WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma transport simulation

  1. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.

    1989-06-01

    An overview of the program has been given in the contract proposal. The principal objectives are: to provide theoretical interpretation and computer modelling for the TEXT tokamak, and to advance the simulation studies of tokamaks generally, functioning as a National Transport Center. We also carry out equilibrium and stability studies in support of the TEXT upgrade, and work has continued on Alfven waves and MFENET software development. The focus of the program is to lay the groundwork for detailed comparison with experiment of the various transport theories to improve physics understanding and confidence in predictions of future machine behavior. This involves: to collect, in retrievable form, the data from TEXT and other tokamaks; to make the data available through easy-to-use interfaces; to develop criteria for success in fitting models to the data; to maintain the Texas transport code CHAPO and make it available to users; to collect theoretical models and implement them in the transport code; and to carry out simulation studies and evaluate fits to the data. In the following we outline the progress made in fiscal year 1989. Of special note are the proposed participation of our data base project in the ITER program, and a proposed q-profile diagnostic based on our neutral transport studies. We have emphasized collaboration with the TEXT experimentalists, making as much use as possible of the measured fluctuation spectra. 52 refs

  2. Plasma transport simulation modeling for helical confinement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Amano, T.

    1991-08-01

    New empirical and theoretical transport models for helical confinement systems are developed based on the neoclassical transport theory including the effect of radial electric field and multi-helicity magnetic components, and the drift wave turbulence transport for electrostatic and electromagnetic modes, or the anomalous semi-empirical transport. These electron thermal diffusivities are compared with CHS (Compact Helical System) experimental data, which indicates that the central transport coefficient of the ECH plasma agrees with the neoclassical axi-symmetric value and the transport outside the half radius is anomalous. On the other hand, the transport of NBI-heated plasmas is anomalous in the whole plasma region. This anomaly is not explained by the electrostatic drift wave turbulence models in these flat-density-profile discharges. For the detailed prediction of plasma parameters in LHD (Large Helical Device), 3-D(dimensional) equilibrium/1-D transport simulations including empirical or drift wave turbulence models are carried out, which suggests that the global confinement time of LHD is determined mainly by the electron anomalous transport near the plasma edge region rather than the helical ripple transport in the core region. Even if the ripple loss can be eliminated, the increase of the global confinement is 10%. However, the rise in the central ion temperature is more than 20%. If the anomalous loss can be reduced to the half level of the present scaling, like so-called 'H-mode' of the tokamak discharge, the neoclassical ripple loss through the ion channel becomes important even in the plasma core. The 5% radial inward shift of the plasma column with respect to the major radius is effective for improving plasma confinement and raising more than 50% of the fusion product by reducing this neoclassical asymmetric ion transport loss and increasing 10% in the plasma radius. (author)

  3. Plasma transport simulation modelling for helical confinement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Amano, T.

    1992-01-01

    New empirical and theoretical transport models for helical confinement systems are developed on the basis of the neoclassical transport theory, including the effect of the radial electric field and of multi-helicity magnetic components as well as the drift wave turbulence transport for electrostatic and electromagnetic modes or the anomalous semi-empirical transport. These electron thermal diffusivities are compared with experimental data from the Compact Helical System which indicate that the central transport coefficient of a plasma with electron cyclotron heating agrees with neoclassical axisymmetric value and the transport outside the half-radius is anomalous. On the other hand, the transport of plasmas with neutral beam injection heating is anomalous in the whole plasma region. This anomaly is not explained by the electrostatic drift wave turbulence models in these discharges with flat density profiles. For a detailed prediction of the plasma parameters in the Large Helical Device (LHD), 3-D equilibrium/1-D transport simulations including empirical or drift wave turbulence models are performed which suggest that the global confinement time of the LHD is determined mainly by the electron anomalous transport in the plasma edge region rather than by the helical ripple transport in the core region. Even if the ripple loss can be eliminated, the increase in global confinement is 10%. However, the rise in the central ion temperature is more than 20%. If the anomalous loss can be reduced to half of the value used in the present scaling, as is the case in the H-mode of tokamak discharges, the neoclassical ripple loss through the ion channel becomes important even in the plasma core. The 5% radial inward shift of the plasma column with respect to the major radius improves the plasma confinement and increases the fusion product by more than 50% by reducing the neoclassical asymmetric ion transport loss and increasing the plasma radius (10%). (author). 32 refs, 7 figs

  4. Combined core/boundary layer plasma transport simulations in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinja, A.K.; Schafer, R.F. Jr.; Conn, R.W.; Howe, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Significant new numerical results are presented from self-consistent core and boundary or scrape-off layer plasma simulations with 3-D neutral transport calculations. For a symmetric belt limiter it is shown that, for plasma conditions considered here, the pump limiter collection efficiency increases from 11% to 18% of the core efflux as a result of local reionization of blade deflected neutrals. This hitherto unobserved effect causes a significant amplification of upstream ion flux entering the pump limiter. Results from coupling of an earlier developed two-zone edge plasma model ODESSA to the PROCTR core plasma simulation code indicates that intense recycling divertor operation may not be possible because of stagnation of upstream flow velocity. This results in a self-consistent reduction of density gradient in an intermediate region between the central plasma and separatrix, and a concomitant reduction of core-efflux. There is also evidence of increased recycling at the first wall. (orig.)

  5. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.

    1993-10-01

    The objectives of the Fusion Research Center Theory Program continue to be: (1) to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database; and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for the TEXT-Upgrade tokamak. Publications and reports and conference presentations for the grant period are listed. Work is described in five basic categories: A. Magnetic Fusion Energy Database; B. Computational Support and Numerical Modeling; C. Support for TEXT-Upgrade and Diagnostics; D. Transport Studies; E. Alfven Waves

  6. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.W.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives are: (1) to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for TEXT-Upgrade. Recent reports, publications, and conference presentations of the Fusion Research Center are listed.

  7. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.

    1990-04-01

    The objectives of this page are to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and to provide theoretical interpretation and modelling for TEXT, and equilibrium and stability studies for TEXT-Upgrade

  8. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.

    1993-02-01

    The objectives continue to be: (1) to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability for TEXT-Upgrade. Recent publications and reports, and conference presentations of the Fusion Research Center theory group are listed

  9. Theoretical and Numerical Properties of a Gyrokinetic Plasma: Issues Related to Transport Time Scale Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.

    2003-01-01

    Particle simulation has played an important role for the recent investigations on turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. In this paper, theoretical and numerical properties of a gyrokinetic plasma as well as its relationship with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed with the ultimate aim of simulating microturbulence in transport time scale using massively parallel computers

  10. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron transport from plasma turbulence: recent progress in gyrokinetic particle simulations of turbulent plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z; Rewoldt, G; Ethier, S; Hahm, T S; Lee, W W; Lewandowski, J L V; Nishimura, Y; Wang, W X

    2005-01-01

    Recent progress in gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of turbulent plasmas using the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) is surveyed. In particular, recent results for electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes and their resulting transport are presented. Also, turbulence spreading, and the effects of the parallel nonlinearity, are described. The GTC code has also been generalized for non-circular plasma cross-section, and initial results are presented. In addition, two distinct methods of generalizing the GTC code to be electromagnetic are described, along with preliminary results. Finally, a related code, GTC-Neo, for calculating neoclassical fluxes, electric fields, and velocities, are described

  11. Integrated heat transport simulation of high ion temperature plasma of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Sakai, A.

    2014-10-01

    A first dynamical simulation of high ion temperature plasma with carbon pellet injection of LHD is performed by the integrated simulation GNET-TD + TASK3D. NBI heating deposition of time evolving plasma is evaluated by the 5D drift kinetic equation solver, GNET-TD and the heat transport of multi-ion species plasma (e, H, He, C) is studied by the integrated transport simulation code, TASK3D. Achievement of high ion temperature plasma is attributed to the 1) increase of heating power per ion due to the temporal increase of effective charge, 2) reduction of effective neoclassical transport with impurities, 3) reduction of turbulence transport. The reduction of turbulence transport is most significant contribution to achieve the high ion temperature and the reduction of the turbulent transport from the L-mode plasma (normal hydrogen plasma) is evaluated to be a factor about five by using integrated heat transport simulation code. Applying the Z effective dependent turbulent reduction model we obtain a similar time behavior of ion temperature after the C pellet injection with the experimental results. (author)

  12. Integral and Lagrangian simulations of particle and radiation transport in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christlieb, A J; Hitchon, W N G; Lawler, J E; Lister, G G

    2009-01-01

    Accurate integral and Lagrangian models of transport in plasmas, in which the models reflect the actual physical behaviour as closely as possible, are presented. These methods are applied to the behaviour of particles and photons in plasmas. First, to show how these types of models arise in a wide range of plasma physics applications, an application to radiation transport in a lighting discharge is given. The radiation transport is solved self-consistently with a model of the discharge to provide what are believed to be very accurate 1D simulations of fluorescent lamps. To extend these integral methods to higher dimensions is computationally very costly. The wide utility of 'treecodes' in solving massive integral problems in plasma physics is discussed, and illustrated in modelling vortex formation in a Penning trap, where a remarkably detailed simulation of vortex formation in the trap is obtained. Extension of treecode methods to other integral problems such as radiation transport is under consideration.

  13. GYRO Simulations of Core Momentum Transport in DIII-D and JET Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budny, R.V.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Momentum, energy, and particle transport in DIII-D and JET ELMy H-mode plasmas is simulated with GYRO and compared with measurements analyzed using TRANSP. The simulated transport depends sensitively on the nabla(T(sub)i) turbulence drive and the nabla(E(sub)r) turbulence suppression inputs. With their nominal values indicated by measurements, the simulations over-predict the momentum and energy transport in the DIII-D plasmas, and under-predict in the JET plasmas. Reducing |nabla(T(sub)i)| and increasing |nabla(E(sub)r)| by up to 15% leads to approximate agreement (within a factor of two) for the DIII-D cases. For the JET cases, increasing |nabla(T(sub)i)| or reducing |nabla(E(sub)r)| results in approximate agreement for the energy flow, but the ratio of the simulated energy and momentum flows remains higher than measurements by a factor of 2-4

  14. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Wang, W.; Horton, W.; Klasky, S.; Decyk, V.; Ma, K.-L.; Chames, J.; Adams, M.

    2011-09-21

    The three-year project GPS-TTBP resulted in over 152 publications and 135 presentations. This summary focuses on the scientific progress made by the project team. A major focus of the project was on the physics intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Progress included the first ever flux driven study of net intrinsic spin-up, mediated by boundary effects (in collaboration with CPES), detailed studies of the microphysics origins of the Rice scaling, comparative studies of symmetry breaking mechanisms, a pioneering study of intrinsic torque driven by trapped electron modes, and studies of intrinsic rotation generation as a thermodynamic engine. Validation studies were performed with C-Mod, DIII-D and CSDX. This work resulted in very successful completion of the FY2010 Theory Milestone Activity for OFES, and several prominent papers of the 2008 and 2010 IAEA Conferences. A second major focus was on the relation between zonal flow formation and transport non-locality. This culminated in the discovery of the ExB staircase - a conceptually new phenomenon. This also makes useful interdisciplinary contact with the physics of the PV staircase, well-known in oceans and atmospheres. A third topic where progress was made was in the simulation and theory of turbulence spreading. This work, now well cited, is important for understanding the dynamics of non-locality in turbulent transport. Progress was made in studies of conjectured non-diffusive transport in trapped electron turbulence. Pioneering studies of ITB formation, coupling to intrinsic rotation and hysteresis were completed. These results may be especially significant for future ITER operation. All told, the physics per dollar performance of this project was quite good. The intense focus was beneficial and SciDAC resources were essential to its success.

  15. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Wang, W.; Horton, W.; Klasky, S.; Decyk, V.; Ma, K.-L.; Chames, J.; Adams, M.

    2011-01-01

    The three-year project GPS-TTBP resulted in over 152 publications and 135 presentations. This summary focuses on the scientific progress made by the project team. A major focus of the project was on the physics intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Progress included the first ever flux driven study of net intrinsic spin-up, mediated by boundary effects (in collaboration with CPES), detailed studies of the microphysics origins of the Rice scaling, comparative studies of symmetry breaking mechanisms, a pioneering study of intrinsic torque driven by trapped electron modes, and studies of intrinsic rotation generation as a thermodynamic engine. Validation studies were performed with C-Mod, DIII-D and CSDX. This work resulted in very successful completion of the FY2010 Theory Milestone Activity for OFES, and several prominent papers of the 2008 and 2010 IAEA Conferences. A second major focus was on the relation between zonal flow formation and transport non-locality. This culminated in the discovery of the ExB staircase - a conceptually new phenomenon. This also makes useful interdisciplinary contact with the physics of the PV staircase, well-known in oceans and atmospheres. A third topic where progress was made was in the simulation and theory of turbulence spreading. This work, now well cited, is important for understanding the dynamics of non-locality in turbulent transport. Progress was made in studies of conjectured non-diffusive transport in trapped electron turbulence. Pioneering studies of ITB formation, coupling to intrinsic rotation and hysteresis were completed. These results may be especially significant for future ITER operation. All told, the physics per dollar performance of this project was quite good. The intense focus was beneficial and SciDAC resources were essential to its success.

  16. Numerical simulation of the anomalous transport at the plasma-edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohn, E.

    2001-03-01

    In addition to the classical transport which is caused by Coloumb-collisions two further transport mechanisms take place in an inhomogeneous magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion-plasma, the neoclassical and the anomalous transport. The anomalous transport is caused by collective motion of the plasma-particles respectively turbulence and essentially affects the energy-confinement-time of the plasma. The energy-confinement-time in turn constitutes an important criterion with respect to the feasibility of using nuclear fusion for energy production. The anomalous transport is theoretically not yet well understood. By means of numerical simulations of the anomalous transport in the plasma edge, it is the intention of this work to contribute to the understanding of this transport mechanism. The Vlasov-Poisson-system constitutes the starting point for all performed simulations. This system consists of kinetic equations, which model for each particle-species the motion of the particles composing the plasma in six-dimensional phase-space. A coupling of these kinetic equations occurs due to the Poisson-equation, resulting in a nonlinear system of differential equations. The time evolution of this system was calculated numerically. On the one hand, simulations were performed where the whole velocity-space was retained. This fully-kinetic model was applied for the spatially one- as well as two-dimensional case. In the one-dimensional case only the radial direction of the plasma-edge was modeled, i.e. the direction along which the plasma joins to the vacuum. When performing the spatially two-dimensional simulations, in addition the poloidal direction has been regarded. A second set of simulations was performed using a gyro-kinetic model. In this model only the velocity-component parallel to the magnetic field vector is retained. The components perpendicular to the magnetic field vector, which are responsible for the gyration of particles, are omitted from phase-space but

  17. A one-dimensional transport code for the simulation of D-T burning tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, Tatsuzo; Maki, Koichi; Kasai, Masao; Nishida, Hidetsugu

    1980-11-01

    A one-dimensional transport code for D-T burning tokamak plasma has been developed, which simulates the spatial behavior of fuel ions(D, T), alpha particles, impurities, temperatures of ions and electrons, plasma current, neutrals, heating of alpha and injected beam particles. The basic transport equations are represented by one generalized equation so that the improvement of models and the addition of new equations may be easily made. A model of burn control using a variable toroidal field ripple is employed. This report describes in detail the simulation model, numerical method and the usage of the code. Some typical examples to which the code has been applied are presented. (author)

  18. TEMPEST simulations of the plasma transport in a single-null tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.; Cohen, R.H.; Rognlien, T.D.; Bodi, K.; Krasheninnikov, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present edge kinetic ion transport simulations of tokamak plasmas in magnetic divertor geometry using the fully nonlinear (full-f) continuum code TEMPEST. Besides neoclassical transport, a term for divergence of anomalous kinetic radial flux is added to mock up the effect of turbulent transport. To study the relative roles of neoclassical and anomalous transport, TEMPEST simulations were carried out for plasma transport and flow dynamics in a single-null tokamak geometry, including the pedestal region that extends across the separatrix into the scrape-off layer and private flux region. A series of TEMPEST simulations were conducted to investigate the transition of midplane pedestal heat flux and flow from the neoclassical to the turbulent limit and the transition of divertor heat flux and flow from the kinetic to the fluid regime via an anomalous transport scan and a density scan. The TEMPEST simulation results demonstrate that turbulent transport (as modelled by large diffusion) plays a similar role to collisional decorrelation of particle orbits and that the large turbulent transport (large diffusion) leads to an apparent Maxwellianization of the particle distribution. We also show the transition of parallel heat flux and flow at the entrance to the divertor plates from the fluid to the kinetic regime. For an absorbing divertor plate boundary condition, a non-half-Maxwellian is found due to the balance between upstream radial anomalous transport and energetic ion endloss.

  19. The simulation of L-H transition in tokamak plasma using MMM95 transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intharat, P; Poolyarat, N; Chatthong, B; Onjun, T; Picha, R

    2015-01-01

    BALDUR integrative predictive modelling code together with a Multimode (MMM95) anomalous transport model is used to simulate the evolution profiles, including plasma current, temperature, density and energy in a tokamak reactor. It is found that a self - transition from low confinement mode (L-mode) to high confinement mode (H-mode) regimes can be achieved once a sufficient auxiliary heating applied to the plasma is reached. The result agrees with experimental observations from various tokamaks. A strong reduction of turbulent transport near the edge of plasma is also observed, which is related to the formation of steep radial electric field near the edge regime. From transport analysis, it appears that the resistive ballooning mode is the dominant term near the plasma edge regime, which is significantly reduced during the transition. (paper)

  20. Integrated ELM simulation with edge MHD stability and transport of SOL-divertor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Takizuka, Tomonori; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Ozeki, Takahisa; Oyama, Naoyuki

    2007-07-01

    The effect of the pressure profile on the energy loss caused by edge localized modes (ELMs) has been investigated by using an integrated simulation code TOPICS-IB based on a core transport code with a stability code for the peeling-ballooning modes and a transport model for scrape-off-layer and divertor plasmas. The steep pressure gradient inside the pedestal top is found to broaden the region of the ELM enhanced transport through the broadening of eigenfunctions and enhance the ELM energy loss. The ELM energy loss in the simulation becomes larger than 15% of the pedestal energy, as is shown in the database of multi-machine experiments. (author)

  1. Simulation of MHD instability effects on burning plasma transport with ITB in tokamak and helical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Yamada, I.; Taniguchi, S.; Oishi, T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The high performance plasma behavior is required to realize economic and environmental-friendly fusion reactors compatible with conventional power plant systems. To improve plasma confinement, the formation of internal transport barrier (ITB) is anticipated, and its behavior is analyzed by the simulation code TOTAL (Toroidal Transport Linkage Analysis). This TOTAL code comprises a 2- or 3-dimensional equilibrium and 1-dimensional predictive transport code for both tokamak and helical systems. In the tokamak code TOTAL-T, the external current drive, bootstrap current, sawtooth oscillation, ballooning mode and neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) analyses are included. The steady-state burning plasma operation is achieved by the feedback control of pellet injection fuelling and external heating power control. The impurity dynamics of iron and tungsten is also included in this code. The NTM effects are evaluated using the modified Rutherford Model with the stabilization of the ECCD current drive. The excitation of m=2/n=1 NTM leads to the 20 % reduction in the central temperature in ITER-like reactors. Recently, the external non-resonant helical field application is analyzed and its stabilization properties are evaluated. The pellet injection effects on ITB formation is also clarified in tokamak and helical plasmas. Relationship between sawtooth oscillation and impurity ejection is recently simulated in comparison with experimental data. In this conference, we will show above-stated new results on MHD instability effects on burning plasma transport. (author)

  2. Simulation analysis of dust-particle transport in the peripheral plasma in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Mamoru; Masuzaki, Suguru; Kawamura, Gakushi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Pigarov, Alexander Yu.; Smirnov, Roman D.

    2014-01-01

    The function of the peripheral plasma in the Large Helical Device (LHD) on transport of dusts is investigated using a dust transport simulation code (DUSTT) in a non-axisymmetric geometry. The simulation shows that the transport of the dusts is dominated by the plasma flow (mainly by ion drag force) formed in the peripheral plasma. The trajectories of dusts are investigated in two probable situations: release of spherical iron dusts from the inboard side of the torus, and drop of spherical carbon dusts from a divertor plate installed near an edge of an upper port. The trajectories in these two situations are calculated in various sized dust cases. From a viewpoint of protection of the main plasma from dust penetration, it proves that there are two functions in the LHD peripheral plasma. One is sweeping of dusts by the effect of the plasma flow in the divertor legs, and another one is evaporation/sublimation of dusts by heat load onto the dusts in the ergodic layer. (author)

  3. Hybrid simulations of plasma transport by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause: magnetic shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowee, Misa M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gary, S Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid (kinetic ions, massless fluid electrons) simulations of the Kelvin Helmholtz Instability (KHI) for a magnetopause configuration with a magnetic shear across the boundary are carried out to examine how the transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere is affected by the shear field. Low magnetic shear conditions where the magnetosheath magnetic field is within 30{sup o} of northward is included in the simulations because KHI is thought to be important for plasma transport only for northward or near-northward interplanetary magnetic field orientations. The simulations show that coherent vortices can grow for these near-northward angles, and that they are sometimes more coherent than for pure northward conditions because the turbulence which breaks-down these vortices is reduced when there are magnetic tension forces. With increasing magnetic shear angle, the growth rate is reduced, and the vortices do not grow to as large of size which reduces the plasma transport. By tracking the individual particle motions diffusion coefficients can be obtained for the system, where the diffusion is not classical in nature but instead has a time dependence resulting from both the increasingly large-scale vortex motion and the small-scale turbulence generated in the break-down of the instabilities. Results indicate that diffusion on the order of 10{sup 9} m{sup 2}/s could possibly be generated by KHI on the flanks of the magnetosphere.

  4. Impact of screening of resonant magnetic perturbations in three dimensional edge plasma transport simulations for DIII-D

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frerichs, H.; Reiter, D.; Schmitz, O.; Cahyna, Pavel; Evans, T.; Feng, Y.; Nardon, E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 5 (2012), 052507-052507 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2341 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : tokamak * TEXTOR * divertors * plasma boundary layers * plasma density * plasma magnetohydrodynamics * plasma simulation * plasma temperature * plasma toroidal confinement * plasma transport processes * Tokamak devices Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.376, year: 2012 http://pop.aip.org/resource/1/phpaen/v19/i5/p052507_s1

  5. Turbulent transport modeling in the edge plasma of tokamaks: verification, validation, simulation and synthetic diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin-Bellot, Clothilde

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to produce power by using magnetically confined fusion is a scientific and technological challenge. The perspective of ITER conveys strong signals to intensify modeling effort on magnetized fusion plasmas. The success of the fusion operation is conditioned by the quality of plasma confinement in the core of the reactor and by the control of plasma exhaust on the wall. Both phenomena are related to turbulent cross-field transport that is at the heart of the notion of magnetic confinement studies, particle and heat losses. The study of edge phenomena is therefore complicated by a particularly complex magnetic geometry.This calls for an improvement of our capacity to develop numerical tools able to reproduce turbulent transport properties reliable to predict particle and energy fluxes on the plasma facing components. This thesis introduces the TOKAM3X fluid model to simulate edge plasma turbulence. A special focus is made on the code Verification and the Validation. It is a necessary step before using a code as a predictive tool. Then new insights on physical properties of the edge plasma turbulence are explored. In particular, the poloidal asymmetries induced by turbulence and observed experimentally in the Low-Field-Side of the devices are investigated in details. Great care is dedicated to the reproduction of the MISTRAL base case which consists in changing the magnetic configuration and observing the impact on parallel flows in the poloidal plane. The simulations recover experimental measurements and provide new insights on the effect of the plasma-wall contact position location on the turbulent features, which were not accessible in experiments. (author) [fr

  6. Simulation of dense recombining divertor plasmas with a Navier endash Stokes neutral transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, D.A.; McHugh, P.R.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    A two-dimensional combined edge plasma Navier endash Stokes neutral transport model is presented for the simulation of dense recombining divertor plasmas. This model includes ions, electrons, and neutral atoms which undergo Coulomb collisions, electron impact ionization, ion endash neutral elastic collisions, three-body and radiative recombination, and neutral endash neutral collisions. The advanced fully implicit solution algorithm is briefly described and a variety of results on a model geometry are presented. It is shown that interesting neutral flow patterns can exist and that these flows can convect significant energy. A solution that ignores neutral endash neutral collisions is shown to be quantitatively different from one that includes neutral endash neutral collisions. Solutions are also shown to be sensitive to the plasma opacity for Lyman α radiation. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  7. Transport simulation analysis of peripheral plasma with the open and the closed LHD divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, G.; Kobayashi, M.; Shoji, M.; Morisaki, T.; Masuzaki, S.; Feng, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Simulation modeling of the ergodic and divertor plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD) and its application to analysis of neutral particles, plasma, and impurity transport is presented. EMC3-EIRENE simulation with a new calculation mesh system is employed to evaluate effects of different divertor configurations: the open and the closed divertor. Qualitatively good agreement of neutral gas pressure with measurements was obtained, where the closed configuration causes roughly 20 times higher pressure under a dome structure than the open configuration. Effects of different configurations and gas pumping were investigated to understand recycling. Impurity accumulation and impurity screening in the ergodic region were investigated and differences caused by the configurations are evaluated. The closed configuration causes large impurity accumulation but the impurity screening effect suppress the accumulation at the same level of as the open configuration. (author)

  8. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  9. Fluid simulations of ∇Te-driven turbulence and transport in boundary plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.

    1992-01-01

    It is clear that the edge plasma plays a crucial role in global tokamak confinement. This paper is a report on simulations of a new drift wave type instability driven by the electron temperature gradient in tokamak scrapeoff-layers (SOL). A 2d fluid code has been developed in order to explore the anomalous transport in the boundary plasmas. The simulation consists of a set of fluid equations for the vorticity ∇ perpendicular 2 φ, the electron density n c and the temperature T c in a shearless plasma slab confined by a uniform, straight magnetic field B z with two divertor (or limiter) plates intercepting the magnetic field. The model has two regions separated by a magnetic separatrix: in the edge region inside the separatrix, the model is periodic along the magnetic field while in the SOL region outside the separatrix, the magnetic field is taken to be of finite length with model boundary conditions at diverter plates. The simulation results show that the observed linear instability agrees well with theory, and that a saturated state of turbulence is reached. In saturated turbulence, clear evidence of the expected long-wavelength mode penetration into the edge is seen, an inverse cascade of wave energy is observed. The simulation results also show that amplitudes of potential and the electron temperature fluctuations are somewhat above and the heat flux are somewhat below those of the simplest mixing-length estimates, and furthermore the large-scale radial structures of fluctuation quantities indicate that the cross-field transport is not diffusive. After saturation, the electron density and temperature profiles are flattened. A self-consistent simulation to determine the microturbulent SOL electron temperature profile has been done, the results of which reasonably agree with the experimental measurements

  10. 5-D simulation study of suprathermal electron transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Idei, H.; Kubo, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Gasparino, U.; Maassberg, H.; Rome, M.; Marushchenko, N.

    2000-01-01

    ECRH driven transport of suprathermal electrons is studied in non-axisymmetric plasmas using a new Monte Carlo simulation technique in 5-D phase space. Two different phases of the ECRH driven transport of suprathermal electrons can be seen. The first is a rapid convective phase due to the direct radial motion of trapped electrons and the second is a slower phase due to the collisional transport. The important role of the radial transport of suprathermal electrons in the broadening of the ECRH deposition profile in W7-AS is clarified. The ECRH driven flux is also evaluated and considered in relation to the 'electron root' feature recently observed in W7-AS. It is found that, at low collisionalities, the ECRH driven flux due to the suprathermal electrons can play a dominant role in the condition of ambipolarity, and thus the observed electron root feature in W7-AS is thought to be driven by the radial (convective) flux of ECRH generated suprathermal electrons. A possible scenario for this type of electron root is considered for the LHD plasma. (author)

  11. 5D simulation study of suprathermal electron transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Idei, H.; Kubo, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Gasparino, U.; Maassberg, H.; Rome, M.; Marushchenko, N.

    1999-01-01

    ECRH-driven transport of suprathermal electrons is studied in non-axisymmetric plasmas using a new Monte Carlo simulation technique in 5D phase space. Two different phases of the ECRH-driven transport of suprathermal electrons can be seen; one is a rapid convective phase due to the direct radial motion of trapped electrons and the other is a slower phase due to the collisional transport. The important role of the radial transport of suprathermal electrons in the broadening of the ECRH deposition profile is clarified in W7-AS. The ECRH driven flux is also evaluated and put in relation with the 'electron root' feature recently observed in W7-AS. It is found that, at low collisionalities, the ECRH driven flux due to the suprathermal electrons can play a dominant role in the condition of ambipolarity and, thus, the observed 'electron root' feature in W7-AS is thought to be driven by the radial (convective) flux of ECRH generated suprathermal electrons. The possible scenario of this 'ECRH-driven electron root' is considered in the LHD plasma. (author)

  12. Tokamak plasma transport simulation in the presence of neoclassical tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Yamazaki, K.; Arimoto, H.; Shoji, T.; Garcia, J.

    2008-01-01

    For the prediction of the ITER plasmas, the effect of the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) on the plasma confinement has been calculated using the 1.5-dimensional equilibrium and transport simulation code TOTAL. The time evolution of the NTM magnetic island has been analyzed using the modified Rutherford equation for a ITER normal shear plasma. The anomalous transport model used here is GLF23. The saturated magnetic island widths are w/a - 0.048 at 3/2 mode and w/a - 0.21 at 2/1 mode, and the reduction in fusion power output by NTM is 27% at the 3/2 mode, 82% at the 2/1 mode, and 89% at the 3/2 + 2/1 double mode. The stabilization effect of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) with EC is also clarified. The threshold of ECCD power for the full stabilization is ∼10[MW] against the 3/2 mode, and ∼23[MW] against the 2/1 mode. (author)

  13. 5D simulation study of suprathermal electron transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Idei, H.; Kubo, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Gasparino, U.; Maassberg, H.; Rome, M.; Marushchenko, N.

    2001-01-01

    ECRH-driven transport of is studied in using a new Monte Carlo simulation technique in 5D phase space. Two different phases of the ECRH-driven transport of suprathermal electrons can be seen; one is a rapid convective phase due to the direct radial motion of trapped electrons and the other is a slower phase due to the collisional transport. The important role of the radial transport of suprathermal electrons in the broadening of the ECRH deposition profile is clarified in W7-AS. The ECRH driven flux is also evaluated and put in relation with the ''electron root'' feature recently observed in W7-AS. It is found that, at low collisionalities, the ECRH driven flux due to the suprathermal electrons can play a dominant role in the condition of ambipolarity and, thus, the observed ''electron root'' feature in W7-AS is thought to be driven by the radial (convective) flux of ECRH generated suprathermal electrons. The possible scenario of this ''ECRH-driven electron root'' is considered in the LHD plasma. (author)

  14. Fluid simulations of ∇Te-driven turbulence and transport in boundary plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.; Cohen, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is a report on simulations of a new drift wave type instability driven by the electron temperature gradient in tokamak scrapeoff-layers (SOL). A 2D(x,y) fluid code has been developed in order to explore the anomalous transport in the boundary plasmas. The simulation consists of a set of fluid equations (in the electrostatic limit) for the vorticity ∇ perpendicular 2 φ, the electron density n e and the temperature T e in a shearless plasma slab confined by a uniform, straight magnetic field B z with two diverter (or limiter) plates intercepting the magnetic field. The model has two regions separated by a magnetic separatrix: in the edge region inside the separatrix, the model is periodic along the magnetic field while in the SOL region outside the separatrix, the magnetic field is taken to be of finite length with model (logical sheath) boundary conditions at diverter (or limiter) plates. The simulation results show that the observed linear instability agrees well with theory, and that a saturated state of turbulence is reached. In saturated turbulence, clear evidence of the expected long-wavelength mode penetration into the edge is seen, an inverse cascade of wave energy (toward both long wavelengths and low frequencies) is observed. The simulation results also show that amplitudes of potential and the electron temperature fluctuations are somewhat above and the heat flux are somewhat below those of the simplest mixing-length estimates. The results from the self-consistent simulations to determine the microturbulent SOL electron temperature profile agree reasonably with the experimental measurements. The effects on the mode of neutral gas collisions at the divertor sheath and comparisons with the ionization driven turbulence are discussed

  15. Benchmark of the local drift-kinetic models for neoclassical transport simulation in helical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B.; Satake, S.; Kanno, R.; Sugama, H.; Matsuoka, S.

    2017-02-01

    The benchmarks of the neoclassical transport codes based on the several local drift-kinetic models are reported here. Here, the drift-kinetic models are zero orbit width (ZOW), zero magnetic drift, DKES-like, and global, as classified in Matsuoka et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 072511 (2015)]. The magnetic geometries of Helically Symmetric Experiment, Large Helical Device (LHD), and Wendelstein 7-X are employed in the benchmarks. It is found that the assumption of E ×B incompressibility causes discrepancy of neoclassical radial flux and parallel flow among the models when E ×B is sufficiently large compared to the magnetic drift velocities. For example, Mp≤0.4 where Mp is the poloidal Mach number. On the other hand, when E ×B and the magnetic drift velocities are comparable, the tangential magnetic drift, which is included in both the global and ZOW models, fills the role of suppressing unphysical peaking of neoclassical radial-fluxes found in the other local models at Er≃0 . In low collisionality plasmas, in particular, the tangential drift effect works well to suppress such unphysical behavior of the radial transport caused in the simulations. It is demonstrated that the ZOW model has the advantage of mitigating the unphysical behavior in the several magnetic geometries, and that it also implements the evaluation of bootstrap current in LHD with the low computation cost compared to the global model.

  16. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Kornilov, S. Yu., E-mail: kornilovsy@gmail.com; Rempe, N. G. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics (Russian Federation); Shidlovskiy, S. V. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Shklyaev, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  17. Numerical simulation of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dnestrovskii, Y.N.; Kostomarov, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains a modern consistent and systematic presentation of numerical computer simulation of plasmas in controlled thermonuclear fusion. The authors focus on the Soviet research in mathematical modelling of Tokamak plasmas, and present kinetic hydrodynamic and transport models with special emphasis on the more recent hybrid models. Compared with the first edition (in Russian) this book has been greatly revised and updated. (orig./WL)

  18. Plasma theory and simulation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Our research group uses both theory and simulation as tools in order to increase the understanding of instabilities, heating, diffusion, transport and other phenomena in plasmas. We also work on the improvement of simulation, both theoretically and practically. Our focus has been more and more on the plasma edge (the ''sheath''), interactions with boundaries, leading to simulations of whole devices (someday a numerical tokamak)

  19. Plasmator. A numerical code for simulation of plasma transport in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.

    1979-01-01

    Plasmator is a flexible monodimensional numerical code for plasma transport in Tokamaks of circular cross-section, it allows neutral particle transport and impurity effects. The code leaves a total freedom in the analytical form of transport coefficients. It has been writen in Fortran-V for the UNIVAC-1100/80 from JEN and allows for the possibility of graphics for radial profiles and temporal evolution of the main plasma magnitudes, as well in three-dimensional as in two-dimensional representation either on a Calcomp plotter or in the printer. (author)

  20. Gyrokinetic simulations with external resonant magnetic perturbations: Island torque and nonambipolar transport with plasma rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, R. E.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Static external resonant magnetic field perturbations (RMPs) have been added to the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. This allows nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the nonambipolar radial current flow jr, and the corresponding j→×B→ plasma torque (density) R[jrBp/c], induced by magnetic islands that break the toroidal symmetry of a tokamak. This extends the previous GYRO formulation for the transport of toroidal angular momentum (TAM) [R. E. Waltz, G. M. Staebler, J. Candy, and F. L. Hinton, Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)]. The focus is on electrostatic full torus radial slice simulations of externally induced q =m/n=6/3 islands with widths 5% of the minor radius or about 20 ion gyroradii. Up to moderately strong E ×B rotation, the island torque scales with the radial electric field at the resonant surface Er, the island width w, and the intensity I of the high-n micro-turbulence, as Erw√I . The radial current inside the island is carried (entirely in the n =3 component) and almost entirely by the ion E ×B flux, since the electron E ×B and magnetic flutter particle fluxes are cancelled. The net island torque is null at zero Er rather than at zero toroidal rotation. This means that while the expected magnetic braking of the toroidal plasma rotation occurs at strong co- and counter-current rotation, at null toroidal rotation, there is a small co-directed magnetic acceleration up to the small diamagnetic (ion pressure gradient driven) co-rotation corresponding to the zero Er and null torque. This could be called the residual stress from an externally induced island. At zero Er, the only effect is the expected partial flattening of the electron temperature gradient within the island. Finite-beta GYRO simulations demonstrate almost complete RMP field screening and n =3 mode unlocking at strong Er.

  1. Turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Horton, Wendell

    2012-01-01

    This book explains how magnetized plasmas self-organize in states of electromagnetic turbulence that transports particles and energy out of the core plasma faster than anticipated by the fusion scientists designing magnetic confinement systems in the 20th century. It describes theory, experiments and simulations in a unified and up-to-date presentation of the issues of achieving nuclear fusion power.

  2. SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhihong [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-12-18

    During the first year of the SciDAC gyrokinetic particle simulation (GPS) project, the GPS team (Zhihong Lin, Liu Chen, Yasutaro Nishimura, and Igor Holod) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) studied the tokamak electron transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence, and by trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence with kinetic electron effects, extended our studies of ITG turbulence spreading to core-edge coupling. We have developed and optimized an elliptic solver using finite element method (FEM), which enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models (split-weight scheme and hybrid model) in the SciDAC GPS production code GTC. The GTC code has been ported and optimized on both scalar and vector parallel computer architectures, and is being transformed into objected-oriented style to facilitate collaborative code development. During this period, the UCI team members presented 11 invited talks at major national and international conferences, published 22 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 10 papers in conference proceedings. The UCI hosted the annual SciDAC Workshop on Plasma Turbulence sponsored by the GPS Center, 2005-2007. The workshop was attended by about fifties US and foreign researchers and financially sponsored several gradual students from MIT, Princeton University, Germany, Switzerland, and Finland. A new SciDAC postdoc, Igor Holod, has arrived at UCI to initiate global particle simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence driven by energetic particle modes. The PI, Z. Lin, has been promoted to the Associate Professor with tenure at UCI.

  3. Simple collision operators for direct Vlasov simulations of laser plasma interaction and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arber, T D; Sircombe, N J

    2010-01-01

    Non-local electron transport effects have a direct influence on the compression of cryogenic targets in laser driven ICF and target heating in high energy density experiments. There is a growing need for self-consistent models of laser plasma interactions coupled to nonlocal transport. We present a direct Vlasov solver that includes multiple species and a simple collision operator. This BGK model operator - which conserves particle density, energy and momentum - is fully implicit. For collisionless plasmas it has been shown that a double layer may be formed in which an accelerated, kinetic ion population satisfies the zero current condition. Here we extend this result to collisionalities of interest to laser driven ignition to assess the validity of nonlocal electron transport models based on fluid ions.

  4. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Joglekar, A. S. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ortega, M. I. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Moll, R. [University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Fenn, D. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  5. Transport barriers in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, I L; Szezech, J D Jr; Kroetz, T; Marcus, F A; Roberto, M; Viana, R L; Lopes, S R

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the creation of transport barriers in magnetically confined plasmas with non monotonic equilibrium radial profiles. These barriers reduce the transport in the shearless region (i.e., where the twist condition does not hold). For the chaotic motion of particles in an equilibrium electric field with a nonmonotonic radial profile, perturbed by electrostatic waves, we show that a nontwist transport barrier can be created in the plasma by modifying the electric field radial profile. We also show non twist barriers in chaotic magnetic field line transport in the plasma near to the tokamak wall with resonant modes due to electric currents in external coils.

  6. Numerical simulation of edge plasma in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yiping; Qiu Lijian

    1996-02-01

    The transport process and transport property of plasma in edge layer of Tokamak are simulated by solving numerically two-dimensional and multi-fluid plasma transport equations using suitable simulation code. The simulation results can show plasma parameter distribution characteristics in the area of edge layer, especially the characteristics near the first wall and divertor target plate. The simulation results play an important role in the design of divertor and first wall of Tokamak. (2 figs)

  7. Transport processes in space plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Elphic, R.C.; Feldman, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project represents a comprehensive research effort to study plasma and field transport processes relevant for solar-terrestrial interaction, involving the solar wind and imbedded magnetic field and plasma structures, the bow shock of the Earth's magnetosphere and associated waves, the Earth's magnetopause with imbedded flux rope structures and their connection with the Earth, plasma flow in the Earth's magnetotail, and ionospheric beam/wave interactions. The focus of the work was on the interaction between plasma and magnetic and electric fields in the regions where different plasma populations exist adjacent to or superposed on each other. These are the regions of particularly dynamic plasma behavior, important for plasma and energy transport and rapid energy releases. The research addressed questions about how this interaction takes place, what waves, instabilities, and particle/field interactions are involved, how the penetration of plasma and energy through characteristic boundaries takes place, and how the characteristic properties of the plasmas and fields of the different populations influence each other on different spatial and temporal scales. These topics were investigated through combining efforts in the analysis of plasma and field data obtained through space missions with theory and computer simulations of the plasma behavior

  8. Gyrofluid Simulations of Intrinsic Rotation Generation in Reversed Shear Plasmas with Internal Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Kwon, J. M.; Terzolo, L.; Kim, J. Y.; Diamond, P. H.

    2010-11-01

    It is accepted that the intrinsic rotation is generated via the residual stress, which is non-diffusive components of the turbulent Reynolds stress, without external momentum input. The physics leading to the onset of intrinsic rotation in L- and H- mode plasmas have been elucidated elsewhere. However, the physics responsible for the generation and transport of the intrinsic rotation and its relationship to the formation of internal transport barriers (ITBs) in reversed shear (RS) plasmas have not been explored in detail, which is the main subject in the present work. The revised version of the global gyrofluid code TRB is used for this study. It is found that the large intrinsic rotation (˜10-30% of the ion sound speed depending on ITB characteristics) is generated near the ITB region and propagates into the core. The intrinsic rotation increases linearly as the temperature gradient at ITB position increases, albeit not indefinitely. Key parameters related to the symmetry breaking, such as turbulent intensity and its gradient, the flux surface averaged parallel wavenumber are evaluated dynamically during the ITB formation. In particular, the role of reversed shear and the q-profile curvature is presented in relation to the symmetry breaking in RS plasmas.

  9. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation: Technical progress report, October 1, 1987-October 14, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.

    1988-06-01

    An overview of the program has been given in the recent proposal. The principal objectives are to provide theoretical interpretation and computer modelling for the TEXT tokamak, and to advance the simulation studies of tokamaks generally, functioning as a national transport computation facility. We also carry out equilibrium and stability studies in support of the TEXT upgrade, and work continues, at low levels, on Alfven waves and MFEnet software development. The specific focus of the program is to lay the groundwork for detailed comparison with experiment of the various transport theories, so that physics understanding and confidence in predictions of future machine behavior will be enhanced. This involves to collect, in retrievable form, the data from TEXT and other tokamaks to make the data available through easy-to-use interfaces; to develop criteria for success in fitting models to the data; to maintain the Texas transport code, CHAPO, and make it available to users; to collect theoretical models and implement them in the transport code; and to carry out the simulation studies and evaluate the fits to the data. 37 refs

  10. Transport analysis of the edge zone of H-mode plasmas by computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.; Murmann, H.

    1988-01-01

    Local transport and ideal ballooning stability in the L-phase and ELM-free H-phase in ASDEX are analysed by computer modelling. It is found that the diffusivities χ e and D at the edge are reduced by a factor of six a few milliseconds after the H-transition. Local transport in the inner plasma improves at an early stage by a typical factor of two. A change in the collisionality regime of electrons and ions does not take place. During the L-phase and the quiescent H-phase ideal ballooning modes are found to be stable. Computer experiments further show that a significant reduction in the particle flux at the separatrix takes place which is closely connected with the H-transition process. This explains the observed buildup of a density shoulder on a millisecond time-scale and the drop of the particle flow into the divertor. A strong decrease of the electron heat conduction flux at the separatrix is, however, ruled out in ELM-free periods. On the assumption of electrostatic turbulence induced transport, these results are consistent with measured density fluctuation levels near the separatrix. (author). 20 refs, 9 figs

  11. Simulation study of energetic ion transport due to Alfven eigenmodes in LHD plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todo, Yasushi; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Osakabe, Masaki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Spong, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    The creation of holes and clumps in an energetic ion energy spectrum associated with Alfven eigenmodes was examined using the neutral particle analyzer (NPA) on the LHD shot no.47645. The difference in slowing-down times between the holes and clumps suggested that the energetic ions were transported over 10% of the plasma minor radius. The spatial profile and frequency of the Alfven eigenmodes were analyzed with the AE3D code. The phase space structures of the energetic ions on the NPA line-of-sight were investigated with Poincare plots, where an oscillating Alfven eigenmode was employed for earth plot. The phase space regions trapped by the Alfven eigenmodes appeared as islands in the Poincare plots. The radial width of the islands corresponded to the transport distance of the energetic ions. Since island width depends on Alfven eigenmode amplitude, it was found that Alfven eigenmodes with amplitude δB r /B - 10 -3 transported energetic ions over 10% of the minor radius. (author)

  12. Particle Simulation of Pulsed Plasma Thruster Plumes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyd, Ian

    2002-01-01

    .... Our modeling had made progress in al aspects of simulating these complex devices including Teflon ablation, plasma formation, electro-magnetic acceleration, plume expansion, and particulate transport...

  13. Simulations of phenomena related to edge transport in tokamak fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzett, S.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates turbulence in a tokamak fusion plasma using numerical simulations. The fluid turbulence code ATTEMPT, which computes the drift dynamics of ions and electrons in electromagnetic fields, is applied to investigate three physical effects which are motivated by recent experimental findings. The first part shows that the statistics of drift fluid turbulence are largely unaffected by the presence of rational magnetic surfaces for typical edge parameter regimes. The second part contains an analysis of the dependence of correlation lengths on various physical parameters. A systematic approach reveals the impact of plasma parameters - which change in the transition from L to H-mode - on parallel, radial and perpendicular correlation lengths. In the last part of the thesis a new flux surface geometry is implemented in the ATTEMPT code. The modified geometry models the onset of the change in magnetic topology near a magnetic X-point. Computations show that turbulent fluctuations are reduced in an X-point distorted flux surface geometry, and the spectral structure of turbulence is altered substantially. (author) [de

  14. The Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) simulation of turbulent transport in the core plasma: A grand challenge in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    The long-range goal of the Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) is the reliable prediction of tokamak performance using physics-based numerical tools describing tokamak physics. The NTP is accomplishing the development of the most advanced particle and extended fluid model's on massively parallel processing (MPP) environments as part of a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary numerical study of tokamak core fluctuations. The NTP is a continuing focus of the Office of Fusion Energy's theory and computation program. Near-term HPCC work concentrates on developing a predictive numerical description of the core plasma transport in tokamaks driven by low-frequency collective fluctuations. This work addresses one of the greatest intellectual challenges to our understanding of the physics of tokamak performance and needs the most advanced computational resources to progress. We are conducting detailed comparisons of kinetic and fluid numerical models of tokamak turbulence. These comparisons are stimulating the improvement of each and the development of hybrid models which embody aspects of both. The combination of emerging massively parallel processing hardware and algorithmic improvements will result in an estimated 10**2--10**6 performance increase. Development of information processing and visualization tools is accelerating our comparison of computational models to one another, to experimental data, and to analytical theory, providing a bootstrap effect in our understanding of the target physics. The measure of success is the degree to which the experimentally observed scaling of fluctuation-driven transport may be predicted numerically. The NTP is advancing the HPCC Initiative through its state-of-the-art computational work. We are pushing the capability of high performance computing through our efforts which are strongly leveraged by OFE support

  15. Computer simulations of anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Okuda, H.

    1980-07-01

    Numerical plasma simulations have been carried out to study: (1) the turbulent spectrum and anomalous plasma transport associated with a steady state electrostatic drift turbulence; and (2) the anomalous energy transport of electrons due to shear-Alfven waves in a finite-β plasma. For the simulation of the steady state drift turbulence, it is observed that, in the absence of magnetic shear, the turbulence is quenched to a low level when the rotational transform is a rational number, while the turbulent level remains high for an irrational rotational transform

  16. Magnetic configuration effects on plasma transport under Neutral Beam Injection at TJ-II (Simulation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Fuentes, C.; Liniers, M.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic analysis of magnetic configurations (27 in total), using a Transport model including impurity dynamics and sputtering effects has been done. For small size configurations or those close to rational t values there is radioactive collapse, independently of the external gas puffing (GP) strategy chosen. The reason is the insufficiency of observed power, either by the high shine through losses due to their low radii, or by the increase of fast ion orbit losses near the resonances. For the majority of configurations without collapse, fast ion orbit losses for CO injection (going in the same direction than the toroidal magnetic field) are higher, and in consequence the power absorption and the plasma β achieved are laser, than for the opposite direction. Nevertheless in the region placed just above the main resonances (1/3 and 1/2 per period) this situation reverses. The reasons have been analysed and explained at previous studies. A consequence of this fact is that the optima of confinement for the Counter case are shifted towards higher t values than the CO one, with higher plasma β, except near the resonances. As usual the balanced case is in between. The optima achieving stationary state are very close (and often are coincident) with those lacking that restriction. The best configuration (highest average β for balanced injection, with =1.1% and central value 3.2%, although in this region the results are rather insensitive to configuration and GP strategy. the configurations placed around the 100 4 4 would need also the lowest power entering the torus in order to avoid collapse and to achieve an acceptable NBI absorption level. (Author) 12 refs

  17. Plasma transport near material boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.

    1985-06-01

    The fluid theory of two-dimensional (2-d) plasma transport in axisymmetric devices is reviewed. The forces which produce flow across the magnetic field in a collisional plasma are described. These flows may lead to up-down asymmetries in the poloidal rotation and radial fluxes. Emphasis is placed on understanding the conditions under which the known 2-d plasma fluid equations provide a valid description of these processes. Attempts to extend the fluid treatment to less collisional, turbulent plasmas are discussed. A reduction to the 1-d fluid equations used in many computer simulations is possible when sources or boundary conditions provide a large enough radial scale length. The complete 1-d fluid equations are given in the text, and 2-d fluid equations are given in the Appendix

  18. Space plasma simulation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Scientific results of experiments and tests of instruments performed with the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber and its facility are reviewed in the following six categories. 1. Tests of instruments on board rockets, satellites and balloons. 2. Plasma wave experiments. 3. Measurements of plasma particles. 4. Optical measurements. 5. Plasma production. 6. Space plasms simulations. This facility has been managed under Laboratory Space Plasma Comittee since 1969 and used by scientists in cooperative programs with universities and institutes all over country. A list of publications is attached. (author)

  19. Simulation of impurity transport in the peripheral plasma due to the emission of dust in long pulse discharges on the Large Helical Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shoji

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Two different plasma termination processes by dust emission were observed in long pulse discharges in the Large Helical Device. One is a plasma termination caused by large amounts of carbon dust released from a lower divertor region. The other is termination caused by stainless steel (iron dust emission from the surface of a helical coil can. The effect of the dust emission on the sustainment of the long pulse discharges are investigated using a three-dimensional edge plasma transport code (EMC3-EIRENE coupled with a dust transport code (DUSTT. The simulation shows that the plasma is more influenced by the iron dust emission from the helical coil can than by the carbon dust emission from the divertor region. The simulation revealed that the plasma flow in divertor legs is quite effective for preventing dust from terminating the long pulse discharges.

  20. US SciDAC Program on Integrated Simulation of Edge Transport in Fusion Plasmas, and its Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    The multi-institutional collaborative center for plasma edge simulation (CPES) has been launched in the USA under the SciDAC (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing) Fusion Simulation Program. This is a multi-disciplinary effort among physicists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists from 15 national laboratories and universities. Its goal is to perform first principles simulations on plasma transport in the edge region from the top of the pedestal to the scrape off/divertor regions bounded by a material wall, and to predict L-H transition, pedestal buildup, ELM crashes, scrape-off transport and divertor heat load. As a major part of the effort, a PIC gyrokinetic edge code XGC is constructed. The gyrokinetic edge code XGC is coupled to a nonlinear edge MHD/2fluid code (M3D and NIMROD) to predict the cycle of pedestal buildup and ELM crash. The magnetic geometry includes the realistic separatrix, X-point, open field lines and material wall. In the first phase of this effort, the electrostatic version of the PIC gyrokinetic code XGC-1 has been built, to be extended into an electromagnetic version soon in the next phase. XGC-1 includes the gyrokinetic ions, electrons, and Monte Carlo neutrals with wall recycling. Since the ions have non-Maxwellian distribution function in the edge, as demonstrated in XGC, a full-f ion technique is used. Electrons are, though, handled with a mixed-f technique: the full-f technique for neoclassical and adiabatic or delta-f split-weight techniques for turbulence physics. The mixed-f electron approach used in XGC is new, successfully integrating the neoclassical and turbulence physics. Recent progress and results on neoclassical and electrostatic turbulence transports will be reported, which includes the pedestal buildup by neutral ionization, density pedestal width scaling, electrostatic potential and plasma flow distributions in the pedestal and scrape-off, and other important physical effects in the pedestal

  1. Final Report for grant ER54958, 'Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decyk, Viktor K.

    2011-01-01

    computational complexity, such as electromagnetic or gyrokinetic codes should perform better. We therefore implemented an 2-1/2D electromagnetic, relativistic code, which used the same algorithms and data structures as the electrostatic code. Typical speedup achieved on the Tesla C1060 was about 40. The Fermi C2050, a newer GPU, achieved a speedup of 55, with a particle processing time of 2.2 nsec/particle/time step. These results were reported at the APS Division of Plasma Physics Meeting and the US-Japan Workshop on Development of Simulation Science in Plasma Physics.

  2. Visualization of intermittent blobby plasma transport in attached and detached plasmas of the NAGDIS-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Noriyasu; Furuta, Katsuhiro; Takamura, Shuichi

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the intermittent convective plasma transport in a attached and/or detached plasma condition of the linear divertor plasma simulator, NAGDIS-II. Images taken by a fast-imaging camera clearly show that in attached plasmas, blobs are peeled off the bulk plasma, and propagate outward with an azimuthal motion. In detached plasmas, plasma turbulence observed near the plasma recombining region drives strong intermittent radial plasma transport, which could broaden the radial density profile. (author)

  3. Transport processes in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balescu, R.

    1988-01-01

    This part is devoted to the classical transport theory in plasmas. Ch. 1 is a chapter of 'pure' hamiltonian mechanics and starts with the study of the motion of an individual charged particle in the presence of an electromagnetic field. Ch. 2 introduces the tools of statistical mechanics for the study of large collections of charged particles. A kinetic theory is derived as a basic tool for transport theory. In ch. 3 the hydro-dynamic - or plasmadynamic - balance equations are derived. The macroscopic dynamical equations have the structure of an infinite hierarchy. This introduces the necessity of construction of a transport theory, by which te infinite set of equations can be reduced to a finite, closed set. This can only be done by a detailed analysis of the kinetic equation under well defined conditions. The tools for such nan analysis are developed in ch. 4. In ch. 5 the transport equations, relating the unknown fluxes of matter, momentum, energy and electricity to the hydrodynamic variables, are derived and discussed. In ch. 6 the results are incorporated into the wider framework of non-equilibrium thermodynamics by connecting the transport processes to the central concept of entropy production. In ch. 7 the results of transport theory are put back into the equations of plasmadynamics

  4. Three-dimensional self-consistent radiation transport model for the fluid simulation of plasma display panel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.C.; Yang, S.S.; Lee, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    In plasma display panels (PDPs), the resonance radiation trapping is one of the important processes. In order to incorporate this effect in a PDP cell, a three-dimensional radiation transport model is self-consistently coupled with a fluid simulation. This model is compared with the conventional trapping factor method in gas mixtures of neon and xenon. It shows the differences in the time evolutions of spatial profile and the total number of resonant excited states, especially in the afterglow. The generation rates of UV light are also compared for the two methods. The visible photon flux reaching the output window from the phosphor layers as well as the total UV photon flux arriving at the phosphor layer from the plasma region are calculated for resonant and nonresonant excited species. From these calculations, the time-averaged spatial profiles of the UV flux on the phosphor layers and the visible photon flux through the output window are obtained. Finally, the diagram of the energy efficiency and the contribution of each UV light are shown

  5. Contribution to the modelling and multi-scale numerical simulation of kinetic electron transport in hot plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallet, J.

    2012-01-01

    This research thesis stands at the crossroad of plasma physics, numerical analysis and applied mathematics. After an introduction presenting the problematic and previous works, the author recalls some basis of classical kinetic models for plasma physics (collisionless kinetic theory and Vlasov equation, collisional kinetic theory with the non-relativistic Maxwell-Fokker-Plansk system) and describes the fundamental properties of the collision operators such as conservation laws, entropy dissipation, and so on. He reports the improvement of a deterministic numerical method to solve the non-relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell system coupled with Fokker-Planck-Landau type operators. The efficiency of each high order scheme is compared. The evolution of the hot spot is studied in the case of thermonuclear reactions in the centre of the pellet in a weakly collisional regime. The author focuses on the simulation of the kinetic electron collisional transport in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) between the laser absorption zone and the ablation front. A new approach is then introduced to reduce the huge computation time obtained with kinetic models. In a last chapter, the kinetic continuous equation in spherical domain is described and a new model is chosen for collisions in order to preserve collision properties

  6. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation. Final report, October 1, 1988--October 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.

    1994-10-01

    The objectives of the Fusion Research Center Theory Program are: (1) to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for the TEXT-Upgrade tokamak. Publications and reports and conference presentations for the grant period are listed. Work is described in five basic categories: (A) magnetic fusion energy database; (B) computational support and numerical modeling; (C) support for TEXT-upgrade and diagnostics; (D) transport studies; and (E) Alfven waves

  7. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation. Technical progress report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.W.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives are: (1) to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for TEXT-Upgrade. Recent reports, publications, and conference presentations of the Fusion Research Center are listed.

  8. High-order Two-Fluid Plasma Solver for Direct Numerical Simulations of Magnetic Flows with Realistic Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaorui; Livescu, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    The two-fluid plasma equations with full transport terms, including temperature and magnetic field dependent ion and electron viscous stresses and heat fluxes, frictional drag force, and ohmic heating term have been solved by using the sixth-order non-dissipative compact scheme for plasma flows in several different regimes. In order to be able to fully resolve all the dynamically relevant time and length scales while maintaining computational feasibility, the assumptions of infinite speed of light and negligible electron inertia have been made. The accuracy and robustness of this two-fluid plasma solver in handling plasma flows have been tested against a series of canonical problems, such as Alfven-Whistler dispersion relation, electromagnetic plasma shock, magnetic reconnection, etc. For all test cases, grid convergence tests have been conducted to achieve fully resolved results. The roles of heat flux, viscosity, resistivity, Hall and Biermann battery effects, are investigated for the canonical flows studied.

  9. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.

    1989-12-01

    When the magnetic moment of particle is conserved, there are three mechanisms which cause anomalous transport. These are: variation of magnetic field strength in flux surface, variation of electrostatic potential in flux surface, and destruction of flux surface. The anomalous transport of different groups of particles resulting from each of these mechanisms is different. This fact can be exploited to determine the cause of transport operative in an experimental situation. This approach can give far more information on the transport than the standard confinement time measurements. To implement this approach, we have developed Monte Carlo codes for toroidal geometries. The equations of motion are developed in a set of non-canonical, practical Boozer co-ordinates by means of Jacobian transformations of the particle drift Hamiltonian equations of motion. Effects of collisions are included by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion. Effects of the loop voltage on particle motions are also included. We plan to apply our method to study two problems: the problem of the hot electron tail observed in edge region of ZT-40, and the energy confinement time in TOKAPOLE II. For the ZT-40 problem three situations will be considered: a single mode in the core, a stochastic region that covers half the minor radius, a stochastic region that covers the entire plasma. A turbulent spectrum of perturbations based on the experimental data of TOKAPOLE II will be developed. This will be used to simulate electron transport resulting from ideal instabilities and resistive instabilities in TOKAPOLE II

  10. Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decyk, Viktor K.

    2008-01-01

    the GTC code into one flexible and extensible version. To do this, we developed a methodology to implement Design Patterns in Fortran90. Design Patterns are abstract solutions to generic programming problems, which allow one to handle increased complexity. This work was done in collaboration with Henry Gardner, a computer scientist (and former plasma physicist) from the Australian National University. As an example, the Strategy Pattern is being used in GTC to support multiple solvers. This new code is currently being used in the study of energetic particles. A document describing the evolution of the GTC code to this new object-oriented version is available to users of GTC.

  11. 2D statistical analysis of Non-Diffusive transport under attached and detached plasma conditions of the linear divertor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Ohno, N.; Tsuji, Y.; Kajita, S.

    2010-01-01

    We have analyzed the 2D convective motion of coherent structures, which is associated with plasma blobs, under attached and detached plasma conditions of a linear divertor simulator, NAGDIS-II. Data analysis of probes and a fast-imaging camera by spatio-temporal correlation with three decomposition and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was carried out to determine the basic properties of coherent structures detached from a bulk plasma column. Under the attached plasma condition, the spatio-temporal correlation with three decomposition based on the probe measurement showed that two types of coherent structures with different sizes detached from the bulk plasma and the azimuthally localized structure radially propagated faster than the larger structure. Under the detached plasma condition, movies taken by the fast-imaging camera clearly showed the dynamics of a 2D spiral structure at peripheral regions of the bulk plasma; this dynamics caused the broadening of the plasma profile. The POD method was used for the data processing of the movies to obtain low-dimensional mode shapes. It was found that the m=1 and m=2 ring-shaped coherent structures were dominant. Comparison between the POD analysis of both the movie and the probe data suggested that the coherent structure could be detached from the bulk plasma mainly associated with the m=2 fluctuation. This phenomena could play an important role in the reduction of the particle and heat flux as well as the plasma recombination processes in plasma detachment (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Plasma Simulation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-10-04

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a

  13. Transport, chaos and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkadda, S.; Doveil, F.; Elskens, Y.

    1993-01-01

    This workshop made it possible to gather for the first time plasma physicists, dynamical systems physicists and mathematicians, around a general theme focusing on the characterisation of chaotic transport. The participations have been divided into 4 topics: - dynamical systems and microscopic models of chaotic transport, - magnetic fluctuations and transport in tokamaks, - drift wave turbulence, self-organisation and intermittency, and - Wave-particle interactions

  14. Edge Plasma Simulations in NSTX and CTF: Synergy of Lithium Coating, Non-Diffusive Anomalous Transport and Drifts. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigarov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This is the final report for the Research Grant DE-FG02-08ER54989 'Edge Plasma Simulations in NSTX and CTF: Synergy of Lithium Coating, Non-Diffusive Anomalous Transport and Drifts'. The UCSD group including: A.Yu. Pigarov (PI), S.I. Krasheninnikov and R.D. Smirnov, was working on modeling of the impact of lithium coatings on edge plasma parameters in NSTX with the multi-species multi-fluid code UEDGE. The work was conducted in the following main areas: (i) improvements of UEDGE model for plasma-lithium interactions, (ii) understanding the physics of low-recycling divertor regime in NSTX caused by lithium pumping, (iii) study of synergistic effects with lithium coatings and non-diffusive ballooning-like cross-field transport, (iv) simulation of experimental multi-diagnostic data on edge plasma with lithium pumping in NSTX via self-consistent modeling of D-Li-C plasma with UEDGE, and (v) working-gas balance analysis. The accomplishments in these areas are given in the corresponding subsections in Section 2. Publications and presentations made under the Grant are listed in Section 3.

  15. Transport processes in multicomponent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissis, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: This book treats in detail, as indicated in the title, the transport phenomena in multicomponent plasmas. Here, the term 'transport' applies to the study of mass and energy transfer in plasmas due to the interactions between pairs of particles only. Radiation is legitimately omitted; anyway, radiative transfer is another field of study. As the author himself mentions in the introduction, 'the term multicomponent plasma implies a partially or fully ionized mixture of arbitrary number of species of neutral and charged particles satisfying the condition of quasi-neutrality'. In fact, this book treats a large variety of plasmas applying to different systems ranging from low-pressure systems which may be far from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions, to thermal plasmas in LTE or near-LTE states with special attention to two-temperature systems; partially ionized plasmas with low ionization degree for which electron-neutral interactions are predominant, to systems with higher ionization degrees in which charged particle interactions are no more negligible. In addition, for all the above stated situations, the author treats both plasmas which are subjected to an external electromagnetic field and those which are not (homogeneous and inhomogeneous cases). Furthermore, in the last chapters a special discussion concerning molecular plasmas is presented. Taking into account the evolution of plasma modelling in the last few years, the subject is of current interest and the reader will find in the book a large amount of information necessary for a good understanding of transport phenomena in plasmas: for a plasma simulation specialist, this book may be regarded as reference text, which includes all necessary mathematical relations for his work. However, it should not be considered a simple formulary; the reader will also find here an excellent description of the theoretical basis necessary for the derivation of all given expressions. To this point of view

  16. Suprathermal ion transport in turbulent magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovet, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Suprathermal ions, which have an energy greater than the quasi-Maxwellian background plasma temperature, are present in many laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In fusion devices, they are generated by the fusion reactions and auxiliary heating. Controlling their transport is essential for the success of future fusion devices that could provide a clean, safe and abundant source of electric power to our society. In space, suprathermal ions include energetic solar particles and cosmic rays. The understanding of the acceleration and transport mechanisms of these particles is still incomplete. Basic plasma devices allow detailed measurements that are not accessible in astrophysical and fusion plasmas, due to the difficulty to access the former and the high temperatures of the latter. The basic toroidal device TORPEX offers an easy access for diagnostics, well characterized plasma scenarios and validated numerical simulations of its turbulence dynamics, making it the ideal platform for the investigation of suprathermal ion transport. This Thesis presents three-dimensional measurements of a suprathermal ion beam injected in turbulent TORPEX plasmas. The combination of uniquely resolved measurements and first principle numerical simulations reveals the general non-diffusive nature of the suprathermal ion transport. A precise characterization of their transport regime shows that, depending on their energies, suprathermal ions can experience either a super diffusive transport or a subdiffusive transport in the same background turbulence. The transport character is determined by the interaction of the suprathermal ion orbits with the turbulent plasma structures, which in turn depends on the ratio between the ion energy and the background plasma temperature. Time-resolved measurements reveal a clear difference in the intermittency of suprathermal ions time-traces depending on the transport regime they experience. Conditionally averaged measurements uncover the influence of

  17. Numerical simulation in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarskii, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma physics is not only a field for development of physical theories and mathematical models but also an object of application of the computational experiment comprising analytical and numerical methods adapted for computers. The author considers only MHD plasma physics problems. Examples treated are dissipative structures in plasma; MHD model of solar dynamo; supernova explosion simulation; and plasma compression by a liner. (Auth.)

  18. Collisional transport in nonneutral plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubin, D.H.E.

    1999-01-01

    Classical transport theory grossly underestimates collisionally-driven cross-field transport for plasmas in the parameter regime of r c D , where r c ≡ v-bar/Ω c , λ D 2 ≡ T/4πe 2 n. In current experiments operating in this regime, cross-field test particle transport is observed to be a factor of 10 larger than the prediction of classical theory. Heat conduction is enhanced by up to 300 times over classical theory, and viscosity is up to 10 4 times larger. New guiding center theories of transport due to long-range collisions have been developed that agree with the measurements. Theory also predicts that emission and absorption of plasma waves may further enhance the thermal conduction and viscosity, providing a possible mechanism for anomalous thermal conductivity in the electron channel of fusion plasmas. (author)

  19. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of neoclassical transport in the pedestal/scrape-off region of a tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, S [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University (United States); Chang, C-S [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University (United States); Adams, M [Columbia University (United States); Cummings, J [California Institute of Technology (United States); Hinton, F [Hinton Associates (United States); Keyes, D [Columbia University (United States); Klasky, S [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Lee, W [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (United States); Lin, Z [University of California at Irvine (United States); Parker, S [University of Colorado at Boulder (United States)

    2006-09-15

    A gyrokinetic neoclassical solution for a diverted tokamak edge plasma has been obtained for the first time using the massively parallel Jaguar XT3 computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The solutions show similar characteristics to the experimental observations: electric potential is positive in the scrape-off layer and negative in the H-mode layer, and the parallel rotation is positive in the scrape-off layer and at the inside boundary of the H-mode layer. However, the solution also makes a new physical discovery that there is a strong ExB convective flow in the scrape-off plasma. A general introduction to the edge simulation problem is also presented.

  20. Transport processes in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balescu, R.

    1988-01-01

    This part is devoted to the neoclassical transport theory. Ch. 8 deals with toroidal magnetic confinement. Ch. 9 studies the motion of an individual particle in a toroidal field. Ch.'s 10 and 11 are devoted to the study of the kinetic equation appropriate to the situation that prevails in the neoclassical theory. Ch. 12 is devoted to the general study of the macroscopic moment equations in toroidal geometry. In ch. 13 the first new transport equations are derived. They include the strange Pfirsch-Schlueter effect. In ch. 14 the method of solution of the kinetic equation in the long free path regime is developed. In ch. 15 the typical long mean free path neoclassical transport equations are obtained and discussed; their very pecular differences with the classicial ones are emphasized. Ch. 16 introduces a mean free path regime as well as a method of interpolation of the results over the whole range of collisionalities. Ch. 17 provides the connection of the transport theory with non-equilibrium thermodynamics in a regime (long mean free path) where the applicability of the latter seems, at first sight, questionable. Nevertheless a complete and consistent thermodynamic theory can be set up, even in this regime. Finally, ch. 18 goes back to the hydrodynamical equations and treats the problem of their closure (in toroidal geometry)

  1. Neutron transportation simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenohara, Yuzo.

    1995-01-01

    In the present invention, problems in an existent parallelized monte carlo method is solved, and behaviors of neutrons in a large scaled system are accurately simulated at a high speed. Namely, a neutron transportation simulator according to the monte carlo method simulates movement of each of neutrons by using a parallel computer. In this case, the system to be processed is divided based on a space region and an energy region to which neutrons belong. Simulation of neutrons in the divided regions is allotted to each of performing devices of the parallel computer. Tarry data and nuclear data of the neutrons in each of the regions are memorized dispersedly to memories of each of the performing devices. A transmission means for simulating the behaviors of the neutrons in the region by each of the performing devices, as well as transmitting the information of the neutrons, when the neutrons are moved to other region, to the performing device in a transported portion are disposed to each of the performing devices. With such procedures, simulation for the neutrons in the allotted region can be conducted with small capacity of memories. (I.S.)

  2. Nonlinear dynamics and plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Drake, J.F.; Finn, J.M.; Guzdar, P.N.; Hassam, A.B.; Sagdeev, R.Z.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the progress made over the last year in three different areas of research: (a) shear flow generation and reduced transport in fluids and plasma, (b) nonlinear dynamics and visualization of 3D flows, and (c) application of wavelet analysis to the study of fractal dimensions in experimental and numerical data

  3. Mathematical modeling plasma transport in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiang, Ji [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In this work, the author applied a systematic calibration, validation and application procedure based on the methodology of mathematical modeling to international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) ignition studies. The multi-mode plasma transport model used here includes a linear combination of drift wave branch and ballooning branch instabilities with two a priori uncertain constants to account for anomalous plasma transport in tokamaks. A Bayesian parameter estimation method is used including experimental calibration error/model offsets and error bar rescaling factors to determine the two uncertain constants in the transport model with quantitative confidence level estimates for the calibrated parameters, which gives two saturation levels of instabilities. This method is first tested using a gyroBohm multi-mode transport model with a pair of DIII-D discharge experimental data, and then applied to calibrating a nominal multi-mode transport model against a broad database using twelve discharges from seven different tokamaks. The calibrated transport model is then validated on five discharges from JT-60 with no adjustable constants. The results are in a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, the resulting class of multi-mode tokamak plasma transport models is applied to the transport analysis of the ignition probability in a next generation machine, ITER. A reference simulation of basic ITER engineering design activity (EDA) parameters shows that a self-sustained thermonuclear burn with 1.5 GW output power can be achieved provided that impurity control makes radiative losses sufficiently small at an average plasma density of 1.2 X 1020/m3 with 50 MW auxiliary heating. The ignition probability of ITER for the EDA parameters, can be formally as high as 99.9% in the present context. The same probability for concept design activity (CDA) parameters of ITER, which has smaller size and lower current, is only 62.6%.

  4. Mathematical modeling plasma transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiang, Ji

    1995-01-01

    In this work, the author applied a systematic calibration, validation and application procedure based on the methodology of mathematical modeling to international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) ignition studies. The multi-mode plasma transport model used here includes a linear combination of drift wave branch and ballooning branch instabilities with two a priori uncertain constants to account for anomalous plasma transport in tokamaks. A Bayesian parameter estimation method is used including experimental calibration error/model offsets and error bar rescaling factors to determine the two uncertain constants in the transport model with quantitative confidence level estimates for the calibrated parameters, which gives two saturation levels of instabilities. This method is first tested using a gyroBohm multi-mode transport model with a pair of DIII-D discharge experimental data, and then applied to calibrating a nominal multi-mode transport model against a broad database using twelve discharges from seven different tokamaks. The calibrated transport model is then validated on five discharges from JT-60 with no adjustable constants. The results are in a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, the resulting class of multi-mode tokamak plasma transport models is applied to the transport analysis of the ignition probability in a next generation machine, ITER. A reference simulation of basic ITER engineering design activity (EDA) parameters shows that a self-sustained thermonuclear burn with 1.5 GW output power can be achieved provided that impurity control makes radiative losses sufficiently small at an average plasma density of 1.2 X 10 20 /m 3 with 50 MW auxiliary heating. The ignition probability of ITER for the EDA parameters, can be formally as high as 99.9% in the present context. The same probability for concept design activity (CDA) parameters of ITER, which has smaller size and lower current, is only 62.6%

  5. Effects of fueling profiles on plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mense, A.T.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.; Milora, S.L.

    1978-04-01

    A one-dimensional (1-D), multifluid transport model is used to investigate the effects of particle fueling profiles on plasma transport in an ignition-sized tokamak (TNS). Normal diffusive properties of plasmas will likely maintain the density at the center of the discharge even if no active fueling is provided there. This significantly relaxes the requirements for fuel penetration. Not only is lower fuel penetration easier to achieve, but it may have the advantage of reducing or eliminating density gradient-driven trapped particle microinstabilities. Simulation of discrete pellet fueling indicates that relatively low velocity (approximately 10 3 m/sec) pellets may be sufficient to fuel a TNS-sized device (approximately 1.25-m minor radius), to produce a relatively broad, cool edge region of plasma which should reduce the potential for sputtering, and also to reduce the likelihood of trapped particle mode dominated transport. Low penetrating pellets containing up to 10 to 20 percent of the total plasma ions can produce fluctuations in density and temperature at the plasma edge, but the pressure profile and fusion alpha production remain almost constant

  6. Plasma transport in a compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.; Ku, L.P; Bateman, G.

    1987-02-01

    Nominal predicted plasma conditions in a compact ignition tokamak are illustrated by transport simulations using experimentally calibrated plasma transport models. The range of uncertainty in these predictions is explored by using various models which have given almost equally good fits to experimental data. Using a transport model which best fits the data, thermonuclear ignition occurs in a Compact Ignition Tokamak design with major radius 1.32 m, plasma half-width 0.43 m, elongation 2.0, and toroidal field and plasma current ramped in six seconds from 1.7 to 10.4 T and 0.7 to 10 MA, respectively. Ignition is facilitated by 20 MW of heating deposited off the magnetic axis near the 3 He minority cyclotron resonance layer. Under these conditions, sawtooth oscillations are small and have little impact on ignition. Tritium inventory is minimized by preconditioning most discharges with deuterium. Tritium is injected, in large frozen pellets, only after minority resonance preheating. Variations of the transport model, impurity influx, heating profile, and pellet ablation rates, have a large effect on ignition and on the maximum beta that can be achieved

  7. Large-scale numerical simulations of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    The recent trend of large scales simulations of fusion plasma and processing plasmas is briefly summarized. Many advanced simulation techniques have been developed for fusion plasmas and some of these techniques are now applied to analyses of processing plasmas. (author)

  8. Third and fourth quarter progress report on plasma theory and simulation, July 1-December 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1987-01-01

    Our group uses theory and simulation as tools in order to increase the understanding of plasma instabilities, heating, transport, plasma-wall interactions, and large potentials in plasmas. We also work on the improvement of simulation both theoretically and practically

  9. Plasma transport through magnetic boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treumann, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    We examine the overall plasma diffusion processes across tangential discontinuities of which the best known example is the Earth's magnetopause during northward interplanetary magnetic field conditions. The existence of the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) adjacent to the magnetopause during those periods is ample evidence for the presence of so far poorly defined and understood entry processes acting at the magnetopause. We conclude that microscopic instabilities are probably not efficient enough to account for the LLBL. They affect only a small number of resonant particles. It is argued that macroscopic nonresonant turbulence is the most probable mechanism for plasma transport

  10. Global gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furnish, G.; Horton, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.

    1998-10-01

    A kinetic simulation code based on the gyrokinetic ion dynamics in global general metric (including a tokamak with circular or noncircular cross-section) has been developed. This gyrokinetic simulation is capable of examining the global and semi-global driftwave structures and their associated transport in a tokamak plasma. The authors investigate the property of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) or η i (η i ≡ ∂ ell nT i /∂ ell n n i ) driven drift waves in a tokamak plasma. The emergent semi-global drift wave modes give rise to thermal transport characterized by the Bohm scaling

  11. Kinetic particle simulation study of parallel heat transport in scrape-off layer plasmas over a wide range of collisionalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froese, Aaron; Takizuka, Tomonori; Yagi, Masatoshi

    2010-01-01

    Fluid models are not generally applicable to fusion edge plasmas without external provision of kinetic factors: closure parameters and boundary conditions inside the sheath region. We explain the PARASOL-1D simulation, a particle-in-cell code with a binary collision Monte-Carlo model, and use it to determine four kinetic factors commonly needed in fluid codes. These are the electron and ion heat flux limiting factors, α e and α i , the ion adiabatic index, γ A , and the electron and ion temperature anisotropy, T ‖ /T ⊥ . We survey these factors over a wide range of collisionalities and find that, as predicted, the conductive heat flux is accurately described by the Spitzer-Härm expression in the collisional limit and asymptotes to a constant value in the collisionless limit. However, unique behavior occurs in the weakly collisional regime when the ratio of the mean free path to connection length is 0.1 < λ mfp /L ‖ < 10, when the SOL is between the conduction- and sheath-limited regimes. We find that α e can peak, becoming larger than the collisionless limit, γ A is less than unity, and only the ions are anisotropic. The effects of electron energy radiation and Langevin heating are explored. Finally, the strong deviations of the energy distribution function from Maxwellian in the weakly collisional and collisionless regimes are explained. (author)

  12. Three-dimensional simulation of H-mode plasmas with localized divertor impurity injection on Alcator C-Mod using the edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lore, J. D.; Reinke, M. L.; Lipschultz, B.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Feng, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in Alcator C-Mod to assess the level of toroidal asymmetry in divertor conditions resulting from poloidally and toroidally localized extrinsic impurity gas seeding show a weak toroidal peaking (∼1.1) in divertor electron temperatures for high-power enhanced D-alpha H-mode plasmas. This is in contrast to similar experiments in Ohmically heated L-mode plasmas, which showed a clear toroidal modulation in the divertor electron temperature. Modeling of these experiments using the 3D edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE [Y. Feng et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 241, 930 (1997)] qualitatively reproduces these trends, and indicates that the different response in the simulations is due to the ionization location of the injected nitrogen. Low electron temperatures in the private flux region (PFR) in L-mode result in a PFR plasma that is nearly transparent to neutral nitrogen, while in H-mode the impurities are ionized in close proximity to the injection location, with this latter case yielding a largely axisymmetric radiation pattern in the scrape-off-layer. The consequences for the ITER gas injection system are discussed. Quantitative agreement with the experiment is lacking in some areas, suggesting potential areas for improving the physics model in EMC3-EIRENE

  13. Analysis of pedestal plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Groebner, R.J.; Osborne, T.H.; Canik, J.M.; Owen, L.W.; Pankin, A.Y.; Rafiq, T.; Rognlien, T.D.; Stacey, W.M.

    2010-01-01

    An H-mode edge pedestal plasma transport benchmarking exercise was undertaken for a single DIII-D pedestal. Transport modelling codes used include 1.5D interpretive (ONETWO, GTEDGE), 1.5D predictive (ASTRA) and 2D ones (SOLPS, UEDGE). The particular DIII-D discharge considered is 98889, which has a typical low density pedestal. Profiles for the edge plasma are obtained from Thomson and charge-exchange recombination data averaged over the last 20% of the average 33.53 ms repetition time between type I edge localized modes. The modelled density of recycled neutrals is largest in the divertor X-point region and causes the edge plasma source rate to vary by a factor ∼10 2 on the separatrix. Modelled poloidal variations in the densities and temperatures on flux surfaces are small on all flux surfaces up to within about 2.6 mm (ρ N > 0.99) of the mid-plane separatrix. For the assumed Fick's-diffusion-type laws, the radial heat and density fluxes vary poloidally by factors of 2-3 in the pedestal region; they are largest on the outboard mid-plane where flux surfaces are compressed and local radial gradients are largest. Convective heat flows are found to be small fractions of the electron (∼ 2 s -1 . Electron heat transport is found to be best characterized by electron-temperature-gradient-induced transport at the pedestal top and paleoclassical transport throughout the pedestal. The effective ion heat diffusivity in the pedestal has a different profile from the neoclassical prediction and may be smaller than it. The very small effective density diffusivity may be the result of an inward pinch flow nearly balancing a diffusive outward radial density flux. The inward ion pinch velocity and density diffusion coefficient are determined by a new interpretive analysis technique that uses information from the force balance (momentum conservation) equations; the paleoclassical transport model provides a plausible explanation of these new results. Finally, the measurements

  14. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a Monte Carlo method to estimate the transport of different groups of particles for plasmas in toroidal geometries. This method can determine the important transport mechanisms driving the anomalous transport by comparing the numerical results with the experimental data. The important groups of particles whose transport can be estimated by this method include runaway electrons, thermal electrons, both passing and trapped diagnostic beam ions etc. The three basic mechanisms driving the anomalous transport are: spatial variation of magnetic field strength, spatial variation of electrostatic potential within the flux surfaces, and the loss of flux surfaces. The equation of motion are obtained from the drift hamiltonian. The equations of motion are developed in the canonical and in the non-canonical, practical co-ordinates as well. The effects of collisions are represented by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion at each time-step. Here we present the results of application of this method to three cases: superathermal alphas in the rippled field of tokamaks, motion in the magnetic turbulence of takapole II, and transport in the stochastic fields of ZT40. This work is supported by DOE OFE and ORAU HBCU program

  15. Nonlinear dynamics and plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.S.; Sagdeev, R.; Antonsen, T.; Drake, J.; Hassma, A.; Guzdar, P.N.

    1995-12-01

    This progress report reports work done on a program in nonlinear dynamical aspects of plasma turbulence and transport funded by DOE from 1992-1995. The purpose of this program has been to promote the utilization of recent pathbreaking developments in nonlinear science in plasma turbulence and transport and to fully utilize the scientific expertise of Russian fusion and plasma community in collaboration with our group to address outstanding fusion theory problems. In the work reported in our progress report, we have studied simple models which are motivated by observation on actual fusion devices. The models focus on the important physical processes without incorporating the complexity of the geometry of real devices. We have also studied linear stability problems which incorporated important physics issues related to geometry involving closed field lines and open field lines. This allows for a deeper analysis and understanding of the system both analytically and numerically. The strong collaboration between the Russian visitors and the US participants has led to a fruitful and strong research program that taps the complementary analytic and numerical capabilities of the two groups. Over the years several distinguished Russian visitors have interacted with various members of the group and set up collaborative work which forms a significant part of proposed research. Dr. Galeev, Director of the Space Research Institute of Moscow and Dr. Novakovskii from the Kurchatov Institute are two such ongoing collaborations. 21 refs

  16. Plasma modelling and numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dijk, J; Kroesen, G M W; Bogaerts, A

    2009-01-01

    Plasma modelling is an exciting subject in which virtually all physical disciplines are represented. Plasma models combine the electromagnetic, statistical and fluid dynamical theories that have their roots in the 19th century with the modern insights concerning the structure of matter that were developed throughout the 20th century. The present cluster issue consists of 20 invited contributions, which are representative of the state of the art in plasma modelling and numerical simulation. These contributions provide an in-depth discussion of the major theories and modelling and simulation strategies, and their applications to contemporary plasma-based technologies. In this editorial review, we introduce and complement those papers by providing a bird's eye perspective on plasma modelling and discussing the historical context in which it has surfaced. (editorial review)

  17. Implicit plasma simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langdon, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Implicit time integration methods have been used extensively in numerical modelling of slowly varying phenomena in systems that also support rapid variation. Examples include diffusion, hydrodynamics and reaction kinetics. This article discussed implementation of implicit time integration in plasma codes of the ''particle-in-cell'' family, and the benefits to be gained

  18. Instabilities, turbulence and transport in a magnetized plasma; Instabilites, turbulence et transport dans un plasma magnetise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbet, X

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce the main processes that occur in a magnetized plasma. During the last 2 decades, the understanding of turbulence has made great progress but analytical formulas and simulations are far to produce reliable predictions. The values of transport coefficients in a tokamak plasma exceed by far those predicted by the theory of collisional transport. This phenomenon is called abnormal transport and might be due to plasma fluctuations. An estimation of turbulent fluxes derived from the levels of fluctuations, is proposed. A flow description of plasma allows the understanding of most micro-instabilities. The ballooning representation deals with instabilities in a toric geometry. 3 factors play an important role to stabilize plasmas: density pinch, magnetic shear and speed shear. The flow model of plasma gives an erroneous value for the stability threshold, this is due to a bad description of the resonant interaction between wave and particle. As for dynamics, flow models can be improved by adding dissipative terms so that the linear response nears the kinetic response. The kinetic approach is more accurate but is complex because of the great number of dimensions involved. (A.C.)

  19. 'Complexity' and anomalous transport in space plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Tom; Wu Chengchin

    2002-01-01

    'Complexity' has become a hot topic in nearly every field of modern physics. Space plasma is of no exception. In this paper, it is demonstrated that the sporadic and localized interactions of magnetic coherent structures are the origin of 'complexity' in space plasmas. The intermittent localized interactions, which generate the anomalous diffusion, transport, and evolution of the macroscopic state variables of the overall dynamical system, may be modeled by a triggered (fast) localized chaotic growth equation of a set of relevant order parameters. Such processes would generally pave the way for the global system to evolve into a 'complex' state of long-ranged interactions of fluctuations, displaying the phenomenon of forced and/or self-organized criticality. An example of such type of anomalous transport and evolution in a sheared magnetic field is provided via two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The coarse-grained dissipation due to the intermittent triggered interactions among the magnetic coherent structures induces a 'fluctuation-induced nonlinear instability' that reconfigures the sheared magnetic field into an X-point magnetic geometry (in the mean field sense), leading to the anomalous acceleration of the magnetic coherent structures. A phenomenon akin to such type of anomalous transport and acceleration, the so-called bursty bulk flows, has been commonly observed in the plasma sheet of the Earth's magnetotail

  20. Labotratory Simulation Experiments of Cometary Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    MINAMI, S.; Baum, P. J.; Kamin, G.; White, R. S.; 南, 繁行

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory simulation experiment to study the interaction between a cometary plasma and the solar wind has been performed using the UCR-T 1 space simulation facility at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, the University of California, Riverside. Light emitting plasma composed of Sr, Ba and/or C simulating cometary coma plasma is produced by a plasma emitter which interacts with intense plasma flow produced by a co-axial plasma gun simulating the solar wind. The purpose of this ...

  1. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of W7-X plasma transport: density control and particle balance in steady-state operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, D.; Feng, Y.; Sardei, F.; Reiter, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents self-consistent three-dimensional (3D) plasma transport simulations in the boundary of stellarator W7-X obtained with the Monte Carlo code EMC3-EIRENE for three typical island divertor configurations. The chosen 3D grid consists of relatively simple nested finite toroidal surfaces defined on a toroidal field period and covering the whole edge topology, which includes closed surfaces, islands and ergodic regions. Local grid refinements account for the required high resolution in the divertor region. The distribution of plasma density and temperature in the divertor region, as well as the power deposition profiles on the divertor plates, are shown to strongly depend on the island geometry, i.e. on the position and size of the dominant island chain. Configurations with strike-point positions closer to the gap of the divertor chamber generally favour the neutral compression in the divertor chamber and hence the pumping efficiency. The ratio of pumping to recycling fluxes is found to be roughly independent of the separatrix density and is thus a figure of merit for the quality of the configuration and of the divertor system in terms of density control. Lower limits for the achievable separatrix density, which determine the particle exhaust capabilities in stationary conditions, are compared for the three W7-X configurations

  2. Heights integrated model as instrument for simulation of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, and heat conduction phenomena of laser-produced plasma in EUV applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizyuk, V.; Hassanein, A.; Morozov, V.; Sizyuk, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-01-16

    The HEIGHTS integrated model has been developed as an instrument for simulation and optimization of laser-produced plasma (LPP) sources relevant to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The model combines three general parts: hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and heat conduction. The first part employs a total variation diminishing scheme in the Lax-Friedrich formulation (TVD-LF); the second part, a Monte Carlo model; and the third part, implicit schemes with sparse matrix technology. All model parts consider physical processes in three-dimensional geometry. The influence of a generated magnetic field on laser plasma behavior was estimated, and it was found that this effect could be neglected for laser intensities relevant to EUV (up to {approx}10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}). All applied schemes were tested on analytical problems separately. Benchmark modeling of the full EUV source problem with a planar tin target showed good correspondence with experimental and theoretical data. Preliminary results are presented for tin droplet- and planar-target LPP devices. The influence of three-dimensional effects on EUV properties of source is discussed.

  3. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics transport

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics: Tranpsort develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma transport to the modern treatment of the Chapman-Enskog method for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The book invites the reader to consider actual problems of the transport of thermal plasmas with particular attention to the derivation of diffusion- and viscosity-type transport cross sections, stressing the role of resonant charge-exchange processes in affecting the diffusion-type collision calculation of viscosity-type collision integrals. A wide range of topics is then discussed including (1) the effect of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions on the transport of vibrational energy, (2) the role of electronically excited states in the transport properties of thermal plasmas, (3) the dependence of transport properties on the multitude of Saha equations for multi-temperature plasmas, and (4) the effect of the magnetic field on transport properties. Throughout the book, worked examples ...

  4. On helicon wave induced radial plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzilka, V.

    1993-04-01

    Estimates of helicon wave induced radial plasma transport are presented. The wave induced transport grows or decreases in dependence on the sign of the azimuthal wave number; these changes in transport may play an important role in helicon wave plasma sources. (author) 5 figs., 18 refs

  5. Comparing simulation of plasma turbulence with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, David W.; Bravenec, Ronald V.; Dorland, William; Beer, Michael A.; Hammett, G. W.; McKee, George R.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Murakami, Masanori; Burrell, Keith H.; Jackson, Gary L.; Staebler, Gary M.

    2002-01-01

    The direct quantitative correspondence between theoretical predictions and the measured plasma fluctuations and transport is tested by performing nonlinear gyro-Landau-fluid simulations with the GRYFFIN (or ITG) code [W. Dorland and G. W. Hammett, Phys. Fluids B 5, 812 (1993); M. A. Beer and G. W. Hammett, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4046 (1996)]. In an L-mode reference discharge in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)], which has relatively large fluctuations and transport, the turbulence is dominated by ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes. Trapped electron modes and impurity drift waves also play a role. Density fluctuations are measured by beam emission spectroscopy [R. J. Fonck, P. A. Duperrex, and S. F. Paul, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 61, 3487 (1990)]. Experimental fluxes and corresponding diffusivities are analyzed by the TRANSP code [R. J. Hawryluk, in Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions, edited by B. Coppi, G. G. Leotta, D. Pfirsch, R. Pozzoli, and E. Sindoni (Pergamon, Oxford, 1980), Vol. 1, p. 19]. The shape of the simulated wave number spectrum is close to the measured one. The simulated ion thermal transport, corrected for ExB low shear, exceeds the experimental value by a factor of 1.5 to 2.0. The simulation overestimates the density fluctuation level by an even larger factor. On the other hand, the simulation underestimates the electron thermal transport, which may be accounted for by modes that are not accessible to the simulation or to the BES measurement

  6. Experimental study of high current negative ion sources D- / H-. Analysis based on the simulation of the negative ion transport in the plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riz, D.

    1996-01-01

    In the frame of the development of a neutral beam injection system able to work the ITER tokamak (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), two negative ion sources, Dragon and Kamaboko, have been installed on the MANTIS test bed in Cadarache, and studies in order to extract 20 mA/cm 2 of D - . The two production modes of negative ions have been investigated: volume production; surface production after cesium injection in the discharge. Experiments have shown that cesium seeding is necessary in order to reach the requested performances for ITER. 20 mA/cm 2 have been extracted from the Kamaboko source for an arc power density of 2.5 kW/liter. Simultaneously, a code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ions transport in the source plasma, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The ion trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collisions H - /H + and of charge exchange H - /H 0 are handled at each time step by a Monte Carlo procedure. The code allows to obtain the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at a given location. The calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have allowed to explain several phenomena observed on negative ion sources, such as the isotopic effect H - /D - and the influence of the polarisation of the plasma grid and of the magnetic filter on the negative ions current. The code has also shown that, in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, working with large arc power densities (> 1 kW/liter), only negative ions produced in volume at a distance lower that 2 cm from the plasma grid and those produced at the grid surface have a chance of being extracted. (author)

  7. New methods in plasma simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The development of implicit methods of particle-in-cell (PIC) computer simulation in recent years, and their merger with older hybrid methods have created a new arsenal of simulation techniques for the treatment of complex practical problems in plasma physics. The new implicit hybrid codes are aimed at transitional problems that lie somewhere between the long time scale, high density regime associated with MHD modeling, and the short time scale, low density regime appropriate to PIC particle-in-cell techniques. This transitional regime arises in ICF coronal plasmas, in pulsed power plasma switches, in Z-pinches, and in foil implosions. Here, we outline how such a merger of implicit and hybrid methods has been carried out, specifically in the ANTHEM computer code, and demonstrate the utility of implicit hybrid simulation in applications. 25 refs., 5 figs

  8. Simulation of burning plasma dynamics in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.F.; Amano, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Inoue, N.

    1996-02-01

    Dynamics of burning plasma for various transient situations in ITER plasma has been simulated with a 1.5-dimensional up-down asymmetry Tokamak Transport Simulation Code (TTSC). We have mainly paid attention to intrinsic plasma transport processes such as the confinement improvement and the change of plasma profiles. It is shown that a large excursion of the fusion power takes place with a small improvement of the plasma confinement; e.g., an increase of the global energy confinement by a factor of 1.22 yields the fusion power excursion of ∼ 30% within a few seconds. Any feedback control of fueling D-T gas is difficult to respond to this short time scale of fusion power transient. The effect of the plasma profile on the fusion power excursion has been studied, by changing the particle transport denoted by the inward pinch parameter C V . It is found that the fusion power excursion is mild and slow, and the feedback control is quite effective in suppressing the fusion power excursion and in shortening the duration time of power transient in this case. The change in the pumping efficiency has also been studied and a large excursion of the fusion power has not been observed, because of the decrease in the fuel density itself in the case of the increase in the pumping efficiency, and the helium ash accumulation in the case of the decrease in the pumping efficiency. Finally it is shown that the MHD sawteeth activity leads to the fusion power fluctuation of ± 20%, although it is helpful for the helium ash exhaust. (author)

  9. Energy transport in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M.H.

    1989-06-01

    The study of energy transport in laser produced plasmas is of great interest both because it tests and develops understanding of several aspects of basic plasma physics and also because it is of central importance in major applications of laser produced plasmas including laser fusion, the production of intense X-ray sources, and X-ray lasers. The three sections cover thermal electrons (energy transport in one dimension, plane targets and lateral transport from a focal spot, thermal smoothing, thermal instabilities), hot electrons (preheating in one dimension, lateral transport from a focal spot) and radiation (preheating in one dimension, lateral transport and smoothing, instabilities). (author)

  10. Plasma physics via particle simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    Plasmas are studied by following the motion of many particles in applied and self fields, analytically, experimentally and computationally. Plasmas for magnetic fusion energy devices are very hot, nearly collisionless and magnetized, with scale lengths of many ion gyroradii and Debye lengths. The analytic studies of such plasmas are very difficult as the plasma is nonuniform, anisotropic and nonlinear. The experimental studies have become very expensive in time and money, as the size, density and temperature approach fusion reactor values. Computational studies using many particles and/or fluids have complemented both theories and experiments for many years and have progressed to fully three dimensional electromagnetic models, albeit with hours of running times on the fastest largest computers. Particle simulation methods are presented in some detail, showing particle advance from acceleration to velocity to position, followed by calculation of the fields from charge and current densities and then further particle advance, and so on. Limitations due to the time stepping and use of a spatial grid are given, to avoid inaccuracies and instabilities. Examples are given for an electrostatic program in one dimension of an orbit averaging program, and for a three dimensional electromagnetic program. Applications of particle simulations of plasmas in magnetic and inertial fusion devices continue to grow, as well as to plasmas and beams in peripheral devices, such as sources, accelerators, and converters. (orig.)

  11. Plasma disruption modeling and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1994-01-01

    Disruptions in tokamak reactors are considered a limiting factor to successful operation and reliable design. The behavior of plasma-facing components during a disruption is critical to the overall integrity of the reactor. Erosion of plasma facing-material (PFM) surfaces due to thermal energy dump during the disruption can severely limit the lifetime of these components and thus diminish the economic feasibility of the reactor. A comprehensive understanding of the interplay of various physical processes during a disruption is essential for determining component lifetime and potentially improving the performance of such components. There are three principal stages in modeling the behavior of PFM during a disruption. Initially, the incident plasma particles will deposit their energy directly on the PFM surface, heating it to a very high temperature where ablation occurs. Models for plasma-material interactions have been developed and used to predict material thermal evolution during the disruption. Within a few microseconds after the start of the disruption, enough material is vaporized to intercept most of the incoming plasma particles. Models for plasma-vapor interactions are necessary to predict vapor cloud expansion and hydrodynamics. Continuous heating of the vapor cloud above the material surface by the incident plasma particles will excite, ionize, and cause vapor atoms to emit thermal radiation. Accurate models for radiation transport in the vapor are essential for calculating the net radiated flux to the material surface which determines the final erosion thickness and consequently component lifetime. A comprehensive model that takes into account various stages of plasma-material interaction has been developed and used to predict erosion rates during reactor disruption, as well during induced disruption in laboratory experiments

  12. Nonlocal transport in hot plasma. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brantov, A. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of describing charged particle transport in hot plasma under the conditions in which the ratio of the electron mean free path to the gradient length is not too small is one of the key problems of plasma physics. However, up to now, there was a deficit of the systematic interpretation of the current state of this problem, which, in most studies, is formulated as the problem of nonlocal transport. In this review, we fill this gap by presenting a self-consistent linear theory of nonlocal transport for small plasma perturbations and an arbitrary collisionality from the classical highly collisional hydrodynamic regime to the collisionless regime. We describe a number of nonlinear transport models and demonstrate the application of the nonclassical transport theory to the solution of some problems of plasma physics, first of all for plasmas produced by nanosecond laser pulses with intensities of 10 13 –10 16 W/cm 2

  13. Compact toroidal plasmas: Simulations and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harned, D.S.; Hewett, D.W.; Lilliequist, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    Realistic FRC equilibria are calculated and their stability to the n=1 tilting mode is studied. Excluding kinetic effects, configurations ranging from elliptical to racetrack are unstable. Particle simulations of FRCs show that particle loss on open field lines can cause sufficient plasma rotation to drive the n=2 rotational instability. The allowed frequencies of the shear Alfven wave are calculated for use in heating of spheromaks. An expanded spheromak is introduced and its stability properties are studied. Transport calculations of CTs are described. A power balance model shows that many features of gun-generated CT plasmas can be explained by the dominance of impurity radiation. It is shown how the Taylor relaxation theory, applied to gun-generated CT plasmas, leads to the possibility of steady-state current drive. Lastly, applications of accelerated CTs are considered. (author)

  14. Positron deposition in plasmas by positronium beam ionization and transport of positrons in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    In a recently proposed positron transport experiment, positrons would be deposited in a fusion plasma by forming a positronium (Ps) beam and passing it through the plasma. Positrons would be deposited as the beam is ionized by plasma ions and electrons. Radial transport of the positrons to the limiter could then be measured by detecting the gamma radiation produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons in the limiter. This would allow measurements of the transport of electron-mass particles and might shed some light on the mechanisms of electron transport in fusion plasmas. In this paper, the deposition and transport of positrons in a tokamak are simulated and the annihilation signal determined for several transport models. Calculations of the expected signals are necessary for the optimal design of a positron transport experiment. There are several mechanisms for the loss of positrons besides transport to the limiter. Annihilation with plasma electrons and reformation of positronium in positron-hydrogen collisions are two such processes. These processes can alter the signal and place restrictions ons on the plasma conditions in which positron transport experiments can be effectively performed

  15. Computer simulation of bounded plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems of simulating a one-dimensional bounded plasma system using particles in a gridded space are systematically explored and solutions to them are given. Such problems include the injection of particles at the boundaries, the solution of Poisson's equation, and the inclusion of an external circuit between the confining boundaries. A recently discovered artificial cooling effect is explained as being a side-effect of quiet injection, and its potential for causing serious but subtle errors in bounded simulation is noted. The methods described in the first part of the thesis are then applied to the simulation of an extension of the Pierce diode problem, specifically a Pierce diode modified by an external circuit between the electrodes. The results of these simulations agree to high accuracy with theory when a theory exists, and also show some interesting chaotic behavior in certain parameter regimes. The chaotic behavior is described in detail

  16. Effects of fueling profiles on plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Attenberger, S.E.; Milora, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of cold particle fueling profiles on particle and energy transport in an ignition sized tokamak plasma are investigated in this study with a one-dimensional, multifluid transport model. A density gradient driven trapped particle microinstability model for plasma transport is used to demonstrate potential effects of fueling profiles on ignition requirements. Important criteria for the development of improved transport models under the conditions of shallow particle fueling profiles are outlined. A discrete pellet fueling model indicates that large fluctuations in density and temperature may occur in the outer regions of the plasma with large, shallowly penetrating pellets, but fluctuations in the pressure profile are small. The hot central core of the plasma remains unaffected by the large fluctuations near the plasma edge

  17. Advanced transport modeling of toroidal plasmas with transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Murakami, S.; Honda, M.; Izumi, Y.; Yagi, M.; Nakajima, N.; Nakamura, Y.; Ozeki, T.

    2005-01-01

    Transport modeling of toroidal plasmas is one of the most important issue to predict time evolution of burning plasmas and to develop control schemes in reactor plasmas. In order to describe the plasma rotation and rapid transition self-consistently, we have developed an advanced scheme of transport modeling based on dynamical transport equation and applied it to the analysis of transport barrier formation. First we propose a new transport model and examine its behavior by the use of conventional diffusive transport equation. This model includes the electrostatic toroidal ITG mode and the electromagnetic ballooning mode and successfully describes the formation of internal transport barriers. Then the dynamical transport equation is introduced to describe the plasma rotation and the radial electric field self-consistently. The formation of edge transport barriers is systematically studied and compared with experimental observations. The possibility of kinetic transport modeling in velocity space is also examined. Finally the modular structure of integrated modeling code for tokamaks and helical systems is discussed. (author)

  18. Magnetic configuration effects on plasma transport under Neutral Beam Injection at TJ-II (Simulation); Efectos de Configuracion Magnetica en el Transporte de Plasma durante la Inyeccion de Haces Neutros en el TJ-II (Simulacion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guasp, J.; Fuentes, C.; Liniers, M.

    2001-07-01

    A systematic analysis of magnetic configurations (27 in total), using a Transport model including impurity dynamics and sputtering effects has been done. For small size configurations or those close to rational t values there is radioactive collapse, independently of the external gas puffing (GP) strategy chosen. The reason is the insufficiency of observed power, either by the high shine through losses due to their low radii, or by the increase of fast ion orbit losses near the resonances. For the majority of configurations without collapse, fast ion orbit losses for CO injection (going in the same direction than the toroidal magnetic field) are higher, and in consequence the power absorption and the plasma {beta} achieved are laser, than for the opposite direction. Nevertheless in the region placed just above the main resonances (1/3 and 1/2 per period) this situation reverses. The reasons have been analysed and explained at previous studies. A consequence of this fact is that the optima of confinement for the Counter case are shifted towards higher t values than the CO one, with higher plasma {beta}, except near the resonances. As usual the balanced case is in between. The optima achieving stationary state are very close (and often are coincident) with those lacking that restriction. The best configuration (highest average {beta}) for balanced injection, with <{beta}>=1.1% and central value 3.2%, although in this region the results are rather insensitive to configuration and GP strategy. The configurations placed around the 100{sub 4}4 would need also the lowest power entering the torus in order to avoid collapse and to achieve an acceptable NBI absorption level. (Author) 12 refs.

  19. Turbulent transport in low-beta plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Pécseli, H.L.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1996-01-01

    Low-frequency electrostatic fluctuations are studied experimentally in a low-P plasma, with particular attention to their importance for the anomalous plasma transport across magnetic field lines. The presence of large coherent structures in a turbulent background at the edge of the plasma column...... is demonstrated by a statistical analysis. The importance of these structures for the turbulent transport is investigated. The study is extended by a multichannel conditional analysis to illustrate detailed properties and parameter dependences of the turbulent transport. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  20. Nonlinear electron transport in magnetized laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kho, T.H.; Haines, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Electron transport in a magnetized plasma heated by inverse bremsstrahlung is studied numerically using a nonlinear Fokker--Planck model with self-consistent E and B fields. The numerical scheme is described. Nonlocal transport is found to alter many of the transport coefficients derived from linear transport theory, in particular, the Nernst and Righi--Leduc effects, in addition to the perpendicular heat flux q/sub perpendicular/, are substantially reduced near critical surface. The magnetic field, however, remains strongly coupled to the nonlinear q/sub perpendicular/ and, as has been found in hydrosimulations, convective amplification of the magnetic field occurs in the overdense plasma

  1. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beiersdorfer, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chernov, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Magee, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  2. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T. D.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Chernov, A.; Frolov, T.; Magee, E.; Rudd, R.; Umansky, M.

    2016-01-01

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  3. Presheath profiles in simulated tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBombard, B.; Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Lehmer, R.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Ra, Y.; Tynan, G.

    1988-04-01

    The PISCES plasma surface interaction facility at UCLA generates plasmas with characteristics similar to those found in the edge plasmas of tokamaks. Steady state magnetized plasmas produced by this device are used to study plasma-wall interaction phenomena which are relevant to tokamak devices. We report here progress on some detailed investigations of the presheath region that extends from a wall surface into these /open quotes/simulated tokamak/close quotes/ edge plasma discharges along magnetic field lines

  4. Simulating Sources of Superstorm Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the contributions to magnetospheric pressure (ring current) of the solar wind, polar wind, auroral wind, and plasmaspheric wind, with the surprising result that the main phase pressure is dominated by plasmaspheric protons. We used global simulation fields from the LFM single fluid ideal MHD model. We embedded the Comprehensive Ring Current Model within it, driven by the LFM transpolar potential, and supplied with plasmas at its boundary including solar wind protons, polar wind protons, auroral wind O+, and plasmaspheric protons. We included auroral outflows and acceleration driven by the LFM ionospheric boundary condition, including parallel ion acceleration driven by upward currents. Our plasmasphere model runs within the CRCM and is driven by it. Ionospheric sources were treated using our Global Ion Kinetics code based on full equations of motion. This treatment neglects inertial loading and pressure exerted by the ionospheric plasmas, and will be superceded by multifluid simulations that include those effects. However, these simulations provide new insights into the respective role of ionospheric sources in storm-time magnetospheric dynamics.

  5. Dense high-temperature plasma transport processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giniyatova, Sh.G.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the transport processes in dense high-temperature semiclassical plasma are studied on the base of the kinetic equation, where the semiclassical potential was used, in its collision integral. The coefficient of plasma electrical conductivity, viscosity and thermal conductivity were received. There were compared with the other authors' results. The Grad's method was used obtaining of viscosity and thermal coefficients. (author)

  6. Experimental study of high current negative ion sources D{sup -} / H{sup -}. Analysis based on the simulation of the negative ion transport in the plasma source; Etude experimentale de sources a fort courant d`ions negatifs D{sup -} / H{sup -}. Analyse fondee sur la simulation du transport des ions dans le plasma de la source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riz, D.

    1996-10-30

    In the frame of the development of a neutral beam injection system able to work the ITER tokamak (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), two negative ion sources, Dragon and Kamaboko, have been installed on the MANTIS test bed in Cadarache, and studies in order to extract 20 mA/cm{sup 2} of D{sup -}. The two production modes of negative ions have been investigated: volume production; surface production after cesium injection in the discharge. Experiments have shown that cesium seeding is necessary in order to reach the requested performances for ITER. 20 mA/cm{sup 2} have been extracted from the Kamaboko source for an arc power density of 2.5 kW/liter. Simultaneously, a code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ions transport in the source plasma, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The ion trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collisions H{sup -}/H{sup +} and of charge exchange H{sup -}/H{sup 0} are handled at each time step by a Monte Carlo procedure. The code allows to obtain the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at a given location. The calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have allowed to explain several phenomena observed on negative ion sources, such as the isotopic effect H{sup -}/D{sup -} and the influence of the polarisation of the plasma grid and of the magnetic filter on the negative ions current. The code has also shown that, in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, working with large arc power densities (> 1 kW/liter), only negative ions produced in volume at a distance lower that 2 cm from the plasma grid and those produced at the grid surface have a chance of being extracted. (author). 122 refs.

  7. Polymerization by plasma: surface treatment and plasma simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales C, J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the general objectives that are developed by the group of polymers semiconductors in the laboratory of polymers of the UAM-Iztapalapa is to study the surface treatment for plasma of different materials. Framed in this general objective, in this work three lines of investigation have been developed, independent one of other that converge in the general objective. The first one tries about the modeling one and evaluation of the microscopic parameters of operation of the polymerization reactor. The second are continuation of the study of conductive polymers synthesized by plasma and the third are an application of the treatment for plasma on natural fibers. In the first one it lines it is carried out the characterization and simulation of the parameters of operation of the polymerization reactor for plasma. They are determined the microscopic parameters of operation of the reactor experimentally like they are the electronic temperature, the potential of the plasma and the density average of electrons using for it an electrostatic Langmuir probe. In the simulation, starting from the Boltzmann transport equation it thinks about the flowing pattern and the electronic temperature, the ions density is obtained and of electrons. The data are compared obtained experimentally with the results of the simulation. In second line a study is presented about the influence of the temperature on the electric conductivity of thin films doped with iodine, of poly aniline (P An/I) and poly pyrrole (P Py/I). The films underwent heating-cooling cycles. The conductivity of P An/I and P Py/I in function of the temperature it is discussed based on the Arrhenius model, showing that it dominates the model of homogeneous conductivity. It is also synthesized a polymer bi-layer of these two elements and a copolymer random poly aniline-poly pyrrole, of the first one it the behavior of its conductivity discusses with the temperature and of the second, the conductivity is discussed in

  8. Simulation models for tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimits, A.M.; Cohen, B.I.

    1992-01-01

    Two developments in the nonlinear simulation of tokamak plasmas are described: (A) Simulation algorithms that use quasiballooning coordinates have been implemented in a 3D fluid code and a 3D partially linearized (Δf) particle code. In quasiballooning coordinates, one of the coordinate directions is closely aligned with that of the magnetic field, allowing both optimal use of the grid resolution for structures highly elongated along the magnetic field as well as implementation of the correct periodicity conditions with no discontinuities in the toroidal direction. (B) Progress on the implementation of a likeparticle collision operator suitable for use in partially linearized particle codes is reported. The binary collision approach is shown to be unusable for this purpose. The algorithm under development is a complete version of the test-particle plus source-field approach that was suggested and partially implemented by Xu and Rosenbluth

  9. Multi-Accuracy-Level Burning Plasma Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Garcia, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Huynh, P.; Huysmans, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Johner, J.; Scheider, M.

    2007-01-01

    The design of a reactor grade tokamak is based on a hierarchy of tools. We present here three codes that are presently used for the simulations of burning plasmas. At the first level there is a 0-dimensional code that allows to choose a reasonable range of global parameters; in our case the HELIOS code was used for this task. For the second level we have developed a mixed 0-D / 1-D code called METIS that allows to study the main properties of a burning plasma, including profiles and all heat and current sources, but always under the constraint of energy and other empirical scaling laws. METIS is a fast code that permits to perform a large number of runs (a run takes about one minute) and design the main features of a scenario, or validate the results of the 0-D code on a full time evolution. At the top level, we used the full 1D1/2 suite of codes CRONOS that gives access to a detailed study of the plasma profiles evolution. CRONOS can use a variety of modules for source terms and transport coefficients computation with different level of complexity and accuracy: from simple estimators to highly sophisticated physics calculations. Thus it is possible to vary the accuracy of burning plasma simulations, as a trade-off with computation time. A wide range of scenario studies can thus be made with CRONOS and then validated with post-processing tools like MHD stability analysis. We will present in this paper results of this multi-level analysis applied to the ITER hybrid scenario. This specific example will illustrate the importance of having several tools for the study of burning plasma scenarios, especially in a domain that present devices cannot access experimentally. (Author)

  10. Effects of pressure anisotropy on plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawaideh, E.; Najmabadi, F.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    In a recent paper a new set of generalized two-field equations is derived which describes plasma transport along the field lines of a space and time dependent magnetic field. These equations are valid for collisional to weakly collisional plasmas; they reduce to the conventional fluid equations of Braginskii for highly collisional plasmas. An important feature of these equations is that the anisotropy in the ion pressure is explicitly included. In this paper, these generalized transport equations are applied to a model problem of plasma flow through a magnetic mirror field. The profiles of the plasma parameters (density, flow speed, and pressures) are numerically calculated for plasma in different collisionality regimes. These profiles are explained by examining the competing terms in the transport equation. The pressure anisotropy is found to profoundly impact the plasma flow behavior. As a result, the new generalized equations predict flow behavior more accurately than the conventional transport equations. A large density and pressure drop is predicted as the flow passes through a magnetic mirror. Further, the new equations uniquely predict oscillations in the density profile, an effect missing in results from the conventional equations

  11. Classical dissipation and transport in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, F.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the subject of classical and neoclassical transport. The paper is organized into four main parts, dealing with plasma kinetic theory, classical transport, neoclassical transport, and the present state of the subject. The results of the neoclassical theory of transport are still being used to give the lower limit on the transport rates in tokamaks, which would apply if instabilities and turbulence could be suppressed. So far, only the ion thermal conductivity and the current density have been found experimentally to agree with this theory, and only under special conditions. The electron thermal conductivity has been found experimentally to be much larger than the neoclassical prediction

  12. Transport analysis of oscillatory state for plasma dynamics in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Itoh, K.

    2012-11-01

    In helical plasmas, two kinds of the oscillation for the plasma quantities are experimentally observed. Firstly, the limit cycle phenomena in the temporal evolution of the electrostatic potential, namely the electric pulsation, have been observed in the core region. The temporally self-generated oscillation of the radial electric field is shown as a simulation result in the core region. The dependence of the transition point for the radial electric field on the source is examined. Secondly, the density limit oscillation in the helical device was reported. To realize the oscillation phenomena at the density limit, the temporal evolution of the density profile is newly included in a simulation when the radiative loss is calculated in the edge region. Two stationary plasma states, where the transport loss or radiative loss is dominant in the edge region, are obtained. The dynamics of the plasma quantity is found to show the transition from the transport-dominated state to the radiation-dominated state. (author)

  13. Introduction to turbulent transport in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.

    2006-01-01

    This introduction presents the main instabilities responsible for turbulence in tokamak plasmas, and the prominent features of the resulting transport. The usual techniques to construct reduced transport models are described. These models can be tested by analysing steady state and transient regimes. Another way to test the theory is to use a similarity principle, similar to the one used in fluid mechanics. Finally, the physics involved in the formation and sustainment of transport barriers is presented. (author)

  14. Simulation of an ITER-like dissipative divertor plasma with a combined edge plasma Navier-Stokes neutral model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, D.A.; McHugh, P.R.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    A combined edge plasma/Navier-Stokes neutral transport model is used to simulate dissipative divertor plasmas in the collisional limit for neutrals on a simplified two-dimensional slab geometry with ITER-like plasma conditions and scale lengths. The neutral model contains three momentum equations which are coupled to the plasma through ionization, recombination, and ion-neutral elastic collisions. The neutral transport coefficients are evaluated including both ion-neutral and neutral-neutral collisions. (orig.)

  15. Gyrokinetic simulation of particle and heat transport in the presence of Wide orbits and strong profile variations in the Edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, J.A.; Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Ogando, F.

    2006-01-01

    A full f nonlinear 5D gyrokinetic electrostatic particle-in-cell code ELMFIRE using an implicit direct solution method for ion polarization drift and electron parallel velocity response to electric field and its validation are described. The developed code is applied for transport analysis in a tokamak plasma at steep pressure gradient. The role of turbulence and neoclassical equilibrium in determining the flux surface averaged radial electric field component are investigated, as well as the role of the latter in affecting the saturation level of the turbulence. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Impact of plasma triangularity and collisionality on electron heat transport in TCV L-mode plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camenen, Y.; Pochelon, A.; Behn, R.; Bottino, A.; Bortolon, A.; Coda, S.; Karpushov, A.; Sauter, O.; Zhuang, G.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of plasma shaping on electron heat transport is investigated in TCV L-mode plasmas. The study is motivated by the observation of an increase in the energy confinement time with decreasing plasma triangularity which may not be explained by a change in the temperature gradient induced by changes in the geometry of the flux surfaces. The plasma triangularity is varied over a wide range, from positive to negative values, and various plasmas conditions are explored by changing the total electron cyclotron (EC) heating power and the plasma density. The mid-radius electron heat diffusivity is shown to significantly decrease with decreasing triangularity and, for similar plasma conditions, only half of the EC power is required at a triangularity of -0.4 compared with +0.4 to obtain the same temperature profile. Besides, the observed dependence of the electron heat diffusivity on the electron temperature, electron density and effective charge can be grouped in a unique dependence on the plasma effective collisionality. In summary, the electron heat transport level exhibits a continuous decrease with decreasing triangularity and increasing collisionality. Local gyro-fluid and global gyro-kinetic simulations predict that trapped electron modes are the most unstable modes in these EC heated plasmas with an effective collisionality ranging from 0.2 to 1. The modes stability dependence on the plasma triangularity is investigated

  17. Two-dimensional Simulations of Correlation Reflectometry in Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeo, E.J.; Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional wave propagation code, developed specifically to simulate correlation reflectometry in large-scale fusion plasmas is described. The code makes use of separate computational methods in the vacuum, underdense and reflection regions of the plasma in order to obtain the high computational efficiency necessary for correlation analysis. Simulations of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasma with internal transport barriers are presented and compared with one-dimensional full-wave simulations. It is shown that the two-dimensional simulations are remarkably similar to the results of the one-dimensional full-wave analysis for a wide range of turbulent correlation lengths. Implications for the interpretation of correlation reflectometer measurements in fusion plasma are discussed

  18. Nonlocality of plasma fluctuations and transport in magnetically confined plasmas nonlocal plasma transport and radial structural formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    Experimental evidence and underlying physical processes of nonlocal characters and structural formation in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas are reviewed. Radial profiles of the plasmas exhibit characteristic structures, depending on the various confinement regimes. Profile stiffness subjected to some global constraint and rapid plasma responses to applied plasma perturbation result from nonlocal transport. Once the plasma is free from the constraint, the plasma state can be changed to a new state exhibiting various types of prominent structural formation such as an internal transport barrier. (author)

  19. Plasma transport in mixed magnetic topologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1992-12-01

    A simple model is introduced to illustrate some features concerning anomalous transport associated with magnetic turbulence. For magnetic topologies that are described as bands of stochasticity separated by regions with good flux surfaces, the transport coefficients deviate significantly from those describing completely stochastic magnetic fields. It is possible to have the electron heat diffusivity exceed a runaway electron diffusion coefficient, despite the existence of widespread magnetic stochasticity. Comparing the ratios of transport coefficients is not an accurate way to determine whether anomalous plasma transport is controlled by electrostatic or electromagnetic fluctuations

  20. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of neoclassical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1995-01-01

    A time varying weighting (δf ) scheme for gyrokinetic particle simulation is applied to a steady-state, multispecies simulation of neoclassical transport. Accurate collision operators conserving momentum and energy are developed and implemented. Simulation results using these operators are found to agree very well with neoclassical theory. For example, it is dynamically demonstrated that like-particle collisions produce no particle flux and that the neoclassical fluxes are ambipolar for an ion--electron plasma. An important physics feature of the present scheme is the introduction of toroidal flow to the simulations. Simulation results are in agreement with the existing analytical neoclassical theory. The poloidal electric field associated with toroidal mass flow is found to enhance density gradient-driven electron particle flux and the bootstrap current while reducing temperature gradient-driven flux and current. Finally, neoclassical theory in steep gradient profile relevant to the edge regime is examined by taking into account finite banana width effects. In general, in the present work a valuable new capability for studying important aspects of neoclassical transport inaccessible by conventional analytical calculation processes is demonstrated. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  1. Thermodynamic theory of transport in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.

    1990-10-01

    Transport laws relating thermodynamic flows to forces by means of transport coefficients in a magnetized plasma are derived here from basic plasmadynamics and nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Macroscopic balance equations are derived in the first part, taking into account the energy of relative diffusion between species in an exact way. The resulting plasmadynamical equations appear to be more general than the usual ones. In the second part, the particular features of a two-temperature diffusing plasma are taken into account in deriving the balance equation for the entropy density, the differences with thermodynamics of neutral fluid mixtures or metals are explained. The general expressions obtained for the entropy production rate are used in part III to derive transport laws. Onsager symmetry relations are applied to interrelate crossed transport coefficients. Basic transport coefficients are the electrical conductivity, the thermo-electric coefficient, along with the thermal conductivities and the viscosities for each species. The slight difference between thermo-electric effect and thermo-diffusion is explained. An important resistive thermo-electric effect appears which describes crossed transport coefficients between thermal and electric flows. Because of the anisotropy introduced by the magnetic field, the transport coefficients are tensors, with non diagonal elements associated with the Hall, Nernst and Ettinghausen effects in the plasma. The field geometry and applications to several particular cases are treated explicitly in part IV, namely the neo-classical transport laws. The Ettinghausen effect appears to play an important role in the transport laws for radial electron heat flow and particle flow in confined plasmas. Practical prescriptions are given to apply the Onsager symmetry relations in a correct way

  2. Fast ions and momentum transport in JET tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Fast ions are an inseparable part of fusion plasmas. They can be generated using electromagnetic waves or injected into plasmas as neutrals to heat the bulk plasma and to drive toroidal rotation and current. In future power plants fusion born fast ions deliver the main heating into the plasma. Understanding and controlling the fast ions is of crucial importance for the operation of a power plant. Furthermore, fast ions provide ways to probe the properties of the thermal plasma and get insight of its confinement properties. In this thesis, numerical code packages are used and developed to simulate JET experiments for a range of physics issues related to fast ions. Namely, the clamping fast ion distribution at high energies with RF heating, fast ion ripple torque generation and the toroidal momentum transport properties using NBI modulation technique are investigated. Through a comparison of numerical simulations and the JET experimental data it is shown that the finite Larmor radius effects in ion cyclotron resonance heating are important and that they can prevent fast ion tail formation beyond certain energy. The identified mechanism could be used for tailoring the fast ion distribution in future experiments. Secondly, ASCOT simulations of NBI ions in a ripple field showed that most of the reduction of the toroidal rotation that has been observed in the JET enhanced ripple experiments could be attributed to fast ion ripple torque. Finally, fast ion torque calculations together with momentum transport analysis have led to the conclusion that momentum transport in not purely diffusive but that a convective component, which increases monotonically in radius, exists in a wide range of JET plasmas. Using parameter scans, the convective transport has been shown to be insensitive to collisionality and q-profile but to increase strongly against density gradient. (orig.)

  3. Fast ions and momentum transport in JET tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmi, A.

    2012-07-01

    Fast ions are an inseparable part of fusion plasmas. They can be generated using electromagnetic waves or injected into plasmas as neutrals to heat the bulk plasma and to drive toroidal rotation and current. In future power plants fusion born fast ions deliver the main heating into the plasma. Understanding and controlling the fast ions is of crucial importance for the operation of a power plant. Furthermore, fast ions provide ways to probe the properties of the thermal plasma and get insight of its confinement properties. In this thesis, numerical code packages are used and developed to simulate JET experiments for a range of physics issues related to fast ions. Namely, the clamping fast ion distribution at high energies with RF heating, fast ion ripple torque generation and the toroidal momentum transport properties using NBI modulation technique are investigated. Through a comparison of numerical simulations and the JET experimental data it is shown that the finite Larmor radius effects in ion cyclotron resonance heating are important and that they can prevent fast ion tail formation beyond certain energy. The identified mechanism could be used for tailoring the fast ion distribution in future experiments. Secondly, ASCOT simulations of NBI ions in a ripple field showed that most of the reduction of the toroidal rotation that has been observed in the JET enhanced ripple experiments could be attributed to fast ion ripple torque. Finally, fast ion torque calculations together with momentum transport analysis have led to the conclusion that momentum transport in not purely diffusive but that a convective component, which increases monotonically in radius, exists in a wide range of JET plasmas. Using parameter scans, the convective transport has been shown to be insensitive to collisionality and q-profile but to increase strongly against density gradient. (orig.)

  4. Hydrocarbon transport in the laboratory plasma (MAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.; Tanaka, Satoru

    1996-10-01

    Hydrocarbons are admitted in the laboratory plasma in order to investigate the transport processes of carbon - containing molecules in relation to redeposition processes in the fusion boundary plasma. When CH{sub 4} was introduced into the plasma, CH radical band spectra were optically identified, while in the case of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} introduction, C{sub 2} radicals were also identified in addition to CH radicals. Excitation temperature was determined from CH and C{sub 2} spectra band, which was observed to increase on approaching to the target. (author)

  5. Development of Integrated Simulation System for Helical Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Nakajima, N.; Fukuyama, A.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Funaba, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Murakami, S.; Ida, K.; Sakakibara, S.; Yamada, H.

    2005-07-01

    Recent progress of computers (parallel/vector-parallel computers, PC clusters, for example) and numerical codes for helical plasmas like three-dimensional MHD equilibrium codes, combined with the development of the plasma diagnostics technique, enable us to do the detailed theoretical analyses of the individual experimental observations. Now, it is pointed out that the experimental data analysis from the viewpoints of integrated physics is an important issue to understand the confinement physics globally. In addition to that, there are international movements towards the integrated numerical simulation study. One is several proposals of integrated modeling of burning tokamak plasmas, motivated by the ITER activity. The integrated numerical simulation will be a good help to draw up new experimental plans especially for burning plasma experiments. Another movement is international collaborations on the confinement database and neoclassical transport in helical plasmas/stellarators. These backgrounds motivate us to start the development of the integrated simulation system which has a modular structure and user-friendly interfaces. The integrated simulation system, which is based on the hierarchical and multi-scale (time and space) modeling, will also be a platform for theoreticians to test their own model such as turbulent transport model. In this paper, we will show the strategy of developing the integrated simulation system and present status of the development. Especially, we discuss the modeling of the time evolution of the plasma net current profile, which is equivalent to the time evolution of the rotational transform profile, in the resistive time scale. (Author)

  6. Plasma theory and simulation: Third and fourth quarterly progress report, July 1, 1986-December 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Our group uses theory and simulation as tools in order to increase the understanding of plasma instabilities, heating, transport, plasma-wall interactions, and large potentials in plasmas. We also work on the improvement of simulation both theoretically and practically. Two separate papers are included in this report

  7. Theory and simulation of laser plasma coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruer, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The theory and simulation of these coupling processes are considered. Particular emphasis is given to their nonlinear evolution. First a brief introduction to computer simulation of plasmas using particle codes is given. Then the absorption of light via the generation of plasma waves is considered, followed by a discussion of stimulated scattering of intense light. Finally these calculations are compared with experimental results

  8. Instabilities, turbulence and transport in a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce the main processes that occur in a magnetized plasma. During the last 2 decades, the understanding of turbulence has made great progress but analytical formulas and simulations are far to produce reliable predictions. The values of transport coefficients in a tokamak plasma exceed by far those predicted by the theory of collisional transport. This phenomenon is called abnormal transport and might be due to plasma fluctuations. An estimation of turbulent fluxes derived from the levels of fluctuations, is proposed. A flow description of plasma allows the understanding of most micro-instabilities. The ballooning representation deals with instabilities in a toric geometry. 3 factors play an important role to stabilize plasmas: density pinch, magnetic shear and speed shear. The flow model of plasma gives an erroneous value for the stability threshold, this is due to a bad description of the resonant interaction between wave and particle. As for dynamics, flow models can be improved by adding dissipative terms so that the linear response nears the kinetic response. The kinetic approach is more accurate but is complex because of the great number of dimensions involved. (A.C.)

  9. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Pigarov, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project of Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program was aimed at providing a high-fidelity whole-tokamak modeling for the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program and ITER through coupling separate components for each of the core region, edge region, and wall, with realistic plasma particles and power sources and turbulent transport simulation. The project also aimed at developing advanced numerical algorithms, efficient implicit coupling methods, and software tools utilizing the leadership class computing facilities under Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The FACETS project was conducted by a multi-discipline, multi-institutional teams, the Lead PI was J.R. Cary (Tech-X Corp.). In the FACETS project, the Applied Plasma Theory Group at the MAE Department of UCSD developed the Wall and Plasma-Surface Interaction (WALLPSI) module, performed its validation against experimental data, and integrated it into the developed framework. WALLPSI is a one-dimensional, coarse grained, reaction/advection/diffusion code applied to each material boundary cell in the common modeling domain for a tokamak. It incorporates an advanced model for plasma particle transport and retention in the solid matter of plasma facing components, simulation of plasma heat power load handling, calculation of erosion/deposition, and simulation of synergistic effects in strong plasma-wall coupling.

  10. Simulations of radiative shocks and jet formation in laboratory plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, P; Gonzalez, M; GarcIa-Fernandez, C; Oliva, E [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain) (Spain); Kasperczuk, A; Pisarczyk, T [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland) (Poland); Ullschmied, J [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic) (Czech Republic); Stehle, C [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France) (France); Rus, B [Institute of Physics, PALS Center, Prague (Czech Republic) (Czech Republic); GarcIa-Senz, D; Bravo, E; Relano, A [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. Barcelona (Spain) (Spain)], E-mail: velarde@din.upm.es

    2008-05-01

    We present the simulations of two relevant hydrodynamical problems related to astrophysical phenomena performed by three different codes. The numerical results from these codes will be compared in order to test both the numerical method implemented inside them and the influence of the physical phenomena simulated by the codes. Under some conditions laser produced plasmas could be scaled to the typical conditions prevailing in astrophysical plasmas. Therefore, such similarity allows to use existing laser facilities and numerical codes suitable to a laser plasma regime, for studying astrophysical proccesses. The codes are the radiation fluid dynamic 2D ARWEN code and the 3D HERACLES, and, without radiation energy transport, a Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code. These codes use different numerical techniques and have overlapping range of application, from laser produced plasmas to astrophysical plasmas. We also present the first laser experiments obtaining cumulative jets with a velocity higher than 100 km/s.

  11. Plasma theory and simulation. Quarterly progress report I, II, January 1-June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    Our group uses theory and simulation as tools in order to increase the understanding of instabilities, heating, transport, and other phenomena in plasmas. We also work on the improvement of simulation both theoretically and practically. Research in plasma theory and simulation has centered on the following: (1) electron Bernstein wave investigations; (2) simulation of plasma-sheath region, including ion reflection; (3) single ended plasma device, general behavior dc or ac; (4) single ended plasma device, unstable states; (5) corrections to time-independent Q-machine equilibria; (6) multifluid derivation of the Alfven ion-cyclotron linear dispersion relation; and (7) potential barrier between hot and cool plasmas

  12. Neoclassical transport of impurtities in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshman, S.P.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1981-05-01

    Tokamak plasmas are inherently comprised of multiple ion species. This is due to wall-bred impurities and, in future reactors, will result from fusion-born alpha particles. Relatively small concentrations of highly charged non-hydrogenic impurities can strongly influence plasma transport properties whenever n/sub I/e/sub I/ 2 /n/sub H/e 2 greater than or equal to (m/sub e//m/sub H/)/sup 1/2/. The determination of the complete neoclassical Onsager matrix for a toroidally confined multispecies plasma, which provides the linear relation between the surface averaged radial fluxes and the thermodynamic forces (i.e., gradients of density and temperature, and the parallel electric field), is reviewed. A closed set of one-dimensional moment equations is presented for the time evolution of thermodynamic and magnetic field quantities which results from collisional transport of the plasma and two dimensional motion of the magnetic flux surface geometry. The effects of neutral beam injection on the equilibrium and transport properties of a toroidal plasma are consistently included

  13. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, J A

    1994-11-30

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (10{sup 8} K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called `tokamak` this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high `fusion` temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This `anomalous transport` of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL).

  14. Plasma channels for electron beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.F.; Smith, J.R.; Moffatt, M.E.; Nguyen, K.T.; Uhm, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in transport of intense relativistic electron beams using plasma channels. These channels are formed by either: ionization of an organic gas by UV photoionization or electron impact ionization of a low pressure gas utilizing a low energy (typically several hundred volts) electron gun. The second method is discussed here. As their electron gun, the authors used a 12 volt lightbulb filament which is biased to -400 volts with respect to the grounded 15 cm diameter drift tube. The electrons emitted from the filament are confined by an axial magnetic field of --100 Gauss to create a plasma channel which is less than 1 cm in radius. The channel density has been determined with Langmuir probes and the resulting line densities were found to be 10 11 to 10 12 per cm. When a multi-kiloamp electron beam is injected onto this channel, the beam space charge will eject the plasma electrons leaving the ions behind to charge neutralize the electron beam, hence allowing the beam to propagate. In this work, the authors performed experimental studies on the dynamics of the plasma channel. These include Langmuir probe measurements of a steady state (DC) channel, as well as time-resolved Langmuir probe studies of pulsed channels. In addition they performed experimental studies of beam propagation in these plasma channels. Specifically, they observed the behavior of current transport in these channels. Detailed results of beam transport and channel studies are presented

  15. Plasma transport across a braided magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stix, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    Simple fluid and particle models are used to estimate the transport of density, current, and electron heat for a plasma immersed in a region through which magnetic lines of force meander in a stochastic fashion and in which magnetic surfaces are destroyed. (author)

  16. Transport in JET high performance plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Two type of high performance scenarios have been produced in JET during DTE1 campaign. One of them is the well known and extensively used in the past ELM-free hot ion H-mode scenario which has two distinct regions- plasma core and the edge transport barrier. The results obtained during DTE-1 campaign with D, DT and pure T plasmas confirms our previous conclusion that the core transport scales as a gyroBohm in the inner half of plasma volume, recovers its Bohm nature closer to the separatrix and behaves as ion neoclassical in the transport barrier. Measurements on the top of the barrier suggest that the width of the barrier is dependent upon isotope and moreover suggest that fast ions play a key role. The other high performance scenario is a relatively recently developed Optimised Shear Scenario with small or slightly negative magnetic shear in plasma core. Different mechanisms of Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) formation have been tested by predictive modelling and the results are compared with experimentally observed phenomena. The experimentally observed non-penetration of the heavy impurities through the strong ITB which contradicts to a prediction of the conventional neo-classical theory is discussed. (author)

  17. Transport in JET high performance plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Two type of high performance scenarios have been produced in JET during DTE1 campaign. One of them is the well known and extensively used in the past ELM-free hot ion H-mode scenario which has two distinct regions- plasma core and the edge transport barrier. The results obtained during DTE-1 campaign with D, DT and pure T plasmas confirms our previous conclusion that the core transport scales as a gyroBohm in the inner half of plasma volume, recovers its Bohm nature closer to the separatrix and behaves as ion neoclassical in the transport barrier. Measurements on the top of the barrier suggest that the width of the barrier is dependent upon isotope and moreover suggest that fast ions play a key role. The other high performance scenario is a relatively recently developed Optimised Shear Scenario with small or slightly negative magnetic shear in plasma core. Different mechanisms of Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) formation have been tested by predictive modelling and the results are compared with experimentally observed phenomena. The experimentally observed non-penetration of the heavy impurities through the strong ITB which contradicts to a prediction of the conventional neo-classical theory is discussed. (author)

  18. Nonlinear neoclassical transport in toroidal edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, T.; Helander, P.

    2001-01-01

    In conventional neoclassical theory, the density and temperature gradients are not allowed to be as steep as frequently observed in the tokamak edge. In this paper the theory of neoclassical transport in a collisional, impure plasma is extended to allow for steeper profiles than normally assumed. The dynamics of highly charged impurity ions then becomes nonlinear, which affects the transport of all species. As earlier found in the banana regime, when the bulk plasma gradients are large the impurity ions undergo a poloidal redistribution, which reduces their parallel friction with the bulk ions and suppresses the neoclassical ion particle flux. The neoclassical confinement is thus improved in regions with large radial gradients. When the plasma is collisional and the gradients are large, the impurities accumulate on the inboard side of the torus

  19. Two-dimensional heat conducting simulation of plasma armatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta, M.A.; Boynton, G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on our development of a two-dimensional MHD code to simulate internal motions in a railgun plasma armature. The authors use the equations of resistive MHD, with Ohmic heating, and radiation heat transport. The authors use a Flux Corrected Transport code to advance all quantities in time. Our runs show the development of complex flows, subsequent shedding of secondary arcs, and a drop in the acceleration of the armature

  20. Magnetic-flutter-induced pedestal plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.; Cole, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma toroidal rotation can limit reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields δB on rational magnetic flux surfaces. Hence it causes the induced radial perturbations δB ρ to be small there, thereby inhibiting magnetic island formation and stochasticity at the top of pedestals in high (H-mode) confinement tokamak plasmas. However, the δB ρ s induced by RMPs increase away from rational surfaces and are shown to induce significant sinusoidal radial motion (flutter) of magnetic field lines with a radial extent that varies linearly with δB ρ and inversely with distance from the rational surface because of the magnetic shear. This produces a radial electron thermal diffusivity that is (1/2)(δB ρ /B 0 ) 2 times a kinetically derived, electron-collision-induced, magnetic-shear-reduced, effective parallel electron thermal diffusivity in the absence of magnetic stochasticity. These low collisionality flutter-induced transport processes and thin magnetic island effects are shown to be highly peaked in the vicinity of rational surfaces at the top of low collisionality pedestals. However, the smaller but finite level of magnetic-flutter-induced electron heat transport midway between rational surfaces is the primary factor that determines the electron temperature difference between rational surfaces at the pedestal top. The magnetic-flutter-induced non-ambipolar electron density transport can be large enough to push the plasma toward an electron density transport root. Requiring ambipolar density transport is shown to determine the radial electric field, the plasma toroidal rotation (via radial force balance), a reduced electron thermal diffusivity and increased ambipolar density transport in the pedestal. At high collisionality the various flutter effects are less strongly peaked at rational surfaces and generally less significant. They are thus less likely to exhibit flutter-induced resonant behaviour and transition toward an

  1. Magnetic-flutter-induced pedestal plasma transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Cole, A. J.

    2013-11-01

    Plasma toroidal rotation can limit reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields δB on rational magnetic flux surfaces. Hence it causes the induced radial perturbations δBρ to be small there, thereby inhibiting magnetic island formation and stochasticity at the top of pedestals in high (H-mode) confinement tokamak plasmas. However, the δBρs induced by RMPs increase away from rational surfaces and are shown to induce significant sinusoidal radial motion (flutter) of magnetic field lines with a radial extent that varies linearly with δBρ and inversely with distance from the rational surface because of the magnetic shear. This produces a radial electron thermal diffusivity that is (1/2)(δBρ/B0)2 times a kinetically derived, electron-collision-induced, magnetic-shear-reduced, effective parallel electron thermal diffusivity in the absence of magnetic stochasticity. These low collisionality flutter-induced transport processes and thin magnetic island effects are shown to be highly peaked in the vicinity of rational surfaces at the top of low collisionality pedestals. However, the smaller but finite level of magnetic-flutter-induced electron heat transport midway between rational surfaces is the primary factor that determines the electron temperature difference between rational surfaces at the pedestal top. The magnetic-flutter-induced non-ambipolar electron density transport can be large enough to push the plasma toward an electron density transport root. Requiring ambipolar density transport is shown to determine the radial electric field, the plasma toroidal rotation (via radial force balance), a reduced electron thermal diffusivity and increased ambipolar density transport in the pedestal. At high collisionality the various flutter effects are less strongly peaked at rational surfaces and generally less significant. They are thus less likely to exhibit flutter-induced resonant behaviour and transition toward an electron

  2. Electron cyclotron waves, transport and instabilities in hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerhof, E.

    1987-01-01

    A number of topics relevant to the magnetic confinement approach to the thermonuclear fusion is addressed. The absorption and emission of electron cyclotron waves in a thermal plasma with a small population of supra-thermal, streaming electrons is examined and the properties of electron cyclotron waves in a plasma with a pure loss-cone distribution are studied. A report is given on the 1-D transport code simulations that were performed to assist the interpretation of the electron cyclotron heating experiments on the TFR tokamak. Transport code simulations of sawteeth discharges in the T-10 tokamak are discussed in order to compare the predictions of different models for the sawtooth oscillations with the experimental findings. 149 refs.; 69 figs.; 7 tabs

  3. Turbulence and intermittent transport at the boundary of magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical fluid simulations of interchange turbulence for geometry and parameters relevant to the boundary region of magnetically confined plasmas are shown to result in intermittent transport qualitatively similar to recent experimental measurements. The two-dimensional simulation domain features...... a forcing region with spatially localized sources of particles and heat outside which losses due to the motion along open magnetic-field lines dominate, corresponding to the edge region and the scrape-off layer, respectively. Turbulent states reveal intermittent eruptions of hot plasma from the edge region...... fluctuation wave forms and transport statistics are also in a good agreement with those derived from the experiments. Associated with the turbulence bursts are relaxation oscillations in the particle and heat confinements as well as in the kinetic energy of the sheared poloidal flows. The formation of blob...

  4. Modelling of neutral particle transport in divertor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakizuka, Tomonori; Shimizu, Katsuhiro

    1995-01-01

    An outline of the modelling of neutral particle transport in the diverter plasma was described in the paper. The characteristic properties of divertor plasma were largely affected by interaction between neutral particles and divertor plasma. Accordingly, the behavior of neutral particle should be investigated quantitatively. Moreover, plasma and neutral gas should be traced consistently in the plasma simulation. There are Monte Carlo modelling and the neutral gas fluid modelling as the transport modelling. The former need long calculation time, but it is able to make the physical process modelling. A ultra-large parallel computer is good for the former. In spite of proposing some kinds of models, the latter has not been established. At the view point of reducing calculation time, a work station is good for the simulation of the latter, although some physical problems have not been solved. On the Monte Carlo method particle modelling, reducing the calculation time and introducing the interaction of particles are important subjects to develop 'the evolutional Monte Carlo Method'. To reduce the calculation time, two new methods: 'Implicit Monte Carlo method' and 'Free-and Diffusive-Motion Hybrid Monte-Carlo method' have been developing. (S.Y.)

  5. Transport simulations of ohmic ignition experiment: IGNITEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Howe, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    The IGNITEX device, proposed by Rosenbluth et al., is a compact, super-high-field, high-current, copper-coil tokamak envisioned to reach ignition with ohmic (OH) heating alone. Several simulations of IGNITEX were made with a 0-D global model and with the 1-D PROCTR transport code. It is shown that OH ignition is a sensitive function of the assumptions about density profile, wall reflectivity of synchrotron radiation, impurity radiation, plasma edge conditions, and additional anomalous losses. In IGNITEX, OH ignition is accessible with nearly all scalings based on favorable OH confinement (such as neo-Alcator). Also, OH ignition appears to be accessible for most (not all) L-mode scalings (such as Kaye-Goldston), provided that the density profile is not too broad (parabolic or more peaked profiles are needed), Z/sub eff/ is not too large (≤2), and anomalous radiation and alpha losses and/or other enhanced transport losses (/eta//sub i/ modes, edge convective energy losses, etc.) are not present. In IGNITEX, because the figure-of-merit parameters (aB 0 2 /q* /approximately/ IB 0 , etc.) are large, ignition can be accessed (either with OH heating alone or with the aid of a small amount of auxiliary power) at relatively low beta, far from stability limits. Once the plasma is ignited, thermal runaway is prevented naturally by a combination of increased synchrotron radiation, burnout of the fuel in the plasma core and replacement by thermal alphas, and the reduction in the thermal plasma confinement assumed in L-mode-like scalings. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Transport simulations of ohmic ignition experiment: IGNITEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Howe, H.C.

    1987-12-01

    The IGNITEX device, proposed by Rosenbluth et al., is a compact, super-high-field, high-current, copper-coil tokamak envisioned to reach ignition with ohmic (OH) heating alone. Several simulations of IGNITEX were made with a 0-D global model and with the 1-D PROCTR transport code. It is shown that OH ignition is a sensitive function of the assumptions about density profile, wall reflectivity of synchrotron radiation, impurity radiation, plasma edge conditions, and additional anomalous losses. In IGNITEX, OH ignition is accessible with nearly all scalings based on favorable OH confinement (such as neo-Alcator). Also, OH ignition appears to be accessible for most (not all) L-mode scalings (such as Kaye-Goldston), provided that the density profile is not too broad (parabolic or more peaked profiles are needed), Z/sub eff/ is not too large, and anomalous radiation and alpha losses and/or other enhanced transport losses (eta/sub i/ modes, edge convective energy losses, etc.) are not present. In IGNITEX, because the figure-of-merit parameters are large, ignition can be accessed (either with OH heating alone or with the aid of a small amount of auxiliary power) at relatively low beta, far from stability limits. Once the plasma is ignited, thermal runaway is prevented naturally by a combination of increased synchrotron radiation, burnout of the fuel in the plasma core and replacement by thermal alphas, and the reduction in the thermal plasma confinement assumed in L-mode-like scalings. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Computer simulation of transport driven current in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunan, W.J.; Dawson, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma transport phenomena can drive large currents parallel to an externally applied magnetic field. The Bootstrap Current Theory accounts for the effect of Banana diffusion on toroidal current, but the effect is not confined to that transport regime. The authors' 2 1/2-D, electromagnetic, particle simulations have demonstrated that Maxwellian plasmas in static toroidal and vertical fields spontaneously develop significant toroidal current, even in the absence of the open-quotes seed currentclose quotes which the Bootstrap Theory requires. Other simulations, in both toroidal and straight cylindrical geometries, and without any externally imposed electric field, show that if the plasma column is centrally fueled, and if the particle diffusion coefficient exceeds the magnetic diffusion coefficient (as is true in most tokamaks) then the toroidal current grows steadily. The simulations indicate that such fueling, coupled with central heating due to fusion reactions may drive all of the tokamak's toroidal current. The Bootstrap and dynamo mechanisms do not drive toroidal current where the poloidal magnetic field is zero. The simulations, as well as initial theoretical work, indicate that in tokamak plasmas, various processes naturally transport current from the outer regions of the plasma to the magnetic axis. The mechanisms which cause this effective electron viscosity include conventional binary collisions, wave emission and reabsorption, and also convection associated with rvec E x rvec B vortex motion. The simulations also exhibit preferential loss of particles carrying current opposing the bulk plasma current. This preferential loss generates current even at the magnetic axis. If these self-seeding mechanisms function in experiments as they do in the simulations, then transport driven current would eliminate the need for any external current drive in tokamaks, except simple ohmic heating for initial generation of the plasma

  8. Jetto a free boundary plasma transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenacchi, G.; Taroni, A.

    1988-01-01

    JETTO is a one-and-a-half-dimensional transport code calculating the evolution of plasma parameters in a time dependent axisymmetric MHD equilibrium configuration. A splitting technique gives a consistent solution of coupled equilibrium and transport equations. The plasma boundary is free and defined either by its contact with a limiter (wall) or by a separatrix or by the toroidal magnetic flux. The Grad's approach to the equilibrium problem with adiabatic (or similar) constraints is adopted. This method consists of iterating by alternately solving the Grad-Schluter-Shafranov equation (PDE) and the ODE obtained by averaging the PDE over the magnetic surfaces. The bidimensional equation of the poloidal flux is solved by a finite difference scheme, whereas a Runge-Kutta method is chosen for the averaged equilibrium equation. The 1D transport equations (averaged over the magnetic surfaces) for the electron and ion densities and energies and for the rotational transform are written in terms of a coordinate (ρ) related to the toroidal flux. Impurity transport is also considered, under the hypothesis of coronal equilibrium. The transport equations are solved by an implicit scheme in time and by a finite difference scheme in space. The centering of the source terms and transport coefficients is performed using a Predictor-Corrector scheme. The basic version of the code is described here in detail; input and output parameters are also listed

  9. Plasma transport in the Scrape-off-Layer of magnetically confined plasma and the plasma exhaust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    An overview of the plasma dynamics in the Scrape-off-Layer (SOL) of magnetically confined plasma is presented. The SOL is the exhaust channel of the warm plasma from the core, and the understanding of the SOL plasma dynamics is one of the key issues in contemporary fusion research. It is essential...... for operation of fusion experiments and ultimately fusion power plants. Recent results clearly demonstrate that the plasma transport through the SOL is dominated by turbulent intermittent fluctuations organized into filamentary structures convecting particles, energy, and momentum through the SOL region. Thus......, the transport cannot be described and parametrized by simple diffusive type models. The transport leads to strong localized power loads on the first wall and the plasma facing components, which have serious lasting influence....

  10. RMP-Flutter-Induced Pedestal Plasma Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C., E-mail: callen@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Cole, A. J. [Columbia University, New York (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Plasma toroidal rotation can prevent or limit reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields {delta}B on rational magnetic flux surfaces. Hence, it causes the induced radial perturbations to vanish or be small there, and thereby inhibits magnetic island formation and stochasticity in the edge of high (H-mode) confinement tokamak plasmas. However, the radial component of the spatial magnetic flutter induced by RMP fields off rational surfaces causes a radial electron thermal diffusivity of (1/2)({delta}B{sub p}/B){sup 2} times a magnetic-shear-influenced effective parallel electron thermal diffusivity. The resultant RMP-flutter-induced electron thermal diffusivity can be comparable to experimentally inferred values at the top of H-mode pedestals. This process also causes a factor of about 3 smaller RMP-induced electron density diffusivity there. Because this electron density transport is non-ambipolar, it produces a toroidal torque on the plasma, which is usually in the co-current direction. Kinetic-based cylindrical screw-pinch and toroidal models of these RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport effects have been developed. The RMP-induced increases in these diffusive plasma transport processes are typically spatially inhomogeneous in that they are strongly peaked near the rational surfaces in low collisionality pedestals, which may lead to resonant sensitivities to the local safety factor q. The effects can be large enough to reduce the radially averaged gradients of the electron temperature and density at the top of H-mode edge pedestals, and modify the plasma toroidal rotation and radial electric field there. At high collisionality the various effects are less strongly peaked at rational surfaces and thus less likely to exhibit RMP-induced resonant behavior. These RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport processes provide a new paradigm for developing an understanding of how RMPs modify the pedestal structure to stabilize

  11. Progress in transport modelling of internal transport barrier plasmas in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tala, T.; Bourdelle, C.; Imbeaux, F.; Moreau, D.; Garbet, X.; Joffrin, E.; Laborde, L.; Litaudon, X.; Mazon, D.; Parail, V.; Corrigan, G.; Heading, D.; Crisanti, F.; Mantica, P.; Salmi, A.; Strand, P.; Weiland, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will report on the recent progress in transport modelling of Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) plasmas. Two separate issues will be covered, fully predictive transport modelling of ITBs in the multi-tokamak database, including micro-stability analyses of ITBs, and predictive closed-loop (i.e. real-time control) transport simulations of the q-profile and ITBs. For the first time, the predictive capabilities of the mixed Bohm/GyroBohm and Weiland transport models are investigated with discharges from the ITPA ITB database by fully predictive transport simulations. The predictive transport simulations with the Bohm/GyroBohm model agree very well with experimental results from JET and JT-60U. In order to achieve a good agreement in DIII-D, the stabilisation had to be included into the model, showing the significant role played by the stabilisation in governing the physics of the ITBs. The significant role of the stabilisation is also emphasised by the gyrokinetic analysis. The Weiland transport model shows only limited agreement between the model predictions and experimental results with respect to the formation and location of the ITB. The fully predictive closed-loop simulations with real-time control of the q-profile and ITB show that it is possible to reach various set-point profiles for q and ITB and control them for longer than a current diffusion time in JET using the same real-time control technique as in the experiments. (author)

  12. Tornado-like transport in a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Matthew; van Compernolle, Bart; Morales, George

    2017-10-01

    Recent heat transport experiments conducted in the LAPD device at UCLA in which avalanche events have been previously documented have also lead to the identification of a new tornado-like transport phenomenon. These tornados occur much earlier than the avalanches events, essentially in the interval following the application of the bias voltage that causes the injection of an electron beam from a ring-shaped LaB6 cathode into the afterglow of a cold, magnetized plasma. The tornados exhibit a low-frequency (4 kHz) (much lower than drift-waves), spiraling, global eigenmode whose transient behavior is responsible for significant radial transport well outside the heated region. Detailed experimental observations are compared with a Braginskii transport code that includes the effects of ExB convection induced by the spiraling global eigenmode. New insights are gained into the necessary modifications of classical transport to accurately simulate the spiraling effects and the possible interaction with avalanches. This work is supported by the NSF/DOE partnership in basic plasma science and engineering, Grant Number 1619505, and is performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, sponsored jointly by DOE and NSF. Sponsored by DOE/NSF at BaPSF and NSF 1619505.

  13. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.; Umansky, M.; Dudson, B.; Snyder, P.

    2008-05-01

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T e ; T i ) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics

  14. Relaxation oscillations and transport barrier dynamics in tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkadda, Sadruddin; Beyer, Peter; Fuhr-Chaudier, Guillaume; Garbet, Xavier; Ghendrih, Philippe; Sarazin, Yanick

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations of turbulent transport of particles and energy in magnetically confined plasmas can be easily observed in simulations of a variety of turbulence models. These oscillations typically involve a mechanism of energy exchange between fluctuations and a poloidal shear flow. This kind of ''predator-prey'' mechanism is found to be not relevant for transport barrier relaxations. In RBM simulations of resistive ballooning turbulence with transport barrier, relaxation oscillations of the latter are observed even in the case of frozen poloidal shear flow. These relaxations are due to a transitory growth of a mode localized at the barrier center. A one-dimensional model for the evolution of such a mode in the presence of a shear flow describes a transitory growth of an initial perturbation. Oscillations in the case of a finite steady-state shear flow are possible due to the coupling of the mode to the dynamics of the pressure profile. (author)

  15. Numerical simulation of electrostatic waves in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erz, U.

    1981-08-01

    In this paper the propagation of electrostatic waves in plasmas and the non-linear interactions, which occur in the case of large wave amplitudes, are studied using a new numerical method for plasma simulation. This mathematical description is based on the Vlasov-model. Changes in the distribution-function are taken into account and thus plasma kinetic effects can be treated. (orig./HT) [de

  16. Transport in the tokamak plasma edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental observations characterize the edge plasma or boundary layer in magnetically confined plasmas as a region of great complexity. Evidence suggests the edge physics plays a key role in plasma confinement although the mechanism remains unresolved. This study focuses on issues in two areas: observed poloidal asymmetries in the Scrape Off Layer (SOL) edge plasma and the physical nature of the plasma-neutral recycling. A computational model solves the coupled two dimensional partial differential equations governing the plasma fluid density, parallel and radial velocities, electron and ion temperatures and neutral density under assumptions of toroidal symmetry, ambipolarity, anomalous diffusive radial flux, and neutral-ion thermal equilibrium. Drift flow and plasma potential are calculated as dependent quantities. Computational results are compared to experimental data for the CCT and TEXTOR:ALT-II tokamak limiter cases. Comparisons show drift flux is a major component of the poloidal flow in the SOL along the tangency/separatrix. Plasma-neutral recycling is characterized in several tokamak divertors, including the C-MOD device using magnetic flux surface coordinates. Recycling is characterized by time constant, τ rc , on the order of tens of milliseconds. Heat flux transients from the core into the edge on shorter time scales significantly increase the plasma temperatures at the target and may increase sputtering. Recycling conditions in divertors vary considerably depending on recycled flux to the core. The high density, low temperature solution requires that the neutral mean free path be small compared to the divertor target to x-point distance. The simulations and analysis support H-mode confinement and transition models based on the recycling divertor solution bifurcation

  17. Three dimensional transport model for toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhauer, C.

    1980-12-01

    A nonlinear MHD model, developed for three-dimensional toroidal geometries (asymmetric) and for high β (β approximately epsilon), is used as a basis for a three-dimensional transport model. Since inertia terms are needed in describing evolving magnetic islands, the model can calculate transport, both in the transient phase before nonlinear saturation of magnetic islands and afterwards on the resistive time scale. In the β approximately epsilon ordering, the plasma does not have sufficient energy to compress the parallel magnetic field, which allows the Alfven wave to be eliminated in the reduced nonlinear equations, and the model then follows the slower time scales. The resulting perpendicular and parallel plasma drift velocities can be identified with those of guiding center theory

  18. Particle transport in JET and TCV-H mode plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, M.

    2009-10-01

    Understanding particle transport physics is of great importance for magnetically confined plasma devices and for the development of thermonuclear fusion power for energy production. From the beginnings of fusion research, more than half a century ago, the problem of heat transport in tokamaks attracted the attention of researchers, but the particle transport phenomena were largely neglected until fairly recently. As tokamak physics advanced to its present level, the physics community realized that there are many hurdles to the development of fusion power beyond the energy confinement. Particle transport is one of the outstanding issues. The aim of this thesis work is to study the anomalous (turbulence driven) particle transport in tokamaks on the basis of experiments on two different devices: JET (Joint European Torus) and TCV (Tokamak à Configuration Variable). In particular the physics of particle inward convection (pinch), which causes formation of peaked density profiles, is addressed in this work. Density profile peaking has a direct, favorable effect on fusion power in a reactor, we therefore also propose an extrapolation to the international experimental reactor ITER, which is currently under construction. To complete the thesis research, a comprehensive experimental database was created on the basis of data collected on JET and TCV during the duration of the thesis. Improvements of the density profile measurements techniques and careful analysis of the experimental data allowed us to derive the dependencies of density profile shape on the relevant plasma parameters. These improved techniques also allowed us to dispel any doubts that had been voiced about previous results. The major conclusions from previous work on JET and other tokamaks were generally confirmed, with some minor supplements. The main novelty of the thesis resides in systematic tests of the predictions of linear gyrokinetic simulations of the ITG (Ion Temperature Gradient) mode against the

  19. Positron transport: The plasma-gas interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marler, J. P.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.; Bankovic, A.; Dujko, S.; Suvakov, M.; Malovic, G.; Buckman, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by an increasing number of applications, new techniques in the analysis of electron transport have been developed over the past 30 years or so, but similar methods had yet to be applied to positrons. Recently, an in-depth look at positron transport in pure argon gas has been performed using a recently established comprehensive set of cross sections and well-established Monte Carlo simulations. The key novelty as compared to electron transport is the effect of positronium formation which changes the number of particles and has a strong energy dependence. This coupled with spatial separation by energy of the positron swarm leads to counterintuitive behavior of some of the transport coefficients. Finally new results in how the presence of an applied magnetic field affects the transport coefficients are presented.

  20. Fractional Transport in Strongly Turbulent Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isliker, Heinz; Vlahos, Loukas; Constantinescu, Dana

    2017-07-01

    We analyze statistically the energization of particles in a large scale environment of strong turbulence that is fragmented into a large number of distributed current filaments. The turbulent environment is generated through strongly perturbed, 3D, resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, and it emerges naturally from the nonlinear evolution, without a specific reconnection geometry being set up. Based on test-particle simulations, we estimate the transport coefficients in energy space for use in the classical Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, and we show that the latter fails to reproduce the simulation results. The reason is that transport in energy space is highly anomalous (strange), the particles perform Levy flights, and the energy distributions show extended power-law tails. Newly then, we motivate the use and derive the specific form of a fractional transport equation (FTE), we determine its parameters and the order of the fractional derivatives from the simulation data, and we show that the FTE is able to reproduce the high energy part of the simulation data very well. The procedure for determining the FTE parameters also makes clear that it is the analysis of the simulation data that allows us to make the decision whether a classical FP equation or a FTE is appropriate.

  1. Fluctuations and transport in fusion plasmas. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, R.W.; Liewer, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    The energy confinement in tokamaks in thought to be limited by transport caused by plasma turbulence. Three dimensional plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) codes are used to model the turbulent transport in tokamaks to attempt to understand this phenomena so that tokamaks can be made more efficient. Presently, hundreds of hours of Cray time are used to model these experiments and much bigger and longer runs are desired, to model a large tokamak with realistic parameters is beyond the capability of existing sequential supercomputers. Parallel supercomputers might be a cost effect tool for performing such large scale 3D tokamak simulations. The goal of the work was to develop algorithms for performing PIC codes on coarse-grained message passing parallel computers and to evaluate the performance of such parallel computers on PIC codes. This algorithm would be used in a large scale PIC production code such as the UCLA 3D gyrokinetic code

  2. Multispecies transport theory for axisymmetric rotating plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessarotto, M.; White, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    A reduced gyrokinetic equation is derived for a multi-species toroidal axisymmetric plasma with arbitrary toroidal differential rotation speeds and in the presence of a finite induced electric field. The kinetic equation obtained, extending previous results obtained by Hinton and Wong and by Catto, Bernstein and Tessarotto, has a form suited for transport applications, via variational techniques; in particular it exhibits the feature that all source terms, including the Spitzer source term, carrying the contribution due to the inductive electric field, appear to be acted upon by the collision operator. Moreover, the equation displays a new contribution due to ''explicit'' velocity perturbations, here proven to be consistent with transport ordering, whose evaluation appears relevant for transport calculations. In addition, general expressions are obtained for the neoclassical fluxes in terms of a variational principle, as well as for the classical ones, retaining, in both cases, the contributions due to the Spitzer's inductive terms

  3. Vesicular and Plasma Membrane Transporters for Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Randy D.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The regulated exocytosis that mediates chemical signaling at synapses requires mechanisms to coordinate the immediate response to stimulation with the recycling needed to sustain release. Two general classes of transporter contribute to release, one located on synaptic vesicles that loads them with transmitter, and a second at the plasma membrane that both terminates signaling and serves to recycle transmitter for subsequent rounds of release. Originally identified as the target of psychoactive drugs, these transport systems have important roles in transmitter release, but we are only beginning to understand their contribution to synaptic transmission, plasticity, behavior, and disease. Recent work has started to provide a structural basis for their activity, to characterize their trafficking and potential for regulation. The results indicate that far from the passive target of psychoactive drugs, neurotransmitter transporters undergo regulation that contributes to synaptic plasticity. PMID:22199021

  4. Computations of intermittent transport in scrape-off layer plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    in the form of blobs. These structures propagate far into the scrape-off layer where they are dissipated due to transport along open magnetic field lines. From single-point recordings it is shown that the blobs have asymmetric conditional wave forms and lead to positively skewed and flattened probability......Two-dimensional fluid simulations of interchange turbulence for geometry and parameters relevant for the scrape-off layer of magnetized plasmas are presented. The computations, which have distinct plasma production and loss regions, reveal bursty ejection of particles and heat from the bulk plasma...... distribution functions. The radial propagation velocity may reach one-tenth of the sound speed. These results are in excellent agreement with recent experimental measurements....

  5. Disruption simulation for the EAST plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Xingping; Wu Bin

    2007-01-01

    The disruptions due to vertical displacement event for the EAST plasma are simulated in this article by using the TSC program. Meanwhile, the evolutions of the halo current and stress on vacuum vessel are calculated; the disruptions at different initial conditions are compared with each other, and killer pellet injection is simulated for the device fast shutting-down. (authors)

  6. Electromagnetic ''particle-in-cell'' plasma simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langdon, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    ''PIC'' simulation tracks particles through electromagnetic fields calculated self-consistently from the charge and current densities of the particles themselves, external sources, and boundaries. Already used extensively in plasma physics, such simulations have become useful in the design of accelerators and their r.f. sources. 5 refs

  7. Light impurity transport in JET ILW L-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanomi, N.; Mantica, P.; Giroud, C.; Angioni, C.; Manas, P.; Menmuir, S.; Contributors, JET

    2018-03-01

    A series of experimental observations of light impurity profiles was carried out in JET (Joint European Torus) ITER-like wall (ILW) L-mode plasmas in order to investigate their transport mechanisms. These discharges feature the presence of 3He, Be, C, N, Ne, whose profiles measured by active Charge Exchange diagnostics are compared with quasi-linear and non-linear gyro-kinetic simulations. The peaking of 3He density follows the electron density peaking, Be and Ne are also peaked, while the density profiles of C and N are flat in the mid plasma region. Gyro-kinetic simulations predict peaked density profiles for all the light impurities studied and at all the radial positions considered, and fail predicting the flat or hollow profiles observed for C and N at mid radius in our cases.

  8. Time-dependent 2-D modeling of edge plasma transport with high intermittency due to blobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2012-01-01

    The results on time-dependent 2-D fluid modeling of edge plasmas with non-diffusive intermittent transport across the magnetic field (termed cross-field) based on the novel macro-blob approach are presented. The capability of this approach to simulate the long temporal evolution (∼0.1 s) of the background plasma and simultaneously the fast spatiotemporal dynamics of blobs (∼10 −4 s) is demonstrated. An analysis of a periodic sequence of many macro-blobs (PSMB) is given showing that the resulting plasma attains a dynamic equilibrium. Plasma properties in the dynamic equilibrium are discussed. In PSMB modeling, the effect of macro-blob generation frequency on edge plasma parameters is studied. Comparison between PSMB modeling and experimental profile data is given. The calculations are performed for the same plasma discharge using two different models for anomalous cross-field transport: time-average convection and PSMB. Parametric analysis of edge plasma variation with transport coefficients in these models is presented. The capability of the models to accurately simulate enhanced transport due to blobs is compared. Impurity dynamics in edge plasma with macro-blobs is also studied showing strong impact of macro-blob on profiles of impurity charge states caused by enhanced outward transport of high-charge states and simultaneous inward transport of low-charge states towards the core. Macro-blobs cause enhancement of sputtering rates, increase radiation and impurity concentration in plasma, and change erosion/deposition patterns.

  9. Nonlinear neoclassical transport in toroidal edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, T.

    2002-01-01

    Edge plasma processes play a critical role for the global confinement of the plasma in a tokamak. In the edge region, where impurity ions are abundant and the temperature and density gradients are large, the assumptions of standard neoclassical theory break down. This paper reviews recent extensions of neoclassical theory to treat this problem, in particular our own work, which focuses on the nonlinear aspects of transport in a plasma with heavy impurity ions. In this theory, the pressure and temperature gradients are allowed to be steeper than in conventional theory neoclassical theory, so that the friction force between the bulk ions and heavy impurities is comparable to the parallel impurity pressure gradient. The impurity ions are then found to undergo a spontaneous rearrangement on each flux surface. This reduces their parallel friction with the bulk ions and causes the neoclassical ion flux to become a non-monotonic function of the gradients for plasma parameters typical of the tokamak edge. Thus, the neoclassical confinement is improved in regions where the gradients are large, such as in the edge pedestal. (orig.)

  10. Self-organization of hot plasmas the canonical profile transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Dnestrovskij, Yu N

    2015-01-01

    In this monograph the author presents the Canonical Profile Transport Model or CPTM as a rather general mathematical framework to simulate plasma discharges.The description of hot plasmas in a magnetic fusion device is a very challenging task and many plasma properties still lack a physical explanation. One important property is plasma self-organization.It is very well known from experiments that the radial profile of the plasma pressure and temperature remains rather unaffected by changes of the deposited power or plasma density. The attractiveness of the CPTM is that it includes the effect o

  11. Guiding-center models for edge plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Jens

    2010-09-01

    The work presented in this thesis falls into two categories: development of reduced dynamical models applicable to edge turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments in the scrape-off layer region investigating the influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial plasma transport. The coexistence of low-frequency fluctuations, having length scales comparable to the ion gyroradius, steep pressure gradients and strong E x B flows in the edge region of fusion plasmas violates the standard gyrokinetic ordering. In this thesis two models are presented that overcome some of the difficulties associated with the development of reduced dynamical models applicable to the edge. Second order guiding-center coordinates are derived using the phasespace Lie transform method. Using a variational principle the corresponding Vlasov-Maxwell equations expressed in guiding-center coordinates are derived including a local energy theorem. The second order terms describe lowest order finite Larmor radius effects. This set of equations might be relevant for edge plasmas due to the capability of capturing strong E x B flows and lowest order finite Larmor radius effects self-consistently. Next, an extension of the existing gyrokinetic formalism with strong flows is presented. In this work the background electric fields is dynamical, whereas earlier contributions did only incorporate a stationary electric field. In an ordering relevant for edge plasma turbulence, fully electromagnetic second order gyrokinetic coordinates and the corresponding gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are derived, including a local energy theorem. By taking the polarization and magnetization densities in the drift kinetic limit, we present the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations in a more tractable form, which could be relevant for direct numerical simulations of edge plasma turbulence. Finally, an investigation of the influence of finite Larmor

  12. Guiding-center models for edge plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, Jens

    2010-09-15

    The work presented in this thesis falls into two categories: development of reduced dynamical models applicable to edge turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments in the scrape-off layer region investigating the influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial plasma transport. The coexistence of low-frequency fluctuations, having length scales comparable to the ion gyroradius, steep pressure gradients and strong E x B flows in the edge region of fusion plasmas violates the standard gyrokinetic ordering. In this thesis two models are presented that overcome some of the difficulties associated with the development of reduced dynamical models applicable to the edge. Second order guiding-center coordinates are derived using the phasespace Lie transform method. Using a variational principle the corresponding Vlasov-Maxwell equations expressed in guiding-center coordinates are derived including a local energy theorem. The second order terms describe lowest order finite Larmor radius effects. This set of equations might be relevant for edge plasmas due to the capability of capturing strong E x B flows and lowest order finite Larmor radius effects self-consistently. Next, an extension of the existing gyrokinetic formalism with strong flows is presented. In this work the background electric fields is dynamical, whereas earlier contributions did only incorporate a stationary electric field. In an ordering relevant for edge plasma turbulence, fully electromagnetic second order gyrokinetic coordinates and the corresponding gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are derived, including a local energy theorem. By taking the polarization and magnetization densities in the drift kinetic limit, we present the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations in a more tractable form, which could be relevant for direct numerical simulations of edge plasma turbulence. Finally, an investigation of the influence of finite Larmor

  13. Simulated impurity transport in LHD from MIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, J.E. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    The impurity transport code MIST and atomic physics package LINES are used to calculate the time evolution of charge state density profiles, individual line emissivity profiles and total radiated power profiles for impurities in LHD plasmas. Three model LHD plasmas are considered; a high density, low temperature case, a low density, high temperature case and the initial LHD start-up plasma (500 kW ECH), using impurity transport coefficient profiles from Heliotron E. The elements oxygen, neon, scandium, iron, nickel and molybdenum are considered, both injected and in steady state. (author)

  14. Continuation of the Application of Parallel PIC Simulations to Laser and Electron Transport Through Plasmas Under Conditions Relevant to ICF and SBSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren B Mori

    2007-01-01

    In 2006/2007 we continued to study several issues related to underdense laser-plasma interactions. We have been studying the onset and saturation of Raman backscatter for NIF conditions, nonlinear plasma oscillations, and the two-plasmon decay instability

  15. Self-consistent simulation of plasma scenarios for ITER using a combination of 1.5D transport codes and free-boundary equilibrium codes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parail, V.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Artaud, J.F.; Besseghir, K.; Cavinato, M.; Corrigan, G.; Garcia, J.; Garzotti, L.; Gribov, Y.; Imbeaux, F.; Koechl, F.; Labate, C.V.; Lister, J.; Litaudon, X.; Loarte, A.; Maget, P.; Mattei, M.; McDonald, D.; Nardon, E.; Saibene, G.; Sartori, R.; Urban, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 11 (2013), s. 113002-113002 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : operation * regimes * model * JET * ITER * plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.243, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/53/11/113002/

  16. Implicit particle simulation of electromagnetic plasma phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, T.; Montalvo, E.; Barnes, D.C.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Tajima, T.

    1986-11-01

    A direct method for the implicit particle simulation of electromagnetic phenomena in magnetized, multi-dimensional plasmas is developed. The method is second-order accurate for ωΔt < 1, with ω a characteristic frequency and time step Δt. Direct time integration of the implicit equations with simplified space differencing allows the consistent inclusion of finite particle size. Decentered time differencing of the Lorentz force permits the efficient simulation of strongly magnetized plasmas. A Fourier-space iterative technique for solving the implicit field corrector equation, based on the separation of plasma responses perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field and longitudinal and transverse to the wavevector, is described. Wave propagation properties in a uniform plasma are in excellent agreement with theoretical expectations. Applications to collisionless tearing and coalescence instabilities further demonstrate the usefulness of the algorithm. (author)

  17. Ion transport in turbulent edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; Hazeltine, R.D.; Catto, P.J.

    1996-02-01

    Edge plasmas, such as the tokamak scrape-off layer, exist as a consequence of a balance between cross-field diffusion and parallel losses. The former is usually anomalous, and is widely thought to be driven by strong electrostatic turbulence. It is shown that the anomalous diffusion affects the parallel ion transport by giving rise to a new type of thermal force between different ion species. This force is parallel to the magnetic field, but arises entirely because of perpendicular gradients, and could be important for impurity retention in the tokamak divertor. (author)

  18. Fluctuations and transport in an inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevins, W.M.; Chen, L.

    1979-11-01

    A formalism is developed for calculating the equilibrium fluctuation level in an inhomogeneous plasma. This formalism is applied to the collisionless drift wave in a sheared magnetic field. The fluctuation level is found to be anomalously large due to both the presence of weakly damped normal modes and convective amplification. As the magnetic shear is reduced, the steady-state fluctuation spectrum is found to increase both in coherence and in amplitude. The transport associated with this mode is evaluated. The diffusion coefficient is found to scale as D is proportional to B 2 /nT/sup 1/2/

  19. Transport Studies in Alcator C-Mod ITB Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, C. L.; Bonoli, P. T.; Ernst, D.; Greenwald, M. J.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Lin, L.; Marmar, E. S.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, J. E.; Wukitch, S.; Rowan, W.; Bespamyatnov, I.; Phillips, P.

    2008-11-01

    Internal transport barriers occur in C-Mod plasmas that have off-axis ICRF heating and also in Ohmic H-mode plasmas. These ITBs are marked by highly peaked density and pressure profiles, as they rely on a reduction of particle and thermal flux in the barrier region which allows the neoclassical pinch to peak the central density without reducing the central temperature. Enhancement of several core diagnostics has resulted in increased understanding of C-Mod ITBs. Ion temperature profile measurements have been obtained using an innovative design for x-ray crystal spectrometry and clearly show a barrier forming in the ion temperature profile. The phase contrast imaging (PCI) provides limited localization of the ITB related fluctuations that increase in strength as the central density increases. Simulation of triggering conditions, integrated simulations with fluctuation measurements, parametric studies, and transport implications of fully ionized boron impurity profiles in the plasma are under study. A summary of these results will be presented.

  20. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-15

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  1. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-01

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  2. Electron heat transport in shaped TCV L-mode plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camenen, Y; Pochelon, A; Bottino, A; Coda, S; Ryter, F; Sauter, O; Behn, R; Goodman, T P; Henderson, M A; Karpushov, A; Porte, L; Zhuang, G

    2005-01-01

    Electron heat transport experiments are performed in L-mode discharges at various plasma triangularities, using radially localized electron cyclotron heating to vary independently both the electron temperature T e and the normalized electron temperature gradient R/L T e over a large range. Local gyro-fluid (GLF23) and global collisionless gyro-kinetic (LORB5) linear simulations show that, in the present experiments, trapped electron mode (TEM) is the most unstable mode. Experimentally, the electron heat diffusivity χ e is shown to decrease with increasing collisionality, and no dependence of χ e on R/L T e is observed at high R/L T e values. These two observations are consistent with the predictions of TEM simulations, which supports the fact that TEM plays a crucial role in electron heat transport. In addition, over the broad range of positive and negative triangularities investigated, the electron heat diffusivity is observed to decrease with decreasing plasma triangularity, leading to a strong increase of plasma confinement at negative triangularity

  3. Hybrid formulation of radiation transport in optically thick divertor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.; Bufferand, H.; Stamm, R. [PIIM, UMR 7345 Aix-Marseille Universite / CNRS, Centre de St-Jerome, Marseille (France); Reiter, D. [IEK-4 Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of coupled atom-radiation transport in optically thick divertor plasmas can be computationally very demanding, in particular in ITER relevant conditions or even larger devices, e.g. for power plant divertor studies. At high (∝ 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) atomic densities, it can be shown that sufficiently large divertors behave in certain areas like a black body near the first resonance line of hydrogen (Lyman α). This suggests that, at least in part, the use of continuum model (radiation hydrodynamics) can be sufficiently accurate, while being less time consuming. In this work, we report on the development of a hybrid model devoted to switch automatically between a kinetic and a continuum description according to the plasma conditions. Calculations of the photo-excitation rate in a homogeneous slab are performed as an illustration. The outlined hybrid concept might be also applicable to neutral atom transport, due to mathematical analogy of transport equations for neutrals and radiation. (copyright 2016 The Authors. Contributions to Plasma Physics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA Weinheim. This)

  4. Computer simulation of complexity in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takaya; Sato, Tetsuya

    1998-01-01

    By making a comprehensive comparative study of many self-organizing phenomena occurring in magnetohydrodynamics and kinetic plasmas, we came up with a hypothetical grand view of self-organization. This assertion is confirmed by a recent computer simulation for a broader science field, specifically, the structure formation of short polymer chains, where the nature of the interaction is completely different from that of plasmas. It is found that the formation of the global orientation order proceeds stepwise. (author)

  5. Theory and Simulations of Solar System Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    "Theory and simulations of solar system plasmas" aims to highlight results from microscopic to global scales, achieved by theoretical investigations and numerical simulations of the plasma dynamics in the solar system. The theoretical approach must allow evidencing the universality of the phenomena being considered, whatever the region is where their role is studied; at the Sun, in the solar corona, in the interplanetary space or in planetary magnetospheres. All possible theoretical issues concerning plasma dynamics are welcome, especially those using numerical models and simulations, since these tools are mandatory whenever analytical treatments fail, in particular when complex nonlinear phenomena are at work. Comparative studies for ongoing missions like Cassini, Cluster, Demeter, Stereo, Wind, SDO, Hinode, as well as those preparing future missions and proposals, like, e.g., MMS and Solar Orbiter, are especially encouraged.

  6. Towards a realistic plasma simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.V.

    1991-06-01

    Several new developments in the technology of simulating plasmas, both in particle and fluid models, now allow a stage of synthesis in which many of these advances can be combined into one simulation model. Accuracy and efficiency are the criteria to be satisfied in this quest. We want to build on the following research: 1. the development of the δf method of Barnes. 2. The moving node Galerkin model of Glasser, Miller and Carlson. 3. Particle moving schemes on unstructured grids by Ambrosiano and Bradon. 4. Particle simulations using sorted particles Anderson and Shumaker. Rather than being competing developments,these presumably can be combined into one computational model. We begin by summarizing the physics model for the plasma. The Vlasov equation can be solved as an initial value problem by integrating the plasma distribution function forward in time. 5 refs

  7. One-dimensional plasma simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friberg, Ari; Virtamo, Jorma

    1976-01-01

    Some basic plasma phenomena are studied by a one-dimensional electrostatic simulation code. A brief description of the code and its application to a test problem is given. The experiments carried out include Landau damping of an excited wave, particle retardation by smoothed field and beam-plasma instability. In each case, the set-up of the experiment is described and the results are compared with theoretical predictions. In the theoretical discussions, the oscillatory behaviour found in the Landau damping experiment is explained, an explicit formula for the particle retardation rate is derived and a rudimentary picture of the beam-plasma instability in terms of quasilinear theory is given. (author)

  8. Monte Carlo simulations for plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, M.; Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Wang, W.X.

    2000-07-01

    Plasma behaviours are very complicated and the analyses are generally difficult. However, when the collisional processes play an important role in the plasma behaviour, the Monte Carlo method is often employed as a useful tool. For examples, in neutral particle injection heating (NBI heating), electron or ion cyclotron heating, and alpha heating, Coulomb collisions slow down high energetic particles and pitch angle scatter them. These processes are often studied by the Monte Carlo technique and good agreements can be obtained with the experimental results. Recently, Monte Carlo Method has been developed to study fast particle transports associated with heating and generating the radial electric field. Further it is applied to investigating the neoclassical transport in the plasma with steep gradients of density and temperatures which is beyong the conventional neoclassical theory. In this report, we briefly summarize the researches done by the present authors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  9. A quasi-linear gyrokinetic transport model for tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casati, A.

    2009-10-01

    After a presentation of some basics around nuclear fusion, this research thesis introduces the framework of the tokamak strategy to deal with confinement, hence the main plasma instabilities which are responsible for turbulent transport of energy and matter in such a system. The author also briefly introduces the two principal plasma representations, the fluid and the kinetic ones. He explains why the gyro-kinetic approach has been preferred. A tokamak relevant case is presented in order to highlight the relevance of a correct accounting of the kinetic wave-particle resonance. He discusses the issue of the quasi-linear response. Firstly, the derivation of the model, called QuaLiKiz, and its underlying hypotheses to get the energy and the particle turbulent flux are presented. Secondly, the validity of the quasi-linear response is verified against the nonlinear gyro-kinetic simulations. The saturation model that is assumed in QuaLiKiz, is presented and discussed. Then, the author qualifies the global outcomes of QuaLiKiz. Both the quasi-linear energy and the particle flux are compared to the expectations from the nonlinear simulations, across a wide scan of tokamak relevant parameters. Therefore, the coupling of QuaLiKiz within the integrated transport solver CRONOS is presented: this procedure allows the time-dependent transport problem to be solved, hence the direct application of the model to the experiment. The first preliminary results regarding the experimental analysis are finally discussed

  10. Calculation of Transport Coefficients in Dense Plasma Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhimali, T.; Cabot, W. H.; Caspersen, K. J.; Greenough, J.; Miller, P. L.; Rudd, R. E.; Schwegler, E. R.

    2011-10-01

    We use classical molecular dynamics (MD) to estimate species diffusivity and viscosity in mixed dense plasmas. The Yukawa potential is used to describe the screened Coulomb interaction between the ions. This potential has been used widely, providing the basis for models of dense stellar materials, inertial confined plasmas, and colloidal particles in electrolytes. We calculate transport coefficients in equilibrium simulations using the Green- Kubo relation over a range of thermodynamic conditions including the viscosity and the self - diffusivity for each component of the mixture. The interdiffusivity (or mutual diffusivity) can then be related to the self-diffusivities by using a generalization of the Darken equation. We have also employed non-equilibrium MD to estimate interdiffusivity during the broadening of the interface between two regions each with a high concentration of either species. Here we present results for an asymmetric mixture between Ar and H. These can easily be extended to other plasma mixtures. A main motivation for this study is to develop accurate transport models that can be incorporated into the hydrodynamic codes to study hydrodynamic instabilities. We use classical molecular dynamics (MD) to estimate species diffusivity and viscosity in mixed dense plasmas. The Yukawa potential is used to describe the screened Coulomb interaction between the ions. This potential has been used widely, providing the basis for models of dense stellar materials, inertial confined plasmas, and colloidal particles in electrolytes. We calculate transport coefficients in equilibrium simulations using the Green- Kubo relation over a range of thermodynamic conditions including the viscosity and the self - diffusivity for each component of the mixture. The interdiffusivity (or mutual diffusivity) can then be related to the self-diffusivities by using a generalization of the Darken equation. We have also employed non-equilibrium MD to estimate interdiffusivity during

  11. Simulation study of burning control with internal transport barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateishi, Gonta [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, S.I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    2000-02-01

    Dynamics of burning plasma with internal transport barrier is studied by use of a one dimensional transport simulation code. Two possible mechanisms are modeled for internal transport barrier collapse. One is the collapse, which occurs above the critical pressure gradient, the impact of which is modeled by the enhancement of thermal conductivity. The other is the collapse, which occurs due to the sawtooth trigger. The extended Kadomtsev type reconnection model with multiple resonant surfaces is introduced. Both models are examined for the analysis of long time sustainment of burning. A test of profile control to mitigate the collapse is investigated. The additional circulating power to suppress thermal quench (collapse) is evaluated. (author)

  12. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  13. Laboratory simulation of space plasma phenomena*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatucci, B.; Tejero, E. M.; Ganguli, G.; Blackwell, D.; Enloe, C. L.; Gillman, E.; Walker, D.; Gatling, G.

    2017-12-01

    Laboratory devices, such as the Naval Research Laboratory's Space Physics Simulation Chamber, are large-scale experiments dedicated to the creation of large-volume plasmas with parameters realistically scaled to those found in various regions of the near-Earth space plasma environment. Such devices make valuable contributions to the understanding of space plasmas by investigating phenomena under carefully controlled, reproducible conditions, allowing for the validation of theoretical models being applied to space data. By working in collaboration with in situ experimentalists to create realistic conditions scaled to those found during the observations of interest, the microphysics responsible for the observed events can be investigated in detail not possible in space. To date, numerous investigations of phenomena such as plasma waves, wave-particle interactions, and particle energization have been successfully performed in the laboratory. In addition to investigations such as plasma wave and instability studies, the laboratory devices can also make valuable contributions to the development and testing of space plasma diagnostics. One example is the plasma impedance probe developed at NRL. Originally developed as a laboratory diagnostic, the sensor has now been flown on a sounding rocket, is included on a CubeSat experiment, and will be included on the DoD Space Test Program's STP-H6 experiment on the International Space Station. In this presentation, we will describe several examples of the laboratory investigation of space plasma waves and instabilities and diagnostic development. *This work supported by the NRL Base Program.

  14. Simulation of plasma erosion opening switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The plasma erosion opening switch (PEOS) has been studied with the ANTHEM and ISIS implicit simulation codes. The switch consists of plasma fill injected into a transmission line. The plasma initially shorts out the circuit, but eventually it is removed by self-electrical forces, allowing for the delivery of energy to a load. ANTHEM models the plasma by multiple fluids with electron inertia retained, or by the particle-in-cell (PIC) technique. ISIS is an optimized PIC code. Both codes determine electric and magnetic fields by the implicit moment method. This allows for the study of long time full-switch behavior with simulational zone sizes and time steps that are large compared to a Debye length and plasma period, respectively. Thus, the authors have modeled switch behavior at densities ranging from 5 x 10 11 to 5 x 10 14 electrons/cm -3 over drive pulses ranging from 5 to 250 ns. Here, the magnetic field rose linearly from zero to 0.8 or 3.0 Tesla. Switch gaps spanned from 1.0 to 8.0 cm, and inner radii ranged from 0.5 to 20.0 cm. Opening dynamics is shown to depend sensitively on the assumed electron emission thresholds at the cathode, and on the effective conductivity of the anode. The particle simulations predict broader current channels than the multi-fluid calculations - reasons for this are discussed. The effect of numerical diffusion in implicit simulations is examined. The response to realistic load impedances (10 Ohms for Sandia National Laboratory's PBFA II accelerator) of the opening characteristics is described. Advantages from plasma fill near the load are investigated. The action of preset initial magnetic fields aligned with the power flow, and of trigger magnetic fields for controlled removal of the plasma is discussed

  15. Convective cells and transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassam, A.B.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1978-12-01

    The properties of convective cells and the diffusion resulting from such cells are significantly influenced by an inhomogeneity in the extermal confining magnetic field, such as that in toroidal plasmas. The convective diffusion in the presence of a field inhomogeneity is estimated. For a thermal background, this diffusion is shown to be substantially smaller than classical collisional diffusion. For a model nonthermal background, the diffusion is estimated, for typical parameters, to be at most of the order of collisional diffusion. The model background employed is based on spectra observed in numerical simulations of drift-wave-driven convective cells

  16. Integrated transport code system for a multicomponent plasma in a gas dynamic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikeev, A.V.; Karpushov, A.N.; Noak, K.; Strogalova, S.L.

    2000-01-01

    This report is focused on the development of the theoretical and numerical models of multicomponent high-β plasma confinement and transport in the gas-dynamic trap (GDT). In order to simulate the plasma behavior in the GDT as well as that in the GDT-based neutron source the Integrated Transport Code System is developed from existing stand-alone codes calculating the target plasma, the fast ions and the neutral gas in the GDT. The code system considers the full dependence of the transport phenomena on space, time, energy and angle variables as well as the interactions between the particle fields [ru

  17. Simulating plasma production from hypervelocity impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Alex, E-mail: alexcf@stanford.edu; Close, Sigrid [Stanford University, Aeronautics and Astronautics, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Mathias, Donovan [NASA Ames Research Center, Bldg. 258, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Hypervelocity particles, such as meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and are energetic enough to vaporize and ionize themselves and as well as a portion of the target material. The resulting plasma rapidly expands into the surrounding vacuum. While plasma measurements from hypervelocity impacts have been made using ground-based technologies such as light gas guns and Van de Graaff dust accelerators, some of the basic plasma properties vary significantly between experiments. There have been both ground-based and in-situ measurements of radio frequency (RF) emission from hypervelocity impacts, but the physical mechanism responsible and the possible connection to the impact-produced plasma are not well understood. Under certain conditions, the impact-produced plasma can have deleterious effects on spacecraft electronics by providing a new current path, triggering an electrostatic discharge, causing electromagnetic interference, or generating an electromagnetic pulse. Multi-physics simulations of plasma production from hypervelocity impacts are presented. These simulations incorporate elasticity and plasticity of the solid target, phase change and plasma formation, and non-ideal plasma physics due to the high density and low temperature of the plasma. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to perform a continuum dynamics simulation with these additional physics. By examining a series of hypervelocity impacts, basic properties of the impact produced plasma plume (density, temperature, expansion speed, charge state) are determined for impactor speeds between 10 and 72 km/s. For a large range of higher impact speeds (30–72 km/s), we find the temperature is unvarying at 2.5 eV. We also find that the plasma plume is weakly ionized for impact speeds less than 14 km/s and fully ionized for impact speeds greater than 20 km/s, independent of impactor mass. This is the same velocity threshold for the detection of RF emission in recent

  18. Advanced ST Plasma Scenario Simulations for NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, C.E.; Synakowski, E.J.; Gates, D.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Kaye, S.M.; Mau, T.K.; Menard, J.; Phillips, C.K.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, R.

    2004-01-01

    Integrated scenario simulations are done for NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] that address four primary milestones for developing advanced ST configurations: high β and high β N inductive discharges to study all aspects of ST physics in the high-beta regime; non-inductively sustained discharges for flattop times greater than the skin time to study the various current-drive techniques; non-inductively sustained discharges at high β for flattop times much greater than a skin time which provides the integrated advanced ST target for NSTX; and non-solenoidal start-up and plasma current ramp-up. The simulations done here use the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) and are based on a discharge 109070. TRANSP analysis of the discharge provided the thermal diffusivities for electrons and ions, the neutral-beam (NB) deposition profile, and other characteristics. CURRAY is used to calculate the High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating depositions and current drive. GENRAY/CQL3D is used to establish the heating and CD [current drive] deposition profiles for electron Bernstein waves (EBW). Analysis of the ideal-MHD stability is done with JSOLVER, BALMSC, and PEST2. The simulations indicate that the integrated advanced ST plasma is reachable, obtaining stable plasmas with β ∼ 40% at β N 's of 7.7-9, I P = 1.0 MA, and B T = 0.35 T. The plasma is 100% non-inductive and has a flattop of 4 skin times. The resulting global energy confinement corresponds to a multiplier of H 98(y,2) 1.5. The simulations have demonstrated the importance of HHFW heating and CD, EBW off-axis CD, strong plasma shaping, density control, and early heating/H-mode transition for producing and optimizing these plasma configurations

  19. Advanced ST plasma scenario simulations for NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, C.E.; Synakowski, E.J.; Gates, D.A.; Kaye, S.M.; Menard, J.; Phillips, C.K.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, R.; Harvey, R.W.; Mau, T.K.

    2005-01-01

    Integrated scenario simulations are done for NSTX that address four primary milestones for developing advanced ST configurations: high β and high β N inductive discharges to study all aspects of ST physics in the high beta regime; non-inductively sustained discharges for flattop times greater than the skin time to study the various current drive techniques; non-inductively sustained discharges at high βfor flattop times much greater than a skin time which provides the integrated advanced ST target for NSTX; and non-solenoidal startup and plasma current rampup. The simulations done here use the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) and are based on a discharge 109070. TRANSP analysis of the discharge provided the thermal diffusivities for electrons and ions, the neutral beam (NB) deposition profile and other characteristics. CURRAY is used to calculate the High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating depositions and current drive. GENRAY/CQL3D is used to establish the heating and CD deposition profiles for electron Bernstein waves (EBW). Analysis of the ideal MHD stability is done with JSOLVER, BALMSC, and PEST2. The simulations indicate that the integrated advanced ST plasma is reachable, obtaining stable plasmas with β ∼ 40% at β N 's of 7.7-9, I P = 1.0 MA and B T = 0.35 T. The plasma is 100% non-inductive and has a flattop of 4 skin times. The resulting global energy confinement corresponds to a multiplier of H 98(y,2 ) = 1.5. The simulations have demonstrated the importance of HHFW heating and CD, EBW off-axis CD, strong plasma shaping, density control, and early heating/H-mode transition for producing and optimizing these plasma configurations (author)

  20. Integrated predictive modelling simulations of burning plasma experiment designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, Glenn; Onjun, Thawatchai; Kritz, Arnold H

    2003-01-01

    Models for the height of the pedestal at the edge of H-mode plasmas (Onjun T et al 2002 Phys. Plasmas 9 5018) are used together with the Multi-Mode core transport model (Bateman G et al 1998 Phys. Plasmas 5 1793) in the BALDUR integrated predictive modelling code to predict the performance of the ITER (Aymar A et al 2002 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44 519), FIRE (Meade D M et al 2001 Fusion Technol. 39 336), and IGNITOR (Coppi B et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 1253) fusion reactor designs. The simulation protocol used in this paper is tested by comparing predicted temperature and density profiles against experimental data from 33 H-mode discharges in the JET (Rebut P H et al 1985 Nucl. Fusion 25 1011) and DIII-D (Luxon J L et al 1985 Fusion Technol. 8 441) tokamaks. The sensitivities of the predictions are evaluated for the burning plasma experimental designs by using variations of the pedestal temperature model that are one standard deviation above and below the standard model. Simulations of the fusion reactor designs are carried out for scans in which the plasma density and auxiliary heating power are varied

  1. Development of high energy pulsed plasma simulator for plasma-lithium trench experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soonwook

    To simulate detrimental events in a tokamak and provide a test-stand for a liquid lithium infused trench (LiMIT) device, a pulsed plasma source utilizing a theta pinch in conjunction with a coaxial plasma accelerator has been developed. An overall objective of the project is to develop a compact device that can produce 100 MW/m2 to 1 GW/m2 of plasma heat flux (a typical heat flux level in a major fusion device) in ~ 100 mus (≤ 0.1 MJ/m2) for a liquid lithium plasma facing component research. The existing theta pinch device, DEVeX, was built and operated for study on lithium vapor shielding effect. However, a typical plasma energy of 3 - 4 kJ/m2 is too low to study an interaction of plasma and plasma facing components in fusion devices. No or little preionized plasma, ringing of magnetic field, collisions of high energy particles with background gas have been reported as the main issues. Therefore, DEVeX is reconfigured to mitigate these issues. The new device is mainly composed of a plasma gun for a preionization source, a theta pinch for heating, and guiding magnets for a better plasma transportation. Each component will be driven by capacitor banks and controlled by high voltage / current switches. Several diagnostics including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, optical emission measurement, Rogowski coil, flux loop, and fast ionization gauge are used to characterize the new device. A coaxial plasma gun is manufactured and installed in the previous theta pinch chamber. The plasma gun is equipped with 500 uF capacitor and a gas puff valve. The increase of the plasma velocity with the plasma gun capacitor voltage is consistent with the theoretical predictions and the velocity is located between the snowplow model and the weak - coupling limit. Plasma energies measured with the calorimeter ranges from 0.02 - 0.065 MJ/m2 and increases with the voltage at the capacitor bank. A cross-check between the plasma energy measured with the calorimeter and the triple probe

  2. EU-US transport task force workshop on transport in fusion plasmas: transport near operational limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J W; Garbet, X; Giannone, L; Greenwald, M; Hidalgo, C; Loarte, A; Mantica, P

    2003-01-01

    This conference report summarizes the contributions to, and discussions at, the 9th EU-US transport task force workshop on 'transport in fusion plasmas: transport near operational limits', held in Cordoba, Spain, during 9-12 September 2002. The workshop was organized under three main headings: edge localized mode physics and confinement, profile dynamics and confinement and confinement near operational limits: density and beta limits; this report follows the same structure

  3. Visualization techniques in plasma numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulhanek, P.; Smetana, M.

    2004-01-01

    Numerical simulations of plasma processes usually yield a huge amount of raw numerical data. Information about electric and magnetic fields and particle positions and velocities can be typically obtained. There are two major ways of elaborating these data. First of them is called plasma diagnostics. We can calculate average values, variances, correlations of variables, etc. These results may be directly comparable with experiments and serve as the typical quantitative output of plasma simulations. The second possibility is the plasma visualization. The results are qualitative only, but serve as vivid display of phenomena in the plasma followed-up. An experience with visualizing electric and magnetic fields via Line Integral Convolution method is described in the first part of the paper. The LIC method serves for visualization of vector fields in two dimensional section of the three dimensional plasma. The field values can be known only in grid points of three-dimensional grid. The second part of the paper is devoted to the visualization techniques of the charged particle motion. The colour tint can be used for particle temperature representation. The motion can be visualized by a trace fading away with the distance from the particle. In this manner the impressive animations of the particle motion can be achieved. (author)

  4. Numerical resolution of a bi-temperature MHD model with a general Ohm's law: Roe solver - Front-tracking - Nonlinear transport equations with discontinuous coefficients. Simulation of a Plasma Opening Switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brassier, Stephane

    1998-01-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations represent the coupling between fluid dynamics equations and Maxwell's equations. We consider here a new MHD model with two temperatures. A Roe scheme is first constructed in the one dimensional case, for a multi-species model and a general equation of state. The multidimensional case is treated thanks to the Powell approach. The notion of Roe-Powell matrix, generalization of the notion of Roe matrix for multidimensional MHD, allows us to develop an original scheme on a curvilinear grid. We focus on a second part on the modelling of a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). A front-tracking method is first set up, in order to correctly handle the deformation of the front between the vacuum and the plasma. Besides, by taking into account a general Ohm's law, we have to deal with the Hall effect, which leads to nonlinear transport equations with discontinuous coefficients. Several numerical schemes are proposed and tested on a variety of test cases. This work has allowed us to construct an industrial MHD code, intended to handle complex flows and in particular to correctly simulate the behaviour of the POS. (author) [fr

  5. Spectral Methods in Numerical Plasma Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Hansen, F.R.; Huld, T.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction is given to the use of spectral methods in numerical plasma simulation. As examples of the use of spectral methods, solutions to the two-dimensional Euler equations in both a simple, doubly periodic region, and on an annulus will be shown. In the first case, the solution is expanded...

  6. Calculation of transport coefficients in an axisymmetric plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumaker, D.E.

    1976-01-01

    A method of calculating the transport coefficient in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma is presented. This method is useful in calculating the transport coefficients in a Tokamak plasma confinement device. The particle density and temperature are shown to be a constant on a magnetic flux surface. Transport equations are given for the total particle flux and total energy flux crossing a closed toroidal surface. Also transport equations are given for the toroidal magnetic flux. A computer code was written to calculate the transport coefficients for a three species plasma, electrons and two species of ions. This is useful for calculating the transport coefficients of a plasma which contains impurities. It was found that the particle and energy transport coefficients are increased by a large amount, and the transport coefficients for the toroidal magnetic field are reduced by a small amount. For example, a deuterium plasma with 1.3 percent oxygen, one of the particle transport coefficients is increased by a factor of about four. The transport coefficients for the toroidal magnetic flux are reduced by about 20 percent. The increase in the particle transport coefficient is due to the collisional scattering of the deuterons by the heavy oxygen ions which is larger than the deuteron electron scattering, the normal process for particle transport in a two species plasma. The reduction in the toroidal magnetic flux transport coefficients are left unexplained

  7. Calculation of transport coefficients in an axisymmetric plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumaker, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of calculating the transport coefficient in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma is presented. This method is useful in calculating the transport coefficients in a Tokamak plasma confinement device. The particle density and temperature are shown to be a constant on a magnetic flux surface. Transport equations are given for the total particle flux and total energy flux crossing a closed toroidal surface. Also transport equations are given for the toroidal magnetic flux. A computer code was written to calculate the transport coefficients for a three species plasma, electrons and two species of ions. This is useful for calculating the transport coefficients of a plasma which contains impurities. It was found that the particle and energy transport coefficients are increased by a large amount, and the transport coefficients for the toroidal magnetic field are reduced by a small amount

  8. Physics of electron internal transport barrier in toroidal helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Toda, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Ida, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Fukuyama, A.; Diamond, P.H.

    2006-10-01

    The role of zonal flows in the formation of the transport barrier in the helical plasmas is analyzed using the transport code. A set of one-dimensional transport equations is analyzed, including the effect of zonal flows. The turbulent transport coefficient is shown to be suppressed when the plasma state changes from the weak negative radial electric field to the strong positive one. This bifurcation of the turbulent transport is newly caused by the change of the damping rate of zonal flows. It is theoretically demonstrated that the damping rate of zonal flows governs the global confinement in toroidal plasmas. (author)

  9. Simulation of plasma erosion opening switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the modeling of Plasma Erosion Opening Switches is reviewed, and new results from both fluid and particle simulation compared. Three-fluid simulations with the ANTHEM code for switches on the NRL GAMBLE I machine and SNL PBFA II machine have shown strong dependence of the opening dynamics on the anode structure, the threshold for electron emission, on the possible presence of anomalous resistivity, and on advection of the magnetic field with cathode emitted electrons. Simulations with the implicit particle-in-cell code ISIS confirm these observations, but manifest broader current channels---in better agreement with GAMBLE I experimental results. 7 refs., 3 figs

  10. Transport Bifurcation in a Rotating Tokamak Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highcock, E. G.; Barnes, M.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Parra, F. I.; Roach, C. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of flow shear on turbulent transport in tokamaks is studied numerically in the experimentally relevant limit of zero magnetic shear. It is found that the plasma is linearly stable for all nonzero flow shear values, but that subcritical turbulence can be sustained nonlinearly at a wide range of temperature gradients. Flow shear increases the nonlinear temperature gradient threshold for turbulence but also increases the sensitivity of the heat flux to changes in the temperature gradient, except over a small range near the threshold where the sensitivity is decreased. A bifurcation in the equilibrium gradients is found: for a given input of heat, it is possible, by varying the applied torque, to trigger a transition to significantly higher temperature and flow gradients.

  11. Turbulence and abnormal transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.

    1988-09-01

    Microinstabilities in linear and nonlinear tokamak plasmas were studied. A variational method based on the existence of a system of angular variables and action for the charged particles in the magnetic configuration of a tokamak is described. The corresponding functional, extremal in relation to the fluctuating electromagnetic field, is calculated analytically, taking into account the effects of the toroidal geometry. A numerical code, TORRID, was derived from these principles and the main instabilities, especially ion instabilities and microtearing, were studied linearly. Nonlinear methods were also applied to microtearing. Quasi-linear transport coefficients are derived from a principle of minimum entropy production. Thermal ionic conductivity and viscosity are calculated for an ionic turbulence [fr

  12. Turbulence and abnormal transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.

    1988-06-01

    The objective of this thesis is the study of plasma microinstabilities in linear and nonlinear tokamak regime. After a brief review of experimental results the theoretical tools used in this study are presented. A variational method founded on the existence of angular variables system and on action for charged particles in tokamak configurations is detailed. The correspondent functional extreme with regard to fluctuating electromagnetic field, is calculated analytically with taking into account the toroidal geometry. A numerical code, TORRID, has been constructed on this principle and the main instabilities, particularly ionic instabilities and microtearing, has been linearly studied. The most simple non linear methods are rewieved and applied at the microtearing instabilities. The quasilinear transport coefficients are deducted of an entropy minimum production principle. The ionic thermic conductivity and the viscosity are calculated for an ionic turbulence [fr

  13. Simulation of electron thermal transport in H-mode discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiq, T.; Pankin, A. Y.; Bateman, G.; Kritz, A. H.; Halpern, F. D.

    2009-01-01

    Electron thermal transport in DIII-D H-mode tokamak plasmas [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] is investigated by comparing predictive simulation results for the evolution of electron temperature profiles with experimental data. The comparison includes the entire profile from the magnetic axis to the bottom of the pedestal. In the simulations, carried out using the automated system for transport analysis (ASTRA) integrated modeling code, different combinations of electron thermal transport models are considered. The combinations include models for electron temperature gradient (ETG) anomalous transport and trapped electron mode (TEM) anomalous transport, as well as a model for paleoclassical transport [J. D. Callen, Nucl. Fusion 45, 1120 (2005)]. It is found that the electromagnetic limit of the Horton ETG model [W. Horton et al., Phys. Fluids 31, 2971 (1988)] provides an important contribution near the magnetic axis, which is a region where the ETG mode in the GLF23 model [R. E. Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)] is below threshold. In simulations of DIII-D discharges, the observed shape of the H-mode edge pedestal is produced when transport associated with the TEM component of the GLF23 model is suppressed and transport given by the paleoclassical model is included. In a study involving 15 DIII-D H-mode discharges, it is found that with a particular combination of electron thermal transport models, the average rms deviation of the predicted electron temperature profile from the experimental profile is reduced to 9% and the offset to -4%.

  14. Two-dimensional transport of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshman, S.P.; Jardin, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced set of two-fluid transport equations is obtained from the conservation equations describing the time evolution of the differential particle number, entropy, and magnetic fluxes in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma with nested magnetic surfaces. Expanding in the small ratio of perpendicular to parallel mobilities and thermal conductivities yields as solubility constraints one-dimensional equations for the surface-averaged thermodynamic variables and magnetic fluxes. Since Ohm's law E +u x B =R', where R' accounts for any nonideal effects, only determines the particle flow relative to the diffusing magnetic surfaces, it is necessary to solve a single two-dimensional generalized differential equation, (partial/partialt) delpsi. (delp - J x B) =0, to find the absolute velocity of a magnetic surface enclosing a fixed toroidal flux. This equation is linear but nonstandard in that it involves flux surface averages of the unknown velocity. Specification of R' and the cross-field ion and electron heat fluxes provides a closed system of equations. A time-dependent coordinate transformation is used to describe the diffusion of plasma quantities through magnetic surfaces of changing shape

  15. Modeling and simulation of plasma materials processing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma processing has emerged as a central technology in the manufacture of integrated circuits (ICs) and related industries. These plasmas are weakly to partially ionized gases, typically operated at a few to several hundred mTorr gas pressure, with neutral temperatures ranging from room temperature to 500 degrees K. Electron mean energies are typically a few eV and ion energies in the bulk plasma are about 0.05-0.5 eV. Positive ions axe accelerated in the sheaths to impact surfaces with energies ranging from about 10 eV to hundreds of eV. These energetic ions profoundly affect rates of surface chemical reactions. One of the consequences of the recent rapid growth in the IC industry has been a greater focus on manufacturing productivity. The capital costs of equipment that is used in manufacturing IC's has become a large fraction of the ∼ $1 billion cost of building a wafer fab. There is now a strong economic incentive to develop workstation-based simulations of plasma chemical reactors in order to design, optimize and control plasma reactors. I will summarize efforts to develop such models, including electromagnetic coupling, and transport and kinetics of charged and neutral species. Length and time scale disparities in the plasma tool challenge current simulation approaches, and I will address strategies to attack aspects of this problem. In addition, I will present some of our recent efforts to exploit molecular dynamics simulations employing empirical potentials to get hints about qualitative mechanisms and ideas on how to formulate rate expressions for plasma-surface chemical processes. Video illustrations of selected sets of ion trajectories impacting near-surface regions of the substrate will be presented

  16. Double internal transport barrier triggering mechanism in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Jiaqi; Mou, Zongze; Long, Yongxing; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2004-01-01

    Sheared flow layers created by energy released in magnetic reconnection processes are studied with the magneto hydrodynamics (MHD), aimed at internal transport barrier (ITB) dynamics. The double tearing mode induced by electron viscosity is investigated and proposed as a triggering mechanism for double internal transport barrier (DITB) observed in tokamak plasmas with non-monotonic safety factor profiles. The quasi-linear development of the mode is simulated and the emphasis is placed on the structure of sheared poloidal flow layers formed in the vicinity of the magnetic islands. For viscosity double tearing modes, it is shown that the sheared flows induced by the mode may reach the level required by the condition for ITB formation. Especially, the flow layers are found to form just outside the magnetic islands. The scaling of the generated velocity with plasma parameters is given. Possible explanation for the experimental observations that the preferential formation of transport barriers in the proximity of low order rational surface is discussed. (author)

  17. Pellet injection and plasma behavior simulation code PEPSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Haruhiko; Tobita, Kenji; Nishio, Satoshi

    2003-08-01

    Fueling is one of the major issues on design of nuclear fusion reactor and the injection of solid hydrogen pellet to the core plasma is a useful method. On the design of a nuclear fusion reactor, it is necessary to determine requirements on the pellet size, the number of pellets, the injection speed and the injection cycle. PEllet injection and Plasma behavior SImulation code PEPSI has been developed to assess these parameters. PEPSI has two special features: 1) Adopting two numerical pellet models, Parks model and Strauss model, 2) Calculating fusion power and other plasma parameters in combination with a time-dependent one-dimensional transport model. This report describes the numerical models, numerical scheme, sequence of calculation, list of subroutines, list of variables and an example of calculation. (author)

  18. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-09-21

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  19. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  20. Simulation of internal transport barriers by means of the canonical profile transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dnestrovskij, Yu. N.; Cherkasov, S. V.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Lysenko, S. E.; Walsh, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    Models with critical gradients are widely used to describe energy balance in L-mode discharges. The so-called first critical gradient can be found from the canonical temperature profile. Here, it is suggested that discharge regimes with transport barriers can be described based on the idea of the second critical gradient. If, in a certain plasma region, the pressure gradient exceeds the second critical gradient, then the plasma bifurcates into a new state and a transport barrier forms in this region. This idea was implemented in a modified canonical profile transport model that makes it possible to describe the energy and particle balance in tokamak plasmas with arbitrary cross sections and aspect ratios. The magnitude of the second critical gradient was chosen by comparing the results calculated for several tokamak discharges with the experimental data. It is found that the second critical gradient is related to the magnetic shear s. The criterion of the transport barrier formation has the form (a 2 /r)d/drln(p/p c ) > z 0 (r), where r is the radial coordinate, a is the plasma minor radius, p is the plasma pressure, p c is the canonical pressure profile, and the dimensionless function z O (r) = C O + C 1 s (with C 0i ∼1, C 0e ∼3, and C 1i,e ∼2) describes the difference between the first and second critical gradients. Simulations show that this criterion is close to that obtained experimentally in JET. The model constructed here is used to simulate internal transport barriers in the JET, TFTR, DIII-D, and MAST tokamaks. The possible dependence of the second critical gradient on the plasma parameters is discussed

  1. Anomalous plasma transport due to electron temperature gradient instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Sinji; Ito, Hiroshi; Kamimura, Tetsuo.

    1979-01-01

    The collisionless drift wave instability driven by an electron temperature inhomogeneity (electron temperature gradient instability) and the enhanced transport processes associated with it are studied using a two-and-a-half dimensional particle simulation code. The simulation results show that quasilinear diffusion in phase space is an important mechanism for the saturation of the electron temperature gradient instability. Also, the instability yields particle fluxes toward the hot plasma regions. The heat conductivity of the electron temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field, T sub(e'), is not reduced by magnetic shear but remains high, whereas the heat conductivity of the parallel temperature, T sub(e''), is effectively reduced, and the instability stabilized. (author)

  2. Turbulence and anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordman, H

    1990-12-31

    In present-day Tokamak fusion machines, instabilities and turbulence driven by temperature gradients can have a considerable impact on the confinement qualities. This thesis is mainly devoted to analyzing the nonlinear evolution of these instabilities and the associated turbulent transport. A combined analytical and numerical study of the ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is presented. An analytical expression for the ion thermal conductivity is derived and found to be in good agreement with the simulation results. The scaling properties of chi{sub i} are investigated and compared with experimental results. The transport due to the simultaneous presence of a trapped electron mode and an ion temperature gradient mode is analysed. It is found that the coupling of the modes can give rise to inward diffusive fluxes of both particles and energy. The tendency of the system to equilibrate density and temperature scale lengths is compared with recent experimental trends. The nonlinear behaviour of the instabilities is also studied in the context of low dimensional dynamical systems. Here, the relation between the fully nonlinear fluid models and the low dimensional models is discussed. The influence of a high frequency RF-field on the ion temperature gradient driven mode is investigated analytically. The consequences for mode stability and transport are considered. 23 refs.

  3. Turbulence and anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordman, H.

    1989-01-01

    In present-day Tokamak fusion machines, instabilities and turbulence driven by temperature gradients can have a considerable impact on the confinement qualities. This thesis is mainly devoted to analyzing the nonlinear evolution of these instabilities and the associated turbulent transport. A combined analytical and numerical study of the ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is presented. An analytical expression for the ion thermal conductivity is derived and found to be in good agreement with the simulation results. The scaling properties of chi i are investigated and compared with experimental results. The transport due to the simultaneous presence of a trapped electron mode and an ion temperature gradient mode is analysed. It is found that the coupling of the modes can give rise to inward diffusive fluxes of both particles and energy. The tendency of the system to equilibrate density and temperature scale lengths is compared with recent experimental trends. The nonlinear behaviour of the instabilities is also studied in the context of low dimensional dynamical systems. Here, the relation between the fully nonlinear fluid models and the low dimensional models is discussed. The influence of a high frequency RF-field on the ion temperature gradient driven mode is investigated analytically. The consequences for mode stability and transport are considered. 23 refs

  4. Sawtooth driven particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, T.

    2013-01-01

    The radial transport of particles in tokamaks is one of the most stringent issues faced by the magnetic confinement fusion community, because the fusion power is proportional to the square of the pressure, and also because accumulation of heavy impurities in the core leads to important power losses which can lead to a 'radiative collapse'. Sawteeth and the associated periodic redistribution of the core quantities can significantly impact the radial transport of electrons and impurities. In this thesis, we perform numerical simulations of sawteeth using a nonlinear tridimensional magnetohydrodynamic code called XTOR-2F to study the particle transport induced by sawtooth crashes. We show that the code recovers, after the crash, the fine structures of electron density that are observed with fast-sweeping reflectometry on the JET and TS tokamaks. The presence of these structure may indicate a low efficiency of the sawtooth in expelling the impurities from the core. However, applying the same code to impurity profiles, we show that the redistribution is quantitatively similar to that predicted by Kadomtsev's model, which could not be predicted a priori. Hence finally the sawtooth flushing is efficient in expelling impurities from the core. (author) [fr

  5. PIC Simulations of Hypersonic Plasma Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehoff, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Niemann, C.; Decyk, V.; Schriver, D.; Clark, E.

    2013-12-01

    The plasma sheaths formed around hypersonic aircraft (Mach number, M > 10) are relatively unexplored and of interest today to both further the development of new technologies and solve long-standing engineering problems. Both laboratory experiments and analytical/numerical modeling are required to advance the understanding of these systems; it is advantageous to perform these tasks in tandem. There has already been some work done to study these plasmas by experiments that create a rapidly expanding plasma through ablation of a target with a laser. In combination with a preformed magnetic field, this configuration leads to a magnetic "bubble" formed behind the front as particles travel at about Mach 30 away from the target. Furthermore, the experiment was able to show the generation of fast electrons which could be due to instabilities on electron scales. To explore this, future experiments will have more accurate diagnostics capable of observing time- and length-scales below typical ion scales, but simulations are a useful tool to explore these plasma conditions theoretically. Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations are necessary when phenomena are expected to be observed at these scales, and also have the advantage of being fully kinetic with no fluid approximations. However, if the scales of the problem are not significantly below the ion scales, then the initialization of the PIC simulation must be very carefully engineered to avoid unnecessary computation and to select the minimum window where structures of interest can be studied. One method of doing this is to seed the simulation with either experiment or ion-scale simulation results. Previous experiments suggest that a useful configuration for studying hypersonic plasma configurations is a ring of particles rapidly expanding transverse to an external magnetic field, which has been simulated on the ion scale with an ion-hybrid code. This suggests that the PIC simulation should have an equivalent configuration

  6. Turbulence and transport in a magnetized argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pots, B.F.M.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study on turbulence and transport in the highly ionized argon plasma of a hollow cathode discharge is described. In order to determine the plasma parameters three standard diagnostics have been used, whilst two diagnostics have been developed to study the plasma turbulence. (Auth.)

  7. Interchange Instability and Transport in Matter-Antimatter Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendl, Alexander; Danler, Gregor; Wiesenberger, Matthias; Held, Markus

    2017-06-01

    Symmetric electron-positron plasmas in inhomogeneous magnetic fields are intrinsically subject to interchange instability and transport. Scaling relations for the propagation velocity of density perturbations relevant to transport in isothermal magnetically confined electron-positron plasmas are deduced, including damping effects when Debye lengths are large compared to Larmor radii. The relations are verified by nonlinear full-F gyrofluid computations. Results are analyzed with respect to planned magnetically confined electron-positron plasma experiments. The model is generalized to other matter-antimatter plasmas. Magnetized electron-positron-proton-antiproton plasmas are susceptible to interchange-driven local matter-antimatter separation, which can impede sustained laboratory magnetic confinement.

  8. Interchange Instability and Transport in Matter-Antimatter Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendl, Alexander; Danler, Gregor; Wiesenberger, Matthias; Held, Markus

    2017-06-09

    Symmetric electron-positron plasmas in inhomogeneous magnetic fields are intrinsically subject to interchange instability and transport. Scaling relations for the propagation velocity of density perturbations relevant to transport in isothermal magnetically confined electron-positron plasmas are deduced, including damping effects when Debye lengths are large compared to Larmor radii. The relations are verified by nonlinear full-F gyrofluid computations. Results are analyzed with respect to planned magnetically confined electron-positron plasma experiments. The model is generalized to other matter-antimatter plasmas. Magnetized electron-positron-proton-antiproton plasmas are susceptible to interchange-driven local matter-antimatter separation, which can impede sustained laboratory magnetic confinement.

  9. Plasma stream transport method (2) Use of charge exchange plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchimoto, T.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma stream transport method using a single plasma source has limitations for practical film deposition. Using a charge exchange phenomenon, a new plasma source is devised and tested by the plasma stream transport machine. Metals, silicon dioxide, and nitride films are deposited by this system. The mechanism of deposition under relatively high vacuum surrounding a silicon wafer is discussed as is the effect of radical atoms

  10. Neoclassical transport simulations for stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkin, Y.; Beidler, C. D.; Maassberg, H.; Murakami, S.; Wakasa, A.; Tribaldos, V.

    2011-01-01

    The benchmarking of the thermal neoclassical transport coefficients is described using examples of the Large Helical Device (LHD) and TJ-II stellarators. The thermal coefficients are evaluated by energy convolution of the monoenergetic coefficients obtained by direct interpolation or neural network techniques from the databases precalculated by different codes. The temperature profiles are calculated by a predictive transport code from the energy balance equations with the ambipolar radial electric field estimated from a diffusion equation to guarantee a unique and smooth solution, although several solutions of the ambipolarity condition may exist when root-finding is invoked; the density profiles are fixed. The thermal transport coefficients as well as the ambipolar radial electric field are compared and very reasonable agreement is found for both configurations. Together with an additional W7-X case, these configurations represent very different degrees of neoclassical confinement at low collisionalities. The impact of the neoclassical optimization on the energy confinement time is evaluated and the confinement times for different devices predicted by transport modeling are compared with the standard scaling for stellarators. Finally, all configurations are scaled to the same volume for a direct comparison of the volume-averaged pressure and the neoclassical degree of optimization.

  11. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Goeler, S. von; Houlberg, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on TFTR have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear (RS) plasmas. The profile evolutions of trace tritium and helium and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in enhanced reverse shear (ERS) plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the RS region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  12. Fluid and gyrokinetic simulations of impurity transport at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordman, H; Skyman, A; Strand, P

    2011-01-01

    Impurity transport coefficients due to ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) mode and trapped-electron mode turbulence are calculated using profile data from dedicated impurity injection experiments at JET. Results obtained with a multi-fluid model are compared with quasi-linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic...... simulation results obtained with the code GENE. The sign of the impurity convective velocity (pinch) and its various contributions are discussed. The dependence of the impurity transport coefficients and impurity peaking factor −∇nZ/nZ on plasma parameters such as impurity charge number Z, ion logarithmic...

  13. A reduced model for ion temperature gradient turbulent transport in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunami, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.

    2013-07-01

    A novel reduced model for ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulent transport in helical plasmas is presented. The model enables one to predict nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation results from linear gyrokinetic analyses. It is shown from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the ITG turbulence in helical plasmas that the transport coefficient can be expressed as a function of the turbulent fluctuation level and the averaged zonal flow amplitude. Then, the reduced model for the turbulent ion heat diffusivity is derived by representing the nonlinear turbulent fluctuations and zonal flow amplitude in terms of the linear growth rate of the ITG instability and the linear response of the zonal flow potentials. It is confirmed that the reduced transport model results are in good agreement with those from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations for high ion temperature plasmas in the Large Helical Device. (author)

  14. Reactive transport models and simulation with ALLIANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leterrier, N.; Deville, E.; Bary, B.; Trotignon, L.; Hedde, T.; Cochepin, B.; Stora, E.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical processes influence the evolution of nuclear waste storage. As a result, simulations based only upon transport and hydraulic processes fail to describe adequately some industrial scenarios. We need to take into account complex chemical models (mass action laws, kinetics...) which are highly non-linear. In order to simulate the coupling of these chemical reactions with transport, we use a classical Sequential Iterative Approach (SIA), with a fixed point algorithm, within the mainframe of the ALLIANCES platform. This approach allows us to use the various transport and chemical modules available in ALLIANCES, via an operator-splitting method based upon the structure of the chemical system. We present five different applications of reactive transport simulations in the context of nuclear waste storage: 1. A 2D simulation of the lixiviation by rain water of an underground polluted zone high in uranium oxide; 2. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with clay. Corrosion of the steel creates corrosion products and the altered package becomes a porous medium. We follow the degradation front through kinetic reactions and the coupling with transport; 3. The degradation of a cement-based material by the injection of an aqueous solution of zinc and sulphate ions. In addition to the reactive transport coupling, we take into account in this case the hydraulic retroaction of the porosity variation on the Darcy velocity; 4. The decalcification of a concrete beam in an underground storage structure. In this case, in addition to the reactive transport simulation, we take into account the interaction between chemical degradation and the mechanical forces (cracks...), and the retroactive influence on the structure changes on transport; 5. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with a clay material under a temperature gradient. In this case the reactive transport simulation is entirely directed by the temperature changes and

  15. Kinetic simulation on collisional bounded plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, S.P.; Sato, Tetsuya; Tomita, Yukihiro; Hatori, Tadatsugu

    1998-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic simulation model on collisional bounded plasma is presented. The electric field is given by solving Poisson equation and collisions among particles (including charged particles and neutral particles) are included. The excitation and ionization of neutral particle, and recombination are also contained in the present model. The formation of potential structure near a boundary for a discharge system was used as an application of this model. (author)

  16. Effect of impurities on kinetic transport processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Stefanie

    2010-12-10

    Within the framework of this thesis, different problems arising in connection with impurities have been investigated. Collisional damping of zonal flows in tokamaks: Since the Coulomb collision frequency increases with increasing ion charge, heavy, highly charged impurities play an important role in this process. The effect of such impurities on the linear response of the plasma to an external potential perturbation, as caused by zonal flows, is calculated with analytical methods. In comparison with a pure plasma, the damping of the flows occurs, as expected, considerably faster; for experimentally relevant parameters, the enhancement exceeds the effective charge Z{sub eff} of the plasma. Impurity transport driven by microturbulence in tokamaks: With regard to impurities, it is especially important whether the resulting flows are directed inwards or outwards, since they are deleterious for core energy confinement on the one hand, but on the other hand help protecting plasma-facing components from too high energy fluxes in the edge region. A semi-analytical model is presented describing the resulting impurity fluxes and the stability boundary of the underlying mode. The main goal is to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, costly numerical simulations, which are applicable to a broad range of problems but yield scarcely traceable results, and, on the other hand, analytical theory, which might ease the interpretation of the results but is so far rather rudimentary. The model is based on analytical formulae whenever possible but resorts to a numerical treatment when the approximations necessary for an analytical solution would lead to a substantial distortion of the results. Both the direction of the impurity flux and the stability boundary are found to depend sensitively on the plasma parameters such as the impurity density and the temperature gradient. Pfirsch-Schlueter transport in stellarators: Due to geometry effects, collisional transport plays a much more

  17. 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connor, J.W.; Fasoli, A.; Hidalgo, C.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-4 September 2008. There were sessions on core heat and particle transport; core and edge momentum transport; edge and scrape-off-layer ......This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-4 September 2008. There were sessions on core heat and particle transport; core and edge momentum transport; edge and scrape...

  18. Electron cloud simulation of the ECR plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Palinkas, J.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The plasma of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) of ATOMKI is being continuously investigated by different diagnostic methods: using small-sized probes or taking X-ray and visible light photographs. In 2011 three articles were published by our team in a special edition of the IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science (Special Issue on Images in Plasma Science) describing our X-ray and visible light measurements and plasma modeling and simulating studies. Simulation is in many cases the base for the analysis of the photographs. The outcomes of the X-ray and visible light experiments were presented already in earlier issues of the Atomki Annual Report, therefore in this year we concentrate on the results of the simulating studies. The spatial distribution of the three main electron components (cold, warm and hot electron clouds) of the ECR plasmas was simulated by TrapCAD code. TrapCAD is a 'limited' plasma simulation code. The spatial and energy evolution of a large number of electrons can be realistically followed; however, these particles are independent, and no particle interactions are included. In ECRISs, the magnetic trap confines the electrons which keep together the ion component by their space charge. The electrons gain high energies while the ions remain very cold throughout the whole process. Thus, the spatial and energy simulation of the electron component gives much important and numerical information even for the ions. The electron components of ECRISs can artificially be grouped into three populations: cold, warm, and hot electrons. Cold electrons (1-200 eV) have not been heated by the microwave; they are mainly responsible for the visible light emission of the plasma. The energized warm electrons (several kiloelectronvolts) are able to ionize atoms and ions and they are mainly responsible for the characteristic Xray photons emitted by the plasma. Electrons having much higher energy than necessary for

  19. Shearing Box Simulations of the MRI in a Collisionless Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Prateek; Hammett, Gregory W.; Quataert, Eliot; Stone, James M.

    2005-01-01

    We describe local shearing box simulations of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless plasma. Collisionless effects may be important in radiatively inefficient accretion flows, such as near the black hole in the Galactic Center. The MHD version of ZEUS is modified to evolve an anisotropic pressure tensor. A fluid closure approximation is used to calculate heat conduction along magnetic field lines. The anisotropic pressure tensor provides a qualitatively new mechanism for transporting angular momentum in accretion flows (in addition to the Maxwell and Reynolds stresses). We estimate limits on the pressure anisotropy due to pitch angle scattering by kinetic instabilities. Such instabilities provide an effective ''collision'' rate in a collisionless plasma and lead to more MHD-like dynamics. We find that the MRI leads to efficient growth of the magnetic field in a collisionless plasma, with saturation amplitudes comparable to those in MHD. In the saturated state, the anisotropic stress is comparable to the Maxwell stress, implying that the rate of angular momentum transport may be moderately enhanced in a collisionless plasma

  20. Biological transportation networks: Modeling and simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Albi, Giacomo

    2015-09-15

    We present a model for biological network formation originally introduced by Cai and Hu [Adaptation and optimization of biological transport networks, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 138701]. The modeling of fluid transportation (e.g., leaf venation and angiogenesis) and ion transportation networks (e.g., neural networks) is explained in detail and basic analytical features like the gradient flow structure of the fluid transportation network model and the impact of the model parameters on the geometry and topology of network formation are analyzed. We also present a numerical finite-element based discretization scheme and discuss sample cases of network formation simulations.

  1. Transport of plasma impurities and the role of the plasma edge layers for the hot plasma production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drawin, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    The first problem of impurity transport is removal of alpha particles from the interior outward. The second problem is the control of impurities produced in the plasma-wall interaction. Finally there is the problem of using injected impurities for assessment of transport coefficients. The influence of impurity radiation on the power balance of a DT plasma is considered. Limiters and divertors as impurity sources are mentioned and transport equations for impurities are given. As an example iron impurities transport in a hydrogen plasma is considered. The role of the edge layer is emphasized. Finally requirements for plasma diagnostics are stated. 50 refs., 10 figs. (qui)

  2. Transient heat transport studies in JET conventional and advanced tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P.; Coffey, I.; Dux, R.

    2003-01-01

    Transient transport studies are a valuable complement to steady-state analysis for the understanding of transport mechanisms and the validation of physics-based transport models. This paper presents results from transient heat transport experiments in JET and their modelling. Edge cold pulses and modulation of ICRH (in mode conversion scheme) have been used to provide detectable electron and ion temperature perturbations. The experiments have been performed in conventional L-mode plasmas or in Advanced Tokamak regimes, in the presence of an Internal Transport Barrier (ITB). In conventional plasmas, the issues of stiffness and non-locality have been addressed. Cold pulse propagation in ITB plasmas has provided useful insight into the physics of ITB formation. The use of edge perturbations for ITB triggering has been explored. Modelling of the experimental results has been performed using both empirical models and physics-based models. Results of cold pulse experiments in ITBs have also been compared with turbulence simulations. (author)

  3. ADVECTIVE TRANSPORT OF INTERSTELLAR PLASMA INTO THE HELIOSPHERE ACROSS THE RECONNECTING HELIOPAUSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strumik, M.; Grzedzielski, S.; Czechowski, A.; Macek, W. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss results of magnetohydrodynamical model simulations of plasma dynamics in the proximity of the heliopause (HP). The model is shown to fit details of the magnetic field variations observed by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during the transition from the heliosphere to the local interstellar medium (LISM). We propose an interpretation of magnetic field structures observed by Voyager 1 in terms of fine-scale physical processes. Our simulations reveal an effective transport mechanism of relatively dense LISM plasma across the reconnecting HP into the heliosphere. The mechanism is associated with annihilation of magnetic sectors in the heliospheric plasma near the HP

  4. Quasilinear Carbon Transport In An Impurity Hole Plasma In LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, David R. [PPPL; Tanaka, K. [NIFS; Nunami, M. [NIFS; Watanabe, T-H. [Nagoya University; Sugama, H. [NIFS; Yoshinuma, M. [NIFS; Suzuki, Y. [NIFS; Goto, M. [NIFS; Morita, S. [NIFS; Wieland, B. [NIFS; Yamada, I. [NIFS; Yashura, R. [NIFS; Akiyama, T. [NIFS; Pablant, Novimir A. [PPPL

    2014-04-01

    Comprehensive electrostatic gyrokinetic linear stability calculations for ion-scale microinstabilities in an LHD plasma with an ion-ITB and carbon "impurity hole" are used to make quasilinear estimates of particle flux to explore whether microturbulence can explain the observed outward carbon fluxes that flow "up" the impurity density gradient. The ion temperature is not stationary in the ion-ITB phase of the simulated discharge, during which the core carbon density decreases continuously. To fully sample these varying conditions the calculations are carried out at three radial locations and four times. The plasma parameter inputs are based on experimentally measured profiles of electron and ion temperature, as well as electron and carbon density. The spectroscopic line-average ratio of hydrogen and helium densities is used to set the density of these species. Three ion species (H,He,C) and the electrons are treated kinetically, including collisions. Electron instability drive does enhance the growth rate significantly, but the most unstable modes have characteristics of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in all cases. As the carbon density gradient is scanned between the measured value and zero, the quasilinear carbon flux is invariably inward when the carbon density profile is hollow, so turbulent transport due to the instabilities considered here does not explain the observed outward flux of impurities in impurity hole plasmas. The stiffness of the quasilinear ion heat flux is found to be 1.7-2.3, which is lower than several estimates in tokamaks.

  5. Theory of anomalous transport in toroidal helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.; Fukuyama, A.

    1992-03-01

    Theoretical model of the anomalous transport in Torsatron/Heliotron plasmas is developed, based on the current-diffusive interchange instability which is destabilized due to the averaged magnetic hill near edge. Analytic formula of transport coefficient is derived. This model explains the high edge transport, the power degradation and energy confinement scaling law and the enhanced heat-pulse thermal conduction. (author)

  6. Simulation of plasma double-layer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovsky, J.E.; Joyce, G.

    1982-01-01

    Electrostatic plasma double layers are numerically simulated by means of a magnetized 2 1/2-dimensional particle-in-cell method. The investigation of planar double layers indicates that these one-dimensional potential structures are susceptible to periodic disruption by instabilities in the low-potential plasmas. Only a slight increase in the double-layer thickness with an increase in its obliqueness to the magnetic field is observed. Weak magnetization results in the double-layer electric-field alignment of accelerated particles and strong magnetization results in their magnetic-field alignment. The numerial simulations of spatially periodic two-dimensional double layers also exhibit cyclical instability. A morphological invariance in two-dimensional double layers with respect to the degree of magnetization implies that the potential structures scale with Debye lengths rather than with gyroradii. Electron-beam excited electrostatic electron-cyclotron waves and (ion-beam driven) solitary waves are present in the plasmas adjacent to the double layers

  7. Simulation of dust voids in complex plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedheer, W. J.; Land, V.

    2008-12-01

    In dusty radio-frequency (RF) discharges under micro-gravity conditions often a void is observed, a dust free region in the discharge center. This void is generated by the drag of the positive ions pulled out of the discharge by the electric field. We have developed a hydrodynamic model for dusty RF discharges in argon to study the behaviour of the void and the interaction between the dust and the plasma background. The model is based on a recently developed theory for the ion drag force and the charging of the dust. With this model, we studied the plasma inside the void and obtained an understanding of the way it is sustained by heat generated in the surrounding dust cloud. When this heating mechanism is suppressed by lowering the RF power, the plasma density inside the void decreases, even below the level where the void collapses, as was recently shown in experiments on board the International Space Station. In this paper we present results of simulations of this collapse. At reduced power levels the collapsed central cloud behaves as an electronegative plasma with corresponding low time-averaged electric fields. This enables the creation of relatively homogeneous Yukawa balls, containing more than 100 000 particles. On earth, thermophoresis can be used to balance gravity and obtain similar dust distributions.

  8. Transport of high fluxes of hydrogen plasma in a linear plasma generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijvers, W.A.J.; Al, R.S.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Goedheer, W.J.; Groot, de B.; Kleyn, A.W.; Meiden, van der H.J.; Peppel, van de R.J.E.; Schram, D.C.; Shumack, A.E.; Westerhout, J.; Rooij, van G.J.; Schmidt, J.; Simek, M.; Pekarek, S.; Prukner, V.

    2007-01-01

    A study was made to quantify the losses during the convective hydrogen plasma transport in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI due to volume recombination. A transport efficiency of 35% was achieved at neutral background pressures below ~7 Pa in a magnetic field of 1.2 T. This efficiency decreased

  9. Effect of Internal and Edge Transport Barriers in ITER Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianroj, Y.; Onjun, T.; Suwanna, S.; Picha, R.; Poolyarat, N.

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Predictive simulations of ITER with the presence of both an edge transport barrier (ETB) and an internal transport barrier (ITB) are carried out using the BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the boundary is taken at the top of the pedestal, where the pedestal values are described using the theory-based pedestal models. These pedestal temperature models are based on three different pedestal width scalings: magnetic and flow shear stabilization (δ α ρ ζ 2 ), flow shear stabilization (δ α Root ρ Rq), and normalized poloidal pressure (δ α R Root βθ, ped). The pedestal width scalings are combined with a pedestal pressure gradient scaling based on ballooning mode limit to predict the pedestal temperature. A version of the semi-empirical Mixed Bohm/gyro Bohm (Mixed B/gB) core transport model that includes ITB effects is used to compute the evolution of plasma profiles and plasma performance, which defined by Fusion Q factor. The results from the cases excluding and including ITB are compared. The preliminary results show the Q value resulted from ITB-excluded simulation is less than the one with ITB included

  10. Axisymmetric MHD simulation of ITB crash and following disruption dynamics of Tokamak plasmas with high bootstrap current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takei, Nahoko; Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Tsuji-Iio, Shunji; Shimada, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Yukiharu; Kawano, Yasunori; Ozeki, Takahisa; Tobita, Kenji; Sugihara, Masayoshi

    2004-01-01

    Axisymmetric MHD simulation using the Tokamak Simulation Code demonstrated detailed disruption dynamics triggered by a crash of internal transport barrier in high bootstrap current, high β, reversed shear plasmas. Self-consistent time-evolutions of ohmic current bootstrap current and induced loop voltage profiles inside the disrupting plasma were shown from a view point of disruption characterization and mitigation. In contrast with positive shear plasmas, a particular feature of high bootstrap current reversed shear plasma disruption was computed to be a significant change of plasma current profile, which is normally caused due to resistive diffusion of the electric field induced by the crash of internal transport barrier in a region wider than the internal transport barrier. Discussion based on the simulation results was made on the fastest record of the plasma current quench observed in JT-60U reversed shear plasma disruptions. (author)

  11. Chaos in plasma simulation and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, C.; Sprott, J.C.

    1993-09-01

    We investigate the possibility that chaos and simple determinism are governing the dynamics of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas using data from both numerical simulations and experiment. A large repertoire of nonlinear analysis techniques is used to identify low dimensional chaos. These tools include phase portraits and Poincard sections, correlation dimension, the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents and short term predictability. In addition, nonlinear noise reduction techniques are applied to the experimental data in an attempt to extract any underlying deterministic dynamics. Two model systems are used to simulate the plasma dynamics. These are -the DEBS code, which models global RFP dynamics, and the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM) model, which models drift wave turbulence. Data from both simulations show strong indications of low,dimensional chaos and simple determinism. Experimental data were obtained from the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP and consist of a wide array of both global and local diagnostic signals. None of the signals shows any indication of low dimensional chaos or other simple determinism. Moreover, most of the analysis tools indicate the experimental system is very high dimensional with properties similar to noise. Nonlinear noise reduction is unsuccessful at extracting an underlying deterministic system

  12. Chaos in plasma simulation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, C. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Fusion Research Center; Newman, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sprott, J.C. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Plasma Physics Research

    1993-09-01

    We investigate the possibility that chaos and simple determinism are governing the dynamics of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas using data from both numerical simulations and experiment. A large repertoire of nonlinear analysis techniques is used to identify low dimensional chaos. These tools include phase portraits and Poincard sections, correlation dimension, the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents and short term predictability. In addition, nonlinear noise reduction techniques are applied to the experimental data in an attempt to extract any underlying deterministic dynamics. Two model systems are used to simulate the plasma dynamics. These are -the DEBS code, which models global RFP dynamics, and the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM) model, which models drift wave turbulence. Data from both simulations show strong indications of low,dimensional chaos and simple determinism. Experimental data were obtained from the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP and consist of a wide array of both global and local diagnostic signals. None of the signals shows any indication of low dimensional chaos or other simple determinism. Moreover, most of the analysis tools indicate the experimental system is very high dimensional with properties similar to noise. Nonlinear noise reduction is unsuccessful at extracting an underlying deterministic system.

  13. Collisional particle-in-cell modeling for energy transport accompanied by atomic processes in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, R.; Beg, F. N. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Leblanc, P.; Sentoku, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Wei, M. S. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Fully relativistic collisional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code, PICLS, has been developed to study extreme energy density conditions produced in intense laser-solid interaction. Recent extensions to PICLS, such as the implementation of dynamic ionization, binary collisions in a partially ionized plasma, and radiative losses, enhance the efficacy of simulating intense laser plasma interaction and subsequent energy transport in resistive media. Different ionization models are introduced and benchmarked against each other to check the suitability of the model. The atomic physics models are critical to determine the energy deposition and transport in dense plasmas, especially when they consist of high Z (atomic number) materials. Finally we demonstrate the electron transport simulations to show the importance of target material on fast electron dynamics.

  14. Spectral methods in numerical plasma simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Hansen, F.R.; Huld, T.; Knorr, G.; Lynov, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction is given to the use of spectral methods in numerical plasma simulation. As examples of the use of spectral methods, solutions to the two-dimensional Euler equations in both a simple, doubly periodic region, and on an annulus will be shown. In the first case, the solution is expanded in a two-dimensional Fourier series, while a Chebyshev-Fourier expansion is employed in the second case. A new, efficient algorithm for the solution of Poisson's equation on an annulus is introduced. Problems connected to aliasing and to short wavelength noise generated by gradient steepening are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Particle-transport simulation with the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Cashwell, E.D.

    1975-01-01

    Attention is focused on the application of the Monte Carlo method to particle transport problems, with emphasis on neutron and photon transport. Topics covered include sampling methods, mathematical prescriptions for simulating particle transport, mechanics of simulating particle transport, neutron transport, and photon transport. A literature survey of 204 references is included. (GMT)

  16. Simulating the Interactions Among Land Use, Transportation ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In most transportation studies, computer models that forecast travel behavior statistics for a future year use static projections of the spatial distribution of future population and employment growth as inputs. As a result, they are unable to account for the temporally dynamic and non-linear interactions among transportation, land use, and socioeconomic systems. System dynamics (SD) provides a common framework for modeling the complex interactions among transportation and other related systems. This study uses a SD model to simulate the cascading impacts of a proposed light rail transit (LRT) system in central North Carolina, USA. The Durham-Orange Light Rail Project (D-O LRP) SD model incorporates relationships among the land use, transportation, and economy sectors to simulate the complex feedbacks that give rise to the travel behavior changes forecasted by the region’s transportation model. This paper demonstrates the sensitivity of changes in travel behavior to the proposed LRT system and the assumptions that went into the transportation modeling, and compares those results to the impacts of an alternative fare-free transit system. SD models such as the D-O LRP SD model can complement transportation studies by providing valuable insight into the interdependent community systems that collectively contribute to travel behavior changes. Presented at the 35th International Conference of the System Dynamics Society in Cambridge, MA, July 18th, 2017

  17. The Science of Transportation Analysis and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleibe, John

    2010-03-01

    Transportation Science focuses on methods developed to model and analyze the interaction between human behavior and transportation systems. From the human behavioral, or demand, perspective, we are interested in how person and households organize their activities across space and time, with travel viewed as an enabling activity. We have a particular interest in how to model the range of responses to public policy and transportation system changes, which leads to the consideration of both short- and long-term decision-making, interpersonal dependencies, and non-transportation-related opportunities and constraints, including household budgets, land use systems and economic systems. This has led to the development of complex structural econometric modeling systems as well as agent-based simulations. From the transportation systems, or supply, perspective we are interested in the level of service provide by transportation facilities, be it auto, transit or multi-modal systems. This has led to the development of network models and equilibrium concepts as well as hybrid simulation systems based on concepts borrowed from physics, such as fluid flow models, and cellular automata-type models. In this presentation, we review a representative sample of these methods and their use in transportation planning and public policy analysis.

  18. Kinetic simulations in plasmas: a general view and some applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Maria Virginia [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma]. E-mail: alves@plasma.inpe.br

    1999-07-01

    In these lecture notes we talk about kinetic simulations plasma physics. We present a general view of the different approach that can be given to kinetic plasmas depending on the physical problem to be investigated. Some applications of kinetic simulations to space plasma phenomena and Pierce electrodes are introduced. (author)

  19. Kinetic simulations in plasmas: a general view and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Maria Virginia

    1999-01-01

    In these lecture notes we talk about kinetic simulations plasma physics. We present a general view of the different approach that can be given to kinetic plasmas depending on the physical problem to be investigated. Some applications of kinetic simulations to space plasma phenomena and Pierce electrodes are introduced. (author)

  20. Theoretical modeling of transport barriers in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Itoh, K.; Ohyabu, N.

    2008-10-01

    A unified transport modelling to explain electron Internal Transport Barriers (e-ITB) in helical plasmas and Internal Diffusion Barriers (IDB) observed in Large Helical Device (LHD) is proposed. The e-ITB can be predicted with the effect of zonal flows to obtain the e-ITB in the low collisional regime when the radial variation of the particle anomalous diffusivity is included. Transport analysis in this article can newly show that the particle fuelling induces the IDB formation when this unified transport modelling is used in the high collisional regime. The density limit for the IDB in helical plasmas is also examined including the effect of the radiation loss. (author)

  1. Simulating charge transport in flexible systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Clark

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Systems in which movements occur on two significantly different time domains, such as organic electronic components with flexible molecules, require different simulation techniques for the two time scales. In the case of molecular electronics, charge transport is complicated by the several different mechanisms (and theoretical models that apply in different cases. We cannot yet combine time scales of molecular and electronic movement in simulations of real systems. This review describes our progress towards this goal.

  2. Internal transport barrier simulation and analysis in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GarcIa, J; Yamazaki, K; Dies, J; Izquierdo, J

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the electron heat transport channel and to clarify the electron thermal diffusivity dependence with some plasma parameters in large helical device (LHD) shots with electron internal transport barrier (eITB), some transport models have been added to the TOTAL code. These models can be divided into two categories: GyroBohm-like drift wave model and other drift wave models with shorter wavelength. A new model consisting of a mix of both models has also been derived for this study as a good candidate for explaining the eITB. The effect of anomalous transport reduction by the electric field shear has been introduced by means of the factor (1 + (τf ExB ) γ ) -1 . This factor has been previously checked as a good candidate to suppress anomalous transport in tokamak plasmas. Results show that a combination of the GyroBohm-like model and the drift wave model with shorter wavelength together with the electric field shear can explain the transition between non-eITB and eITB shots. The central temperature dependence with density is also well simulated. In the case of GyroBohm models, they also fit temperature profiles, although central temperature dependence with density is higher

  3. Modelling of ion thermal transport in ergodic region of collisionless toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ryutaro; Nunami, Masanori; Satake, Shinsuke; Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi; Takamaru, Hisanori; Okamoto, Masao

    2009-09-01

    In recent tokamak experiments it has been found that so-called diffusion theory based on the 'diffusion of magnetic field lines' overestimates the radial energy transport in the ergodic region of the collisionless plasma affected by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), though the RMPs induce chaotic behavior of the magnetic field lines. The result implies that the modelling of the transport should be reconsidered for low collisionality cases. A computer simulation study of transport in the ergodic region is required for understanding fundamental properties of collisionless ergodized-plasmas, estimating the transport coefficients, and reconstructing the modelling of the transport. In this paper, we report the simulation study of thermal transport in the ergodic region under the assumption of neglecting effects of an electric field, impurities and neutrals. Because of the simulations neglecting interactions with different particle-species and saving the computational time, we treat ions (protons) in our numerical-study of the transport. We find that the thermal diffusivity in the ergodic region is extremely small compared to the one predicted by the theory of field-line diffusion and that the diffusivity depends on both the collision frequency and the strength of RMPs even for the collisionless ergodized-plasma. (author)

  4. Collisionality dependent transport in TCV SOL plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Odd Erik; Pitts, R.A.; Horacek, J.

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented from probe measurements in the low field side scrape-off layer (SOL) region of TCV during plasma current scan experiments. It is shown that with decreasing plasma current the radial particle density profile becomes broader and the fluctuation levels and turbulence driven...... radial particle flux increase. In the far SOL the fluctuations exhibit a high degree of statistical similarity and the particle density and flux at the wall radius scale inversely with the plasma current. Together with previous TCV density scan experiments, this indicates that plasma fluctuations...

  5. TFTR/JET INTOR workshop on plasma transport tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of a Workshop on transport models for prediction and analysis of tokamak plasma confinement. Summaries of papers on theory, predictive modeling, and data analysis are included

  6. Plasma flow measurements in a simulated low earth orbit plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, S.B.; Mccoy, J.E.; Carruth, M.R. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The employment of large, higher power solar arrays for space operation has been considered, taking into account a utilization of high operating voltages. In connection with the consideration of such arrays, attention must be given to the fact that the ambient environment of space contains a tenuous low energy plasma which can interact with the high voltage array causing power 'leakage' and arcing. An investigation has been conducted with the aim to simulate the behavior of such an array in low-earth-orbit (LEO). During the experiments, local concentrations of the 'leakage' current were observed when the panel was at a high voltage. These concentrations could overload or damage a small area of cells in a large string. It was hypothesized that this effect was produced by electrostatic focusing of the particles by the sheath fields. To verify this experimentally, an end-effect Langmuir probe was employed. The obtained results are discussed

  7. A collision model in plasma particle simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yanyun; Chang Wenwei; Yin Yan; Yue Zongwu; Cao Lihua; Liu Daqing

    2000-01-01

    In order to offset the collisional effects reduced by using finite-size particles, β particle clouds are used in particle simulation codes (β is the ratio of charge or mass of modeling particles to real ones). The method of impulse approximation (strait line orbit approximation) is used to analyze the scattering cross section of β particle clouds plasmas. The authors can obtain the relation of the value of a and β and scattering cross section (a is the radius of β particle cloud). By using this relation the authors can determine the value of a and β so that the collisional effects of the modeling system is correspondent with the real one. The authors can also adjust the values of a and β so that the authors can enhance or reduce the collisional effects fictitiously. The results of simulation are in good agreement with the theoretical ones

  8. Phenomenological studies of electron-beam transport in wire-plasma channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Beezhold, W.

    1980-01-01

    Multiple electron-beam transport in air through plasma channels is an important method for delivering many intense beams to a bremsstrahlung converter system. This paper reports work intended to optimize this transport technique with emphasis on transport through curved channels and on transport efficiencies. Curved-channel transport allows accelerators such as Sandia's PROTO II and PBFA I facilities to be used as flash x-ray sources for weapon effects simulation without reconfiguring the diodes or developing advanced converters. The formation mechanisms of wire-initiated plasma channels in air were examined and the subsequent transport efficiencies of relativistic electron beams through various-length straight and curved plasma channels were determined. Electron transport efficiency through a channel was measured to be 80 to 100% of a zero length channel for 40 cm long straight channels and for curved channels which re-directed the electron beam through an angle of 90 0 . Studies of simultaneous e-beam transport along two curved channels closely spaced at the converter showed that transport efficiency remained at 80 to 100%. However, it was observed that the two e-beams were displaced towards each other. Transport efficiency was observed to depend only weakly on parameters such as wire material, wire length and shape, diode anode aperture, e-beam injection time, and wire-channel applied voltage. For off-center injection conditions the electron beam strongly perturbed the plasma channel in periodic or regularly spaced patterns even though the total energy lost by the electron beam remained small. Plasma-channel transport, when all experimental parameters have been optimized for maximum transport efficiency, is a workable method for directing electron beams to a converter target

  9. Theory-based transport simulation of tokamaks: density scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanem, E.S.; Kinsey, J.; Singer, C.; Bateman, G.

    1992-01-01

    There has been a sizeable amount of work in the past few years using theoretically based flux-surface-average transport models to simulate various types of experimental tokamak data. Here we report two such studies, concentrating on the response of the plasma to variation of the line averaged electron density. The first study reported here uses a transport model described by Ghanem et al. to examine the response of global energy confinement time in ohmically heated discharges. The second study reported here uses a closely related and more recent transport model described by Bateman to examine the response of temperature profiles to changes in line-average density in neutral-beam-heated discharges. Work on developing a common theoretical model for these and other scaling experiments is in progress. (author) 5 refs., 2 figs

  10. Simulations of Electron Transport in Laser Hot Spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Valeo, E.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of electron transport are carried out by solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the diffusive approximation. The system of a single laser hot spot, with open boundary conditions, is systematically studied by performing a scan over a wide range of the two relevant parameters: (1) Ratio of the stopping length over the width of the hot spot. (2) Relative importance of the heating through inverse Bremsstrahlung compared to the thermalization through self-collisions. As for uniform illumination [J.P. Matte et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30 (1988) 1665], the bulk of the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) present a super-Gaussian dependence. However, as a result of spatial transport, the tails are observed to be well represented by a Maxwellian. A similar dependence of the distributions is also found for multiple hot spot systems. For its relevance with respect to stimulated Raman scattering, the linear Landau damping of the electron plasma wave is estimated for such VD Fs. Finally, the nonlinear Fokker-Planck simulations of the single laser hot spot system are also compared to the results obtained with the linear non-local hydrodynamic approach [A.V. Brantov et al., Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 2742], thus providing a quantitative limit to the latter method: The hydrodynamic approach presents more than 10% inaccuracy in the presence of temperature variations of the order delta T/T greater than or equal to 1%, and similar levels of deformation of the Gaussian shape of the Maxwellian background

  11. Plasma transport studies using transient techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.C.; Brower, D.L.; Efthimion, P.

    1991-01-01

    Selected topics from the Transient Transport sessions of the Transport Task Force Workshop, held February 19-23, 1990, in Hilton Head, South Carolina are summarized. Presentations on sawtooth propagation, ECH modulation, particle modulation, and H-mode transitions are included. The research results presented indicated a growing theoretical understanding and experimental sophistication in the application of transient techniques to transport studies. (Author)

  12. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. A comprehensive study of electrostatic turbulence and transport in the laboratory basic plasma device TORPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furno, I.; Fasoli, A.; Avino, F.; Bovet, A.; Gustafson, K.; Iraji, D.; Labit, B.; Loizu, J.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2012-04-01

    TORPEX is a toroidal device located at the CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. In TORPEX, a vertical magnetic field superposed on a toroidal field creates helicoidal field lines with both ends terminating on the torus vessel. The turbulence driven by magnetic curvature and plasma gradients causes plasma transport in the radial direction while at the same time plasma is progressively lost along the field lines. The relatively simple magnetic geometry and diagnostic access of the TORPEX configuration facilitate the experimental study of low frequency instabilities and related turbulent transport, and make an accurate comparison between simulations and experiments possible. We first present a detailed investigation of electrostatic interchange turbulence, associated structures and their effect on plasma using high-resolution diagnostics of plasma parameters and wave fields throughout the whole device cross-section, fluid models and numerical simulations. Interchange modes nonlinearly develop blobs, radially propagating filaments of enhanced plasma pressure. Blob velocities and sizes are obtained from probe measurements using pattern recognition and are described by an analytical expression that includes ion polarization currents, parallel sheath currents and ion-neutral collisions. Then, we describe recent advances of a non-perturbative Li 6+ miniaturized ion source and a detector for the investigation of the interaction between supra thermal ions and interchange-driven turbulence. We present first measurements of the spatial and energy space distribution of the fast ion beam in different plasma scenarios, in which the plasma turbulence is fully characterized. The experiments are interpreted using two-dimensional fluid simulations describing the low-frequency interchange turbulence, taking into account the plasma source and plasma losses at the torus vessel. By treating fast ions as test particles, we integrate their equations of motion in the simulated electromagnetic fields, and

  14. Plasma Transport at the Magnetospheric Flank Boundary. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, Antonius

    2012-01-01

    Progress is highlighted in these areas: 1. Model of magnetic reconnection induced by three-dimensional Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes at the magnetospheric flank boundary; 2. Quantitative evaluation of mass transport from the magnetosheath onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 3. Comparison of mass transfer by cusp reconnection and Flank Kelvin Helmholtz modes; 4. Entropy constraint and plasma transport in the magnetotail - a new mechanism for current sheet thinning; 5. Test particle model for mass transport onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 6. Influence of density asymmetry and magnetic shear on (a) the linear and nonlinear growth of 3D Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes, and (b) three-dimensional KH mediated mass transport; 7. Examination of entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail; 8. Entropy change and plasma transport by KH mediated reconnection - mixing and heating of plasma; 9. Entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail - tail reconnection; and, 10. Wave coupling at the magnetospheric boundary and generation of kinetic Alfven waves

  15. Dynamic transport study of the plasmas with transport improvement in LHD and JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.; Sakamoto, R.; Tanaka, K.; Funaba, H.; Kubo, S.; Yoshinuma, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Takeiri, Y.; Ikeda, K.; Michael, C.; Tokuzawa, T.; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Takenaga, Hidenobu; Isayama, Akihiko; Ide, Shunsuke; Fujita, Takaaki

    2006-10-01

    A transport analysis during the transient phase of heating (a dynamic transport study) applied to the plasma with internal transport barriers (ITBs) in the Large Helical Device (LHD) heliotron and JT-60U tokamak is described. In the dynamic transport study 1) a slow transition between two transport branches is observed, 2) the time of the transition from the L-mode plasma to the ITB plasma is clearly determined by the onset of the flattening of the temperature profile in the core region and 3) a spontaneous phase transition from a weak, wide ITB to a strong, narrow ITB and its back-transition are observed. The flattening of the core region of the ITB transition and the back-transition between a wide ITB and a narrow ITB suggest the strong interaction of turbulent transport in space, where turbulence suppression at certain locations in the plasma causes the enhancement of turbulence and thermal diffusivity nearby. (author)

  16. Plasma flow and transport on the tokamak ISTTOK boundary plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, H.; Silva, C.; Goncalves, B.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.

    2011-01-01

    The ISTTOK boundary plasma velocity near the outer midplane is measured on the parallel and perpendicular directions in four different configurations by reversing independently the toroidal magnetic field and the plasma current directions. The parallel flow is found to not depend significantly on both the toroidal magnetic field and plasma current directions, being always directed towards the nearest limiter in the scrape-off layer. On the contrary, the perpendicular flow is found to follow the E r x B drift direction. The poloidal velocity has also been derived from the correlation of floating potential signals measured on poloidally separated probes and a good agreement with the value derived with the Gundestrup probe is found. Finally, the dynamical interplay between parallel momentum and turbulent particle flux has been investigated and a clear dynamical coupling between these quantities is found in the region inside the limiter.

  17. Universal Probability Distribution Function for Bursty Transport in Plasma Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, I.; Benkadda, S.; Garbet, X.; Ropokis, G.; Hizanidis, K.; Castillo-Negrete, D. del

    2009-01-01

    Bursty transport phenomena associated with convective motion present universal statistical characteristics among different physical systems. In this Letter, a stochastic univariate model and the associated probability distribution function for the description of bursty transport in plasma turbulence is presented. The proposed stochastic process recovers the universal distribution of density fluctuations observed in plasma edge of several magnetic confinement devices and the remarkable scaling between their skewness S and kurtosis K. Similar statistical characteristics of variabilities have been also observed in other physical systems that are characterized by convection such as the x-ray fluctuations emitted by the Cygnus X-1 accretion disc plasmas and the sea surface temperature fluctuations.

  18. Kinetic transport in a magnetically confined and flux-constrained fusion plasma; Transport cinetique dans un plasma de fusion magnetique a flux force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmet, G

    2007-11-15

    This work deals with the kinetic transport in a fusion plasma magnetically confined and flux-constrained. The author proposes a new interpretation of the dynamics of zonal flows. The model that has been studied is a gyrokinetic model reduced to the transport of trapped ions. The inter-change stability that is generated allows the study of the kinetic transport of trapped ions. This model has a threshold instability and can be simulated over a few tens confining time for either thermal bath constraint or flux constraint. For thermal baths constraint, the simulation shows a metastable state where zonal flows are prevailing while turbulence is non-existent. In the case of a flux-constraint, zonal flows appear and relax by exchanging energy with system's kinetic energy and turbulence energy. The competition between zonal flows and turbulence can be then simulated by a predator-prey model. 2 regimes can be featured out: an improved confining regime where zonal flows dominate transport and a turbulent regime where zonal flows and turbulent transport are of the same magnitude order. We show that flux as well as the Reynolds tensor play an important role in the dynamics of the zonal flows and that the gyrokinetic description is relevant for all plasma regions. (A.C.)

  19. Consequences of nonlinear heat transport laws on expected plasma profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, K.

    1987-03-01

    The expected variation of plasma pressure profiles against changes in power deposition is investigated by using a simple linear heat transport law as well as a quadratic one. Applying the quadratic transport law it can be shown that the stiffening of the resulting profiles is sufficient to understand the experimentally measured phenomenon of 'profile consistence' without further assumptions of nonlocal effects. (orig.) [de

  20. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  1. Interaction between sheared flows and turbulent transport in magnetized fusion-grade plasmas; Interaction entre ecoulements cisailles et transport turbulent dans les plasmas de fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leconte, M.

    2008-11-15

    The H confinement regime is set when the heating power reaches a threshold value P{sub c} and is linked to the formation of a transport barrier in the edge region of the plasma. Such a barrier is characterized by a high pressure gradient and is submitted to ELM (edge localized mode) instabilities. ELM instabilities trigger violent quasi-periodical ejections of matter and heat that induce quasi-periodical relaxations of the transport barrier called relaxation oscillations. In this work we studied the interaction between sheared flows and turbulence in fusion plasmas. In particular, we studied the complex dynamics of a transport barrier and we show through a simulation that resonant magnetic perturbations could control relaxation oscillations without a significant loss of confinement

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation study of plasma jets and plasma-surface contact in coaxial plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2017-06-01

    Recent experiments by Loebner et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 44, 1534 (2016)] studied the effect of a hypervelocity jet emanating from a coaxial plasma accelerator incident on target surfaces in an effort to mimic the transient loading created during edge localized mode disruption events in fusion plasmas. In this paper, we present a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model to simulate plasma jet formation and plasma-surface contact in this coaxial plasma accelerator experiment. The MHD system of equations is spatially discretized using a cell-centered finite volume formulation. The temporal discretization is performed using a fully implicit backward Euler scheme and the resultant stiff system of nonlinear equations is solved using the Newton method. The numerical model is employed to obtain some key insights into the physical processes responsible for the generation of extreme stagnation conditions on the target surfaces. Simulations of the plume (without the target plate) are performed to isolate and study phenomena such as the magnetic pinch effect that is responsible for launching pressure pulses into the jet free stream. The simulations also yield insights into the incipient conditions responsible for producing the pinch, such as the formation of conductive channels. The jet-target impact studies indicate the existence of two distinct stages involved in the plasma-surface interaction. A fast transient stage characterized by a thin normal shock transitions into a pseudo-steady stage that exhibits an extended oblique shock structure. A quadratic scaling of the pinch and stagnation conditions with the total current discharged between the electrodes is in qualitative agreement with the results obtained in the experiments. This also illustrates the dominant contribution of the magnetic pressure term in determining the magnitude of the quantities of interest.

  3. B2.5-Eunomia simulations of Pilot-PSI plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieggers, R.C.; Coster, D.P.; Groen, P.W.C.; Blank, H.J. de; Goedheer, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    The B2.5-Eunomia code is used to simulate the plasma and neutral species in and around a Pilot-PSI plasma beam. B2.5, part of the SOLPS5.0 code package, is a multi-fluid plasma code for the scrape-off layer. Eunomia is a newly developed non-linear Monte Carlo transport code that solves the neutral equilibrium, given a background plasma. Eunomia is developed to simulate the relevant neutral species in Pilot-PSI and Magnum-PSI, linear devices that study plasma surface interactions in conditions expected in the ITER divertor. Results show the influence of the neutral species on the Pilot-PSI plasma beam. We show that a fluid description for the neutrals is not sufficient and Eunomia is needed to describe Pilot-PSI. The treatment of individual vibrational states of molecular hydrogen as separate species is crucial to match the experiment

  4. Time dependent plasma viscosity and relation between neoclassical transport and turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaing, K.C.

    2005-01-01

    Time dependent plasma viscosities for asymmetric toroidal plasmas in various collisionality regimes are calculated. It is known that in the symmetric limit the time dependent plasma viscosities accurately describe plasma flow damping rate. Thus, time dependent plasma viscosities are important in modeling the radial electric field of the zonal flow. From the momentum balance equation, it is shown that, at the steady state, the balance of the viscosity force and the momentum source determines the radial electric field of the zonal flow. Thus, for a fixed source, the smaller the viscous force is, the larger the value of the radial electric field is, which in turn suppresses the turbulence fluctuations more and improves turbulence transport. However, the smaller the viscous force also implies the smaller the neoclassical transport fluxes based on the neoclassical flux-force relationship. We thus show that when neoclassical transport fluxes are improved so are the turbulent fluxes in toroidal plasmas. (author)

  5. Numerical studies of transport processes in Tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spineanu, F.; Vlad, M.

    1984-09-01

    The paper contains the summary of a set of studies of the transport processes in tokamak plasma, performed with a one-dimensional computer code. The various transport models (which are implemented by the expressions of the transport coefficients) are presented in connection with the regimes of the dynamical development of the discharge. Results of studies concerning the skin effect and the large scale MHD instabilities are also included

  6. Momentum Injection in Tokamak Plasmas and Transitions to Reduced Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, F. I.; Highcock, E. G.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Barnes, M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of momentum injection on the temperature gradient in tokamak plasmas is studied. A plausible scenario for transitions to reduced transport regimes is proposed. The transition happens when there is sufficient momentum input so that the velocity shear can suppress or reduce the turbulence. However, it is possible to drive too much velocity shear and rekindle the turbulent transport. The optimal level of momentum injection is determined. The reduction in transport is maximized in the regions of low or zero magnetic shear.

  7. Theory of anomalous transport in H-mode plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, S.; Itoh, K.; Fukuyama, A.; Yagi, M.

    1993-05-01

    Theory of the anomalous transport is developed, and the unified formula for the L- and H-mode plasmas is presented. The self-sustained ballooning-mode turbulence is solved in the presence of the inhomogeneous radial electric field, E r . Reductions in transport coefficients and the amplitude and decorrelation length of fluctuations due to E r ' are quantitatively analyzed. Combined with the E r -bifurcation model, the thickness of the transport barrier is simultaneously determined. (author)

  8. Transport and turbulence in a magnetized plasma (application to tokamak plasmas); Transport et turbulence dans un plasma magnetise (application aux plasmas de tokamaks)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y

    2004-03-01

    This document gathers the lectures made in the framework of a Ph.D level physics class dedicated to plasma physics. This course is made up of 3 parts : 1) collisions and transport, 2) transport and turbulence, and 3) study of a few exchange instabilities. More precisely the first part deals with the following issues: thermonuclear fusion, Coulomb collisions, particles trajectories in a tokamak, neo-classical transport in tokamaks, the bootstrap current, and ware pinch. The second part involves: particle transport in tokamaks, quasi-linear transport, resonance islands, resonance in tokamaks, from quasi to non-linear transport, and non-linear saturation of turbulence. The third part deals with: shift velocities in fluid theory, a model for inter-change instabilities, Rayleigh-Benard instability, Hasegawa-Wakatani model, and Hasegawa-Mima model. This document ends with a series of appendices dealing with: particle-wave interaction, determination of the curvature parameter G, Rossby waves.

  9. Transport in a toroidally confined pure electron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, S.M.; ONeil, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    O close-quote Neil and Smith [T.M. O close-quote Neil and R.A. Smith, Phys. Plasmas 1, 8 (1994)] have argued that a pure electron plasma can be confined stably in a toroidal magnetic field configuration. This paper shows that the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field of necessity causes slow cross-field transport. The transport mechanism is similar to magnetic pumping and may be understood by considering a single flux tube of plasma. As the flux tube of plasma undergoes poloidal ExB drift rotation about the center of the plasma, the length of the flux tube and the magnetic field strength within the flux tube oscillate, and this produces corresponding oscillations in T parallel and T perpendicular . The collisional relaxation of T parallel toward T perpendicular produces a slow dissipation of electrostatic energy into heat and a consequent expansion (cross-field transport) of the plasma. In the limit where the cross section of the plasma is nearly circular the radial particle flux is given by Γ r =1/2ν perpendicular,parallel T(r/ρ 0 ) 2 n/(-e∂Φ/∂r), where ν perpendicular,parallel is the collisional equipartition rate, ρ 0 is the major radius at the center of the plasma, and r is the minor radius measured from the center of the plasma. The transport flux is first calculated using this simple physical picture and then is calculated by solving the drift-kinetic Boltzmann equation. This latter calculation is not limited to a plasma with a circular cross section. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  10. Hierarchical modeling of plasma and transport phenomena in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, N.; Aggelopoulos, C. A.; Skouras, E. D.; Tsakiroglou, C. D.; Burganos, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    A novel dual-time hierarchical approach is developed to link the plasma process to macroscopic transport phenomena in the interior of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor that has been used for soil remediation (Aggelopoulos et al 2016 Chem. Eng. J. 301 353-61). The generation of active species by plasma reactions is simulated at the microseconds (µs) timescale, whereas convection and thermal conduction are simulated at the macroscopic (minutes) timescale. This hierarchical model is implemented in order to investigate the influence of the plasma DBD process on the transport and reaction mechanisms during remediation of polluted soil. In the microscopic model, the variables of interest include the plasma-induced reactive concentrations, while in the macroscopic approach, the temperature distribution, and the velocity field both inside the discharge gap and within the polluted soil material as well. For the latter model, the Navier-Stokes and Darcy Brinkman equations for the transport phenomena in the porous domain are solved numerically using a FEM software. The effective medium theory is employed to provide estimates of the effective time-evolving and three-phase transport properties in the soil sample. Model predictions considering the temporal evolution of the plasma remediation process are presented and compared with corresponding experimental data.

  11. Plasma thermal energy transport: theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppi, B.

    Experiments on the transport across the magnetic field of electron thermal energy are reviewed (Alcator, Frascati Torus). In order to explain the experimental results, a transport model is described that reconfirmed the need to have an expression for the local diffusion coefficient with a negative exponent of the electron temperature

  12. Streamlined Darwin simulation of nonneutral plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, D.W.; Boyd, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Efficient, new algorithms that require less formal manipulation than previous implementations have been formulated for the numerical solution of the Darwin model. These new procedures reduce the effort required to achieve some of the advantages that the Darwin model offers. Because the Courant--Friedrichs--Lewy stability limit for radiation modes is eliminated, the Darwin model has the advantage of a substantially larger time-step. Further, without radiation modes, simulation results are less sensitive to enhanced particle fluctation noise. We discuss methods for calculating the magnetic field that avoid formal vector decomposition and offer a new procedure for finding the inductive electric field. This procedure avoids vector decomposition of plasma source terms and circumvents some source gradient issues that slow convergence. As a consequence, the numerical effort required for each of the field time-steps is reduced, and more importantly, the need to specify several nonintuitive boundary conditions is eliminated. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc

  13. Plasma simulation studies using multilevel physics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y.; Tang, X.Z.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    The question of how to proceed toward ever more realistic plasma simulation studies using ever increasing computing power is addressed. The answer presented here is the M3D (Multilevel 3D) project, which has developed a code package with a hierarchy of physics levels that resolve increasingly complete subsets of phase-spaces and are thus increasingly more realistic. The rationale for the multilevel physics models is given. Each physics level is described and examples of its application are given. The existing physics levels are fluid models (3D configuration space), namely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluids; and hybrid models, namely gyrokinetic-energetic-particle/MHD (5D energetic particle phase-space), gyrokinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron (5D ion phase-space), and full-kinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron level (6D ion phase-space). Resolving electron phase-space (5D or 6D) remains a future project. Phase-space-fluid models are not used in favor of δf particle models. A practical and accurate nonlinear fluid closure for noncollisional plasmas seems not likely in the near future. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  14. Plasma simulation studies using multilevel physics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y.

    2000-01-01

    The question of how to proceed toward ever more realistic plasma simulation studies using ever increasing computing power is addressed. The answer presented here is the M3D (Multilevel 3D) project, which has developed a code package with a hierarchy of physics levels that resolve increasingly complete subsets of phase-spaces and are thus increasingly more realistic. The rationale for the multilevel physics models is given. Each physics level is described and examples of its application are given. The existing physics levels are fluid models (3D configuration space), namely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluids; and hybrid models, namely gyrokinetic-energetic-particle/MHD (5D energetic particle phase-space), gyrokinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron (5D ion phase-space), and full-kinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron level (6D ion phase-space). Resolving electron phase-space (5D or 6D) remains a future project. Phase-space-fluid models are not used in favor of delta f particle models. A practical and accurate nonlinear fluid closure for noncollisional plasmas seems not likely in the near future

  15. Integrated core-SOL simulations of L-mode plasma in ITER and Indian demo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisitsorasak, Apiwat; Onjun, Thawatchai; Kanjanaput, Wittawat

    2015-01-01

    Core-SOL simulations are carried out using 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code to investigate tokamak plasma in ITER and Indian DEMO reactors operating in low confinement mode (L-Mode). In each simulation, the plasma current, temperature, and density profiles in both core and SOL region are evolved self-consistency. The SOL is simulated by integrating the fluid equations, including sources, along the field lines. The solutions in SOL subsequently provide as the boundary conditions of core plasma region on low-confinement mode. The core plasma transport model is described using a combination of anomalous transport by Multi-Mode-Model version 2001 (MMM2001) and neoclassical transport calculated by NCLASS module together with the toroidal velocity based on the torque due to Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity (NTV). In addition, a sensitivity analysis is explored by varying plasma parameters, such as plasma density and auxiliary heating power. Furthermore, the ignition tests are conducted to observed plasma response in each design after shutting down an auxiliary heating. (author)

  16. Advanced plasma flow simulations of cathodic-arc and ferroelectric plasma sources for neutralized drift compression experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Sefkow

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-space-scale and long-time-scale plasma flow simulations are executed in order to study the spatial and temporal evolution of plasma parameters for two types of plasma sources used in the neutralized drift compression experiment (NDCX. The results help assess the charge neutralization conditions for ion beam compression experiments and can be employed in more sophisticated simulations, which previously neglected the dynamical evolution of the plasma. Three-dimensional simulations of a filtered cathodic-arc plasma source show the coupling efficiency of the plasma flow from the source to the drift region depends on geometrical factors. The nonuniform magnetic topology complicates the well-known general analytical considerations for evaluating guiding-center drifts, and particle-in-cell simulations provide a self-consistent evaluation of the physics in an otherwise challenging scenario. Plasma flow profiles of a ferroelectric plasma source demonstrate that the densities required for longitudinal compression experiments involving ion beams are provided over the drift length, and are in good agreement with measurements. Simulations involving azimuthally asymmetric plasma creation conditions show that symmetric profiles are nevertheless achieved at the time of peak on-axis plasma density. Also, the ferroelectric plasma expands upstream on the thermal expansion time scale, and therefore avoids the possibility of penetration into the acceleration gap and transport sections, where partial neutralization would increase the beam emittance. Future experiments on NDCX will investigate the transverse focusing of an axially compressing intense charge bunch to a sub-mm spot size with coincident focal planes using a strong final-focus solenoid. In order to fill a multi-tesla solenoid with the necessary high-density plasma for beam charge neutralization, the simulations predict that supersonically injected plasma from the low-field region will penetrate and

  17. The ITER Plasma Control System Simulation Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.L.; Ambrosino, G.; De Tommasi, G.; Humphreys, D.A.; Mattei, M.; Neu, G.; Rapson, C.J.; Raupp, G.; Treutterer, W.; Welander, A.S.; Winter, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A development and test environment called PCSSP has been constructed for the ITER PCS. • A description of requirements and use cases, a final design and software architecture design, users guide, and a prototype implementation have been delivered. • The prototype implementation was demonstrated at IO in December of 2013. • PCSSP will be deployed for alpha testing to the IO, the development group, and selected other ITER partners upon completion of the next development phase. - Abstract: The Plasma Control System Simulation Platform (PCSSP) is a highly flexible, modular, time-dependent simulation environment developed primarily to support development of the ITER Plasma Control System (PCS). It has been under development since 2011 and is scheduled for first release to users in the ITER Organization (IO) and at selected additional sites in 2015. Modules presently implemented in PCSSP enable exploration of axisymmetric evolution and control, basic kinetic control, and tearing mode suppression. A basic capability for generation of control-relevant events is included, enabling study of exception handling in the PCS, continuous controllers, and PCS architecture. While the control design focus of PCSSP applications tends to require only a moderate level of accuracy and complexity in modules, more complex codes can be embedded or connected to access higher accuracy if needed. This paper describes the background and motivation for PCSSP, provides an overview of the capabilities, architecture, and features of PCSSP, and discusses details of the PCSSP vision and its intended goals and application. Completed work, including architectural design, prototype implementation, reference documents, and IO demonstration of PCSSP, is summarized and example use of PCSSP is illustrated. Near-term high-level objectives are summarized and include preparation for release of an “alpha” version of PCSSP and preparation for the next development phase. High

  18. The ITER Plasma Control System Simulation Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, M.L., E-mail: walker@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Ambrosino, G.; De Tommasi, G. [CREATE/Università di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Humphreys, D.A. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Mattei, M. [CREATE/Seconda Università di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Neu, G.; Rapson, C.J.; Raupp, G.; Treutterer, W. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Welander, A.S. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Winter, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13115 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A development and test environment called PCSSP has been constructed for the ITER PCS. • A description of requirements and use cases, a final design and software architecture design, users guide, and a prototype implementation have been delivered. • The prototype implementation was demonstrated at IO in December of 2013. • PCSSP will be deployed for alpha testing to the IO, the development group, and selected other ITER partners upon completion of the next development phase. - Abstract: The Plasma Control System Simulation Platform (PCSSP) is a highly flexible, modular, time-dependent simulation environment developed primarily to support development of the ITER Plasma Control System (PCS). It has been under development since 2011 and is scheduled for first release to users in the ITER Organization (IO) and at selected additional sites in 2015. Modules presently implemented in PCSSP enable exploration of axisymmetric evolution and control, basic kinetic control, and tearing mode suppression. A basic capability for generation of control-relevant events is included, enabling study of exception handling in the PCS, continuous controllers, and PCS architecture. While the control design focus of PCSSP applications tends to require only a moderate level of accuracy and complexity in modules, more complex codes can be embedded or connected to access higher accuracy if needed. This paper describes the background and motivation for PCSSP, provides an overview of the capabilities, architecture, and features of PCSSP, and discusses details of the PCSSP vision and its intended goals and application. Completed work, including architectural design, prototype implementation, reference documents, and IO demonstration of PCSSP, is summarized and example use of PCSSP is illustrated. Near-term high-level objectives are summarized and include preparation for release of an “alpha” version of PCSSP and preparation for the next development phase. High

  19. Effect of transport on MAR in detached divertor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Kenji; Hatayama, A.; Ishii, Y.; Miyamoto, T.; Fukano, A.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of H 2 transport on the onset of MAR in the relatively lower plasma parameter regime of a detached state (n e =1x10 19 m -3 , T e =1 eV) is investigated theoretically. The vibrationally excited molecular densities and the degree of MAR are evaluated by using a 1-D Monte Carlo method (with transport effect), and by solving time-dependent 0-D rate equations without the transport term (without transport effect), respectively. It is found that the degree of MAR with transport is smaller than that without transport under the same H 2 flow rate. Especially, the degree of MAR is negligible near the gas inlet. This smaller degree of MAR with transport is due to the lack of highly excited vibrational molecules which contribute to MAR. The hydrogen molecular density available for MAR is determined by the external hydrogen molecular source and the outflow due to transport, i.e., a 'net' confinement time

  20. Multigroup calculations of low-energy neutral transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilligan, J.G.; Gralnick, S.L.; Price, W.G. Jr.; Kammash, T.

    1978-01-01

    Multigroup discrete ordinates methods avoid many of the approximations that have been used in previous neutral transport analyses. Of particular interest are the neutral profiles generated as an integral part of larger plasma system simulation codes. To determine the appropriateness of utilizing a particular multigroup code, ANISN, for this purpose, results are compared with the neutral transport module of the Duechs code. For a typical TFTR plasma, predicted neutral densities differ by a maximum factor of three on axis and outfluxes at the plasma boundary by approximately 40%. This is found to be significant for a neutral transport module. Possible sources of the observed discrepancies are indicated from an analysis of the approximations used in the Duechs model. Recommendations are made concerning the future application of the multigroup method. (author)

  1. Plasma simulation in space propulsion : the helicon plasma thruster

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro Cavallé, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    The Helicon Plasma Thruster (HPT) is an electrodynamic rocket proposed in the early 2000s. It matches an Helicon Plasma Source (HPS), which ionizes the neutral gas and heats up the plasma, with aMagneticNozzle (MN),where the plasma is supersonically accelerated resulting in thrust. Although the core of this thruster inherits the knowledge on Helicon Plasma sources, dated from the seventies, the HPT technology is still not developed and remains below TRL 4. A deep review of the HPT State-of-ar...

  2. Monte Carlo simulation for the transport beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Jia, S. B.; Varisano, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Attili, A.; Marchetto, F.; Russo, G. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy); Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Institute of Physics Czech Academy of Science, ELI-Beamlines project, Na Slovance 2, Prague (Czech Republic); Carpinelli, M. [INFN Sezione di Cagliari, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Tramontana, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    In the framework of the ELIMED project, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to study the physical transport of charged particles generated by laser-target interactions and to preliminarily evaluate fluence and dose distributions. An energy selection system and the experimental setup for the TARANIS laser facility in Belfast (UK) have been already simulated with the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) MC toolkit. Preliminary results are reported here. Future developments are planned to implement a MC based 3D treatment planning in order to optimize shots number and dose delivery.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation for the transport beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Jia, S. B.; Varisano, A.; Attili, A.; Marchetto, F.; Russo, G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Carpinelli, M.; Tramontana, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the ELIMED project, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to study the physical transport of charged particles generated by laser-target interactions and to preliminarily evaluate fluence and dose distributions. An energy selection system and the experimental setup for the TARANIS laser facility in Belfast (UK) have been already simulated with the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) MC toolkit. Preliminary results are reported here. Future developments are planned to implement a MC based 3D treatment planning in order to optimize shots number and dose delivery

  4. Conflict simulation for surface transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeton, S.C.; De Laquil, P. III.

    1977-07-01

    An important element in the analysis of transportation safeguards systems is the determination of the outcome of an armed attack against the system. Such information is necessary to understand relationships among the various defender tactics, weapons systems, and adversary attributes. A battle model, SABRES, which can simulate safeguards engagements is under development. This paper briefly describes the first phase of SABRES and presents some examples of its capabilities

  5. The Multi-Agent Transport Simulation MATSim

    OpenAIRE

    Horni Andreas; Nagel Kai; Axhausen Kay W.

    2016-01-01

    "The MATSim (Multi-Agent Transport Simulation) software project was started around 2006 with the goal of generating traffic and congestion patterns by following individual synthetic travelers through their daily or weekly activity programme. It has since then evolved from a collection of stand-alone C++ programs to an integrated Java-based framework which is publicly hosted, open-source available, automatically regression tested. It is currently used by about 40 groups throughout the world. T...

  6. Rotation and transport in Alcator C-Mod ITB plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, C. L.; Rice, J. E.; Podpaly, Y.; Bespamyatnov, I. O.; Rowan, W. L.; Hughes, J. W.; Reinke, M.

    2010-06-01

    Internal transport barriers (ITBs) are seen under a number of conditions in Alcator C-Mod plasmas. Most typically, radio frequency power in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRFs) is injected with the second harmonic of the resonant frequency for minority hydrogen ions positioned off-axis at r/a > 0.5 to initiate the ITBs. They can also arise spontaneously in ohmic H-mode plasmas. These ITBs typically persist tens of energy confinement times until the plasma terminates in radiative collapse or a disruption occurs. All C-Mod core barriers exhibit strongly peaked density and pressure profiles, static or peaking temperature profiles, peaking impurity density profiles and thermal transport coefficients that approach neoclassical values in the core. The strongly co-current intrinsic central plasma rotation that is observed following the H-mode transition has a profile that is peaked in the centre of the plasma and decreases towards the edge if the ICRF power deposition is in the plasma centre. When the ICRF resonance is placed off-axis, the rotation develops a well in the core region. The central rotation continues to decrease as long as the central density peaks when an ITB develops. This rotation profile is flat in the centre (0 ITB density profile is observed (0.5 ITB foot that is sufficiently large to stabilize ion temperature gradient instabilities that dominate transport in C-Mod high density plasmas.

  7. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR

  8. Nonlinear 2D convection and enhanced cross-field plasma transport near the MHD instability threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastukhov, V.P.; Chudin, N.V.

    2003-01-01

    Results of theoretical study and computer simulations of nonlinear 2D convection induced by a convective MHD instability near its threshold in FRC-like non-paraxial magnetic confinement system are presented. An appropriate closed set of weakly nonideal reduced MHD equations is derived to describe the self-consistent plasma dynamics. It is shown that the convection forms nonlinear large scale stochastic vortices (convective cells), which tend to restore and to maintain the marginally stable pressure pro e and result in an essentially nonlocal enhanced heat transport. A large amount of data on the structure of the nascent convective flows is obtained and analyzed. The computer simulations of long time plasma evolutions demonstrate such features of the resulting anomalous transport as pro e consistency, L-H transition, external transport barrier, pinch of impurities, etc. (author)

  9. Turbulence spectra, transport, and E × B flows in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.-H.; Nunami, M.; Sugama, H.; Satake, S.; Matsuoka, S.; Ishizawa, A.; Tanaka, K.; Maeyama, Shinya

    2012-11-01

    Gyrokinetic simulation of ion temperature gradient turbulence and zonal flows for helical plasmas has been validated against the Large Helical Device experiments with high ion temperature, where a reduced modeling of ion heat transport is also considered. It is confirmed by the entropy transfer analysis that the turbulence spectrum elongated in the radial wavenumber space is associated with successive interactions with zonal flows. A novel multi-scale simulation for turbulence and zonal flows in poloidally-rotating helical plasmas has demonstrated strong zonal flow generation by turbulence, which implies that turbulent transport processes in non-axisymmetric systems are coupled to neoclassical transport through the macroscopic E × B flows determined by the ambipolarty condition for neoclassical particle fluxes. (author)

  10. Macrofilament simulation of high current beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, R.J.; Jakobson, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Macrofilament simulation of high current beam transport through a series of solenoids has been used to investigate the sensitivity of such calculations to the initial beam distribution and to the number of filaments used in the simulation. The transport line was tuned to approximately 105 0 phase advance per cell at zero current with a tune depression of 65 0 due to the space charge. Input distributions with the filaments randomly uniform throughout a four dimensional ellipsoid and K-V input distributions have been studied. The behavior of the emittance is similar to that published for quadrupoles with like tune depression. The emittance demonstrated little growth in the first twelve solenoids, a rapid rate of growth for the next twenty, and a subsequent slow rate of growth. A few hundred filaments were sufficient to show the character of the instability. The number of filaments utilized is an order of magnitude fewer than has been utilized previously for similar instabilities. The previously published curves for simulations with less than a thousand particles show a rather constant emittance growth. If the solenoid transport line magnetic field is increased a few percent, emittance growth curves are obtained not unlike those curves. Collision growth effects are less important than indicated in the previously published results for quadrupoles

  11. Statistical properties of transport in plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Garcia, O.E.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    The statistical properties of the particle flux in different types of plasma turbulence models are numerically investigated using probability distribution functions (PDFs). The physics included in the models range from two-dimensional drift wave turbulence to three-dimensional MHD dynamics...

  12. IPROP simulations of the GAMBLE II proton transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The author has simulated the proton transport of the 6-kA, 1-MV GAMBLE II experiment using a modified version of the IPROP particle-in-cell code. IPROP now uses a hybrid model in which plasma electrons are divided into high-energy macro particle and thermal-fluid components. This model includes open-quotes knock-onclose quotes bound-electron collision and runaway sources for high-energy electrons. Using IPROP, the authors has calculated net currents in reasonable agreement with the experiment ranging from 5-11% of the total current in pressures from 0.25-4 torr helium. In the simulations, the pinch current sample by the 1.5-cm beam was 2-3 times larger than the net current at 4 cm radius. The attenuation of net current at larger radii was the result of a highly-conductive energetic component of plasma electrons surrounding the beam. Having benchmarked IPROP against experiment, the author has examined higher-current ion beams with respect to possible transport for inertial confinement fusion

  13. The effect of pre-plasma formation under nonlocal transport conditions for ultra-relativistic laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holec, M.; Nikl, J.; Vranic, M.; Weber, S.

    2018-04-01

    Interaction of high-power lasers with solid targets is in general strongly affected by the limited contrast available. The laser pre-pulse ionizes the target and produces a pre-plasma which can strongly modify the interaction of the main part of the laser pulse with the target. This is of particular importance for future experiments which will use laser intensities above 1021 W cm-2 and which are subject to the limited contrast. As a consequence the main part of the laser pulse will be modified while traversing the pre-plasma, interacting with it partially. A further complication arises from the fact that the interaction of a high-power pre-pulse with solid targets very often takes place under nonlocal transport conditions, i.e. the characteristic mean-free-path of the particles and photons is larger than the characteristic scale-lengths of density and temperature. The classical diffusion treatment of radiation and heat transport in the hydrodynamic model is then insufficient for the description of the pre-pulse physics. These phenomena also strongly modify the formation of the pre-plasma which in turn affects the propagation of the main laser pulse. In this paper nonlocal radiation-hydrodynamic simulations are carried out and serve as input for subsequent kinetic simulations of ultra-high intensity laser pulses interacting with the plasma in the ultra-relativistic regime. It is shown that the results of the kinetic simulations differ considerably whether a diffusive or nonlocal transport is used for the radiation-hydrodynamic simulations.

  14. Numerical simulation of nonequilibrium effects in an argon plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.H.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Departures from thermal (translational), ionization, and excitation equilibrium in an axisymmetric argon plasma jet have been studied by two-dimensional numerical simulations. Electrons, ions, and excited and ground states of neutral atoms are represented as separate chemical species in the mixture. Transitions between excited states, as well as ionization/recombination reactions due to both collisional and radiative processes, are treated as separate chemical reactions. Resonance radiation transport is represented using Holstein escape factors to simulate both the optically thin and optically thick limits. The optically thin calculation showed significant underpopulation of excited species in the upstream part of the jet core, whereas in the optically thick calculation this region remains close to local thermodynamic equilibrium, consistent with previous experimental observations. Resonance radiation absorption is therefore an important effect. The optically thick calculation results also show overpopulations (relative to equilibrium) of excited species and electron densities in the fringes and downstream part of the jet core. In these regions, however, the electrons and ions are essentially in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium with the excited state at the electron temperature, even though the ionized and excited states are no longer in equilibrium with the ground state. Departures from partial local thermodynamic equilibrium are observed in the outer fringes and far downstream part of the jet. These results are interpreted in terms of the local relative time scales for the various physical and chemical processes occurring in the plasma

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Transport and Structural Formation in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagaraja, A.

    1999-06-01

    The book under review is one of a series of monographs on plasma physics published by the Institute of Physics under the editorship of Peter Stott and Hans Wilhelmsson. It is nicely produced and is aimed at research workers and advanced students of both laboratory (i.e. tokamak plasmas) and astrophysical plasma physics. The authors are prolific contributors to the subject of plasma turbulence and transport with a well-defined message: ``The authors' view is that the plasma structure, fluctuations and turbulent transport are continually regulating each other and, in addition, that the structural formation and structural transition of plasmas are typical of the physics of far from equilibrium systems. The book presents and explains why the plasma inhomogeneity is the ordering parameter governing transport and how self-sustained fluctuations can be driven through subcritical excitation even beyond linear instability''. This point of view is expounded in 24 chapters, including topics such as transport phenomena in toroidal plasmas (Chapters 2-4), low frequency modes and instabilities of confined systems (Chapters 5-7), renormalization (Chapter 8), self-sustained turbulence due to the current diffusive mode and resistive effects (Chapters 9-11), subcritical turbulence and numerical simulations (Chapters 12-14), scale invariance arguments (Chapter 15), electric field effects (Chapters 17-21) and self-organized dynamics (Chapter 22). The material is essentially drawn from the authors' many and varied original contributions to the plasma turbulence and transport literature. Whatever view one might have about the merits of this work, there is little doubt in this reviewer's mind that it is indeed thought-provoking and presents a worthy intellectual challenge to plasma theorists and experimentalists alike. The authors take a consistent stance and discuss the issues from their own standpoint. They observe that the plasmas one encounters in practice (for definiteness, the

  16. First-principles simulations of heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puligheddu, Marcello; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2017-11-01

    Advances in understanding heat transport in solids were recently reported by both experiment and theory. However an efficient and predictive quantum simulation framework to investigate thermal properties of solids, with the same complexity as classical simulations, has not yet been developed. Here we present a method to compute the thermal conductivity of solids by performing ab initio molecular dynamics at close to equilibrium conditions, which only requires calculations of first-principles trajectories and atomic forces, thus avoiding direct computation of heat currents and energy densities. In addition the method requires much shorter sequential simulation times than ordinary molecular dynamics techniques, making it applicable within density functional theory. We discuss results for a representative oxide, MgO, at different temperatures and for ordered and nanostructured morphologies, showing the performance of the method in different conditions.

  17. Ion sampling and transport in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative accuracy and high sensitivity in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) depend on consistent and efficient extraction and transport of analyte ions from an inductively coupled plasma to a mass analyzer, where they are sorted and detected. In this review we examine the fundamental physical processes that control ion sampling and transport in ICP-MS and compare the results of theory and computerized models with experimental efforts to characterize the flow of ions through plasma mass spectrometers' vacuum interfaces. We trace the flow of ions from their generation in the plasma, into the sampling cone, through the supersonic expansion in the first vacuum stage, through the skimmer, and into the ion optics that deliver the ions to the mass analyzer. At each stage we consider idealized behavior and departures from ideal behavior that affect the performance of ICP-MS as an analytical tool.

  18. Transport quasiparticles and transverse interactions in quark-gluon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baym, Gordon

    1996-01-01

    Calculations of the properties of interacting quark-gluon plasmas are beset by infrared divergences associated with the fact that magnetic interactions, i.e., those occurring through exchange of transverse gluons, are, in the absence of a 'magnetic mass''in QCD, not screened. In this lecture we discuss the effects of magnetic interactions on the transport coefficients and the quasiparticle structure of quark-gluon plasmas. We describe how inclusion of dynamical screening effects - corresponding to Landau damping of the virtual quanta exchanged - leads to finite transport scattering rates. In the weak coupling limit, dynamical screening effects dominate over a magnetic mass. We illustrate the breakdown of the quasi particle structure of degenerate plasmas caused by long-ranged magnetic interactions, describe the structure of fermion quasiparticles in hot relativistic plasmas, and touch briefly on the problem of the lifetime of quasiparticle in the presence of long-ranged magnetic interactions. (author)

  19. The use of internal transport barriers in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challis, C D [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    Internal transport barriers (ITBs) can provide high tokamak confinement at modest plasma current. This is desirable for operation with most of the current driven non-inductively by the bootstrap mechanism, as currently envisaged for steady-state power plants. Maintaining such plasmas in steady conditions with high plasma purity is challenging, however, due to MHD instabilities and impurity transport effects. Significant progress has been made in the control of ITB plasmas: the pressure profile has been varied using the barrier location; q-profile modification has been achieved with non-inductive current drive, and means have been found to affect density peaking and impurity accumulation. All these features are, to some extent, interdependent and must be integrated self-consistently to demonstrate a sound basis for extrapolation to future devices.

  20. Finite beta effects on turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    The research on the transport properties of magnetically confined plasmas plays an essential role towards the achievement of practical nuclear fusion energy. An economically viable fusion reactor is expected to operate at high plasma pressure. This implies that the detailed study of the impact of electromagnetic effects, whose strength increases with increasing pressure, is of critical importance. In the present work, the electromagnetic effects on the particle, momentum and heat transport channels have been investigated, with both analytical and numerical calculations. Transport processes due to a finite plasma pressure have been identified, their physical mechanisms have been explained, and their contributions have been quantified, showing that they can be significant under experimentally relevant conditions.

  1. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong [Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-101, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Tang Zhiping [CAS Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  2. Heating and transport in TFTR D-T plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarnstorff, M.C.; Scott, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    The confinement and heating of supershot plasmas are significantly enhanced with tritium beam injection relative to deuterium injection in TFTR. The global energy confinement and local thermal transport are analyzed for deuterium and tritium fueled plasmas to quantify their dependence on the average mass of the hydrogenic ions. The radial profiles of the deuterium and tritium densities are determined from the DT fusion neutron emission profile

  3. Solitary Model of the Charge Particle Transport in Collisionless Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonchik, L.V.; Trukhachev, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    The one-dimensional MHD solitary model of charged particle transport in plasma is developed. It is shown that self-consistent electric field of ion-acoustic solitons can displace charged particles in space, which can be a reason of local electric current generation. The displacement amount is order of a few Debye lengths. It is shown that the current associated with soliton cascade has pulsating nature with DC component. Methods of built theory verification in dusty plasma are proposed

  4. BALDUR: a one-dimensional plasma transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.; Post, D.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.

    1986-07-01

    The purpose of BALDUR is to calculate the evolution of plasma parameters in an MHD equilibrium which can be approximated by concentric circular flux surfaces. Transport of up to six species of ionized particles, of electron and ion energy, and of poloidal magnetic flux is computed. A wide variety of source terms are calculated including those due to neutral gas, fusion, and auxiliary heating. The code is primarily designed for modeling tokamak plasmas but could be adapted to other toroidal confinement systems

  5. Extended fluid transport theory in the tokamak plasma edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, W. M.

    2017-06-01

    Fluid theory expressions for the radial particle and energy fluxes and the radial distributions of pressure and temperature in the edge plasma are derived from fundamental conservation (particle, energy, momentum) relations, taking into account kinetic corrections arising from ion orbit loss, and integrated to illustrate the dependence of the observed edge pedestal profile structure on fueling, heating, and electromagnetic and thermodynamic forces. Solution procedures for the fluid plasma and associated neutral transport equations are discussed.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Antenna with FDTD Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Liang; Yue-Min, Xu; Zhi-Jiang, Wang

    2008-01-01

    We adopt cylindrical-coordinate FDTD algorithm to simulate and analyse a 0.4-m-long column configuration plasma antenna. FDTD method is useful for solving electromagnetic problems, especially when wave characteristics and plasma properties are self-consistently related to each other. Focus on the frequency from 75 MHz to 400 MHz, the input impedance and radiation efficiency of plasma antennas are computed. Numerical results show that, different from copper antenna, the characteristics of plasma antenna vary simultaneously with plasma frequency and collision frequency. The property can be used to construct dynamically reconBgurable antenna. The investigation is meaningful and instructional for the optimization of plasma antenna design

  7. Numerical simulation of plasma antenna with FDTD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Chao; Xu Yuemin; Wang Zhijiang

    2008-01-01

    We adopt cylindrical-coordinate FDTD algorithm to simulate and analyse a 0.4-m-long column configuration plasma antenna. FDTD method is useful for solving electromagnetic problems, especially when wave characteristics and plasma properties are self-consistently related to each other. Focus on the frequency from 75 MHz to 400 MHz, the input impedance and radiation efficiency of plasma antennas are computed. Numerical results show that, different from copper antenna, the characteristics of plasma antenna vary simultaneously with plasma frequency and collision frequency. The property can be used to construct dynamically reconfigurable antenna. The investigation is meaningful and instructional for the optimization of plasma antenna design. (authors)

  8. Plasma radiation in tokamak disruption simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Safronov, V.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Zhitlukhin, A.; Wuerz, H.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma impact results in sudden evaporation of divertor plate material and produces a plasma cloud which acts as a protective shield. The incoming energy flux is absorbed in the plasma shield and is converted mainly into radiation. Thus the radiative characteristics of the target plasma determine the dissipation of the incoming energy and the heat load at the target. Radiation of target plasma is studied at the two plasma gun facility 2MK-200 at Troitsk. Space- and time-resolved spectroscopy and time-integrated space-resolved calorimetry are employed as diagnostics. Graphite and tungsten samples are exposed to deuterium plasma streams. It is found that the radiative characteristics depend strongly on the target material. Tungsten plasma arises within 1 micros close to the surface and shows continuum radiation only. Expansion of tungsten plasma is restricted. For a graphite target the plasma shield is a mixture of carbon and deuterium. It expands along the magnetic field lines with a velocity of v = (3--4) 10 6 cm/s. The plasma shield is a two zone plasma with a hot low dense corona and a cold dense layer close to the target. The plasma corona emits intense soft x-ray (SXR) line radiation in the frequency range from 300--380 eV mainly from CV ions. It acts as effective dissipation system and converts volumetrically the incoming energy flux into SXR radiation

  9. Light-induced modification of plant plasma membrane ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marten, I; Deeken, R; Hedrich, R; Roelfsema, M R G

    2010-09-01

    Light is not only the driving force for electron and ion transport in the thylakoid membrane, but also regulates ion transport in various other membranes of plant cells. Light-dependent changes in ion transport at the plasma membrane and associated membrane potential changes have been studied intensively over the last century. These studies, with various species and cell types, revealed that apart from regulation by chloroplasts, plasma membrane transport can be controlled by phytochromes, phototropins or channel rhodopsins. In this review, we compare light-dependent plasma membrane responses of unicellular algae (Eremosphaera and Chlamydomonas), with those of a multicellular alga (Chara), liverworts (Conocephalum), mosses (Physcomitrella) and several angiosperm cell types. Light-dependent plasma membrane responses of Eremosphaera and Chara are characterised by the dominant role of K(+) channels during membrane potential changes. In most other species, the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of plasma membrane anion channels represents a general light-triggered event. Cell type-specific responses are likely to have evolved by modification of this general response or through the development of additional light-dependent signalling pathways. Future research to elucidate these light-activated signalling chains is likely to benefit from the recent identification of S-type anion channel genes and proteins capable of regulating these channels.

  10. Kinetic theory of nonlinear transport phenomena in complex plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to the prevalent use of the phenomenological theory of transport phenomena, a number of transport properties of complex plasmas have been evaluated by using appropriate expressions, available from the kinetic theory, which are based on Boltzmann's transfer equation; in particular, the energy dependence of the electron collision frequency has been taken into account. Following the recent trend, the number and energy balance of all the constituents of the complex plasma and the charge balance on the particles is accounted for; the Ohmic loss has also been included in the energy balance of the electrons. The charging kinetics for the complex plasma comprising of uniformly dispersed dust particles, characterized by (i) uniform size and (ii) the Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck power law of size distribution has been developed. Using appropriate expressions for the transport parameters based on the kinetic theory, the system of equations has been solved to investigate the parametric dependence of the complex plasma transport properties on the applied electric field and other plasma parameters; the results are graphically illustrated.

  11. Parallel pic plasma simulation through particle decomposition techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briguglio, S.; Vlad, G.; Di Martino, B.; Naples, Univ. 'Federico II'

    1998-02-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) codes are among the major candidates to yield a satisfactory description of the detail of kinetic effects, such as the resonant wave-particle interaction, relevant in determining the transport mechanism in magnetically confined plasmas. A significant improvement of the simulation performance of such codes con be expected from parallelization, e.g., by distributing the particle population among several parallel processors. Parallelization of a hybrid magnetohydrodynamic-gyrokinetic code has been accomplished within the High Performance Fortran (HPF) framework, and tested on the IBM SP2 parallel system, using a 'particle decomposition' technique. The adopted technique requires a moderate effort in porting the code in parallel form and results in intrinsic load balancing and modest inter processor communication. The performance tests obtained confirm the hypothesis of high effectiveness of the strategy, if targeted towards moderately parallel architectures. Optimal use of resources is also discussed with reference to a specific physics problem [it

  12. Surface transport in plasma-balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas, Jay [Physique Théorique et Mathématique, Université Libre de Bruxelles andInternational Solvay Institutes,ULB-Campus Plaine CP231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy [Centre for Particle Theory & Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Kundu, Nilay [Harish-Chandra Research Institute,Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India)

    2016-06-06

    We study the surface transport properties of stationary localized configurations of relativistic fluids to the first two non-trivial orders in a derivative expansion. By demanding that these finite lumps of relativistic fluid are described by a thermal partition function with arbitrary stationary background metric and gauge fields, we are able to find several constraints among surface transport coefficients. At leading order, besides recovering the surface thermodynamics, we obtain a generalization of the Young-Laplace equation for relativistic fluid surfaces, by considering a temperature dependence in the surface tension, which is further generalized in the context of superfluids. At the next order, for uncharged fluids in 3+1 dimensions, we show that besides the 3 independent bulk transport coefficients previously known, a generic localized configuration is characterized by 3 additional surface transport coefficients, one of which may be identified with the surface modulus of rigidity. Finally, as an application, we study the effect of temperature dependence of surface tension on some explicit examples of localized fluid configurations, which are dual to certain non-trivial black hole solutions via the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  13. Isotopic scaling of transport in deuterium-tritium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, S.D.; Adler, H.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Budny, R.V.; Bush, C.E.; Chang, Z.; Duong, H.

    1995-01-01

    Both global and thermal energy confinement improve in high-temperature supershot plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) when deuterium beam heating is partially or wholly replaced by tritium beam heating. For the same heating power, the tritium-rich plasmas obtain up to 22% higher total energy, 30% higher thermal ion energy, and 20-25% higher central ion temperature. Kinetic analysis of the temperature and density profiles indicates a favorable isotopic scaling of ion heat transport and electron particle transport, with τ Ei (a/2) ∝ (A) 0.7-0.8 and τ pe (a) ∝ (A) 0.8

  14. Collisional transport in a plasma with steep gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Murakami, S.

    1999-06-01

    The validity is given to the newly proposed two δf method for neoclassical transport calculation, which can be solve the drift kinetic equation considering effects of steep plasma gradients, large radial electric field, finite banana width, and an orbit topology near the axis. The new method is applied to the study of ion transport with steep plasma gradients. It is found that the ion thermal diffusivity decreases as the scale length of density gradient decreases, while the ion particle flux due to ion-ion self collisions increases with increasing gradient. (author)

  15. Coarse Grained Transport Model for Neutrals in Turbulent SOL Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marandet, Y.; Mekkaoui, A.; Genesio, P.; Rosato, J.; Capes, H.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Stamm, R., E-mail: yannick.marandet@univ-amu.fr [PIIM, CNRS/Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France); Reiter, D.; Boerner, P. [IEK4, FZJ, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices exhibit strong intermittent turbulence, which governs perpendicular transport of particles and heat. Turbulent fluxes result from the coarse graining procedure used to derive the transport equation, which entails time averaging of the underlying equations governing the turbulent evolution of the electron and ion fluids. In previous works, we have pointed out that this averaging is not carried out on the Boltzmann equation that describes the transport of neutral particles (atoms, molecules) in current edge code suites (such as SOLPS). Since fluctuations in the far SOL are of order unity, calculating the transport of neutral particles, hence the source terms in plasma fluid equations, in the average plasma background might lead to misleading results. In particular, retaining the effects of fluctuations could affect the estimation of the importance of main chamber recycling, hence first wall sputtering by charge exchange atoms, as well as main chamber impurity contamination and transport. In this contribution, we obtain an exact coarse-grained equation for the average neutral density, assuming that density fluctuations are described by multivariate Gamma statistics. This equation is a scattering free Boltzmann equation, where the ionization rate has been renormalized to account for fluctuations. The coarse grained transport model for neutrals has been implemented in the EIRENE code, and applications in 2D geometry with ITER relevant plasma parameters are presented. Our results open the way for the implementation of the effects of turbulent fluctuations on the transport of neutral particles in coupled plasma/neutral edge codes like B2-EIRENE. (author)

  16. Dynamic transport study of the plasmas with transport improvement in LHD and JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.; Sakamoto, R.; Tanaka, K.; Fujita, T.; Funaba, H.; Kubo, S.; Yoshinuma, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Takeiri, Y.; Ikeda, K.; Michael, C.; Tokuzawa, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Takenaga, H.; Isayama, A.; Matsunaga, G.; Ide, S.

    2009-01-01

    Transport analysis during the transient phase of heating (a dynamic transport study) applied to the plasma with internal transport barriers (ITBs) in the Large Helical Device (LHD) heliotron and the JT-60U tokamak is described. In the dynamic transport study the time of transition from the L-mode plasma to the ITB plasma is clearly determined by the onset of flattening of the temperature profile in the core region and a spontaneous phase transition from a zero curvature ITB (hyperbolic tangent shaped ITB) or a positive curvature ITB (concaved shaped ITB) to a negative curvature ITB (convex shaped ITB) and its back-transition are observed. The flattening of the core region of the ITB transition and the back-transition between a zero curvature ITB and a convex ITB suggest the strong interaction of turbulent transport in space.

  17. Extended numerical modeling of impurity neoclassical transport in tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, H.; Yamoto, S.; Hatayama, A.; Homma, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of impurity transport in tokamaks is an important issue in order to reduce the impurity contamination in fusion core plasmas. Recently, a new kinetic numerical scheme of impurity classical/neoclassical transport has been developed. This numerical scheme makes it possible to include classical self-diffusion (CL SD), classical inward pinch (CL IWP), and classical temperature screening effect (CL TSE) of impurity ions. However, impurity neoclassical transport has been modeled only in the case where background plasmas are in the Pfirsch-Schluter (PS) regime. The purpose of this study is to extend our previous model to wider range of collisionality regimes, i.e., not only the PS regime, but also the plateau regime. As in the previous study, a kinetic model with Binary Collision Monte-Carlo Model (BMC) has been adopted. We focus on the modeling of the neoclassical self-diffusion (NC SD) and the neoclassical inward pinch (NC IWP). In order to simulate the neoclassical transport with the BCM, velocity distribution of background plasma ions has been modeled as a deformed Maxwell distribution which includes plasma density gradient. Some test simulations have been done. As for NC SD of impurity ions, our scheme reproduces the dependence on the collisionality parameter in wide range of collisionality regime. As for NC IWP, in cases where test impurity ions and background ions are in the PS and plateau regimes, parameter dependences have been reproduced. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Extended numerical modeling of impurity neoclassical transport in tokamak edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, H.; Yamoto, S.; Hatayama, A. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama (Japan); Homma, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama (Japan); Research Fellow of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Understanding of impurity transport in tokamaks is an important issue in order to reduce the impurity contamination in fusion core plasmas. Recently, a new kinetic numerical scheme of impurity classical/neoclassical transport has been developed. This numerical scheme makes it possible to include classical self-diffusion (CL SD), classical inward pinch (CL IWP), and classical temperature screening effect (CL TSE) of impurity ions. However, impurity neoclassical transport has been modeled only in the case where background plasmas are in the Pfirsch-Schluter (PS) regime. The purpose of this study is to extend our previous model to wider range of collisionality regimes, i.e., not only the PS regime, but also the plateau regime. As in the previous study, a kinetic model with Binary Collision Monte-Carlo Model (BMC) has been adopted. We focus on the modeling of the neoclassical self-diffusion (NC SD) and the neoclassical inward pinch (NC IWP). In order to simulate the neoclassical transport with the BCM, velocity distribution of background plasma ions has been modeled as a deformed Maxwell distribution which includes plasma density gradient. Some test simulations have been done. As for NC SD of impurity ions, our scheme reproduces the dependence on the collisionality parameter in wide range of collisionality regime. As for NC IWP, in cases where test impurity ions and background ions are in the PS and plateau regimes, parameter dependences have been reproduced. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. FDTD simulation for plasma photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shaobin; Zhu Chuanxi; Yuan Naichang

    2005-01-01

    Plasma photonic crystals are artificially periodic structures, which are composed of plasmas and dielectric structures (or vacuum). In this paper, the piecewise linear current density recursive convolution (PLCDRC) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is applied to study the plasma photonic crystals and those containing defects. In time-domain, the electromagnetic (EM) propagation process and reflection/transmission electric field of Gauss pulses passing through the plasma photonic crystals are investigated. In frequency-domain, the reflection and transmission coefficients of the pulses through the two kinds of crystals are computed. The results illustrate that the plasma photonic crystals mostly reflect for the EM wave of frequencies less than the plasma frequency, and mostly transmit for EM wave of frequencies higher than the plasma frequency. In high frequency domain, the plasma photonic crystals have photonic band gaps, which is analogous to the conventional photonic crystals. (authors)

  20. Simulations of charge transport in organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vehoff, Thorsten

    2010-05-05

    We study the charge transport properties of organic liquid crystals, i.e. hexabenzocoronene and carbazole macrocycle, and single crystals, i.e. rubrene, indolocarbazole and benzothiophene derivatives (BTBT, BBBT). The aim is to find structure-property relationships linking the chemical structure as well as the morphology with the bulk charge carrier mobility of the compounds. To this end, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed yielding realistic equilibrated morphologies. Partial charges and molecular orbitals are calculated based on single molecules in vacuum using quantum chemical methods. The molecular orbitals are then mapped onto the molecular positions and orientations, which allows calculation of the transfer integrals between nearest neighbors using the molecular orbital overlap method. Thus we obtain realistic transfer integral distributions and their autocorrelations. In case of organic crystals the differences between two descriptions of charge transport, namely semi-classical dynamics (SCD) in the small polaron limit and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) based on Marcus rates, are studied. The liquid crystals are investigated solely in the hopping limit. To simulate the charge dynamics using KMC, the centers of mass of the molecules are mapped onto lattice sites and the transfer integrals are used to compute the hopping rates. In the small polaron limit, where the electronic wave function is spread over a limited number of neighboring molecules, the Schroedinger equation is solved numerically using a semi-classical approach. The carbazole macrocycles form columnar structures arranged on a hexagonal lattice with side chains facing inwards, so columns can closely approach each other allowing inter-columnar and thus three-dimensional transport. We are able to show that, on the time-scales of charge transport, static disorder due to slow side chain motions is the main factor determining the mobility. The high mobility of rubrene is explained by two main

  1. Resistive Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, X.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Jardin, S.C.; Lowe, L.L.; Park, W.; Strauss, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    Although high-temperature plasmas in laboratory magnetic fusion confinements are sufficiently collisionless that formal fluid closures are difficult to attain, the resistive MHD model has proven, by comparison with experimental data, to be useful for describing the large scale dynamics of magnetized plasmas. Resistive MHD model consists of Faraday's law for the evolution of the magnetic field and Navier-Stokes equation for the plasma flow. These equations are closed by the Ohm's law and an equation of state for the plasma

  2. Final technical report on studies of plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, T.M.; Driscoll, C.F.; Malmberg, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    This document gives an overview of the scientific results obtained under the DOE grant, and references the journal articles which give more complete descriptions of the various topics. Recently, the research has been focused on 2-dimensional vortices and turbulence: experiments using a new camera-diagnosed electron plasma apparatus have given surprising results which both clarify and challenge theories. Here, the crossfield E x B flow of the electron plasma is directly analogous to the 2-d flow of an ideal fluid such as water, and may also give insight into more complicated poloidal flows exhibited in toroidal plasmas. The shear-flow instabilities, turbulence, and vortices can be accurately observed, and the free relaxation of this turbulence has been characterized. The physical processes underlying the complicated turbulent evolution can also be studied in more controlled near-linear regimes. The original experimental focus of this program was on radial particle transport from applied external field asymmetries. Here, this research program clearly identified the importance of the collective response of the plasma, giving smaller fields from shielding, or enhanced fields from resonant modes. Experiments and theory work have also elucidated the flow of a plasma along the magnetic field. Finally, some theory was pursued for direct application to fusion plasmas, and to gravitating gas clouds in astrophysics. This program was highly successful in clarifying basic plasma transport processes

  3. Modeling and Simulation of Technical Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van J.

    2009-01-01

    Original title: Challenges in the Modelling of Low-Temperature Plasma Sources Elektrotechnisches Kolloquium. Since its inception in the beginning of the twentieth century, plasma science has grown to a major field of science. Lowtemperature plasma sources and gas discharges can be found in domestic

  4. Simulating the mesoscale transport of krypton-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsberg, Anne; Ross, J Ole; Schlosser, Clemens; Kirchner, Gerald

    2018-01-01

    Due to its half-life, chemical inertness and low solubility in water, radioactive 85 Kr is a valuable tracer for testing the performance of atmospheric dispersion models in simulating long-range transport of pollutants. This paper evaluates the capability of simulating the dispersion of radiokrypton emitted by a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in north-west France. Three time periods during which elevated activity concentrations of 85 Kr in ground level air were detected in south-west Germany are chosen. Simulations have been performed using the HYSPLIT code and the European Centre for Median-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) data base. Although their results show a slight trend of underestimating the measured 85 Kr concentrations, there is a significant correlation and moderate scatter between observations and simulations with about 50% of the results being within a factor of two of the measured concentrations. The simulated travel time distributions provided a valuable tool for providing additional insight into the dispersion of the tracer radionuclides and for identifying potential causes of deviations between measured and calculated concentrations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Study of neoclassical transport in LHD plasmas by applying the DCOM/NNW neoclassical transport database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasa, Arimitsu; Oikawa, Shun-ichi; Murakami, Sadayoshi

    2008-01-01

    In helical systems, neoclassical transport is one of the important issues in addition to anomalous transport, because of a strong temperature dependency of heat conductivity and an important role in the radial electric field determination. Therefore, the development of a reliable tool for the neoclassical transport analysis is necessary for the transport analysis in Large Helical Device (LHD). We have developed a neoclassical transport database for LHD plasmas, DCOM/NNW, where mono-energetic diffusion coefficients are evaluated by the Monte Carlo method, and the diffusion coefficient database is constructed by a neural network technique. The input parameters of the database are the collision frequency, radial electric field, minor radius, and configuration parameters (R axis , beta value, etc). In this paper, database construction including the plasma beta is investigated. A relatively large Shafranov shift occurs in the finite beta LHD plasma, and the magnetic field configuration becomes complex leading to rapid increase in the number of the Fourier modes in Boozer coordinates. DCOM/NNW can evaluate neoclassical transport accurately even in such a configuration with a large number of Fourier modes. The developed DCOM/NNW database is applied to a finite-beta LHD plasma, and the plasma parameter dependences of neoclassical transport coefficients and the ambipolar radial electric field are investigated. (author)

  6. Adaptive grids and numerical fluid simulations for scrape-off layer plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingshirn, Hans-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic confinement nuclear fusion experiments create plasmas with local temperatures in excess of 100 million Kelvin. In these experiments the scrape-off layer, which is the plasma region in direct contact with the device wall, is of central importance both for the quality of the energy confinement and the wall material lifetime. To study the behaviour of the scrape-off layer, in addition to experiments, numerical simulations are used. This work investigates the use of adaptive discretizations of space and compatible numerical methods for scrape-off layer simulations. The resulting algorithms allow dynamic adaptation of computational grids aligned to the magnetic fields to precisely capture the strongly anisotropic energy and particle transport in the plasma. The methods are applied to the multi-fluid plasma code B2, with the goal of reducing the runtime of simulations and extending the applicability of the code.

  7. Neutral Transport Simulations of Gas Puff Imaging Experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J.L.; Zweben, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Visible imaging of gas puffs has been used on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak to characterize edge plasma turbulence, yielding data that can be compared with plasma turbulence codes. Simulations of these experiments with the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code have been carried out to explore the relationship between the plasma fluctuations and the observed light emission. By imposing two-dimensional modulations on the measured time-average plasma density and temperature profiles, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the emission cloud reflects that of the underlying turbulence. However, the photon emission rate depends on the plasma density and temperature in a complicated way, and no simple scheme for inferring the plasma parameters directly from the light emission patterns is apparent. The simulations indicate that excited atoms generated by molecular dissociation are a significant source of photons, further complicating interpretation of the gas puff imaging results.Visibl e imaging of gas puffs has been used on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak to characterize edge plasma turbulence, yielding data that can be compared with plasma turbulence codes. Simulations of these experiments with the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code have been carried out to explore the relationship between the plasma fluctuations and the observed light emission. By imposing two-dimensional modulations on the measured time-average plasma density and temperature profiles, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the emission cloud reflects that of the underlying turbulence. However, the photon emission rate depends on the plasma density and temperature in a complicated way, and no simple scheme for inferring the plasma parameters directly from the light emission patterns is apparent. The simulations indicate that excited atoms generated by molecular dissociation are a significant source of photons, further complicating interpretation of the gas puff imaging results

  8. Laboratory simulation of erosion by space plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristoferson, L.; Fredga, K.

    1976-04-01

    A laboratory experiment has been made where a plasma stream collides with targets made of different materials of cosmic interest. The experiment can be viewed as a process simulation of the solar wind particle interaction with solid surfaces in space, e.g. cometary dust. Special interest is given to sputtering of OH and Na. It is shown that the erosion of solid particles in interplanetary space at large heliocentric distances is most likely dominated by sputtering and by sublimation near the sun. The heliocentric distance of the limit between the two regions is determined mainly by the material properties of the eroded surface, e.g. heat of sublimation and sputtering yield, a typical distance being 0,5 a.u. It is concluded that the observations of Na in comets at large solar distances, in some cases also near the sun, is most likely to be explained by solar wind sputtering. OH emission in space could be of importance also from 'dry', water-free, matter by means of molecule sputtering. The observed OH production rates in comets are however too large to be explained in this way and are certainly the results of sublimation and dissociation of H 2 O from an icy nucleus. (Auth.)

  9. Simulation of radiation in laser produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombant, D. G.; Klapisch, M.; Deniz, A. V.; Weaver, J.; Schmitt, A.

    1999-11-01

    The radiation hydrodynamics code FAST1D(J.H.Gardner,A.J.Schmitt,J.P.Dahlburg,C.J.Pawley,S.E.Bodner,S.P.Obenschain,V.Serlin and Y.Aglitskiy,Phys. Plasmas,5,1935(1998)) was used directly (i.e. without postprocessor) to simulate radiation emitted from flat targets irradiated by the Nike laser, from 10^12 W/cm^2 to 10^13W/cm^2. We use enough photon groups to resolve spectral lines. Opacities are obtained from the STA code(A.Bar-Shalom,J.Oreg,M.Klapisch and T.Lehecka,Phys.Rev.E,59,3512(1999)), and non LTE effects are described with the Busquet model(M.Busquet,Phys.Fluids B,5,4191(1993)). Results are compared to transmission grating spectra in the range 100-600eV, and to time-resolved calibrated filtered diodes (spectral windows around 100, 180, 280 and 450 eV).

  10. Fast Low-to-High Confinement Mode Bifurcation Dynamics in a Tokamak Edge Plasma Gyrokinetic Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C S; Ku, S; Tynan, G R; Hager, R; Churchill, R M; Cziegler, I; Greenwald, M; Hubbard, A E; Hughes, J W

    2017-04-28

    Transport barrier formation and its relation to sheared flows in fluids and plasmas are of fundamental interest in various natural and laboratory observations and of critical importance in achieving an economical energy production in a magnetic fusion device. Here we report the first observation of an edge transport barrier formation event in an electrostatic gyrokinetic simulation carried out in a realistic diverted tokamak edge geometry under strong forcing by a high rate of heat deposition. The results show that turbulent Reynolds-stress-driven sheared E×B flows act in concert with neoclassical orbit loss to quench turbulent transport and form a transport barrier just inside the last closed magnetic flux surface.

  11. Intermittent strong transport of the quasi-adiabatic plasma state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Bae; An, Chan-Yong; Min, Byunghoon

    2018-06-05

    The dynamics of the fluctuating electrostatic potential and the plasma density couched in the resistive-drift model at nearly adiabatic state are simulated. The linear modes are unstable if the phase difference between the potential and the density are positive. Exponential growth of the random small perturbations slows down due to the nonlinear E × B flows that work in two ways. They regulate the strength of the fluctuations by transferring the energy from the energy-producing scale to neighboring scales and reduce the cross phase at the same time. During quasi-steady relaxation sporadic appearance of very strong turbulent particle flux is observed that is characterized by the flat energy spectrum and the broad secondary peak in the mesoscale of the order of the gyro-radius. Such boost of the transport is found to be caused by presence of relatively large cross phase as the E × B flows are not effective in cancelling out the cross phase.

  12. MSTS - Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator theory manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.D.; Nichols, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, through the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, has designated the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada for detailed study as the candidate US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Site characterization will determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential waste repository. If the site is determined suitable, subsequent studies and characterization will be conducted to obtain authorization from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct the potential waste repository. A principal component of the characterization and licensing processes involves numerically predicting the thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment of the Yucca Mountain site to the potential repository over a 10,000-year period. The thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment to the repository is anticipated to include complex processes of countercurrent vapor and liquid migration, multiple-phase heat transfer, multiple-phase transport, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulators based on mathematical descriptions of these subsurface phenomena are required to make numerical predictions of the thermal and hydrologic response of the Yucca Mountain subsurface environment The engineering simulator called the Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator (MSTS) was developed at the request of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office to produce numerical predictions of subsurface flow and transport phenomena at the potential Yucca Mountain site. This document delineates the design architecture and describes the specific computational algorithms that compose MSTS. Details for using MSTS and sample problems are given in the open-quotes User's Guide and Referenceclose quotes companion document

  13. A treecode to simulate dust-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. M.; Holgate, J. T.

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of a small object with surrounding plasma is an area of plasma-physics research with a multitude of applications. This paper introduces the plasma octree code pot, a microscopic simulator of a spheroidal dust grain in a plasma. pot uses the Barnes-Hut treecode algorithm to perform N-body simulations of electrons and ions in the vicinity of a chargeable spheroid, employing also the Boris particle-motion integrator and Hutchinson’s reinjection algorithm from SCEPTIC; a description of the implementation of all three algorithms is provided. We present results from pot simulations of the charging of spheres in magnetised plasmas, and of spheroids in unmagnetized plasmas. The results call into question the validity of using the Boltzmann relation in hybrid PIC codes. Substantial portions of this paper are adapted from chapters 4 and 5 of the first author’s recent PhD dissertation.

  14. Transport simulations TFTR: Theoretically-based transport models and current scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redi, M.H.; Cummings, J.C.; Bush, C.E.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.; Hahm, T.S.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Scott, S.D.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Tang, W.M.; Taylor, G.

    1991-12-01

    In order to study the microscopic physics underlying observed L-mode current scaling, 1-1/2-d BALDUR has been used to simulate density and temperature profiles for high and low current, neutral beam heated discharges on TFTR with several semi-empirical, theoretically-based models previously compared for TFTR, including several versions of trapped electron drift wave driven transport. Experiments at TFTR, JET and D3-D show that I p scaling of τ E does not arise from edge modes as previously thought, and is most likely to arise from nonlocal processes or from the I p -dependence of local plasma core transport. Consistent with this, it is found that strong current scaling does not arise from any of several edge models of resistive ballooning. Simulations with the profile consistent drift wave model and with a new model for toroidal collisionless trapped electron mode core transport in a multimode formalism, lead to strong current scaling of τ E for the L-mode cases on TFTR. None of the theoretically-based models succeeded in simulating the measured temperature and density profiles for both high and low current experiments

  15. A thermal transport coefficient for ohmic and ICRF plasmas in alcator C-mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daughton, W.; Coppi, B.; Greenwald, M.

    1996-01-01

    The energy confinement in plasmas produced by Alcator C-Mod machine is markedly different from that observed by previous high field compact machines such as Alcator A and C, FT, and more recently FTU. For ohmic plasmas at low and moderate densities, the confinement times routinely exceed those expected from the so-called open-quotes neo-Alcatorclose quotes scaling by a factor as high as three. For both ohmic and ICRF heated plasmas, the energy confinement time increases with the current and is approximately independent of the density. The similarity in the confinement between the ohmic and ICRF regimes opens the possibility that the thermal transport in Alcator C-Mod may be described by one transport coefficient for both regimes. We introduce a modified form of a transport coefficient previously used to describe ohmic plasmas in Alcator C-Mod. The coefficient is inspired by the properties of the so-called open-quotes ubiquitousclose quotes mode that can be excited in the presence of a significant fraction of trapped electrons and also includes the constraint of profile consistency. A detailed series of transport simulations are used to show that the proposed coefficient can reproduce the observed temperature profiles, loop voltage and energy confinement time for both ohmic and ICRF discharges. A total of nearly two dozen ohmic and ICRF Alcator C-Mod discharges have been fit over the range of parameter space available using this transport coefficient

  16. Predictive simulations of radio frequency heated plasmas of Tore Supra using the Multi-Mode model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsekhovitch, Irina; Bateman, Glenn; Kritz, Arnold H.; Pankin, Alexei

    2002-01-01

    Multichannel integrated predictive simulations using the Multi-Mode transport model are carried out for radio frequency heated Tore Supra tokamak discharges in which helium is the primary ion component. Lower hybrid heated discharges in which the total current is driven noninductively [X. Litaudon et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 677 (2001)] and a discharge with ion cyclotron radio frequency heating of the hydrogen minority ions [G. T. Hoang et al., Nucl. Fusion 38, 117 (1998)] are simulated. The simulations of these discharges represent the first test of the Multi-Mode model in helium plasmas with dominant electron heating. Also for the first time, the particle transport in Tore Supra discharges is computed and the density profiles are predicted self-consistently with other transport channels. It is found in these simulations that the anomalous transport driven by trapped electron mode turbulence is dominant compared to the transport driven by the ion temperature gradient turbulence. The feature of the Multi-Mode model to calculate the impurity transport self-consistently with other transport channels is used in this study to predict the influence of carbon impurity influx on the discharge evolution

  17. Orbit effects on impurity transport in a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1988-01-01

    In 1985, very high ion temperature plasmas were first produced in TFTR with co-injecting neutral beams in low current, low density plasmas. This mode of operation is called the energetic ion mode in which the plasma rotates at very high speed. It was found that heavy impurities injected into these plasmas diffused out very quickly. In this paper, the authors calculate the impurity ion orbits in a rotating tokamak plasma based on the equation of motion in the frame that rotates with the plasma. It is shown that heavy particles in a rotating plasma can drift away from magnetic surfaces significantly faster. Particle orbits near the surface of a rotating tokamak are also analyzed. During impurity injection experiments, freshly ionized impurities near the plasma surface are essentially stationary in the laboratory frame and they are counter-rotating in the plasma frame with co-beam injection. The results are substantiated by numeral particle simulation. The computer code follows the impurity guiding center positions by integrating the equation of motion with the second order predictor-corrector method

  18. ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WALTZ, RE; CANDY, J; HINTON, FL; ESTRADA-MILA, C; KINSEY, JE.

    2004-01-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite β, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ * ) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or a globally with physical profile variation. Rohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, plasma pinches and impurity flow, and simulations at fixed flow rather than fixed gradient are illustrated and discussed

  19. Rare event simulation in radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollman, C.

    1993-10-01

    This dissertation studies methods for estimating extremely small probabilities by Monte Carlo simulation. Problems in radiation transport typically involve estimating very rare events or the expected value of a random variable which is with overwhelming probability equal to zero. These problems often have high dimensional state spaces and irregular geometries so that analytic solutions are not possible. Monte Carlo simulation must be used to estimate the radiation dosage being transported to a particular location. If the area is well shielded the probability of any one particular particle getting through is very small. Because of the large number of particles involved, even a tiny fraction penetrating the shield may represent an unacceptable level of radiation. It therefore becomes critical to be able to accurately estimate this extremely small probability. Importance sampling is a well known technique for improving the efficiency of rare event calculations. Here, a new set of probabilities is used in the simulation runs. The results are multiple by the likelihood ratio between the true and simulated probabilities so as to keep the estimator unbiased. The variance of the resulting estimator is very sensitive to which new set of transition probabilities are chosen. It is shown that a zero variance estimator does exist, but that its computation requires exact knowledge of the solution. A simple random walk with an associated killing model for the scatter of neutrons is introduced. Large deviation results for optimal importance sampling in random walks are extended to the case where killing is present. An adaptive ''learning'' algorithm for implementing importance sampling is given for more general Markov chain models of neutron scatter. For finite state spaces this algorithm is shown to give with probability one, a sequence of estimates converging exponentially fast to the true solution

  20. Orbit effects on impurity transport in a rotating tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1988-05-01

    Particle orbits in a rotating tokamak plasma are calculated from the equation of motion in the frame that rotates with the plasma. It is found that heavy particles in a rotating plasma can drift away from magnetic surfaces significantly faster with a higher bounce frequency, resulting in a diffusion coefficient much larger than that for a stationary plasma. Particle orbits near the surface of a rotating tokamak are also analyzed. Orbit effects indicate that more impurities can penetrate into a plasma rotating with counter-beam injection. Particle simulation is carried out with realistic experimental parameters and the results are in qualitative agreement with some experimental observations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). 19 refs., 15 figs

  1. Transition phenomena and thermal transport properties in LHD plasmas with an electron internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.; Inagaki, S.; Tamura, N.; Tokuzawa, T.; Morisaki, T.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Ida, K.; Yamada, I.; Narihara, K.; Muto, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Notake, T.; Ohkubo, K.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Watari, T.; Komori, A.

    2005-01-01

    Two types of improved core confinement were observed during centrally focused electron cyclotron heating (ECH) into plasmas sustained by counter (CNTR) and Co neutral beam injections (NBI) in the Large Helical Device. The CNTR NBI plasma displayed transition phenomena to the high-electron-temperature state and had a clear electron internal transport barrier, while the Co NBI plasma did not show a clear transition or an ECH power threshold but showed broad high temperature profiles with moderate temperature gradient. This indicated that the Co NBI plasma with additional ECH also had an improved core confinement. The electron heat transport characteristics of these plasmas were directly investigated using heat pulse propagation excited by modulated ECH. These effects appear to be related to the m/n = 2/1 rational surface or the island induced by NBI beam-driven current

  2. On transport and the bootstrap current in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Taylor, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The recently reported observation of the bootstrap current in a tokamak plasma highlights the problem of reconciling this neoclassical effect with the anomalous (i.e., non-neoclassical) electron thermal transport. This Comment reviews the bootstrap current and considers the implications of a self-consistent modification of neoclassical theory based on an enhanced electron-electron interaction. (author)

  3. Influence of plasma shape on transport in the TCV tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moret, J.M.; Franke, S.; Weisen, H.

    1996-11-01

    The energy confinement time of TCV ohmic, L-mode plasmas is observed to depend on the shape, improving slightly with elongation and degrading strongly with positive triangularity. This dependence can be explained by combination of geometrical effects on the temperature gradient and power degradation, without invoking a shape dependence of the transport coefficients. (author) 5 figs., 8 refs

  4. Tokamak transport phenomenology and plasma dynamic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moret, J.M.; Association Euratom CEA, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance

    1991-07-01

    A system identification method is developed to estimate the transfer function of the system from the time evolution of its parameters to any excitation. The form of the identified transfer function is linked to a representation of the transport in terms of poles (eigenvalues) and eigenmodes. These eigenvalues and eigenvectors are thus directly deduced from the raw data with no restriction on the underlying processes and there is consequently no need to adjust any simplified transport model to the experimental data. This method is illustrated in this paper by analysing the injection of pellets on Tore Supra. The density and the temperature transfer functions were observed to share the same poles with the corresponding eigenmodes grouped in pairs with identical profiles. This implies the presence of a coupling between the particle and heat flow. A criterion is developed to select amongst the possible coupling mechanisms, based on compatibility with the observed transfer function. The selection suggests a model in which the particle diffusion coefficient depends on the density and on the temperature gradient

  5. Simulation of photons from plasmas for the applications to display devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae June; Yoon, Hyun Jin; Lee, Jae Koo

    2007-07-01

    Numerical modeling of the photon transport of the ultraviolet (UV) and the visible lights are presented for plasma based display devices. The transport of UV lights which undergo resonance trapping by ground state atoms is solved by using the Holstein equation. After the UV lights are transformed to visible lights at the phosphor surfaces, the visible lights experience complicated traces inside the cell and finally are emitted toward the viewing window after having some power loss within the cell. A three-dimensional ray trace of the visible lights is calculated with a radiosity model. These simulations for the photons strengthen plasma discharge modeling for the application to display devices.

  6. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wei; Hsu, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection into a uniform hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into core fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER and NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment). Unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection is similar to compact toroid injection but with much higher plasma density and total mass, and consequently lower required injection velocit...

  7. Artificial cooling due to quiet injection in bounded plasma particle simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, W.S.

    1988-01-01

    An explanation is proposed for an artificial cooling effect seen in electrostatic particle-in-cell plasma simulations. The effect hinges on heat transport from the trapped electrons to fluctuations of the electric field, which are kept at a sub-thermal level through the continuous ''quiet'' injection of passing electrons. Further simulations are done which test and support the explanation. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc

  8. Computer simulation of radial transport in tandem mirror machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    A code used for simulation of classical radial transport in the 2XIIB experiment has been modified to simulate radial transport in TMX. Results have been obtained using classical transport coefficients and also using very simple trial neoclassical resonant transport coefficients. Comparison of the results obtained with solely classical transport and with both classical and neo-classical transport indicate that neoclassical transport depresses the ion density by approximately 5%. The central cell ion temperature is increased by approximately by the neo-classical transport, as is the electron temperature

  9. Kinetic transport in a magnetically confined and flux-constrained fusion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmet, G.

    2007-11-01

    This work deals with the kinetic transport in a fusion plasma magnetically confined and flux-constrained. The author proposes a new interpretation of the dynamics of zonal flows. The model that has been studied is a gyrokinetic model reduced to the transport of trapped ions. The inter-change stability that is generated allows the study of the kinetic transport of trapped ions. This model has a threshold instability and can be simulated over a few tens confining time for either thermal bath constraint or flux constraint. For thermal baths constraint, the simulation shows a metastable state where zonal flows are prevailing while turbulence is non-existent. In the case of a flux-constraint, zonal flows appear and relax by exchanging energy with system's kinetic energy and turbulence energy. The competition between zonal flows and turbulence can be then simulated by a predator-prey model. 2 regimes can be featured out: an improved confining regime where zonal flows dominate transport and a turbulent regime where zonal flows and turbulent transport are of the same magnitude order. We show that flux as well as the Reynolds tensor play an important role in the dynamics of the zonal flows and that the gyrokinetic description is relevant for all plasma regions. (A.C.)

  10. Perturbative transport experiments in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantica, P.; Gorini, G.; Sozzi, C. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Imbeaux, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X. [Association Euratom-CEA, St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Kinsey, J. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania (United States); Budny, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, New Jersey (United States); Coffey, I.; Parail, V.; Walden, A. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Dux, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Garzotti, L. [Istituto Gas Ionizzati, Padova (Italy); Ingesson, C. [FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kissick, M. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Perturbative transport experiments have been performed in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas either in conditions of fully developed Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) or during a phase where an ITB was not observed. Transient peripheral cooling was induced by either Laser Ablation or Shallow Pellet Injection and the ensuing travelling cold pulse was used to probe the plasma transport in the electron and, for the first time, also in the ion channel. Cold pulses travelling through ITBs are observed to erode the ITB outer part, but, if the inner ITB portion survives, it strongly damps the propagating wave. The result is discussed in the context of proposed possible pictures for ITB formation. In the absence of an ITB, the cold pulse shows a fast propagation in the outer plasma half, which is consistent with a region of stiff transport, while in the inner half it slows down but shows the peculiar feature of amplitude growing while propagating. The data are powerful tests for the validation of theoretical transport models. (author)

  11. Electromagnetic effects on trace impurity transport in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, T.; Angioni, C.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of electromagnetic effects on the transport of light and heavy impurities in tokamak plasmas is investigated by means of an extensive set of linear gyrokinetic numerical calculations with the code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] and of analytical derivations with a fluid model. The impurity transport is studied by appropriately separating diffusive and convective contributions, and conditions of background microturbulence dominated by both ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron modes (TEMs) are analyzed. The dominant contribution from magnetic flutter transport turns out to be of pure convective type. However it remains small, below 10% with respect to the E ×B transport. A significant impact on the impurity transport due to an increase in the plasma normalized pressure parameter β is observed in the case of ITG modes, while for TEM the overall effect remains weak. In realistic conditions of high β plasmas in the high confinement (H-) mode with dominant ITG turbulence, the impurity diffusivity is found to decrease with increasing β in qualitative agreement with recent observations in tokamaks. In contrast, in these conditions, the ratio of the total off-diagonal convective velocity to the diagonal diffusivity is not strongly affected by an increase in β, particularly at low impurity charge, due to a compensation between the different off-diagonal contributions.

  12. Higher order multipoles and splines in plasma simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, H.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1978-01-01

    The reduction of spatial grid effects in plasma simulations has been studied numerically using higher order multipole expansions and the spline method in one dimension. It is found that, while keeping the higher order moments such as quadrupole and octopole moments substantially reduces the grid effects, quadratic and cubic splines in general have better stability properties for numerical plasma simulations when the Debye length is much smaller than the grid size. In particular the spline method may be useful in three-dimensional simulations for plasma confinement where the grid size in the axial direction is much greater than the Debye length. (Auth.)

  13. Higher-order multipoles and splines in plasma simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, H.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1977-12-01

    Reduction of spatial grid effects in plasma simulations has been studied numerically using higher order multipole expansions and spline method in one dimension. It is found that, while keeping the higher order moments such as quadrupole and octopole moments substantially reduces the grid effects, quadratic and cubic splines in general have better stability properties for numerical plasma simulations when the Debye length is much smaller than the grid size. In particular, spline method may be useful in three dimensional simulations for plasma confinement where the grid size in the axial direction is much greater than the Debye length

  14. Simulation of W dust transport in the KSTAR tokamak, comparison with fast camera data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Autricque

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, dust transport in tokamak plasmas is studied through both experimental and modeling aspects. Image processing routines allowing dust tracking on CCD camera videos are presented. The DUMPRO (DUst Movie PROcessing code features a dust detection method and a trajectory reconstruction algorithm. In addition, a dust transport code named DUMBO (DUst Migration in a plasma BOundary is briefly described. It has been developed at CEA in order to simulate dust grains transport in tokamaks and to evaluate the contribution of dust to the impurity inventory of the plasma. Like other dust transport codes, DUMBO integrates the Orbital Motion Limited (OML approach for dust/plasma interactions modeling. OML gives direct expressions for plasma ions and electrons currents, forces and heat fluxes on a dust grain. The equation of motion is solved, giving access to the dust trajectory. An attempt of model validation is made through comparison of simulated and measured trajectories on the 2015 KSTAR dust injection experiment, where W dust grains were successfully injected in the plasma using a gun-type injector. The trajectories of the injected particles, estimated using the DUMPRO routines applied on videos from the fast CCD camera in KSTAR, show two distinct general dust behaviors, due to different dust sizes. Simulations were made with DUMBO to match the measurements. Plasma parameters were estimated using different diagnostics during the dust injection experiment plasma discharge. The experimental trajectories show longer lifetimes than the simulated ones. This can be due to the substitution of a boiling/sublimation point to the usual vaporization/sublimation cooling, OML limitations (eventual potential barriers in the vicinity of a dust grain are neglected and/or to the lack of a vapor shielding model in DUMBO.

  15. Modeling VOC transport in simulated waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Hotz, N.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    A volatile organic compound (VOC) transport model has been developed to describe unsteady-state VOC permeation and diffusion within a waste drum. Model equations account for three primary mechanisms for VOC transport from a void volume within the drum. These mechanisms are VOC permeation across a polymer boundary, VOC diffusion across an opening in a volume boundary, and VOC solubilization in a polymer boundary. A series of lab-scale experiments was performed in which the VOC concentration was measured in simulated waste drums under different conditions. A lab-scale simulated waste drum consisted of a sized-down 55-gal metal drum containing a modified rigid polyethylene drum liner. Four polyethylene bags were sealed inside a large polyethylene bag, supported by a wire cage, and placed inside the drum liner. The small bags were filled with VOC-air gas mixture and the VOC concentration was measured throughout the drum over a period of time. Test variables included the type of VOC-air gas mixtures introduced into the small bags, the small bag closure type, and the presence or absence of a variable external heat source. Model results were calculated for those trials where the VOC permeability had been measured. Permeabilities for five VOCs [methylene chloride, 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (Freon-113), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethylene] were measured across a polyethylene bag. Comparison of model and experimental results of VOC concentration as a function of time indicate that model accurately accounts for significant VOC transport mechanisms in a lab-scale waste drum

  16. Gyrokinetic theory for particle and energy transport in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falessi, Matteo Valerio; Zonca, Fulvio

    2018-03-01

    A set of equations is derived describing the macroscopic transport of particles and energy in a thermonuclear plasma on the energy confinement time. The equations thus derived allow studying collisional and turbulent transport self-consistently, retaining the effect of magnetic field geometry without postulating any scale separation between the reference state and fluctuations. Previously, assuming scale separation, transport equations have been derived from kinetic equations by means of multiple-scale perturbation analysis and spatio-temporal averaging. In this work, the evolution equations for the moments of the distribution function are obtained following the standard approach; meanwhile, gyrokinetic theory has been used to explicitly express the fluctuation induced fluxes. In this way, equations for the transport of particles and energy up to the transport time scale can be derived using standard first order gyrokinetics.

  17. Magnetic Cavitation and the Reemergence of Nonlocal Transport in Laser Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridgers, C. P.; Kingham, R. J.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first fully kinetic Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations of nanosecond laser-plasma interactions including self-consistent magnetic fields and hydrodynamic plasma expansion. For the largest magnetic fields externally applied to long-pulse laser-gas-jet experiments (12 T) a significant degree of cavitation of the B field (>40%) will be shown to occur from the laser-heated region in under half a nanosecond. This is due to the Nernst effect and leads to the reemergence of nonlocality even if the initial value of the magnetic field strength is sufficient to localize the transport

  18. The critical temperature gradient model of plasma transport: applications to Jet and future tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Lallia, P.P.; Watkins, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The diversity and complexity of behaviour in tokamak plasmas place strong constraints on any model attempting a description in terms of a single underlying phenomenon. Assuming that turbulence in the magnetic topology is the underlying phenomenon, specific expressions for electron and ion heat flux are derived from heuristic and dimensional arguments. When used in plasma transport codes, rather satisfactory simulations of experimental results are achieved in different sized tokamaks in various regimes of operation. Predictions are given for the expected performance of JET at full planned power and implications for next step tokamaks are indicated

  19. Low-temperature plasma modelling and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van J.

    2011-01-01

    Since its inception in the beginning of the twentieth century, low-temperature plasma science has become a major ¿eld of science. Low-temperature plasma sources and gas discharges are found in domestic, industrial, atmospheric and extra-terrestrial settings. Examples of domestic discharges are those

  20. TOUGH, Unsaturated Groundwater Transport and Heat Transport Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.A.; Cooper, C.; Osnes, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: A successor to the TOUGH program, TOUGH2 offers added capabilities and user features, including the flexibility to handle different fluid mixtures (water, water with tracer; water, CO 2 ; water, air; water, air with vapour pressure lowering, and water, hydrogen), facilities for processing of geometric data (computational grids), and an internal version control system to ensure referenceability of code applications. TOUGH (Transport of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat) is a multi-dimensional numerical model for simulating the coupled transport of water, vapor, air, and heat in porous and fractured media. The program provides options for specifying injection or withdrawal of heat and fluids. Although primarily designed for studies of high-level nuclear waste isolation in partially saturated geological media, it should also be useful for a wider range of problems in heat and moisture transfer, and in the drying of porous materials. For example, geothermal reservoir simulation problems can be handled simply by setting the air mass function equal to zero on input. The TOUGH simulator was developed for problems involving strongly heat-driven flow. To describe these phenomena a multi-phase approach to fluid and heat flow is used, which fully accounts for the movement of gaseous and liquid phases, their transport of latent transitions between liquid and vapor. TOUGH takes account of fluid flow in both liquid and gaseous phases occurring under pressure, viscous, and gravity forces according to Darcy's law. Interference between the phases is represented by means of relative permeability functions. The code handles binary, but not Knudsen, diffusion in the gas phase and capillary and phase absorption effects for the liquid phase. Heat transport occurs by means of conduction with thermal conductivity dependent on water saturation, convection, and binary diffusion, which includes both sensible and latent heat. 2 - Method of solution: All

  1. Impurity accumulation and performance of ITER and DEMO plasmas in the presence of transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatthong, B; Promping, J; Onjun, T

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the impurity accumulations and their performance in the presence of both ITB and ETB in ITER and DEMO plasmas are investigated using a BALDUR integrated predictive modelling code. In these simulations, a combination of a neoclassical transport model NCLASS and an anomalous transport model Mixed Bohm/gyro-Bohm is used. The boundary condition is described at the top of the pedestal, which is calculated theoretically based on a combination of magnetic and flow shear stabilization pedestal width scaling and an infinite-n ballooning pressure gradient model. The toroidal flow is calculated based on the NTV (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) toroidal velocity model. The time evolution of plasma temperature and density profiles of ITER and DEMO (Korean K-DEMO and Japanese DEMO models A, B and C) plasmas are simulated in H -mode scenario with and without ITB formation. It is found that Japanese DEMO model C yields highest plasma temperature; while Korean DEMO yields the best plasma performance among those designs considered. Impurity accumulation is found to be highest in Japanese DEMO model B. (paper)

  2. Core-SOL simulations of L-mode tokamak plasma discharges using BALDUR code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutthapong Pinanroj

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Core-SOL simulations were carried out of plasma in tokamak reactors operating in a low confinement mode (L-mode, for various conditions that match available experimental data. The simulation results were quantitatively compared against experimental data, showing that the average RMS errors for electron temperature, ion temperature, and electron density were lower than 16% or less for 14 L-mode discharges from two tokamaks named DIII-D and TFTR. In the simulations, the core plasma transport was described using a combination of neoclassical transport calculated by NCLASS module and anomalous transport by Multi-Mode-Model version 2001 (MMM2001. The scrape-off-layer (SOL is the small amount of residual plasma that interacts with the tokamak vessel, and was simulated by integrating the fluid equations, including sources, along open field lines. The SOL solution provided the boundary conditions of core plasma region on low confinement mode (L-mode. The experimental data were for 14 L-mode discharges and from two tokamaks, named DIII-D and TFTR.

  3. Computationally efficient description of relativistic electron beam transport in dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polomarov, Oleg; Sefkov, Adam; Kaganovich, Igor; Shvets, Gennady

    2006-10-01

    A reduced model of the Weibel instability and electron beam transport in dense plasma is developed. Beam electrons are modeled by macro-particles and the background plasma is represented by electron fluid. Conservation of generalized vorticity and quasineutrality of the plasma-beam system are used to simplify the governing equations. Our approach is motivated by the conditions of the FI scenario, where the beam density is likely to be much smaller than the plasma density and the beam energy is likely to be very high. For this case the growth rate of the Weibel instability is small, making the modeling of it by conventional PICs exceedingly time consuming. The present approach does not require resolving the plasma period and only resolves a plasma collisionless skin depth and is suitable for modeling a long-time behavior of beam-plasma interaction. An efficient code based on this reduced description is developed and benchmarked against the LSP PIC code. The dynamics of low and high current electron beams in dense plasma is simulated. Special emphasis is on peculiarities of its non-linear stages, such as filament formation and merger, saturation and post-saturation field and energy oscillations. *Supported by DOE Fusion Science through grant DE-FG02-05ER54840.

  4. Internal transport barrier in tokamak and helical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K.; Fujita, T.

    2018-03-01

    The differences and similarities between the internal transport barriers (ITBs) of tokamak and helical plasmas are reviewed. By comparing the characteristics of the ITBs in tokamak and helical plasmas, the mechanisms of the physics for the formation and dynamics of the ITB are clarified. The ITB is defined as the appearance of discontinuity of temperature, flow velocity, or density gradient in the radius. From the radial profiles of temperature, flow velocity, and density the ITB is characterized by the three parameters of normalized temperature gradient, R/{L}T, the location, {ρ }{ITB}, and the width, W/a, and can be expressed by ‘weak’ ITB (small R/{L}T) or ‘strong’ (large R/{L}T), ‘small’ ITB (small {ρ }{ITB}) or ‘large’ ITB (large {ρ }{ITB}), and ‘narrow’ (small W/a) or ‘wide’ (large W/a). Three key physics elements for the ITB formation, radial electric field shear, magnetic shear, and rational surface (and/or magnetic island) are described. The characteristics of electron and ion heat transport and electron and impurity transport are reviewed. There are significant differences in ion heat transport and electron heat transport. The dynamics of ITB formation and termination is also discussed. The emergence of the location of the ITB is sometimes far inside the ITB foot in the steady-state phase and the ITB region shows radial propagation during the formation of the ITB. The non-diffusive terms in momentum transport and impurity transport become more dominant in the plasma with the ITB. The reversal of the sign of non-diffusive terms in momentum transport and impurity transport associated with the formation of the ITB reported in helical plasma is described. Non-local transport plays an important role in determining the radial profile of temperature and density. The spontaneous change in temperature curvature (second radial derivative of temperature) in the ITB region is described. In addition, the key parameters of the control of the

  5. Fluid and gyrokinetic modelling of particle transport in plasmas with hollow density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegnered, D; Oberparleiter, M; Nordman, H; Strand, P

    2016-01-01

    Hollow density profiles occur in connection with pellet fuelling and L to H transitions. A positive density gradient could potentially stabilize the turbulence or change the relation between convective and diffusive fluxes, thereby reducing the turbulent transport of particles towards the center, making the fuelling scheme inefficient. In the present work, the particle transport driven by ITG/TE mode turbulence in regions of hollow density profiles is studied by fluid as well as gyrokinetic simulations. The fluid model used, an extended version of the Weiland transport model, Extended Drift Wave Model (EDWM), incorporates an arbitrary number of ion species in a multi-fluid description, and an extended wavelength spectrum. The fluid model, which is fast and hence suitable for use in predictive simulations, is compared to gyrokinetic simulations using the code GENE. Typical tokamak parameters are used based on the Cyclone Base Case. Parameter scans in key plasma parameters like plasma β, R/L T , and magnetic shear are investigated. It is found that β in particular has a stabilizing effect in the negative R/L n region, both nonlinear GENE and EDWM show a decrease in inward flux for negative R/L n and a change of direction from inward to outward for positive R/L n . This might have serious consequences for pellet fuelling of high β plasmas. (paper)

  6. Control of Internal Transport Barriers in Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panta, Soma; Newman, David; Sanchez, Raul; Terry, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices the best performance often involves some sort of transport barriers to reduce the energy and particle flow from core to edge. Those barriers create gradients in the temperature and density profiles. If gradients in the profiles are too steep that can lead to instabilities and the system collapses. Control of these barriers is therefore an important challenge for fusion devices (burning plasmas). In this work we focus on the dynamics of internal transport barriers. Using a simple 7 field transport model, extensively used for barrier dynamics and control studies, we explore the use of RF heating to control the local gradients and therefore the growth rates and shearing rates for barrier initiation and control in self-heated fusion plasmas. Ion channel barriers can be formed in self-heated plasmas with some NBI heating but electron channel barriers are very sensitive. They can be formed in self-heated plasmas with additional auxiliary heating i.e. NBI and radio-frequency(RF). Using RF heating on both electrons and ions at proper locations, electron channel barriers along with ion channel barriers can be formed and removed demonstrating a control technique. Investigating the role of pellet injection in controlling the barriers is our next goal. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER54741.

  7. Modification of PRETOR Code to Be Applied to Transport Simulation in Stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanet, J.; Castejon, F.; Dies, J.; Fontdecaba, J.; Alejaldre, C.

    2001-01-01

    The 1.5 D transport code PRETOR, that has been previously used to simulate tokamak plasmas, has been modified to perform transport analysis in stellarator geometry. The main modifications that have been introduced in the code are related with the magnetic equilibrium and with the modelling of energy and particle transport. Therefore, PRETOR- Stellarator version has been achieved and the code is suitable to perform simulations on stellarator plasmas. As an example, PRETOR- Stellarator has been used in the transport analysis of several Heliac Flexible TJ-II shots, and the results are compared with those obtained using PROCTR code. These results are also compared with the obtained using the tokamak version of PRETOR to show the importance of the introduced changes. (Author) 18 refs

  8. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, P.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  9. Fractional diffusion models of transport in magnetically confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Carreras, B. A.; Lynch, V. E.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical evidence suggests that transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas deviates from the standard diffusion paradigm. Some examples include the confinement time scaling in L-mode plasmas, rapid pulse propagation phenomena, and inward transport in off-axis fueling experiments. The limitations of the diffusion paradigm can be traced back to the restrictive assumptions in which it is based. In particular, Fick's law, one of the cornerstones of diffusive transport, assumes that the fluxes only depend on local quantities, i. e. the spatial gradient of the field (s). another key issue is the Markovian assumption that neglects memory effects. Also, at a microscopic level, standard diffusion assumes and underlying Gaussian, uncorrelated stochastic process (i. e. a Brownian random walk) with well defined characteristic spatio-temporal scales. Motivated by the need to develop models of non-diffusive transport, we discuss here a class of transport models base on the use of fractional derivative operators. The models incorporates in a unified way non-Fickian transport, non-Markovian processes or memory effects, and non-diffusive scaling. At a microscopic level, the models describe an underlying stochastic process without characteristic spatio-temporal scales that generalizes the Brownian random walk. As a concrete case study to motivate and test the model, we consider transport of tracers in three-dimensional, pressure-gradient-driven turbulence. We show that in this system transport is non-diffusive and cannot be described in the context of the standard diffusion parading. In particular, the probability density function (pdf) of the radial displacements of tracers is strongly non-Gaussian with algebraic decaying tails, and the moments of the tracer displacements exhibit super-diffusive scaling. there is quantitative agreement between the turbulence transport calculations and the proposed fractional diffusion model. In particular, the model

  10. Plasma simulations using the Car-Parrinello method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerouin, J.; Zerah, G.; Benisti, D.; Hansen, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified version of the Car-Parrinello method, based on the Thomas-Fermi (local density) functional for the electrons, is adapted to the simulation of the ionic dynamics in dense plasmas. The method is illustrated by an explicit application to a degenerate one-dimensional hydrogen plasma

  11. LOMEGA: a low frequency, field implicit method for plasma simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.C.; Kamimura, T.

    1982-04-01

    Field implicit methods for low frequency plasma simulation by the LOMEGA (Low OMEGA) codes are described. These implicit field methods may be combined with particle pushing algorithms using either Lorentz force or guiding center force models to study two-dimensional, magnetized, electrostatic plasmas. Numerical results for ωsub(e)deltat>>1 are described. (author)

  12. Electromagnetic effects on plasma blob-filament transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae, E-mail: wol023@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Angus, J.R. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Umansky, Maxim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Krasheninnikov, Sergei I. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Nuclear Research National University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Both microscopic and macroscopic impacts of the electromagnetic effects on blob dynamics are considered. Linear stability analysis and nonlinear BOUT++ simulations demonstrate that electromagnetic effects in high temperature or high beta plasmas suppress the resistive drift wave turbulence in the blob when resistivity drops below a certain value. In the course of blob’s motion in the SOL its temperature is reduced, which leads to enhancement of resistive effects, so the blob can switch from electromagnetic to electrostatic regime, where resistive drift wave turbulence become important. It is found that inhomogeneity of magnetic curvature or plasma pressure along the filament length leads to bending of the high-beta blob filaments. This is caused by the increase of the propagation time of plasma current (Alfvén time) in higher-density plasma. The effects of sheath boundary conditions on the part of the blob away from the boundary are also diminished by the increased Alfvén time.

  13. Impurity transport in a collision-dominated rotating tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, G.; Liljegren, A.

    1981-04-01

    The flux of heavy impurities is an axisymmetric, toroidal plasma with all particles in the collision-dominated regime is considered. Plasma rotation and charge-exchange with neutrals are taken into account. A hydrodynamic model employing Braginskii's transport equations is used. The theorry is extended to higher collision freqencies as compared to previous treatments. It is found that the Pfirsch-Schlueter flux is significantly reduced as compared to the value given by Rutherford and that it is of the same order of magnitude, or less, than the classical flux in all regimes considered. It is also shown that the impurity flux can be influenced by charge-exchange with neutrals. (author)

  14. Revisited neoclassical transport theory for steep, collisional plasma edge profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    Published neoclassical results are misleading as concerns the plasma edge for they do not adequately take the peculiar local conditions into account, in particular the fact that the density and temperature variation length-scales are quite small. Coupled novel neoclassical equations obtain, not only for the evolution of the density and temperatures, but also for the radial electric field and the evolution of the parallel ion momentum: gyro-stresses and inertia indeed upset the otherwise de facto ambipolarity of particle transport and a radial electric field necessarily builds up. The increased nonlinear character of these revisited neoclassical equations widens the realm of possible plasma behaviors. (author)

  15. Modeling of impurity transport in the core plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of computer modeling of impurity transport in the core region of controlled thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The atomic processes of importance in these high temperature plasmas and the numerical formulation of the model are described. Selected modeling examples are then used to highlight some features of the physics of impurity behavior in large tokamak fusion devices, with an emphasis on demonstrating the sensitivity of such modeling to uncertainties in the rate coefficients used for the atomic processes. This leads to a discussion of current requirements and opportunities for generating the improved sets of comprehensive atomic data needed to support present and future fusion impurity modeling studies

  16. Transport in zonal flows in analogous geophysical and plasma systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego

    1999-11-01

    Zonal flows occur naturally in the oceans and the atmosphere of planets. Important examples include the zonal flows in Jupiter, the stratospheric polar jet in Antarctica, and oceanic jets like the Gulf Stream. These zonal flows create transport barriers that have a crucial influence on mixing and confinement (e.g. the ozone depletion in Antarctica). Zonal flows also give rise to long-lasting vortices (e.g. the Jupiter red spot) by shear instability. Because of this, the formation and stability of zonal flows and their role on transport have been problems of great interest in geophysical fluid dynamics. On the other hand, zonal flows have also been observed in fusion plasmas and their impact on the reduction of transport has been widely recognized. Based on the well-known analogy between Rossby waves in quasigeostrophic flows and drift waves in magnetically confined plasmas, I will discuss the relevance to fusion plasmas of models and experiments recently developed in geophysical fluid dynamics. Also, the potential application of plasma physics ideas to geophysical flows will be discussed. The role of shear in the suppression of transport and the effect of zonal flows on the statistics of transport will be studied using simplified models. It will be shown how zonal flows induce large particle displacements that can be characterized as Lévy flights, and that the trapping effect of vortices combined with the zonal flows gives rise to anomalous diffusion and Lévy (non-Gaussian) statistics. The models will be compared with laboratory experiments and with atmospheric and oceanographic qualitative observations.

  17. Rare Event Simulation in Radiation Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollman, Craig

    This dissertation studies methods for estimating extremely small probabilities by Monte Carlo simulation. Problems in radiation transport typically involve estimating very rare events or the expected value of a random variable which is with overwhelming probability equal to zero. These problems often have high dimensional state spaces and irregular geometries so that analytic solutions are not possible. Monte Carlo simulation must be used to estimate the radiation dosage being transported to a particular location. If the area is well shielded the probability of any one particular particle getting through is very small. Because of the large number of particles involved, even a tiny fraction penetrating the shield may represent an unacceptable level of radiation. It therefore becomes critical to be able to accurately estimate this extremely small probability. Importance sampling is a well known technique for improving the efficiency of rare event calculations. Here, a new set of probabilities is used in the simulation runs. The results are multiplied by the likelihood ratio between the true and simulated probabilities so as to keep our estimator unbiased. The variance of the resulting estimator is very sensitive to which new set of transition probabilities are chosen. It is shown that a zero variance estimator does exist, but that its computation requires exact knowledge of the solution. A simple random walk with an associated killing model for the scatter of neutrons is introduced. Large deviation results for optimal importance sampling in random walks are extended to the case where killing is present. An adaptive "learning" algorithm for implementing importance sampling is given for more general Markov chain models of neutron scatter. For finite state spaces this algorithm is shown to give, with probability one, a sequence of estimates converging exponentially fast to the true solution. In the final chapter, an attempt to generalize this algorithm to a continuous

  18. MED101: a laser-plasma simulation code. User guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, P.A.; Rose, S.J.; Rogoyski, A.M.

    1989-12-01

    Complete details for running the 1-D laser-plasma simulation code MED101 are given including: an explanation of the input parameters, instructions for running on the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory IBM, Atlas Centre Cray X-MP and DEC VAX, and information on three new graphics packages. The code, based on the existing MEDUSA code, is capable of simulating a wide range of laser-produced plasma experiments including the calculation of X-ray laser gain. (author)

  19. Conceptual Design and Simulation of a Miniature Plasma Focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, H.; Habibi, M.; Amrollahi, R.

    2012-01-01

    Design and construction of a miniature plasma focus device with 3.6 J of energy bank is reported. In design the device, some of very important parameters of designing such as plasma energy density and derive parameter was used. Regarding to the electrical and geometrical parameters of the device, a simulation is carried out by MATLAB software. Simulation results showed that the formation of the pinch have occurred at the moment of the peak discharge current.

  20. Transition phenomena and thermal transport property in LHD plasmas with an electron internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.

    2005-01-01

    Two kinds of improved core confinement were observed during centrally focused Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) into plasmas sustained by Counter (CNTR) and Co Neutral Beam Injections (NBI) in the Large Helical Device (LHD). One shows transition phenomena to the high-electron-temperature state and has a clear electron Internal Transport Barrier (eITB) in CNTR NBI plasma. Another has no clear transition and no ECH power threshold, but shows a broad high temperature profiles with moderate temperature gradient, which indicates the improved core confinement with additional ECH in Co NBI plasma. The electron heat transport characteristics of these plasmas were directly investigated by using the heat pulse propagation excited by Modulated ECH (MECH). The difference of the features could be caused by the existence of the m/n=2/1 rational surface or island determined by the direction of NBI beam-driven current. (author)

  1. Variations of helicon wave induced radial plasma transport in different experimental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzilka, V.

    1993-08-01

    Variations of the helicon wave induced radial plasma transport are presented in dependence on values of the plasma radius, magnetostatic field, plasma density, frequency of the helicon wave and on the ion charge. 22 refs., 14 figs

  2. The gyro-radius scaling of ion thermal transport from global numerical simulations of ITG turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Manfredi, G.

    1998-12-01

    A three-dimensional, fluid code is used to study the scaling of ion thermal transport caused by Ion-Temperature-Gradient-Driven (ITG) turbulence. The code includes toroidal effects and is capable of simulating the whole torus. It is found that both close to the ITG threshold and well above threshold, the thermal transport and the turbulence structures exhibit a gyro-Bohm scaling, at least for plasmas with moderate poloidal flow. (author)

  3. Effect of density control and impurity transport on internal transport barrier formation in tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakami, Tomoyuki; Fujita, Takaaki; Arimoto, Hideki; Yamazaki, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    In future fusion reactors, density control, such as fueling by pellet injection, is an effective method to control the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB) in reversed magnetic shear plasma, which can improve plasma performance. On the other hand, an operation with ITB can cause accumulation of impurities inside the core ITB region. We studied the relation between pellet injection and ITB formation and the effect of impurity transport on the core of ITB for tokamak plasmas by using the toroidal transport analysis linkage. For ITB formation, we showed that the pellet has to be injected beyond the position where the safety factor q takes the minimum value. We confirmed that the accumulation of impurities causes the attenuation of ITB owing to radiation loss inside the ITB region. Moreover, in terms of the divertor heat flux reduction by impurity gas, the line radiation loss is high for high-Z noble gas impurities, such as Kr, whereas factor Q decreases slightly. (author)

  4. Heat and momentum transport of ion internal transport barrier plasmas on Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, K.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.

    2010-11-01

    The peaked ion-temperature profile with steep gradient so called ion internal transport barrier (ion ITB) was formed in the neutral beam heated plasmas on the Large Helical Device (LHD) and the high-ion-temperature regime of helical plasmas has been significantly extended. The ion thermal diffusivity in the ion ITB plasma decreases down to the neoclassical transport level. The heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) observed the smooth potential profile with negative radial electric field (ion root) in the core region where the ion thermal diffusivity decreases significantly. The large toroidal rotation was also observed in the ion ITB core and the transport of toroidal momentum was analyzed qualitatively. The decrease of momentum diffusivity with ion temperature increase was observed in the ion ITB core. The toroidal rotation driven by ion temperature gradient so called intrinsic rotation is also identified. (author)

  5. Transport Simulations for Fast Ignition on NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strozzi, D J; Tabak, M; Grote, D P; Cohen, B I; Shay, H D; Town, R J; Kemp, A J; Key, M

    2009-10-26

    We are designing a full hydro-scale cone-guided, indirect-drive FI coupling experiment, for NIF, with the ARC-FIDO short-pulse laser. Current rad-hydro designs with limited fuel jetting into cone tip are not yet adequate for ignition. Designs are improving. Electron beam transport simulations (implicit-PIC LSP) show: (1) Magnetic fields and smaller angular spreads increase coupling to ignition-relevant 'hot spot' (20 um radius); (2) Plastic CD (for a warm target) produces somewhat better coupling than pure D (cryogenic target) due to enhanced resistive B fields; and (3) The optimal T{sub hot} for this target is {approx} 1 MeV; coupling falls by 3x as T{sub hot} rises to 4 MeV.

  6. Transport simulation of mangoes irradiated for exportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broisler, Paula Olhe

    2007-01-01

    It had been studied the effect of the ionizing radiation (gamma) in mangoes for exportation, simulating the stage of preservation of the fruit during its transport, through the refrigeration in cold chamber. In a first stage they had been analyzed through loss of weight, pH, treatable acidity, soluble solid, texture and decomposition. Later, sensorial analyses had been become fulfilled (alterations of color, odor, flavor, texture). The assays had been carried through in two stadiums of maturation of the fruits, that is, 2 and 3, with the intention of studying optimum point of harvest for the best dosage of irradiation. The results disclose together that the treatment of the mangoes Tommy Atkins in the dose of 0,75 kGy was significant, with the fruit in stadium 2, for the retardation of the matureness and consequent profit of time for the exportation. (author)

  7. Physics of strong internal transport barriers in JT-60U reversed-magnetic-shear plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, N; Takizuka, T; Sakamoto, Y; Fujita, T; Kamada, Y; Ide, S; Koide, Y [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The physics of strong internal transport barriers (ITBs) in JT-60U reversed-magnetic-shear (RS) plasmas has been studied through the modelling on the 1.5 dimensional transport simulation. The key physics to produce two scalings on the basis of the JT-60U box-type ITB database are identified. As for the scaling for the narrow ITB width proportional to the ion poloidal gyroradius, the following three physics are important: (1) the sharp reduction of the anomalous transport below the neoclassical level in the RS region, (2) the autonomous formation of pressure and current profiles through the neoclassical transport and the bootstrap current and (3) the large difference between the neoclassical transport and the anomalous transport in the normal-shear region. As for the scaling for the energy confinement inside ITB ({epsilon}{sub f}{beta}{sub p,core} {approx} 0.25, where {epsilon}{sub f} is the inverse aspect ratio at the ITB foot and {beta}{sub p,core} is the core poloidal beta value), the value of 0.25 is found to be a saturation value due to the MHD equilibrium. The value of {epsilon}{sub f}{beta}{sub p,core} reaches the saturation value, when the box-type ITB is formed in the strong RS plasma with a large asymmetry of the poloidal magnetic field, regardless of the details of the transport and the non-inductively driven current.

  8. Nonlocal collisionless and collisional electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Igor

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of the talk is to describe recent advances in nonlocal electron kinetics in low-pressure plasmas. A distinctive property of partially ionized plasmas is that such plasmas are always in a non-equilibrium state: the electrons are not in thermal equilibrium with the neutral species and ions, and the electrons are also not in thermodynamic equilibrium within their own ensemble, which results in a significant departure of the electron velocity distribution function from a Maxwellian. These non-equilibrium conditions provide considerable freedom to choose optimal plasma parameters for applications, which make gas discharge plasmas remarkable tools for a variety of plasma applications, including plasma processing, discharge lighting, plasma propulsion, particle beam sources, and nanotechnology. Typical phenomena in such discharges include nonlocal electron kinetics, nonlocal electrodynamics with collisionless electron heating, and nonlinear processes in the sheaths and in the bounded plasmas. Significant progress in understanding the interaction of electromagnetic fields with real bounded plasma created by this field and the resulting changes in the structure of the applied electromagnetic field has been one of the major achievements of the last decade in this area of research [1-3]. We show on specific examples that this progress was made possible by synergy between full scale particle-in-cell simulations, analytical models, and experiments. In collaboration with Y. Raitses, A.V. Khrabrov, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, USA; V.I. Demidov, UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Rd., Beavercreek, OH 45322, USA and AFRL, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433, USA; and D. Sydorenko, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. [4pt] [1] D. Sydorenko, A. Smolyakov, I. Kaganovich, and Y. Raitses, IEEE Trans. Plasma Science 34, 895 (2006); Phys. Plasmas 13, 014501 (2006); 14 013508 (2007); 15, 053506 (2008). [0pt] [2] I. D. Kaganovich, Y. Raitses, D. Sydorenko, and

  9. Computational Simulation of High Energy Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-30

    the imploding liner. The PFS depends on a lithium barrier foil slowing the advance of deuterium up the coaxial gun to the corner. There the plasma ...the coaxial gun section, and Figure 4 shows the physical state of the plasma just prior to pinch. Figure 5 shows neutron yield reaching 1014 in this...details the channel geometry between the center cylinder and coaxial gas gun . The deuterium injection starts when the pressure of the deuterium gas in

  10. Comparing DINA code simulations with TCV experimental plasma equilibrium responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Lister, J.B.; Lukash, V.E.; Wainwright, J.P.

    2000-08-01

    The DINA non-linear time dependent simulation code has been validated against an extensive set of plasma equilibrium response experiments carried out on the TCV tokamak. Limited and diverted plasmas are found to be well modelled during the plasma current flat top. In some simulations the application of the PF coil voltage stimulation pulse sufficiently changed the plasma equilibrium that the vertical position feedback control loop became unstable. This behaviour was also found in the experimental work, and cannot be reproduced using linear time-independent models. A single null diverted plasma discharge was also simulated from start-up to shut-down and the results were found to accurately reproduce their experimental equivalents. The most significant difference noted was the penetration time of the poloidal flux, leading to a delayed onset of sawtoothing in the DINA simulation. The complete set of frequency stimulation experiments used to measure the open loop tokamak plasma equilibrium response was also simulated using DINA and the results were analysed in an identical fashion to the experimental data. The frequency response of the DINA simulations agrees with the experimental results. Comparisons with linear models are also discussed to identify areas of good and only occasionally less good agreement. (author)

  11. A Toroidally Symmetric Plasma Simulation code for design of position and shape control on tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Haruhiko; Senda, Ikuo

    1999-01-01

    A Toroidally Symmetric Plasma Simulation (TSPS) code has been developed for investigating the position and shape control on tokamak plasmas. The analyses of three-dimensional eddy currents on the conducting components around the plasma and the two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium are taken into account in this code. The code can analyze the plasma position and shape control during the minor disruption in which the deformation of plasma is not negligible. Using the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) parameters, some examples of calculations are shown in this paper. (author)

  12. Pellet injection into H-mode ITER plasma with the presence of internal transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekhaphan, P.; Onjun, T.

    2011-04-01

    The impacts of pellet injection into ITER type-1 ELMy H-mode plasma with the presence of internal transport barriers (ITBs) are investigated using self-consistent core-edge simulations of 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the plasma core transport is predicted using a combination of a semi-empirical Mixed B/gB anomalous transport model, which can self-consistently predict the formation of ITBs, and the NCLASS neoclassical model. For simplicity, it is assumed that toroidal velocity for ω E× B calculation is proportional to local ion temperature. In addition, the boundary conditions are predicted using the pedestal temperature model based on magnetic and flow shear stabilization width scaling; while the density of each plasma species, including both hydrogenic and impurity species, at the boundary are assumed to be a large fraction of its line averaged density. For the pellet's behaviors in the hot plasma, the Neutral Gas Shielding (NGS) model by Milora-Foster is used. It was found that the injection of pellet could result in further improvement of fusion performance from that of the formation of ITB. However, the impact of pellet injection is quite complicated. It is also found that the pellets cannot penetrate into a deep core of the plasma. The injection of the pellet results in a formation of density peak in the region close to the plasma edge. The injection of pellet can result in an improved nuclear fusion performance depending on the properties of pellet (i.e., increase up to 5% with a speed of 1 km/s and radius of 2 mm). A sensitivity analysis is carried out to determine the impact of pellet parameters, which are: the pellet radius, the pellet velocity, and the frequency of injection. The increase in the pellet radius and frequency were found to greatly improve the performance and effectiveness of fuelling. However, changing the velocity is observed to exert small impact.

  13. Relationship between particle and heat transport in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaga, H.

    2002-01-01

    Relationship between particle and heat transport in an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been systematically investigated for the first time in reversed shear (RS) and high-β p ELMy H-mode (weak positive shear) plasmas of JT-60U for understanding of compatibility of improved energy confinement and effective particle control such as exhaust of helium ash and reduction in impurity contamination. In the RS plasma, no helium and carbon accumulation inside the ITB is observed even with highly improved energy confinement. In the high-β p plasma, both helium and carbon density profiles are flat. As the ion temperature profile changes from parabolic- to box-type, the helium diffusivity decreases by a factor of about 2 as well as the ion thermal diffusivity in the RS plasma. The measured soft X-ray profile is more peaked than that calculated by assuming the same n AR profile as the n e profile in the Ar injected RS plasma with the box-type profile, suggesting accumulation of Ar inside the ITB. Particle transport is improved with no change of ion temperature in the RS plasma, when density fluctuation is drastically reduced by a pellet injection. (author)

  14. Bringing global gyrokinetic turbulence simulations to the transport timescale using a multiscale approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey; Lodestro, Lynda; Told, Daniel; Merlo, Gabriele; Ricketson, Lee; Campos, Alejandro; Jenko, Frank; Hittinger, Jeffrey

    2017-10-01

    Predictive whole-device simulation models will play an increasingly important role in ensuring the success of fusion experiments and accelerating the development of fusion energy. In the core of tokamak plasmas, a separation of timescales between turbulence and transport makes a single direct simulation of both processes computationally expensive. We present the first demonstration of a multiple-timescale method coupling global gyrokinetic simulations with a transport solver to calculate the self-consistent, steady-state temperature profile. Initial results are highly encouraging, with the coupling method appearing robust to the difficult problem of turbulent fluctuations. The method holds potential for integrating first-principles turbulence simulations into whole-device models and advancing the understanding of global plasma behavior. Work supported by US DOE under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and the Exascale Computing Project (17-SC-20-SC).

  15. Towards self-consistent plasma modelisation in presence of neoclassical tearing mode and sawteeth: effects on transport coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, V.; Huynh, P.; Merle, A.; Nowak, S.; Sauter, O.; Contributors, JET; the EUROfusion-IM Team

    2017-12-01

    The neoclassical tearing modes (NTM) increase the effective heat and particle radial transport inside the plasma, leading to a flattening of the electron and ion temperature and density profiles at a given location depending on the safety factor q rational surface (Hegna and Callen 1997 Phys. Plasmas 4 2940). In burning plasma such as in ITER, this NTM-induced increased transport could reduce significantly the fusion performance and even lead to a disruption. Validating models describing the NTM-induced transport in present experiment is thus important to help quantifying this effect on future devices. In this work, we apply an NTM model to an integrated simulation of current, heat and particle transport on JET discharges using the European transport simulator. In this model, the heat and particle radial transport coefficients are modified by a Gaussian function locally centered at the NTM position and characterized by a full width proportional to the island size through a constant parameter adapted to obtain the best simulations of experimental profiles. In the simulation, the NTM model is turned on at the same time as the mode is triggered in the experiment. The island evolution is itself determined by the modified Rutherford equation, using self-consistent plasma parameters determined by the transport evolution. The achieved simulation reproduces the experimental measurements within the error bars, before and during the NTM. A small discrepancy is observed on the radial location of the island due to a shift of the position of the computed q = 3/2 surface compared to the experimental one. To explain such small shift (up to about 12% with respect to the position observed from the experimental electron temperature profiles), sensitivity studies of the NTM location as a function of the initialization parameters are presented. First results validate both the transport model and the transport modification calculated by the NTM model.

  16. Correlated prompt fission data in transport simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talou, P.; Vogt, R.; Randrup, J.; Rising, M. E.; Pozzi, S. A.; Verbeke, J.; Andrews, M. T.; Clarke, S. D.; Jaffke, P.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Marcath, M. J.; Meierbachtol, K.; Nakae, L.; Rusev, G.; Sood, A.; Stetcu, I.; Walker, C.

    2018-01-01

    Detailed information on the fission process can be inferred from the observation, modeling and theoretical understanding of prompt fission neutron and γ-ray observables. Beyond simple average quantities, the study of distributions and correlations in prompt data, e.g., multiplicity-dependent neutron and γ-ray spectra, angular distributions of the emitted particles, n - n, n - γ, and γ - γ correlations, can place stringent constraints on fission models and parameters that would otherwise be free to be tuned separately to represent individual fission observables. The FREYA and CGMF codes have been developed to follow the sequential emissions of prompt neutrons and γ rays from the initial excited fission fragments produced right after scission. Both codes implement Monte Carlo techniques to sample initial fission fragment configurations in mass, charge and kinetic energy and sample probabilities of neutron and γ emission at each stage of the decay. This approach naturally leads to using simple but powerful statistical techniques to infer distributions and correlations among many observables and model parameters. The comparison of model calculations with experimental data provides a rich arena for testing various nuclear physics models such as those related to the nuclear structure and level densities of neutron-rich nuclei, the γ-ray strength functions of dipole and quadrupole transitions, the mechanism for dividing the excitation energy between the two nascent fragments near scission, and the mechanisms behind the production of angular momentum in the fragments, etc. Beyond the obvious interest from a fundamental physics point of view, such studies are also important for addressing data needs in various nuclear applications. The inclusion of the FREYA and CGMF codes into the MCNP6.2 and MCNPX - PoliMi transport codes, for instance, provides a new and powerful tool to simulate correlated fission events in neutron transport calculations important in

  17. Correlated prompt fission data in transport simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talou, P.; Jaffke, P.; Kawano, T.; Stetcu, I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nuclear Physics Group, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogt, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California, Physics Department, Davis, CA (United States); Randrup, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Rising, M.E.; Andrews, M.T.; Sood, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Methods, Codes, and Applications Group, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pozzi, S.A.; Clarke, S.D.; Marcath, M.J. [University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Verbeke, J.; Nakae, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Livermore, CA (United States); Jandel, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Group, Los Alamos, NM (United States); University of Massachusetts, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Lowell, MA (United States); Meierbachtol, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rusev, G.; Walker, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Group, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Detailed information on the fission process can be inferred from the observation, modeling and theoretical understanding of prompt fission neutron and γ-ray observables. Beyond simple average quantities, the study of distributions and correlations in prompt data, e.g., multiplicity-dependent neutron and γ-ray spectra, angular distributions of the emitted particles, n-n, n-γ, and γ-γ correlations, can place stringent constraints on fission models and parameters that would otherwise be free to be tuned separately to represent individual fission observables. The FREYA and CGMF codes have been developed to follow the sequential emissions of prompt neutrons and γ rays from the initial excited fission fragments produced right after scission. Both codes implement Monte Carlo techniques to sample initial fission fragment configurations in mass, charge and kinetic energy and sample probabilities of neutron and γ emission at each stage of the decay. This approach naturally leads to using simple but powerful statistical techniques to infer distributions and correlations among many observables and model parameters. The comparison of model calculations with experimental data provides a rich arena for testing various nuclear physics models such as those related to the nuclear structure and level densities of neutron-rich nuclei, the γ-ray strength functions of dipole and quadrupole transitions, the mechanism for dividing the excitation energy between the two nascent fragments near scission, and the mechanisms behind the production of angular momentum in the fragments, etc. Beyond the obvious interest from a fundamental physics point of view, such studies are also important for addressing data needs in various nuclear applications. The inclusion of the FREYA and CGMF codes into the MCNP6.2 and MCNPX-PoliMi transport codes, for instance, provides a new and powerful tool to simulate correlated fission events in neutron transport calculations important in nonproliferation

  18. Nonlinear transport processes in tokamak plasmas. I. The collisional regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Peeters, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    An application of the thermodynamic field theory (TFT) to transport processes in L-mode tokamak plasmas is presented. The nonlinear corrections to the linear ('Onsager') transport coefficients in the collisional regimes are derived. A quite encouraging result is the appearance of an asymmetry between the Pfirsch-Schlueter (P-S) ion and electron transport coefficients: the latter presents a nonlinear correction, which is absent for the ions, and makes the radial electron coefficients much larger than the former. Explicit calculations and comparisons between the neoclassical results and the TFT predictions for Joint European Torus (JET) plasmas are also reported. It is found that the nonlinear electron P-S transport coefficients exceed the values provided by neoclassical theory by a factor that may be of the order 10 2 . The nonlinear classical coefficients exceed the neoclassical ones by a factor that may be of order 2. For JET, the discrepancy between experimental and theoretical results for the electron losses is therefore significantly reduced by a factor 10 2 when the nonlinear contributions are duly taken into account but, there is still a factor of 10 2 to be explained. This is most likely due to turbulence. The expressions of the ion transport coefficients, determined by the neoclassical theory in these two regimes, remain unaltered. The low-collisional regimes, i.e., the plateau and the banana regimes, are analyzed in the second part of this work

  19. Plasma rotation and transport in MAST spherical tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, A. R.; Michael, C.; Akers, R. J.; Candy, J.; Colyer, G.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ghim, Y.-c.; Roach, C. M.; Saarelma, S.; MAST Team

    2011-06-01

    The formation of internal transport barriers (ITBs) is investigated in MAST spherical tokamak plasmas. The relative importance of equilibrium flow shear and magnetic shear in their formation and evolution is investigated using data from high-resolution kinetic- and q-profile diagnostics. In L-mode plasmas, with co-current directed NBI heating, ITBs in the momentum and ion thermal channels form in the negative shear region just inside qmin. In the ITB region the anomalous ion thermal transport is suppressed, with ion thermal transport close to the neo-classical level, although the electron transport remains anomalous. Linear stability analysis with the gyro-kinetic code GS2 shows that all electrostatic micro-instabilities are stable in the negative magnetic shear region in the core, both with and without flow shear. Outside the ITB, in the region of positive magnetic shear and relatively weak flow shear, electrostatic micro-instabilities become unstable over a wide range of wave numbers. Flow shear reduces the linear growth rates of low-k modes but suppression of ITG modes is incomplete, which is consistent with the observed anomalous ion transport in this region; however, flow shear has little impact on growth rates of high-k, electron-scale modes. With counter-NBI ITBs of greater radial extent form outside qmin due to the broader profile of E × B flow shear produced by the greater prompt fast-ion loss torque.

  20. Turbulent transport of impurities in a magnetized plasma; Transport turbulent d'impuretes dans un plasma magnetise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubuit, N

    2006-10-15

    This work deals with the transport of impurities in magnetically confined thermonuclear plasmas. The accumulation of impurities in the core of the plasma would imply dramatic losses of energy that may lead to the extinction of the plasma. On the opposite, the injection of impurities in the plasma edge is considered as an efficient means to extract heat without damaging the first wall. The balance between these 2 contradictory constraints requires an accurate knowledge of the impurity transport inside the plasma. The effect of turbulence, the main transport mechanism for impurities is therefore a major issue. In this work, the complete formula of a turbulent flow of impurities for a given fluctuation spectrum has been inferred. The origin and features of the main accumulation processes have been identified. The main effect comes from the compressibility of the electrical shift speed in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. This compressibility appears to be linked to the curvature of the magnetic field. A less important effect is a thermal-diffusion process that is inversely proportional to the number of charges and then disappears for most type of impurities except the lightest. This effect implies an impurity flux proportional to the temperature gradient and its direction can change according to the average speed of fluctuations. A new version of the turbulence code TRB has been developed. This new version allows the constraints of the turbulence not by the gradients but by the flux which is more realistic. The importance of the processes described above has been confirmed by a comparison between calculation and experimental data from Tore-supra and the Jet tokamak. The prevailing role of the curvature of the magnetic field in the transport impurity is highlighted. (A.C.)

  1. Computer simulation of superthermal transport for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kershaw, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    The relativistic multigroup diffusion equations describing superthermal electron transport in laser fusion plasmas were derived in an earlier UCRL. A successful numerical scheme based on these equations which is now being used to model laser fusion experiments is described

  2. Time parallelization of advanced operation scenario simulations of ITER plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaddar, D; Casper, T A; Kim, S H; Houlberg, W A; Berry, L A; Elwasif, W R; Batchelor, D

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates that simulations of advanced burning plasma operation scenarios can be successfully parallelized in time using the parareal algorithm. CORSICA -an advanced operation scenario code for tokamak plasmas is used as a test case. This is a unique application since the parareal algorithm has so far been applied to relatively much simpler systems except for the case of turbulence. In the present application, a computational gain of an order of magnitude has been achieved which is extremely promising. A successful implementation of the Parareal algorithm to codes like CORSICA ushers in the possibility of time efficient simulations of ITER plasmas.

  3. A self-organized criticality model for plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.A.; Newman, D.; Lynch, V.E.

    1996-01-01

    Many models of natural phenomena manifest the basic hypothesis of self-organized criticality (SOC). The SOC concept brings together the self-similarity on space and time scales that is common to many of these phenomena. The application of the SOC modelling concept to the plasma dynamics near marginal stability opens new possibilities of understanding issues such as Bohm scaling, profile consistency, broad band fluctuation spectra with universal characteristics and fast time scales. A model realization of self-organized criticality for plasma transport in a magnetic confinement device is presented. The model is based on subcritical resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence. Three-dimensional nonlinear calculations based on this model show the existence of transport under subcritical conditions. This model that includes fluctuation dynamics leads to results very similar to the running sandpile paradigm

  4. Internal transport barriers in optimized shear plasmas in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sips, A.C.C.; Baranov, Y.F.; Challis, C.D.; Cottrell, G.A.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Gormezano, C.; Gowers, C.; Haas, J.C.M. de; Hellermann, M. von; Huysmans, G.T.A.; Howman, A.; K ig, R.; Lazarus, A.; Nielsen, P.; O'Brien, D.; Sadler, G.; Soeldner, F.X.; Stamp, M.F.; Tubbing, B.J.D.; Ward, D.J.; Greenfield, C.M.; Luce, T.; Strait, E.J.; Lazarus, E.A.; Wade, M.; Rice, B.W.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments using high-power heating during the current ramp-up phase of the discharge have obtained the highest D-D neutron rates in JET; S n =5x6x10 16 neutrons s -1 , with n e0 approx.= 6x10 19 m - 3, T e0 approx.= 12 keV and T i0 approx.= 26 keV. The best discharges (I p = 3.3 MA and B t = 3.4 tesla) have peaked pressure profiles with a transport barrier located at r/a = 0.55. The pressure peaking is limited by MHD modes and requires active input power control to achieve the best performance. Deuterium neutral beam injection into a tritium-rich target plasma has established internal transport barriers at power levels close to the lowest threshold for pure deuterium plasmas. (author)

  5. Isotopic scaling of transport in deuterium-tritium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, S.D.; Murakami, M.; Adler, H.; Chang, Z.; Duong, H.; Grisham, L.R.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Grek, B.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Loughlin, M.J.; Mansfield, D.K.; McGuire, K.M.; Meade, D.M.; Mikkelsen, D.M.; Murphy, J.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schivell, J.; Skinner, C.H.; Strachan, J.D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Thompson, M.E.; Wieland, R.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Both global and thermal energy confinement improve in high-temperature supershot plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) when deuterium beam heating is partially or wholly replaced by tritium beam heating. For the same heating power, the tritium-rich plasmas obtain up to 22% higher total energy, 30% higher thermal ion energy, and 20-25% higher central ion temperature. Kinetic analysis of the temperature and density profiles indicates a favorable isotopic scaling of ion heat transport and electron particle transport, with τ Ei (a/2) ∝ left angle A right angle 0.7-0.8 and τ pe (a) ∝ left angle A right angle 0.8 . (orig.)

  6. Glycine transporter dimers: evidence for occurrence in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholomäus, Ingo; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Nicke, Annette

    2008-01-01

    membrane based on hydrodynamic and native gel electrophoretic studies. Here, we used cysteine substitution and oxidative cross-linking to show that of GlyT1 and GlyT2 also form dimeric complexes within the plasma membrane. GlyT oligomerization at the cell surface was confirmed for both GlyT1 and GlyT2......Different Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6a family have been shown to form dimers or oligomers in both intracellular compartments and at the cell surface. In contrast, the glycine transporters (GlyTs) GlyT1 and -2 have been reported to exist as monomers in the plasma...

  7. Simulations of proppant transport in microfractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancewicz, Mateusz; Poła, Jakub; Koza, Zbigniew

    2017-04-01

    During the hydraulic fracturing of oil and gas shales a mixture of fracking fluid and solid proppant is injected into the rock fractures. Since this process takes place under physically extreme conditions, a few kilometers under the earth surface, it is practically impossible to obtain detailed, in situ data about the actual proppant transport on the scale of individual fractures and proppant grains. One way to improve our understanding of this technologically critical phenomenon is through numerical simulations. We use two standard computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers, finite volume (FVM) and lattice-Boltzmann (LBM) methods, and couple them with the discrete element method (DEM) in a fully resolved manner [1, 2, 3] to track the fluid parameters and proppant trajectories. This approach allows us to simulate up to about a thousand proppant agents in an arbitrary 3D fracture geometry filled with a fluid, with proppant-proppant, proppant-fluid, and fluid-proppant interactions taken into account. In this report we focus on two problems crucial for efficient and sufficiently accurate numerical simulations of proppant transport and sedimentation. 1. Is rotation of proppant grains an important factor determining the final distribution of proppants during proppant sedimentation in a realistically narrow, wiggly fracture? 2. Is the lubrication force necessary for the proper reconstruction of collision events between particles and walls as well as between particles themselves [4]? Our preliminary results show that the answer to the first question is negative. Due to a large number of proppant-proppant and proppant-wall collisions, as well as because of the damping effect of the proppant-fluid coupling, the influence of the proppant rotation on the proppant sedimentation appears to be negligible. However, the answer to the second question is positive: the lubrication force plays an important role in the proper numerical recovery of collisions. References: [1] D. R. J

  8. Effects of magnetic drift tangential to magnetic surfaces on neoclassical transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Seikichi; Satake, Shinsuke; Kanno, Ryutaro; Sugama, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    In evaluating neoclassical transport by radially local simulations, the magnetic drift tangential to a flux surface is usually ignored in order to keep the phase-space volume conservation. In this paper, effect of the tangential magnetic drift on the local neoclassical transport is investigated. To retain the effect of the tangential magnetic drift in the local treatment of neoclassical transport, a new local formulation for the drift kinetic simulation is developed. The compressibility of the phase-space volume caused by the tangential magnetic drift is regarded as a source term for the drift kinetic equation, which is solved by using a two-weight δf Monte Carlo method for non-Hamiltonian system [G. Hu and J. A. Krommes, Phys. Plasmas 1, 863 (1994)]. It is demonstrated that the effect of the drift is negligible for the neoclassical transport in tokamaks. In non-axisymmetric systems, however, the tangential magnetic drift substantially changes the dependence of the neoclassical transport on the radial electric field E r . The peaked behavior of the neoclassical radial fluxes around E r  =   0 observed in conventional local neoclassical transport simulations is removed by taking the tangential magnetic drift into account

  9. Effects of magnetic drift tangential to magnetic surfaces on neoclassical transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Seikichi, E-mail: matsuoka@rist.or.jp [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, 6F Kimec-Center Build., 1-5-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Satake, Shinsuke; Kanno, Ryutaro [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Sugama, Hideo [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    In evaluating neoclassical transport by radially local simulations, the magnetic drift tangential to a flux surface is usually ignored in order to keep the phase-space volume conservation. In this paper, effect of the tangential magnetic drift on the local neoclassical transport is investigated. To retain the effect of the tangential magnetic drift in the local treatment of neoclassical transport, a new local formulation for the drift kinetic simulation is developed. The compressibility of the phase-space volume caused by the tangential magnetic drift is regarded as a source term for the drift kinetic equation, which is solved by using a two-weight δf Monte Carlo method for non-Hamiltonian system [G. Hu and J. A. Krommes, Phys. Plasmas 1, 863 (1994)]. It is demonstrated that the effect of the drift is negligible for the neoclassical transport in tokamaks. In non-axisymmetric systems, however, the tangential magnetic drift substantially changes the dependence of the neoclassical transport on the radial electric field E{sub r}. The peaked behavior of the neoclassical radial fluxes around E{sub r }={sub  }0 observed in conventional local neoclassical transport simulations is removed by taking the tangential magnetic drift into account.

  10. [Fluctuations and transport in fusion plasma]: Progress report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In the study of plasma collection by obstacles in a tokamak edge plasma, the effect of anomalous transport have been examined using an extension of the 2D fluid code developed here previously (Appendices A and B). The origin of the anomalous transport is assumed to be a randomly fluctuating electric field such as would be caused by drift waves. As before, the magnetic field is assumed to be uniform and perpendicular to the obstacle, which is taken to be an infinite strip. In the absence of ambient plasma flow, the numerical results indicate that ion viscous heating is important near the tip of the obstacle, where there is a large velocity gradient in the flow. For typical plasma parameters, the maximum ion temperature near the tip is up to 85% higher than the ambient ion temperature. When there is a subsonic plasma flow past the obstacle, the numerical results indicate that, near the tip of the obstacle, the ions on the downstream side are hotter than those on the upstream side. Furthermore, the ion density is higher on the upstream side. A detailed report of this work has been prepared and will be submitted as part of the Annual Progress Report. Recently, the 2D parallel electrostatic plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) code described in reference (9) (Appendix B) has been upgraded to a 2D fully electromagnetic PIC code. This code has been successfully tested on the JPL/Caltech Mark III Hypercube concurrent computers and can be used to simulate interactions of electromagnetic waves with a magnetized plasma. It is currently applied to investigate the decay of large amplitude Alfven waves, such as those observed in the solar wind. Large amplitude Alfven waves, propagating parallel to the magnetic field, are predicted to decay into obliquely propagating daughter waves and standing magnetosonic waves. Results from the simulations will be compared with theoretical predictions

  11. Recent measurements of electron density profiles of plasmas in PLADIS I, a plasma disruption simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J. III; Sharp, G.; Gahl, J.M. Kuznetsov, V.; Rockett, P.; Hunter, J.

    1995-01-01

    Tokamak disruption simulation experiments are being conducted at the University of New Mexico (UNM) using the PLADIS I plasma gun system. PLADIS I is a high power, high energy coaxial plasma gun configured to produce an intense plasma beam. First wall candidate materials are placed in the beam path to determine their response under disruption relevant energy densities. An optically thick vapor shield plasma has been observed to form above the target surface in PLADIS I. Various diagnostics have been used to determine the characteristics of the incident plasma and the vapor shielding plasma. The cross sectional area of the incident plasma beam is a critical characteristic, as it is used in the calculation of the incident plasma energy density. Recently, a HeNe interferometer in the Mach-Zehnder configuration has been constructed and used to probe the electron density of the incident plasma beam and vapor shield plasma. The object beam of the interferometer is scanned across the plasma beam on successive shots, yielding line integrals of beam density on different chords through the plasma. Data from the interferometer is used to determine the electron density profile of the incident plasma beam as a function of beam radius. This data is then used to calculate the effective beam area. Estimates. of beam area, obtained from other diagnostics such as damage targets, calorimeter arrays and off-axis measurements of surface pressure, will be compared with data from the interferometer to obtain a better estimate of the beam cross sectional area

  12. Impact of Hypobarism During Simulated Transport on Critical Care Air Transport Team Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2017-0008 Impact of Hypobarism During Simulated Transport on Critical Care Air Transport Team Performance Dina...July 2014 – November 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Impact of Hypobarism During Simulated Transport on Critical Care Air Transport Team Performance 5a...During Critical Care Air Transport Team Advanced Course validation, three-member teams consisting of a physician, nurse, and respiratory therapist

  13. Numerical simulation of plasma vertical position stabilization in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astapkovich, A.M.; Sadakov, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The paper deals with numerical simulation of plasma vertical position stabilization in ITER. The calculations are performed using EDDY C-2 code by the method of direct numerical simulation of transient electromagnetic processes taking into account the evolution of plasma position, cross-section shape and full plasma current. When simulating free vertical plasma drift in ITER with twin passive stabilization loops, it was shown that account of the effects of cross-section deformation and plasma current alternations results in almost two fold degradation of passive stabilization parameters as compared to the calculations for 'rigid displacement' model. In terms of methodology, the account of the effects of cross section deformation and plasma current alternations requires clarification of the definitions for reverse increment of vertical instability and for stability margin coefficient. The simulation of plasma pinch return to equilibrium position after the closure of control coils allows to assess the required parameters of active control system and demonstrate the effect of screen current reverse in twin loops. The obtained results were used to develop the ITER conceptual design and affected the choice of the concept of twin passive loops and new positron of control coils as the basis approaches. 11 refs.; 12 figs.; 1 tab

  14. Ion turbulence and thermal transport in laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, H.C.; Boyd, T.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    In the interaction of high-intensity lasers with target plasmas the transport of thermal energy from the region in which the radiation is absorbed, to the cold dense plasma in the interior of the target, is an issue of central importance. The role of ion turbulence as a flux limiter is addressed with particular regard to recent experiments in which target plasmas were irradiated by 1.06 μm neodymium laser light at irradiances of 10 15 W cm - 2 and greater. Saturation levels of the ion-acoustic turbulence driven by a combination of a suprathermal electron current and a heat flux are calculated on the basis of perturbed orbit theory. The levels of turbulence are found to be markedly lower than those commonly estimated from simple trapping arguments and too low to explain the thermal flux inhibition observed in the experiments used as a basis for the model. (author)

  15. Fluid description of particle transport in hf heated magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klima, R.

    1980-01-01

    Particle fluxes averaged over high-frequency oscillations are analyzed. The collisional effects and the kinetic mechanisms of energy absorption are included. Spatial dependences of both the high-frequency and the (quasi-)steady electromagnetic fields are arbitrary. The equations governing the fluxes are deduced from the moments of the averaged kinetic equation. Explicit expressions for steady state fluxes are given in terms of electromagnetic field quantities. The results can also be applied to anomalous transport phenomena in weakly turbulent plasmas. (author)

  16. Multi-scale modelling and numerical simulation of electronic kinetic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duclous, R.

    2009-11-01

    This research thesis which is at the interface between numerical analysis, plasma physics and applied mathematics, deals with the kinetic modelling and numerical simulations of the electron energy transport and deposition in laser-produced plasmas, having in view the processes of fuel assembly to temperature and density conditions necessary to ignite fusion reactions. After a brief review of the processes at play in the collisional kinetic theory of plasmas, with a focus on basic models and methods to implement, couple and validate them, the author focuses on the collective aspect related to the free-streaming electron transport equation in the non-relativistic limit as well as in the relativistic regime. He discusses the numerical development and analysis of the scheme for the Vlasov-Maxwell system, and the selection of a validation procedure and numerical tests. Then, he investigates more specific aspects of the collective transport: the multi-specie transport, submitted to phase-space discontinuities. Dealing with the multi-scale physics of electron transport with collision source terms, he validates the accuracy of a fast Monte Carlo multi-grid solver for the Fokker-Planck-Landau electron-electron collision operator. He reports realistic simulations for the kinetic electron transport in the frame of the shock ignition scheme, the development and validation of a reduced electron transport angular model. He finally explores the relative importance of the processes involving electron-electron collisions at high energy by means a multi-scale reduced model with relativistic Boltzmann terms

  17. Statistical description of turbulent transport for flux driven toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.; Imadera, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Li, J. Q.; Nordman, H.

    2017-06-01

    A novel methodology to analyze non-Gaussian probability distribution functions (PDFs) of intermittent turbulent transport in global full-f gyrokinetic simulations is presented. In this work, the auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model is applied to time series data of intermittent turbulent heat transport to separate noise and oscillatory trends, allowing for the extraction of non-Gaussian features of the PDFs. It was shown that non-Gaussian tails of the PDFs from first principles based gyrokinetic simulations agree with an analytical estimation based on a two fluid model.

  18. Transport of plasma across a braided magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stix, T.H.

    1976-10-01

    Transport rates are calculated for a plasma immersed in a region through which magnetic lines of force meander in a stochastic fashion and in which the magnetic surfaces are destroyed. Such a magnetic condition, termed magnetic braiding, may be brought about by asymmetric magnetic perturbations, perhaps quite weak, which typically produce overlap of two sets of magnetic islands. Plasma transport is calculated for this environment, using both a fluid and a kinetic drift model. The latter gives an appreciably higher rate, namely, a fast-particle diffusion coefficient equal to ( 1 / 2 )D/sub M/ [absolute value of v/sub ''/], where D/sub M/ is the coefficient of spatial diffusion for the magnetic lines of force. Correction terms, due to polarization-associated E/sub ''/ fields, are small unless components of the braiding field resonate with ion-acoustic or drift waves. Insertion of a Bhatnager--Gross--Krook collision term shows the diffusion rate is unaffected by weak collisions. Diffusion due to magnetic braiding is of interest for tokamaks, particularly with respect to enhanced electron heat transport, enhanced current penetration, plasma disruption, and internal sawtooth oscillations

  19. Relationship between particle and heat transport in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaga, H.; Higashijima, S.; Oyama, N.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between particle and heat transport in an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been systematically investigated in reversed shear (RS) and high β p ELMy H-mode plasmas in JT-60U. No helium and carbon accumulation inside the ITB is observed even with ion heat transport reduced to a neoclassical level. On the other hand, the heavy impurity argon is accumulated inside the ITB. The argon density profile estimated from the soft x-ray profile is more peaked, by a factor of 2-4 in the RS plasma and of 1.6 in the high β p mode plasma, than the electron density profile. The helium diffusivity (D He ) and the ion thermal diffusivity (χ i ) are at an anomalous level in the high β p mode plasma, where D He and χ i are higher by a factor of 5-10 than the neoclassical value. In the RS plasma, D He is reduced from the anomalous to the neoclassical level, together with χ i . The carbon and argon density profiles calculated using the transport coefficients reduced to the neoclassical level only in the ITB are more peaked than the measured profiles, even when χ i is reduced to the neoclassical level. Argon exhaust from the inside of the ITB is demonstrated by applying ECH in the high β p mode plasma, where both electron and argon density profiles become flatter. The reduction of the neoclassical inward velocity for argon due to the reduction of density gradient is consistent with the experimental observation. In the RS plasma, the density gradient is not decreased by ECH and argon is not exhausted. These results suggest the importance of density gradient control to suppress heavy impurity accumulation. (author)

  20. Relationship between particle and heat transport in JT-60U plasmas with internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaga, Hidenobu; Higashijima, S.; Oyama, N.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between particle and heat transport in an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been systematically investigated in reversed shear (RS) and high β p ELMy H-mode plasmas in JT-60U. No helium and carbon accumulation inside the ITB is observed even with ion heat transport reduced to a neoclassical level. On the other hand, the heavy impurity argon is accumulated inside the ITB. The argon density profile estimated from the soft x-ray profile is more peaked, by a factor of 2-4 in the RS plasma and of 1.6 in the high β p mode plasma, than the electron density profile. The helium diffusivity (D He ) and the ion thermal diffusivity (χ i ) are at an anomalous level in the high β p mode plasma, where D He and χ i are higher by a factor of 5-10 than the neoclassical value. In the RS plasma, D He is reduced from the anomalous to the neoclassical level, together with χ i . The carbon and argon density profiles calculated using the transport coefficients reduced to the neoclassical level only in the ITB are more peaked than the measured profiles, even when χ i is reduced to the neoclassical level. Argon exhaust from the inside of the ITB is demonstrated by applying ECH in the high β p mode plasma, where both electron and argon density profiles become flatter. The reduction of the neoclassical inward velocity for argon due to the reduction of density gradient is consistent with the experimental observation. In the RS plasma, the density gradient is not decreased by ECH and argon is not exhausted. These results suggest the importance of density control to suppress heavy impurity accumulation. (author)

  1. Charge-transport simulations in organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Falk

    2012-07-06

    In this thesis we have extended the methods for microscopic charge-transport simulations for organic semiconductors, where weak intermolecular interactions lead to spatially localized charge carriers, and the charge transport occurs as an activated hopping process between diabatic states. In addition to weak electronic couplings between these states, different electrostatic environments in the organic material lead to a broadening of the density of states for the charge energies which limits carrier mobilities. The contributions to the method development include (i) the derivation of a bimolecular charge-transfer rate, (ii) the efficient evaluation of intermolecular (outer-sphere) reorganization energies, (iii) the investigation of effects of conformational disorder on intramolecular reorganization energies or internal site energies and (iv) the inclusion of self-consistent polarization interactions for calculation of charge energies. These methods were applied to study charge transport in amorphous phases of small molecules used in the emission layer of organic light emitting diodes (OLED). When bulky substituents are attached to an aromatic core in order to adjust energy levels or prevent crystallization, a small amount of delocalization of the frontier orbital to the substituents can increase electronic couplings between neighboring molecules. This leads to improved charge-transfer rates and, hence, larger charge-mobility. We therefore suggest using the mesomeric effect (as opposed to the inductive effect) when attaching substituents to aromatic cores, which is necessary for example in deep blue OLEDs, where the energy levels of a host molecule have to be adjusted to those of the emitter. Furthermore, the energy landscape for charges in an amorphous phase cannot be predicted by mesoscopic models because they approximate the realistic morphology by a lattice and represent molecular charge distributions in a multipole expansion. The microscopic approach shows that

  2. Transport hysteresis and zonal flow stimulation in magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravier, E.; Lesur, M.; Reveille, T.; Drouot, T.; Médina, J.

    2017-12-01

    A hysteresis in the relationship between zonal flows and electron heating is observed numerically by using gyrokinetic simulations in fusion plasmas. As the electron temperature increases, a first transition occurs, at a given electron/ion temperature ratio, above which zonal flows are much weaker than before the transition, leading to a poorly confined plasma. Beyond this transition, even if the electron temperature is lowered to a moderate value, the plasma fails to recover a dynamic state with strong zonal flows. Then, as the electron temperature decreases further, a new transition appears, at a temperature lower than the first transition, below which the zonal flows are stronger than they were initially. The confinement of the plasma and the heat flux are thus found to be sensitive to the history of the magnetized plasma. These transitions are associated with large exchanges of energy between the modes corresponding to instabilities ( m> 0 ) and zonal flows ( m = 0 ). We also observe that up to the first transition it is possible to use a control method to stimulate the appearance of zonal flows and therefore the confinement of the plasma. Beyond that transition, this control method is no longer effective.

  3. The theory and simulation of relativistic electron beam transport in the ion-focused regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanekamp, S.B.; Holloway, J.P.; Kammash, T.; Gilgenbach, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Several recent experiments involving relativistic electron beam (REB) transport in plasma channels show two density regimes for efficient transport; a low-density regime known as the ion-focused regime (IFR) and a high-pressure regime. The results obtained in this paper use three separate models to explain the dependency of REB transport efficiency on the plasma density in the IFR. Conditions for efficient beam transport are determined by examining equilibrium solutions of the Vlasov--Maxwell equations under conditions relevant to IFR transport. The dynamic force balance required for efficient IFR transport is studied using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. These simulations provide new insight into the transient beam front physics as well as the dynamic approach to IFR equilibrium. Nonlinear solutions to the beam envelope are constructed to explain oscillations in the beam envelope observed in the PIC simulations but not contained in the Vlasov equilibrium analysis. A test particle analysis is also developed as a method to visualize equilibrium solutions of the Vlasov equation. This not only provides further insight into the transport mechanism but also illustrates the connections between the three theories used to describe IFR transport. Separately these models provide valuable information about transverse beam confinement; together they provide a clear physical understanding of REB transport in the IFR

  4. Experimental study of electron temperature gradient influence on impurity turbulent transport in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villegas, D.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding impurity transport is a key to an optimal regime for a future fusion device. In this thesis, the theoretical and experimental influence of the electron temperature gradient R/L Te on heavy impurity transport is analyzed both in Tore Supra and ASDEX Upgrade. The electron temperature profile is modified locally by heating the plasma with little ECRH power deposited at two different radii. Experimental results have been obtained with the impurity transport code (ITC) which has been completed with a genetic algorithm allowing to determine the transport coefficient profiles with more accuracy. Transport coefficient profiles obtained by a quasilinear gyrokinetic code named QuaLiKiz are consistent with the experimental ones despite experimental uncertainties on gradients. In the core dominated by electron modes, the lower R/L Te the lower the nickel diffusion coefficient. The latter tends linearly to the neoclassical level when the instability threshold is approached. The experimental threshold is in agreement with the one computed by QuaLiKiz. Further out, where the plasma is dominated by ITG, which are independent of R/L Te , both experimental and simulated results show no modification in the diffusion coefficient profile. Furthermore, the convection velocity profile is not modified. This is attributed to a very small contribution of the thermodiffusion (1/Z dependence) in the total convection. On ASDEX, the preliminary results, very different from the Tore Supra ones, show a internal transport barrier for impurities located at the same radius as the strong ECRH power deposit. (author) [fr

  5. Particle-in-cell simulations of Hall plasma thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Martins, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Hall plasma thrusters can be modelled using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In these simulations, the plasma is described by a set of equations which represent a coupled system of charged particles and electromagnetic fields. The fields are computed using a spatial grid (i.e., a discretization in space), whereas the particles can move continuously in space. Briefly, the particle and fields dynamics are computed as follows. First, forces due to electric and magnetic fields are employed to calculate the velocities and positions of particles. Next, the velocities and positions of particles are used to compute the charge and current densities at discrete positions in space. Finally, these densities are used to solve the electromagnetic field equations in the grid, which are interpolated at the position of the particles to obtain the acting forces, and restart this cycle. We will present numerical simulations using software for PIC simulations to study turbulence, wave and instabilities that arise in Hall plasma thrusters. We have sucessfully reproduced a numerical simulation of a SPT-100 Hall thruster using a two-dimensional (2D) model. In addition, we are developing a 2D model of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The results of these simulations will contribute to improve the performance of plasma thrusters to be used in Cubesats satellites currenty in development at the Plasma Laboratory at University of Brasília.

  6. Parallel Transport and Profile of Boundary Plasma with a Low Recycling Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, X.; Guo, Z., E-mail: xtang@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Reduction of wall recycling by, for example, a flowing liquid surface at the divertor and first wall, holds the promise of accessing the distinct tokamak reactor operational mode with boundary plasmas of high temperature and low density. Earlier work has indicated that such a boundary plasma would reduce the temperature gradient across the entire plasma and hence remove the primary micro-instability drive responsibly for anomalous particle and energy transport. Here we present a systematic study solving the kinetic equations both analytically and numerically, with and without Coulomb collision. The distinct roles of magnetic field strength modulation and the ambipolar electric field on the electron and ion distribution functions are clarified. The resulting behavior on plasma profile and parallel heat flux, which are often surprising and counter the expectations from the collisional fluid models, on which previous work were based, are explained both intuitively and with a contrast between analytical calculation and numerical simulations. The transport-induced plasma instabilities, and their essential role in maintaining ambipolarity, are clarified, along with the subtle effect of Coulomb collision on electron temperature and wall potential as small but finite collisionality is taken into account. (author)

  7. Global plasma oscillations in electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udintsev, V S; Sauter, O; Asp, E; Fable, E; Goodman, T P; Turri, G; Graves, J P; Zucca, C [Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, EPFL/SB/CRPP, Station 13, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Scarabosio, A [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, IPP-EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Zhuang, G [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2008-12-15

    In the Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV) (Hofmann F et al1994 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 36 B277), global plasma oscillations have been discovered in fully non-inductively driven plasmas featuring electron internal transport barriers (ITB) with strong ECRH/ECCD. These oscillations are linked to the destabilization and stabilization of MHD modes near the foot of the ITB and can lead to large oscillations of the total plasma current and line-averaged density, among others. They are intrinsically related to the fact that ITBs have large pressure gradients in a region of low magnetic shear. Therefore, the ideal MHD limit is relatively low and infernal modes can be unstable. Depending on the proximity to the ideal limit, small crashes or resistive modes can appear which affect the time evolution of the discharge. Being near marginal stability, the modes can self-stabilize due to the modification of the pressure gradient and local q-profile. The plasma recovers good confinement, reverses shear and the ITB builds up, until a new MHD mode is destabilized. TCV results show that this cycling behaviour can be controlled by modifying the current density or the pressure profiles, either with Ohmic current density perturbation or by modifying the ECH/ECCD power. It is demonstrated that many observations such as q {>=} 2 sawteeth, beta collapses, minor disruptions and oscillation regimes in ITBs can be assigned to the same physics origin: the proximity to the infernal mode stability limit.

  8. Global plasma oscillations in electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udintsev, V. S.; Sauter, O.; Asp, E.; Fable, E.; Goodman, T. P.; Turri, G.; Graves, J. P.; Scarabosio, A.; Zhuang, G.; Zucca, C.; TCV Team

    2008-12-01

    In the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) (Hofmann F et al1994 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 36 B277), global plasma oscillations have been discovered in fully non-inductively driven plasmas featuring electron internal transport barriers (ITB) with strong ECRH/ECCD. These oscillations are linked to the destabilization and stabilization of MHD modes near the foot of the ITB and can lead to large oscillations of the total plasma current and line-averaged density, among others. They are intrinsically related to the fact that ITBs have large pressure gradients in a region of low magnetic shear. Therefore, the ideal MHD limit is relatively low and infernal modes can be unstable. Depending on the proximity to the ideal limit, small crashes or resistive modes can appear which affect the time evolution of the discharge. Being near marginal stability, the modes can self-stabilize due to the modification of the pressure gradient and local q-profile. The plasma recovers good confinement, reverses shear and the ITB builds up, until a new MHD mode is destabilized. TCV results show that this cycling behaviour can be controlled by modifying the current density or the pressure profiles, either with Ohmic current density perturbation or by modifying the ECH/ECCD power. It is demonstrated that many observations such as q >= 2 sawteeth, beta collapses, minor disruptions and oscillation regimes in ITBs can be assigned to the same physics origin: the proximity to the infernal mode stability limit.

  9. Initial Studies of Core and Edge Transport of NSTX Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Bush, C.E.; Bourdelle, C.; Darrow, D.; Dorland, W.; Ejiri, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Gates, D.A.; Kaye, S.M.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R.J.; Menard, J.E.; Mueller, D.; Rosenberg, A.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Stutman, D.; Taylor, G.; Johnson, D.W.; Kaita, R.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Peebles, W.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Skinner, C.H.; Soukhanovskii, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    Rapidly developing diagnostic, operational, and analysis capability is enabling the first detailed local physics studies to begin in high-beta plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). These studies are motivated in part by energy confinement times in neutral-beam-heated discharges that are favorable with respect to predictions from the ITER-89P scaling expression. Analysis of heat fluxes based on profile measurements with neutral-beam injection (NBI) suggest that the ion thermal transport may be exceptionally low, and that electron thermal transport is the dominant loss channel. This analysis motivates studies of possible sources of ion heating not presently accounted for by classical collisional processes. Gyrokinetic microstability studies indicate that long wavelength turbulence with k(subscript ''theta'') rho(subscript ''i'') ∼ 0.1-1 may be suppressed in these plasmas, while modes with k(subscript ''theta'') rho(subscript ''i'') ∼ 50 may be robust. High-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) heating efficiently heats electrons on NSTX, and studies have begun using it to assess transport in the electron channel. Regarding edge transport, H-mode [high-confinement mode] transitions occur with either NBI or HHFW heating. The power required for low-confinement mode (L-mode) to H-mode transitions far exceeds that expected from empirical edge-localized-mode-free H-mode scaling laws derived from moderate aspect ratio devices. Finally, initial fluctuation measurements made with two techniques are permitting the first characterizations of edge turbulence

  10. Formation of electron-root radial electric field and its effect on thermal transport in LHD high Te plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Seikichi; Satake, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Hiromi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Ido, Takeshi; Shimizu, Akihiro; Shimozuma, Takashi; Wakasa, Arimitsu; Murakami, Sadayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Neoclassical transport analyses have been performed for a high electron temperature LHD plasma with steep temperature gradient using a neoclassical transport simulation code, FORTEC-3D. It is shown that the large positive radial electric field is spontaneously formed at the core along with the increase in the electron temperature, while the neoclassical heat diffusivity remains almost unchanged. This indicates that the 1/ν-type increase expected in the neoclassical transport in helical plasmas can be avoided by the spontaneous formation of the radial electric field. At the same time, it is found that the experimentally estimated heat diffusivity is significantly reduced. This suggests that the formation process of the transport barrier in the high electron temperature plasma can be caused by the spontaneous formation of the radial electric field. (author)

  11. Development of plasma diagnostics technologies - Measurement of transport= parameters in tokamak edge plasma by using electric transport probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyu Sun; Chang, Do Hee; Sim, Yeon Gun; Kim, Jin Hee [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-01

    Electric transport probe system is developed for the measurement of electron temperature, floating potential, plasma density and flow velocity of= edge plasmas in the KT-2 medium size tokamak. Experiments have been performed in KT-1 small size tokamak. Electric transport probe is composed of a single probe(SP) and a Mach probe (MP). SP is used for the measurements of electron density, floating potential, and plasma density and measured values are {approx} 3*10{sup 11}/cm{sup -3}, -20 volts, 15 {approx} 25 eV. For the most discharges, respectively. MP is for the measurements of toroidal(M{sub T}) and poloidal(M{sub P}) flow velocities, and density, which are M{sub T} {approx_equal} .0.85, M{sub P} {approx_equal}. 0.17, n. {approx_equal} 2.1*10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, respectively. A triple probe is also developed for the direct reading of T{sub e} and n{sub e}, and is used for DC, RF, and RF+DC plasma in APL of Hanyang university. 38 refs., 36 figs. (author)

  12. The plasma membrane transport systems and adaptation to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Mohamed Magdy F

    2014-11-15

    Salt stress represents one of the environmental challenges that drastically affect plant growth and yield. Evidence suggests that glycophytes and halophytes have a salt tolerance mechanisms working at the cellular level, and the plasma membrane (PM) is believed to be one facet of the cellular mechanisms. The responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in contrasting species/cultivars were discussed. The review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent advances describing the crucial roles that the PM transport systems have in plant adaptation to salt. Several lines of evidence were presented to demonstrate the correlation between the PM transport proteins and adaptation of plants to high salinity. How alterations in these transport systems of the PM allow plants to cope with the salt stress was also addressed. Although inconsistencies exist in some of the information related to the responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in different species/cultivars, their key roles in adaptation of plants to high salinity is obvious and evident, and cannot be precluded. Despite the promising results, detailed investigations at the cellular/molecular level are needed in some issues of the PM transport systems in response to salinity to further evaluate their implication in salt tolerance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Particle simulation of a two-dimensional electrostatic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, K.

    1989-01-01

    Computer simulation is a growing field of research and plasma physics is one of the important areas where it is being applied today. This report describes the particle method of simulating a two-dimensional electrostatic plasma. The methods used to discretise the plasma equations and integrate the equations of motion are outlined. The algorithm used in building a simulation program is described. The program is applied to simulating the Two-stream Instability occurring within an infinite plasma. The results of the simulation are presented. The growth rate of the instability as simulated is in excellent agreement with the growth rate as calculated using linear theory. Diagnostic techniques used in interpreting the data generated by the simulation program are discussed. A comparison of the computing environment of the ND and PC from a user's viewpoint is presented. It is observed that the PC is an acceptable computing tool for certain (non-trivial) physics problems, and that more extensive use of its computing power should be made. (author). 5 figs

  14. Simulating Magnetized Laboratory Plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jeffrey N. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The creation of plasmas in the laboratory continues to generate excitement in the physics community. Despite the best efforts of the intrepid plasma diagnostics community, the dynamics of these plasmas remains a difficult challenge to both the theorist and the experimentalist. This dissertation describes the simulation of strongly magnetized laboratory plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a method born of astrophysics but gaining broad support in the engineering community. We describe the mathematical formulation that best characterizes a strongly magnetized plasma under our circumstances of interest, and we review the SPH method and its application to astrophysical plasmas based on research by Phillips [1], Buerve [2], and Price and Monaghan [3]. Some modifications and extensions to this method are necessary to simulate terrestrial plasmas, such as a treatment of magnetic diffusion based on work by Brookshaw [4] and by Atluri [5]; we describe these changes as we turn our attention toward laboratory experiments. Test problems that verify the method are provided throughout the discussion. Finally, we apply our method to the compression of a magnetized plasma performed by the Compact Toroid Injection eXperiment (CTIX) [6] and show that the experimental results support our computed predictions.

  15. Investigations of the role of nonlinear couplings in structure formation and transport regulation in plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Christopher George

    Studies of nonlinear couplings and dynamics in plasma turbulence are presented. Particular areas of focus are analytic studies of coherent structure formation in electron temperature gradient turbulence, measurement of nonlinear energy transfer in simulations of plasma turbulence, and bispectral analysis of experimental and computational data. The motivation for these works has been to develop and expand the existing theories of plasma transport, and verify the nonlinear predictions of those theories in simulation and experiment. In Chapter II, we study electromagnetic secondary instabilities of electron temperature gradient turbulence. The growth rate for zonal flow generation via modulational instability of electromagnetic ETG turbulence is calculated, as well as that for zonal (magnetic) field generation. In Chapter III, the stability and saturation of streamers in ETG turbulence is considered, and shown to depend sensitively upon geometry and the damping rates of the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. Requirements for a credible theory of streamer transport are presented. In addition, a self-consistent model for interactions between ETG and ITG (ion temperature gradient) turbulence is presented. In Chapter IV, the nonlinear transfer of kinetic and internal energy is measured in simulations of plasma turbulence. The regulation of turbulence by radial decorrelation due to zonal flows and generation of zonal flows via the Reynolds stress are explicitly demonstrated, and shown to be symmetric facets of a single nonlinear process. Novel nonlinear saturation mechanisms for zonal flows are discussed. In Chapter V, measurements of fluctuation bicoherence in the edge of the DIII-D tokamak are presented. It is shown that the bicoherence increases transiently before a L-H transition, and decays to its initial value after the barrier has formed. The increase in bicoherence is localized to the region where the transport barrier forms, and shows strong coupling between well

  16. PLASMA ENERGETIC PARTICLES SIMULATION CENTER (PEPSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, Herbert L.

    2014-05-23

    The main effort of the Texas group was to develop theoretical and simplified numerical models to understand chirping phenomena often seen for Alfven and geodesic acoustic waves in experimental plasmas such as D-III-D, NSTX and JET. Its main numerical effort was to modify the AEGIS code, which was originally developed as an eigenvalue solver. To apply to the chirping problem this code has to be able to treat the linear response to the continuum and the response of the plasma to external drive or to an internal drive that comes from the formation of phase space chirping structures. The theoretical underpinning of this investigation still needed to be more fully developed to understand how to best formulate the theoretical problem. Considerable progress was made on this front by B.N. Breizman and his collaborators and a new reduced model was developed by H. L. Berk and his PhD student, G. Wang which can be uses as simplified model to describe chirping in a large aspect ratio tokamak. This final report will concentrate on these two directions that were developed as well as results that were found in the work with the AEGIS code and in the progress in developing a novel quasi-linear formulation for a description of Alfvenic modes destabilized by energetic particles, such as alpha particles in a burning plasma.

  17. PIC simulation of electron acceleration in an underdense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Darvish Molla

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the interesting Laser-Plasma phenomena, when the laser power is high and ultra intense, is the generation of large amplitude plasma waves (Wakefield and electron acceleration. An intense electromagnetic laser pulse can create plasma oscillations through the action of the nonlinear pondermotive force. electrons trapped in the wake can be accelerated to high energies, more than 1 TW. Of the wide variety of methods for generating a regular electric field in plasmas with strong laser radiation, the most attractive one at the present time is the scheme of the Laser Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA. In this method, a strong Langmuir wave is excited in the plasma. In such a wave, electrons are trapped and can acquire relativistic energies, accelerated to high energies. In this paper the PIC simulation of wakefield generation and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma with a short ultra intense laser pulse is discussed. 2D electromagnetic PIC code is written by FORTRAN 90, are developed, and the propagation of different electromagnetic waves in vacuum and plasma is shown. Next, the accuracy of implementation of 2D electromagnetic code is verified, making it relativistic and simulating the generating of wakefield and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma. It is shown that when a symmetric electromagnetic pulse passes through the plasma, the longitudinal field generated in plasma, at the back of the pulse, is weaker than the one due to an asymmetric electromagnetic pulse, and thus the electrons acquire less energy. About the asymmetric pulse, when front part of the pulse has smaller time rise than the back part of the pulse, a stronger wakefield generates, in plasma, at the back of the pulse, and consequently the electrons acquire more energy. In an inverse case, when the rise time of the back part of the pulse is bigger in comparison with that of the back part, a weaker wakefield generates and this leads to the fact that the electrons

  18. Electron heat transport analysis of low-collisionality plasmas in the neoclassical-transport-optimized configuration of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Sadayoshi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Wakasa, Arimitsu

    2002-01-01

    Electron heat transport in low-collisionality LHD plasma is investigated in order to study the neoclassical transport optimization effect on thermal plasma transport with an optimization level typical of so-called ''advanced stellarators''. In the central region, a higher electron temperature is obtained in the optimized configuration, and transport analysis suggests the considerable effect of neoclassical transport on the electron heat transport assuming the ion-root level of radial electric field. The obtained experimental results support future reactor design in which the neoclassical and/or anomalous transports are reduced by magnetic field optimization in a non-axisymmetric configuration. (author)

  19. Neoclassical Simulation of Tokamak Plasmas using Continuum Gyrokinetc Code TEMPEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X Q

    2007-01-01

    We present gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations of tokamak plasmas with self-consistent electric field for the first time using a fully nonlinear (full-f) continuum code TEMPEST in a circular geometry. A set of gyrokinetic equations are discretized on a five dimensional computational grid in phase space. The present implementation is a Method of Lines approach where the phase-space derivatives are discretized with finite differences and implicit backwards differencing formulas are used to advance the system in time. The fully nonlinear Boltzmann model is used for electrons. The neoclassical electric field is obtained by solving gyrokinetic Poisson equation with self-consistent poloidal variation. With our 4D (ψ, θ, ε, μ) version of the TEMPEST code we compute radial particle and heat flux, the Geodesic-Acoustic Mode (GAM), and the development of neoclassical electric field, which we compare with neoclassical theory with a Lorentz collision model. The present work provides a numerical scheme and a new capability for self-consistently studying important aspects of neoclassical transport and rotations in toroidal magnetic fusion devices

  20. Internal transport barrier formation and pellet injection simulation in helical and tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiyama, You; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Garcia, Jeronimo

    2008-01-01

    In the future fusion reactor, plasma density peaking is important for increase in the fusion power gain and for achievement of confinement improvement mode. Density control and internal transport barrier (ITB) formation due to pellet injection have been simulated in tokamak and helical reactors using the toroidal transport linkage code TOTAL. First, pellet injection simulation is carried out, including the neutral gas shielding model and the mass relocation model in the TOTAL code, and the effectiveness of high-field side (HFS) pellet injection is clarified. Second, ITB simulation with pellet injection is carried out with the confinement improvement model based on the E x B shear effects, and it is found that deep pellet penetration is helpful for ITB formation as well as plasma core fuelling in the reversed-shear tokamak and helical reactors. (author)

  1. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  2. Biological transportation networks: Modeling and simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Albi, Giacomo; Artina, Marco; Foransier, Massimo; Markowich, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a model for biological network formation originally introduced by Cai and Hu [Adaptation and optimization of biological transport networks, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 138701]. The modeling of fluid transportation (e.g., leaf venation

  3. Three-dimensional two-fluid Braginskii simulations of the large plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Dustin M., E-mail: dustin.m.fisher.gr@dartmouth.edu; Rogers, Barrett N., E-mail: barrett.rogers@dartmouth.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Rossi, Giovanni D.; Guice, Daniel S.; Carter, Troy A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) is modeled using the 3D Global Braginskii Solver code. Comparisons to experimental measurements are made in the low-bias regime in which there is an intrinsic E × B rotation of the plasma. In the simulations, this rotation is caused primarily by sheath effects and may be a likely mechanism for the intrinsic rotation seen in LAPD. Simulations show strong qualitative agreement with the data, particularly the radial dependence of the density fluctuations, cross-correlation lengths, radial flux dependence outside of the cathode edge, and camera imagery. Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) turbulence at relatively large scales is the dominant driver of cross-field transport in these simulations with smaller-scale drift waves and sheath modes playing a secondary role. Plasma holes and blobs arising from KH vortices in the simulations are consistent with the scale sizes and overall appearance of those in LAPD camera images. The addition of ion-neutral collisions in the simulations at previously theorized values reduces the radial particle flux by about a factor of two, from values that are somewhat larger than the experimentally measured flux to values that are somewhat lower than the measurements. This reduction is due to a modest stabilizing contribution of the collisions on the KH-modes driving the turbulent transport.

  4. Numerical simulation of a DC double anode arc plasma torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lunjiang; Tang Deli; Zhu Hailong

    2012-01-01

    A 2D axisymmetric numerical simulation of DC double anode plasma torch was done by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT to improve the efficiency of the waste treatment, which is on the basis of the magnetic fluid dynamics (MHD) theory and uses the method of magnetic vector potential, and the simulation method is based on SIMPLE algorithm. The temperature and speed distributions of the plasma, and so on were obtained. The results show that the temperature of plasma decreases with increasing the axial distance, and increases with increasing the amplitude of the arc current. The velocity first increases and then decreases with the axial distance increase, and increase with the arc current increase. The temperature and the speed at the export of the plasma torch both decrease when the radial distance increases. Those results are in agreement with the experimental results. (authors)

  5. GPU based 3D feature profile simulation of high-aspect ratio contact hole etch process under fluorocarbon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Poo-Reum; Lee, Se-Ah; Yook, Yeong-Geun; Choi, Kwang-Sung; Cho, Deog-Geun; Yu, Dong-Hun; Chang, Won-Seok; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Im, Yeon-Ho

    2013-09-01

    Although plasma etch profile simulation has been attracted much interest for developing reliable plasma etching, there still exist big gaps between current research status and predictable modeling due to the inherent complexity of plasma process. As an effort to address this issue, we present 3D feature profile simulation coupled with well-defined plasma-surface kinetic model for silicon dioxide etching process under fluorocarbon plasmas. To capture the realistic plasma surface reaction behaviors, a polymer layer based surface kinetic model was proposed to consider the simultaneous polymer deposition and oxide etching. Finally, the realistic plasma surface model was used for calculation of speed function for 3D topology simulation, which consists of multiple level set based moving algorithm, and ballistic transport module. In addition, the time consumable computations in the ballistic transport calculation were improved drastically by GPU based numerical computation, leading to the real time computation. Finally, we demonstrated that the surface kinetic model could be coupled successfully for 3D etch profile simulations in high-aspect ratio contact hole plasma etching.

  6. Hybrid Simulations of Plasma-Neutral-Dust Interactions at Enceladus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omidi, N.; Russell, C. T.; Jia, Y. D.; Tokar, R. L.; Farrell, W. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Leisner, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Through ejection from its southern hemisphere, Enceladus is a dominant source of neutral gas and dust in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. The interaction of the corotating plasma with the gas and dust modifies the plasma environment around Enceladus. We use 3-D hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulations to examine the effects of gas and dust on the nature of the interaction region and use Cassini observations to constrain their properties.

  7. Formation of Plasma Around a Small Meteoroid: Simulation and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, G.; Oppenheim, M. M.; Dimant, Y. S.; Close, S.

    2018-05-01

    High-power large-aperture radars detect meteors by reflecting radio waves off dense plasma that surrounds a hypersonic meteoroid as it ablates in the Earth's atmosphere. If the plasma density profile around the meteoroid is known, the plasma's radar cross section can be used to estimate meteoroid properties such as mass, density, and composition. This paper presents head echo plasma density distributions obtained via two numerical simulations of a small ablating meteoroid and compares the results to an analytical solution found in Dimant and Oppenheim (2017a, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017JA023960, 2017b, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017JA023963). The first simulation allows ablated meteoroid particles to experience only a single collision to match an assumption in the analytical solution, while the second is a more realistic simulation by allowing multiple collisions. The simulation and analytical results exhibit similar plasma density distributions. At distances much less than λT, the average distance an ablated particle travels from the meteoroid before a collision with an atmospheric particle, the plasma density falls off as 1/R, where R is the distance from the meteoroid center. At distances substantially greater than λT, the plasma density profile has an angular dependence, falling off as 1/R2 directly behind the meteoroid, 1/R3 in a plane perpendicular to the meteoroid's path that contains the meteoroid center, and exp[-1.5(R/λT2/3)]/R in front of the meteoroid. When used for calculating meteoroid masses, this new plasma density model can give masses that are orders of magnitude different than masses calculated from a spherically symmetric Gaussian distribution, which has been used to calculate masses in the past.

  8. Three-fluid magnetohydrodynamical simulation of plasma focus discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behler, K.; Bruhns, H.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional, three-fluid code based on the two-fluid Potter code [Methods in Computational Physics (Academic, New York, 1970), Vol. 9, p. 340] was developed for simulating the plasma focus discharge. With this code it is possible to treat the neutral gas in addition to the plasma components and to model the ionization and recombination phenomena. Thus the sheet dynamics in a plasma focus can be studied and effects investigated such as the occurrence of residual gas (or plasma) density behind the current sheet in the run-down phase. This is a prerequisite to the occurrence of leak currents, which are one of the causes limiting the performance of large plasma focus devices. It is shown that fast operating foci with small dimensions behave favorably compared with the ''classical'' Mather focus [Methods of Experimental Physics (Academic, New York, 1971), Vol. 9B, p. 187] with long coaxial electrodes

  9. Anthem simulation studies of the plasma opening switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    For a deeper understanding of the physical processes governing the Plasma Opening Switch (POS) the authors use the ANTHEM 2D implicit simulation code to study: (1) ion dynamical effects on electrohydrodynamic (EHD) waves propagating along steep density interfaces in the switch plasmas. At radial interfaces where the density jumps toward the anode, these waves can drive a finger of magnetic field into the plasma toward the load. Ion dynamics can open the rear of such fingers into a wedge-like density gap. Then: (2) they examine ion effects in uniform switch plasmas. These first develop potential hill structures at the drive edge of the cathode from the competition between electron velocity advection and EHD magnetic exclusion waves. Magnetic pressure gradients at the hill periphery and EHD effects then establish a density gap propagating along the cathode with radial electron emission from its tip. Similar results are obtained under both multi-fluid and PIC modeling on the plasma components

  10. Computer simulation of plasma turbulence in open systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigov, Yu.S.

    1982-01-01

    A short review of the results of kinetic simulation of collective phenomena in open plasma systems with the variable total energy and number of particles, i.e., the particle and energy fluxes on boundary surfaces and/or their internal sources and channels is given. Three specific problems are considered in different detail for such systems in one-dimensional geometry: the generation and evolution of double layers in a currently unstable plasma; the collisionless relaxation of strongly non-equilibrium electron distributions; the Langmuir collapse and strong electrostatic turbulence in systems with parametric excitation of a plasma by an external pumping wave and with cooling the fast non-Maxwell electrons. In all these cases the non-linearity and a collective character of processes give examples of new dissipative plasma structures that essentially widen our idea about the nature of the plasma turbulence in non-homogeneous open systems. (Auth.)

  11. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Liang; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N.; Yu, He

    2014-01-01

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (n e ) and temperature (T e ) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high n e peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, n e increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped n e and T e data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (V p ) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower T e and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  12. Plasma/neutral gas transport in divertors and limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierszewski, P.J.

    1983-09-01

    The engineering design of the divertor and first wall region of fusion reactors requires accurate knowledge of the energies and particle fluxes striking these surfaces. Simple calculations indicate that approx. 10 MW/m 2 heat fluxes and approx. 1 cm/yr erosion rates are possible, but there remain fundamental physics questions that bear directly on the engineering design. The purpose of this study was to treat hydrogen plasma and neutral gas transport in divertors and pumped limiters in sufficient detail to answer some of the questions as to the actual conditions that will be expected in fusion reactors. This was accomplished in four parts: (1) a review of relevant atomic processes to establish the dominant interactions and their data base; (2) a steady-state coupled O-D model of the plasma core, scrape-off layer and divertor exhaust to determine gross modes of operation and edge conditions; (3) a 1-D kinetic transport model to investigate the case of collisionless divertor exhaust, including non-Maxwellian ions and neutral atoms, highly collisional electrons, and a self-consistent electric field; and (4) a 3-D Monte Carlo treatment of neutral transport to correctly account for geometric effects

  13. Transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas in the nonlinear regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Giorgio

    2006-06-01

    A field theory approach to transport phenomena in magnetically confined plasmas is presented. The thermodynamic field theory (TFT), previously developed for treating the generic thermodynamic system out of equilibrium, is applied to plasmas physics. Transport phenomena are treated here as the effect of the field linking the thermodynamic forces with their conjugate flows combined with statistical mechanics. In particular, the Classical and the Pfirsch-Schluter regimes are analyzed by solving the thermodynamic field equations of the TFT in the weak-field approximation. We found that, the TFT does not correct the expressions of the ionic heat fluxes evaluated by the neoclassical theory in these two regimes. On the other hand, the fluxes of matter and electronic energy (heat flow) is further enhanced in the nonlinear Classical and Pfirsch-Schluter regimes. These results seem to be in line with the experimental observations. The complete set of the electronic and ionic transport equations in the nonlinear Banana regime, is also reported. A paper showing the comparison between our theoretic results and the experimental observations in the JET machine is currently in preparation.

  14. Glycine transporter dimers: evidence for occurrence in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomäus, Ingo; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Nicke, Annette; Dutertre, Sébastien; Hastrup, Hanne; Jha, Alok; Gether, Ulrik; Sitte, Harald H; Betz, Heinrich; Eulenburg, Volker

    2008-04-18

    Different Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6a family have been shown to form dimers or oligomers in both intracellular compartments and at the cell surface. In contrast, the glycine transporters (GlyTs) GlyT1 and -2 have been reported to exist as monomers in the plasma membrane based on hydrodynamic and native gel electrophoretic studies. Here, we used cysteine substitution and oxidative cross-linking to show that of GlyT1 and GlyT2 also form dimeric complexes within the plasma membrane. GlyT oligomerization at the cell surface was confirmed for both GlyT1 and GlyT2 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy. Endoglycosidase treatment and surface biotinylation further revealed that complex-glycosylated GlyTs form dimers located at the cell surface. Furthermore, substitution of tryptophan 469 of GlyT2 by an arginine generated a transporter deficient in dimerization that was retained intracellulary. Based on these results and GlyT structures modeled by using the crystal structure of the bacterial homolog LeuT(Aa), as a template, residues located within the extracellular loop 3 and at the beginning of transmembrane domain 6 are proposed to contribute to the dimerization interface of GlyTs.

  15. Self-consistent electron transport in collisional plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme has been developed to model electron transport in evolving plasmas of arbitrary classical collisionality. The electrons and ions are treated as either multiple donor-cell fluids, or collisional particles-in-cell. Particle suprathermal electrons scatter off ions, and drag against fluid background thermal electrons. The background electrons undergo ion friction, thermal coupling, and bremsstrahlung. The components move in self-consistent advanced E-fields, obtained by the Implicit Moment Method, which permits Δt >> ω/sub p/ -1 and Δx >> lambda/sub D/ - offering a 10 2 - 10 3 -fold speed-up over older explicit techniques. The fluid description for the background plasma components permits the modeling of transport in systems spanning more than a 10 7 -fold change in density, and encompassing contiguous collisional and collisionless regions. Results are presented from application of the scheme to the modeling of CO 2 laser-generated suprathermal electron transport in expanding thin foils, and in multi-foil target configurations

  16. Numerical simulation of plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nagendra; Chan, C. B.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating in a diverging flux tube are investigated with numerical simulation. The heating is found to drive a host of plasma processes, in addition to the well-known phenomenon of ion conics. The downward electric field near the reverse shock generates a doublestreaming situation consisting of two upflowing ion populations with different average flow velocities. The electric field in the reverse shock region is modulated by the ion-ion instability driven by the multistreaming ions. The oscillating fields in this region have the possibility of heating electrons. These results from the simulations are compared with results from a previous study based on a hydrodynamical model. Effects of spatial resolutions provided by simulations on the evolution of the plasma are discussed.

  17. Macroscale implicit electromagnetic particle simulation of magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Motohiko.

    1988-01-01

    An electromagnetic and multi-dimensional macroscale particle simulation code (MACROS) is presented which enables us to make a large time and spatial scale kinetic simulation of magnetized plasmas. Particle ions, finite mass electrons with the guiding-center approximation and a complete set of Maxwell equations are employed. Implicit field-particle coupled equations are derived in which a time-decentered (slightly backward) finite differential scheme is used to achieve stability for large time and spatial scales. It is shown analytically that the present simulation scheme suppresses high frequency electromagnetic waves and that it accurately reproduces low frequency waves in the plasma. These properties are verified by numerical examination of eigenmodes in a 2-D thermal equilibrium plasma and by that of the kinetic Alfven wave. (author)

  18. Experimental study of tungsten transport properties in T-10 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupin, V. A.; Nurgaliev, M. R.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Nemets, A. R.; Zemtsov, I. A.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Sarychev, D. V.; Lisitsa, V. S.; Shurygin, V. A.; Leontiev, D. S.; Borschegovskij, A. A.; Grashin, S. A.; Ryjakov, D. V.; Sergeev, D. S.; Mustafin, N. A.; Trukhin, V. M.; Solomatin, R. Yu.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Naumenko, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    First experimental results of tungsten transport investigation in OH and ECRH plasmas in the T-10 tokamak with W-limiter and movable Li-limiter are presented. It is shown that tungsten tends to accumulate (a joint process of cumulation and peaking) near the plasma axis in ohmic regimes. The cumulation of W is enhanced in discharges with high values of the parameter γ ={{\\bar{n}}\\text{e}}\\centerdot {{\\bar{Z}}\\text{eff}}\\centerdot I\\text{pl}-1.5 that coincides with accumulation conditions of light and medium impurities in T-10 plasmas. Experiments with Li-limiter show the immeasurable level of Li3+ (0.3-0.5% of n e) of T-10 CXRS diagnostics because of the low inflow of Li with respect to other light impurities. Nevertheless, the strong influence of lithium on inflow of light and tungsten impurities is observed. In discharges with lithized walls, vanishing of light impurities occurs and values of {{Z}\\text{eff}}≈ 1 are obtained. It is also shown that the tungsten density in the plasma center decreases by 15 to 20 times while the W inflow reduces only by 2 to 4 times. In lithized discharges with high γ, the flattening of the tungsten density profile occurs and its central concentration decreases up to 10 times during the on-axis ECRH. This effect is observed together with the increase of the W inflow by 3 to 4 times at the ECRH stage.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Actuator Using OpenFOAM

    OpenAIRE

    H. Yazdani; K. Ghorbanian

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with modeling and simulation of the plasma actuator with OpenFOAM. Plasma actuator is one of the newest devices in flow control techniques which can delay separation by inducing external momentum to the boundary layer of the flow. The effects of the plasma actuators on the external flow are incorporated into Navier-Stokes computations as a body force vector which is obtained as a product of the net charge density and the electric field. In order to compute this body force vec...

  20. Dynamical Simulation of Recycling and Particle Fueling in TJ-II Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Bruna, D.; Ferreira, J. A.; Tabares, F. L.; Castejon, F.; Guasp, J.

    2007-01-01

    With the aim of improving the calculation tools for transport analysis in TJ-II plasmas, in this work we analyze the simplified model for a kinetic equation that ASTRA uses to calculate the neutral particle distribution in the plasma. Next, we act on the boundary conditions for this kinetic equation (particularly on the neutral density in the plasma boundary) so we can simulate the recycling conditions for the TJ-II in a simple way. With the resulting transport models we can easily analyze the sensibility of these plasmas to the cold gas puffing depending on the recycling conditions. These transport models evidence the problem