-03-07

    We propose an analytical approach to solving the diffusion-convection equations governing oxygen transport in the human placenta. We show that only two geometrical characteristics of a placental cross-section, villi density and the effective villi radius, are needed to predict fetal oxygen uptake. We also identify two combinations of physiological parameters that determine oxygen uptake in a given placenta: (i) the maximal oxygen inflow of a placentone if there were no tissue blocking the flow and (ii) the ratio of transit time of maternal blood through the intervillous space to oxygen extraction time. We derive analytical formulas for fast and simple calculation of oxygen uptake and provide two diagrams of efficiency of oxygen transport in an arbitrary placental cross-section. We finally show that artificial perfusion experiments with no-hemoglobin blood tend to give a two-orders-of-magnitude underestimation of the in vivo oxygen uptake and that the optimal geometry for such setup alters significantly. The theory allows one to adjust the results of artificial placenta perfusion experiments to account for oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation. Combined with image analysis techniques, the presented model can give an easy-to-use tool for prediction of the human placenta efficiency.

  18. Molecular orbital theory of ballistic electron transport through molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernzerhof, Matthias; Rocheleau, Philippe; Goyer, Francois

    2009-03-01

    Electron transport through molecules occurs, for instance, in STM imaging and in conductance measurements on molecular electronic devices (MEDs). To model these phenomena, we use a non-Hermitian model Hamiltonian [1] for the description of open systems that exchange current density with their environment. We derive qualitative, molecular-orbital-based rules relating molecular structure and conductance. We show how side groups attached to molecular conductors [2] can completely suppress the conductance. We discuss interference effects in aromatic molecules [3] that can also inhibit electron transport. Rules are developed [1] for the prediction of Fano resonances. All these phenomena are explained with a molecular orbital theory [1,4] for molecules attached to macroscopic reservoirs. [1] F. Goyer, M. Ernzerhof, and M. Zhuang, JCP 126, 144104 (2007); M. Ernzerhof, JCP 127, 204709 (2007). [2] M. Ernzerhof, M. Zhuang, and P. Rocheleau, JCP 123, 134704 (2005); G. C. Solomon, D Q. Andrews, R P. Van Duyne, and M A. Ratner, JACS 130, 7788 (2008). [3] M. Ernzerhof, H. Bahmann, F. Goyer, M. Zhuang, and P. Rocheleau, JCTC 2, 1291 (2006); G. C. Solomon, D. Q. Andrews, R. P. Van Duyne, and M. A. Ratner, JCP 129, 054701 (2008). [4] B.T. Pickup, P.W. Fowler, CPL 459, 198 (2008); P. Rocheleau and M. Ernzerhof, JCP, submitted.

  19. Ubiquitination regulates the plasma membrane expression of renal UT-A urea transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gavin S; O'Brien, Jennifer H; Smith, Craig P

    2008-07-01

    The renal UT-A urea transporters UT-A1, UT-A2, and UT-A3 are known to play an important role in the urinary concentrating mechanism. The control of the cellular localization of UT-A transporters is therefore vital to overall renal function. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of ubiquitination on UT-A plasma membrane expression in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell lines expressing each of the three renal UT-A transporters. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway caused an increase in basal transepithelial urea flux across MDCK-rat (r)UT-A1 and MDCK-mouse (m)UT-A2 monolayers (P UT-A transporter expression in the plasma membrane (P UT-A3 expression in the plasma membrane (P UT-A urea transporters, but that this is not the mechanism primarily used by vasopressin to produce its physiological effects.

  20. Fast transient transport phenomena measured by soft X-ray emission in TCV tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furno, I. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-08-01

    Energy and particle transport during sawtooth activity in TCV plasmas has been studied in this thesis with high temporal resolution many chord diagnostics. We indicated the influence of sawteeth on plasma profiles in ohmic conditions and in the presence of auxiliary electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive. A 2-dimensional model for heat transport, including localised heat source and a magnetic island, has been used to interpret the experimental observations. These results provided a new interpretation of a coupled heat and transport phenomenon which is potentially important for plasma confinement. The observations validate the applicability and show the possibility of improvement of a 2-dimensional theoretic a1 model for the study of heat transport in the presence of localised heat source and a magnetic island. Furthermore, the TCV results showed a new possibility for the interpretation of a coupled heat and particle transport phenomenon previously understood only in stellarators. (author)

  1. Transport through correlated systems with density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, S.; Stefanucci, G.

    2017-10-01

    We present recent advances in density functional theory (DFT) for applications in the field of quantum transport, with particular emphasis on transport through strongly correlated systems. We review the foundations of the popular Landauer–Büttiker(LB)  +  DFT approach. This formalism, when using approximations to the exchange-correlation (xc) potential with steps at integer occupation, correctly captures the Kondo plateau in the zero bias conductance at zero temperature but completely fails to capture the transition to the Coulomb blockade (CB) regime as the temperature increases. To overcome the limitations of LB  +  DFT, the quantum transport problem is treated from a time-dependent (TD) perspective using TDDFT, an exact framework to deal with nonequilibrium situations. The steady-state limit of TDDFT shows that in addition to an xc potential in the junction, there also exists an xc correction to the applied bias. Open shell molecules in the CB regime provide the most striking examples of the importance of the xc bias correction. Using the Anderson model as guidance we estimate these corrections in the limit of zero bias. For the general case we put forward a steady-state DFT which is based on one-to-one correspondence between the pair of basic variables, steady density on and steady current across the junction and the pair local potential on and bias across the junction. Like TDDFT, this framework also leads to both an xc potential in the junction and an xc correction to the bias. Unlike TDDFT, these potentials are independent of history. We highlight the universal features of both xc potential and xc bias corrections for junctions in the CB regime and provide an accurate parametrization for the Anderson model at arbitrary temperatures and interaction strengths, thus providing a unified DFT description for both Kondo and CB regimes and the transition between them.

  2. Theory of electromagnetic fluctuations for magnetized multi-species plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Roberto E., E-mail: roberto.navarro@ug.uchile.cl; Muñoz, Víctor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Araneda, Jaime [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción 4070386 (Chile); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C. 20064 (United States); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Valdivia, Juan A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios Básicos y Aplicados en Complejidad, CEIBA complejidad, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2014-09-15

    Analysis of electromagnetic fluctuations in plasma provides relevant information about the plasma state and its macroscopic properties. In particular, the solar wind persistently sustains a small but detectable level of magnetic fluctuation power even near thermal equilibrium. These fluctuations may be related to spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations arising from the discreteness of charged particles. Here, we derive general expressions for the plasma fluctuations in a multi-species plasma following arbitrary distribution functions. This formalism, which generalizes and includes previous works on the subject, is then applied to the generation of electromagnetic fluctuations propagating along a background magnetic field in a plasma of two proton populations described by drifting bi-Maxwellians.

  3. Coarse mesh transport theory model for heterogeneous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilas, Danut

    To improve fuel utilization, recent reactor cores have become substantially more heterogeneous. In these cores, use of variable fuel enrichments and strong absorbers lead to high neutron flux gradients, which may limit the accuracy (validity) of diffusion theory based methods. In fact, the diffusion equation itself may become a poor approximation of the Boltzmann equation, the exact equation that describes the neutron flux. Therefore, numerical methods to solve the transport equation efficiently over a large heterogeneous region (such as a reactor core) are very desirable in case where the diffusion approximation breaks down. Presently, the only methods capable of computing the power (flux) distributions very accurately throughout a large system such as a nuclear reactor core are the Monte-Carlo or the fine-mesh transport theory methods. Both these methods suffer from the long computational time which makes them useless for routine core calculations. Starting from a variational principle that admits trial functions that can be discontinuous at coarse mesh (assembly) interfaces, we propose a method to solve the transport equation on a spatial grid made up of meshes as large as the size of a fuel assembly. The variational principle is derived for the most general case, but further methods are developed for one-dimensional geometry with the angular variable treated by discrete ordinates. The method uses the finite element approach for the space variable with basis functions precomputed for each element to obtain an algebraic linear system of equations. The eigenvalue of this system is the multiplication constant and the eigenvector represents the incoming angular fluxes for each coarse mesh. The latter allows the reconstruction of the fine mesh solution (angular flux) throughout the domain of interest when used with the basis functions (surface Green's function) for each coarse mesh. The method requires no homogenization procedure that can be a serious source of

  4. Ionic structures and transport properties of hot dense W and U plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-10-01

    We have combined the average-atom model with the hyper-netted chain approximation (AAHNC) to describe the electronic and ionic structure of uranium and tungsten in the hot dense matter regime. When the electronic structure is described within the average-atom model, the effects of others ions on the electronic structure are considered by the correlation functions. And the ionic structure is calculated though using the hyper-netted chain (HNC) approximation. The ion-ion pair potential is calculated using the modified Gordon-Kim model based on the electronic density distribution in the temperature-depended density functional theory. And electronic and ionic structures are determined self-consistently. On the basis of the ion-ion pair potential, we perform the classical (CMD) and Langevin (LMD) molecular dynamics to simulate the ionic transport properties, such as ionic self-diffusion and shear viscosity coefficients, through the ionic velocity correlation functions. Due that the free electrons become more and more with increasing the plasma temperature, the influence of the electron-ion collisions on the transport properties become more and more important.

  5. General theory of spherically symmetric boundary-value problems of the linear transport theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanal, M.

    1972-01-01

    A general theory of spherically symmetric boundary-value problems of the one-speed neutron transport theory is presented. The formulation is also applicable to the 'gray' problems of radiative transfer. The Green's function for the purely absorbing medium is utilized in obtaining the normal mode expansion of the angular densities for both interior and exterior problems. As the integral equations for unknown coefficients are regular, a general class of reduction operators is introduced to reduce such regular integral equations to singular ones with a Cauchy-type kernel. Such operators then permit one to solve the singular integral equations by the standard techniques due to Muskhelishvili. We discuss several spherically symmetric problems. However, the treatment is kept sufficiently general to deal with problems lacking azimuthal symmetry. In particular the procedure seems to work for regions whose boundary coincides with one of the coordinate surfaces for which the Helmholtz equation is separable.

  6. Particle simulation of neoclassical transport in the plasma Edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.S. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea); Ku, S. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY (United States); Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    Particle-in-cell is a popular technique for a global five dimensional numerical simulation of the neoclassical plasma phenomena in a toroidal plasma. In this paper, we briefly review the physical and mathematical aspects of the modern neoclassical particle simulation methodology for a plasma edge simulation and present representative results recently obtained from XGC (X-point included Guiding Center) code. The strength and weakness in the modern neoclassical particle simulation techniques will also be discussed. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Impurity generation, transport and redeposition at plasma boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, M.; Ido, Y.; Ezumi, N.; Ohno, N.; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Erosion and redeposition processes have been investigated using a linear plasma device and a Monte-Carlo simulation code. Molybdenum substrate is exposed to argon plasmas for oblique incidence of magnetic field under well-defined plasma conditions. The effect of magnetic field directions on the erosion distribution is clearly observed. We have a qualitative explanation for the erosion profiles with the effect of prompt redeposition of high Z material in comparison with numerical code predictions. However, we have quantitative differences for their erosion rates. (author)

  8. The Effect of Correlations on the Heat Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Torben; Donko, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    In a classical ideal plasma, a magnetic field is known to reduce the heat conductivity perpendicular to the field whereas it does not alter the one along the field. Here we show that, in strongly correlated plasmas that are observed at high pressure or/and low temperature, a magnetic field reduces the perpendicular heat transport much less and even {\\it enhances} the parallel transport. These surprising observations are explained by the competition of kinetic, potential and collisional contributions to the heat conductivity. Our results are based on first principle molecular dynamics simulations of a one-component plasma.

  9. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  10. Carbon transport and escape fraction in a high density plasma beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Swaaij, G. A.; Bystrov, K.; Borodin, D.; Kirschner, A.; Zaharia, T.; van der Vegt, L. B.; De Temmerman, G.; W. J. Goedheer,

    2013-01-01

    Hydrocarbon injection experiments on molybdenum targets facing high-density plasmas in Pilot-PSI were simulated with the 3D Monte Carlo impurity transport and PSI code ERO. Impurity transport and calculation of redeposition profiles were decoupled by calculating carbon redistribution matrices with E

  11. ADENOSINE-TRIPHOSPHATE DEPENDENT TAUROCHOLATE TRANSPORT IN HUMAN LIVER PLASMA-MEMBRANES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLTERS, H; KUIPERS, F; SLOOFF, MJH; VONK, RJ

    1992-01-01

    Transport systems involved in uptake and biliary secretion of bile salts have been extensively studied in rat liver; however, little is known about these systems in the human liver. In this study, we investigated taurocholate (TC) transport in canalicular and basolateral plasma membrane vesicles iso

  12. Comparison of macro- and microscopic theories describing multicomponent mass transport in microporous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benes, Nieck Edwin; Verweij, H.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed discussion is presented of three well-known macroscopic theories for describing the mass transport behavior of multicomponent mixtures; these include Fick's law, the Onsager theory of irreversible thermodynamics, and the Maxwell-Stefan theory. The merits and drawbacks of these theories ar

  13. Multiple solutions in the theory of direct current glow discharges: Effect of plasma chemistry and nonlocality, different plasma-producing gases, and 3D modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, P. G. C.; Benilov, M. S. [Departamento de Física, CCCEE, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do Município, 9000 Funchal (Portugal)

    2013-10-15

    The work is aimed at advancing the multiple steady-state solutions that have been found recently in the theory of direct current (DC) glow discharges. It is shown that an account of detailed plasma chemistry and non-locality of electron transport and kinetic coefficients results in an increase of the number of multiple solutions but does not change their pattern. Multiple solutions are shown to exist for discharges in argon and helium provided that discharge pressure is high enough. This result indicates that self-organization in DC glow microdischarges can be observed not only in xenon, which has been the case until recently, but also in other plasma-producing gases; a conclusion that has been confirmed by recent experiments. Existence of secondary bifurcations can explain why patterns of spots grouped in concentric rings, observed in the experiment, possess in many cases higher number of spots in outer rings than in inner ones.

  14. Electromagnetic effects on plasma blob-filament transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae, E-mail: wol023@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Angus, J.R. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Umansky, Maxim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Krasheninnikov, Sergei I. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Nuclear Research National University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Both microscopic and macroscopic impacts of the electromagnetic effects on blob dynamics are considered. Linear stability analysis and nonlinear BOUT++ simulations demonstrate that electromagnetic effects in high temperature or high beta plasmas suppress the resistive drift wave turbulence in the blob when resistivity drops below a certain value. In the course of blob’s motion in the SOL its temperature is reduced, which leads to enhancement of resistive effects, so the blob can switch from electromagnetic to electrostatic regime, where resistive drift wave turbulence become important. It is found that inhomogeneity of magnetic curvature or plasma pressure along the filament length leads to bending of the high-beta blob filaments. This is caused by the increase of the propagation time of plasma current (Alfvén time) in higher-density plasma. The effects of sheath boundary conditions on the part of the blob away from the boundary are also diminished by the increased Alfvén time.

  15. Experimental Assessment of Plasma Transport in a 16-cm Multicusp Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubble, Aimee; Foster, John

    2012-10-01

    The physics of plasma transport from the bulk plasma through the magnetic cusp to the anode remains poorly understood. A proper accounting of plasma losses to the anode is critical to accurate modeling of multicusp device performance. In this work, plasma transport in a 16-cm multicusp discharge chamber was studied. Each ring was covered with an electrically isolated electrode, which enables the direct measurement of current to each individual ring as well as the discharge chamber wall. A translatable Langmuir probe was used to obtain maps of spatially resolved plasma parameters in bulk plasma region. These maps of spatially resolved plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma potential were compared to current collection at the cusps as well as the magnetic circuit and device performance. Ring electrode measurements coupled with spatially resolved plasma parameter measurements throughout the discharge chamber allow for an assessment of plasma losses to each ring in terms of an ``effective loss area'' which, multiplied by electron current density incident on the bulk/cusp boundary, gives the correct collected current to each ring. A relationship between effective loss area and the physical loss area was determined that can be applied to a 0-D particle and energy balance model.

  16. Transport phenomena in a plasma of confining gluons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryblewski Radoslaw

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma of confining gluons resulting from the Gribov quantization is considered. In the fluid dynamical framework the non-equilibrium properties of the system are studied. In the linear response approximation the formulas for the bulk, ζ, and shear, η, viscosities of the plasma are calculated analytically. Surprisingly, the approximate scaling of the ζ/η ratio reveals the strong-coupling properties of the system under consideration.

  17. Interaction between sheared flows and turbulent transport in magnetized fusion-grade plasmas; Interaction entre ecoulements cisailles et transport turbulent dans les plasmas de fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leconte, M.

    2008-11-15

    The H confinement regime is set when the heating power reaches a threshold value P{sub c} and is linked to the formation of a transport barrier in the edge region of the plasma. Such a barrier is characterized by a high pressure gradient and is submitted to ELM (edge localized mode) instabilities. ELM instabilities trigger violent quasi-periodical ejections of matter and heat that induce quasi-periodical relaxations of the transport barrier called relaxation oscillations. In this work we studied the interaction between sheared flows and turbulence in fusion plasmas. In particular, we studied the complex dynamics of a transport barrier and we show through a simulation that resonant magnetic perturbations could control relaxation oscillations without a significant loss of confinement

  18. Improved theory for relativistic transmittance of circularly polarized laser pulses in non-ideal, realistic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Teyoun; Kim, Young-Kuk; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-10-01

    Owing to the rapid development of laser technologies, relativistically-induced transmittance (RT) of ultra-intense laser pulses in overdense plasmas is now a practically important matter. RT could give either deleterious or positive effects depending on the kinds of laser-plasma interactions. In radiation-pressure-acceleration (RPA), enhanced transmittance lowers the momentum transfer from the pulse to the ions. Meanwhile, in collisionless-electrostatic-shock, the acceleration efficiency can be increased owing to the effective heating of upstream electrons by transmitted laser fields. Previous theories mostly have handled RT in ideal plasmas, such as an infinitely long uniform plasma or a delta-function-like slab. In the actual applications, however, RT is generally combined with other dynamics, such as plasma density compression, leading to RT under a plasma in other cases. We developed one-dimensional RT theories for circularly polarized laser pulses, which would be used for such realistic plasma profiles. According to our theory, optimal thickness condition should be modified in RPA. Furthermore we developed our theory so that RT in the common two-step density plasma can be modeled. In this poster, we present the derivation and the comparison of the improved theory with PIC simulation results. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program (Grant Number NRF-2013R1A1A2006353).

  19. Quasiclassical Theory and Simulations of Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Ebeling, W.; Ortner, J.

    1999-01-01

    A survey on the dynamical and thermodynamical properties of plasmas with strong Coulomb interactions in the quasi-classical density-temperature region is given. First the basic theoretical concepts describing nonideality are discussed. The chemical picture is introduced. It is shown that the nonideal plasma subsystem of the free charges has a rather large quasi-classical regime, where the quantum effects yield only corrections to the merely classical dynamics. The plasma of free charges may b...

  20. The plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT): Structure, function, and role in organic cation disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J

    2016-11-01

    Plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) is a new polyspecific organic cation transporter that transports a variety of biogenic amines and xenobiotic cations. Highly expressed in the brain, PMAT represents a major uptake2 transporter for monoamine neurotransmitters. At the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier, PMAT is the principal organic cation transporter for removing neurotoxins and drugs from the CSF. Here I summarize our latest understanding of PMAT and its roles in monoamine uptake and xenobiotic disposition. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  1. Nondiffusive toroidal-momentum-transport in the JFT-2M tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, Katsumi; Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Miura, Yukitoshi; Itoh, Sanae; Matsuda, Toshiaki

    1998-12-01

    A nondiffusive term in the toroidal-momentum-transport equation is evaluated by the analysis of the transport of toroidal rotation in the transient phase, where the direction of neutral beam injection is changed from parallel to the plasma current to antiparallel. The ratio of nondiffusive viscosity coefficient to diffusive viscosity coefficient is evaluated to be 0.1 to 0.3, which increases as the plasma current is decreased. Nondiffusive momentum transport is found to be in proportion to {nabla}T{sub i}. (author)

  2. Channeling of particles and associated anomalous transport in a 2D complex plasma crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Cheng-Ran; Zhdanov, Sergey; Thomas, Hubertus M; Morfill, Gregor E

    2013-01-01

    Implications of recently discovered effect of channeling of upstream extra particles for transport phenomena in a two-dimensional plasma crystal are discussed. Upstream particles levitated above the lattice layer and tended to move between the rows of lattice particles. An example of heat transport is considered, where upstream particles act as moving heat sources, which may lead to anomalous heat transport. The average channeling length observed was 15 - 20 interparticle distances. New features of the channeling process are also reported.

  3. Dynamical interplay between fluctuations, electric fields and transport in fusion plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Hidalgo; B Gonçalves; M A Pedrosa

    2003-12-01

    A view of recent experimental results and progress in the characterization of the statistical properties of electrostatic turbulence in magnetically confined devices is given. An empirical similarity in the scaling properties of the probability distribution function (PDF) of turbulent transport has been observed in the plasma edge region in fusion plasmas. The investigation of the dynamical interplay between fluctuation in gradients, turbulent transport and radial electric fields has shown that these parameters are strongly coupled both in tokamak and stellarator plasmas. The bursty behaviour of turbulent transport is linked with a departure from the most probable radial gradient. The dynamical relation between fluctuations in gradients and transport is strongly affected by the presence of sheared poloidal flows which organized themselves near marginal stability. These results emphasize the importance of the statistical description of transport processes in fusion plasmas as an alternative approach to the traditional way to characterize transport based on the computation of effective transport coefficients.

  4. Theory of sheath in a collisional multi-component plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Mahanta; K S Goswami

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this brief report is to study the behaviour of sheath structure in a multicomponent plasma with dust-neutral collisions. The plasma consists of electrons, ions, micron size negatively charged dust particles and neutrals. The sheath-edge potential and sheath width are calculated for collisionally dominated sheath. Comparison of collisionless and collisionally dominated sheath are made.

  5. Transport in three-dimensional topological insulators: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culcer, Dimitrie

    2012-02-01

    This paper reviews recent theoretical and experimental work on transport due to the surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators. The theoretical focus is on longitudinal transport in the presence of an electric field, including Boltzmann transport, quantum corrections and weak localization, as well as longitudinal and Hall transport in the presence of both electric and magnetic fields and/or magnetizations. Special attention is paid to transport at finite doping, and to the π-Berry phase, which leads to the absence of backscattering, Klein tunneling and half-quantized Hall response. Signatures of surface states in ordinary transport and magnetotransport are identified. The review also covers transport experiments of the past years, tracing its evolution from the initial obscuring of surface transport by bulk transport to the increasing success of experimental work in identifying transport due to the surface states. Current and likely future experimental challenges are given prominence and the present status of the field is assessed.

  6. A New Look at the Landau's Theory of Spreading and Damping of Waves in Collisionless Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Soshnikov, V N

    2008-01-01

    The theory of plasma waves and Landau damping in Maxwellian plasmas, Landau's ``rule of pass around poles'' include doubtful statements, particularly related to an artificial ``constructing'' of the dispersion equation, what should allow the possibility of its solution otherwise not existing at all, and the possibility of analytical continuations of corresponding very specific ruptured functions in the one-dimensional Laplace transformation, used by Landau, what is the base of his theory. We represent, as an accessible variant, a more general alternative theory based on a two-dimensional Laplace transformation, leading to an asymptotical in time and space solution as a complicated superposition of coupled damping and {\\em non-damping \\/} plane waves and oscillations with different dispersion laws for every constituent mode. This theory naturally and very simply explains paradoxes of the phenomenon of plasma echo. We propose for discussion a new ideology of plasma waves (both electron and ion-acoustic waves) q...

  7. Is Density Functional Theory adequate for quantum transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kieron

    2007-03-01

    Density functional calculations for the electronic conductance of single molecules attached to leads are now common. I'll examine the methodology from a rigorous point of view, discussing where it can be expected to work, and where it should fail. When molecules are weakly coupled to leads, local and gradient-corrected approximations fail, as the Kohn-Sham levels are misaligned. In the weak bias regime, XC corrections to the current are missed by the standard methodology. Finally, I will compare and contrast several new methodologies that go beyond the present standard approach of applying the Landauer formula to ground-state DFT. Self-interaction errors in density functional calculations of electronictransport, C. Toher, A. Filippetti, S. Sanvito, and K. Burke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 146402 (2005) The Dramatic Role of the Exchange-Correlation Potential in ab initio Electron Transport Calculations, S-H. Ke, H.U. Baranger, and W. Yang, cond-mat/0609367. Zero-bias molecular electronics: Exchange-correlation corrections to Landauer's formula, M. Koentopp, K. Burke, and F. Evers, Phys. Rev. B Rapid Comm., 73, 121403 (2006). Density Functional Theory of the Electrical Conductivity of Molecular Devices, K. Burke, Roberto Car, and Ralph Gebauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 146803 (2005). Density functional calculations of nanoscale conductance, Connie Chang, Max Koentopp, Kieron Burke, and Roberto Car, in prep.

  8. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR

  9. Influence of Plasma Shape on Transport in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moret, J.; Franke, S.; Weisen, H.; Anton, M.; Behn, R.; Duval, B.P.; Hofmann, F.; Joye, B.; Martin, Y.; Nieswand, C.; Pietrzyk, Z.A.; van Toledo, W. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The energy confinement time of TCV Ohmic, L -mode discharges is observed to depend strongly on the plasma shape, improving slightly with elongation and degrading strongly as triangularity is increased from zero to positive values. The thermal conductivity of these plasmas is found to be independent of the shape. This observation, combined with geometrical effects on the temperature gradient and a degradation with increasing input energy flux, can explain the observed variation in the energy confinement time. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Moisture transport during cooking of meat: An analysis based on Flory-Rehner theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    It is proposed that the moisture transport during cooking of meat can be described by the Flory¿Rehner theory of rubber-elasticity. This theory contains the essential physics to describe the transport of liquid moisture due to denaturation and shrinkage of the heated protein matrix. The validity of

  11. Kinetic theory of self-diffusion in a moderately dense one-component plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    A microscopic description of self-diffusion in a moderately dense classical one-component plasma is given on the basis of renormalized kinetic theory. The effects of close binary collisions and of collective interactions in the plasma are taken into account through the use of a composite memory kern

  12. Multi-particle collision simulations of 2D one-component plasmas: anomalous transport and dimensional crossovers

    CERN Document Server

    Di Cintio, Pierfrancesco; Lepri, Stefano; Ciraolo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    By means of hybrid MPC-PIC simulations we study the dynamical scaling of energy and density correlations at equilibrium in moderately coupled 2D and quasi 1D plasmas. We find that the predictions of Nonlinear Fluctuating Hydrodynamics for the structure factors of density and energy fluctuations in 1D systems with three global conservation laws hold true also for two dimensional systems that are more extended along one of the two spatial dimensions. Moreover, from the analysis of the equilibrium energy correlators and density structure factors of both 1D and 2D neutral plasmas, we find that neglecting the contribution of the fluctuations of the vanishing self-consistent electrostatic fields overestimates the interval of frequencies over which the anomalous transport is observed. Such violations of the expected scaling in the currents correlation are found in different regimes, hindering the observation of the asymptotic scaling predicted by the theory.

  13. Hybrid Plasma Reactor/Filter for Transportable Collective Protection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Frye, J. G.; Riley, Brian J.; Rappe, Kenneth G.

    2011-04-06

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has performed an assessment of a Hybrid Plasma/Filter system as an alternative to conventional methods for collective protection. The key premise of the hybrid system is to couple a nonthermal plasma (NTP) reactor with reactive adsorption to provide a broader envelope of protection than can be provided through a single-solution approach. The first step uses highly reactive species (e.g. oxygen radicals, hydroxyl radicals, etc.) created in a nonthermal plasma (NTP) reactor to destroy the majority (~75% - 90%) of an incoming threat. Following the NTP reactor an O3 reactor/filter uses the O3 created in the NTP reactor to further destroy the remaining organic materials. This report summarizes the laboratory development of the Hybrid Plasma Reactor/Filter to protect against a ‘worst-case’ simulant, methyl bromide (CH3Br), and presents a preliminary engineering assessment of the technology to Joint Expeditionary Collective Protection performance specifications for chemical vapor air purification technologies.

  14. A plasma membrane association module in yeast amino acid transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Bianchi, Frans; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Meutiawati, Febrina; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid permeases (AAPs) in the plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the uptake of amino acids and involved in regulation of their cellular levels. Here, we report on a strong and complex module for PM association found in the C-terminal tail of AAPs. Using in sili

  15. A plasma membrane association module in yeast amino acid transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Bianchi, Frans; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Meutiawati, Febrina; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid permeases (AAPs) in the plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the uptake of amino acids and involved in regulation of their cellular levels. Here, we report on a strong and complex module for PM association found in the C-terminal tail of AAPs. Using in

  16. Theoretical and Numerical Study of Anomalous Turbulent Transport in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-05

    1983). CONFERENCE RECORD - ABSTRACTS 1067 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PLASMA SCIENCE June 1-3, 1987 Aifington, Virginia 2X5 Real Space Difusion ...disuibution. The effect of aon-GaussWa tubulent fields on dte pautile difusion coeffickat is discussed in deaiL To examine the long behavior of th

  17. Experimental Investigation of Active Feedback Control of Turbulent Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Mark Allen [University of New Mexico

    2013-07-07

    A new and unique basic plasma science laboratory device - the HelCat device (HELicon-CAThode) - has been constructed and is operating at the University of New Mexico. HelCat is a 4 m long, 0.5 m diameter device, with magnetic field up to 2.2 kG, that has two independent plasmas sources - an RF helicon source, and a thermionic cathode. These two sources, which can operate independently or simultaneously, are capable of producing plasmas with a wide range of parameters and turbulence characteristics, well suited to a variety of basic plasma physics experiments. An extensive set of plasma diagnostics is also operating. Experiments investigating the active feedback control of turbulent transport of particles and heat via electrode biasing to affect plasma ExB flows are underway, and ongoing.

  18. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, Trevor; Baalrud, Scott; Chabert, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    Using insights from particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we develop a kinetic theory to explain the anomalous cross-field electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters (HETs). The large axial electric field in the acceleration region of HETs, together with the radially applied magnetic field, causes electrons to drift in the azimuthal direction with a very high velocity. This drives an electron cyclotron instability that produces large amplitude oscillations in the plasma density and azimuthal electric field, and which is convected downstream due to the large axial ion drift velocity. The frequency and wavelength of the instability are of the order of 5 MHz and 1 mm respectively, while the electric field amplitude can be of a similar magnitude to axial electric field itself. The instability leads to enhanced electron scattering many orders of magnitude higher than that from standard electron-neutral or electron-ion Coulomb collisions, and gives electron mobilities in good agreement with experiment. Since the instability is a strong function of almost all plasma properties, the mobility cannot in general be fitted with simple 1/B or 1/B2 scaling laws, and changes to the secondary electron emission coefficient of the HET channel walls are expected to play a role in the evolution of the instability. This work received financial support from a CNES postdoctoral research award.

  19. Transport barriers with and without shear flows in a magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinell, Julio J. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A. Postal 70-543, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-01-14

    Different ways of producing a transport barrier in a toroidal magnetized plasma are discussed and the properties of the barriers are analyzed. The first mechanism is associated with the presence of a sheared plasma flow that is present in a limited region of the plasma, which creates a zonal flow. In contrast to the usual paradigm stating that the sheared flow reduces the turbulence correlation length and leads to suppression of the fluctuation driven transport in the region of highest shear, it is shown that from the perspective of chaotic transport of plasma particles in the fluctuation fields, the transport barrier is formed in the region of zero shear and it can be destroyed when the fluctuation level is high enough. It is also shown that finite gyroradius effects modify the dynamics and introduces new conditions for barrier formation. The second mechanism considers a method in which radio-frequency waves injected into the plasma can stabilize the drift waves and therefore the anomalous transport is reduced, creating a barrier. This process does not involve the presence of sheared flows and depends only on the effect of the RF wave field on the drift waves. The stabilizing effect in this case is due to the nonlinear ponderomotive force which acts in a way that offsets the pressure gradient destabilization. Finally, a mechanism based on the ponderomotive force of RF waves is described which produces poloidal plasma rotation around the resonant surface due to the asymmetry of induced transport; it creates a transport barrier by shear flow stabilization of turbulence.

  20. Instabilities and transport in Hall plasmas with ExB drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyakov, Andrei

    2016-10-01

    Low temperature plasma with moderate magnetic field, where the ions are not or just weakly magnetized, i.e. the ion Larmor radius being larger or comparable to the characteristic length scale of interest (e.g. the size ofthe system), have distinctly different properties from strongly magnetized plasmas such as that for fusion applications. Such parameters regimes are generally defined here as Hall plasmas. The natural scale separation between the ion and electron Larmor radii in Hall plasma, further exploited by the application of the external electric field, offers unique applications in various plasma devices for material processing and electric propulsion. Plasmas in such devices are in strongly non-equilibrium state making it prone to a number of instabilities. This talk presents physics description of the dominant unstable modes in ExB Hall plasmas resulting in highly turbulent state with nonlinear coherent structures and anomalous electron current. Since ions are un-magnetized, fundamental instabilities operating in low temperature Hall plasmas are very different from much studied gradients (density, temperature and magnetic field) driven drift-wave turbulence in strongly magnetized plasmas for fusion applications. As a result the nonlinear saturation mechanisms, role of the ExB shear flows are also markedly different in such plasmas. We review the basic instabilities in these plasmas which are related to the ion-sound, low-hybrid and anti-drift modes, discuss nonlinear saturation and anomalous transport mechanisms. The advanced nonlinear fluid model for such plasmas and results of nonlinear simulations of turbulence and anomalous transport performed within a modified BOUT++ framework will be presented. Research supported by NSERC Canada and US AFOSR FA9550-15-1-0226.

  1. Kinetic transport in a magnetically confined and flux-constrained fusion plasma; Transport cinetique dans un plasma de fusion magnetique a flux force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmet, G

    2007-11-15

    This work deals with the kinetic transport in a fusion plasma magnetically confined and flux-constrained. The author proposes a new interpretation of the dynamics of zonal flows. The model that has been studied is a gyrokinetic model reduced to the transport of trapped ions. The inter-change stability that is generated allows the study of the kinetic transport of trapped ions. This model has a threshold instability and can be simulated over a few tens confining time for either thermal bath constraint or flux constraint. For thermal baths constraint, the simulation shows a metastable state where zonal flows are prevailing while turbulence is non-existent. In the case of a flux-constraint, zonal flows appear and relax by exchanging energy with system's kinetic energy and turbulence energy. The competition between zonal flows and turbulence can be then simulated by a predator-prey model. 2 regimes can be featured out: an improved confining regime where zonal flows dominate transport and a turbulent regime where zonal flows and turbulent transport are of the same magnitude order. We show that flux as well as the Reynolds tensor play an important role in the dynamics of the zonal flows and that the gyrokinetic description is relevant for all plasma regions. (A.C.)

  2. Cooling strategies and transport theories for brain hypothermia resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing

    2007-01-01

    The brain is one of the most important organs in a biological body whose normal function depends heavily on an uninterrupted delivery of oxygen.Unlike skeletal muscles that can survive for hours without oxygen,neuron cells in the brain are easily subjected to an irreversible damage within minutes from the onset of oxygen deficiency.With the interruption of cardiopulmonary circulation in many cardiac surgical procedures or accidental events leading to cerebral circulation arrest,an imbalance between energy production and consumption will occur which causes a rapid depletion of oxygen due to the interrupted blood-flow to the brain.Meanwhile,the cooling function of the blood flow on the hot tissue will be stopped,while metabolic heat generation in the tissues still keeps running for awhile.Under such adverse situations,the potential for cerebral protection through hypothermia has been intensively investigated in clinics by lowering brain temperature to restrain the cerebral oxygen demands.The reason can be attributed to the decreased metabolic requirements of the cold brain tissues,which allows a longer duration for the brain to endure reduced oxygen delivery.It is now clear that hypothermia would serve as the principal way for neurologic protection in a wide variety of emergency medicines,especially in cerebral damage,anoxia,circulatory arrest,respiratory occlusion,etc.However,although brain cooling has been found uniquely significant in clinical practices,the serious lack of knowledge on the mechanisms involved prevents its further advancement in brain resuscitation.Compared with the expanded trials in clinics,only very limited efforts were made to probe the engineering issues involved,which turns out to be a major obstacle for the successful operation of brain hypothermia resuscitation.From the viewpoint of biothermal medical engineering,the major theories and strategies for administering brain cooling can generally be classified into three categories:heat transfer

  3. Research on the application of VRP theory in logistics transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Ruiqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Logistics transportation problem is a hot issue in today’s research, with the diversification of transport vehicles, the complexity of the transportation network, the choice of logistics transportation route is a NP problem in combinatorial optimization. The paper discusses the relevant knowledge of VRP and physical distribution routing, such as the relationship between them, how to describe the distribution problem with VRP, how to build up mathematical model and so on and meanwhile, points out the direction of research.

  4. Inventory theory, mode choice and network structure in freight transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Combes, F.; Tavasszy, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    In passenger transport, hub-and-spoke networks allow the transportation of small passenger flows with competitive frequencies, in a way that direct line networks cannot. Equivalently, in freight transport, it can be expected that small shipper-receiver flows of high added value commodities transit t

  5. Numerical investigation of non-local electron transport in laser-produced plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Ya-Lin; Zhao Bin; Zheng Jian

    2007-01-01

    Non-local electron transport in laser-produced plasmas under inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions is studied based on Fokker-Planck (FP) and hydrodynamic simulations. A comparison between the classical Spitzer-H(a)rm (SH)transport model and non-local transport models has been made. The result shows that among those non-local models the Epperlein and Short (ES) model of heat flux is in reasonable agreement with the FP simulation in overdense region.However, the non-local models are invalid in the hot underdense plasmas. Hydrodynamic simulation is performed with the flux limiting model and the non-local model, separately. The simulation results show that in the underdense region of the laser-produced plasmas the temperature given by the flux limiting model is significantly higher than that given with the non-local model.

  6. Calculation of transport coefficients of air-water vapor mixtures thermal plasmas used in circuit breakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOHIO Niéssan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we calculate the transport coefficients of plasmas formed by air and water vapor mixtures. The calculation, which assume local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE are performed in the temperature range from 500 to 12000 K. We use the Gibbs free energy minimization method to determine the equilibrium composition of the plasmas, which is necessary to calculate the transport coefficients. We use the Chapman-Enskog method to calculate the transport coefficients. The results are presented and discussed according to the rate of water vapor. The results of the total thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity show in particular that the increasing of the rate of water vapor in air can be interesting for power cut. This could be improve the performance of plasma during current breaking in air contaminate by the water vapor.

  7. Impurities in a non-axisymmetric plasma: transport and effect on bootstrap current

    CERN Document Server

    Mollén, Albert; Smith, Håkan M; Braun, Stefanie; Helander, Per

    2015-01-01

    Impurities cause radiation losses and plasma dilution, and in stellarator plasmas the neoclassical ambipolar radial electric field is often unfavorable for avoiding strong impurity peaking. In this work we use a new continuum drift-kinetic solver, the SFINCS code (the Stellarator Fokker-Planck Iterative Neoclassical Conservative Solver) [M. Landreman et al., Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014) 042503] which employs the full linearized Fokker-Planck operator, to calculate neoclassical impurity transport coefficients for a Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) magnetic configuration. We compare SFINCS calculations with theoretical asymptotes in the high collisionality limit. In intermediate and high collisionality regimes, a momentum conserving collision operator is critical to correctly determine the impurity transport coefficients, and a simple pitch-angle scattering approximation can lead to transport predictions in the wrong direction. In the low collisionality regime pitch-angle scattering is sufficient to accurately describe impuri...

  8. A Unified Gas Kinetic Scheme for Multi-scale Plasma Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    A unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for multi-scale and multi-component plasma transport is constructed. The current scheme is a direct modeling method, where the time evolution solutions from the Vlasov-BGK equations for both electron and ion, and the Maxwell equations are used to construct the scale-dependent plasma simulation. As a result, based on the modeling scales of mesh size and time step, the discretized governing equations for the whole plasma regimes are obtained. The UGKS takes into account the electron inertia, full electromagnetic field equations, and separate electron and ion evolution. The physics recovered in UGKS ranges from the kinetic Vlasov equation to the hydrodynamic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, with a unified treatment in all scales from the collisionless particle transport to the hydrodynamic wave interactions. The UGKS presents a plasma description which is more general than the Vlasov equation in the kinetic scale and all kinds of MHD equations in the hydrodynamic scale, su...

  9. Comprehensive Study of Plasma-Wall Sheath Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    temperature is always well below that expected for significant thermionic emission from LaB6, and the heat flux from the plasma is also low given the order...measurements from HET materials is their low electrical conductivity. In a typical electron emission study, a primary electron beam is focused onto to...Transition Controlled by Secondary Electron Emission at Low Gas Pressure,” 67th Annual Gaseous Electronics Conference, Raleigh, NC, November 2-7, 2014

  10. Hybrid Plasma Reactor/Filter for Transportable Collective Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    None From the ion chromatography results we can calculate the concentration of HNO3 in the gas leaving the plasma reactor. The small NO3- detected...resistant to decomposition by O3. Carbon and polymeric adsorbents were not considered because they would react with O3 and decompose . Potential...nor any ability to decompose ozone. A SAC-13 catalyst was obtained from Engelhard for testing also. This material is an H- Nafion Ion Exchange

  11. On the application of quantum transport theory to electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, K.L

    2003-05-15

    Electron sources (e.g., field emitter arrays, wide band-gap (WBG) semiconductor materials and coatings, carbon nanotubes, etc.) seek to exploit ballistic transport within the vacuum after emission from microfabricated structures. Regardless of kind, all sources strive to minimize the barrier to electron emission by engineering material properties (work function/electron affinity) or physical geometry (field enhancement) of the cathode. The unique capabilities of cold cathodes, such as instant ON/OFF performance, high brightness, high current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, cold emission, small size and/or low voltage operation characteristics, commend their use in several advanced devices when physical size, weight, power consumption, beam current, and pulse repletion frequency are important, e.g., RF power amplifier such as traveling wave tubes (TWTs) for radar and communications, electrodynamic tethers for satellite deboost/reboost, and electric propulsion systems such as Hall thrusters for small satellites. The theoretical program described herein is directed towards models to evaluate emission current from electron sources (in particular, emission from WBG and Spindt-type field emitter) in order to assess their utility, capabilities and performance characteristics. Modeling efforts particularly include: band bending, non-linear and resonant (Poole-Frenkel) potentials, the extension of one-dimensional theory to multi-dimensional structures, and emission site statistics due to variations in geometry and the presence of adsorbates. Two particular methodologies, namely, the modified Airy approach and metal-semiconductor statistical hyperbolic/ellipsoidal model, are described in detail in their present stage of development.

  12. On the application of quantum transport theory to electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kevin L

    2003-01-01

    Electron sources (e.g., field emitter arrays, wide band-gap (WBG) semiconductor materials and coatings, carbon nanotubes, etc.) seek to exploit ballistic transport within the vacuum after emission from microfabricated structures. Regardless of kind, all sources strive to minimize the barrier to electron emission by engineering material properties (work function/electron affinity) or physical geometry (field enhancement) of the cathode. The unique capabilities of cold cathodes, such as instant ON/OFF performance, high brightness, high current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, cold emission, small size and/or low voltage operation characteristics, commend their use in several advanced devices when physical size, weight, power consumption, beam current, and pulse repletion frequency are important, e.g., RF power amplifier such as traveling wave tubes (TWTs) for radar and communications, electrodynamic tethers for satellite deboost/reboost, and electric propulsion systems such as Hall thrusters for small satellites. The theoretical program described herein is directed towards models to evaluate emission current from electron sources (in particular, emission from WBG and Spindt-type field emitter) in order to assess their utility, capabilities and performance characteristics. Modeling efforts particularly include: band bending, non-linear and resonant (Poole-Frenkel) potentials, the extension of one-dimensional theory to multi-dimensional structures, and emission site statistics due to variations in geometry and the presence of adsorbates. Two particular methodologies, namely, the modified Airy approach and metal-semiconductor statistical hyperbolic/ellipsoidal model, are described in detail in their present stage of development.

  13. A Kinetic Transport Theory for Particle Acceleration and Transport in Regions of Multiple Contracting and Reconnecting Inertial-scale Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-03-01

    Simulations of particle acceleration in turbulent plasma regions with multiple contracting and merging (reconnecting) magnetic islands emphasize the key role of temporary particle trapping in island structures for the efficient acceleration of particles to form hard power-law spectra. Statistical kinetic transport theories have been developed that capture the essential physics of particle acceleration in multi-island regions. The transport theory of Zank et al. is further developed by considering the acceleration effects of both the mean and the variance of the electric fields induced by the dynamics of multiple inertial-scale flux ropes. A focused transport equation is derived that includes new Fokker-Planck terms for particle scattering and stochastic acceleration due to the variance in multiple flux-rope magnetic fields, plasma flows, and reconnection electric fields. A Parker transport equation is also derived in which a new expression for momentum diffusion appears, combining stochastic acceleration by particle scattering in the mean multi-flux-rope electric fields with acceleration by the variance in these electric fields. Test particle acceleration is modeled analytically considering drift acceleration by the variance in the induced electric fields of flux ropes in the slow supersonic, radially expanding solar wind. Hard power-law spectra occur for sufficiently strong inertial-scale flux ropes with an index modified by adiabatic cooling, solar wind advection, and diffusive escape from flux ropes. Flux ropes might be sufficiently strong behind interplanetary shocks where the index of suprathermal ion power-law spectra observed in the supersonic solar wind can be reproduced.

  14. A KINETIC TRANSPORT THEORY FOR PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND TRANSPORT IN REGIONS OF MULTIPLE CONTRACTING AND RECONNECTING INERTIAL-SCALE FLUX ROPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Webb, G. M. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Khabarova, O., E-mail: jar0013@uah.edu [Heliophysical Laboratory, Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation RAS (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-10

    Simulations of particle acceleration in turbulent plasma regions with multiple contracting and merging (reconnecting) magnetic islands emphasize the key role of temporary particle trapping in island structures for the efficient acceleration of particles to form hard power-law spectra. Statistical kinetic transport theories have been developed that capture the essential physics of particle acceleration in multi-island regions. The transport theory of Zank et al. is further developed by considering the acceleration effects of both the mean and the variance of the electric fields induced by the dynamics of multiple inertial-scale flux ropes. A focused transport equation is derived that includes new Fokker-Planck terms for particle scattering and stochastic acceleration due to the variance in multiple flux-rope magnetic fields, plasma flows, and reconnection electric fields. A Parker transport equation is also derived in which a new expression for momentum diffusion appears, combining stochastic acceleration by particle scattering in the mean multi-flux-rope electric fields with acceleration by the variance in these electric fields. Test particle acceleration is modeled analytically considering drift acceleration by the variance in the induced electric fields of flux ropes in the slow supersonic, radially expanding solar wind. Hard power-law spectra occur for sufficiently strong inertial-scale flux ropes with an index modified by adiabatic cooling, solar wind advection, and diffusive escape from flux ropes. Flux ropes might be sufficiently strong behind interplanetary shocks where the index of suprathermal ion power-law spectra observed in the supersonic solar wind can be reproduced.

  15. Orbital-motion-limited theory of dust charging and plasma response

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The foundational theory for dusty plasmas is the dust charging theory that provides the dust potential and charge arising from the dust interaction with a plasma. The most widely used dust charging theory for negatively charged dust particles is the so-called orbital motion limited (OML) theory, which predicts the dust potential and heat collection accurately for a variety of applications, but was previously found to be incapable of evaluating the dust charge and plasma response in any situation. Here we report a revised OML formulation that is able to predict the plasma response and hence the dust charge. Numerical solutions of the new OML model show that the widely-used Whipple approximation of dust charge-potential relationship agrees with OML theory in the limit of small dust radius compared with plasma Debye length, but incurs large (order-unity) deviation from the OML prediction when the dust size becomes comparable with or larger than plasma Debye length. This latter case is expected for the important ...

  16. Validating Laser-Induced Birefringence Theory with Plasma Interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cecilia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Intense laser beams crossing paths in plasma is theorized to induce birefringence in the medium, resulting from density and refractive index modulations that affect the polarization of incoming light. The goal of the associated experiment, conducted on Janus at Lawrence Livermore’s Jupiter Laser Facility, was to create a tunable laser-plasma waveplate to verify the relationship between dephasing angle and beam intensity, plasma density, plasma temperature, and interaction length. Interferometry analysis of the plasma channel was performed to obtain a density map and to constrain temperature measured from Thomson scattering. Various analysis techniques, including Fast Fourier transform (FFT) and two variations of fringe-counting, were tried because interferograms captured in this experiment contained unusual features such as fringe discontinuity at channel edges, saddle points, and islands. The chosen method is flexible, semi-automated, and uses a fringe tracking algorithm on a reduced image of pre-traced synthetic fringes. Ultimately, a maximum dephasing angle of 49.6° was achieved using a 1200 μm interaction length, and the experimental results appear to agree with predictions.

  17. The transport of phosphate between the plasma and dialysate compartments in peritoneal dialysis is influenced by an electric potential difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Fugleberg, S; Brahm, J

    1996-01-01

    was not identifiable. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the electrochemical gradient between plasma water and dialysate favours the diffusive phosphate transport, and both electric and chemical potentials must be taken into account in calculations of the transperitoneal phosphate transport....

  18. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Starinets, Andrei O.

    2006-01-01

    Using gauge theory/gravity duality we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. We compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of N=2 supersymmetric SU(N) Yang-Mills plasma at a temperature much larger than the mass scale of the theory in the limit of large N and large 't Hooft coupling. The speed of sound is computed both from the equation of state and the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. Both computations lead to the same result. Bulk viscosity is determined by computing the attenuation constant of the sound wave mode.

  19. Neutral Particle Transport in Cylindrical Plasma Simulated by a Monte Carlo Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Deliang; YAN Longwen; ZHONG Guangwu; LU Jie; YI Ping

    2007-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code (MCHGAS) has been developed to investigate the neutral particle transport.The code can calculate the radial profile and energy spectrum of neutral particles in cylindrical plasmas.The calculation time of the code is dramatically reduced when the Splitting and Roulette schemes are applied. The plasma model of an infinite cylinder is assumed in the code,which is very convenient in simulating neutral particle transports in small and middle-sized tokamaks.The design of the multi-channel neutral particle analyser (NPA) on HL-2A can be optimized by using this code.

  20. Determination of albumin transport rate between plasma and peritoneal space in decompensated cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring-Larsen, H; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1984-01-01

    the abdominal puncture may lead to overestimation of TERperit.space, whereas systematic understimation seems less likely. This may besides differences in patient selection and unsteady state, account for the discrepancy between the present relatively low value and earlier reports on much higher values.......10-0.59). The transport rate of albumin from ascitic fluid back to plasma was measured in eight patients by plasma sampling after intraperitoneal injection of 131I-labelled serum albumin. After correction for tracer re-extravasation this back transport (median 0.31, range 0.07-0.44% IVM/h-1) was not significantly...

  1. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  2. Cross-field transport of electrons at the magnetic throat in an annular plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2017-01-01

    Cross-field transport of electrons has been studied at the magnetic throat of the annular Chi-Kung reactor. This annular configuration allows the creation of a low pressure argon plasma with two distinct electron heating locations by independently operating a radio-frequency antenna surrounding the outer source tube, or an antenna housed inside the inner source tube. The two antenna cases show opposite variation trends in radial profiles of electron energy probability function, electron density, plasma potential and electron temperature. The momentum and energy transport coefficients are obtained from the electron energy probability functions, and the related electron fluxes follow the path of electron cooling across the magnetic throat.

  3. Ion confinement and transport in a toroidal plasma with externally imposed radial electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, H. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Strong electric fields were imposed along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma by biasing it with electrodes maintained at kilovolt potentials. Coherent, low-frequency disturbances characteristic of various magnetohydrodynamic instabilities were absent in the high-density, well-confined regime. High, direct-current radial electric fields with magnitudes up to 135 volts per centimeter penetrated inward to at least one-half the plasma radius. When the electric field pointed radially toward, the ion transport was inward against a strong local density gradient; and the plasma density and confinement time were significantly enhanced. The radial transport along the electric field appeared to be consistent with fluctuation-induced transport. With negative electrode polarity the particle confinement was consistent with a balance of two processes: a radial infusion of ions, in those sectors of the plasma not containing electrodes, that resulted from the radially inward fields; and ion losses to the electrodes, each of the which acted as a sink and drew ions out of the plasma. A simple model of particle confinement was proposed in which the particle confinement time is proportional to the plasma volume. The scaling predicted by this model was consistent with experimental measurements.

  4. Gyrokinetic stability theory of electron-positron plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Helander, Per

    2016-01-01

    The linear gyrokinetic stability properties of magnetically confined electron-positron plasmas are investigated in the parameter regime most likely to be relevant for the first laboratory experiments involving such plasmas, where the density is small enough that collisions can be ignored and the Debye length substantially exceeds the gyroradius. Although the plasma beta is very small, electromagnetic effects are retained, but magnetic compressibility can be neglected. The work of a previous publication (Helander, 2014) is thus extended to include electromagnetic instabilities, which are of importance in closed-field-line configurations, where such instabilities can occur at arbitrarily low pressure. It is found that gyrokinetic instabilities are completely absent if the magnetic field is homogeneous: any instability must involve magnetic curvature or shear. Furthermore, in dipole magnetic fields, the stability threshold for interchange modes with wavelengths exceeding the Debye radius coincides with that in i...

  5. Dynamics between the fishbone instability and nonlocal transient transport in HL-2A NBI plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Xu, Y.; Ding, X. T.; Shi, Z. B.; Jiang, M.; Zhong, W. L.; Ji, X. Q.; HL-2A Team

    2016-04-01

    Understanding of nonlocal electron heat transport is of key importance for current magnetic confinement fusion research. Global nonlocal response presents a fundamental challenge to the standard anomalous transport model based on local microinstabilities and turbulence. Here, we present for the first time a new nonlocal phenomenon triggered by the fishbone instability in HL-2A neutral beam injection plasmas. Rapid core heating leads to a simultaneous decrease in temperature at the plasma edge. The effect reveals fast anomalous transport of core heat pulses to the plasma edge, not compatible with diffusive time scales. More importantly, Δ {{T}\\text{e}}/text{e}}> variations at different locations are restricted by the intensity of magnetic fluctuations. The Δ {{T}\\text{e}}/text{e}}> and {{≤ft(δ {{B}θ}\\right)}\\text{rms}} form two types of hysteresis loops at two sides of the inversion radius. The ECEIs show that the 2D mode structure of the fishbone is intensive shearing/spiraling during the nonlocal transport. Experimental results suggest that magnetic perturbation, long-range correlation, mesoscale structure and E× B flow play crucial roles in the nonlocal response. The Hurst exponent and auto-correlation coefficient indicate that the nonlocal transport is potentially linked to the self-organized critical (SOC) dynamics. This work will be beneficial for understanding of the plasma dynamics in future fusion reactors.

  6. High Temperature Plasmas Theory and Mathematical Tools for Laser and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Spatschek, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Filling the gap for a treatment of the subject as an advanced course in theoretical physics with a huge potential for future applications, this monograph discusses aspects of these applications and provides theoretical methods and tools for their investigation. Throughout this coherent and up-to-date work the main emphasis is on classical plasmas at high-temperatures, drawing on the experienced author's specialist background. As such, it covers the key areas of magnetic fusion plasma, laser-plasma-interaction and astrophysical plasmas, while also including nonlinear waves and phenomena.

  7. Electromagnetic fluctuations in magnetized plasmas. I. The rigorous relativistic kinetic theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlickeiser, R., E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Yoon, P. H., E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Using the system of the Klimontovich and Maxwell equations, the general linear fluctuation theory for magnetized plasmas is developed. General expressions for the electromagnetic fluctuation spectra (electric and magnetic fields) from uncorrelated plasma particles in plasmas with a uniform magnetic field are derived, which are covariantly correct within the theory of special relativity. The general fluctuation spectra hold for plasmas of arbitrary composition, arbitrary momentum dependences of the plasma particle distribution functions, and arbitrary orientations of the wave vector with respect to the uniform magnetic field. Moreover, no restrictions on the values of the real and the imaginary parts of the frequency are made. The derived fluctuation spectra apply to both non-collective fluctuations and collective plasma eigenmodes in magnetized plasmas. In the latter case, kinetic equations for the components of fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in magnetized plasmas are derived that include the effect of spontaneous emission and absorption. In the limiting case of an unmagnetized plasmas, the general fluctuation spectra correctly reduce to the unmagnetized fluctuation spectra derived before.

  8. Turbulence and intermittent transport at the boundary of magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2005-01-01

    a forcing region with spatially localized sources of particles and heat outside which losses due to the motion along open magnetic-field lines dominate, corresponding to the edge region and the scrape-off layer, respectively. Turbulent states reveal intermittent eruptions of hot plasma from the edge region......, propagating radially far into the scrape-off layer in the form of field-aligned filaments, or blobs. This results in positively skewed and flattened single-point probability distribution functions of particle density and temperature, reflecting the frequent appearance of large fluctuations. The conditional...

  9. ADVECTIVE TRANSPORT OF INTERSTELLAR PLASMA INTO THE HELIOSPHERE ACROSS THE RECONNECTING HELIOPAUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strumik, M.; Grzedzielski, S.; Czechowski, A.; Macek, W. M.; Ratkiewicz, R. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18A, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-02-10

    We discuss results of magnetohydrodynamical model simulations of plasma dynamics in the proximity of the heliopause (HP). The model is shown to fit details of the magnetic field variations observed by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during the transition from the heliosphere to the local interstellar medium (LISM). We propose an interpretation of magnetic field structures observed by Voyager 1 in terms of fine-scale physical processes. Our simulations reveal an effective transport mechanism of relatively dense LISM plasma across the reconnecting HP into the heliosphere. The mechanism is associated with annihilation of magnetic sectors in the heliospheric plasma near the HP.

  10. Plasma Transport at Magnetic Axis in Toroidal Confinement System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGZhongtian

    2001-01-01

    The particle orbits which intersect the magnetic axis behave differently from banana ones, referred to as potato orbits. The potential importance on tokamak transport is emphasized by Politzer, Lin, Tang, and Lee,and Shaing, Hazeltine, and Zarnstoff. However, there are many problems in the lasttwo papers. For example, the Eq. (48) in Ref. [5] should satisfy the orbit constraint which guarantees single value of the function go, that is, solubility condition, and Eq. (8) in Ref. [6] has the same problem.

  11. Heat Transport Simulation for Atmospheric-Pressure High-Density Microgap Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiro; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi

    2006-02-01

    Atmospheric-pressure cw high-density plasma can be produced in a microgap between two knife-edge electrodes by microwave excitation. A possible application of such a plasma is as an excimer light source and for this purpose the gas temperature in the plasma is a particularly important parameter. In this paper we report a fluid dynamic simulation of heat transport in the microgap plasma and compare the results with previously studied experimental gas temperature characteristics (e.g., dependence on the microwave power and the forced gas flow rate). The simulation explains reasonably well the experimental results when the effect of local gas density change on the gas heating process is taken into consideration. Discussion is given that the existence of thermally driven convection in the microgap plasma indicated in a preliminary report is incorrect.

  12. Ballistic transport in Saturn's rings - An analytic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ejecta from impacts of micrometeoroids on Saturn's ring particles will, in most cases, remain in orbit about Saturn and eventually be reaccreted by the rings, possibly at a different radial location. The resulting mass transport has been suggested as the cause of some of the features observed in Saturn's rings. Previous attempts to model this transport have used numerical simulations which have not included the effects of the angular momentum transport coincident with mass transport. An analytical model for ballistic mass transport in Saturn's rings is developed. The model includes the effects of angular momentum advection and shows that the net material movement due to angular momentum advection is comparable to that caused by direct ballistic mass transport.

  13. Rate of radial transport of plasma in Saturn’s inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hill, T. W.

    2009-12-01

    The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) and the Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) frequently observe longitudinally localized injection and drift dispersion of hot plasma in Saturn’s magnetosphere. These signatures provide direct evidence for the major convective process in the inner magnetosphere of a rapidly rotating planet, in which the radial transport of plasma comprises hot, tenuous plasma moving inward and cooler, denser plasma moving outward. These injection events have been found to occupy only a small fraction of the total available longitudinal space, indicating that the inflow speed is probably much larger than the outflow speed. We set the local corotation speed as the upper limit of inflow velocities, and deduce the corresponding radial velocities of the outflowing flux tubes by analyzing the width of injection structures and assuming that the total potential drop around a given L-shell is zero. We then estimate an upper limit to the plasma outward mass transport rate, which turns out to be somewhat larger than previous estimates of the Enceladus source rate (e.g., Pontius and Hill, 2006). An important assumption in this study is that the plasma is largely confined to a thin equatorial sheet, and we have applied a centrifugal scale height model developed by Hill and Michel [1976].

  14. Anomalous plasma transport and induced electric field in a stochastic magnetic field structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Tetsuyuki; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Toda, Shinichiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukuyama, Atsushi [Okayama Univ. (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    The plasma transport matrix is formulated using the kinetic equation for the particles in the stochastic magnetic field. The radial electric field generation is analyzed using this transport matrix. This thermoelectric field is dictated by the difference between the electron heat flux and the ion heat flux. We calculate the spatial structures of the radial electric field and the temperature in the stochastic field region. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Collisional-radiative model: a plasma spectroscopy theory for experimentalists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Takashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Sawada, Keiji

    1997-01-01

    The rate equation describing the population n(p) of an excited (and the ground state) level p of ions immersed in plasma is shown. In 1962, the method of quasi-steady state solution (collisional-radiative model) was proposed. Its idea is explained. The coupled differential equations reduce to a set of coupled linear equations for excited levels. The solution of these coupled equations is presented. The equations giving the ionization and recombination of this system of ions under consideration are described in terms of the effective rate coefficients. The collisional-radiative ionization and recombination rate coefficients are expressed in terms of the population coefficients for p > 1. As for ionizing plasma, the excited level populations, the populations, the population distribution among the excited levels, two regimes of the excited levels, the dominant flows of electrons among the levels and so on are shown. As for recombining plasma, the excited level populations, the population distribution among the excited levels, the dominant flows of electrons and so on are shown. Ionization balance plasma may be considered. (K.I.)

  16. Simulations for plasma spectroscopy based on UTA theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The unresolved transition array(UTA) simulation with configurationaverage approximation is used to calculate the spectral properties ofplasmas involving complex ions. This method is used to simulate thetransmission of X-rays through aluminum plasma and niobium plasmarespectively. The results are compared with experiments and other results ofadvanced models and good agreements are obtained.

  17. Theory of the M = 1 Kink Mode in Toroidal Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blank, H. J.; Schep, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The energy principle of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is used to study the ideal MHD stability of the m = 1 internal kink mode in a toroidal plasma. The equilibrium configurations that are considered allow for a broad region where the safety factor q is close to unity. This region may extend to t

  18. Linear theory of plasma filled backward wave oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Preeti Vyas; Arti Gokhale; Y Choyal; K P Maheshwari

    2001-05-01

    An analytical and numerical study of backward wave oscillator (BWO) in linear regime is presented to get an insight into the excitation of electromagnetic waves as a result of the interaction of the relativistic electron beam with a slow wave structure. The effect of background plasma on the BWO instability is also presented.

  19. A comprehensive study of electrostatic turbulence and transport in the laboratory basic plasma device TORPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furno, I.; Fasoli, A.; Avino, F.; Bovet, A.; Gustafson, K.; Iraji, D.; Labit, B.; Loizu, J.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2012-04-01

    TORPEX is a toroidal device located at the CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. In TORPEX, a vertical magnetic field superposed on a toroidal field creates helicoidal field lines with both ends terminating on the torus vessel. The turbulence driven by magnetic curvature and plasma gradients causes plasma transport in the radial direction while at the same time plasma is progressively lost along the field lines. The relatively simple magnetic geometry and diagnostic access of the TORPEX configuration facilitate the experimental study of low frequency instabilities and related turbulent transport, and make an accurate comparison between simulations and experiments possible. We first present a detailed investigation of electrostatic interchange turbulence, associated structures and their effect on plasma using high-resolution diagnostics of plasma parameters and wave fields throughout the whole device cross-section, fluid models and numerical simulations. Interchange modes nonlinearly develop blobs, radially propagating filaments of enhanced plasma pressure. Blob velocities and sizes are obtained from probe measurements using pattern recognition and are described by an analytical expression that includes ion polarization currents, parallel sheath currents and ion-neutral collisions. Then, we describe recent advances of a non-perturbative Li 6+ miniaturized ion source and a detector for the investigation of the interaction between supra thermal ions and interchange-driven turbulence. We present first measurements of the spatial and energy space distribution of the fast ion beam in different plasma scenarios, in which the plasma turbulence is fully characterized. The experiments are interpreted using two-dimensional fluid simulations describing the low-frequency interchange turbulence, taking into account the plasma source and plasma losses at the torus vessel. By treating fast ions as test particles, we integrate their equations of motion in the simulated electromagnetic fields, and

  20. Invited and contributed papers presented by the theory group at the joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop `theory of fusion plasmas`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    In this report eight invited and contributed papers of the theory group are included which were presented at joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop on `theory of fusion plasmas`. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  1. Exact kinetic theory for the instability of an electron beam in a hot magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Timofeev, I V

    2013-01-01

    Efficiency of collective beam-plasma interaction strongly depends on the growth rates of dominant instabilities excited in the system. Nevertheless, exact calculations of the full unstable spectrum in the framework of relativistic kinetic theory for arbitrary magnetic fields and particle distributions were unknown until now. In this paper we give an example of such a calculation answering the question whether the finite thermal spreads of plasma electrons are able to suppress the fastest growing modes in the beam-plasma system. It is shown that nonrelativistic temperatures of Maxwellian plasmas can stabilize only the oblique instabilities of relativistic beam. On the contrary, non-Maxwellian tails typically found in laboratory beam-plasma experiments are able to substantially reduce the growth rate of the dominant longitudinal modes affecting the efficiency of turbulent plasma heating.

  2. Exact kinetic theory for the instability of an electron beam in a hot magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Annenkov, V. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    Efficiency of collective beam-plasma interaction strongly depends on the growth rates of dominant instabilities excited in the system. Nevertheless, exact calculations of the full unstable spectrum in the framework of relativistic kinetic theory for arbitrary magnetic fields and particle distributions were unknown until now. In this paper, we give an example of such a calculation answering the question whether the finite thermal spreads of plasma electrons are able to suppress the fastest growing modes in the beam-plasma system. It is shown that nonrelativistic temperatures of Maxwellian plasmas can stabilize only the oblique instabilities of relativistic beam. On the contrary, non-Maxwellian tails typically found in laboratory beam-plasma experiments are able to substantially reduce the growth rate of the dominant longitudinal modes affecting the efficiency of turbulent plasma heating.

  3. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  4. Introducing performance indicators in the French Public Transport. An approach by the Agency Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Moudjed, Mounia

    2007-01-01

    The public utilities are an interesting testing ground to understand the relation and asymmetry of information between an agent and his principle. The normative theory of agency and the positive theory of agency represent theory sphere of the contractual relation and the incentive and performance mechanisms. This theory sphere will be confronted by a comparative study on the telecommunication, electricity and urban public transport. Considered as public utility in France, the interest of this...

  5. Transport in weak dynamic disorder: a unified theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Bin; Li, Tiejun

    2013-11-01

    For quantum particles, it is well known that static disorder would lead to Anderson localization (AL) while dynamic (evolving) disorder would destroy AL and facilitate the transport. In this article, we study the transport behavior of a quantum particle in weak dynamic disorder. Based on Wigner representation, we obtain the radiative transfer equation (a linear Boltzmann equation) in the weak dynamic disorder limit, which could lead to not only all the existing transport behaviors in the literature but also new transport behaviors (for example, Lévy flight in momentum space). Furthermore, for dimensions greater than one, though we can formally derive the diffusive transport approximation, we argue that this diffusive transport is not physical but the nondiffusive transport should persist forever. This provides a possible resolution for the long-standing puzzle whether diffusive or nondiffusive transport would prevail in the long time limit. Our result would have major implications for the hypertransport of light, matter wave dynamics in disordered media, and directed polymer problems.

  6. A review of carrier thermoelectric-transport theory in organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Liu, Ming

    2016-07-20

    Carrier thermoelectric-transport theory has recently become of growing interest and numerous thermoelectric-transport models have been proposed for organic semiconductors, due to pressing current issues involving energy production and the environment. The purpose of this review is to provide a theoretical description of the thermoelectric Seebeck effect in organic semiconductors. Special attention is devoted to the carrier concentration, temperature, polaron effect and dipole effect dependence of the Seebeck effect and its relationship to hopping transport theory. Furthermore, various theoretical methods are used to discuss carrier thermoelectric transport. Finally, an outlook of the remaining challenges ahead for future theoretical research is provided.

  7. What RHIC Experiments and Theory tell us about Properties of Quark-Gluon Plasma ?

    CERN Document Server

    Shuryak, E V

    2004-01-01

    This brief review summarizes the main experimental discoveries made at RHIC and then discusses their implications. The robust collective flow phenomena are well described by ideal hydrodynamics, with the Equation of State (EoS) predicted by lattice simulations. However the transport properties turned out to be unexpected, with rescattering cross section one-to-two orders of magnitude larger than expected from perturbative QCD. These and other theoretical developments indicate that Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) produced at RHIC, and probably in a wider temperature region $T_ctheories studied via Maldacena duality; (ii) trapped ultra-cold atoms with very large scattering length, we return to sQGP and show that there should exist literally hundreds of bound states in it in the RHIC domain, most them...

  8. Microscopic theory of electron absorption by plasma-facing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a method for calculating the probability with which the wall of a plasma absorbs an electron at low energy. The method, based on an invariant embedding principle, expresses the electron absorption probability as the probability for transmission through the wall’s long-range surface potential times the probability to stay inside the wall despite of internal backscattering. To illustrate the approach we apply it to a SiO2 surface. Besides emission of optical phonons inside the wall we take elastic scattering at imperfections of the plasma-wall interface into account and obtain absorption probabilities significantly less than unity in accordance with available electron-beam scattering data but in disagreement with the widely used perfect absorber model.

  9. Microscopic theory of electron absorption by plasma-facing surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bronold, Franz X

    2016-01-01

    We describe a method for calculating the probability with which the wall of a plasma absorbs an electron at low energy. The method, based on an invariant embedding principle, expresses the electron absorption probability as the probability for transmission through the wall's long-range surface potential times the probability to stay inside the wall despite of internal backscattering. To illustrate the approach we apply it to a \\SiOTwo\\ surface. Besides emission of optical phonons inside the wall we take elastic scattering at imperfections of the plasma-wall interface into account and obtain absorption probabilities significantly less than unity in accordance with available electron-beam scattering data but in disagreement with the widely used perfect absorber model.

  10. Magnetic-perturbation-induced plasma transport in H-mode pedestals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, J. D.; Cole, A. J.; Hegna, C. C.

    2012-03-01

    Plasma toroidal rotation can prevent reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields on rational surfaces and hence magnetic island formation and stochasticity in the edge of tokamak H-mode plasmas. However, magnetic flutter induced by RMPs off the rational surfaces causes a radial electron heat diffusivity χe^RMP˜(δBr/B0)^2χ| F(x) in which χ|˜vTe^2/νe is an effective parallel electron heat diffusivity and F is a spatially varying factor [1]. The flutter also diffuses electrons radially and causes a factor of about 3 smaller increases in density diffusion. Since the electron density transport is non-ambipolar, this flutter process also modifies the radial electric field and plasma toroidal rotation. This work extends the previously developed periodic cylinder screw pinch model [1] of RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport to a full toroidal model which is axisymmetric to lowest order plus gyroradius-small magnetic field perturbations. The possible role of the RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport in reducing pressure gradients in H-mode pedestals and thereby suppressing ELMs will be discussed.[4pt] [1] J.D. Callen et al., UW-CPTC 11-13, http://www.cptc.wisc.edu (submitted to Nucl. Fusion.)

  11. Kinetic theory the Chapman-Enskog solution of the transport equation for moderately dense gases

    CERN Document Server

    Brush, S G

    1972-01-01

    Kinetic Theory, Volume 3: The Chapman-Enskog Solution of the Transport Equation for Moderately Dense Gases describes the Chapman-Enskog solution of the transport equation for moderately dense gases. Topics covered range from the propagation of sound in monatomic gases to the kinetic theory of simple and composite monatomic gases and generalizations of the theory to higher densities. The application of kinetic theory to the determination of intermolecular forces is also discussed. This volume is divided into two sections and begins with an introduction to the work of Hilbert, Chapman, and Ensko

  12. Plasma Theory and Simulation Group Annual Progress Report for 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-31

    experimental run. " results in a form to be compared with laboratory experiments. PDCX include the electromagnetics, atomic physics and chemical reactions...beam formation analitically : i) the resistance of the (low-density) to the final, high-density cylindrical wall can be approximated by the regime...related to the presence of sub-micron dust contamination in plasma aided processing. The dust particles are produced by chemical and mechanical means. In

  13. Theory of density fluctuations in strongly radiative plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. E.; Mabey, P.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.

    2016-03-01

    Derivation of the dynamic structure factor, an important parameter linking experimental and theoretical work in dense plasmas, is possible starting from hydrodynamic equations. Here we obtain, by modifying the governing hydrodynamic equations, a new form of the dynamic structure factor which includes radiative terms. The inclusion of such terms has an effect on the structure factor at high temperatures, which suggests that its effect must be taken into consideration in such regimes.

  14. Extended numerical modeling of impurity neoclassical transport in tokamak edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, H.; Yamoto, S.; Hatayama, A. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama (Japan); Homma, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama (Japan); Research Fellow of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Understanding of impurity transport in tokamaks is an important issue in order to reduce the impurity contamination in fusion core plasmas. Recently, a new kinetic numerical scheme of impurity classical/neoclassical transport has been developed. This numerical scheme makes it possible to include classical self-diffusion (CL SD), classical inward pinch (CL IWP), and classical temperature screening effect (CL TSE) of impurity ions. However, impurity neoclassical transport has been modeled only in the case where background plasmas are in the Pfirsch-Schluter (PS) regime. The purpose of this study is to extend our previous model to wider range of collisionality regimes, i.e., not only the PS regime, but also the plateau regime. As in the previous study, a kinetic model with Binary Collision Monte-Carlo Model (BMC) has been adopted. We focus on the modeling of the neoclassical self-diffusion (NC SD) and the neoclassical inward pinch (NC IWP). In order to simulate the neoclassical transport with the BCM, velocity distribution of background plasma ions has been modeled as a deformed Maxwell distribution which includes plasma density gradient. Some test simulations have been done. As for NC SD of impurity ions, our scheme reproduces the dependence on the collisionality parameter in wide range of collisionality regime. As for NC IWP, in cases where test impurity ions and background ions are in the PS and plateau regimes, parameter dependences have been reproduced. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Evidence of active transport (filtration?) of plasma proteins across the capillary walls in muscle and subcutis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Lassen, N A

    1978-01-01

    Under slight lymphatic stasis (tilting the body 15 degrees) we measured the arrival of locally injected I-albumin to the plasma pool. From 30 min. to 90 min. after the injection the return rate was zero i.e. local back transport in the two tissues studied viz.muscle and subcutaneous fat is very...

  16. Evidence of active transport (filtration?) of plasma proteins across the capillary walls in muscle and subcutis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Lassen, N A

    1979-01-01

    Under slight lymphatic stasis (tilting the body 15 degrees) we measured the arrival of locally injected 131I-albumin in the plasma pool. From 30 min to 90 min after the injection the return rate was zero, i.e. local back transport in the two tissues studied, muscle and subcutaneous fat, is very...

  17. The effect of plasma fluctuations on parallel transport parameters in the SOL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havlíčková, E.; Fundamenski, W.; Naulin, Volker

    2011-01-01

    in the scrape-off layer (SOL) taking into account these fluctuations is presented. Plasma transport in the SOL along the magnetic field between two targets is calculated by a one-dimensional fluid code in order to estimate the response to transient conditions along the SOL and the attention is given...

  18. Electron transport in the plasma edge with rotating resonant magnetic perturbations at the TEXTOR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoschus, Henning

    2011-10-13

    Small three-dimensional (3D) magnetic perturbations can be used as a tool to control the edge plasma parameters in magnetically confined plasmas in high confinement mode (''H-mode'') to suppress edge instabilities inherent to this regime, the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs). In this work, the impact of rotating 3D resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields on the edge plasma structure characterized by electron density and temperature fields is investigated. We study a low confinement (L-mode) edge plasma (r/a>0.9) with high resistivity (edge electron collisionality {nu}{sup *}{sub e}>4) at the TEXTOR tokamak. The plasma structure in the plasma edge is measured by a set of high resolution diagnostics: a fast CCD camera ({delta}t=20 {mu}s) is set up in order to visualize the plasma structure in terms of electron density variations. A supersonic helium beam diagnostic is established as standard diagnostic at TEXTOR to measure electron density n{sub e} and temperature T{sub e} with high spatial ({delta}r=2 mm) and temporal resolution ({delta}t=20 {mu}s). The measured plasma structure is compared to modeling results from the fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-EIRENE. A sequence of five new observations is discussed: (1) Imaging of electron density variations in the plasma edge shows that a fast rotating RMP field imposes an edge plasma structure, which rotates with the external RMP rotation frequency of vertical stroke {nu}{sub RMP} vertical stroke =1 kHz. (2) Measurements of the electron density and temperature provide strong experimental evidence that in the far edge a rotating 3D scrape-off layer (SOL) exists with helical exhaust channels to the plasma wall components. (3) Radially inward, the plasma structure at the next rational flux surface is found to depend on the relative rotation between external RMP field and intrinsic plasma rotation. For low relative rotation the plasma structure is dominated by a particle and energy loss

  19. A state-of-the-art review of transportation systems evaluation techniques relevant to air transportation, volume 1. [urban planning and urban transportation using decision theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefner, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Mathematical and philosophical approaches are presented for evaluation and implementation of ground and air transportation systems. Basic decision processes are examined that are used for cost analyses and planning (i.e, statistical decision theory, linear and dynamic programming, optimization, game theory). The effects on the environment and the community that a transportation system may have are discussed and modelled. Algorithmic structures are examined and selected bibliographic annotations are included. Transportation dynamic models were developed. Citizen participation in transportation projects (i.e, in Maryland and Massachusetts) is discussed. The relevance of the modelling and evaluation approaches to air transportation (i.e, airport planning) is examined in a case study in St. Louis, Missouri.

  20. Plasma transport properties at the L-H transition and high performance phase of JET discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balet, B.; Cordey, J.G.; Erba, M.; Jones, T.T.C.; Lomas, P.J.; Smeulders, P.; Springmann, E.M.; Stubberfield, P.M.; Taroni, A.; Thomsen, K. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Parail, V.V. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-07-01

    Numerical analysis are performed which show that both electron and ion thermal diffusivities are reduced by one order of magnitude everywhere, not only in a narrow region near separatrix during the L-H transition. There is no separate H-VH transition on JET, this transition coincides with the cessation of ELMs. In the ELM free phase ion transport in the core is close to its neoclassical value, but probably rises towards plasma edge (however still remaining much less than it was in L-mode). The best agreement with experiment is obtained with the model which simultaneously takes into account both the global reduction of Bohm type anomalous transport in plasma core and formation of temperature pedestal near plasma edge. (authors). 6 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Electron heat transport in current carrying and currentless thermonuclear plasmas. Tokamaks and stellarators compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, M.

    1996-01-16

    In the first experiment the plasma current in the RTP tokamak is varied. Here the underlying idea was to check whether at a low plasma current, transport in the tokamak resembles transport in stellarators more than at higher currents. Secondly, experiments have been done to study the relation of the diffusivity {chi} to the temperature and its gradient in both W7-AS and RTP. In this case the underlying idea was to find the explanation for the phenomenon observed in both tokamaks and stellarators that the quality of the confinement degrades when more heating is applied. A possible explanation is that the diffusivity increases with the temperature or its gradient. Whereas in standard tokamak and stellarator experiments the temperature and its gradient are strongly correlated, a special capability of the plasma heating system of W7-AS and RTP can force them to decouple. (orig.).

  2. Relationship between plasma growth hormone concentration and cellular sodium transport in acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlitz, H.; Jonsson, O.; Bengtsson, B.-Aa. (Departments of Nephrology, Urology and Endocrinology, University of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between mean plasma growth hormone (GH) concentration and cellular sodium transport in untreated and treated acromegaly. Seventeen patients (age 55 [+-] 3 years) with active acromegaly were studied with respect to plasma GH (mean of 24 h GH profile) and erythrocyte electrolyte content as well as transmembrane sodium transport. The patients were reinvestigated two weeks after successful surgery (N = 14) and again after one year (N = 13). Erythrocyte electrolytes were analyzed by flame photometry and sodium influx and efflux rate constant determined by in vitro incubation using a modified Keyne's formula. In patients with active acromegaly there was a significant positive correlation between IGF-1 and cellular sodium transport, while GH tended to show a negative relatonship to the same parameter. After successful treatment, both IGF-1 and GH disclosed a positive relationship to cellular sodium transport. After one year, a significant increase in erythrocyte sodium content was seen in the patients compared to the preoperative situation. In conclusion, if this is a generalized phenomonen the results are compatible with a sodium-retaining effect of GH via stimulation of transmembrane sodium transport. In active acromegaly this may be counteracted by a sodium transport inhibitor giving the reverse relationship between GH and cellular sodium transport. (au).

  3. Coherent structures and anomalous transport in reversed field pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, V.; Drake, J. R.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Bergsåker, H.; Cavazzana, R.; Cecconello, M.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.

    2006-02-01

    The results leading to the identification of coherent structures emerging from the background turbulence in the edge region of the reversed field pinch experiments EXTRAP-T2R and RFX are reviewed. These structures have traits of vortices in velocity field and blobs in density, and the reconstruction of their spatial structure and of their time evolution is discussed focusing on the analysis tools applied. The role of these structures in the particle anomalous transport is addressed, showing that their collisions can contribute up to 50% the total particle losses.This process is shown to be responsible for bursts in particle flux and it is found to set a characteristic collision time, which is in agreement with the statistical properties of laminar times for particle flux bursts.

  4. Resonant-magnetic-perturbation-induced plasma transport in H-mode pedestals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C. [University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1609 (United States); Cole, A. J. [Columbia University, 201 S.W. Mudd, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Plasma toroidal rotation reduces reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields {delta}B on rational (q = m/n) magnetic flux surfaces. Hence, it causes radial perturbations {delta}B{sub {rho}m/n} to be small there, and thus inhibits magnetic island formation and stochasticity in the edge of high (H-) mode confinement tokamak plasmas. However, electron collisional damping combined with the spatial magnetic flutter {delta}B{sub {rho}m/n} induced by RMPs in the vicinity of rational surfaces causes a radial electron heat diffusivity in which {chi}{sub e Parallel-To }{sup eff}{approx}(v{sub Te}{sup 2}/{nu}{sub e})/(1+x{sup 2}/{delta}{sub Parallel-To }{sup 2}) is an effective parallel electron thermal diffusivity. These effects are reduced by magnetic shear effects at a distance x from rational surfaces for |x|>{delta}{sub Parallel-To} but amplified for {delta}B-caret{sub {rho}m/n}(x)>{delta}B-caret{sub {rho}m/n}(0). A kinetic, toroidal model of these RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport effects is developed and compared to a previously developed cylindrical model. The RMP-induced increases in plasma transport can be large enough to reduce plasma gradients in H-mode pedestals. Thus, they may contribute to suppressing edge localized modes in tokamak plasmas.

  5. Thermodynamical and microscopic properties of turbulent transport in the edge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghendrih, Ph; Norscini, C.; Hasenbeck, F.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Abiteboul, J.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Marandet, Y.; Sarazin, Y.; Tamain, P.; Zarzoso, D.

    2012-12-01

    Edge plasma turbulence modelled with 2D interchange is shown to exhibit convective transport at the microscale level. This transport property is related to avalanche like transport in such a flux-driven system. Correlation functions and source modulation are used to analyse the transport properties but do not allow one to recover the Fick law that must characterise the system at large scales. Coarse graining is then introduced to average out the small scales in order to recover the Fick law. One finds that the required space averaging is comparable to the system size while the time averaging is comparable to the confinement time. The system is then reduced to a single reservoir such that transport is characterised by a single scalar, either the diffusion coefficient of the Fick law or a characteristic evolution time constant.

  6. Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma in the Earth's atmosphere: Implications for Radar Head Echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimant, Y. S.; Oppenheim, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to be observed visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo often accompanied by a much longer non-specular trail (see the Figure). Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma responsible for the radar head echo. This theory produces analytic expressions describing the ion and neutral velocity distributions along with the detailed 3-D spatial structure of the near-meteoroid plasma. These expressions predict a number of unexpected features such as shell-like velocity distributions. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a strongly non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for a more accurate quantitative interpretation of radar measurements, estimates of the ionization efficiency, and should help calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. This theory could also help clarify the physical nature of electromagnetic pulses observed during recent meteor showers and associated with the passage of fast-moving meteors through the

  7. Experimental validation of a filament transport model in turbulent magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Carralero, D; Aho-Mantila, L; Birkenmeier, G; Brix, M; Groth, M; Müller, H W; Stroth, U; Vianello, N; Wolfrum, E; Contributors, JET

    2015-01-01

    In a wide variety of natural and laboratory magnetized plasmas, filaments appear as a result of interchange instability. These convective structures substantially enhance transport in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. According to filament models, their propagation may follow different regimes depending on the parallel closure of charge conservation. This is of paramount importance in magnetic fusion plasmas, as high collisionality in the scrape-off layer may trigger a regime transition leading to strongly enhanced perpendicular particle fluxes. This work reports for the first time on an experimental verification of this process, linking enhanced transport with a regime transition as predicted by models. Based on these results, a novel scaling for global perpendicular particle transport in reactor relevant tokamaks such as ASDEX-Upgrade and JET is found, leading to important implications for next generation fusion devices.

  8. Dust in magnetised plasmas - Basic theory and some applications. [to planetary rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, T. G.; Morfill, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the theory of charged test particle motion in magnetic fields is reviewed. This theory is then extended to charged dust particles, for which gravity and charge fluctuations play an important role. It is shown that systematic drifts perpendicular to the magnetic field and stochastic transport effects may then have to be considered none of which occur in the case of atomic particles (with the exception of charge exchange reactions). Some applications of charged dust particle transport theory to planetary rings are then briefly discussed.

  9. Theory and measurements of emittance preservation in plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederico, Joel

    2016-12-01

    In this dissertation, we examine the preservation and measurement of emittance in the plasma wakefield acceleration blowout regime. Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) is a revolutionary approach to accelerating charged particles that has been demonstrated to have the potential for gradients orders of magnitude greater than traditional approaches. The application of PWFA to the design of a linear collider will make new high energy physics research possible, but the design parameters must first be shown to be competitive with traditional methods. Emittance preservation is necessary in the design of a linear collider in order to maximize luminosity. We examine the conditions necessary for circular symmetry in the PWFA blowout regime, and demonstrate that current proposals meet these bounds. We also present an application of beam lamentation which describes the process of beam parameter and emittance matching. We show that the emittance growth saturates as a consequence of energy spread in the beam. The initial beam parameters determine the amount of emittance growth, while the contribution of energy spread is negligible. We also present a model for ion motion in the presence of a beam that is much more dense than the plasma. By combining the model of ion motion and emittance growth, we find the emittance growth due to ion motion is minimal in the case of marginal ion motion. In addition, we present a simulation that validates the ion motion model, which is under further development to examine emittance growth of both marginal and pronounced ion motion. Finally, we present a proof-of-concept of an emittance measurement which may enable the analysis of emittance preservation in future PWFA experiments.

  10. Theory of current-free double layers in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, K. S.; Saharia, K.; Schamel, H.

    2008-06-01

    The existence of current-free double layers in unmagnetized plasma is studied by means of the quasipotential method applied to the Vlasov-Poisson system. Crucial for its existence are trapped particle populations that are characterized by notches (dips) in the velocity distribution functions at resonant velocity becoming flat at large amplitude limit. The potential drop across the double layer, or its amplitude ψ, can be arbitrarily strong covering the whole range 0pressures. It is, hence, the effective electron (ion) temperature increase (decrease) with increasing potential, caused by the trapped particles, which is responsible for the existence of this two-parameter family of solutions.

  11. Analysis of modern optimal control theory applied to plasma position and current control in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, M.A.

    1981-09-01

    The strong compression TFTR discharge has been segmented into regions where linear dynamics can approximate the plasma's interaction with the OH and EF power supply systems. The dynamic equations for these regions are utilized within the linear optimal control theory framework to provide active feedback gains to control the plasma position and current. Methods are developed to analyze and quantitatively evaluate the quality of control in a nonlinear, more realistic simulation. Tests are made of optimal control theory's assumptions and requirements, and the feasibility of this method for TFTR is assessed.

  12. Criticism of generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerner, Boris S. [Physics of Transportation and Traffic, University Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-03-10

    It is explained why the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown (a transition from free flow to congested traffic) should be the empirical basis for any traffic and transportation theory that can be reliable used for control and optimization in traffic networks. It is shown that generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory are not consistent with the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown at a highway bottleneck. To these fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory belong (i) Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) theory, (ii) the General Motors (GM) model class (for example, Herman, Gazis et al. GM model, Gipps’s model, Payne’s model, Newell’s optimal velocity (OV) model, Wiedemann’s model, Bando et al. OV model, Treiber’s IDM, Krauß’s model), (iii) the understanding of highway capacity as a particular stochastic value, and (iv) principles for traffic and transportation network optimization and control (for example, Wardrop’s user equilibrium (UE) and system optimum (SO) principles). Alternatively to these generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory, we discuss three-phase traffic theory as the basis for traffic flow modeling as well as briefly consider the network breakdown minimization (BM) principle for the optimization of traffic and transportation networks with road bottlenecks.

  13. Criticism of generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory: A brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2013-11-01

    It is explained why the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown (a transition from free flow to congested traffic) should be the empirical basis for any traffic and transportation theory that can be reliably used for control and optimization in traffic networks. It is shown that the generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of the traffic and transportation theory are not consistent with the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown at a highway bottleneck. To these fundamentals and methodologies of the traffic and transportation theory belong (i) Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) theory, (ii) the General Motors (GM) model class (for example, Herman, Gazis et al. GM model, Gipps’s model, Payne’s model, Newell’s optimal velocity (OV) model, Wiedemann’s model, Bando et al. OV model, Treiber’s IDM, Krauß’s model), (iii) the understanding of highway capacity as a particular (fixed or stochastic) value, and (iv) principles for traffic and transportation network optimization and control (for example, Wardrop’s user equilibrium (UE) and system optimum (SO) principles). Alternatively to these generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of the traffic and transportation theory, we discuss the three-phase traffic theory as the basis for traffic flow modeling as well as briefly consider the network breakdown minimization (BM) principle for the optimization of traffic and transportation networks with road bottlenecks.

  14. Theory of the Jitter radiation in a magnetized plasma accompanying temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The linear stability of a magnetized plasma accompanying temperature gradient was reexamined by using plasma kinetic theory. The anisotropic velocity distribution function was decomposed into two components. One is proportional to the temperature gradient parallel to and the other is proportional to the temperature gradient perpendicular to the back ground magnetic field. Since the amplitude of the anisotropic velocity distribution function is proportional to the heat conductivity and the heat conductivities perpendicular to the magnetic field is strongly reduced, the first component of the anisotropic velocity distribution function is predominant. The anisotropic velocity distribution function induced by the temperature gradient along the back ground magnetic field drives plasma kinetic instability and the circular polarized magnetic plasma waves are excited. The instability is almost identical to Weibel instability in weakly magnetized plasma. However, depending on whether wave vectors of modes are parallel...

  15. Hydrodynamic theory for ion structure and stopping power in quantum plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P K; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M

    2013-04-01

    We present a theory for the dynamical ion structure factor (DISF) and ion stopping power in an unmagnetized collisional quantum plasma with degenerate electron fluids and nondegenerate strongly correlated ion fluids. Our theory is based on the fluctuation dissipation theorem and the quantum plasma dielectric constant that is deduced from a linearized viscoelastic quantum hydrodynamical (LVQHD) model. The latter incorporates the essential physics of quantum forces, which are associated with the quantum statistical pressure, electron-exchange, and electron-correlation effects, the quantum electron recoil effect caused by the dispersion of overlapping electron wave functions that control the dynamics of degenerate electron fluids, and the viscoelastic properties of strongly correlated ion fluids. Both degenerate electrons and nondegenerate strongly correlated ions are coupled with each other via the space charge electric force. Thus, our LVQHD theory is valid for a collisional quantum plasma at atomic scales with a wide range of the ion coupling parameter, the plasma composition, and plasma number densities that are relevant for compressed plasmas in laboratories (inertial confinement fusion schemes) and in astrophysical environments (e.g., warm dense matter and the cores of white dwarf stars). It is found that quantum electron effects and viscoelastic properties of strongly correlated ions significantly affect the features of the DISF and the ion stopping power (ISP). Unlike previous theories, which have studied ion correlations in terms of the ion coupling parameter, by neglecting the essential physics of collective effects that are competing among each other, we have here developed a method to evaluate the dependence of the plasma static and dynamical features in terms of individual parameters, like the Wigner-Seitz radius, the ion atomic number, and the ion temperature. It is found that due to the complex nature of charge screening in quantum plasmas, the ion

  16. Hydrodynamic theory for ion structure and stopping power in quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2013-04-01

    We present a theory for the dynamical ion structure factor (DISF) and ion stopping power in an unmagnetized collisional quantum plasma with degenerate electron fluids and nondegenerate strongly correlated ion fluids. Our theory is based on the fluctuation dissipation theorem and the quantum plasma dielectric constant that is deduced from a linearized viscoelastic quantum hydrodynamical (LVQHD) model. The latter incorporates the essential physics of quantum forces, which are associated with the quantum statistical pressure, electron-exchange, and electron-correlation effects, the quantum electron recoil effect caused by the dispersion of overlapping electron wave functions that control the dynamics of degenerate electron fluids, and the viscoelastic properties of strongly correlated ion fluids. Both degenerate electrons and nondegenerate strongly correlated ions are coupled with each other via the space charge electric force. Thus, our LVQHD theory is valid for a collisional quantum plasma at atomic scales with a wide range of the ion coupling parameter, the plasma composition, and plasma number densities that are relevant for compressed plasmas in laboratories (inertial confinement fusion schemes) and in astrophysical environments (e.g., warm dense matter and the cores of white dwarf stars). It is found that quantum electron effects and viscoelastic properties of strongly correlated ions significantly affect the features of the DISF and the ion stopping power (ISP). Unlike previous theories, which have studied ion correlations in terms of the ion coupling parameter, by neglecting the essential physics of collective effects that are competing among each other, we have here developed a method to evaluate the dependence of the plasma static and dynamical features in terms of individual parameters, like the Wigner-Seitz radius, the ion atomic number, and the ion temperature. It is found that due to the complex nature of charge screening in quantum plasmas, the ion

  17. Transport timescale calculations of sawteeth and helical structures in non-circular tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Stephen; Ferraro, Nate; Breslau, Josh; Chen, Jin

    2012-10-01

    We present results of using the implicit 3D MHD code M3D-C^1 [1,2] to perform 3D nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics calculations of the internal dynamics of a shaped cross-section tokamak plasma that span the timescales associated with ideal and resistive stability as well as parallel and perpendicular transport. We specify the transport coefficients and apply a ``current controller'' that adjusts the boundary loop-voltage to keep the total plasma current fixed. The 3D 2-fluid plasma model advances the magnetic field, velocities, electron and ion temperatures, and plasma density. We find that the plasma either reaches a stationary quasi-helical state in which the central safety factor is approximately unity, or it periodically undergoes either simple or compound sawtooth oscillations [3] with a period that approaches a constant value. By comparing a dee-shaped cross section with an elliptical shaped cross section, it is shown that the plasma shape has a large effect on determining the sawtooth behavior and the associated mode activity. Application to ITER shaped tokamak plasmas predict the magnitude of the 3D boundary deformation as a result of a stationary quasi-helical state forming in the interior. [4pt] [1] J. Breslau, N. Ferraro, S.C. Jardin, Physics of Plasmas 16 092503 (2009) [0pt] [2] S. C. Jardin, N. Ferraro, J. Breslau, J. Chen, Computational Science and Discovery 5 014002 (2012) [0pt] [3] X. von Goeler, W. Stodiek, and N. Sauthoff, Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 1201 (1974)

  18. Experiments on the transportation of a magnetized plasma stream in the GOL-3 facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postupaev, V. V.; Batkin, V. I.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kuklin, K. N.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The program of the deep upgrade of the GOL-3 multiple-mirror trap is presented. The upgrade is aimed at creating a new GOL-NB open trap located at the GOL-3 site and intended to directly demonstrate the efficiency of using multiple-mirror magnetic cells to improve longitudinal plasma confinement in a gasdynamic open trap. The GOL-NB device will consist of a new central trap, adjoint cells with a multiple-mirror magnetic field, and end tanks (magnetic flux expanders). Plasma in the central trap will be heated by neutral beam injection with a power of up to 1.5 MW and duration of 1 ms. At present, physical experiments directed at developing plasma technologies that are novel for this facility are being carried out using the 6-m-long autonomous part of the GOL-3 solenoid. The aim of this work was to develop a method for filling the central trap with a low-temperature start plasma. Transportation of a plasma stream from an arc source over a distance of 3 m in a uniform magnetic field with an induction of 0.5-4.5 T is demonstrated. In these experiments, the axial plasma density was (1-4) × 1020 m-3 and the mirror ratio varied from 5 to 60. In general, the experiments confirmed the correctness of the adopted decisions for the start plasma source of the GOL-NB device.

  19. Quantum noise theory for phonon transport through nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Huang, Yunmi; Huang, Changcheng

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a quantum noise approach to study the phonon transport through nanostructures. The nanostructures acting as phonon channels are attached to two phonon reservoirs. And the temperature drop between the two reservoirs drives the phonon transport through the channels. We have derived a quantum Langevin equation(QLE) to describe the phonon transport with the quantum noise originated from the thermal fluctuation of the reservoirs. Within the Markov approximation, the QLE is used to get the thermal conductivity κ of the nanostructures and the finite size effect of the κ then is studied. In this study, the advantage of the quantum noise approach lays on the fact that no any local temperature needs to be defined for the nanostructures in its non-equilibrium state.

  20. Internal Transport Barrier Broadening through Subdominant Mode Stabilization in Reversed Field Pinch Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, R.; Auriemma, F.; Fassina, A.; Martines, E.; Terranova, D.; Sattin, F.

    2016-05-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) device RFX-mod features strong internal transport barriers when the plasma accesses states with a single dominant helicity. Such transport barriers enclose a hot helical region with high confinement whose amplitude may vary from a tiny one to an amplitude encompassing an appreciable fraction of the available volume. The transition from narrow to wide thermal structures has been ascribed so far to the transport reduction that occurs when the dominant mode separatrix, which is a preferred location for the onset of stochastic field lines, disappears. In this Letter we show instead that the contribution from the separatrix disappearance, by itself, is marginal and the main role is instead played by the progressive stabilization of secondary modes. The position and the width of the stochastic boundary encompassing the thermal structures have been estimated by applying the concept of a 3D quasiseparatrix layer, developed in solar physics to treat reconnection phenomena without true separatrices and novel to toroidal laboratory plasmas. Considering the favorable scaling of secondary modes with the Lundquist number, these results open promising scenarios for RFP plasmas at temperatures higher than the presently achieved ones, where lower secondary modes and, consequently, larger thermal structures are expected. Furthermore, this first application of the quasiseparatrix layer to a toroidal plasma indicates that such a concept is ubiquitous in magnetic reconnection, independent of the system geometry under investigation.

  1. Non-equilibrium reacting gas flows kinetic theory of transport and relaxation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Nagnibeda, Ekaterina; Nagnibeda, Ekaterina

    2009-01-01

    This volume develops the kinetic theory of transport phenomena and relaxation processes in the flows of reacting gas mixtures. The theory is applied to the modeling of non-equilibrium flows behind strong shock waves, in the boundary layer, and in nozzles.

  2. Scaling theory put into practice: First-principles modeling of transport in doped silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Rurali, R.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2007-01-01

    We combine the ideas of scaling theory and universal conductance fluctuations with density-functional theory to analyze the conductance properties of doped silicon nanowires. Specifically, we study the crossover from ballistic to diffusive transport in boron or phosphorus doped Si nanowires...

  3. SymGF: A Symbolic Tool for Quantum Transport Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zi Min

    In this thesis, I report the development and application of a symbolic derivation tool named "SymGF'' - standing for Symbolic Green's Function, that can automatically and analytically derive quantum transport expressions and the associated Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's functions (NEGF). Quantum transport happens in open systems consisting of a scattering region coupled to external electrodes. When there are strong electron-electron interactions in the scattering region, analytical derivations of the Green's functions can be very tedious and error prone. Running on a personal computer, SymGF derives the necessary analytical formulas at a level of correlation specified by the user, using the equation of motion (EOM) method. The input to SymGF are the second quantized form the device Hamiltonian, the (anti)commutators of the operators that appear in the Hamiltonian, and a truncation rule for the correlators which determines the accuracy of the final outcome. The output of SymGF are the analytical expressions of transport properties such as electric current and conductance in terms of various Green's functions; as well as the Green's functions themselves in terms of the unperturbed non-interacting Green's functions that can be obtained straightforwardly. For systems where electron-electron interaction can be neglected, the transport problems can be easily solved and SymGF is not necessary - even though SymGF gives the same answer; but for interacting systems SymGF drastically reduces the mathematical burden of analytical derivations. We have tested SymGF for several transport problems involving Kondo resonances where analytical derivations were done by humans: exactly the same results were obtained by SymGF but in a tiny fraction of time. We have applied SymGF to new and very hard problems that resist analytical derivations by hand, including quantum transport in a double quantum dot system; transport through a single quantum dot in parallel to a direct lead

  4. The Gaussian Radial Basis Function Method for Plasma Kinetic Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hirvijoki, Eero; Belli, Emily; Embréus, Ola

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental macroscopic description of a magnetized plasma is the Vlasov equation supplemented by the nonlinear inverse-square force Fokker-Planck collision operator [Rosenbluth et al., Phys. Rev., 107, 1957]. The Vlasov part describes advection in a six-dimensional phase space whereas the collision operator involves friction and diffusion coefficients that are weighted velocity-space integrals of the particle distribution function. The Fokker-Planck collision operator is an integro-differential, bilinear operator, and numerical discretization of the operator is far from trivial. In this letter, we describe a new approach to discretize the entire kinetic system based on an expansion in Gaussian Radial Basis functions (RBFs). This approach is particularly well-suited to treat the collision operator because the friction and diffusion coefficients can be analytically calculated. Although the RBF method is known to be a powerful scheme for the interpolation of scattered multidimensional data, Gaussian RBFs also...

  5. Modification of argon impurity transport by electron cyclotron heating in KSTAR H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joohwan; Henderson, S. S.; Kim, Kimin; Seon, C. R.; Song, Inwoo; Lee, H. Y.; Jang, Juhyeok; Park, Jae Sun; Lee, S. G.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, Seung Hun; Hong, Suk-Ho; Choe, Wonho

    2017-03-01

    Experiments with a small amount of Ar gas injection as a trace impurity were conducted in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) H-mode plasma ({{B}\\text{T}}   =  2.8 T, {{I}\\text{P}}   =  0.6 MA, and {{P}\\text{NBI}}   =  4.0 MW). 170 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) at 600 and 800 kW was focused along the mid-plane with a fixed major radial position of R   =  1.66 m. The emissivity of the Ar16+ (3.949 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) and Ar15+ (353.860 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) spectral lines were measured by x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy (XICS) and a vacuum UV (VUV) spectrometer, respectively. ECH reduces the peak Ar15+ emission and increases the Ar16+ emission, an effect largest with 800 kW. The ADAS-SANCO impurity transport code was used to evaluate the Ar transport coefficients. It was found that the inward convective velocity found in the plasma core without ECH was decreased with ECH, while diffusion remained approximately constant resulting in a less-peaked Ar density profile. Theoretical results from the NEO code suggest that neoclassical transport is not responsible for the change in transport, while the microstability analysis using GKW predicts a dominant ITG mode during both ECH and non-ECH plasmas.

  6. Bifurcation and hysteresis of plasma edge transport in a flux-driven system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Wang, X. Y.; Sun, C. K.; Zhou, A.; Liu, D.; Ma, C. H.; Wang, X. G.

    2016-10-01

    Transition dynamics and mean shear flow generation in plasma interchange turbulence are explored in a flux-driven system that resembles the plasma edge region. The nonlinear evolution of the interchange mode shows two confinement regimes with different transport levels. Large amplitude oscillations in the phase space of turbulence intensity and mean flow energy are observed and investigated. Both clockwise and counterclockwise oscillations occur during the transition between the two regimes. The Reynolds stress gradients are shown to play a critical role in the generation of mean sheared flows in the edge region. Both the forward and back transitions are simulated self-consistently and a significant hysteresis is found.

  7. Plasma transport in the interplanetary space: Percolation and anomalous diffusion of magnetic-field lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimbardo, G.; Veltri, P. [Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza, Univ. della Calabria (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1997-11-01

    The magnetic fluctuations due to, e.g., magnetohydrodynamic turbulence cause a magnetic-field line random walk that influences many cosmic plasma phenomena. The results of a three-dimensional numerical simulation of a turbulent magnetic field in plane geometry are presented here. Magnetic percolation, Levy flights, and non-Gaussian random walk of the magnetic-field lines are found for moderate perturbation levels. In such a case plasma transport can be anomalous, i.e., either super diffusive or sub diffusive. Increasing the perturbation level a Gaussian diffusion regime is attained. The implications on the structure of the electron fore shock and of planetary magneto pauses are discussed.

  8. Modelling of turbulent impurity transport in fusion edge plasmas using measured and calculated ionization cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Kendl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent transport of trace impurities impurities in the edge and scrape-off-layer of tokamak fusion plasmas is modelled by three dimensional electromagnetic gyrofluid computations including evolution of plasma profile gradients. The source function of impurity ions is dynamically computed from pre-determined measured and calculated electron impact ionization cross section data. The simulations describe the generation and further passive turbulent E-cross-B advection of the impurities by intermittent fluctuations and coherent filamentary structures (blobs) across the scrape-off-layer.

  9. Line photon transport in a non-homogeneous plasma using radiative coupling coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florido, R.; Gil, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.; Rubiano, J.G.; Martel, P. [Las Palmas de Gran Canaria Univ., Dept. de Fisica (Spain); Florido, R.; Gil, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.; Rubiano, J.G.; Martel, P.; Minguez, E. [Madrid Univ. Politecnica, Instituto de Fusion Nuclear-DENIM (Spain)

    2006-06-15

    We present a steady-state collisional-radiative model for the calculation of level populations in non-homogeneous plasmas with planar geometry. The line photon transport is taken into account following an angle- and frequency-averaged escape probability model. Several models where the same approach has been used can be found in the literature, but the main difference between our model and those ones is that the details of geometry are exactly treated in the definition of coupling coefficients and a local profile is taken into account in each plasma cell. (authors)

  10. Measurement of hot electron transport in overdense plasma VIA self induced giant magnetic pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, S.; Narayanan, V.; Lad, Amit D.; Ahmed, Saima; Sengupta, S.; Das, A.; Sheng, Z. M.; Kaw, P. K.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2010-08-01

    Spatial and temporal resolved ultrashort(8ps) multimegagauss(65 MG) magnetic field has been measured in plasma produced on Al-coated BK-7 glass by the interaction of a relativististic intensity laser(4x1018W/cm2, 30 fs) using pump-probe polarimetry. The 2D profile of magnetic field is captured using a CCD camera. Mapping of this magnetic field maps the transport of relativistic electrons in the plasma. The magnetic field profiles indicate filamentary behavior (Weibel-like instability). Particle in cell simulation are used to explain the result obtained.

  11. [Fluctuations and transport in fusion plasma]: Progress report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-12-31

    In the study of plasma collection by obstacles in a tokamak edge plasma, the effect of anomalous transport have been examined using an extension of the 2D fluid code developed here previously (Appendices A and B). The origin of the anomalous transport is assumed to be a randomly fluctuating electric field such as would be caused by drift waves. As before, the magnetic field is assumed to be uniform and perpendicular to the obstacle, which is taken to be an infinite strip. In the absence of ambient plasma flow, the numerical results indicate that ion viscous heating is important near the tip of the obstacle, where there is a large velocity gradient in the flow. For typical plasma parameters, the maximum ion temperature near the tip is up to 85% higher than the ambient ion temperature. When there is a subsonic plasma flow past the obstacle, the numerical results indicate that, near the tip of the obstacle, the ions on the downstream side are hotter than those on the upstream side. Furthermore, the ion density is higher on the upstream side. A detailed report of this work has been prepared and will be submitted as part of the Annual Progress Report. Recently, the 2D parallel electrostatic plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) code described in reference (9) (Appendix B) has been upgraded to a 2D fully electromagnetic PIC code. This code has been successfully tested on the JPL/Caltech Mark III Hypercube concurrent computers and can be used to simulate interactions of electromagnetic waves with a magnetized plasma. It is currently applied to investigate the decay of large amplitude Alfven waves, such as those observed in the solar wind. Large amplitude Alfven waves, propagating parallel to the magnetic field, are predicted to decay into obliquely propagating daughter waves and standing magnetosonic waves. Results from the simulations will be compared with theoretical predictions.

  12. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.; Chen, J.; Startsev, E.; Lu, Z.; Li, Z. Q.

    2015-10-01

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E ×B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transport that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around kθρs˜0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E ×B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E ×B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Moreover, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma transport in advanced ST

  13. Kinetic theory of equilibrium axisymmetric collisionless plasmas in off-equatorial tori around compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Slaný, Petr; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Karas, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    The possible occurrence of equilibrium off-equatorial tori in the gravitational and electromagnetic fields of astrophysical compact objects has been recently proved based on non-ideal MHD theory. These stationary structures can represent plausible candidates for the modelling of coronal plasmas expected to arise in association with accretion discs. However, accretion disc coronae are formed by a highly diluted environment, and so the fluid description may be inappropriate. The question is posed of whether similar off-equatorial solutions can be determined also in the case of collisionless plasmas for which treatment based on kinetic theory, rather than fluid one, is demanded. In this paper the issue is addressed in the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell description for non-relativistic multi-species axisymmetric plasmas subject to an external dominant spherical gravitational and dipolar magnetic field. Equilibrium configurations are investigated and explicit solutions for the species kinetic distribution functio...

  14. Transport analysis of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casali L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Future fusion reactors, foreseen in the “European road map” such as DEMO, will operate under more demanding conditions compared to present devices. They will require high divertor and core radiation by impurity seeding to reduce heat loads on divertor target plates. In addition, DEMO will have to work at high core densities to reach adequate fusion performance. The performance of fusion reactors depends on three essential parameters: temperature, density and energy confinement time. The latter characterizes the loss rate due to both radiation and transport processes. The DEMO foreseen scenarios described above were not investigated so far, but are now addressed at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. In this work we present the transport analysis of such scenarios. Plasma with high radiation by impurity seeding: transport analysis taking into account the radiation distribution shows no change in transport during impurity seeding. The observed confinement improvement is an effect of higher pedestal temperatures which extend to the core via stiffness. A non coronal radiation model was developed and compared to the bolometric measurements in order to provide a reliable radiation profile for transport calculations. High density plasmas with pellets: the analysis of kinetic profiles reveals a transient phase at the start of the pellet fuelling due to a slower density build up compared to the temperature decrease. The low particle diffusion can explain the confinement behaviour.

  15. Quantum theory of the dielectric constant of a magnetized plasma and astrophysical applications. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V.; Ventura, J.

    1972-01-01

    A quantum mechanical treatment of an electron plasma in a constant and homogeneous magnetic field is considered, with the aim of (1) defining the range of validity of the magnetoionic theory (2) studying the deviations from this theory, in applications involving high densities, and intense magnetic field. While treating the magnetic field exactly, a perturbation approach in the photon field is used to derive general expressions for the dielectric tensor. Numerical estimates on the range of applicability of the magnetoionic theory are given for the case of the 'one-dimensional' electron gas, where only the lowest Landau level is occupied.

  16. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Benincasa, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Gauge/string correspondence provides an efficient method to investigate gauge theories. In this talk we discuss the results of the paper (to appear) by P. Benincasa, A. Buchel and A. O. Starinets, where the propagation of sound waves is studied in a strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. In particular, a prediction for the speed of sound as well as for the bulk viscosity is made for the N=2* gauge theory in the high temperature limit. As expected, the results achieved show a devi...

  17. Observation of internal transport barrier in ELMy H-mode plasmas on the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Gao, X.; Liu, H. Q.; Li, G. Q.; Zhang, T.; Zeng, L.; Liu, Y. K.; Wu, M. Q.; Kong, D. F.; Ming, T. F.; Han, X.; Wang, Y. M.; Zang, Q.; Lyu, B.; Li, Y. Y.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhong, F. B.; Li, K.; Xu, L. Q.; Gong, X. Z.; Sun, Y. W.; Qian, J. P.; Ding, B. J.; Liu, Z. X.; Liu, F. K.; Hu, C. D.; Xiang, N.; Liang, Y. F.; Zhang, X. D.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Wan, Y. X.; EAST Team

    2017-08-01

    The internal transport barrier (ITB) has been obtained in ELMy H-mode plasmas by neutron beam injection and lower hybrid wave heating on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The ITB structure has been observed in profiles of ion temperature, electron temperature, and electron density within ρ beta, β N, increases from 1.5 to near 2. The fishbone activity observed during the ITB phase suggests the central safety factor q(0) ˜ 1. Transport coefficients are calculated by particle balance and power balance analysis, showing an obvious reduction after the ITB formation.

  18. Conservation laws for collisional and turbulent transport processes in toroidal plasmas with large mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, H.; Nunami, M.; Nakata, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2017-02-01

    A novel gyrokinetic formulation is presented by including collisional effects into the Lagrangian variational principle to yield the governing equations for background and turbulent electromagnetic fields and gyrocenter distribution functions, which can simultaneously describe classical, neoclassical, and turbulent transport processes in toroidal plasmas with large toroidal flows on the order of the ion thermal velocity. Noether's theorem modified for collisional systems and the collision operator given in terms of Poisson brackets are applied to derivation of the particle, energy, and toroidal momentum balance equations in the conservative forms, which are desirable properties for long-time global transport simulation.

  19. Catchment-scale herbicides transport: Theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Thomet, M.; Botter, G.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-02-01

    This paper proposes and tests a model which couples the description of hydrologic flow and transport of herbicides at catchment scales. The model accounts for streamflow components' age to characterize short and long term fluctuations of herbicide flux concentrations in stream waters, whose peaks exceeding a toxic threshold are key to exposure risk of aquatic ecosystems. The model is based on a travel time formulation of transport embedding a source zone that describes near surface herbicide dynamics. To this aim we generalize a recently proposed scheme for the analytical derivation of travel time distributions to the case of solutes that can be partially taken up by transpiration and undergo chemical degradation. The framework developed is evaluated by comparing modeled hydrographs and atrazine chemographs with those measured in the Aabach agricultural catchment (Switzerland). The model proves reliable in defining complex transport features shaped by the interplay of long term processes, related to the persistence of solute components in soils, and short term dynamics related to storm inter-arrivals. The effects of stochasticity in rainfall patterns and application dates on concentrations and loads in runoff are assessed via Monte Carlo simulations, highlighting the crucial role played by the first rainfall event occurring after herbicide application. A probabilistic framework for critical determinants of exposure risk to aquatic communities is defined. Modeling of herbicides circulation at catchment scale thus emerges as essential tools for ecological risk assessment.

  20. Fractional-order theory of heat transport in rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingales, Massimiliano

    2014-11-01

    The non-local model of heat transfer, used to describe the deviations of the temperature field from the well-known prediction of Fourier/Cattaneo models experienced in complex media, is framed in the context of fractional-order calculus. It has been assumed (Borino et al., 2011 [53], Mongioví and Zingales, 2013 [54]) that thermal energy transport is due to two phenomena: (i) A short-range heat flux ruled by a local transport equation; (ii) A long-range thermal energy transfer proportional to a distance-decaying function, to the relative temperature and to the product of the interacting masses. The distance-decaying function is assumed in the functional class of the power-law decay of the distance yielding a novel temperature equation in terms of α-order Marchaud fractional-order derivative (0⩽α⩽1). Thermodynamical consistency of the model is provided in the context of Clausius-Plank inequality. The effects induced by the boundary conditions on the temperature field are investigated for diffusive as well as ballistic local heat flux. Deviations of the temperature field from the linear distributions in the neighborhood of the thermostated zones of small-scale conductors are qualitatively predicted by the used fractional-order heat transport model, as shown by means of molecular dynamics simulations.

  1. Electronics Research Laboratory, Plasma Theory and Simulation Group annual progress report, January 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-12-31

    This is a brief progress report, covering our research in general plasma theory and simulation, plasma-wall physics theory and simulation, and code development. Reports written in this period are included with this mailing. A publications list plus abstracts for two major meetings are included.

  2. Modeling and measuring the transport and scattering of energetic debris in an extreme ultraviolet plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporre, John R.; Elg, Daniel T.; Kalathiparambil, Kishor K.; Ruzic, David N.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical model for describing the propagation and scattering of energetic species in an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light lithography source is presented. An EUV light emitting XTREME XTS 13-35 Z-pinch plasma source is modeled with a focus on the effect of chamber pressure and buffer gas mass on energetic ion and neutral debris transport. The interactions of the energetic debris species, which is generated by the EUV light emitting plasma, with the buffer gas and chamber walls are considered as scattering events in the model, and the trajectories of the individual atomic species involved are traced using a Monte Carlo algorithm. This study aims to establish the means by which debris is transported to the intermediate focus with the intent to verify the various mitigation techniques currently employed to increase EUV lithography efficiency. The modeling is compared with an experimental investigation.

  3. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in ITG-modes of magneto-plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqub Khan, M.; Qaiser Manzoor, M.; Haq, A. ul; Iqbal, J.

    2017-04-01

    The ideal gas equation and S={{c}v}log ≤ft(P/ρ \\right) (where S is entropy, P is pressure and ρ is the mass density) define the interconnection of entropy with the temperature and density of plasma. Therefore, different phenomena relating to plasma and entropy need to be investigated. By employing the Braginskii transport equations for a nonuniform electron–ion magnetoplasma, two new parameters—the entropy distribution function and the entropy gradient drift—are defined, a new dispersion relation is obtained, and the dependence of anomalous transport on entropy is also proved. Some results, like monotonicity, the entropy principle and the second law of thermodynamics, are proved with a new definition of entropy. This work will open new horizons in fusion processes, not only by controlling entropy in tokamak plasmas—particularly in the pedestal regions of the H-mode and space plasmas—but also in engineering sciences.

  4. Multi-scale physics mechanisms and spontaneous edge transport bifurcations in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, C.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Silva, C.; Carralero, D.; Ascasibar, E.; Carreras, B. A.; Estrada, T.; Tabarés, F.; Tafalla, D.; Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.; López-Fraguas, A.; van Milligen, B.; Ochando, M. A.

    2009-09-01

    The magnitude of radial transport in magnetic confinement devices for controlled nuclear fusion suffers spontaneous bifurcations when specific system parameter values are exceeded. Here we show, for the first time, that the correlation length of the plasma potential becomes of the order of the machine size during the edge bifurcation itself, quite unlike the density fluctuations. The mechanism governing the development of this bifurcation, leading to the establishment of an edge transport barrier, is still one of the main scientific conundrums facing the magnetic fusion community after more than twenty years of intense research. The results presented here show the dominant role of long-range correlations when approaching the Low to High confinement edge transition in fusion plasmas. This is in line with the expectation that multi-scale interactions are a crucial ingredient of complex dynamics in many non-equilibrium systems.

  5. A Particle In Cell code development for high current ion beam transport and plasma simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N

    2016-01-01

    A simulation package employing a Particle in Cell (PIC) method is developed to study the high current beam transport and the dynamics of plasmas. This package includes subroutines those are suited for various planned projects at University of Frankfurt. In the framework of the storage ring project (F8SR) the code was written to describe the beam optics in toroidal magnetic fields. It is used to design an injection system for a ring with closed magnetic field lines. The generalized numerical model, in Cartesian coordinates is used to describe the intense ion beam transport through the chopper system in the low energy beam section of the FRANZ project. Especially for the chopper system, the Poisson equation is implemented with irregular geometries. The Particle In Cell model is further upgraded with a Monte Carlo Collision subroutine for simulation of plasma in the volume type ion source.

  6. Transport studies in boundary and divertor plasmas of JT-60U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    This thesis describes an investigation on transport of plasma, neutral particle and impurity in the boundary and divertor of the JT-60U tokamak to provide a better understanding of plasma-surface interactions and divertor physics. The asymmetry between the inboard and outboard divertor on plasma parameters (in-out asymmetry) are usually observed in tokamaks with the divertor. In this study, the in-out asymmetry was investigated under various plasma conditions and discharge parameters. The observed results were discussed with several mechanisms that can produce the in-out asymmetry. It was confirmed experimentally that the importance of each mechanism depends on the plasma parameters and discharge conditions. The current flowing in the scrape-off layer (SOL) due to the in-out asymmetry was observed. The SOL currents in the high density plasma with the occurrence of the plasma detachment were investigated for the first time in this study. The ion temperature in the divertor region is one of the most important factors for both generation and transport of impurity. However, the background ion temperature in the divertor region has not been measured in any tokamak so far. The ion temperature in the divertor region has been measured for the first time with the Doppler broading of the C{sup 3+} ion emission line. The measured temperature was analyzed by an impurity particle transport code. The code calculation showed that the measured temperature reflects the low temperature at the outside of the separatrix in the inboard region. The spectral profile of Balmer-{alpha} (D{sub {alpha}}) line emitted from the deuterium atoms reflects the velocity distribution of neutral particles by the Doppler effect and is effective for investigating the detailed neutral behavior and recycling process. The spatial variation of the D{sub {alpha}} line spectral profile in the divertor region has been measured for the first time in this study. The observed results were compared with the

  7. General theories for the electrical transport properties of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, L T; Nanda, K K, E-mail: nanda@mrc.iisc.ernet.in [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2011-08-05

    We have shown that the general theories of metals and semiconductors can be employed to understand the diameter and voltage dependency of current through metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes, respectively. The current through a semiconducting multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is associated with the energy gap that is different for different shells. The contribution of the outermost shell is larger as compared to the inner shells. The general theories can also explain the diameter dependency of maximum current through nanotubes. We have also compared the current carrying ability of a MWCNT and an array of the same diameter of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and found that MWCNTs are better suited and deserve further investigation for possible applications as interconnects.

  8. Thermodynamics, transport and relaxation in non-conformal theories

    CERN Document Server

    Attems, Maximilian; Mateos, David; Papadimitriou, Ioannis; Santos-Oliván, Daniel; Sopuerta, Carlos F; Triana, Miquel; Zilhão, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We study the equilibrium and near-equilibrium properties of a holographic five-dimensional model consisting of Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar field with a non-trivial potential. The dual four-dimensional gauge theory is not conformal and, at zero temperature, exhibits a renormalisation group flow between two different fixed points. We quantify the deviations from conformality both in terms of thermodynamic observables and in terms of the bulk viscosity of the theory. By computing the quasi-normal modes of the system we identify two different relaxation channels. At high temperatures, the system first isotropises, meaning that all pressures become equal, and subsequently equilibrates, meaning that the equation of state becomes applicable. At low temperatures the order of these two processes is reversed.

  9. Linear response theory for magnon transport in ferromagnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shuichi; Matsumoto, Ryo

    2012-02-01

    We study transverse response of magnons in ferromagnetic insulators within linear response theory. In analogy with the corresponding theory for electrons [1], magnon transverse response is described, including the Hall effect, Nernst effect, and thermal Hall effect. As is also the case for electrons [1], the response functions for magnons consist of the Kubo-formula term, and the term corresponding to the orbital angular momentum. We can rewrite the response functions in terms of the Berry curvature in momentum space [2]. We apply this theory to the (quantum-mechanical) magnons and to the classical magnetostatic waves. For the magnetostatic waves, the eigenmodes are given by a generalized eigenvalue problem, giving rise to the special form of the Berry curvature [2]. We explain various properties of this Berry curvature for the generalized eigenvalue problem, and discuss its implications for the physical properties of magnetostatic modes. [1] L. Smrcka and P. Streda, J. Phys. C, 10, 2153 (1977); H. Oji, P. Streda, Phys. Rev. B 31, 7291 (1985); [2] R. Matsumoto and S. Murakami, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 197202 (2011); Phys. Rev. B 84, 184406 (2011).

  10. Transport processes and entropy production in toroidal plasmas with gyrokinetic electromagnetic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, H.; Okamoto, M.; Horton, W.; Wakatani, M.

    1996-01-01

    Transport processes and resultant entropy production in magnetically confined plasmas are studied in detail for toroidal systems with gyrokinetic electromagnetic turbulence. The kinetic equation including the turbulent fluctuations are double-averaged over the ensemble and the gyrophase. The entropy balance equation is derived from the double-averaged kinetic equation with the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation for the fluctuating distribution function. The result clarifies the spatial transport and local production of the entropy due to the classical, neoclassical and anomalous transport processes, respectively. For the anomalous transport process due to the electromagnetic turbulence as well as the classical and neoclassical processes, the kinetic form of the entropy production is rewritten as the thermodynamic form, from which the conjugate pairs of the thermodynamic forces and the transport fluxes are identified. The Onsager symmetry for the anomalous transport equations is shown to be valid within the quasilinear framework. The complete energy balance equation, which takes account of the anomalous transport and exchange of energy due to the fluctuations, is derived from the ensemble-averaged kinetic equation. The intrinsic ambipolarity of the anomalous particle fluxes is shown to hold for the self-consistent turbulent electromagnetic fields satisfying Poisson`s equation and Ampere`s law. (author).

  11. Controlling fluctuations and transport in the reversed field pinch with edge current drive and plasma biasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, D.J.G.

    1998-09-01

    Two techniques are employed in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to test and control different aspects of fluctuation induced transport in the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Auxiliary edge currents are driven along the magnetic field to modify magnetic fluctuations, and the particle and energy transport associated with them. In addition, strong edge flows are produced by plasma biasing. Their effect on electrostatic fluctuations and the associated particle losses is studied. Both techniques are accomplished using miniature insertable plasma sources that are biased negatively to inject electrons. This type of emissive electrode is shown to reliably produce intense, directional current without significant contamination by impurities. The two most important conclusions derived from these studies are that the collective modes resonant at the reversal surface play a role in global plasma confinement, and that these modes can be controlled by modifying the parallel current profile outside of the reversal surface. This confirms predictions based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that auxiliary current drive in the sense to flatten the parallel current profile can be successful in controlling magnetic fluctuations in the RFP. However, these studies expand the group of magnetic modes believed to cause transport in MST and suggest that current profile control efforts need to address both the core resonant magnetic modes and those resonant at the reversal surface. The core resonant modes are not significantly altered in these experiments; however, the distribution and/or amplitude of the injected current is probably not optimal for affecting these modes. Plasma biasing generates strong edge flows with shear and particle confinement likely improves in these discharges. These experiments resemble biased H modes in other magnetic configurations in many ways. The similarities are likely due to the common role of electrostatic fluctuations in edge transport.

  12. Relationship between brain serotonin transporter binding, plasma concentration and behavioural effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterise the relationship between in vivo brain serotonin transporter (SERT) binding, plasma concentration and pharmacological effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in mice. Oral administration of fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline at pharmacologically relevant doses exerted dose- and time-dependent binding activity of brain SERT as revealed by significant increases in KD for specific [3H]paroxetine binding, and the i...

  13. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, P; Starinets, A O; Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Starinets, Andrei O.

    2005-01-01

    Using gauge theory/gravity duality we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. We compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of N=2^* supersymmetric SU(N_c) Yang-Mills plasma at a temperature much larger than the mass scale of the theory in the limit of large N_c and large 't Hooft coupling. The speed of sound is computed both from the equation of state and the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. Both computations lead to the same result. Bulk viscosity is determined by computing the attenuation constant of the sound wave mode.

  14. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benincasa, Paolo [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada); Buchel, Alex [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON N2J 2W9 (Canada); Starinets, Andrei O. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON N2J 2W9 (Canada)]. E-mail: starina@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2006-01-16

    Using gauge theory/gravity duality we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. We compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of N=2* supersymmetric SU(N{sub c}) Yang-Mills plasma at a temperature much larger than the mass scale of the theory in the limit of large N{sub c} and large 't Hooft coupling. The speed of sound is computed both from the equation of state and the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. Both computations lead to the same result. Bulk viscosity is determined by computing the attenuation constant of the sound wave mode.

  15. Tungsten transport and sources control in JET ITER-like wall H-mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorczak, N., E-mail: nicolas.fedorczak@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Monier-Garbet, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pütterich, T. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jlich, Assoc EURATOM-FZJ, Jlich (Germany); Devynck, P.; Dumont, R.; Goniche, M.; Joffrin, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Luna, E. de la [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maddison, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Matthews, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Nunes, I. [Istituto de plasmas e fusao nuclear, Lisboa (Portugal); Rimini, F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Solano, E.R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsalas, M. [Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, NCSR Demokritos 153 10, Attica (Greece); Vries, P. de [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    A set of discharges performed with the JET ITER-like wall is investigated with respect to control capabilities on tungsten sources and transport. In attached divertor regimes, increasing fueling by gas puff results in higher divertor recycling ion flux, lower divertor tungsten source, higher ELM frequency and lower core plasma radiation, dominated by tungsten ions. Both pedestal flushing by ELMs and divertor screening (including redeposition) are possibly responsible. For specific scenarios, kicks in plasma vertical position can be employed to increase the ELM frequency, which results in slightly lower core radiation. The application of ion cyclotron radio frequency heating at the very center of the plasma is efficient to increase the core electron temperature gradient and flatten electron density profile, resulting in a significantly lower central tungsten peaking. Beryllium evaporation in the main chamber did not reduce the local divertor tungsten source whereas core radiation was reduced by approximately 50%.

  16. Stability of tokamak plasmas with internal transport barriers against high n ideal magnetohydrodynamic ballooning mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Bing-Ren; Qu Wen-Xiao

    2006-01-01

    A ballooning mode equation for tokamak plasma, with the toroidicity and the Shafranov shift effects included, is derived for a shift circular flux tokamak configuration. Using this equation, the stability of the plasma configuration with an internal transport barrier (IT2 against the high n (the toroidal mode number) ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning mode is analysed. It is shown that both the toroidicity and the Shafranov shift effects are stabilizing.In the ITB region, these effects give rise to a low shear stable channel between the first and the second stability regions.Out of the ITB region towards the plasma edge, the stabilizing effect of the Shafranov shift causes the unstable zone to be significantly narrowed.

  17. Transport of plasma free fatty acids and triglycerides in man: a theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, David M.; Frank, Arthur; Steinberg, Daniel; Berman, Mones

    1970-01-01

    Three different multicompartmental models of free fatty acid (FFA) and very low density lipoprotein triglyceride fatty acid (VLDL-TGFA) transport in man are formulated from plasma FFA and VLDL-TGFA tracee and tracer data collected over a 24 hr interval after the injection of palmitate-14C. All modeling and data fitting were performed on a digital computer using the SAAM program. Structural differences in the three models relate to the position of the slowly turning over compartment required to generate the late portion of the plasma VLDL-TGFA tracer data. The positions of this slow compartment are along the hepatic pathway from FFA to VLDL-TGFA (model A) or in the distribution system of VLDL-TGFA (model B) or in the distribution system of FFA (model C). Although all three models are equally consistent with our experimental data and are supported by observations of others, each reveals inconsistency with some data obtained from the literature. Consequently, a combination model of FFA-TGFA transport, incorporating properties of models A, B, and C would be more consistent with all available data. Experiments that would help to determine the quantitative significance of each of the slow compartments in the combination model are suggested. Several other models suggesting recycling of plasma VLDL-TGFA through the plasma FFA pool, kinetic heterogencity of the plasma VLDL-TGFA pool, and contamination of plasma VLDL-TGFA radioactivity with low density lipoprotein (LDL) TGFA radioactivity were tested. The first model does not explain the late portion of the plasma VLDL-TGFA tracer data. The second and third models, while consistent with our tracee and tracer data, have steady-state implications with respect to the extent of kinetic heterogeneity and size of the LDL-TGFA contaminant that make them unlikely. Assumptions underlying other investigator's models of FFA and TGFA transport in man are reviewed within the logical framework of our models. Quantitative differences among

  18. Thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients of two-temperature helium thermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoxue; Murphy, Anthony B.; Li, Xingwen

    2017-03-01

    Helium thermal plasmas are in widespread use in arc welding and many other industrial applications. Simulation of these processes relies on accurate plasma property data, such as plasma composition, thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients. Departures from LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) generally occur in some regions of helium plasmas. In this paper, properties are calculated allowing for different values of the electron temperature, T e, and heavy-species temperature, T h, at atmospheric pressure from 300 K to 30 000 K. The plasma composition is first calculated using the mass action law, and the two-temperature thermodynamic properties are then derived. The viscosity, diffusion coefficients, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity of the two-temperature helium thermal plasma are obtained using a recently-developed method that retains coupling between electrons and heavy species by including the electron–heavy-species collision term in the heavy-species Boltzmann equation. It is shown that the viscosity and the diffusion coefficients strongly depend on non-equilibrium ratio θ (θ ={{T}\\text{e}}/{{T}\\text{h}} ), through the plasma composition and the collision integrals. The electrical conductivity, which depends on the electron number density and ordinary diffusion coefficients, and the thermal conductivity have similar dependencies. The choice of definition of the Debye length is shown to affect the electrical conductivity significantly for θ  >  1. By comparing with literature data, it is shown that the coupling between electrons and heavy species has a significant influence on the electrical conductivity, but not on the viscosity. Plasma properties are tabulated in the supplementary data.

  19. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, P

    2005-01-01

    Gauge/string correspondence provides an efficient method to investigate gauge theories. In this talk we discuss the results of the paper (to appear) by P. Benincasa, A. Buchel and A. O. Starinets, where the propagation of sound waves is studied in a strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. In particular, a prediction for the speed of sound as well as for the bulk viscosity is made for the N=2* gauge theory in the high temperature limit. As expected, the results achieved show a deviation from the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity for a conformal theory. It is pointed out that such results depend on the particular gauge theory considered.

  20. Plasma membrane electron transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on the presence of mitochondrial respiratory subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herst, Patries M; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W; Bircham, Peter W; Berridge, Michael V

    2008-09-01

    Most investigations into plasma membrane electron transport (PMET) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on the inducible ferric reductase responsible for iron uptake under iron/copper-limiting conditions. In this paper, we describe a PMET system, distinct from ferric reductase, which reduces the cell-impermeable water-soluble tetrazolium dye, 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium monosodium salt (WST-1), under normal iron/copper conditions. WST-1/1-methoxy-phenazine methosulphate reduction was unaffected by anoxia and relatively insensitive to diphenyleneiodonium. Dye reduction was increased when intracellular NADH levels were high, which, in S. cerevisiae, required deletion of numerous genes associated with NADH recycling. Genome-wide screening of all viable nuclear gene-deletion mutants of S. cerevisiae revealed that, although mitochondrial electron transport per se was not required, the presence of several nuclear and mitochondrially encoded subunits of respiratory complexes III and IV was mandatory for PMET. This suggests some form of interaction between components of mitochondrial and plasma membrane electron transport. In support of this, mitochondrial tubular networks in S. cerevisiae were shown to be located in close proximity to the plasma membrane using confocal microscopy.

  1. Fluid and gyrokinetic modelling of particle transport in plasmas with hollow density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegnered, D.; Oberparleiter, M.; Nordman, H.; Strand, P.

    2016-11-01

    Hollow density profiles occur in connection with pellet fuelling and L to H transitions. A positive density gradient could potentially stabilize the turbulence or change the relation between convective and diffusive fluxes, thereby reducing the turbulent transport of particles towards the center, making the fuelling scheme inefficient. In the present work, the particle transport driven by ITG/TE mode turbulence in regions of hollow density profiles is studied by fluid as well as gyrokinetic simulations. The fluid model used, an extended version of the Weiland transport model, Extended Drift Wave Model (EDWM), incorporates an arbitrary number of ion species in a multi-fluid description, and an extended wavelength spectrum. The fluid model, which is fast and hence suitable for use in predictive simulations, is compared to gyrokinetic simulations using the code GENE. Typical tokamak parameters are used based on the Cyclone Base Case. Parameter scans in key plasma parameters like plasma β, R/LT , and magnetic shear are investigated. It is found that β in particular has a stabilizing effect in the negative R/Ln region, both nonlinear GENE and EDWM show a decrease in inward flux for negative R/Ln and a change of direction from inward to outward for positive R/Ln . This might have serious consequences for pellet fuelling of high β plasmas.

  2. Investigation of turbulent transport and shear flows in the Edge of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkenmeier, G.; Koehn, A.; Manz, P.; Nold, B.; Stroth, U. [Institut fuer Plasmaforschung, Universitaet Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Happel, T. [Lab. Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Mahdizadeh, N. [ABB Switzerland Ltd. Corporate Research, Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland); Wilcox, R.; Anderson, D.T. [HSX Plasma Lab., University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Ramisch, M.

    2010-08-15

    Intense Langmuir-probe measurements were carried out in the toroidal low-temperature plasma of the torsatron TJ-K in order to investigate the origin and dynamics of intermittent transport events, so-called blobs, at the transition from closed to open field lines. The statistical properties of the fluctuations at the plasma boundary agree with observations made in fusion edge plasmas. Blobs were found to be generated locally through a change in turbulence drive across the separatrix. The non-linear spectral energy transfer from small-scale fluctuations into large-scale flows was measured with a 128-probe array. The results point to the transfer being a key loss channel for turbulence energy leading to a reduction in turbulent transport. Earlier observations[M.A. Pedrosa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 215003 (2008)] of enhanced long-range correlations in the plasma potential through externally induced shear flows in TJ-II stellarator were verified. The newly measured correlation of zonal vorticity and Reynolds stress at induced flow shear indicates an enhancement of zonal-flow drive (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Impurities in a non-axisymmetric plasma: Transport and effect on bootstrap current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollén, A., E-mail: albertm@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Landreman, M. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Smith, H. M.; Helander, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Braun, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); German Aerospace Center, Institute of Engineering Thermodynamics, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Impurities cause radiation losses and plasma dilution, and in stellarator plasmas the neoclassical ambipolar radial electric field is often unfavorable for avoiding strong impurity peaking. In this work we use a new continuum drift-kinetic solver, the SFINCS code (the Stellarator Fokker-Planck Iterative Neoclassical Conservative Solver) [M. Landreman et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 042503 (2014)] which employs the full linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau operator, to calculate neoclassical impurity transport coefficients for a Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) magnetic configuration. We compare SFINCS calculations with theoretical asymptotes in the high collisionality limit. We observe and explain a 1/ν-scaling of the inter-species radial transport coefficient at low collisionality, arising due to the field term in the inter-species collision operator, and which is not found with simplified collision models even when momentum correction is applied. However, this type of scaling disappears if a radial electric field is present. We also use SFINCS to analyze how the impurity content affects the neoclassical impurity dynamics and the bootstrap current. We show that a change in plasma effective charge Z{sub eff} of order unity can affect the bootstrap current enough to cause a deviation in the divertor strike point locations.

  4. Statistical theory of designed quantum transport across disordered networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walschaers, Mattia; Mulet, Roberto; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    We explain how centrosymmetry, together with a dominant doublet of energy eigenstates in the local density of states, can guarantee interference-assisted, strongly enhanced, strictly coherent quantum excitation transport between two predefined sites of a random network of two-level systems. Starting from a generalization of the chaos-assisted tunnelling mechanism, we formulate a random matrix theoretical framework for the analytical prediction of the transfer time distribution, of lower bounds of the transfer efficiency, and of the scaling behavior of characteristic statistical properties with the size of the network. We show that these analytical predictions compare well to numerical simulations, using Hamiltonians sampled from the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble.

  5. A Statistical Theory of Designed Quantum Transport Across Disordered Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Walschaers, Mattia; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We explain how centrosymmetry, together with a dominant doublet in the local density of states, can guarantee interference-assisted, strongly enhanced, strictly coherent quantum excitation transport between two predefined sites of a random network of two-level systems. Starting from a generalisation of the chaos assisted tunnelling mechanism, we formulate a random matrix theoretical framework for the analytical prediction of the transfer time distribution, of lower bounds of the transfer efficiency, and of the scaling behaviour of characteristic statistical properties with the size of the network.

  6. Transport coefficients in Yang-Mills theory and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strodthoff, Nils; Christiansen, Nicolai; Haas, Michael [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); Pawlowski, Jan M. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We calculate the shear viscosity over entropy density ratio η/s in Yang-Mills theory from the Kubo formula using an exact diagrammatic representation in terms of full propagators and vertices using gluon spectral functions as external input. We provide an analytic fit formula for the temperature dependence of η/s over the whole temperature range from a glueball resonance gas at low temperatures, to a high-temperature regime consistent with perturbative results. Subsequently we provide a first estimate for η/s in QCD.

  7. Density functional theory calculations of charge transport properties of ‘plate-like’ coronene topological structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ZIRAN CHEN; ZHANRONG HE; YOUHUI XU; WENHAO YU

    2017-09-01

    Charge transport rate is one of the key parameters determining the performance of organic electronic devices. In this paper, we used density functional theory (DFT) at the M06-2X/6−31+G(d) level to compute the charge transport rates of nine coronene topological structures. The results show that the energy gap of these nine coronene derivatives is in the range 2.90–3.30 eV, falling into the organic semiconductor category. The size of the conjugate ring has a large influence on the charge transport properties. Incorporation of methyl groupson the rigid core of tetrabenzocoronene and hexabenzocoronene is more conducive to the hole transport of the molecule than incorporating methoxyl groups. The derivatisation of a ‘long plate-like’ coronene with methoxylgroups facilitates both hole and electron transport. This class of molecules can thus be used in the design of ambipolar transport semiconductor materials.

  8. A tutorial introduction to the statistical theory of turbulent plasmas, a half-century after Kadomtsev's Plasma Turbulence and the resonance-broadening theory of Dupree and Weinstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krommes, John A.

    2015-12-01

    > In honour of the 50th anniversary of the influential review/monograph on plasma turbulence by B. B. Kadomtsev as well as the seminal works of T. H. Dupree and J. Weinstock on resonance-broadening theory, an introductory tutorial is given about some highlights of the statistical-dynamical description of turbulent plasmas and fluids, including the ideas of nonlinear incoherent noise, coherent damping, and self-consistent dielectric response. The statistical closure problem is introduced. Incoherent noise and coherent damping are illustrated with a solvable model of passive advection. Self-consistency introduces turbulent polarization effects that are described by the dielectric function . Dupree's method of using to estimate the saturation level of turbulence is described; then it is explained why a more complete theory that includes nonlinear noise is required. The general theory is best formulated in terms of Dyson equations for the covariance and an infinitesimal response function , which subsumes . An important example is the direct-interaction approximation (DIA). It is shown how to use Novikov's theorem to develop an -space approach to the DIA that is complementary to the original -space approach of Kraichnan. A dielectric function is defined for arbitrary quadratically nonlinear systems, including the Navier-Stokes equation, and an algorithm for determining the form of in the DIA is sketched. The independent insights of Kadomtsev and Kraichnan about the problem of the DIA with random Galilean invariance are described. The mixing-length formula for drift-wave saturation is discussed in the context of closures that include nonlinear noise (shielded by ). The role of in the calculation of the symmetry-breaking (zonostrophic) instability of homogeneous turbulence to the generation of inhomogeneous mean flows is addressed. The second-order cumulant expansion and the stochastic structural stability theory are also discussed in that context. Various historical

  9. Thermodynamics, transport and relaxation in non-conformal theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attems, Maximilian; Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; Papadimitriou, Ioannis; Santos-Oliván, Daniel; Sopuerta, Carlos F.; Triana, Miquel; Zilhão, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    We study the equilibrium and near-equilibrium properties of a holographic five-dimensional model consisting of Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar field with a non-trivial potential. The dual four-dimensional gauge theory is not conformal and, at zero temperature, exhibits a renormalisation group flow between two different fixed points. We quantify the deviations from conformality both in terms of thermodynamic observables and in terms of the bulk viscosity of the theory. The ratio of bulk over shear viscosity violates Buchel's bound. We study relaxation of small-amplitude, homogeneous perturbations by computing the quasi-normal modes of the system at zero spatial momentum. In this approximation we identify two different relaxation channels. At high temperatures, the different pressures first become approximately equal to one another, and subsequently this average pressure evolves towards the equilibrium value dictated by the equation of state. At low temperatures, the average pressure first evolves towards the equilibrium pressure, and only later the different pressures become approximately equal to one another.

  10. Forward transport of proteins in the plasma membrane of migrating cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; She, Liang; Sui, Ya-nan; Yuan, Xiao-bing; Wen, Yunqing; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-12-18

    Directional flow of membrane components has been detected at the leading front of fibroblasts and the growth cone of neuronal processes, but whether there exists global directional flow of plasma membrane components over the entire migrating neuron remains largely unknown. By analyzing the trajectories of antibody-coated single quantum dots (QDs) bound to two membrane proteins, overexpressed myc-tagged synaptic vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP2 and endogenous neurotrophin receptor TrkB, we found that these two proteins exhibited net forward transport, which is superimposed upon Brownian motion, in both leading and trailing processes of migrating cerebellar granule cells in culture. Furthermore, no net directional transport of membrane proteins was observed in nonmigrating cells with either growing or stalling leading processes. Analysis of the correlation of motion direction between two QDs on the same process in migrating neurons also showed a higher frequency of correlated forward than rearward movements. Such correlated QD movements were markedly reduced in the presence of myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin,suggesting the involvement of myosin II-dependent active transport processes. Thus, a net forward transport of plasma membrane proteins exists in the leading and trailing processes of migrating neurons, in line with the translocation of the soma.

  11. Transport theory: Spatial coherence of random laser emission

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Regine

    2012-01-01

    Recently random laser reached the stage of technologi- cal applicability. They have already been engineered as coherent microscope light sources in combination with light transport based disordered lenses. The big issue for all kinds of applications is the degree of coherence of the emitted radiation. The lasing spot sizes in dif- ferent regimes may provide different degrees of spatial and temporal coherence and as a consequence they can be perfectly tunable light sources for the case that the modal behavior can be controlled easily. In this letter we investigate the spatial coherence lengths of different random laser samples theoretically. The samples only vary in their filling with spherical ZnO Mie scatterers. Beyond we show, that the scattering mean free paths of random lasers are not only a material characteristics and dependent to the filling, instead the mean free paths change in depth of the sample and therefor depend on the nonlinear self-consistent gain of the random lasing principle.

  12. Modeling of limiter heat loads and impurity transport in Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberg, Florian; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Hoelbe, H.; Koenig, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Pedersen, T. S.; Bozhenkov, S.; Reiter, D.

    2015-11-01

    The quasi-isodynamic stellarator Wendelstein 7-X starts plasma operation in a limiter configuration. The field consists of closed magnetic flux surfaces avoiding magnetic islands in the plasma boundary. Because of the small size of the limiters and the absence of wall-protecting elements in this phase, limiter heat loads and impurity generation due to plasma surface interaction become a concern. These issues are studied with the 3D fluid plasma edge and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-Eirene. It is shown that the 3D SOL consists of three separate helical magnetic flux bundles of different field line connection lengths. A density scan at input power of 4MW reveals a strong modulation of the plasma paramters with the connection length. The limiter peak heat fluxes drop from 14 MWm-2 down to 10 MWm-2 with raising the density from 1 ×1018m-3 to 1.9 ×1019m-3, accompanied by an increase of the heat flux channel widths λq. Radiative power losses can help to avoid thermal overloads of the limiters at the upper margin of the heating power. The power removal feasibility of the intrinsic carbon and other extrinsic light impurities via active gas injection is discussed as a preparation of this method for island divertor operation. Work supported in part by start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA and by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-SC0013911.

  13. Charge transport in high mobility molecular semiconductors: classical models and new theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisi, Alessandro

    2011-05-01

    The theories developed since the fifties to describe charge transport in molecular crystals proved to be inadequate for the most promising classes of high mobility molecular semiconductors identified in the recent years, including for example pentacene and rubrene. After reviewing at an elementary level the classical theories, which still provide the language for the understanding of charge transport in these systems, this tutorial review outlines the recent experimental and computational evidence that prompted the development of new theories of charge transport in molecular crystals. A critical discussion will illustrate how very rarely it is possible to assume a charge hopping mechanism for high mobility organic crystals at any temperature. Recent models based on the effect of non-local electron-phonon coupling, dynamic disorder, coexistence of localized and delocalized states are reviewed. Additionally, a few more recent avenues of theoretical investigation, including the study of defect states, are discussed.

  14. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  15. Turbulent momentum transport in core tokamak plasmas and penetration of scrape-off layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiteboul, J.; Ghendrih, Ph; Grandgirard, V.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.; Sarazin, Y.; Strugarek, A.; Thomine, O.; Zarzoso, D.

    2013-07-01

    The turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum in the core of a tokamak plasma is investigated in global, full-f gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the GYSELA code in the flux-driven regime. During the initial turbulent phase, a front of positive Reynolds stress propagates radially, generating intrinsic toroidal rotation from a vanishing initial profile. This is also accompanied by a propagating front of turbulent heat flux. In the statistical steady-state regime, turbulent transport exhibits large-scale avalanche-like events which are found to transport both heat and momentum, and similar statistical properties are obtained for both fluxes. The impact of scrape-off layer flows is also investigated by modifying the boundary conditions in the simulations. The observed impact is radially localized for L-mode like poloidal profiles of parallel velocity at the edge, while a constant velocity at the edge can modify the core toroidal rotation profile in a large fraction of the radial domain.

  16. A reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport in solids and dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, M.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph; Santos, J. J.; Gremillet, L.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-07-01

    A hybrid reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport based on the angular moments of the relativistic kinetic equation with a special closure is presented. It takes into account collective effects with the self-generated electromagnetic fields as well as collisional effects with the slowing down of the relativistic electrons by plasmons, bound and free electrons and their angular scattering on both ions and electrons. This model allows for fast computations of relativistic electron beam transport while describing their energy distribution evolution. Despite the loss of information concerning the angular distribution of the electron beam, the model reproduces analytical estimates in the academic case of a monodirectional and monoenergetic electron beam propagating through a warm and dense plasma and hybrid particle-in-cell simulation results in a realistic laser-generated electron beam transport case.

  17. Nonlinear physics and energetic particle transport features of the beam-plasma instability

    CERN Document Server

    Carlevaro, Nakia; Montani, Giovanni; Zonca, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study transport features of a one-dimensional beam-plasma system in the presence of multiple resonances. As a model description of the general problem of a warm energetic particle beam, we assume $n$ cold supra-thermal beams and investigate the self-consistent evolution in the presence of the complete spectrum of nearly degenerate Langmuir modes. A qualitative transport estimation is obtained by computing the Lagrangian Coherent Structures of the system on given temporal scales. This leads to the splitting of the phase space into regions where the local transport processes are relatively faster. The general theoretical framework is applied to the case of the nonlinear dynamics of two cold beams, for which numerical simulation results are illustrated and analyzed.

  18. OsHT, a Rice Gene Encoding for a Plasma-Membrane Localized Histidine Transporter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di LIU; Wei GONG; Yong BAI; Jing-Chu LUO; Yu-Xian ZHU

    2005-01-01

    Using a degenerative probe designed according to the most conservative region of a known Lys- and His-specific amino acid transporter (LHT1) from Arabidopsis, we isolated a full-length cDNA named OsHT (histidine transporter of Oryza sativa L.) by screening the rice cDNA library. The cDNA is 1.3kb in length and the open reading frame encodes for a 441 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 49 kDa. Multiple sequence alignments showed that OsHT shares a high degree of sequence conservation at the deduced amino acid level with the Arabidopsis LHT1 and six putative lysine and histidine transporters. Computational analysis indicated that OsHT is an integral membrane protein with 11 putative transmembrane helices. This was confirmed by the transient expression assay because the OsHT-GFP fusion protein was, indeed, localized mainly in the plasma membrane of onion epidermal cells. Functional complementation experiments demonstrated that OsHT was able to work as a histidine transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that OsHT is a gene that encodes for a histidine transporter from rice.This is the first time that an LHT-type amino acid transporter gene has been cloned from higher plants other than A rabidopsis.

  19. Theory of wave propagation along waveguide filled with plasma in finite magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘盛纲; J.K.Lee; 祝大军

    1996-01-01

    Rigorous analytical theory of wave propagation along a cylindrical waveguide filled with plasmas in a dielectric tube immersed in finite magnetic field is presented.The field components’ expressions,eigenvalues,dispersion equations and complex wave power transmission equations have been obtained rigorously and discussed in detail.It is shown analytically that there is no disruption of the wave propagationin the ECR (ω=ωa) case,although the electrical permittivities approach to infinite in the case,and it hasbeen found that a real resonance takes place in this case while ω=(ωa2+ωpc2)1/2,in which the wave propagationof any mode is broken.The effective collisions are taken into consideration in the theory.Based on the above theory,the analytical theory of corrugated plasma waveguide immersed in finite axial magnetic field is also presented.The Floquet’s expansion of field components,the dispersion equations,and the coupling coefficients of the corrugated plasma waveguide have been derived rigorously a

  20. On the tuning of electrical and thermal transport in thermoelectrics: an integrated theory-experiment perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiong; Xi, Lili; Qiu, Wujie; Wu, Lihua; Shi, Xun; Chen, Lidong; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Uher, Ctirad; Singh, David J.

    2016-02-01

    During the last two decades, we have witnessed great progress in research on thermoelectrics. There are two primary focuses. One is the fundamental understanding of electrical and thermal transport, enabled by the interplay of theory and experiment; the other is the substantial enhancement of the performance of various thermoelectric materials, through synergistic optimisation of those intercorrelated transport parameters. Here we review some of the successful strategies for tuning electrical and thermal transport. For electrical transport, we start from the classical but still very active strategy of tuning band degeneracy (or band convergence), then discuss the engineering of carrier scattering, and finally address the concept of conduction channels and conductive networks that emerge in complex thermoelectric materials. For thermal transport, we summarise the approaches for studying thermal transport based on phonon-phonon interactions valid for conventional solids, as well as some quantitative efforts for nanostructures. We also discuss the thermal transport in complex materials with chemical-bond hierarchy, in which a portion of the atoms (or subunits) are weakly bonded to the rest of the structure, leading to an intrinsic manifestation of part-crystalline part-liquid state at elevated temperatures. In this review, we provide a summary of achievements made in recent studies of thermoelectric transport properties, and demonstrate how they have led to improvements in thermoelectric performance by the integration of modern theory and experiment, and point out some challenges and possible directions.

  1. Transport Theory for Kinetic Emission of Secondary Electrons from Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen

    1980-01-01

    Kinetic secondary electron emission from a solid target resulting from incidence of keV electrons or keV and MeV ions is treated theoretically on the basis of ionization cascade theory. The energy and angular distribution and the yield of secondary electrons are calculated for a random target...... that liberated electrons of low energy move isotropically inside the target in the limit of high primary energy as compared to the instantaneous energy of the liberated electrons. The connection between the spatial distribution of kinetic energy of the liberated electrons and the secondary electron current from...... a solid is derived. To find the former, existing computations for ion slowing down and experimental and theoretical ones for electron bombardment can be utilized. The energy and angular distribution of the secondary electrons and the secondary electron yield are both expressed as products of the deposited...

  2. Kinetic theory of twisted waves: Application to space plasmas having superthermal population of species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Kashif; Poedts, Stefaan; Lazar, Marian

    2017-04-01

    ring shape morphology of a beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM) is ideal for the observation of solar corona around the sun where the intensity of the beam is minimum at the center, in solar experiments, and Earth's ionosphere. The twisted plasma modes carrying OAM are mostly studied either by the fluid theory or Maxwellian distributed Kinetic Theory. But most of the space plasmas and some laboratory plasmas have non-thermal distributions due to super-thermal population of the plasma particles. Therefore the Kinetic Theory of twisted plasma modes carrying OAM are recently studied using non-thermal (kappa) distribution of the super-thermal particles in the presence of the helical electric field and significant change in the damping rates are observed by tuning appropriate parameters.

  3. Isospin effects in heavy-ion reactions: Results from transport theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colonna M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss recent studies, within the framework of transport theories, on heavy ion reactions between charge asymmetric systems, from low up to Fermi energies. We focus on isospin sensitive observables, aiming at extracting information on the density dependence of the isovector part of the nuclear effective interaction and of the nuclear symmetry energy. Results are critically reviewed, also trying to establish a link, when possible, between the outcome of different transport models.

  4. Theory of Nonequilibrium Spin Transport and Spin Transfer Torque in Superconducting-Ferromagnetic Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Erhai; Sauls, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Spin transport currents and the spin-transfer torques in voltage-biased superconducting-ferromagnetic nanopillars (SFNFS point contacts) are computed. We develop and implement an algorithm based on the Ricatti formulation of the quasiclassical theory of superconductivity to solve the time-dependent boundary conditions for the nonequilibrium Green's functions for spin transport through the ferromagnetic interfaces. A signature of the nonequilibrium torque is a component perpendicular to the pl...

  5. Theory of Electron Transport in Semiconductors A Pathway from Elementary Physics to Nonequilibrium Green Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Jacoboni, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    This book describes in details the theory of the electron transport in the materials and structures at the basis of modern micro- and nano-electronics. It leads and accompanies the reader, through a step-by-step derivation of all calculations, from the basic laws of classical and quantum physics up to the most modern theoretical techniques, such as nonequilibrium Green functions, to study transport properties of both semiconductor materials and modern low-dimensional and mesoscopic structures.

  6. Fluctuation theory for transport properties in multicomponent mixtures: thermodiffusion and heat conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The theory of transport properties in multicomponent gas and liquid mixtures, which was previously developed for diffusion coefficients, is extended onto thermodiffusion coefficients and heat conductivities. The derivation of the expressions for transport properties is based on the general...... statistical theory of fluctuations around an equilibrium state. The Onsager matrix of phenomenological coefficients is expressed in terms of the penetration lengths, including the newly introduced penetration length for the energy transfer. As an example, this penetration length is found from the known value...... of the heat conductivity coefficient for ideal gas. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  8. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scisciò, M.; Antici, P., E-mail: patrizio.antici@polytechnique.edu [INFN-RM1 and SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INRS-EMT, Université du Québec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [INFN-RM1 and SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Papaphilippou, Y. [CERN, CH 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-03-07

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  9. Magnetic fluctuations can contribute to plasma transport, ''self-consistency constraints'' notwithstanding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krommes, J.A.; Kim, Chang-Bae

    1987-09-01

    The recent conclusion that in a turbulent, collisionless plasma ''magnetic transport including quasilinear magnetic flutter transport ... does not contribute to the relaxation of (f), and thus is not responsible for electron energy or momentum transport'' is shown to be incorrect for a variety of situations of physical interest, including saturation by quasilinear plateau formation, induced scattering, and, most importantly, conventional mode coupling. The well-established theory of the mean infinitesimal response function and the spectral balance equation provides a unifying framework for understanding the above conclusion. In particular, the cancellations which lead to their conclusion are special cases of well-known relationships between the response function, particle propagator, and dielectric function. A more general, concise, and manifestly gauge-invariant algebraic derivation of the cancellations is given. Though the cancellations occur in a certain limit, these conclusions do not follow in general: The picture of steady-state turbulence as consisting of small-scale ''incoherent'' ballistic ''clumps'' shielded by long-wavelength ''coherent'' dielectric response is physically misleading and mathematically incomplete, as it ignores or mistreates the often dominant process of renormalized n-wave coupling. Thus, when ion nonlinearities are considered, formulas for the magnetic contribution to transport emerge which are quite similar to the quasilinear one. Furthermore, limits are possible in which all or part of the noise can be negligible, yet in which the total fluctuation spectrum remains finite. 56 refs.

  10. Application of inertia-induced excitation theory for nonlinear acoustic modes in colloidal plasma equilibrium flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Karmakar

    2007-04-01

    Application of inertia-induced acoustic excitation theory offers a new resonant excitation source channel of acoustic turbulence in the transonic domain of plasma flow. In bi-ion plasmas like colloidal plasma, two well-defined transonic points exist corresponding to the parent ion and the dust grain-associated acoustic modes. As usual, the modified ion acoustic mode (also known as dust ion-acoustic (DIA) wave) dynamics associated with parent ion inertia is excitable for both nanoscale- and micronscale-sized dust grains. It is found that the so-called (ion) acoustic mode (also known as dust-acoustic (DA) wave) associated with nanoscale dust grain inertia is indeed resonantly excitable through the active role of weak but finite parent ion inertia. It is interestingly conjectured that the same excitation physics, as in the case of normal plasma sound mode, operates through the active inertial role of plasma thermal species. Details of the nonlinear acoustic mode analyses of current interest in transonic domains of such impure plasmas in hydrodynamic flow are presented.

  11. Axisymmetric Bernstein modes in a finite-length non-neutral plasma: simulation and kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Grant; Peterson, Bryan G.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2016-10-01

    We are using a 2-D PIC code to model high-frequency (near the cyclotron frequency) axisymmetric oscillations in a finite-length pure-ion plasma. We previously modeled these modes for infinite-length plasmas, where they are not detectable in the surface charge on the walls because of axisymmetry and lack of z-dependence. This is not true in a finite-length plasma, however, because the eigenfunction of the oscillation has to have nodes a short distance beyond the ends of the plasma. This gives the modes a cos (kz z) or sin (kz z) dependence, with a kz such that an integral number (approximately) of half-wavelengths fit into the plasma. This z-dependence makes the mode detectable in the surface charge on the walls. The modes also have r-dependence. The radial-velocity eigenfunctions of the modes behave as J1 (kr r) . We have simulated the plasma with different kz and kr values and find that increasing kz introduces a small frequency shift, either upward or downward depending on which mode is measured. The damping of the modes also increases as kz or kr increases. We are developing an appropriate kinetic theory of these modes that will include both the finite-Larmour-radius effects and the axial bouncing motion of the particles.

  12. Sites of glucose transporter-4 vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane correlate spatially with microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennine M Dawicki-McKenna

    Full Text Available In adipocytes, vesicles containing glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4 redistribute from intracellular stores to the cell periphery in response to insulin stimulation. Vesicles then fuse with the plasma membrane, facilitating glucose transport into the cell. To gain insight into the details of microtubule involvement, we examined the spatial organization and dynamics of microtubules in relation to GLUT4 vesicle trafficking in living 3T3-L1 adipocytes using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy. Insulin stimulated an increase in microtubule density and curvature within the TIRF-illuminated region of the cell. The high degree of curvature and abrupt displacements of microtubules indicate that substantial forces act on microtubules. The time course of the microtubule density increase precedes that of the increase in intensity of fluorescently-tagged GLUT4 in this same region of the cell. In addition, portions of the microtubules are highly curved and are pulled closer to the cell cortex, as confirmed by Parallax microscopy. Microtubule disruption delayed and modestly reduced GLUT4 accumulation at the plasma membrane. Quantitative analysis revealed that fusions of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane, detected using insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with a pH-sensitive GFP tag (pHluorin, preferentially occur near microtubules. Interestingly, long-distance vesicle movement along microtubules visible at the cell surface prior to fusion does not appear to account for this proximity. We conclude that microtubules may be important in providing spatial information for GLUT4 vesicle fusion.

  13. Theory of Nucleon Transport in Deep Inelastic Heavy Ion Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Andrew Bruce

    Heavy ion reactions induced by projectiles of A > 80 at bombarding energies of 5-10 MeV/nucleon were studied using classical dynamical models. The damping of the relative motion was accounted for by radial and tangential friction, which dissipated both energy and angular momentum. Deformations were initially simulated by a simple phenomenological prescription for the entrance channel/exit channel asymmetry in the nuclear and centrifugal potentials. Later, a time dependent prolate spheroidal deformation was assumed for the exit channel, and its effect on all forces was explicitly treated. In that treatment the nuclear forces were derived from the proximity potential and the one-body proximity friction. The most important aspect of this work was the treatment of mass and charge transport. Transfer was treated as a random process occurring at finite time intervals along the trajectory. The probability of transfer at a given time was governed by a driving force derived from the liquid-drop binding energy and the nuclear temperature. All forces affecting the collision dynamics as well as the transfer driving forces were adjusted instantaneously to reflect any change in the charge or mass. Because the process was random, the equations of motion were solved by a Monte-Carlo procedure, whereby each impact parameter (or partial wave) was integrated many times, yielding a distribution for the scattering angle, final kinetic energy, final mass and final charge. The model was very successful in fitting the peak of the angular distribution and most of the observed energy loss. The qualitative features of the mass or charge distributions were accounted for by the model, including the increase of the width with increased energy loss. However, the model was not able to account for all of the observed width of either the mass (or charge) distributions or the angular distributions. This was true even if the effects of thermal fluctuations were included. The reasons for these

  14. Current-driven plasma acceleration versus current-driven energy dissipation. I - Wave stability theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant unstable electrostatic wave modes of an electromagnetically accelerated plasma are investigated. The study is the first part of a three-phase program aimed at characterizing the current-driven turbulent dissipation degrading the efficiency of Lorentz force plasma accelerators such as the MPD thruster. The analysis uses a kinetic theory that includes magnetic and thermal effects as well as those of an electron current transverse to the magnetic field and collisions, thus combining all the features of previous models. Analytical and numerical solutions allow a detailed description of threshold criteria, finite growth behavior, destabilization mechanisms and maximized-growth characteristics of the dominant unstable modes. The lower hybrid current-driven instability is implicated as dominant and was found to preserve its character in the collisional plasma regime.

  15. Unraveling Quasiperiodic Relaxations of Transport Barriers with Gyrokinetic Simulations of Tokamak Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, A.; Sarazin, Y.; Zarzoso, D.; Abiteboul, J.; Brun, A. S.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.; Thomine, O.

    2013-10-01

    The generation and dynamics of transport barriers governed by sheared poloidal flows are analyzed in flux-driven 5D gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence in tokamak plasmas. The transport barrier is triggered by a vorticity source that polarizes the system. The chosen source captures characteristic features of some experimental scenarios, namely, the generation of a sheared electric field coupled to anisotropic heating. For sufficiently large shearing rates, turbulent transport is suppressed and a transport barrier builds up, in agreement with the common understanding of transport barriers. The vorticity source also governs a secondary instability— driven by the temperature anisotropy (T∥≠T⊥). Turbulence and its associated zonal flows are generated in the vicinity of the barrier, destroying the latter due to the screening of the polarization source by the zonal flows. These barrier relaxations occur quasiperiodically, and generically result from the decoupling between the dynamics of the barrier generation, triggered by the source driven sheared flow, and that of the crash, triggered by the secondary instability. This result underlines that barriers triggered by sheared flows are prone to relaxations whenever secondary instabilities come into play.

  16. Kinetic theory for radiation interacting with sound waves in ultrarelativistic pair plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Marklund, M; Stenflo, L

    2006-01-01

    A kinetic theory for radiation interacting with sound waves in an ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma is developed. It is shown that the effect of a spatial spectral broadening of the electromagnetic pulse is to introduce a reduction of the growth rates for the decay and modulational instabilities. Such spectral broadening could be due to a finite pulse coherence length, or through the use of random phase filters, and would stabilize the propagation of electromagnetic pulses.

  17. Solanaceae XIPs are plasma membrane aquaporins that facilitate the transport of many uncharged substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Bienert, Manuela Désirée; Jahn, Thomas Paul; Boutry, Marc; Chaumont, François

    2011-04-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) transport water and uncharged solutes across membranes in all kingdoms of life. Recently, an uncharacterized MIP subfamily was identified in the genomes of plants and fungi and named X Intrinsic Proteins (XIPs). Here, we describe the genetic features, localization, expression, and functions of a group of Solanaceae XIPs. XIP cDNA and gDNA were cloned from tobacco, potato, tomato, and morning glory. A conserved sequence motif in the first intron of Solanaceae XIPs initiates an RNA-processing mechanism that results in two splice variants (α and β). When transiently or stably expressed in tobacco plants, yellow fluorescent protein-tagged NtXIP1;1α and NtXIP1;1β were both localized in the plasma membrane. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing NtXIP1;1-promoter-GUS constructs and RT-PCR studies showed that NtXIP1;1 was expressed in all organs. The NtXIP1;1 promoter was mainly active in cell layers facing the environment in all above-ground tissues. Heterologous expression of Solanaceae XIPs in Xenopus laevis oocytes and various Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants demonstrated that these isoforms facilitate the transport of bulky solutes, such as glycerol, urea, and boric acid. In contrast, permeability for water was undetectable. These data suggest that XIPs function in the transport of uncharged solutes across the cell plasma membrane in specific plant tissues, including at the interface between the environment and external cell layers.

  18. Long wavelength perfect fluidity from short distance jet transport in quark-gluon plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jiechen; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2015-01-01

    We build a new phenomenological framework that bridges the long wavelength bulk viscous transport properties of the strongly-coupled quark-gluon plasma (sQGP) and short distance hard jet transport properties in the QGP. The full nonperturbative chromo-electric (E) and chromo-magnetic (M) structure of the near "perfect fluid" like sQGP in the critical transition region are integrated into a semi-Quark-Gluon-Monopole Plasma (sQGMP) model lattice-compatibly and implemented into the new CUJET3.0 jet quenching framework. All observables computed from CUJET3.0 are found to be consistent with available data at RHIC and LHC simultaneously. A quantitative connection between the shear viscosity and jet transport parameter is rigorously established within this framework. We deduce the $T=160-600$ MeV dependence of the QGP's $\\eta/s$: its near vanishing value in the near $T_c$ regime is determined by the composition of E and M charges, it increases as $T$ rises, and its high $T$ limit is fixed by color screening scales.

  19. Long wavelength perfect fluidity from short distance jet transport in quark-gluon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiechen; Liao, Jinfeng; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2016-12-01

    We build a new phenomenological framework that bridges the long wavelength bulk viscous transport properties of the strongly-coupled quark-gluon plasma (sQGP) and short distance hard jet transport properties in the QGP. The full nonperturbative chromo-electric (E) and chromo-magnetic (M) structure of the near "perfect fluid" like sQGP in the critical transition region are integrated into a semi-Quark-Gluon-Monopole Plasma (sQGMP) model lattice-compatibly and implemented into the new CUJET3.0 jet quenching framework. All observables computed from CUJET3.0 are found to be consistent with available data at RHIC and LHC simultaneously. A quantitative connection between the shear viscosity and jet transport parameter is rigorously established within this framework. We deduce the T = 160 - 600 MeV dependence of the QGP's η / s: its near vanishing value in the near Tc regime is determined by the composition of E and M charges, it increases as T rises, and its high T limit is fixed by color screening scales.

  20. Calculation of thermodynamic and transport properties of thermal plasmas based on the Cantera software toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Charles; Hencken, Kai

    2013-09-01

    Computational fluid-dynamic simulations nowadays play a central role in the development of new gas circuit breakers. For these simulations to be reliable, a good knowledge of the pressure and temperature-dependence of the thermodynamic and transport properties of ionized gases is required. A key ingredient in the calculation of thermodynamic properties of thermal plasmas is the calculation of the chemical equilibrium composition of the gas. The general-purpose, open-source software toolkit Cantera provides most functionality required to carry out such thermodynamic calculations. In this contribution, we explain how we tailored Cantera specifically to calculate material properties of plasmas. The highly modular architecture of this framework made it possible to add support for Debye-Hückel non-ideality corrections in the calculation of the chemical equilibrium mixture, as well as to enable the calculation of the key transport parameters needed in CFD-based electric arc simulations: electrical and thermal conductivity, viscosity, and diffusion coefficients. As an example, we discuss the thermodynamic and transport properties of mixtures of carbon dioxide and copper vapor.