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Sample records for plasma time courses

  1. The time course of metabolites in human plasma after 6-[(18)F]fluoro-l-m-tyrosine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, L M; Chen, J J; Thompson, M; Chirakal, R; Nahmias, C

    1999-11-01

    For the investigation of intracerebral dopamine metabolism, 6-[(18)F]fluoro-l-m-tyrosine (FmT) has been proposed as an alternative tracer that, unlike 6-[(18)F]fluoro-l-dopa, is not subjected to O-methylation. We have studied the time course of FmT and its labelled metabolites in plasma after intravenous injection into humans, employing a method that we have developed and validated to analyze labelled metabolites of FmT in plasma. The study population comprised 38 subjects, 14 of whom were taking an aromatic amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor (carbidopa), and obtained arterialized venous blood samples at various times after an intravenous injection of between 185 and 370 MBq of FmT. The major metabolite of FmT present in plasma was 6-[(18)F]fluoro-3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. The time course of the fraction of radioactivity in plasma attributable to FmT was fitted well by the decay of two exponential functions. The fast component of the decay accounted for 40%-50% of the radioactivity and had a half-life of about 5 min. The slow component of the decay had a half-life of about 6 h in the subjects not taking carbidopa and 20 h in the patients taking carbidopa. When the total available FmT was calculated for each individual subject and expressed as a proportion of total radioactivity, this quantity did not differ significantly from that determined from the corresponding population mean. There was significantly more (15% on average) FmT available over the course of the 2-h experiment in the group pretreated with carbidopa. Our results demonstrate that the major metabolite in plasma after an intravenous injection of FmT is 6-[(18)F]fluoro-3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. The clearance of FmT from plasma compares well with the clearance of intravenously administered levodopa. Carbidopa increases significantly the availability of FmT in plasma. These results verify, in a large number of human subjects, earlier analyses of FmT metabolism in other species. We validate a

  2. Time course of hepatic gene expression and plasma vitellogenin protein concentrations in estrone-exposed juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osachoff, Heather L; Brown, Lorraine L Y; Tirrul, Leena; van Aggelen, Graham C; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Kennedy, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    Estrone (E1), a natural estrogen hormone found in sewage effluents and surface waters, has known endocrine disrupting effects in fish, thus, it is a contaminant of emerging concern. Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to an environmentally-relevant concentration of E1 (24ng/L E1 [0.1nM]) for 7d and then placed in clean water for a 9d recovery period. RNA sequencing showed transcripts from numerous affected biological processes (e.g. immune, metabolic, apoptosis, clotting, and endocrine) were altered by E1 after 4d of treatment. The time course of E1-inducible responses relating to vitellogenesis was examined daily during the two phases of exposure. Hepatic gene expression alterations evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) were found during the treatment period for vitellogenin (VTG), vitelline envelope proteins (VEPs) α, β and γ, and estrogen receptor α1 (ERα1) transcripts. ERα1 was the only transcript induced each day during the treatment phase, thus it was a good indicator of E1 exposure. Gradual increases occurred in VEPβ and VEPγ transcripts, peaking at d7. VTG transcript was only elevated at d4, making it less sensitive than VEPs to this low-level E1 treatment. Inductions of ERα1, VEPα, VEPβ and VEPγ transcripts ceased 1d into the recovery phase. Plasma VTG protein concentrations were not immediately elevated but peaked 7d into the recovery phase. Thus, elevated vitellogenesis-related gene expression and protein production occurred slowly but steadily at this concentration of E1, confirming the sequence of events for transcripts and VTG protein responses to xenoestrogen exposure.

  3. CAS course on Plasma Wake Acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) recently organised a specialised course on Plasma Wake Acceleration, held at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, from 23 to 29 November 2014.    Following a number of introductory lectures on laser and plasma physics, as well as an overview of conventional accelerators and their limitations, the course covered a large number of aspects of plasma wake acceleration schemes: the creation of plasma by high power lasers or particle beams, a description of the plasma creation process through simulations and the characteristics of the accelerated particle beams, including results of the latest achievements. Lectures on beam diagnostics, the applications of plasma accelerated beams, and topical seminars completed the programme.  The course was very successful, with 109 students of 26 nationalities attending; most participants coming from European counties, but also from the US, Israel, India, South Korea, Russia and Ukraine. Feedback from the participants was...

  4. A semimechanistic model of the time-course of release of PTH into plasma following administration of the calcilytic JTT-305/MK-5442 in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, Antonio; Mehta, Khamir; Ross, David S; Shrestha, Rajiv P; Comisar, Wendy; Denker, Andrew; Pai, Sudhakar M; Ishikawa, Tomohiro

    2013-08-01

    JTT-305/MK-5442 is a calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) allosteric antagonist being investigated for the treatment of osteoporosis. JTT-305/MK-5442 binds to CaSRs, thus preventing receptor activation by Ca(2+) . In the parathyroid gland, this results in the release of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Sharp spikes in PTH secretion followed by rapid returns to baseline are associated with bone formation, whereas sustained elevation in PTH is associated with bone resorption. We have developed a semimechanistic, nonpopulation model of the time-course relationship between JTT-305/MK-5442 and whole plasma PTH concentrations to describe both the secretion of PTH and the kinetics of its return to baseline levels. We obtained mean concentration data for JTT-305/MK-5442 and whole PTH from a multiple dose study in U.S. postmenopausal women at doses of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg. We hypothesized that PTH is released from two separate sources: a reservoir that is released rapidly (within minutes) in response to reduction in Ca(2+) binding, and a second source released more slowly following hours of reduced Ca(2+) binding. We modeled the release rates of these reservoirs as maximum pharmacologic effect (Emax ) functions of JTT-305/MK-5442 concentration. Our model describes both the dose-dependence of PTH time of occurrence for maximum drug concentration (Tmax ) and maximum concentration of drug (Cmax ), and the extent and duration of the observed nonmonotonic return of PTH to baseline levels following JTT-305/MK-5442 administration.

  5. Time course of postoperative hypoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Ullstad, T; Rasmussen, J;

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the time course of nocturnal episodic and constant hypoxaemia during the first five nights after a major abdominal operation in patients not given supplementary oxygen. DESIGN: Open study. SUBJECTS: 17 patients undergoing major elective operations and with no recognised risk...... factors. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Arterial oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry. RESULTS: The level of constant hypoxaemia was lowest during night 2 (p time spent below 90% saturation (p ... during night 3 (p constant hypoxaemia on postoperative nights 1, 3, 4, and 5...

  6. Training course on inductively coupled plasma spectrometry - Note

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.

    TRAINING COURSE ON INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA SPECTROMETRY In the present day geological, chemical, environmental and archaeological research activities, the Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectrometry is established as a cost-effective multi... research and educational institutions and the industry participated in the course. The participants were research students, teachers and professionals from the states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Goa, Tamil...

  7. A Course on Plasma Processing in Integrated Circuit Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawin, Herbert H.; Reif, Rafael

    1983-01-01

    Describes a course, taught jointly by electrical/chemical engineering departments at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, designed to teach the fundamental science of plasma processing as well as to give an overview of the present state of industrial processes. Provides rationale for course development, texts used, class composition, and…

  8. A Course in Time Series Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Peña, Daniel; Tsay, Ruey S

    2011-01-01

    New statistical methods and future directions of research in time series A Course in Time Series Analysis demonstrates how to build time series models for univariate and multivariate time series data. It brings together material previously available only in the professional literature and presents a unified view of the most advanced procedures available for time series model building. The authors begin with basic concepts in univariate time series, providing an up-to-date presentation of ARIMA models, including the Kalman filter, outlier analysis, automatic methods for building ARIMA models, a

  9. Vitality and time course of wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M

    2004-09-10

    The term "wound" describes the morphologic-functional disruption of the continuity of a tissue structure. A wound can be inflicted during life--when the cardiovascular and respiratory system is still intact--or after death, i.e. after cardiac and respiratory arrest. Traumatization during life triggers vital reactions that do not occur in postmortem wounds. Three types of vital reactions in wound healing can be distinguished: Reactions of the scavenger type, which are almost exclusively mediated by blood cells. Reactions by complex signal transduction pathways, which involves cascade-like release of chemokines, cytokines and adhesion molecules and may influence type 1 and type 3 reactions. Reactions of the scarring type, which involve the final repair of the damaged tissue and are carried out primarily by cells residing at the wound edges, i.e. partly concerning mesenchymal cells and partly tissue-specific cells dependent on the involved organ system. The three different types of reaction follow roughly parallel temporal courses that include cascade-like interactions among themselves. Whereas demonstration of a vital reaction suffices to differentiate an intravital wound from a postmortem wound, the vital reactions themselves follow strictly temporal courses. The regular time-dependent occurrence of each phenomenon allows--in limits--a reliable temporal classification of wound healing. A review will be given especially demonstrating the actual German scientific research in vitality and in skin wound timing as well as in timing of mechanical injury of the brain.

  10. The end-point and course detection of plasma-chemical reactions on semiconductor structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janca, J. (Universita J.E. Purkyne, Brno, Czechoslovakia); Konecny, Z. (TESLA Roznov, n.p., Roznov pod Radhostem, Czechoslovakia)

    1980-01-01

    The end point and courses of the photoresist removal oxygen plasma by RF were determined by optical emission and mass spectrometry. The spectroscopic analysis shows large changes in CO and N2 molecular spectra the time dependencies of mass spectra are similar to optical spectroscopy results, but the interpretation is more complicated. This study demonstrates a process monitoring system which automatically detects and signals the completion of etching processes from etched wafers.

  11. Time of relaxation in dusty plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Dust particles in plasma may have different values of average kinetic energy for vertical and horizontal motion. The partial equilibrium of the subsystems and the relaxation processes leading to this asymmetry are under consideration. A method for the relaxation time estimation in nonideal dusty plasma is suggested. The characteristic relaxation times of vertical and horizontal motion of dust particles in gas discharge are estimated by analytical approach and by analysis of simulation results. These relaxation times for vertical and horizontal subsystems appear to be different. A single hierarchy of relaxation times is proposed.

  12. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, Paul P.; Smatlak, Donna L.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Wittle, J. Kenneth; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  13. The time course of cancer detection performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Phillips, Sian; Clarke, Aileen; Wallis, Matthew; Wheaton, Margot; Duncan, Alison; Gale, Alastair G.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure how mammography readers' performance varies with time of day and time spent reading. This was investigated in screening practice and when reading an enriched case set. In screening practice records of time and date that each case was read, along with outcome (whether the woman was recalled for further tests, and biopsy results where performed) was extracted from records from one breast screening centre in UK (4 readers). Patterns of performance with time spent reading was also measured using an enriched test set (160 cases, 41% malignant, read three times by eight radiologists). Recall rates varied with time of day, with different patterns for each reader. Recall rates decreased as the reading session progressed both when reading the enriched test set and in screening practice. Further work is needed to expand this work to a greater number of breast screening centres, and to determine whether these patterns of performance over time can be used to optimize overall performance.

  14. Magnitude and Time Course of Sleep Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-10

    1-hour nap. Work & Stress. 1995;9(4):528-39. 20. Naitoh P, Kelly T, Babkoff H. Sleep Inertia: best time not to wake up? Chronobiology ...Ostberg O. A self-assessment questionnaire to determine morningness-eveningness in human circadian rhythms. International Journal Of Chronobiology . 1976;4:97-110.

  15. Infusing Geoethics One Geoscience Course at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, V. S.

    2016-12-01

    Positive change is sometimes difficult to accomplish within a university. While it might be easy to get faculty members and administrators to agree that facilitating the development of students as ethical geoscientists is a desirable goal in the abstract, formally proposing concrete plans to achieve that goal might generate negative responses and even roadblocks. For example, it might be a challenge to pass a course in geoethics through a college curriculum committee, because ethics is a topic usually taught by the philosophy faculty. Although there are recognized subfields in engineering, medical, business, and legal ethics that are commonly taught by faculty members in those respective departments, geoethics is not yet recognized in this way. A more productive approach might be to begin with change that can be accomplished simply, within existing courses. Faculty members are usually granted broad discretionary authority to decide how material is to be presented in geoscience courses, including required core courses. My suggestion is to structure a course that presents all of the material normally expected under that course title, but in such a way that the ethical dimensions are intentionally and consistently highlighted. As with any change in the way we present course material, there is a startup cost to be borne by the teacher. One cost is the time needed to deepen our understanding of applied professional and scientific ethics; however, this is more of a personal and professional benefit than a cost in the long run. Infusing a course with an awareness of ethical issues also takes prior thought and planning to be successful. But, of course, that is no different from any other improvement in science education. Impressions from a semester's effort to include geoethics in a required core course in structural geology to about 25 students will be shared. The main course topic is not particularly relevant, because there are a number of ethical questions that students

  16. An optimal real-time controller for vertical plasma stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, N; Coda, S; Duval, B P; Le, H B; Rodrigues, A P; Varandas, C A F; Correia, C M B A; Goncalves, B S

    2014-01-01

    Modern Tokamaks have evolved from the initial axisymmetric circular plasma shape to an elongated axisymmetric plasma shape that improves the energy confinement time and the triple product, which is a generally used figure of merit for the conditions needed for fusion reactor performance. However, the elongated plasma cross section introduces a vertical instability that demands a real-time feedback control loop to stabilize the plasma vertical position and velocity. At the Tokamak \\`a Configuration Variable (TCV) in-vessel poloidal field coils driven by fast switching power supplies are used to stabilize highly elongated plasmas. TCV plasma experiments have used a PID algorithm based controller to correct the plasma vertical position. In late 2013 experiments a new optimal real-time controller was tested improving the stability of the plasma. This contribution describes the new optimal real-time controller developed. The choice of the model that describes the plasma response to the actuators is discussed. The ...

  17. Time courses of PIVKA-II and AFP levels after hepatic artery embolization and hepatic artery infusion against hepatocellular carcinoma: relation between the time course and tumor necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, K; Sonomura, T; Mitsuzane, K; Nishida, N; Kimura, M; Satoh, M; Yamada, R; Kodama, N; Kinoshita, M; Tanaka, H

    1992-01-01

    We examined 35 untreated patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma who exhibited positivity for both plasma PIVKA-II and serum AFP, and studied the weekly course of these markers from the pre-TAE or -HAI period to the third week of treatment. We correlated changes in these markers with the tumor necrosis rate and the time course on X-ray CT images. One week after TAE, the tumor necrosis rate and the time course of PIVKA-II showed a significant correlation (r = 0.7), while the correlation was between the time course of AFP and the tumor necrosis rate was insignificant (r = 0.2). At two and three weeks after TAE, both the time course of AFP and PIVKA-II showed significant correlations with the tumor necrosis rate. In 16 patients with tumor necrosis rates of not less than 90%, the mean of the actual half-life (AHL) of PIVKA-II was 3.2 days, the shortest was 1.83 days, and 75% of all AHLs clustered from two days to four days, while the mean and shortest AHLs of AFP were six days and 2.98 days, respectively, exhibiting a broader distribution. On the other hand, in three out of the nine cases of hepatocellular carcinoma complicated with portal tumor thrombi, PIVKA-II increased after HAI in spite of a reduction in tumor size. It was suggested that the PIVKA-II level requires careful interpretation in cases of portal vein obstruction after intensive hepatic arterial infusion of anticancer agents.

  18. Faculty Speak on the Impact of Time in Accelerated Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Eighteen faculty members participated in this qualitative study to determine the impact of reduced seat time in accelerated courses. The findings challenge critics who believe the accelerated delivery format compromises academic quality. The participants noted the importance of students in the learning process, emphasizing the significant workload…

  19. Modeling Fan Effects on the Time Course of Associative Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Darryl W.; Anderson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the time course of associative recognition using the response signal procedure, whereby a stimulus is presented and followed after a variable lag by a signal indicating that an immediate response is required. More specifically, we examined the effects of associative fan (the number of associations that an item has with other items…

  20. Transference, Insight, and the Course of Time-Limited Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelso, Charles J.; Kivlighan, Dennis M.; Wine, Bruce; Jones, Alissa; Friedman, Suzanne C.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the interactive role of therapist-rated transference and insight in predicting both the outcome of time-limited therapy and the course of therapist-rated transference and insight. Results indicate that neither transference nor insight alone predicted outcome; the interaction of transference and emotional insight influenced client- and…

  1. Course of organized structures in thermal plasma inside and outside argon plasma torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Jan; Sonsky, Jiri; Hlina, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Arc chamber of direct-current (dc) argon plasma torch and area just above the nozzle outside of this dc plasma torch were observed by hi-speed camera. System of reflecting mirrors and transparent silica arc chamber walls were used to obtain simultaneous records of both i) cathode area with electric arc inside the plasma torch and ii) nozzle exit with resulting plasma jet outside the plasma torch. Such experimental arrangement allowed us to track localized repeating patterns (organized structures) in the arc chamber and in the plasma flow. Identification of various organized structures - for different experimental conditions - according to their origin and typical development is presented in this paper. Impact of 300 Hz ripple in arc current was compared between different areas of the plasma. Additional simultaneous observation of plasma flow in the same system by series of photodiodes was used for verification of the results. The work was possible with institutional support RVO:61388998.

  2. Time course and dose response of alpha tocopherol on oxidative stress in haemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coombes Jeff S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality particularly in patients with end stage kidney disease. Although observational data from the general population has shown dietary antioxidant intake is associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, most clinical intervention trials have failed to support this relationship. This may be a consequence of not using an effective antioxidant dose and/or not investigating patients with elevated oxidative stress. The SPACE study, conducted in haemodialysis patients, reported that 800 IU/day of alpha tocopherol significantly reduced cardiovascular disease endpoints. A recent time course and dose response study conducted in hypercholesterolaemic patients that found 1600 IU/day of alpha tocopherol was an optimal dose. There is no such dose response data available for haemodialysis patients. Therefore the aim of this study is to investigate the effect of different doses of oral alpha tocopherol on oxidative stress in haemodialysis patients with elevated oxidative stress and the time taken to achieve this effect. Methods The study will consist of a time-course followed by a dose response study. In the time course study 20 haemodialysis patients with elevated oxidative stress will take either 1600 IU/day natural (RRR alpha tocopherol for 20 weeks or placebo. Blood will be collected every two weeks and analysed for a marker of oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and alpha tocopherol. The optimum time period to significantly decrease plasma F2-isoprostanes will be determined from this study. In the dose response study 60 patients will be randomised to receive either placebo, 100, 200, 400, 800 or 1600 IU/day of natural (RRR alpha tocopherol for a time period determined from the time course study. Blood will be collected at baseline and every two weeks and analysed for plasma F2-isoprostanes and alpha tocopherol. It is hypothesised that

  3. Time course of muscle soreness following different types of exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers Andrew J

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-exercise muscle soreness is a dull, aching sensation that follows unaccustomed muscular exertion. Primarily on the basis of previous laboratory-based research on eccentric exercise, soreness is usually said to follow an inverted U-shaped curve over time, peaking 24 – 48 hours after exercise. As such, it is often described as "delayed-onset" muscle soreness. In a study of long-distance runners, soreness seemed to peak immediately and then reduce gradually over time. The study is a secondary analysis of clinical trial data that aims to determine whether the time course of soreness following a natural exercise, long-distance running, is different from that following a laboratory-based exercise, bench-stepping. Methods This is a reanalysis of data from three previous clinical trials. The trials included 400 runners taking part in long-distance races and 82 untrained volunteers performing a bench-stepping test. Subjects completed a Likert scale of muscle soreness every morning and evening for the five days following their exercise. Results Interaction between trial and time is highly significant, suggesting a different time course of soreness following running and bench-stepping. 45% of subjects in the bench-stepping trial experienced peak soreness at the third or fourth follow-up (approximately 36 – 48 hours after exercise compared to only 14% of those in the running trial. The difference between groups is robust to multivariate analysis incorporating possible confounding variables. Conclusion Soreness in runners following long-distance running follows a different time course to that in untrained individuals undertaking bench-stepping. Research on exercise taking place in the laboratory context does not necessarily generalize to exercise undertaken by trained athletes when engaged in their chosen sport.

  4. Time course of muscle soreness following different types of exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J

    2001-01-01

    Background Post-exercise muscle soreness is a dull, aching sensation that follows unaccustomed muscular exertion. Primarily on the basis of previous laboratory-based research on eccentric exercise, soreness is usually said to follow an inverted U-shaped curve over time, peaking 24 – 48 hours after exercise. As such, it is often described as "delayed-onset" muscle soreness. In a study of long-distance runners, soreness seemed to peak immediately and then reduce gradually over time. The study is a secondary analysis of clinical trial data that aims to determine whether the time course of soreness following a natural exercise, long-distance running, is different from that following a laboratory-based exercise, bench-stepping. Methods This is a reanalysis of data from three previous clinical trials. The trials included 400 runners taking part in long-distance races and 82 untrained volunteers performing a bench-stepping test. Subjects completed a Likert scale of muscle soreness every morning and evening for the five days following their exercise. Results Interaction between trial and time is highly significant, suggesting a different time course of soreness following running and bench-stepping. 45% of subjects in the bench-stepping trial experienced peak soreness at the third or fourth follow-up (approximately 36 – 48 hours after exercise) compared to only 14% of those in the running trial. The difference between groups is robust to multivariate analysis incorporating possible confounding variables. Conclusion Soreness in runners following long-distance running follows a different time course to that in untrained individuals undertaking bench-stepping. Research on exercise taking place in the laboratory context does not necessarily generalize to exercise undertaken by trained athletes when engaged in their chosen sport. PMID:11701094

  5. Time-dependent Integrated Predictive Modeling of ITER Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.V. Budny

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction Modeling burning plasmas is important for speeding progress toward practical Tokamak energy production. Examples of issues that can be elucidated by modelinginclude requirements for heating, fueling, torque, and current drive systems, design of diagnostics, and estimates of the plasma performance (e.g., fusion power production) in various plasma scenarios. The modeling should be time-dependent to demonstrate that burning plasmas can be created, maintained (controlled), and terminated successfully. The modeling also should be integrated to treat self-consistently the nonlinearities and strong coupling between the plasma, heating, current drive, confinement, and control systems.

  6. College students' study time: course level, time of semester, and grade earned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, R Eric; Turrisi, Rob; Brandel, Jessica M

    2006-06-01

    The association of total study time, number of events, time per event ratio, study strategies, and course grades across the semester were examined by linking students' study logs to course performance. There were 37 upper-division and 109 lower-division participants. Students earning As and Bs studied more frequently at the end of the semester but for shorter periods of time than students earning lower grades. Results are discussed in terms of providing college students and faculty with recommendations about learning strategies and time spent studying.

  7. A time-predefined approach to course timetabling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Edmund

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A common weakness of local search metaheuristics, such as Simulated Annealing, in solving combinatorial optimization problems, is the necessity of setting a certain number of parameters. This tends to generate a significant increase in the total amount of time required to solve the problem and often requires a high level of experience from the user. This paper is motivated by the goal of overcoming this drawback by employing "parameter-free" techniques in the context of automatically solving course timetabling problems. We employ local search techniques with "straightforward" parameters, i.e. ones that an inexperienced user can easily understand. In particular, we present an extended variant of the "Great Deluge" algorithm, which requires only two parameters (which can be interpreted as search time and an estimation of the required level of solution quality. These parameters affect the performance of the algorithm so that a longer search provides a better result - as long as we can intelligently stop the approach from converging too early. Hence, a user can choose a balance between processing time and the quality of the solution. The proposed method has been tested on a range of university course timetabling problems and the results were evaluated within an International Timetabling Competition. The effectiveness of the proposed technique has been confirmed by a high level of quality of results. These results represented the third overall average rating among 21 participants and the best solutions on 8 of the 23 test problems. .

  8. The Time-Frequency Characteristics of Pulse Propagation Through Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, propagated δ pulses through different distance of Plasma are calculated, and their time-frequency characteristics are studied using CWD (Choi-William distrilution). It is found that several horizontal spectra appear at early arrival time like discrete spectruml at last time a hyperbolic curve lies in the time-frequency spectrum which corresponds to the frequency-group delay curve of plasma. To understand the time-frequency, the property of a signal is helpful for obtaining the plasma parameters.

  9. Time Course of Pupil Center Location after Ocular Drug Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tony A; Macdonnell, Jacqueline E; Mangan, Michelle C; Monsour, Cindy S; Polwattage, Buddhika L; Wilson, Sarah F; Suheimat, Marwan; Atchison, David A

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the time course of pupil centration after application of common topical ocular drugs. Single drops of 2.5% phenylephrine hydrochloride, 1% tropicamide, and 2% pilocarpine hydrochloride were applied on different days to the right eyes of 12 participants. Anterior eye images were captured, at 5-min intervals for an hour, using an infrared-sensitive camera. The images were analyzed to determine pupil diameter and pupil center, the latter with respect to the limbal center. As a control, natural pupil size and pupil center were determined under different illuminances. Pupil centers of natural pupils shifted temporally as pupils dilated. At common pupil sizes, drug-induced pupil centers were different from natural pupil centers. Phenylephrine produced a center shift in the nasal and inferior directions that peaked after a mean of 30 min, whereas dilation was continuing up to 60 min. Tropicamide produced transient center shifts in the nasal and inferior directions that peaked at about 10 min before reducing toward baseline values, whereas dilation reached a peak at about 25 min. Pilocarpine produced a small sustained superior shift that, like constriction, reached a peak after about 25 min. Application of topical ophthalmic drugs cause shifts in pupil center that do not match those produced by natural changes in pupil size and that, in the cases of phenylephrine and tropicamide, follow a different time course than the pupil size changes.

  10. The time-course of a scrapie outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson Emily

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the incubation period of scrapie has a strong host genetic component and a dose-response relationship, it is possible that changes will occur during an outbreak, especially in the genotypes of cases, age-at-onset of disease and, perhaps, the clinical signs displayed. We investigated these factors for a large outbreak of natural scrapie, which yielded sufficient data to detect temporal trends. Results Cases occurred mostly in two genotypes, VRQ/VRQ and VRQ/ARQ, with those early in the outbreak more likely to be of the VRQ/VRQ genotype. As the epidemic progressed, the age-at-onset of disease increased, which reflected changes in the genotypes of cases rather than changes in the age-at-onset within genotypes. Clinical signs of cases changed over the course of the outbreak. As the epidemic progressed VRQ/VRQ and VRQ/ARQ sheep were more likely to be reported with behavioural changes, while VRQ/VRQ sheep only were less likely to be reported with loss of condition. Conclusion This study of one of the largest scrapie outbreaks in the UK allowed investigation of the effect of PrP genotype on other epidemiological parameters. Our analysis indicated that, although age-at-onset and clinical signs changed over time, the observed changes were largely, but not exclusively, driven by the time course of the PrP genotypes of cases.

  11. The Slow Developmental Time Course of Real-Time Spoken Word Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigler, Hannah; Farris-Trimble, Ashley; Greiner, Lea; Walker, Jessica; Tomblin, J. Bruce; McMurray, Bob

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the developmental time course of spoken word recognition in older children using eye tracking to assess how the real-time processing dynamics of word recognition change over development. We found that 9-year-olds were slower to activate the target words and showed more early competition from competitor words than…

  12. Real-Time Fault Classification for Plasma Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2011-01-01

    Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, ...

  13. Real-time optical plasma boundary reconstruction for plasma position control at the TCV Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommen, G.; Baar, M. de; Duval, B.P.; Andrebe, Y.; Le, H.B.; Klop, M.A.; Doelman, N.J.; Witvoet, G.; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    A dual, high speed, real-time visible light camera setup was installed on the TCV tokamak to reconstruct optically and in real-time the plasma boundary shape. Localized light emission from the plasma boundary in tangential view, broadband visible images results in clearly resolved boundary edge-feat

  14. Structural complexity and the time course of grammatical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, R

    1998-06-01

    One traditional view of the time course of language acquisition holds that a child's difficulties in learning her language are due to general processing, memory or conceptual limitations. As the child's cognitive capacities expand, so do her abilities to use her already-acquired grammar or to recognize additional properties of her soon-to-be native language. Recent work in the study of child language, however, has discovered the existence of a number of characteristic stages, transitions between which are best described in the terms of linguistic theory proper. These stages are surprising under a view of language acquisition according to which developmental delay derives from general cognitive limitations, which cannot characterize difficulties explicable only in language-specific terms. At the same time, current linguistic theories so severely restrict the variation among possible human grammars that there remains little reason why there should be any learning problem at all or characteristic developmental stages. In this paper, I propose that these two views can be reconciled. I show that children's difficulties with a wide range of syntactic constructions, which are indeed best defined in linguistic terms, should nonetheless be derived from limitations on the child's ability to deal with processing load and formal representational complexity. I suggest however that this can be done only in the context of a particular view of syntactic representation, one which is articulated in the terms of the formal system of tree adjoining grammar (TAG). I demonstrate how precisely those difficulties that children experience in the acquisition of relative clauses, adjectival modification, control constructions, raising, wh-questions and the obligatoriness of finite inflection can be traced to the complexity associated with one of the TAG combinatory operations, adjoining. This proposal relates this apparently disparate set of constructions in a novel way and provides us with

  15. A 1-year time course study of the relaxation times and histology for irradiated rat lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shioya, S.; Haida, M.; Fukuzaki, M.; Ono, Y.; Tsuda, M.; Ohta, Y.; Yamabayashi, H. (Tokai Univ. School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    To investigate the NMR relaxation times for irradiated rat lung tissue, we measured T1 and T2 at 11 different times during the injury's 1-year time course. A biexponential analysis of T2 was used to determine T2 fast (T2f) and T2 slow (T2s). In addition, we measured water content and correlated changes in the relaxation times with pathological changes. The correlation indicates the following: (1) Shortly after irradiation, the biexponential T2 decay for 1/3 of the samples became monoexponential and there were no noticeable pathological changes observed using light microscopy. (2) During radiation pneumonitis, T2f and T2s were prolonged. This accompanied acute edematous changes and inflammatory cell infiltration. (3) Finally, during radiation fibrosis T1 shortened and collagen increased. We observed no significant correlation between relaxation time changes and water content changes throughout the 1-year time course.

  16. Time Evolution of Artificial Plasma Cloud in Atmospheric Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆启明; 杨维纮; 刘万东

    2004-01-01

    By analyzing the time evolution of artificial plasma cloud in the high altitude of atmospheric environment, we found that there are two zones, an exponential attenuation zone and a linearly attenuating zone, existing in the spatial distribution of electron density of the artificial plasma clouds. The plasma generator's particle flux density only contributes to the exponential attenuation zone, and has no effect on the linear attenuation zone. The average electron density in the linear attenuation zone is about 10-5 of neutral particle density, and can diffuse over a wider area. The conclusion will supply some valuable references to the research of electromagnetic wave and artificial plasma interaction, the plasma invisibleness research of missile and special aerocraft,and the design of artificial plasma source.

  17. Time-course of attention biases in social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Casey A; Inhoff, Albrecht W; Coles, Meredith E

    2013-10-01

    Theoretical models of social phobia implicate preferential attention to social threat in the maintenance of anxiety symptoms, though there has been limited work characterizing the nature of these biases over time. The current study utilized eye-movement data to examine the time-course of visual attention over 1500ms trials of a probe detection task. Nineteen participants with a primary diagnosis of social phobia based on DSM-IV criteria and 20 non-clinical controls completed this task with angry, fearful, and happy face trials. Overt visual attention to the emotional and neutral faces was measured in 50ms segments across the trial. Over time, participants with social phobia attend less to emotional faces and specifically less to happy faces compared to controls. Further, attention to emotional relative to neutral expressions did not vary notably by emotion for participants with social phobia, but control participants showed a pattern after 1000ms in which over time they preferentially attended to happy expressions and avoided negative expressions. Findings highlight the importance of considering attention biases to positive stimuli as well as the pattern of attention between groups. These results suggest that attention "bias" in social phobia may be driven by a relative lack of the biases seen in non-anxious participants.

  18. Time course analyses of orthographic and phonological priming effects during word recognition in a transparent orthography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeguers, M.H.T.; Snellings, P.; Huizenga, H.M.; van der Molen, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    In opaque orthographies, the activation of orthographic and phonological codes follows distinct time courses during visual word recognition. However, it is unclear how orthography and phonology are accessed in more transparent orthographies. Therefore, we conducted time course analyses of masked

  19. Atypical Time Course of Object Recognition in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplette, Laurent; Wicker, Bruno; Gosselin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    In neurotypical observers, it is widely believed that the visual system samples the world in a coarse-to-fine fashion. Past studies on Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have identified atypical responses to fine visual information but did not investigate the time course of the sampling of information at different levels of granularity (i.e. Spatial Frequencies, SF). Here, we examined this question during an object recognition task in ASD and neurotypical observers using a novel experimental paradigm. Our results confirm and characterize with unprecedented precision a coarse-to-fine sampling of SF information in neurotypical observers. In ASD observers, we discovered a different pattern of SF sampling across time: in the first 80 ms, high SFs lead ASD observers to a higher accuracy than neurotypical observers, and these SFs are sampled differently across time in the two subject groups. Our results might be related to the absence of a mandatory precedence of global information, and to top-down processing abnormalities in ASD. PMID:27752088

  20. Time courses of myofascial temporomandibular disorder complaints during a 12-month follow-up period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.K.A. van Selms; F. Lobbezoo; M. Naeije

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the time courses of myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain and mandibular function impairment (MFI), and to identify predictive factors associated with these time courses. METHODS: During a 12-month period following conservative TMD treatment, the time courses of myofa

  1. Book discussion course: timely topics for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Donna F; Woodson, Deidra; Jones, Dee

    2014-01-01

    Several library faculty members at the Louisiana State University Health Shreveport Health Sciences Library offered a book discussion course as an elective for first-year medical students. This article provides details on how the librarians developed, taught, and evaluated this elective. The librarians took a team-teaching approach, required the students to read two books, and outlined the criteria for participation. At the end of the course, the students completed an evaluation, commenting on positive and negative aspects of the course. The elective proved to be successful, and the librarians look forward to offering the course again in the spring of 2014.

  2. Holographic Brownian motion and time scales in strongly coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atmaja, Ardian Nata [Research Center for Physics, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Kompleks PUSPITEK Serpong, Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia); Indonesia Center for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (ICTMP), Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Boer, Jan de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Shigemori, Masaki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP), Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hakubi Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiyacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    We study Brownian motion of a heavy quark in field theory plasma in the AdS/CFT setup and discuss the time scales characterizing the interaction between the Brownian particle and plasma constituents. Based on a simple kinetic theory, we first argue that the mean-free-path time is related to the connected 4-point function of the random force felt by the Brownian particle. Then, by holographically computing the 4-point function and regularizing the IR divergence appearing in the computation, we write down a general formula for the mean-free-path time, and apply it to the STU black hole which corresponds to plasma charged under three U(1)R-charges. The result indicates that the Brownian particle collides with many plasma constituents simultaneously.

  3. Generalized Correlation Coefficient for Non-Parametric Analysis of Microarray Time-Course Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qihua; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark; Mose, Kristian Fredløv; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Kruse, Torben

    2017-06-06

    Modeling complex time-course patterns is a challenging issue in microarray study due to complex gene expression patterns in response to the time-course experiment. We introduce the generalized correlation coefficient and propose a combinatory approach for detecting, testing and clustering the heterogeneous time-course gene expression patterns. Application of the method identified nonlinear time-course patterns in high agreement with parametric analysis. We conclude that the non-parametric nature in the generalized correlation analysis could be an useful and efficient tool for analyzing microarray time-course data and for exploring the complex relationships in the omics data for studying their association with disease and health.

  4. Generalized Correlation Coefficient for Non-Parametric Analysis of Microarray Time-Course Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Modeling complex time-course patterns is a challenging issue in microarray study due to complex gene expression patterns in response to the time-course experiment. We introduce the generalized correlation coefficient and propose a combinatory approach for detecting, testing and clustering...... the heterogeneous time-course gene expression patterns. Application of the method identified nonlinear time-course patterns in high agreement with parametric analysis. We conclude that the non-parametric nature in the generalized correlation analysis could be an useful and efficient tool for analyzing microarray...... time-course data and for exploring the complex relationships in the omics data for studying their association with disease and health....

  5. Delay time for the onset of beam plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, J. L.; Denig, W. F.; Raitt, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of a nonrelativistic electron beam with a neutral gas in a large chamber is considered, and the time interval before ignition of beam plasma discharge (BPD) is studied. A new theoretical expression for the time delay before BPD ignition is found as a function of the critical current necessary for BPD to be established. There are two parameters in the theoretical expression, and both are derived from two different experiments. These parameters are used to write the time evolution equation for plasma density as a function of time.

  6. [Clinical value of time course changes in postprandial intragastric acidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, I Iu

    2010-01-01

    to study the level and duration of postprandial pH abnormalities in the body of the stomach in healthy individuals and in patients with duodenal peptic ulcer (DPU). 24-hour pH-metry was used to study the degree and duration of postprandial pH abnormalities in the body of the stomach in 50 healthy individuals and 188 patients with DPU. Interdigestive gastric pH in healthy individuals was significantly higher than that in patients with DPU; food intake was followed by an 86 +/- 3.4% increase in pH, the latter returned to the baseline pH values within 64.7-70.3 minutes. In the uncomplicated course of DPU, the mean postprandial pH increase was comparable in the level and duration with the similar indices in healthy individuals. Complicated DPU was characterized by a short-term and insignificant increase in postprandial pH. The mean postprandial pH increase and the time of its return to the baseline level in uncomplicated DPU were comparable with those in healthy individuals; there was a significant reduction in these indices in complicated DPU.

  7. THz time-domain spectroscopy for tokamak plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causa, F.; Zerbini, M.; Buratti, P.; Gabellieri, L.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O. [ASSOCIAZIONE EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Johnston, M. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E. [ENEA C.R. Frascati UTAPRAD, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2014-08-21

    The technology is now becoming mature for diagnostics using large portions of the electromagnetic spectrum simultaneously, in the form of THz pulses. THz radiation-based techniques have become feasible for a variety of applications, e.g., spectroscopy, imaging for security, medicine and pharmaceutical industry. In particular, time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) is now being used also for plasma diagnostics in various fields of application. This technique is promising also for plasmas for fusion applications, where plasma characteristics are non-uniform and/or evolve during the discharge This is because THz pulses produced with femtosecond mode-locked lasers conveniently span the spectrum above and below the plasma frequency and, thus, can be used as very sensitive and versatile probes of widely varying plasma parameters. The short pulse duration permits time resolving plasma characteristics while the large frequency span permits a large dynamic range. The focus of this work is to present preliminary experimental and simulation results demonstrating that THz TDS can be realistically adapted as a versatile tokamak plasma diagnostic technique.

  8. Time-dependent Cooling in Photoionized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnat, Orly

    2017-02-01

    I explore the thermal evolution and ionization states in gas cooling from an initially hot state in the presence of external photoionizing radiation. I compute the equilibrium and nonequilibrium cooling efficiencies, heating rates, and ion fractions for low-density gas cooling while exposed to the ionizing metagalactic background radiation at various redshifts (z = 0 ‑ 3), for a range of temperatures (108–104 K), densities (10‑7–103 cm‑3), and metallicities (10‑3–2 times solar). The results indicate the existence of a threshold ionization parameter, above which the cooling efficiencies are very close to those in photoionization equilibrium (so that departures from equilibrium may be neglected), and below which the cooling efficiencies resemble those in collisional time-dependent gas cooling with no external radiation (and are thus independent of density).

  9. Time course of expiratory propofol after bolus injection as measured by ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornuss, Cyrill; Wiepcke, Dirk; Praun, Siegfried; Dolch, Michael E; Apfel, Christian C; Schelling, Gustav

    2012-04-01

    Propofol in exhaled breath can be detected and monitored in real time by ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry (IMR-MS). In addition, propofol concentration in exhaled breath is tightly correlated with propofol concentration in plasma. Therefore, real-time monitoring of expiratory propofol could be useful for titrating intravenous anesthesia, but only if concentration changes in plasma can be determined in exhaled breath without significant delay. To evaluate the utility of IMR-MS during non-steady-state conditions, we measured the time course of both expiratory propofol concentration and the processed electroencephalography (EEG) as a surrogate outcome for propofol effect after an IV bolus induction of propofol. Twenty-one patients scheduled for routine surgery were observed after a bolus of 2.5 mg kg(-1) propofol for induction of anesthesia. Expiratory propofol was measured using IMR-MS and the cerebral propofol effect was estimated using the bispectral index (BIS). Primary endpoints were time to detection of expiratory propofol and time to onset of propofol's effect on BIS, and the secondary endpoint was time to peak effect (highest expiratory propofol or lowest BIS). Expiratory propofol and changes in BIS were first detected at 43 ± 21 and 49 ± 11 s after bolus injection, respectively (P = 0.29). Peak propofol concentrations (9.2 ± 2.4 parts-per-billion) and lowest BIS values (23 ± 4) were reached after 208 ± 57 and 219 ± 62 s, respectively (P = 0.57). Expiratory propofol concentrations measured by IMR-MS have similar times to detection and peak concentrations compared with propofol effect as measured by the processed EEG (BIS). This suggests that expiratory propofol concentrations may be useful for titrating intravenous anesthesia.

  10. Shock Formation in Electron-Ion Plasmas: Mechanism and Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret, Antoine; Stockem Novo, Anne; Ricardo, Fonseca; Luis, Silva

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the formation of a collisionless shock in electron-ion plasmas in theory and simulations. In initially un-magnetized relativistic plasmas, such shocks are triggered by the Weibel instability. While in pair plasmas the shock starts forming right after the instability saturates, it is not so in electron-ion plasmas because the Weibel filaments at saturation are too small. An additional merging phase is therefore necessary for them to efficiently stop the flow. We derive a theoretical model for the shock formation time, taking into account filament merging in the nonlinear phase of the Weibel instability. This process is much slower than in electron-positron pair shocks, and so the shock formation is longer by a factor proportional to √{mi /me } ln(mi /me).

  11. Level crossings, excess times and transient plasma-wall interactions in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsen, Audun

    2016-01-01

    Based on a stochastic model for intermittent fluctuations in the boundary region of magnetically confined plasmas, an expression for the level crossing rate is derived from the joint distribution of the process and its derivative. From this the average time spent by the process above a certain threshold level is obtained. This provides novel predictions of plasma-wall interactions due to transient transport events associated with radial motion of blob-like structures in the scrape-off layer.

  12. Study on Performance Parameters of the Plasma Source for a Short-Conduction-Time Plasma Opening Switch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Weixi; ZENG Zhengzhong; WANG Liangping; LEI Tianshi; HU Yixiang; HUANG Tao; SUN Tieping

    2012-01-01

    Plasma source performance parameters, including plasma ejection density and velocity, greatly affect the operation of a short-conduction-time plasma opening switch (POS). In this paper, the plasma source used in the POS of Qiangguang I generator is chosen as the study object. At first the POS working process is analyzed. The result shows that the opening performance of the POS can be improved by increasing the plasma ejection velocity and decreasing the plasma density. The influence of the cable plasma gun structure and number on the plasma ejection parameters is experimentally investigated with two charge collectors. Finally a semi-empirical model is proposed to describe the experimental phenomenon.

  13. Reduced glomerular angiotensin II receptor density in diabetes mellitus in the rat: time course and mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, B.M.

    1987-04-01

    Glomerular angiotensin II receptors are reduced in number in early diabetes mellitus, which may contribute to hyperfiltration and glomerular injury. The time course and role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the pathogenesis of the receptor abnormality were studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats made diabetic with streptozotocin (65 mg, iv). Glomerular angiotensin II receptors were measured by Scatchard analysis; insulin, renin activity, angiotensin II, and aldosterone were measured by RIA. Diabetes mellitus was documented at 24 h by a rise in plasma glucose (vehicle-injected control, 133 +/- 4; diabetic, 482 +/- 22 mg/dl and a fall in plasma insulin (control, 53.1 +/- 5.7; diabetic, 35.6 +/- 4.0 microIU/ml. At 24 h glomerular angiotensin II receptor density was decreased by 26.5% in diabetic rats (control, 75.5 +/- 9.6 X 10(6); diabetic, 55.5 +/- 8.3 X 10(6) receptors/glomerulus. Receptor occupancy could not explain the defect, because there was reduced binding in diabetic glomeruli after pretreatment with 3 M MgCl/sub 2/, a maneuver that caused dissociation of previously bound hormone. There was a progressive return of the receptor density toward normal over the 60 days following induction of diabetes, with diabetic glomeruli measuring 22.7%, 14.8%, and 3.7% fewer receptors than age-matched controls at 11 days, 1 month, and 2 months, respectively.

  14. Dietary DHA: time course of tissue uptake and effects on cytokine secretion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefils, Jennifer; Géloën, Alain; Vidal, Hubert; Lagarde, Michel; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie

    2010-11-01

    Consumption of DHA has numerous beneficial effects, but little is known about these effects during the first few days of the DHA dietary intake. The main objectives of the present study were to determine the time course of DHA incorporation into phospholipids in different mouse tissues and the effects of DHA supplementation on adiponectin and leptin secretion. Mice were fed either a control diet or a DHA-rich diet, and some were killed on days 0, 4, 8, 16 and 32. Some mice were fed the DHA-rich diet for 16 d, and were then maintained on the control diet for sixteen more days (washout period). DHA supplementation increased plasma adiponectin secretion by 2·4-fold as early as 4 d after the initiation of the DHA-rich diet feeding. The adiponectin concentration remained 1·6-fold higher after the 16 d washout period. Plasma leptin levels were significantly lower after 4 d of feeding with DHA. These effects were associated with a significant increase in DHA incorporation in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine of all analysed tissues (liver, heart and white adipose tissues). DHA mainly got incorporated at the expense of n-6 arachidonic acid. The present data show that DHA rapidly improved the profile of secreted adipokines, and that these protective effects were long lasting.

  15. Generalized Correlation Coefficient for Non-Parametric Analysis of Microarray Time-Course Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Modeling complex time-course patterns is a challenging issue in microarray study due to complex gene expression patterns in response to the time-course experiment. We introduce the generalized correlation coefficient and propose a combinatory approach for detecting, testing and clustering...... the heterogeneous time-course gene expression patterns. Application of the method identified nonlinear time-course patterns in high agreement with parametric analysis. We conclude that the non-parametric nature in the generalized correlation analysis could be an useful and efficient tool for analyzing microarray...

  16. Real-Time Fault Classification for Plasma Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Yang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, and thus can save downtime of the plasma tool. In this work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES is employed as the metrology sensor for in-situ process monitoring. Splitting into twelve different match rates by spectrum bands, the matching rate indicator in our previous work (Yang, R.; Chen, R.S. Sensors 2010, 10, 5703-5723 is used to detect the fault process. Based on the match data, a real-time classification of plasma faults is achieved by a novel method, developed in this study. Experiments were conducted to validate the novel fault classification. From the experimental results, we may conclude that the proposed method is feasible inasmuch that the overall accuracy rate of the classification for fault event shifts is 27 out of 28 or about 96.4% in success.

  17. Real-time fault classification for plasma processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2011-01-01

    Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, and thus can save downtime of the plasma tool. In this work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is employed as the metrology sensor for in-situ process monitoring. Splitting into twelve different match rates by spectrum bands, the matching rate indicator in our previous work (Yang, R.; Chen, R.S. Sensors 2010, 10, 5703-5723) is used to detect the fault process. Based on the match data, a real-time classification of plasma faults is achieved by a novel method, developed in this study. Experiments were conducted to validate the novel fault classification. From the experimental results, we may conclude that the proposed method is feasible inasmuch that the overall accuracy rate of the classification for fault event shifts is 27 out of 28 or about 96.4% in success.

  18. Inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for beam plasma research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yushkov, Yu. G., E-mail: yuyushkov@gmail.com; Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Savkin, K. P. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    The paper describes the design and principle of operation of an inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for research in the plasma produced by an electron beam in the forevacuum pressure range (5–20 Pa). In the spectrometer, the deflecting plates as well as the drift tube and the primary ion beam measuring system are at high potential with respect to ground. This provides the possibility to measure the mass-charge constitution of the plasma created by a continuous electron beam with a current of up to 300 mA and electron energy of up to 20 keV at forevacuum pressures in the chamber placed at ground potential. Research results on the mass-charge state of the beam plasma are presented and analyzed.

  19. Time course of central and peripheral alterations after isometric neuromuscular electrical stimulation-induced muscle damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fouré

    Full Text Available Isometric contractions induced by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES have been shown to result in a prolonged force decrease but the time course of the potential central and peripheral factors have never been investigated. This study examined the specific time course of central and peripheral factors after isometric NMES-induced muscle damage. Twenty-five young healthy men were subjected to an NMES exercise consisting of 40 contractions for both legs. Changes in maximal voluntary contraction force of the knee extensors (MVC, peak evoked force during double stimulations at 10 Hz (Db(10 and 100 Hz (Db(100, its ratio (10:100, voluntary activation, muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity were assessed before, immediately after and throughout four days after NMES session. Changes in knee extensors volume and T2 relaxation time were also assessed at two (D2 and four (D4 days post-exercise. MVC decreased by 29% immediately after NMES session and was still 19% lower than the baseline value at D4. The decrease in Db(10 was higher than in Db(100 immediately and one day post-exercise resulting in a decrease (-12% in the 10:100 ratio. On the contrary, voluntary activation significantly decreased at D2 (-5% and was still depressed at D4 (-5%. Muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity increased after NMES and peaked at D2 and D4, respectively. T2 was also increased at D2 (6% and D4 (9%. Additionally, changes in MVC and peripheral factors (e.g., Db(100 were correlated on the full recovery period, while a significant correlation was found between changes in MVC and VA only from D2 to D4. The decrease in MVC recorded immediately after the NMES session was mainly due to peripheral changes while both central and peripheral contributions were involved in the prolonged force reduction. Interestingly, the chronological events differ from what has been reported so far for voluntary exercise-induced muscle damage.

  20. Characterization of a microsecond-conduction-time plasma opening switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commisso, R. J.; Goodrich, P. J.; Grossmann, J. M.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Weber, B. V.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents data and analyses from which emerges a physical picture of microsecond-conduction-time plasma opening switch operation. During conduction, a broad current channel penetrates axially through the plasma, moving it toward the load. Opening occurs when the current channel reaches the load end of the plasma, far from the load. During conduction, the axial line density in the interelectrode region is reduced from its value with no current conduction as a result of radial hydrodynamic forces associated with the current channel. A factor of 20 reduction is observed at opening in a small, localized region between the electrodes. When open, the switch plasma behaves like a section of magnetically insulated transmission line with an effective gap of 2 to 3 mm. Increasing the magnetic field in this gap by 50% results in an improvement of 50% in the peak load voltage and load current rise time, to 1.2 MV and 20 nsec, respectively. An erosion opening mechanism explains the inferred gap growth rate using the reduced line density at opening. Improved switch performance results when the maximum gap size is increased by using a rising load impedance.

  1. The time course of visual categorization: Electrophysiological evidence from ERP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Antao; LI Hong; QIU Jiang; LUO Yuejia

    2006-01-01

    Visual categorization can be derived from interaction between inputting features set (IFS)from outside stimuli and anticipating features set (AFS) from concept, and such interaction can take two forms: match extraction and conflict control. Using ERP recording, we investigated the temporal course of visual categorization. The results indicated that the larger the AFS, the higher the amplitude of the N1 was generated, which demonstrated the effect of the AFS on the attention. When the size of the AFS was larger than or equal to 2, prominent N2 component was elicited, which demonstrated the effect of conflict when the feature of IFS mismatched with the feature of the AFS. The judgment of category was manifested on the LPC component, and this component was also sensitive to conflict control. Based on the results, we proposed that the temporal course of visual categorization was as follows: selective attention, feature perception, feature match/extraction and judgment of category/conflict control. Among those processes, the judgment of category is the core processing; however the former three sub-processes form the base of categorization. The results are in support of the idea that LPC is responsible for highlevel categorization process.

  2. A global oral health course: isn't it time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Asef; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Dharamsi, Shafik

    2008-11-01

    This article examines current global oral health initiatives to underserved dental populations and assesses the level of familiarity with these initiatives among dental students. The World Health Organization (WHO)'s basic package of oral care (BPOC) is described, as well as successes and difficulties in global oral health initiatives. A survey was conducted of third-year dental students at a North American dental school to determine their familiarity with global oral health initiatives set out by the WHO and the World Dental Federation (FDI). The majority of the surveyed students (87 percent) expressed interest in volunteering their professional services in international settings. However, none of the surveyed students knew about the BPOC or the FDI's role in global oral health. The findings indicate that predoctoral dental public health courses in dental schools ought to include a course on global oral health to expose students to global oral health issues and equip them with interventions like the BPOC so they can provide better care to globally underserved dental populations.

  3. Pancreatic cellular injury after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: frequency, time course and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nys, Monique; Venneman, Ingrid; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Preiser, Jean-Charles; Vanbelle, Sophie; Albert, Adelin; Camus, Gérard; Damas, Pierre; Larbuisson, Robert; Lamy, Maurice

    2007-05-01

    Although often clinically silent, pancreatic cellular injury (PCI) is relatively frequent after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass; and its etiology and time course are largely unknown. We defined PCI as the simultaneous presence of abnormal values of pancreatic isoamylase and immunoreactive trypsin (IRT). The frequency and time evolution of PCI were assessed in this condition using assays for specific exocrine pancreatic enzymes. Correlations with inflammatory markers were searched for preoperative risk factors. One hundred ninety-three patients submitted to cardiac surgery were enrolled prospectively. Blood IRT, amylase, pancreatic isoamylase, lipase, and markers of inflammation (alpha1-protease inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin, myeloperoxidase) were measured preoperatively and postoperatively until day 8. The postoperative increase in plasma levels of pancreatic enzymes and urinary IRT was biphasic in all patients: early after surgery and later (from day 4 to 8 after surgery). One hundred thirty-three patients (69%) experienced PCI, with mean IRT, isoamylase, and alpha1-protease inhibitor values higher for each sample than that in patients without PCI. By multiple regression analysis, we found preoperative values of plasma IRT >or=40 ng/mL, amylase >or=42 IU/mL, and pancreatic isoamylase >or=20 IU/L associated with a higher incidence of postsurgery PCI (P < 0.005). In the PCI patients, a significant correlation was found between the 4 pancreatic enzymes and urinary IRT, total calcium, myeloperoxidase, alpha1-protease inhibitor, and alpha2-macroglobulin. These data support a high prevalence of postoperative PCI after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, typically biphasic and clinically silent, especially when pancreatic enzymes were elevated preoperatively.

  4. Relating a calcium indicator signal to the unperturbed calcium concentration time-course

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borst, Alexander; Abarbanel, Henry D I

    2007-01-01

    .... By investigating the underlying reaction kinetics, we show that in some ranges of kinetic parameters one can explicitly link the time dependent indicator signal to the time-course of the calcium...

  5. The time course of implicit and explicit concept learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziori, Eleni; Dienes, Zoltán

    2012-03-01

    The present experiment investigated the development of implicit and explicit knowledge during concept learning. According to Cleeremans and Jiménez (2002), the content of a representation can be conscious only when the representation is of a sufficiently good quality; on this theory, increasing explicit and decreasing implicit knowledge might be expected with training. The view that implicit knowledge arises from compilation of explicit knowledge makes the opposite prediction. The present research tested these possibilities using subjective measures based on confidence ratings. One group of participants was presented with blocks of category exemplars that activated prior knowledge, whereas another group was presented with blocks of categories that did not elicit any useful prior knowledge. The results showed that, irrespective of the knowledge group participants were allocated to, explicit knowledge increased over the course of learning, whereas implicit knowledge either stayed the same or decreased, consistent with Cleeremans and Jiménez's prediction.

  6. Time course of episodes of definitive vertigo in Meniere's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garrigues, Herminio; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A; Perez, Paz; Sanz, Ricardo; Orts, Miguel; Marco, Jaime; Barona, Rafael; Tapia, Mari C; Aran, Ismael; Cenjor, Carlos; Perez, Nicolas; Morera, Constantino; Ramirez, Rafael

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the frequency and duration of episodes of definitive vertigo in Ménière's disease. Prospective longitudinal study. Multiple tertiary referral centers. Five hundred ten individuals from 8 hospitals that met the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery diagnostic criteria for definitive Ménière's disease. Conservative treatment. Frequency and duration of episodes of definitive vertigo during follow-up. Ménière's disease affects both sexes and both ears equally, with onset generally in the fourth decade of life. The number of episodes of vertigo is greater in the first few years of the disease. Although episodes of vertigo that last longer than 6 hours are less frequent than shorter episodes, they occur with similar frequency throughout the natural course of the disease. The percentage of patients without episodes of vertigo increases as the disease progresses, and 70% of patients who did not have an episode of vertigo for 1 year will continue to be free of episodes during the following year. Thus, there is a relationship between the frequency of episodes in consecutive years, although this association decreases rapidly as the number of years increases. The frequency of definitive episodes of vertigo in Ménière's disease decreased during follow-up, and many individuals reached a steady-state phase free of vertigo.

  7. The time course of verb processing in Dutch sentences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goede, D.; Shapiro, L.P.; Wester, F.; Love, T.; Bastiaanse, Y.R.M.

    2009-01-01

    The verb has traditionally been characterized as the central element in a sentence. Nevertheless, the exact role of the verb during the actual ongoing comprehension of a sentence as it unfolds in time remains largely unknown. This paper reports the results of two Cross-Modal Lexical Priming (CMLP) e

  8. The Time Course of Verb Processing in Dutch Sentences

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goede, Dieuwke; Shapiro, Lewis P.; Wester, Femke; Swinney, David A.; Bastiaanse, Roelien

    2009-01-01

    The verb has traditionally been characterized as the central element in a sentence. Nevertheless, the exact role of the verb during the actual ongoing comprehension of a sentence as it unfolds in time remains largely unknown. This paper reports the results of two Cross-Modal Lexical Priming (CMLP) experiments detailing the pattern of verb priming…

  9. Time-course of trigeminal versus olfactory stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flohr, E.L.R.; Boesveldt, Sanne; Haehner, Antje; Iannilli, Emilia; Sinding, Charlotte; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Habituation of responses to chemosensory signals has been explored in many ways. Strong habituation and adaptation processes can be observed at the various levels of processing. For example, with repeated exposure, amplitudes of chemosensory event-related potentials (ERP) decrease over time. Howe

  10. Disinfection for infection prevention over the course of time

    OpenAIRE

    Hell, M.; Pauser, G

    2007-01-01

    In recent years and decades increasingly more emphasis has been placed on alcohol-based solutions for hygienic and surgical hand disinfection. Traditional handwashing with soap and water has been largely replaced in the everyday clinical setting, as has the use of disinfectant soap-based solutions for surgical hand disinfection. It has been possible in recent years to reduce the exposure time for alcohol-based hand disinfection in surgery from 5 to 3 minutes, and there are plans to reduce thi...

  11. Time Course of Early Postadmission Hematoma Expansion in Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Christian; Christensen, Anders Fogh; Krieger, Derk W

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Early hematoma expansion (EHE) in patients with intracerebral hematoma is a promising treatment target. To date, the time course of EHE has remained poorly described. We prospectively investigated the time course of EHE. METHODS: We included consecutive patients presenting...... occurred within the first 7 to 8 hours after symptom onset. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01472224....

  12. Time-Course Changes of Steroidogenic Gene Expression and Steroidogenesis of Rat Leydig Cells after Acute Immobilization Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Lin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Leydig cells secrete testosterone, which is essential for male fertility and reproductive health. Stress increases the secretion of glucocorticoid (corticosterone, CORT; in rats, which decreases circulating testosterone levels in part through a direct action by binding to the glucocorticoid receptors (NR3C1 in Leydig cells. The intratesticular CORT level is dependent on oxidative inactivation of glucocorticoid by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD11B1 in Leydig cells. In the present study, we investigated the time-course changes of steroidogenic gene expression levels after acute immobilization stress in rats. The plasma CORT levels were significantly increased 0.5, 1, 3 and 6 h after immobilization stress, while plasma testosterone levels were significantly reduced 3 and 6 h, after stress and luteinizing hormone (LH did not change. Immobilization stress caused the down-regulation of Scarb1, Star and Cyp17a1 expression levels in the rat testis starting at the first hour of stress, ahead of the significant decreases of plasma testosterone levels. Other mRNA levels, including Cyp11a1, Hsd3b1 and Hsd17b3, began to decline after 3 h. Hsd11b1 and Nos2 mRNA levels did not change during the course of stress. Administration of glucocorticoid antagonist RU486 significantly restored plasma testosterone levels. In conclusion, Scarb1, Star and Cyp17a1 expression levels are more sensitive to acute stress, and acute immobilization stress causes the decline of the steroidogenic pathway via elevating the levels of glucocorticoid, which binds to NR3C1 in Leydig cells to inhibit steroidogenic gene expression.

  13. The time course of laryngeal coarticulation in children: First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Laura L.

    2004-05-01

    Previous work has suggested that the degree or extent of coarticulation is more extreme in young children than adults. Research in this area has focused primarily on supralaryngeal aspects of coarticulation, using spectral measures such as formant frequencies and fricative centroids. At the same time, studies of adults have found that laryngeal adjustments for voiceless consonants extend well into neighboring vowels, yielding higher values of open quotient and DC flow, and more symmetical pulse shapes, in vowels flanking voiceless as compared to voiced consonants. The current work investigates laryngeal coarticulation in normally developing, English-speaking 4- and 5-year olds. Inverse filtering of the oral airflow is used to approximate the glottal source signal in utterances containing /VpV, VhV, VbV/ sequences. The /VbV/ utterance, which does not require vocal-fold abduction, serves as a control condition to the voiceless consonants. Voice source (open quotient, speed quotient) and aerodynamic (AC and DC flow) quantities are measured over time, and compared between the children and adult females. Along with adding to our understanding of developmental changes in coarticulation, these data will contribute to the literature on differences in voice source properties between children and adults. [Work supported by NIH.

  14. Inferences about time course of Weber's Law violate statistical principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Rachel M; Franz, Volker H

    2013-01-15

    Recently, Holmes et al. (2011b) suggested that grasping is only subject to Weber's Law at early but not late points of a grasping movement. They therefore conclude that distinct visual computations and information may guide early and late portions of grasping. Here, we argue that their results can be explained by an interesting statistical artifact, and cannot be considered indicative of the presence or absence of Weber's Law during early portions of grasping. Our argument has implications for other studies using similar methodology (e.g., Heath et al., 2011, Holmes et al., 2011a, 2012), and also for the analysis of temporal data (often called time series) in general. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The time course of shape discrimination in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ales, Justin M; Appelbaum, L Gregory; Cottereau, Benoit R; Norcia, Anthony M

    2013-02-15

    The lateral occipital cortex (LOC) activates selectively to images of intact objects versus scrambled controls, is selective for the figure-ground relationship of a scene, and exhibits at least some degree of invariance for size and position. Because of these attributes, it is considered to be a crucial part of the object recognition pathway. Here we show that human LOC is critically involved in perceptual decisions about object shape. High-density EEG was recorded while subjects performed a threshold-level shape discrimination task on texture-defined figures segmented by either phase or orientation cues. The appearance or disappearance of a figure region from a uniform background generated robust visual evoked potentials throughout retinotopic cortex as determined by inverse modeling of the scalp voltage distribution. Contrasting responses from trials containing shape changes that were correctly detected (hits) with trials in which no change occurred (correct rejects) revealed stimulus-locked, target-selective activity in the occipital visual areas LOC and V4 preceding the subject's response. Activity that was locked to the subjects' reaction time was present in the LOC. Response-locked activity in the LOC was determined to be related to shape discrimination for several reasons: shape-selective responses were silenced when subjects viewed identical stimuli but their attention was directed away from the shapes to a demanding letter discrimination task; shape-selectivity was present across four different stimulus configurations used to define the figure; LOC responses correlated with participants' reaction times. These results indicate that decision-related activity is present in the LOC when subjects are engaged in threshold-level shape discriminations.

  16. TIME COURSE MODIFICATIONS INDUCED BY PERINATAL ASPHYXIA IN RAT CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Capani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal asphyxia (PA induced short and long term biochemical, synaptic, cytoskeletal and astrocytes alterations that has been associated with neuronal cell death following hypoxia . The lack of knowledge about the mechanisms underlying this dysfunction prompted us to investigate the changes in the synapse and neuronal cytoskeleton and related structures. For this study we used a well established murine model of PA. Full-term pregnant rats were rapidly decapitated and the uterus horns were placed in a water bath at 37 °C for different time of asphyxia. When their physiological conditions improved, they were given to surrogate mothers. One month, four month, 6 month and 18 month after PA rats were included in this study. Modifications were analyzed using photooxidation with phalloidin-eosin, conventional electron microscopy (EM, inmunocytochemistry and ethanolic phosphotungstic acid (E-PTA staining combining with electron tomography and 3-D reconstruction techniques and molecular biology studies. After one month of the PA insult, an increase in the F-actin staining in neostriatum and hippocampus synapses was observed using correlative fluorescent electron microscopy for phalloidin-eosin. Mushroom-shaped spines showed the most consistent staining. Strong alterations in the dendrite and astroglial cytoskeleton were found at four months of PA (1. After six months of PA, postsynaptic densities (PSDs of the rat neostriatum are highly modified . We observed an increment of PSDs thickness related with the duration and severity of the hypoxic insult. In addition, PSDs showed and increase in the ubiquitination level. Using 3-d reconstruction and electron tomography we observed showed clear signs of damage in the asphyctic PSDs. These changes are correlated with intense staining for ubiquitin (2. Finally, in 18 months old rat was observed a reduction in the number of synapses in the PA animals related with a decrease in BDNF staining.(3 Using protocols

  17. Transforming a Business Statistics Course with Just-in-Time Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangs, Joann

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes changing the way a business statistics course is taught through the use of just-in-time teaching methods. Implementing this method allowed for more time in the class to be spent focused on problem solving, resulting in students being able to handle more difficult problems. Students' perceptions of the just-in-time assignments…

  18. Full-time working couples and their life course : An analysis of leaving full-time employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gils, W. van; Kraaykamp, G.; Lippe, T. van der

    2009-01-01

    In the initial phase of family formation a majority of all spouses works full-time. As a result most couples start off as full-time working couples. We used complete career reports of 2.014 couples from the Netherlands to answer the question of which life-course events and individual social resource

  19. Full-time working couples and their life course: An analysis of leaving full-time employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaykamp, G.L.M.; Gils, W.S. van; Lippe, A.G. van der

    2009-01-01

    In the initial phase of family formation a majority of all spouses works full-time. As a result most couples start off as full-time working couples. We used complete career reports of 2.014 couples from the Netherlands to answer the question of which life-course events and individual social resource

  20. Dissociated time course recovery between rate of force development and peak torque after eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Renato; Denadai, Benedito S

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the association between isokinetic peak torque (PT) of quadriceps and the corresponding peak rate of force development (peak RFD) during the recovery of eccentric exercise. Twelve untrained men (aged 21·7 ± 2·3 year) performed 100 maximal eccentric contractions for knee extensors (10 sets of 10 repetitions with a 2-min rest between each set) on isokinetic dynamometer. PT and peak RFD accessed by maximal isokinetic knee concentric contractions at 60° s(-1) were obtained before (baseline) and at 24 and 48 h after eccentric exercise. Indirect markers of muscle damage included delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. The eccentric exercise resulted in elevated DOMS and CK compared with baseline values. At 24 h, PT (-15·3%, P = 0·002) and peak RFD (-13·1%, P = 0·03) decreased significantly. At 48 h, PT (-7·9%, P = 0·002) was still decreased but peak RFD have returned to baseline values. Positive correlation was found between PT and peak RFD at baseline (r = 0·62, P = 0·02), 24 h (r = 0·99, P = 0·0001) and 48 h (r = 0·68, P = 0·01) after eccentric exercise. The magnitude of changes (%) in PT and peak RFD from baseline to 24 h (r = 0·68, P = 0·01) and from 24 to 48 h (r = 0·68, P = 0·01) were significantly correlated. It can be concluded that the muscle damage induced by the eccentric exercise affects differently the time course of PT and peak RFD recovery during isokinetic concentric contraction at 60° s(-1). During the recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage, PT and peak RFD are determined but not fully defined by shared putative physiological mechanisms. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2011 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  1. Relating a calcium indicator signal to the unperturbed calcium concentration time-course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abarbanel Henry DI

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical indicators of cytosolic calcium levels have become important experimental tools in systems and cellular neuroscience. Indicators are known to interfere with intracellular calcium levels by acting as additional buffers, and this may strongly alter the time-course of various dynamical variables to be measured. Results By investigating the underlying reaction kinetics, we show that in some ranges of kinetic parameters one can explicitly link the time dependent indicator signal to the time-course of the calcium influx, and thus, to the unperturbed calcium level had there been no indicator in the cell.

  2. Analysis of factorial time-course microarrays with application to a clinical study of burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Baiyu; Xu, Weihong; Herndon, David; Tompkins, Ronald; Davis, Ronald; Xiao, Wenzhong; Wong, Wing Hung; Toner, Mehmet; Warren, H Shaw; Schoenfeld, David A; Rahme, Laurence; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Hayden, Douglas; Mason, Philip; Fagan, Shawn; Yu, Yong-Ming; Cobb, J Perren; Remick, Daniel G; Mannick, John A; Lederer, James A; Gamelli, Richard L; Silver, Geoffrey M; West, Michael A; Shapiro, Michael B; Smith, Richard; Camp, David G; Qian, Weijun; Storey, John; Mindrinos, Michael; Tibshirani, Rob; Lowry, Stephen; Calvano, Steven; Chaudry, Irshad; West, Michael A; Cohen, Mitchell; Moore, Ernest E; Johnson, Jeffrey; Moldawer, Lyle L; Baker, Henry V; Efron, Philip A; Balis, Ulysses G J; Billiar, Timothy R; Ochoa, Juan B; Sperry, Jason L; Miller-Graziano, Carol L; De, Asit K; Bankey, Paul E; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Minei, Joseph P; Arnoldo, Brett D; Hunt, John L; Horton, Jureta; Cobb, J Perren; Brownstein, Bernard; Freeman, Bradley; Maier, Ronald V; Nathens, Avery B; Cuschieri, Joseph; Gibran, Nicole; Klein, Matthew; O'Keefe, Grant

    2010-06-01

    Time-course microarray experiments are capable of capturing dynamic gene expression profiles. It is important to study how these dynamic profiles depend on the multiple factors that characterize the experimental condition under which the time course is observed. Analytic methods are needed to simultaneously handle the time course and factorial structure in the data. We developed a method to evaluate factor effects by pooling information across the time course while accounting for multiple testing and nonnormality of the microarray data. The method effectively extracts gene-specific response features and models their dependency on the experimental factors. Both longitudinal and cross-sectional time-course data can be handled by our approach. The method was used to analyze the impact of age on the temporal gene response to burn injury in a large-scale clinical study. Our analysis reveals that 21% of the genes responsive to burn are age-specific, among which expressions of mitochondria and immunoglobulin genes are differentially perturbed in pediatric and adult patients by burn injury. These new findings in the body's response to burn injury between children and adults support further investigations of therapeutic options targeting specific age groups. The methodology proposed here has been implemented in R package "TANOVA" and submitted to the Comprehensive R Archive Network at http://www.r-project.org/. It is also available for download at http://gluegrant1.stanford.edu/TANOVA/.

  3. Time after time: biological factors in the course of recurrent depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lok, A.

    2013-01-01

    The primary focus of this dissertation was to increase the knowledge about possible biological factors and psychopathological mechanisms (including HPA-axis functioning, one-carbon and fatty-acid metabolism), as well as some gene-environment interactions for the course of recurrent MDD (MDD-R). Stud

  4. A Time Sequence-Oriented Concept Map Approach to Developing Educational Computer Games for History Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Yang, Kai-Hsiang; Chen, Jing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Concept maps have been recognized as an effective tool for students to organize their knowledge; however, in history courses, it is important for students to learn and organize historical events according to the time of their occurrence. Therefore, in this study, a time sequence-oriented concept map approach is proposed for developing a game-based…

  5. A Time Sequence-Oriented Concept Map Approach to Developing Educational Computer Games for History Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Yang, Kai-Hsiang; Chen, Jing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Concept maps have been recognized as an effective tool for students to organize their knowledge; however, in history courses, it is important for students to learn and organize historical events according to the time of their occurrence. Therefore, in this study, a time sequence-oriented concept map approach is proposed for developing a game-based…

  6. Detecting shifts in gene regulatory networks during time-course experiments at single-time-point temporal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Yoichi; Seno, Shigeto; Matsuda, Hideo

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensively understanding the dynamics of biological systems is one of the greatest challenges in biology. Vastly improved biological technologies have provided vast amounts of information that must be understood by bioinformatics and systems biology researchers. Gene regulations have been frequently modeled by ordinary differential equations or graphical models based on time-course gene expression profiles. The state-of-the-art computational approaches for analyzing gene regulations assume that their models are same throughout time-course experiments. However, these approaches cannot easily analyze transient changes at a time point, such as diauxic shift. We propose a score that analyzes the gene regulations at each time point. The score is based on the information gains of information criterion values. The method detects the shifts in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) during time-course experiments with single-time-point resolution. The effectiveness of the method is evaluated on the diauxic shift from glucose to lactose in Escherichia coli. Gene regulation shifts were detected at two time points: the first corresponding to the time at which the growth of E. coli ceased and the second corresponding to the end of the experiment, when the nutrient sources (glucose and lactose) had become exhausted. According to these results, the proposed score and method can appropriately detect the time of gene regulation shifts. The method based on the proposed score provides a new tool for analyzing dynamic biological systems. Because the score value indicates the strength of gene regulation at each time point in a gene expression profile, it can potentially infer hidden GRNs from time-course experiments.

  7. Time course analyses of orthographic and phonological priming effects during word recognition in a transparent orthography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeguers, M H T; Snellings, P; Huizenga, H M; van der Molen, M W

    2014-10-01

    In opaque orthographies, the activation of orthographic and phonological codes follows distinct time courses during visual word recognition. However, it is unclear how orthography and phonology are accessed in more transparent orthographies. Therefore, we conducted time course analyses of masked priming effects in the transparent Dutch orthography. The first study used targets with small phonological differences between phonological and orthographic primes, which are typical in transparent orthographies. Results showed consistent orthographic priming effects, yet phonological priming effects were absent. The second study explicitly manipulated the strength of the phonological difference and revealed that both orthographic and phonological priming effects became identifiable when phonological differences were strong enough. This suggests that, similar to opaque orthographies, strong phonological differences are a prerequisite to separate orthographic and phonological priming effects in transparent orthographies. Orthographic and phonological priming appeared to follow distinct time courses, with orthographic codes being quickly translated into phonological codes and phonology dominating the remainder of the lexical access phase.

  8. Using prime-time animation to engage students in courses on aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curch, Lisa M

    2010-01-01

    Prime-time animation is a television genre that frequently reflects on issues that are significant in contemporary society, including aging issues. Using such programs to present aging-related content can be a constructive pedagogical device, offering a means of actively engaging students. This article provides a brief overview of the use of media, popular culture, and prime-time animation in college teaching and addresses specific issues in, as well as examples of, how such programs can be used in college courses, particularly aging courses. The article also reports on a small survey of students who were exposed to such a teaching technique in an undergraduate aging course. Results showed that, in general, students were positive about viewing prime-time animation videos in class and indicated that they found the viewings and associated assignments helpful for learning about concepts and issues in aging.

  9. Time course of adipose tissue dysfunction associated with antioxidant defense, inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in dyslipemic insulin resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, María Eugenia; Selenscig, Dante; Illesca, Paola; Chicco, Adriana; Lombardo, Yolanda B

    2015-04-01

    The dysfunctional adipose tissue of rats fed a sucrose-rich diet was investigated following the time course of the development of oxidative stress, changes in proinflammatory cytokines and adiponectin levels, and their relationship with insulin resistance. We analyzed the morphometric characteristics of epididymal adipocytes, de novo lipogenesis enzyme activities and cellular antioxidant defense, inflammatory mediators, adiponectin levels and insulin resistance in rats fed a sucrose-rich diet for 3, 15 or 30 weeks and compared to those fed a control diet. The results showed a depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities in the fat pads of rats fed a sucrose-rich diet, with an increase in xanthine oxidase activity and lipid peroxidation after 3, 15 and 30 weeks on the diet. Superoxide dismutase activity and the redox state of glutathione showed a significant decrease at weeks 15 and 30. This was accompanied by visceral adiposity and enhanced lipogenic enzyme activities. An increase in the plasma levels of proinflammatory markers (TNF-α and IL-6) was recorded only after 30 weeks on the diet. A reduction in plasma adiponectin levels accompanied the time course of deterioration of whole-body insulin sensitivity. The results suggest that lipid peroxidation, depletion of antioxidant defenses and changes in inflammatory cytokines induced by a sucrose-rich diet contribute to the dysregulation of adipose tissue and insulin resistance. Finally, these results show that the progressive deterioration of adipose tissue function, which begins in the absence of both visceral adiposity and overweight, is highly dependent on the length of time on the diet.

  10. Changes over the course of time in histological subclassification of Hodgkin's disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, A.F.; Specht, Lena; Nissen, N.I.;

    1991-01-01

    cases which are not histologically diagnostic but microscopically bear resemblance to Hodgkin's disease, to obtain a uniform subclassification in accordance with recent new points of the Rye classification, to examine possible changes in incidence over the course of time and to examine the NS...... disagreement. In the histologically reclassified material, the Rye classification lost its prognostic significance. It was not possible to demonstrate a gradual change over the course of time in the relative number of cases in each subgroup.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Udgivelsesdato: 1991/2...

  11. Acute nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid in vitro: metabolomics study for intracellular metabolic time-course changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yanqiu; Cheng, Mengchun; Xiao, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Time-course metabolic changes of aristolochic acid nephrotoxicity (AAN) was investigated using acute AAN HK-2 model. And the AAN-related biomarkers were selected. In the results, 11 potential identified biomarkers were selected and validated using multivariate method combined with time-course analysis. Several metabolic pathways, including vitamin metabolism, lipids acalytion, trytophan metabolism and protein degradation were found to be associated with AAN pathology. This research will provide a valuable reference for the discovery of more potential biomarkers of AAN progression in clinic.

  12. [The time course of changes in cell immunological parameters during administration of live dry plague vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacheva, N V; Darmov, I V; Borisevich, I V; Kriuchkov, A V; Pechenkin, D V

    2009-08-01

    The study of the time course of changes in cell immunological parameters by a magnetic separation technique in human beings during the administration of plague vaccine in relation to the immunological load revealed the higher blood levels of all T lymphocyte subpopulations on day 14 after vaccination. These changes are most typical of a primary vaccinated cohort. The increased frequency of plague vaccine administration and multiple immunizations with live plague, anthrax, and tularemia vaccines produce the time-course of changes in T lymphocyte populations (subpopulations) in response to the regular administration of plague vaccine. A high immunological load in man also promotes a significant reduction in the level of B lymphocytes.

  13. pGQL: A probabilistic graphical query language for gene expression time courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schilling Ruben

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Timeboxes are graphical user interface widgets that were proposed to specify queries on time course data. As queries can be very easily defined, an exploratory analysis of time course data is greatly facilitated. While timeboxes are effective, they have no provisions for dealing with noisy data or data with fluctuations along the time axis, which is very common in many applications. In particular, this is true for the analysis of gene expression time courses, which are mostly derived from noisy microarray measurements at few unevenly sampled time points. From a data mining point of view the robust handling of data through a sound statistical model is of great importance. Results We propose probabilistic timeboxes, which correspond to a specific class of Hidden Markov Models, that constitutes an established method in data mining. Since HMMs are a particular class of probabilistic graphical models we call our method Probabilistic Graphical Query Language. Its implementation was realized in the free software package pGQL. We evaluate its effectiveness in exploratory analysis on a yeast sporulation data set. Conclusions We introduce a new approach to define dynamic, statistical queries on time course data. It supports an interactive exploration of reasonably large amounts of data and enables users without expert knowledge to specify fairly complex statistical models with ease. The expressivity of our approach is by its statistical nature greater and more robust with respect to amplitude and frequency fluctuation than the prior, deterministic timeboxes.

  14. Experimental Investigation on the Ignition Delay Time of Plasma-Assisted Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Yu, Jin-Lu; He, Li-Ming; Jiang, Yong-Jian; Wu, Yong

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the ignition performances of plasma-assisted ignition in propane/air mixture. The results show that a shorter ignition delay time is obtained for the plasma ignition than the spark ignition and the average ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition can be reduced at least by 50%. The influence of air flow rate of combustor, the arc current and argon flow rate of plasma igniter on ignition delay time are also investigated. The ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition increases with increasing air flow rate in the combustor. By increasing the arc current, the plasma ignition will gain more ignition energy to ignite the mixture more easily. The influence of plasma ignition argon flow rates on the ignition delay time is quite minor.

  15. Plasma confinement time in trimix-M galatea multipole magnetic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishaev, A. M.; Bugrova, A. I.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sigov, A. S.; Kharchevnikov, V. K.

    2010-05-01

    The confinement time of hydrogen plasma trapped in a Trimix-M magnetic multipole galatea was studied in a range of plasma densities (1 × 1016 - 6 × 1018 m-3) and ion energies (˜100-300 eV). It is established that (i) the confinement time increases with decreasing plasma density in the trap and (ii) as the barrier magnetic field is increased, the plasma confinement time grows faster than according to a linear law. The obtained results are indicative of a collisional character of plasma diffusion through the barrier field in the trap.

  16. Teaching and assessment in otolaryngology and neurology: Does the timing of clinical courses matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dünne, A A; Zapf, S; Hamer, H M; Folz, B J; Käuser, G; Fischer, M R G

    2006-11-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of clinical courses as a learning environment. To accurately assess performance in these courses, equal conditions for all candidates are required. We investigated the influence of the proximity of the course to the students test taking, the students' learning styles, and their self-motivation for learning in relation to performance success. One hundred and eleven students were randomized into eight groups, each attending a 2 week course in otolaryngology with a high proportion of patient-related teaching, and a 2 week long course in neurology with a low level of patient-related teaching. All students took multiple-choice end-of-term exams to assess their knowledge in both subjects. There was a different time interval between the course participation and the test taking for each of the groups. Performance success was correlated with the different groups, as well as with the type of learning style (LIST questionnaire) and with motivation for learning (study interest questionnaire). Explorative rank variance analysis showed a significant correlation between students' performance on the written exam and the time interval between completion of the neurology course and test-taking, with the shortest interval corresponding to highest scores (P = 0.002). There was no such effect on the success rate in otolaryngology (P = 0.28). Study motivation was not the major component for performance success, but a strong correlation between the use of strategic and deep learning styles and success in the exam was observed (R = 0.62; P teaching and the students' taking of the exam plays a significant role on performance success; this effect does not occur in a course with a high proportion of practical patient-related teaching. More studies on clinical courses are needed to establish how students can be given adequate opportunities to develop necessary skills for patient care and for objective success on assessment. With such further information

  17. Boosting persistence time of laser-induced plasma by electric arc discharge for optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S., E-mail: simon.eschlboeck-fuchs@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Kolmhofer, P.J.; Bodea, M.A.; Hechenberger, J.G.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    Plasma induced by nanosecond laser ablation is re-excited by a pulsed electric discharge and the parameters and optical emission of the plasma are measured. The discharge is a low-voltage and high-current electric arc that is triggered by the laser-induced plasma and slowly decaying with time. The optical emission of such combined plasma lasts up to several milliseconds which is much longer than without re-excitation (μs range). The emission spectra of re-excited plasma measured on different sample materials show higher line intensities than spectra measured by conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Moreover, emission lines of fluorine (spectral range 683–691 nm) and sulfur (range 520–550 nm) not detected by conventional LIBS become easily detectable with the combined plasma. The concentration of major components in metallurgical slags, as determined by calibration-free LIBS, agrees very well to the reference data evaluating the spectra taken from re-excited plasma. - Highlights: • Persistence time of laser-induced plasma in air is increased from ~ 10 μs to ~ 1 ms. • Laser-induced plasma triggers an electric arc discharge that boosts the plasma. • The combined laser-arc plasma is in LTE state over very long time (ms range). • CF-LIBS method delivers accurate results evaluating spectra of combined plasma. • Emission from S and F, not detected by LIBS, is detected with combined plasma.

  18. Time course of EEG oscillations during repeated listening of a well-known aria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz eJäncke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While previous studies have analyzed mean neurophysiological responses to musical stimuli, the current study aimed to identify specific time courses of EEG oscillations, which are associated with dynamic changes in the acoustic features of the musical stimulus. In addition, we were interested in whether these time courses change during a repeated presentation of the same musical piece. A total of 16 subjects repeatedly listened to the well-known aria Nessun dorma, sung by Paul Potts, while continuous 128-channel EEG and heart rate (HR, as well as electrodermal (EDA responses, were recorded. The time courses for the EEG oscillations were calculated using a time resolution of 1 second for several frequency bands, on the basis of individual alpha-peak frequencies (theta, low alpha-1, low alpha-2, upper alpha, and beta. For all frequency bands, we identified a more or less continuous increase in power relative to a baseline period, indicating strong event-related synchronization (ERS during music listening. The ERS time courses, however, did not correlate strongly with the time courses of the acoustic features of the aria. In addition, we did not observe changes in EEG oscillations after repeated presentation of the same musical piece. Aside from this distinctive feature, we identified a remarkable variability in EEG oscillations, both within and between the repeated presentations of the aria. We interpret the continuous increase in ERS observed in all frequency bands during music listening as an indicator of a particular neurophysiological and psychological state evoked by music listening. We suggest that this state is characterized by increased internal attention (accompanied by reduced external attention, increased inhibition of brain networks not involved in the generation of this internal state, the maintenance of a particular level of general alertness, and a type of brain state that can be described as mind wandering. The overall state can be

  19. Catecholaminergic activation in acute myocardial infarction: time course and relation to left ventricular performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Claus Leth; Nielsen, Jens Rokkedal; Petersen, Bodil Laub;

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The study was designed to assess (1) the time course of catecholaminergic activation in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) as estimated by adrenaline (ADR) and noradrenaline (NOR) concentrations, and (2) to relate activation of these hormones to predict the outcome of cardiac performance...

  20. The Time Course for Language Acquisition in Biologically Distinct Populations: Evidence from Deaf Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Danielle S.; Bever, Thomas G.

    2004-01-01

    The present study provides evidence that individuals who have different patterns of cerebral lateralization and who develop along different maturational time courses can attain comparable levels of language proficiency. Right-handed individuals with left-handed family members (left-handed familials, LHFs) showed a shorter sensitive period for…

  1. TIME-COURSE OF ACTION AND INTUBATING CONDITIONS FOLLOWING VECURONIUM, ROCURONIUM AND MIVACURIUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERDA, JMKH; HOMMES, FDM; NAP, HJA; VANDENBROEK, L

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the time course of action and tracheal intubating conditions of vecuronium, rocuronium, and mivacurium in anaesthetised patients. Anaesthesia consisted of thiopentone, fentanyl, N2O/O-2 and isoflurane. After a 2 x ED(50) dose the first attempt at tracheal int

  2. Efficacy and time course of paired associative stimulation in cortical plasticity: Implications for neuropsychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wischnewski, M.; Schutter, D.J.L.G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Paired associative stimulation (PAS) has been used to study normal and abnormal cortical plasticity. However, a normative review of PAS effects has not been provided so far. To this end, the magnitude and time course of PAS protocols was systematically evaluated here. Methods: A literatur

  3. Time course and dimensions of postural control changes following neuromuscular training in youth field hockey athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zech, Astrid; Klahn, Philipp; Hoeft, Jon; Eulenburg, Christine Zu; Steib, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Injury prevention effects of neuromuscular training have been partly attributed to postural control adaptations. Uncertainty exists regarding the magnitude of these adaptations and on how they can be adequately monitored. The objective was to determine the time course of neuromuscular traini

  4. The Time Course Effect of Moderate Intensity Exercise on Response Execution and Response Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Jennifer; Graydon, Jan; McMorris, Terry; Davranche, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the time course effect of a moderate steady-state exercise session on response execution and response inhibition using a stop-task paradigm. Ten participants performed a stop-signal task whilst cycling at a carefully controlled workload intensity (40% of maximal aerobic power), immediately following exercise and…

  5. The time course of the inflammatory response to the Salmonella typhi vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paine, N.J.; Ring, C.; Bosch, J.A.; Drayson, M.T.; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, J.J.C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The Salmonella typhi vaccination induces transient increases in inflammatory-responsive cytokines and molecules. For instance, it causes small, mild increases in interleukin-6 (IL-6) within a few hours and C-reactive protein (CRP) within 24 h. No study has charted either the time course of the infla

  6. The level and time course of disability: Trajectories of disability in adults and young elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Nusselder (Wilma); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractObjectives. The objectives of this study were: (i) to identify trajectories in the level and time course of disability, (ii) to determine the relative frequency of each trajectory, and (iii) to assess the relationship of these trajectories with age, sex and the presence of four chronic

  7. Time course and dimensions of postural control changes following neuromuscular training in youth field hockey athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zech, Astrid; Klahn, Philipp; Hoeft, Jon; Eulenburg, Christine Zu; Steib, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Injury prevention effects of neuromuscular training have been partly attributed to postural control adaptations. Uncertainty exists regarding the magnitude of these adaptations and on how they can be adequately monitored. The objective was to determine the time course of neuromuscular traini

  8. Visual Object Detection, Categorization, and Identification Tasks Are Associated with Different Time Courses and Sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Stephan; Choudhery, Rabia N.; Chatziastros, Astros

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the recognition of an object's presence and its explicit recognition are temporally closely related. Here we re-examined the time course (using a fine and a coarse temporal resolution) and the sensitivity of three possible component processes of visual object recognition. In particular, participants saw briefly…

  9. The Time-Course of Lexical Activation during Sentence Comprehension in People with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrill, Michelle; Love, Tracy; Walenski, Matthew; Shapiro, Lewis P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the time-course of processing of lexical items in auditorily presented canonical (subject-verb-object) constructions in young, neurologically unimpaired control participants and participants with left-hemisphere damage and agrammatic aphasia. Method: A cross modal picture priming (CMPP) paradigm was used to test 114 control…

  10. The Just in Time Approach To Effectively Use Business Software in College Business Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Brian R.

    The skills necessary to compete in a fast paced business environment--critical thinking, risk taking, team building, project management, and others--are not and cannot be addressed in the traditional delivery of an undergraduate business course. The Ohio University-Lancaster Management program uses a project based, just-in-time (JIT) approach to…

  11. Attention, temporal predictability, and the time course of context effects in naming performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Ardi

    2010-01-01

    Models of attention and context effects in naming performance should be able to account for the time course of color-word Stroop interference revealed by manipulations of the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between color and word. Prominent models of Stroop task performance (Cohen, Dunbar, & McClell

  12. Adverse radiation effect after stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases : incidence, time course, and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sneed, Penny K.; Mendez, Joe; Vemer-van den Hoek, Johanna; Seymour, Zachary A.; Ma, Lijun; Molinaro, Annette M.; Fogh, Shannon E.; Nakamura, Jean L.; McDermott, Michael W.

    OBJECT The authors sought to determine the incidence, time course, and risk factors for overall adverse radiation effect (ARE) and symptomatic ARE after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. METHODS All cases of brain metastases treated from 1998 through 2009 with Gamma Knife SRS at

  13. Time Course of Treatment Effect of OROS[R] Methylphenidate in Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Robert B.; Damaraju, C. V.; Ascher, Steve; Schwarzman, Lesley; O'Neill, James; Starr, H. Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated the time course of the treatment effect of Osmotic-Release Oral System methylphenidate (OROS[R] MPH) HCl (Concerta[R], Raritan, NJ) CII in children with ADHD. Method: Data were combined from two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over, analog classroom studies in children (9-12 years) with ADHD.…

  14. Effectiveness of Just in Time Teaching on Student Achievement in an Introductory Thermodynamics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatore, Matthew W.; Morrish, Rachel M.; Vestal, Charles R.

    2017-01-01

    The utility of Just-In-Time-Teaching (JITT) is compared across course topics and groups of students not receiving JITT exercises in class. JITT feedback incorporated various active learning exercises based on students' performance on online homework problems from Sapling Learning. With over 200 students in two sections participating in the…

  15. The time course of location-avoidance learning in fear of spiders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinck, M.; Koene, M.; Telli, S.; Moerman-van den Brink, W.; Verhoeven, B.W.H.; Becker, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    Two experiments were designed to study the time course of avoidance learning in spider fearfuls (SFs) under controlled experimental conditions. To achieve this, we employed an immersive virtual environment (IVE): While walking freely through a virtual art museum to search for specific paintings, the

  16. Eye Movements Reveal the Time-Course of Anticipating Behaviour Based on Complex, Conflicting Desires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Heather J.; Breheny, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The time-course of representing others' perspectives is inconclusive across the currently available models of ToM processing. We report two visual-world studies investigating how knowledge about a character's basic preferences (e.g. "Tom's favourite colour is pink") and higher-order desires (his wish to keep this preference secret) compete to…

  17. Discovering gene expression patterns in time course microarray experiments by ANOVA-SCA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Nueda; A. Conessa; J.A. Westerhuis; H.C.J. Hoefsloot; A.K. Smilde; M. Talon; A. Ferrer

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we develop the application of the Analysis of variance-simultaneous component analysis (ANOVA-SCA) Smilde et al. Bioinformatics, (2005) to the analysis of multiple series time course microarray data as an example of multifactorial gene expression profiling experiments. We denoted this

  18. The distribution of radio plasma in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Katherine M

    2005-03-15

    The influence of jet-ejected plasma has been an important theme of this meeting; I draw attention to the prevalence of jet-ejected plasma, in particular that which has not been properly accounted for in the past. There are three strands to this paper: important emission which is prominent only at the lowest radio frequencies; relic radio plasma which must exist if even the most basic aspects of radio source evolutionary models are correct; and evidence that some 'radio-quiet' quasars could be FR-I radio sources.

  19. Time dependent atomic processes in discharge produced low Z plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyama, M.; Sasaki, T.; Horioka, K.; Kawamura, T.

    2008-05-01

    The z-pinch simulation have been performed with magneto-hydro dynamics and atomic population kinetics codes. A factor associated with transient atomic processes was proposed. The atomic transient degrees of dopant lithium in hydrogen plasma were calculated with initial plasma densities of 1.0 × 1016 ~ 5.0 × 1017cm-3. The higher initial plasma density is, the lower is the transient degree generally. It is also found that the transient properties of the atomic processes are sensitive to ionization energy and electron temperature.

  20. Estimating the time course of population excitatory postsynaptic potentials in motoneurons of spastic stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaogang; Suresh, Nina L; Rymer, William Z

    2015-03-15

    Hyperexcitable motoneurons are likely to contribute to muscle hypertonia after a stroke injury; however, the origins of this hyperexcitability are not clear. One possibility is that the effective duration of the Ia excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) is prolonged, increasing the potential for temporal summation of EPSPs, making action potential initiation easier. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to quantify the time course of EPSPs in motoneurons of stroke survivors. The experimental protocol, which was based on parameters derived from simulation, involved sequential subthreshold electrical stimuli delivered to the median nerve of hemispheric stroke survivors. The resulting H-reflex responses were recorded in the flexor carpi radialis muscle. H-reflex response probability was then used to quantify the time course of the underlying EPSPs in the motoneuron pool. A population EPSP was estimated based on the probability of evoking an H reflex from the second electrical stimulus in the absence of a reflex response to the first stimulus. The accuracy of this time-course estimate was quantified using a computer simulation that explored a range of feasible EPSP parameters. Our experimental results showed that in all five hemispheric stroke survivors the rate of decay of the population EPSP was consistently slower in spastic compared with the contralateral motoneuron pools. We propose that one potential mechanism for hyperexcitability of motoneurons in spastic stroke survivors may be linked to this prolongation of the Ia EPSP time course. Our subthreshold double-stimulation approach also provides a noninvasive tool for quantifying the time course of EPSPs in both healthy and pathological conditions.

  1. Relating a calcium indicator signal to the unperturbed calcium concentration time-course

    OpenAIRE

    Abarbanel Henry DI; Borst Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Optical indicators of cytosolic calcium levels have become important experimental tools in systems and cellular neuroscience. Indicators are known to interfere with intracellular calcium levels by acting as additional buffers, and this may strongly alter the time-course of various dynamical variables to be measured. Results By investigating the underlying reaction kinetics, we show that in some ranges of kinetic parameters one can explicitly link the time dependent indicat...

  2. Time course of the effect of the Muller-Lyer illusion on saccades and perceptual judgments

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwer, A.J. de; Brenner, E.; Medendorp, W. P.; Smeets, J. B. J.

    2014-01-01

    The amplitude of saccadic eye movements is affected by size illusions such as the Muller-Lyer illusion, but this effect varies highly between studies. Here we examine the origin of this variability by testing the influence of three temporal factors on the effect of the Muller-Lyer illusion: presentation time, response delay, and saccade latency. Subjects performed reflexive saccades, deferred saccades, and memory-guided saccades along the shaft of the illusion. We evaluated the time course of...

  3. Multimodal probabilistic generative models for time-course gene expression data and Gene Ontology (GO) tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbur, Prasad; Hoying, James; Barnard, Kobus

    2015-10-01

    We propose four probabilistic generative models for simultaneously modeling gene expression levels and Gene Ontology (GO) tags. Unlike previous approaches for using GO tags, the joint modeling framework allows the two sources of information to complement and reinforce each other. We fit our models to three time-course datasets collected to study biological processes, specifically blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) and mitotic cell cycles. The proposed models result in a joint clustering of genes and GO annotations. Different models group genes based on GO tags and their behavior over the entire time-course, within biological stages, or even individual time points. We show how such models can be used for biological stage boundary estimation de novo. We also evaluate our models on biological stage prediction accuracy of held out samples. Our results suggest that the models usually perform better when GO tag information is included. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Corticostriatal pathways contribute to the natural time course of positive mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admon, Roee; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2015-12-07

    The natural time course of mood includes both acute responses to stimuli and spontaneous fluctuations. To date, neuroimaging studies have focused on either acute affective responses or spontaneous neural fluctuations at rest but no prior study has concurrently probed both components, or how mood disorders might modulate these processes. Here, using fMRI, we capture the acute affective and neural responses to naturalistic positive mood induction, as well as their spontaneous fluctuations during resting states. In both healthy controls and individuals with a history of depression, our manipulation acutely elevates positive mood and ventral striatum activation. Only controls, however, sustain positive mood over time, and this effect is accompanied by the emergence of a reciprocal relationship between the ventral striatum and medial prefrontal cortex during ensuing rest. Findings suggest that corticostriatal pathways contribute to the natural time course of positive mood fluctuations, while disturbances of those neural interactions may characterize mood disorder.

  5. Changes in rural trauma prehospital times following the Rural Trauma Team Development Course training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahdi; Neuhaus, Nina; Martin, David; Widom, Kenneth; Rapp, Megan; Leonard, Diane; Baro, Susan; Dove, James; Hunsinger, Marie; Blansfield, Joseph; Shabahang, Mohsen; Torres, Denise; Wild, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    The majority of the US population live in urban areas, yet more than half of all trauma deaths occur in rural areas. The Rural Trauma Team Development Course (RTTDC) is developed to improve the outcomes of rural trauma and we aimed to study its effect on patient transfer. Trauma referrals 2 years before the RTTDC training were compared with referrals 2 years after the course. Of the 276 studied patients, 97 were referred before the RTTDC training and 179 patients were referred after the course. Transfer acceptance time was significantly shorter after the RTTDC training (139.2 ± 87.1 vs 110 ± 66.3 min, P = .003). The overall transfer time was also significantly reduced following the RTTDC training (257.4 ± 110.8 vs 219.2 ± 86.5 min, P = .002). Patients receiving pretransfer imaging had a significantly higher transfer time both before and after RTTDC training (all Ps < .01). Mortality was nearly halved (6.2% vs 3.4%) after the RTTDC training. The RTTDC training was associated with reduced transfer acceptance time and reduced transfer time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Natural Time Course of Membrane Alterations During Peritoneal Dialysis Is Partly Altered by Peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esch, Sadie; Struijk, Dirk G; Krediet, Raymond T

    2016-01-01

    ♦ The quality of the peritoneal membrane can deteriorate over time. Exposure to glucose-based dialysis solutions is the most likely culprit. Because peritonitis is a common complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD), distinguishing between the effect of glucose exposure and a possible additive effect of peritonitis is difficult. The aim of the present study was to compare the time-course of peritoneal transport characteristics in patients without a single episode of peritonitis-representing the natural course-and in patients who experienced 1 or more episodes of peritonitis during long-term follow-up. ♦ This prospective, single-center cohort study enrolled incident adult PD patients who started PD during 1990-2010. A standard peritoneal permeability analysis was performed in the first year of PD treatment and was repeated every year. The results in patients without a single episode of peritonitis ("no-peritonitis group") were compared with the results obtained in patients who experienced 1 or more peritonitis episodes ("peritonitis group") during a follow-up of 4 years. ♦ The 124 patients analyzed included 54 in the no-peritonitis group and 70 in the peritonitis group. The time-course of small-solute transport was different in the groups, with the peritonitis group showing an earlier and more pronounced increase in the mass transfer area coefficient for creatinine (p = 0.07) and in glucose absorption (p = 0.048). In the no-peritonitis group, the net ultrafiltration rate (NUFR) and the transcapillary ultrafiltration rate (TCUFR) both showed a steep increase from the 1st to the 2nd year of PD that was absent in the peritonitis group. Both groups showed a decrease in the NUFR after year 3. A decrease in the TCUFR occurred only in the peritonitis group. That decrease was already present after the year 1 in patients with severe peritonitis. The time-course of free water transport showed a continuous increase in the patients without peritonitis, but a decrease in the

  7. The time course of location-avoidance learning in fear of spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinck, Mike; Koene, Marieke; Telli, Sibel; Moerman-van den Brink, Wiltine; Verhoeven, Barbara; Becker, Eni S

    2016-01-01

    Two experiments were designed to study the time course of avoidance learning in spider fearfuls (SFs) under controlled experimental conditions. To achieve this, we employed an immersive virtual environment (IVE): While walking freely through a virtual art museum to search for specific paintings, the participants were exposed to virtual spiders. Unbeknown to the participants, only two of four museum rooms contained spiders, allowing for avoidance learning. Indeed, the more SF the participants were, the faster they learned to avoid the rooms that contained spiders (Experiment. 1), and within the first six trials, high fearfuls already developed a preference for starting their search task in rooms without spiders (Experiment 2). These results illustrate the time course of avoidance learning in SFs, and they speak to the usefulness of IVEs in fundamental anxiety research.

  8. Plasma density evolution in plasma opening switch obtained by a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Ren, Jing; Guo, Fan; Zhou, LiangJi; Li, Ye; He, An; Jiang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    To understand the formation process of vacuum gap in coaxial microsecond conduction time plasma opening switch (POS), we have made measurements of the line-integrated plasma density during switch operation using a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer. The conduction current and conduction time in experiments are about 120 kA and 1 μs, respectively. As a result, more than 85% of conduction current has been transferred to an inductive load with rise time of 130 ns. The radial dependence of the density is measured by changing the radial location of the line-of-sight for shots with the same nominal POS parameters. During the conduction phase, the line-integrated plasma density in POS increases at all radial locations over the gun-only case by further ionization of material injected from the guns. The current conduction is observed to cause a radial redistribution of the switch plasma. A vacuum gap forms rapidly in the plasma at 5.5 mm from the center conductor, which is consistent with the location where magnetic pressure is the largest, allowing current to be transferred from the POS to the load.

  9. Time Course of Chemokine Expression and Leukocyte Infiltration after Acute Skeletal Muscle Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    at either 8 or 48 h. RT-PCR analysis on select chemokines confirmed the microarray activation pattern. Neutrophil infiltration patterns mirrored the...microarray activation pattern. Neutrophil infiltration patterns mirrored the time course of neutrophil-related chemokines with Gr-1-, 1A8- and 7/4-positive...expression levels were compared with an 18S reference gene in the gastrocnemius cDNA, and the data were normalized to a pool of uninjured gastrocne

  10. Elucidating dynamic metabolic physiology through network integration of quantitative time-course metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Yurkovich, James T.; Paglia, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The increasing availability of metabolomics data necessitates novel methods for deeper data analysis and interpretation. We present a flux balance analysis method that allows for the computation of dynamic intracellular metabolic changes at the cellular scale through integration of time-course ab......The increasing availability of metabolomics data necessitates novel methods for deeper data analysis and interpretation. We present a flux balance analysis method that allows for the computation of dynamic intracellular metabolic changes at the cellular scale through integration of time......-course absolute quantitative metabolomics. This approach, termed " unsteady-state flux balance analysis" (uFBA), is applied to four cellular systems: three dynamic and one steady-state as a negative control. uFBA and FBA predictions are contrasted, and uFBA is found to be more accurate in predicting dynamic...... isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis in stored red blood cells. Utilizing time-course metabolomics data, uFBA provides an accurate method to predict metabolic physiology at the cellular scale for dynamic systems....

  11. Time course of programmed cell death, which included autophagic features, in hybrid tobacco cells expressing hybrid lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Naoya; Nihei, Saori; Miyakawa, Naoto; Hirasawa, Tadashi; Kanekatsu, Motoki; Marubashi, Wataru; van Doorn, Wouter G; Yamada, Tetsuya

    2016-12-01

    PCD with features of vacuolar cell death including autophagy-related features were detected in hybrid tobacco cells, and detailed time course of features of vacuolar cell death were established. A type of interspecific Nicotiana hybrid, Nicotiana suaveolens × N. tabacum exhibits temperature-sensitive lethality. This lethality results from programmed cell death (PCD) in hybrid seedlings, but this PCD occurs only in seedlings and suspension-cultured cells grown at 28 °C, not those grown at 36 °C. Plant PCD can be classified as vacuolar cell death or necrotic cell death. Induction of autophagy, vacuolar membrane collapse and actin disorganization are each known features of vacuolar cell death, but observed cases of PCD showing all these features simultaneously are rare. In this study, these features of vacuolar cell death were evident in hybrid tobacco cells expressing hybrid lethality. Ion leakage, plasma membrane disruption, increased activity of vacuolar processing enzyme, vacuolar membrane collapse, and formation of punctate F-actin foci were each evident in these cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that macroautophagic structures formed and tonoplasts ruptured in these cells. The number of cells that contained monodansylcadaverine (MDC)-stained structures and the abundance of nine autophagy-related gene transcripts increased just before cell death at 28 °C; these features were not evident at 36 °C. We assessed whether an autophagic inhibitor, wortmannin (WM), influenced lethality in hybrid cells. After the hybrid cell began to die, WM suppressed increases in ion leakage and cell deaths, and it decreased the number of cells containing MDC-stained structures. These results showed that several features indicative of autophagy and vacuolar cell death were evident in the hybrid tobacco cells subject to lethality. In addition, we documented a detailed time course of these vacuolar cell death features.

  12. The time course of processing difficulties with non-WH extraction in Danish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads

    if unintegrated constituents are present at a clause boundary. Thus this theory predicts longer reading times at ‘if’ in (2) compared to ‘that’ in (1). Thus with regard to time course, this account is similar in spirit to work on island constraints in English indicating that extraction constraints work......-Pedersen & P. Harder (Eds.), Ikonicitet og struktur (pp. 23-39): Preprint from Netværk for Funktionel Lingvistik, Department of English, University of Copenhagen. Erteschik-Shir, N. (1982). Extractability in Danish and the pragmatic principle of dominance. In E. Engdahl & E. Ejerhed (Eds.), Readings...

  13. The Impact of Feedback on the Different Time Courses of Multisensory Temporal Recalibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. De Niear

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity to rapidly adjust perceptual representations confers a fundamental advantage when confronted with a constantly changing world. Unexplored is how feedback regarding sensory judgments (top-down factors interacts with sensory statistics (bottom-up factors to drive long- and short-term recalibration of multisensory perceptual representations. Here, we examined the time course of both cumulative and rapid temporal perceptual recalibration for individuals completing an audiovisual simultaneity judgment task in which they were provided with varying degrees of feedback. We find that in the presence of feedback (as opposed to simple sensory exposure temporal recalibration is more robust. Additionally, differential time courses are seen for cumulative and rapid recalibration dependent upon the nature of the feedback provided. Whereas cumulative recalibration effects relied more heavily on feedback that informs (i.e., negative feedback rather than confirms (i.e., positive feedback the judgment, rapid recalibration shows the opposite tendency. Furthermore, differential effects on rapid and cumulative recalibration were seen when the reliability of feedback was altered. Collectively, our findings illustrate that feedback signals promote and sustain audiovisual recalibration over the course of cumulative learning and enhance rapid trial-to-trial learning. Furthermore, given the differential effects seen for cumulative and rapid recalibration, these processes may function via distinct mechanisms.

  14. The Impact of Feedback on the Different Time Courses of Multisensory Temporal Recalibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Jean-Paul; Wallace, Mark T.

    2017-01-01

    The capacity to rapidly adjust perceptual representations confers a fundamental advantage when confronted with a constantly changing world. Unexplored is how feedback regarding sensory judgments (top-down factors) interacts with sensory statistics (bottom-up factors) to drive long- and short-term recalibration of multisensory perceptual representations. Here, we examined the time course of both cumulative and rapid temporal perceptual recalibration for individuals completing an audiovisual simultaneity judgment task in which they were provided with varying degrees of feedback. We find that in the presence of feedback (as opposed to simple sensory exposure) temporal recalibration is more robust. Additionally, differential time courses are seen for cumulative and rapid recalibration dependent upon the nature of the feedback provided. Whereas cumulative recalibration effects relied more heavily on feedback that informs (i.e., negative feedback) rather than confirms (i.e., positive feedback) the judgment, rapid recalibration shows the opposite tendency. Furthermore, differential effects on rapid and cumulative recalibration were seen when the reliability of feedback was altered. Collectively, our findings illustrate that feedback signals promote and sustain audiovisual recalibration over the course of cumulative learning and enhance rapid trial-to-trial learning. Furthermore, given the differential effects seen for cumulative and rapid recalibration, these processes may function via distinct mechanisms.

  15. Diving reflex: can the time course of heart rate reduction be quantified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspers, C; Cleveland, S; Schipke, J D

    2011-02-01

    In this meta-analysis of diving bradycardia in humans, we sought to quantify any heart rate (HR) reduction using a relatively simple mathematical function. Using the terms "diving reflex,"diving bradycardia,"diving response,"diving plus heart rate," databases were searched. Data from the studies were fitted using HR=c+aexp(-(t-t(0))/τ), where c is the final HR, a is the HR decrease, τ is the time constant of HR decay, and t(0) is the time delay. Of 890 studies, 220 were given closer scrutiny. Only eight of these provided data obtained under comparable conditions. Apneic facial immersion decreased HR with τ=10.4 s and in air alone it was less pronounced and slower (τ=16.2 s). The exponential function fitted the time course of HR decrease closely (r(2)>0.93). The fit was less adequate for apneic-exercising volunteers. During apnea both with and without face immersion, HR decreases along a monoexponential function with a characteristic time constant. HR decrease during exercise with and without face immersion could not readily be described with a simple function: the parasympathetic reaction was partially offset by some sympathetic activity. Thus, we succeeded in quantifying the early time course of diving bradycardia. It is concluded that the diving reflex is useful to diagnose the integrity of efferent cardiovascular autonomic pathways. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Difference-based clustering of short time-course microarray data with replicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jihoon

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are some limitations associated with conventional clustering methods for short time-course gene expression data. The current algorithms require prior domain knowledge and do not incorporate information from replicates. Moreover, the results are not always easy to interpret biologically. Results We propose a novel algorithm for identifying a subset of genes sharing a significant temporal expression pattern when replicates are used. Our algorithm requires no prior knowledge, instead relying on an observed statistic which is based on the first and second order differences between adjacent time-points. Here, a pattern is predefined as the sequence of symbols indicating direction and the rate of change between time-points, and each gene is assigned to a cluster whose members share a similar pattern. We evaluated the performance of our algorithm to those of K-means, Self-Organizing Map and the Short Time-series Expression Miner methods. Conclusions Assessments using simulated and real data show that our method outperformed aforementioned algorithms. Our approach is an appropriate solution for clustering short time-course microarray data with replicates.

  17. Time-course of the DSM-5 cannabis withdrawal symptoms in poly-substance abusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence is accumulating that a cannabis withdrawal syndrome is common, of clinical significance, and has a clear time course. Up till now, very limited data exist on the cannabis withdrawal symptoms in patients with co-morbid substance use disorders, other than cannabis use and tobacco use. Methods Symptoms of withdrawal were assessed through patient self-reports during detoxification in Danish residential rehabilitation centers. Patients (n = 90) completed booklets three times during their first month at the treatment centre. Self-reported withdrawal symptoms was rated using the DSM-5 Withdrawal Symptom Check List with withdrawal symptoms from all classes of substances, with no indication that the described symptoms should be attributed to withdrawal. Self-reported time since last use of cannabis was used as a predictor of cannabis withdrawal severity. Results With the exception of loss of appetite, time since last use of cannabis was associated with all types of withdrawal symptoms listed in the DSM-5. Only four of 19 symptoms intended to measure withdrawal from other substances were related to time since last use of cannabis, including vivid, unpleasant dreams. Conclusions The findings yield strong support to the notion of a cannabis withdrawal syndrome, and gives further evidence for the inclusion of the criterion of vivid, unpleasant dreams. Further, the findings speak against the significance of demand characteristics in determining the course of the symptoms of cannabis withdrawal. PMID:24118963

  18. Space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shanhong, E-mail: liushanhong108098@163.com; Liu, Xuandong; Shen, Xi; Feng, Lei; Zhang, Qiaogen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Institute of High Voltage Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Tie, Weihao [Xi' an Electrical Engineering Research Institute, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Ejected plasma has been widely applied to the discharge process of gas spark switches as a trigger technology, and the development process of ejected plasma has a direct and important effect on the discharge characteristics of gas switches. In this paper, both the injection characteristics and space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas spark switch with different stored energies, pulse polarities, and pressures are studied. The discharge characteristics and breakdown process of a gas switch ignited by ejected plasma under different working coefficients are also discussed briefly. The results show that stored energy has significant influence on the characteristics of ejected plasma. With the increase of stored energy, the propulsion mode of ejected plasma in the axial direction transforms from “plasmoid” to “plasma flow,” and the distribution of the ejected plasma goes through “cloud,” “core-cloud,” and “branch” in sequence. The velocity of ejected plasma under negative pulse polarity is obviously higher than that under positive pulse polarity, especially at the very beginning time. The radial dimensions of ejected plasma under two kinds of pulse polarities follow the similar varying pattern over time, which increase first and then decrease, assuming an inverted “U”-shaped curve. With the increase of pressure, the velocity of ejected plasma significantly decreases and the “branch” channels droop earlier. Applying the ejected plasma to the triggering of a gas switch, the switch can be triggered reliably in a much wide working coefficient range of 10%–90%. With the increase of working coefficient, the breakdown process of the switch translates from slow working mode to fast working mode, and the delay time reduces from tens of μs to hundreds of ns.

  19. Space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanhong; Liu, Xuandong; Shen, Xi; Feng, Lei; Tie, Weihao; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2016-06-01

    Ejected plasma has been widely applied to the discharge process of gas spark switches as a trigger technology, and the development process of ejected plasma has a direct and important effect on the discharge characteristics of gas switches. In this paper, both the injection characteristics and space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas spark switch with different stored energies, pulse polarities, and pressures are studied. The discharge characteristics and breakdown process of a gas switch ignited by ejected plasma under different working coefficients are also discussed briefly. The results show that stored energy has significant influence on the characteristics of ejected plasma. With the increase of stored energy, the propulsion mode of ejected plasma in the axial direction transforms from "plasmoid" to "plasma flow," and the distribution of the ejected plasma goes through "cloud," "core-cloud," and "branch" in sequence. The velocity of ejected plasma under negative pulse polarity is obviously higher than that under positive pulse polarity, especially at the very beginning time. The radial dimensions of ejected plasma under two kinds of pulse polarities follow the similar varying pattern over time, which increase first and then decrease, assuming an inverted "U"-shaped curve. With the increase of pressure, the velocity of ejected plasma significantly decreases and the "branch" channels droop earlier. Applying the ejected plasma to the triggering of a gas switch, the switch can be triggered reliably in a much wide working coefficient range of 10%-90%. With the increase of working coefficient, the breakdown process of the switch translates from slow working mode to fast working mode, and the delay time reduces from tens of μs to hundreds of ns.

  20. Time course of changes in the development of gait disorders in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Petrov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the time course of changes in foot biomechanical function as multiple sclerosis (MS progresses in patients with different degrees of disability compared to a control group. Patients and methods. To estimate the time course of changes in gait disorders in MS, changes in foot biomechanical function were explored in 30 patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Their neurological status was evaluated using the expanded disability status scale (EDSS; pedographic examination was made applying a plantar pressure distribution system; all the patients were examined twice. During the first examination, the patients were divided into two groups: 1 minimal neurological disorders (EDSS scores of < 3.0 and 2 moderate ones (EDSS scores of ≥3.0. Results and discussion. The patients with a mild neurological deficit showed increases in foot load and its lateralization by elevating pressure on the heads of the fourth and fifth metatarsal bones, as evidenced by a significant rise in mean pressure, maximum force, and force-time integral. These changes occurred in the absence of the patients’ complaints of changes in movements. Pedographic examination revealed the changes indicating an enlarged anterior transverse arch and the lower role of the hallux in body weight transfer in the patients with a moderate neurological deficit despite the fact that there were no further visible negative changes in a motor process or progression in neurological deficit. The pedographic examination makes it possible to estimate the degree of gait disorders caused by pyramidal and/or cerebellar lesions and to identify a leading role of this or that functional system in their genesis. Pyramidal dysfunction has impact on the pressurization of the heads of the second and third metatarsal bones. Computed pedography can identify clinically subtle movement changes and estimate the time course of changes in movement disorders in MS patients, including those to evaluate

  1. Time course of sleep inertia dissipation in human performance and alertness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, M. E.; Wyatt, J. K.; Ritz-De Cecco, A.; Khalsa, S. B.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Alertness and performance on a wide variety of tasks are impaired immediately upon waking from sleep due to sleep inertia, which has been found to dissipate in an asymptotic manner following waketime. It has been suggested that behavioural or environmental factors, as well as sleep stage at awakening, may affect the severity of sleep inertia. In order to determine the time course of sleep inertia dissipation under normal entrained conditions, subjective alertness and cognitive throughput were measured during the first 4 h after habitual waketime from a full 8-h sleep episode on 3 consecutive days. We investigated whether this time course was affected by either sleep stage at awakening or behavioural/environmental factors. Sleep inertia dissipated in an asymptotic manner and took 2-4 h to near the asymptote. Saturating exponential functions fitted the sleep inertia data well, with time constants of 0.67 h for subjective alertness and 1.17 h for cognitive performance. Most awakenings occurred out of stage rapid eye movement (REM), 2 or 1 sleep, and no effect of sleep stage at awakening on either the severity of sleep inertia or the time course of its dissipation could be detected. Subjective alertness and cognitive throughput were significantly impaired upon awakening regardless of whether subjects got out of bed, ate breakfast, showered and were exposed to ordinary indoor room light (approximately 150 lux) or whether subjects participated in a constant routine (CR) protocol in which they remained in bed, ate small hourly snacks and were exposed to very dim light (10-15 lux). These findings allow for the refinement of models of alertness and performance, and have important implications for the scheduling of work immediately upon awakening in many occupational settings.

  2. Arrow-bot: A Teaching Tool for Real-Time Embedded System Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Mohamad Fauzi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a line following Arduino-based mobile robot for Real-Time Embedded System course at Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia. The real-time system (RTS concept was implementing is based on rate monotonic scheduling (RMS on an ATmega328P microcontroller. Three infrared line sensors were used as input for controlling two direct current (DC motors. A RTS software was programmed in Arduino IDE which relied on a real-time operating system (RTOS of ChibiOS/RT library. Three independent tasks of software functions were created for testing real-time scheduling capability and the result of temporal scope was collected. The microcontroller succeeded to handle multiple tasks without missed their dateline. This implementation of the RTOS in embedded system for mobile robotics system is hoped to increase students understanding and learning capability.

  3. Time-course regulation of quercetin on cell survival/proliferation pathways in human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén; Angeles Martín, María; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia

    2008-04-01

    Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid, has been shown to possess anticarcinogenic properties, but the precise molecular mechanisms of action are not thoroughly elucidated. This study was aimed at investigating the time-course regulation effect of quercetin on survival/proliferation pathways in a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2). Quercetin induced a significant time-dependent inactivation of the major survival signaling proteins, i. e., phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B (AKT), extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha), in concert with a time-dependent activation of key death-related signals: c-jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and PKC-delta. These data suggest that quercetin exerts a tight regulation of survival/proliferation pathways that requires the integration of different signals and persists over time, being the balance of these regulatory signals what determines the fate of HepG2 cells.

  4. Motor and perceptual sequence learning: different time course of parallel processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirnberger, Georg; Novak-Knollmueller, Judith

    2013-07-10

    The aim was to determine the extent and time course of motor and perceptual learning in a procedural learning task, and the relation of these two processes. Because environmental constraints modulate the relative impact of different learning mechanisms, we chose a simple learning task similar to real-life exercise. Thirty-four healthy individuals performed a visuomotor serial reaction time task. Learning blocks with high stimulus-response compatibility were practiced repeatedly; in between these, participants performed test blocks with the same or a different (mirror-inverted, or new) stimulus sequence and/or with the same or a different (mirror-inverted) stimulus-response allocation. This design allowed us to measure the progress of motor learning and perceptual learning independently. Results showed that in the learning blocks, a steady reduction of the reaction times indicated that - as expected - participants improved their skills continuously. Analysis of the test blocks indicated that both motor learning and perceptual learning were significant. The two mechanisms were correlated (r=0.62, Pperceptual learning was more stable but slower. In conclusion, in a simple visuomotor learning task, participants can learn the motor sequence and the stimulus sequence in parallel. The positive correlation of motor and perceptual learning suggests that the two mechanisms act in synergy and are not alternative opposing strategies. The impact of these two learning mechanisms changes over time: motor learning sets in later and becomes relevant only in the course of training.

  5. Dose-time relation in BF3 plasma immersion ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiqun; Round, Mark; Qin, Shu; Chan, Chung

    1995-03-01

    Etching and deposition rates of silicon and SiO2 during BF3 plasma immersion ion implantation are measured. The relation between total dose and plasma immersion ion implantation processing time is developed through computer modeling. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data. Comparison with a previously published model is also given.

  6. Shock formation in magnetised electron-positron plasmas: mechanism and timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Bret, A.; Sinha, U.

    2016-10-01

    The shock formation process in electron-positron pair plasmas is investigated in the presence of an ambient perpendicular magnetic field. In initially unmagnetised plasmas, which are dominated by the Weibel or filamentation instability, the shock formation time is a multiple of the saturation time of the linear instability. While in weakly magnetised plasmas the mechanism is still the same, higher magnetisations induce synchrotron maser modes such that the shock formation is dominated by magnetic reflection. As a consequence the formation times are reduced. The focus is on the detailed picture of the particle kinetics, in which the transition between Weibel and magneto-hydrodynamic shocks can be clearly identified.

  7. Courses timetabling problem by minimizing the number of less preferable time slots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktavia, M.; Aman, A.; Bakhtiar, T.

    2017-01-01

    In an organization with large number of resources, timetabling is one of the most important factors of management strategy and the one that is most prone to errors or issues. Timetabling the perfect organization plan is quite a task, thus the aid of operations research or management strategy approaches is obligation. Timetabling in educational institutions can roughly be categorized into school timetabling, course timetabling, and examination timetabling, which differ from each other by their entities involved such as the type of events, the kind of institution, and the type and the relative influence of constraints. Education timetabling problem is generally a kind of complex combinatorial problem consisting of NP-complete sub-problems. It is required that the requested timetable fulfills a set of hard and soft constraints of various types. In this paper we consider a courses timetabling problem at university whose objective is to minimize the number of less preferable time slots. We mean by less preferable time slots are those devoted in early morning (07.00 – 07.50 AM) or those in the late afternoon (17.00 – 17.50 AM) that in fact beyond the working hour, those scheduled during the lunch break (12.00 – 12.50 AM), those scheduled in Wednesday 10.00 – 11.50 AM that coincides with Department Meeting, and those in Saturday which should be in fact devoted for day-off. In some cases, timetable with a number of activities scheduled in abovementioned time slots are commonly encountered. The courses timetabling for the Educational Program of General Competence (PPKU) students at odd semester at Bogor Agricultural University (IPB) has been modelled in the framework of the integer linear programming. We solved the optimization problem heuristically by categorizing all the groups into seven clusters.

  8. Diabetes patients show different time-course of myocardial perfusion improvement after coronary artery bypass grafting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. J.; Seok, J. W.; Eo, J. S. [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease. Diabetes is known to cause microangiopathy. The microangiopathy is hardly detectable on the coronary angiography. Myocardial perfusion imaging shows the resultant perfusion status which reflects the microangiopathy. For patients who underwent revascularization, the microangiopathy could affect the myocardial perfusion improvement. Diabetes patients probably experience the different myocardial perfusion improvement as compared to the non-diabetes patients although they have similar angiographic findings. The aim of this study is to find out whether there is a time-course difference of perfusion improvement between the diabetes and non diabetes patients who showed patent angiographic findings after coronary artery grafting surgery (CABG). A total of 129 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery were enrolled in this study. Myocardial SPECTs performed at previous, short-term (3 month), and mid-term (1 year) to CABG. One-year follow up angiography was done 411{+-}121 days after surgery. Graft patency was determined according to the FitzGibbon et al. Segments were assigned to vascular territories using a 20 segment model. The segments of excellent patency were included in this study. Time course differences of concerned segments were analyzed using RMANOVA. The number of segments enrolled was 764 of diabetes and 1083 of non-diabetes. At short-term follow up, reversibility score was 2.8{+-}8.1% in diabetes and 0.3{+-}7.5% in non-diabetes. At long-term follow up, reversibility score was 1.8{+-}8.0% in diabetes and 0.1{+-}7.3% in non-diabetes. The time-course of reversibility score was significantly different between the diabetes and non diabetes (p<0.001) Diabetic segments showed high residual reversibility score than non-diabetic segments after CABG although the angiographic finding was patent in both groups. This result is maybe attributable to microangiopathy induced by

  9. Cardiovascular alterations at different stages of hypertension development during ethanol consumption: Time-course of vascular and autonomic changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crestani, Carlos C. [Department of Natural Active Principles and Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Univ. Estadual Paulista—UNESP (Brazil); Lopes da Silva, Andréia [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Scopinho, América A. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ruginsk, Silvia G.; Uchoa, Ernane T. [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Correa, Fernando M.A. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Elias, Lucila L.K.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Resstel, Leonardo B.M., E-mail: leoresstel@yahoo.com.br [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of the present work was to establish a time-course correlation between vascular and autonomic changes that contribute to the development of hypertension during ethanol ingestion in rats. For this, male Wistar rats were subjected to the intake of increasing ethanol concentrations in their drinking water during four weeks. Ethanol effects were investigated at the end of each week. Mild hypertension was already observed at the first week of treatment, and a progressive blood pressure increase was observed along the evaluation period. Increased pressor response to phenylephrine was observed from first to fourth week. α{sub 1}-adrenoceptor protein in the mesenteric bed was enhanced at the first week, whereas β{sub 2}-adrenoceptor protein in the aorta was reduced after the second week. In the third week, ethanol intake facilitated the depressor response to sodium nitroprusside, whereas in the fourth week it reduced nitrate content in aorta and increased it plasma. The bradycardic component of the baroreflex was impaired, whereas baroreflex tachycardia was enhanced at the third and fourth weeks. AT{sub 1A} receptor and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) mRNAs in the nucleus tractus solitarius were increased at the fourth week. These findings suggest that increased vascular responsiveness to vasoconstrictor agents is possibly a link factor in the development and maintenance of the progressive hypertension induced by ethanol consumption. Additionally, baroreflex changes are possibly mediated by alterations in angiotensinergic mechanisms and CNP content within the brainstem, which contribute to maintaining the hypertensive state in later phases of ethanol ingestion. Facilitated vascular responsiveness to nitric oxide seems to counteract ethanol-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Mild hypertension was observed during the entire period of ethanol ingestion. • Ethanol facilitated vascular reactivity to vasoactive agents. • Changes in baroreflex activity

  10. Time-Course Gene Set Analysis for Longitudinal Gene Expression Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris P Hejblum

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene set analysis methods, which consider predefined groups of genes in the analysis of genomic data, have been successfully applied for analyzing gene expression data in cross-sectional studies. The time-course gene set analysis (TcGSA introduced here is an extension of gene set analysis to longitudinal data. The proposed method relies on random effects modeling with maximum likelihood estimates. It allows to use all available repeated measurements while dealing with unbalanced data due to missing at random (MAR measurements. TcGSA is a hypothesis driven method that identifies a priori defined gene sets with significant expression variations over time, taking into account the potential heterogeneity of expression within gene sets. When biological conditions are compared, the method indicates if the time patterns of gene sets significantly differ according to these conditions. The interest of the method is illustrated by its application to two real life datasets: an HIV therapeutic vaccine trial (DALIA-1 trial, and data from a recent study on influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. In the DALIA-1 trial TcGSA revealed a significant change in gene expression over time within 69 gene sets during vaccination, while a standard univariate individual gene analysis corrected for multiple testing as well as a standard a Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA for time series both failed to detect any significant pattern change over time. When applied to the second illustrative data set, TcGSA allowed the identification of 4 gene sets finally found to be linked with the influenza vaccine too although they were found to be associated to the pneumococcal vaccine only in previous analyses. In our simulation study TcGSA exhibits good statistical properties, and an increased power compared to other approaches for analyzing time-course expression patterns of gene sets. The method is made available for the community through an R package.

  11. Sphingoid Base Metabolism in Yeast: Mapping Gene Expression Patterns Into Qualitative Metabolite Time Course Predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas Radivoyevitch

    2001-01-01

    Can qualitative metabolite time course predictions be inferred from measured mRNA expression patterns? Speaking against this possibility is the large number of ‘decoupling’ control points that lie between these variables, i.e. translation, protein degradation, enzyme inhibition and enzyme activation. Speaking for it is the notion that these control points might be coordinately regulated such that action exerted on the mRNA level is informative of action exerted on the protein and me...

  12. Time course of primary and secondary hyperalgesia after heat injury to the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Kehlet, H

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the time course of, and relationship between, primary and secondary hyperalgesia after thermal injury to the skin in humans. Burn injuries (15 x 25 mm rectangular thermode, 49 degrees C, 5 min) were produced in eight healthy, unmedicated male volunteers, on the medial side...... of the right calf, on two occasions at least 8 days apart. Heat pain detection thresholds (HPDT), heat pain tolerance (HPT), mechanical pain detection threshold (MPDT) and the intensity of burn-injury induced erythema (skin erythema index, SEI) were assessed inside the burn injury. HPT was assessed only in one...

  13. Delay time embedding of mass loss avalanches in a fusion plasma-oriented sandpile model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, C. A.; Dendy, R. O.; Hole, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    The sandpile paradigm is widely used to model aspects of the phenomenology of magnetically confined fusion (MCF) plasmas, including enhanced confinement, edge pedestals and, potentially, the impulsive energy and particle release process known as ELMing. Here we identify new points of contact between ELMing and the systemwide avalanches in a sandpile. We compare the quantified response [Calderon et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 042306 (2014)] to increased fuelling of the time sequence of edge localised mode events in a series of similar Joint European Torus plasmas with the response to increased fuelling of the time sequence of systemwide avalanches in a sandpile model [Chapman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2814 (2001)] that has well established links to MCF plasma phenomenology. Both the probability density functions of inter-event time intervals, and delay time embeddings of event time sequences, at different fuelling rates, show common features and point to shared underlying physics.

  14. Analysis of anabolic steroids in hair: time courses in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Min; Xiang, Ping; Yan, Hui; Shen, Baohua; Wang, Mengye

    2009-09-01

    Sensitive, specific, and reproducible methods for the quantitative determination of eight anabolic steroids in guinea pig hair have been developed using LC/MS/MS and GC/MS/MS. Methyltestosterone, stanozolol, methandienone, nandrolone, trenbolone, boldenone, methenolone and DHEA were administered intraperitoneally in guinea pigs. After the first injection, black hair segments were collected on shaved areas of skin. The analysis of these segments revealed the distribution of anabolic steroids in the guinea pig hair. The major components in hair are the parent anabolic steroids. The time courses of the concentrations of the steroids in hair (except methenolone, which does not deposit in hair) demonstrated that the peak concentrations were reached on days 2-4, except stanozolol, which peaked on day 10 after administration. The concentrations in hair appeared to be related to the physicochemical properties of the drug compound and to the dosage. These studies on the distribution of drugs in the hair shaft and on the time course of their concentration changes provide information relevant to the optimal time and method of collecting hair samples. Such studies also provide basic data that will be useful in the application of hair analysis in the control of doping and in the interpretation of results.

  15. Pre-saccadic perception: Separate time courses for enhancement and spatial pooling at the saccade target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonocore, Antimo; Fracasso, Alessio; Melcher, David

    2017-01-01

    We interact with complex scenes using eye movements to select targets of interest. Studies have shown that the future target of a saccadic eye movement is processed differently by the visual system. A number of effects have been reported, including a benefit for perceptual performance at the target ("enhancement"), reduced influences of backward masking ("un-masking"), reduced crowding ("un-crowding") and spatial compression towards the saccade target. We investigated the time course of these effects by measuring orientation discrimination for targets that were spatially crowded or temporally masked. In four experiments, we varied the target-flanker distance, the presence of forward/backward masks, the orientation of the flankers and whether participants made a saccade. Masking and randomizing flanker orientation reduced performance in both fixation and saccade trials. We found a small improvement in performance on saccade trials, compared to fixation trials, with a time course that was consistent with a general enhancement at the saccade target. In addition, a decrement in performance (reporting the average flanker orientation, rather than the target) was found in the time bins nearest saccade onset when random oriented flankers were used, consistent with spatial pooling around the saccade target. We did not find strong evidence for un-crowding. Overall, our pattern of results was consistent with both an early, general enhancement at the saccade target and a later, peri-saccadic compression/pooling towards the saccade target.

  16. Time course and predictors of use of erectile dysfunction treatment in a Veterans Affairs medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, R I; Daskivich, T; Kwan, L; Bassett, J; Keller, T; Bennett, C

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to define the pattern and time course of use of ED treatments in a Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center and to identify clinical or demographic variables that are associated with the use of second- or third-line ED treatments. We identified 702 men treated for ED at the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Affairs between 2007 and 2013. We extracted demographics, Charlson co-morbidity score, pertinent surgical/medication history as well as use of ED treatments from medical records. On multivariate analysis, age over 65 (OR 1.83, 95% CI: 1.31-2.56) and Charlson co-morbidity score of 1 (OR 1.77, 95% CI: 1.13-2.77) and 2+ (OR 2.07, 95% CI: 1.28-3.36) were significantly associated with use of medicated urethral suppositories for erection (MUSE)/intracorporal injections (ICI) compared with PDE5i/erection devices. Across all men who used second- or third-line treatments, median time until receiving MUSE was 0.6 years and median time until receiving ICI/implant was 2 years. We conclude that men who will ultimately use more invasive ED treatments, such as men with more co-morbidities, tend to have a prolonged treatment course. This information may be incorporated into a shared decision-making model for more efficient treatment of ED.

  17. Differential time course of the vasodilator action of various calcium antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, R; Kam, K L; Pfaffendorf, M; van Zwieten, P A

    1998-01-01

    It is rather the rate of the vasodilator effect than its magnitude which determines the triggering of reflex tachycardia associated with dihydropyridine calcium antagonists (DHP-CA). We therefore compared the rate of the vasodilator effects of a series of CA (both DHP and non-DHP) in rat isolated mesenteric artery preparations (size 256 +/- 3 microns, length 2 mm) from male Wistar rats (weighing 300-350 g) in an isolated wire myograph according to Mulvany and Halpern [12]. The mean force of the KCl-induced contraction amounted to 2.3 +/- 0.1 mN/mm. Potency (given as IC50-values), differential time course of action and recovery of the contractile response of the vessels after wash-out were established. These three parameters adhere to the following sequences: (1. potency) barnidipine [corrected] > (S)-lercanidipine > barnidipine racemate [corrected]> amlodipine > nifedipine, lacidipine > (R)-lercanidipine > verapamil, mibefradil; (2. differential time course) lacidipine, amlodipine > (S)- and (R)-lercanidipine, barnidipine [corrected], barnidipine racemate [corrected] > mibefradil, verapamil, nifedipine; (3. recovery) nifedipine > verapamil, barnidipine [corrected], amlodipine > barnidipine, lacidipine > mibefradil, (R)-lercanidipine > (S)-lercanidipine. In conclusion, barnidipine [corrected] proved to be the most potent vasodilator agent; interestingly, barnidipine was 20 times less potent when applied as a racemic mixture. A slow onset of action in DHP is a very important mechanism in preventing reflex tachycardia. For non-DHP (verapamil, mibefradil) reflex tachycardia probably is prevented by a direct effect on the conductive tissue in the myocardium.

  18. Time course of spatial contextual interference: event history analyses of simultaneous masking by nonoverlapping patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panis, Sven; Hermens, Frouke

    2014-02-01

    Simultaneous masking refers to the impairment of performance on a visual target by simultaneously presented flankers. Whereas the spatial aspects of simultaneous masking have been studied extensively, the time course of these spatial influences is much less well understood. We here measure response latency and accuracy in a simultaneous masking paradigm and apply event history analysis to study the time course of target-flanker interactions. In our experiments, we presented a central target vernier flanked on both sides by 12 aligned distractor verniers that were either shorter, longer, or equal in length (Experiment 1), and that also were congruent or incongruent in their spatial offset with the target (Experiment 2). Response time distributions showed that there were more fast responses when the target was flanked by short flankers. Conditional accuracy functions showed that accuracy of responses dropped when the flankers had the same length as the target, but only for slow responses. These results are at odds with accounts based solely on lateral neural interactions or response competition, and instead suggest that top-down visual object-to-feature interference occurs when the target is not selected fast enough, congruent with object substitution theory. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. The time course of word retrieval revealed by event-related brain potentials during overt speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Albert; Strijkers, Kristof; Martin, Clara; Thierry, Guillaume

    2009-12-15

    Speech production is one of the most fundamental activities of humans. A core cognitive operation involved in this skill is the retrieval of words from long-term memory, that is, from the mental lexicon. In this article, we establish the time course of lexical access by recording the brain electrical activity of participants while they named pictures aloud. By manipulating the ordinal position of pictures belonging to the same semantic categories, the cumulative semantic interference effect, we were able to measure the exact time at which lexical access takes place. We found significant correlations between naming latencies, ordinal position of pictures, and event-related potential mean amplitudes starting 200 ms after picture presentation and lasting for 180 ms. The study reveals that the brain engages extremely fast in the retrieval of words one wishes to utter and offers a clear time frame of how long it takes for the competitive process of activating and selecting words in the course of speech to be resolved.

  20. Comparative time-course study on pituitary and branchial response to salinity challenge in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and Nile tilapia (O. niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velan, Ariel; Hulata, Gideon; Ron, Micha; Cnaani, Avner

    2011-12-01

    The physiological response of Mozambique and Nile tilapia transferred from fresh to brackish (15 ppt) water was compared during a one-week time course. Response in the pituitary was measured by the gene expression pattern of prolactin (PRL I), growth hormone (GH), and calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), while the response in the gills was measured by the gene expression pattern of the prolactin receptor (PRL-R), Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) and Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC), and by activity and expression of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA). The time-course curves of plasma osmolality levels indicate a rapid elevation 24 h after transfer, which later decreased and maintained at stable level. PRL I expression decreased in both species, but with stronger response in the Nile tilapia, while no differences were found in the slightly elevated levels of GH mRNA. The branchial response demonstrated a faster up-regulation of NKA and NKCC in the Mozambique tilapia, but similar levels after a week, while Nile tilapia had stronger and constant down-regulation of NCC. The time-course response of the measured osmoregulatory parameters indicate that 24 h after transfer is a critical time point for brackish-water adaptation. The differences in responses to saltwater challenge between Mozambique and Nile tilapia shown in this study may be associated with the differences in saltwater tolerance between these two tilapiine species.

  1. A Formal Framework for Modelling the Developmental Course of Competence and Performance in the Distance, Speed, and Time Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dietrich; Kickmeier-Rust, Michael D.; Matsuda, Fumiko

    2008-01-01

    The developmental course in the distance-speed-time domain is still a matter of debate. Traditional stage models are contested by theories of continuous development and adaptive thinking. In the present work, we introduce a formal framework for modelling the developmental course in this domain, grounding on Competence-based Knowledge Space Theory.…

  2. Influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance in turbulent plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588, South Korea and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance for the electron-ion collision is investigated in turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal method and the effective Dupree potential term associated with the plasma turbulence are employed to obtain the occurrence scattering time as a function of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, thermal energy, and Debye length. The result shows that the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the Dupree diffusivity. Hence, we have found that the influence of plasma turbulence diminishes the occurrence time advance in forward electron-ion collisions in thermal turbulent plasmas. The occurrence time advance shows that the propensity of the occurrence time advance increases with increasing scattering angle. It is also found that the effect of turbulence due to the Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the thermal energy. In addition, the variation of the plasma turbulence on the occurrence scattering time advance due to the plasma parameters is also discussed.

  3. Reliability Analysis of Time to Complete the Obstacle Course Portion of the Load Effects Assessment Program (LEAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-25

    degree of relative reliability of the course completion time measure , ICC(2,1) = .93. The standard error of measurement and the limits of agreement...times). The value obtained, ICC(2,1) = .93, demonstrated a high degree of relative reliability of the course completion time measure . Further, the...to trial) was also assessed by calculating the standard error of measurement (SEM) and the 95% limits of agreement (LOA). The SEM calculation yielded

  4. Still feeling it: The time course of emotional recovery from an attentional perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne eMorriss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Emotional reactivity and the time taken to recover, particularly from negative, stressful, events, are inextricably linked, and both are crucial for maintaining well-being. It is unclear, however, to what extent emotional reactivity during stimulus onset predicts the time course of recovery after stimulus offset. To address this question, 25 participants viewed arousing (negative and positive and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS followed by task-relevant face targets, which were to be gender categorised. Faces were presented early (400–1500 ms or late (2400–3500 ms after picture offset to capture the time course of recovery from emotional stimuli. Measures of reaction time, as well as face-locked N170 and P3 components were taken as indicators of the impact of lingering emotion on attentional facilitation or interference. Electrophysiological effects revealed negative and positive images to facilitate face-target processing on the P3 component, regardless of temporal interval. At the individual level, increased reactivity to: (1 negative pictures, quantified as the IAPS picture-locked Late Positive Potential (LPP, predicted larger attentional interference on the face-locked P3 component to faces presented in the late time window after picture offset. (2 Positive pictures, denoted by the LPP, predicted larger facilitation on the face-locked P3 component to faces presented in the earlier time window after picture offset. These results suggest that subsequent processing is still impacted up to 3500 ms after the offset of negative pictures and 1500 ms after the offset of positive pictures for individuals reacting more strongly to these pictures respectively. Such findings emphasise the importance of individual differences in reactivity when predicting the temporality of emotional recovery.The current experimental model provides a novel basis for future research aiming to identify profiles of adaptive and

  5. Still feeling it: the time course of emotional recovery from an attentional perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morriss, Jayne; Taylor, Alexander N. W.; Roesch, Etienne B.; van Reekum, Carien M.

    2013-01-01

    Emotional reactivity and the time taken to recover, particularly from negative, stressful, events, are inextricably linked, and both are crucial for maintaining well-being. It is unclear, however, to what extent emotional reactivity during stimulus onset predicts the time course of recovery after stimulus offset. To address this question, 25 participants viewed arousing (negative and positive) and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) followed by task-relevant face targets, which were to be gender categorized. Faces were presented early (400–1500 ms) or late (2400–3500 ms) after picture offset to capture the time course of recovery from emotional stimuli. Measures of reaction time (RT), as well as face-locked N170 and P3 components were taken as indicators of the impact of lingering emotion on attentional facilitation or interference. Electrophysiological effects revealed negative and positive images to facilitate face-target processing on the P3 component, regardless of temporal interval. At the individual level, increased reactivity to: (1) negative pictures, quantified as the IAPS picture-locked Late Positive Potential (LPP), predicted larger attentional interference on the face-locked P3 component to faces presented in the late time window after picture offset. (2) Positive pictures, denoted by the LPP, predicted larger facilitation on the face-locked P3 component to faces presented in the earlier time window after picture offset. These results suggest that subsequent processing is still impacted up to 3500 ms after the offset of negative pictures and 1500 ms after the offset of positive pictures for individuals reacting more strongly to these pictures, respectively. Such findings emphasize the importance of individual differences in reactivity when predicting the temporality of emotional recovery. The current experimental model provides a novel basis for future research aiming to identify profiles of adaptive and

  6. Feeling backwards? How temporal order in speech affects the time course of vocal emotion recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eRigoulot

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that the time course for recognizing vocal expressions of basic emotion in speech varies significantly by emotion type, implying that listeners uncover acoustic evidence about emotions at different rates in speech (e.g., fear is recognized most quickly whereas happiness and disgust are recognized relatively slowly, Pell and Kotz, 2011. To investigate whether vocal emotion recognition is largely dictated by the amount of time listeners are exposed to speech or the position of critical emotional cues in the utterance, 40 English participants judged the meaning of emotionally-inflected pseudo-utterances presented in a gating paradigm, where utterances were gated as a function of their syllable structure in segments of increasing duration from the end of the utterance (i.e., gated ‘backwards’. Accuracy for detecting six target emotions in each gate condition and the mean identification point for each emotion in milliseconds were analyzed and compared to results from Pell & Kotz (2011. We again found significant emotion-specific differences in the time needed to accurately recognize emotions from speech prosody, and new evidence that utterance-final syllables tended to facilitate listeners’ accuracy in many conditions when compared to utterance-initial syllables. The time needed to recognize fear, anger, sadness, and neutral from speech cues was not influenced by how utterances were gated, although happiness and disgust were recognized significantly faster when listeners heard the end of utterances first. Our data provide new clues about the relative time course for recognizing vocally-expressed emotions within the 400-1200 millisecond time window, while highlighting that emotion recognition from prosody can be shaped by the temporal properties of speech.

  7. The time-course of EEG Alpha Power Changes in Creative Ideation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eSchwab

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Increases in EEG alpha power during creative ideation are among the most consistent findings in the neuroscientific study of creativity, but existing studies did not focus on time-related changes of EEG alpha activity patterns during the process of creative ideation so far. Since several cognitive processes are involved in the generation of creative ideas, different EEG correlates may result as a function of time. In this study we addressed this crucial point. Forty-five participants worked on the Alternative Uses Task while the EEG was recorded and changes in task-related power (relative to rest in the upper-frequency band (10-12 Hz for three isochronous time intervals of the idea generation period were determined. Alpha power changes during idea generation followed a characteristic time course: We found a general increase of alpha power at the beginning of idea generation that was followed by a decrease and finally by a re-increase of alpha prior to responding that was most pronounced at parietal and temporal sites of the right hemisphere. Additionally, the production of more original ideas was accompanied by increasing hemispheric asymmetry (more alpha in the right than left hemisphere with increasing duration of the idea generation period. The observed time course of brain activity may reflect the progression of different but well-known stages in the idea generation process: That is the initial retrieval of common and old ideas followed by the actual generation of novel and more creative ideas by overcoming typical responses through processes of mental simulation and imagination.

  8. The time-course of EEG alpha power changes in creative ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Daniela; Benedek, Mathias; Papousek, Ilona; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Fink, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Increases in EEG alpha power during creative ideation are among the most consistent findings in the neuroscientific study of creativity, but existing studies did not focus on time-related changes of EEG alpha activity patterns during the process of creative ideation so far. Since several cognitive processes are involved in the generation of creative ideas, different EEG correlates may result as a function of time. In this study we addressed this crucial point. Forty-five participants worked on the "Alternative Uses Task" while the EEG was recorded and changes in task-related power (relative to rest) in the upper-frequency band (10-12 Hz) for three isochronous time intervals of the idea generation period were determined. Alpha power changes during idea generation followed a characteristic time course: we found a general increase of alpha power at the beginning of idea generation that was followed by a decrease and finally by a re-increase of alpha prior to responding that was most pronounced at parietal and temporal sites of the right hemisphere. Additionally, the production of more original ideas was accompanied by increasing hemispheric asymmetry (more alpha in the right than left hemisphere) with increasing duration of the idea generation period. The observed time course of brain activity may reflect the progression of different but well-known stages in the idea generation process: that is the initial retrieval of common and old ideas followed by the actual generation of novel and more creative ideas by overcoming typical responses through processes of mental simulation and imagination.

  9. The time-course of EEG alpha power changes in creative ideation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Daniela; Benedek, Mathias; Papousek, Ilona; Weiss, Elisabeth M.; Fink, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Increases in EEG alpha power during creative ideation are among the most consistent findings in the neuroscientific study of creativity, but existing studies did not focus on time-related changes of EEG alpha activity patterns during the process of creative ideation so far. Since several cognitive processes are involved in the generation of creative ideas, different EEG correlates may result as a function of time. In this study we addressed this crucial point. Forty-five participants worked on the “Alternative Uses Task” while the EEG was recorded and changes in task-related power (relative to rest) in the upper-frequency band (10–12 Hz) for three isochronous time intervals of the idea generation period were determined. Alpha power changes during idea generation followed a characteristic time course: we found a general increase of alpha power at the beginning of idea generation that was followed by a decrease and finally by a re-increase of alpha prior to responding that was most pronounced at parietal and temporal sites of the right hemisphere. Additionally, the production of more original ideas was accompanied by increasing hemispheric asymmetry (more alpha in the right than left hemisphere) with increasing duration of the idea generation period. The observed time course of brain activity may reflect the progression of different but well-known stages in the idea generation process: that is the initial retrieval of common and old ideas followed by the actual generation of novel and more creative ideas by overcoming typical responses through processes of mental simulation and imagination. PMID:24860485

  10. Elucidating dynamic metabolic physiology through network integration of quantitative time-course metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Yurkovich, James T.; Paglia, Giuseppe; Rolfsson, Ottar; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing availability of metabolomics data necessitates novel methods for deeper data analysis and interpretation. We present a flux balance analysis method that allows for the computation of dynamic intracellular metabolic changes at the cellular scale through integration of time-course absolute quantitative metabolomics. This approach, termed “unsteady-state flux balance analysis” (uFBA), is applied to four cellular systems: three dynamic and one steady-state as a negative control. uFBA and FBA predictions are contrasted, and uFBA is found to be more accurate in predicting dynamic metabolic flux states for red blood cells, platelets, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Notably, only uFBA predicts that stored red blood cells metabolize TCA intermediates to regenerate important cofactors, such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. These pathway usage predictions were subsequently validated through 13C isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis in stored red blood cells. Utilizing time-course metabolomics data, uFBA provides an accurate method to predict metabolic physiology at the cellular scale for dynamic systems. PMID:28387366

  11. Time course for arm and chest muscle thickness changes following bench press training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Riki; Thiebaud, Robert S.; Loenneke, Jeremy P.; Loftin, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the time course of hypertrophic adaptations in both the upper arm and trunk muscles following high-intensity bench press training. Seven previously untrained young men (aged 25 ± 3 years) performed free-weight bench press training 3 days (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) per week for 24 weeks. Training intensity and volume were set at 75% of one repetition maximum (1-RM) and 30 repetitions (3 sets of 10 repetitions, with 2−3 min of rest between sets), respectively. Muscle thickness (MTH) was measured using B-mode ultrasound at three sites: the biceps and triceps brachii and the pectoralis major. Measurements were taken a week prior to the start of training, before the training session on every Monday and 3 days after the final training session. Pairwise comparisons from baseline revealed that pectoralis major MTH significantly increased after week-1 (p = 0.002), triceps MTH increased after week-5 (p = 0.001) and 1-RM strength increased after week-3 (p = 0.001) while no changes were observed in the biceps MTH from baseline. Significant muscle hypertrophy was observed earlier in the chest compared to that of the triceps. Our results indicate that the time course of the muscle hypertrophic response differs between the upper arm and chest. PMID:24265879

  12. Time course of the size of the dark area in macular holes by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Y; Nishikawa, S; Tamai, M

    2000-02-01

    To investigate the time course of idiopathic macular hole development by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), we examined 28 eyes of 25 patients with macular holes. Cases included four eyes with stage 1-B disease (foveal detachment), 3 with stage 2 (break at the fovea), 13 with stage 3 (full-thickness macular hole), and 8 with stage 4 (hole with pseudo-operculum, posterior vitreous detachment), according to Gass's classification. The diameter of the dark area around the macular holes was recorded by SLO using a helium-neon laser. We compared the percent difference of dark area recorded between initial findings and these after three months. The size of the dark area increased after three months in eyes with stages 1, 2, and 3 disease. The size of the dark area in stage 4 disease decreased after 3 months. In the stage before posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), the dark areas increased. Once PVD occurred, these areas decreased. These findings suggested that the time course of the dark area may be related to the development of PVD.

  13. Ultrastructural studies of time-course and cellular specificity of interleukin-1 mediated islet cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup-Poulsen, T; Egeberg, J; Nerup, J

    1987-01-01

    Previous electron-microscopic studies of isolated islets of Langerhans exposed to the monokine interleukin-1 for 7 days have indicated that interleukin-1 is cytotoxic to all islet cells. To study the time-course and possible cellular specificity of interleukin-1 cytotoxicity to islets exposed...... to interleukin-1 for short time periods, isolated rat or human islets were incubated with or without 25 U/ml highly purified human interleukin-1 for 24 h. Samples of rat islets were taken after 5 min, 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20 and 24 h and samples of human islets after 5 min, 30 min and 24 h...... of incubation and examined by electron microscopy in a blinded fashion. Already after 30 min, accumulation of opaque intracytoplasmic bodies without apparent surrounding membranes, and autophagic vacuoles were seen in about 20% of the beta cells examined in rat islets exposed to interleukin-1. After 16 h...

  14. When does pleasure start after the end of pain? The time course of relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreatta, Marta; Mühlberger, Andreas; Pauli, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Painful events are suggested to elicit two opponent responses: a negatively valenced and a positively valenced process triggered by their onset and termination, respectively. Consequently, stimuli (conditioned stimulus, CS) associated with pain onset (unconditioned stimulus, US) provoke defensive responses like startle potentiation, while stimuli associated with pain termination elicit appetitive responses like startle attenuation. Here we summarize four studies elucidating the time course of the relief following the termination of a painful US. In these studies, the timing of a relief-associated stimulus (reliefCS) presented after a painful US was varied from immediately (Study1), 3 seconds (Study4), or 6 seconds (Study2 and 3) after the US. Responses to these relief CSs were compared also with responses to a stimulus presented before the US (fearCS), and a third stimulus (safetyCS) that was never associated with the US. The synopsis of these studies reveals that the timing of the reliefCS is crucial to turn a defensive response into an appetitive response. Namely, the reliefCS immediately following the US-induced startle potentiation and negative valence (Study1); 3 seconds later, the startle response was slightly less potentiated and the ratings a little less negative (Study4); finally, the reliefCS presented 6 seconds after the US caused startle attenuation (Study2 and 3) and positively valenced ratings (Study3). In sum, the observed time course of relief closely follows the predictions of opponent process theory. This means that relief may be a reinforcer that elicits conditioned appetitive behavior, but its reinforcing properties strongly depend on its temporal relation to the aversive event.

  15. Time course of corticospinal excitability and intracortical inhibition just before muscle relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomotaka eSuzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, we investigated how short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI was involved with transient motor cortex excitability changes observed just before the transition from muscle contraction to muscle relaxation. Ten healthy participants performed a simultaneous relaxation task of the ipsilateral finger and foot, relaxing from 10% of their maximal voluntary contraction force after the go signal. In the simple reaction time paradigm, single or paired TMS pulses were randomly delivered after the go signal, and motor evoked potentials were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous muscle. We analyzed the time course prior to the estimated relaxation reaction time, defined here as the onset of voluntary relaxation. SICI decreased in the 80–100 ms before relaxation reaction time, and motor evoked potentials were significantly greater in amplitude in the 60–80 ms period before relaxation reaction time than in the other intervals in single-pulse trials. TMS pulses did not effectively increase relaxation reaction time. These results show that cortical excitability in the early stage, before muscle relaxation, plays an important role in muscle relaxation control. SICI circuits may vary between decreased and increased activation to continuously maintain muscle relaxation during or after a relaxation response. With regard to motor cortex excitability dynamics, we suggest that SICI also dynamically changes throughout the muscle relaxation process.

  16. Identification of driving network of cellular differentiation from single sample time course gene expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ye; Wolanyk, Nathaniel; Ilker, Tunc; Gao, Shouguo; Wang, Xujing

    Methods developed based on bifurcation theory have demonstrated their potential in driving network identification for complex human diseases, including the work by Chen, et al. Recently bifurcation theory has been successfully applied to model cellular differentiation. However, there one often faces a technical challenge in driving network prediction: time course cellular differentiation study often only contains one sample at each time point, while driving network prediction typically require multiple samples at each time point to infer the variation and interaction structures of candidate genes for the driving network. In this study, we investigate several methods to identify both the critical time point and the driving network through examination of how each time point affects the autocorrelation and phase locking. We apply these methods to a high-throughput sequencing (RNA-Seq) dataset of 42 subsets of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells at multiple time points during their differentiation (GSE48138 from GEO). We compare the predicted driving genes with known transcription regulators of cellular differentiation. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of our proposed methods, as well as potential further improvements of our methods.

  17. Twitch potentiation influences the time course of twitch depression in muscle relaxant studies : A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic explanation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, Douglas J.; Proost, Johannes H.; Wierda, J. Mark K. H.

    2006-01-01

    The time course of twitch depression following neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) administration is influenced by the duration of control neuromuscular monitoring (twitch stabilization). The physiological mechanism for this interaction is not known. During twitch stabilization twitch response often

  18. PAVA: Physiological and Anatomical Visual Analytics for Mapping of Tissue-Specific Concentration and Time-Course Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe the development and implementation of a Physiological and Anatomical Visual Analytics tool (PAVA), a web browser-based application, used to visualize experimental/simulated chemical time-course data (dosimetry), epidemiological data and Physiologically-Annotated Data ...

  19. CLINICAL-PHARMACOLOGY OF ROCURONIUM (ORG-9426) - STUDY OF THE TIME-COURSE OF ACTION, DOSE REQUIREMENT, REVERSIBILITY, AND PHARMACOKINETICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBROEK, L; WIERDA, JMKH; SMEULERS, NJ; VANSANTEN, GJ; LECLERCQ, MGL; HENNIS, PJ

    1994-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the time course of action, dose requirement, reversibility, and pharmacokinetics of rocuronium (Org 9426) under 3 anesthetic techniques (nitrous oxide-fentanyl supplemented with propofol halothane, or isoflurane). Design: Prospective, randomized study. Setting: Operating

  20. PAVA: Physiological and Anatomical Visual Analytics for Mapping of Tissue-Specific Concentration and Time-Course Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe the development and implementation of a Physiological and Anatomical Visual Analytics tool (PAVA), a web browser-based application, used to visualize experimental/simulated chemical time-course data (dosimetry), epidemiological data and Physiologically-Annotated Data ...

  1. Faculty teaching time: a comparison of web-based and face-to-face graduate nursing courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Katherine M; Avery, Melissa D

    2008-01-01

    Web-based education brings a new dimension to the issue of measuring faculty workload. Current literature reflects instructor concerns related to the time required to teach web-based courses (McAlpine, Lockerbie, Ramsay & Beaman 2002; Sellani & Harrington, 2002; Smith, Ferguson & Caris, 2001). This descriptive, comparative study seeks to determine the time required to teach web-based graduate nursing courses and compare that to teaching similar courses in the face-to-face setting. Utilizing time records previously collected as part of a federally funded grant, data from 11 web-based and five face-to-face graduate level nursing courses were analyzed. Although a statistically significant difference in teaching time requirements was not demonstrated, several interesting trends did appear. Examples include differences related to preparation time and the division of teacher time while teaching web-based as opposed to face-to-face courses. Future research and continued data collection related to faculty workload and time usage will be needed as web-based courses become a growing part of graduate nursing education.

  2. TIME DOMAIN ANALYSIS OF TRANSIENT PROPAGATION IN INHOMOGENEOUS MAGNETIZED PLASMA USING Z-TRANSFORMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Shoujiang; Li Fang

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic propagation through an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma slab is studied using the Z-transform formulation of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain(FDTD) method. The direction of electromagnetic propagation is parallel to the biasing magnetic filed. To validate the Z-transform algorithm, the reflection and transmission coefficients for the right-hand circularly polarized wave of the homogeneous magnetized plasma slab are computed by means of discrete Fourier transform. The comparison between the reflection and transmission coefficients of the homogeneous plasma slab and analytical values indicates that Z-transform algorithm is very accurate. When the plasma frequency varies according to the square root and parabolic relations, the reflection and transmission coefficients of the inhomogeneous magnetized plasma slab are computed.

  3. Deep brain stimulation effects in dystonia: time course of electrophysiological changes in early treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Diane; Tisch, Stephen; Hariz, Marwan I; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Bhatia, Kailash P; Quinn, Niall P; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Limousin, Patricia; Rothwell, John C

    2011-08-15

    Deep brain stimulation to the internal globus pallidus is an effective treatment for primary dystonia. The optimal clinical effect often occurs only weeks to months after starting stimulation. To better understand the underlying electrophysiological changes in this period, we assessed longitudinally 2 pathophysiological markers of dystonia in patients prior to and in the early treatment period (1, 3, 6 months) after deep brain stimulation surgery. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to track changes in short-latency intracortical inhibition, a measure of excitability of GABA(A) -ergic corticocortical connections and long-term potentiation-like synaptic plasticity (as a response to paired associative stimulation). Deep brain stimulation remained on for the duration of the study. Prior to surgery, inhibition was reduced and plasticity increased in patients compared with healthy controls. Following surgery and commencement of deep brain stimulation, short-latency intracortical inhibition increased toward normal levels over the following months with the same monotonic time course as the patients' clinical benefit. In contrast, synaptic plasticity changed rapidly, following a nonmonotonic time course: it was absent early (1 month) after surgery, and then over the following months increased toward levels observed in healthy individuals. We postulate that before surgery preexisting high levels of plasticity form strong memories of dystonic movement patterns. When deep brain stimulation is turned on, it disrupts abnormal basal ganglia signals, resulting in the absent response to paired associative stimulation at 1 month. Clinical benefit is delayed because engrams of abnormal movement persist and take time to normalize. Our observations suggest that plasticity may be a driver of long-term therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation in dystonia. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Gaussian process regression bootstrapping: exploring the effects of uncertainty in time course data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Paul D W; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2009-05-15

    Although widely accepted that high-throughput biological data are typically highly noisy, the effects that this uncertainty has upon the conclusions we draw from these data are often overlooked. However, in order to assign any degree of confidence to our conclusions, we must quantify these effects. Bootstrap resampling is one method by which this may be achieved. Here, we present a parametric bootstrapping approach for time-course data, in which Gaussian process regression (GPR) is used to fit a probabilistic model from which replicates may then be drawn. This approach implicitly allows the time dependence of the data to be taken into account, and is applicable to a wide range of problems. We apply GPR bootstrapping to two datasets from the literature. In the first example, we show how the approach may be used to investigate the effects of data uncertainty upon the estimation of parameters in an ordinary differential equations (ODE) model of a cell signalling pathway. Although we find that the parameter estimates inferred from the original dataset are relatively robust to data uncertainty, we also identify a distinct second set of estimates. In the second example, we use our method to show that the topology of networks constructed from time-course gene expression data appears to be sensitive to data uncertainty, although there may be individual edges in the network that are robust in light of present data. Matlab code for performing GPR bootstrapping is available from our web site: http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/theoreticalsystemsbiology/data-software/.

  5. Bacillus anthracis secretome time course under host-simulated conditions and identification of immunogenic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whittington Jessica

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secretion time course of Bacillus anthracis strain RA3R (pXO1+/pXO2- during early, mid, and late log phase were investigated under conditions that simulate those encountered in the host. All of the identified proteins were analyzed by different software algorithms to characterize their predicted mode of secretion and cellular localization. In addition, immunogenic proteins were identified using sera from humans with cutaneous anthrax. Results A total of 275 extracellular proteins were identified by a combination of LC MS/MS and MALDI-TOF MS. All of the identified proteins were analyzed by SignalP, SecretomeP, PSORT, LipoP, TMHMM, and PROSITE to characterize their predicted mode of secretion, cellular localization, and protein domains. Fifty-three proteins were predicted by SignalP to harbor the cleavable N-terminal signal peptides and were therefore secreted via the classical Sec pathway. Twenty-three proteins were predicted by SecretomeP for secretion by the alternative Sec pathway characterized by the lack of typical export signal. In contrast to SignalP and SecretomeP predictions, PSORT predicted 171 extracellular proteins, 7 cell wall-associated proteins, and 6 cytoplasmic proteins. Moreover, 51 proteins were predicted by LipoP to contain putative Sec signal peptides (38 have SpI sites, lipoprotein signal peptides (13 have SpII sites, and N-terminal membrane helices (9 have transmembrane helices. The TMHMM algorithm predicted 25 membrane-associated proteins with one to ten transmembrane helices. Immunogenic proteins were also identified using sera from patients who have recovered from anthrax. The charge variants (83 and 63 kDa of protective antigen (PA were the most immunodominant secreted antigens, followed by charge variants of enolase and transketolase. Conclusion This is the first description of the time course of protein secretion for the pathogen Bacillus anthracis. Time course studies of protein secretion and

  6. Limited Engagements? Women's and Men's Work/Volunteer Time in the Encore Life Course Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Phyllis; Flood, Sarah

    2013-05-01

    Americans are living healthier and longer lives, but the shifting age distribution is straining existing and projected social welfare protections for older adults (e.g., Social Security, Medicare). One solution is to delay retirement. Another is an alternative to "total leisure" retirement -- an "encore" stage of paid or unpaid engagement coming after career jobs but before infirmities associated with old age. We draw on gendered life-course themes together with data from the American Time Use Survey (2003-2009) to examine the real time American men and women ages 50-75 apportion to paid work and unpaid volunteer work on an average day, as well as factors predicting their time allocations. We find that while full-time employment declines after the 50s, many Americans allot time to more limited engagements - working part time, being self-employed, volunteering, helping out - through and even beyond their 60s. Caring for a child or infirm adult reduces the odds of paid work but not volunteering. While time working for pay declines with age (though more slowly for men than women), time volunteering does not. Older men and women in poor health, without a college degree, with a disability or SSI income are the least likely to be publicly engaged. This social patterning illustrates that while the ideal of an encore of paid or unpaid voluntary, flexible, and meaningful engagement is an emerging reality for some, it appears less attainable for others. This suggests the importance of organizational and public policy innovations offering all Americans a range of encore opportunities.

  7. Time course of pharmacokinetic and hormonal effects of inhaled high-dose salvinorin A in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew W; MacLean, Katherine A; Caspers, Michael J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Griffiths, Roland R

    2016-04-01

    Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the Salvia divinorum plant, which has been used for hallucinogenic effects. Previous research on salvinorin A pharmacokinetics likely underestimated plasma levels typically resulting from the doses administered due to inefficient vaporization and not collecting samples during peak drug effects. Six healthy adults inhaled a single high dose of vaporized salvinorin A (n = 4, 21 mcg/kg; n = 2, 18 mcg/kg). Participant- and monitor-rated effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min post-inhalation. Blood samples were collected at 13 time points up to 90 min post-inhalation. Drug levels peaked at 2 min and then rapidly decreased. Drug levels were significantly, positively correlated with participant and monitor drug effect ratings. Significant elevations in prolactin were observed beginning 5 min post-inhalation and peaking at 15 min post-inhalation. Cortisol showed inconsistent increases across participants. Hormonal responses were not well correlated with drug levels. This is the first study to demonstrate a direct relationship between changes in plasma levels of salvinorin A and drug effects in humans. The results confirm the efficacy of an inhalation technique for salvinorin A.

  8. Peptic digestion of beta-casein. Time course and fate of possible bioactive peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Christian E H; Schöps, Regina; Reynell, Lucy; Ulbrich-Hofmann, Renate; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Raith, Klaus

    2007-09-28

    Numerous peptides obtained by enzymatic digestion of food proteins have been reported to exhibit biological activities. In this study, the focus was placed on peptides of beta-casein from bovine milk after a gastro-analogous in vitro digestion with pepsin, a protease with broad specificity. In order to study the time course of the digestion, the process was stopped after specific times and the samples were subjected to HPLC separation followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) and nanoelectrospray (nanoESI) quadrupole time-of-flight (qTOF) mass spectrometry. A combined sequencing approach using de novo interpretation and databases was employed. Overall, 100% of the beta-casein sequence was covered by identifying 125 peptides of 4-84 residues in length, including 3 phosphorylated species. The results show that the peptic hydrolysis starts at the C-terminus of the protein. The release of known bioactive peptides from beta-casein following the peptic digestion under simulated gastric conditions is unlikely with a few exceptions. Furthermore, an amino acid variation was found, providing evidence for the existence of an additional genetic variant of beta-casein.

  9. The Magnitude and Time Course of Muscle Cross-section Decrease in Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Haaf, Dianne; Hemmen, Bea; van de Meent, Henk; BovendʼEerdt, Thamar J H

    2017-09-01

    Bedriddenness and immobilization of patients at an intensive care unit may result in muscle atrophy and devaluation in quality of life. The exact effect of immobilization on intensive care unit patients is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the magnitude and time course of muscle cross-section decrease in acute critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. An observational pilot study was performed in intensive care unit patients. Data of bilateral ultrasound muscle cross-section measurements of the knee extensors and the elbow flexors were collected. Thirty-four intensive care unit patients were included in this study; data are presented from 14 patients who were measured at least three times. Repeated measures analysis of variance shows a significant decrease in muscle cross-section over time (F1,13 = 80.40, P ≤ 0.001).The decrease in muscle cross-section of the arms was significantly higher (F1,13 = 5.38, P = 0.037) than the decrease of the legs. Four weeks after intensive care unit admission, the muscle cross-section decrease had not reached an asymptote yet. The muscle cross-section decrease in bedridden intensive care unit patients is significant for a time of 2 to 4 weeks. The decrease in muscle cross-section of the arms is greater than the decrease of the legs.

  10. Investigating the nature and time-course of the modality shift effect between vision and touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Eleanor; Brown, Richard; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2011-05-01

    It is well known that stimuli grab attention to their location, but do they also grab attention to their sensory modality? The modality shift effect (MSE), the observation that responding to a stimulus leads to reaction time benefits for subsequent stimuli in the same modality, suggests that this may be the case. If noninformative cue stimuli, which do not require a response, also lead to benefits for their modality, this would suggest that the effect is automatic. We investigated the time-course of the visuotactile MSE and the difference between the effects of cues and targets. In Experiment 1, when visual and tactile tasks and stimulus locations were matched, uninformative cues did not lead to reaction time benefits for targets in the same modality. However, the modality of the previous target led to a significant MSE. Only stimuli that require a response, therefore, appear to lead to reaction time benefits for their modality. In Experiment 2, increasing attention to the cue stimuli attenuated the effect of the previous target, but the cues still did not lead to a MSE. In Experiment 3, a MSE was demonstrated between successive targets, and this effect decreased with increasing intertrial intervals. Overall, these studies demonstrate how cue- and target-induced effects interact and suggest that modalities do not automatically capture attention as locations do; rather, the MSE is more similar to other task repetition effects.

  11. Time course and localization of brain activity in humor comprehension: An ERP/sLORETA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Midori; Terasawa, Yuri; Osumi, Takahiro; Masui, Keita; Ito, Yuichi; Sato, Arisa; Umeda, Satoshi

    2017-02-15

    Although a number of studies have investigated the incongruity-detection and resolution process in humor comprehension, it is difficult to functionally and anatomically dissociate these processes. We used event-related potentials (ERP) and standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography analysis (sLORETA) to examine the time course and localization of brain activity during incongruity detection and resolution. We used the same materials as in our previous fMRI study. Eighteen participants read funny and unfunny scenarios and judged whether the target sentence was funny or not. Results indicated that ERPs elicited by a funny punch line showed a P2 component followed by a P600 component over the centro-parietal electrode sites. Our sLORETA analysis of the P2 ERPs revealed a stronger activation for the funny vs. unfunny condition in the superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). For the P600 ERPs, the funny punch line elicited greater activation in the temporal-parietal regions. These results indicate that incongruity-detection processes activate the SFG and mPFC in the P2 time window, while incongruity-resolution processes generate activation at the temporal-parietal regions in the P600 time window. These results provide the evidence that verbal humor comprehension is processed in steps which start with the incongruity detection in the early P2 time window and followed by a P600 component reflecting incongruity resolution.

  12. Effects of diffusion impairment on O2 and CO2 time courses in pulmonary capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, P. D.; West, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Simultaneous time courses for O2 and CO2 exchange along the capillary have been calculated for homogeneous lungs, allowing for O2-CO2 interactions, dissolved O2, and chemical reaction rates. As diffusing capacity (Dl) was reduced, the transfer of CO2 and O2 was impaired by similar amounts, in spite of the 20-fold greater diffusing capacity for CO2. The reason why CO2 is affected so much is that the slope of the content against partial pressure is so much greater in blood than tissue for this gas. Because of the shapes of their respective dissociation curves, O2 transfer was most affected at normal ventilation-perfusion ratios, whereas CO2 was most affected at high ratios. Exercise exaggerated the impairment of transfer of both gases.

  13. Time course of subjective pain ratings, and wound and leg tenderness after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Erichsen, C J;

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little information is available on time course of wound tenderness and relationship to subjective pain ratings following surgery. Furthermore, it is not clarified whether surgical procedures may induce hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation outside the area of the surgical incision. We...... have therefore assessed postoperative pain and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) adjacent to and remote from the surgical incision in 16 patients undergoing hysterectomy. METHODS: Pressure pain threshold was assessed with pressure algometry preoperatively, 4 and 6 and 1, 4 and 8 d after surgery...... on the abdominal wall 0.05, 5, 10 and 15 cm perpendicular to the wound, and on the anterior surface of the left thigh and tuberositas tibia. Furthermore, pain was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS) at rest and during cough. RESULTS: PPT decreased significantly 0.5, 5, 10 and 15 cm from skin incision up...

  14. Strategic influence on the time course of predictive inferences in reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Manuel G; Castillo, M Dolores; Schmalhofer, Franz

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated how reading strategies affect the time course of online predictive inferences. Participants read sentences under instructions either to anticipate the outcomes of described events or to understand the sentences. These were followed by a target word to be named, with stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) of 500 or 1,000 msec (50- or 550-msec interstimulus interval, respectively). Sentences either were predictive of events or were lexically matched control sentences. There was facilitation in naming latencies for predictable target words in the strategic-anticipation condition at both SOAs, but not in the read-to-understand condition, with a significant improvement in the former condition in comparison with the latter. This suggests that predictive inferences, which are typically considered to be resource demanding, can be speeded up by specific goals in reading. Moreover, this can occur at no cost to comprehension of explicit information, as was revealed by a comprehension test.

  15. Time course and mechanisms of the anti-hypertensive and renal effects of liraglutide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Scholten, B J; Lajer, M; Goetze, J P

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist studies have revealed clinically significant reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP). The aim was to investigate the time course of the anti-hypertensive effect of liraglutide treatment and potential underlying mechanisms. METHODS: We used an open...... weeks of maximum dose. Reductions in ECV and MR-proANP may explain the anti-hypertensive potential. Liraglutide treatment was associated with reversible reductions in albuminuria and GFR, which has to be confirmed in randomized trials.......-four-h SBP increased by 10 mmHg on day 3 (P = 0.008) and 7 mmHg on day 7 (P = 0.033, 0.6 mg/day). On day 29, (1.8 mg/day), 24-h SBP was 7 mmHg lower compared with baseline (P = 0.11). Following the treatment period (day 49) and after washout (day 70), 24-h BP was equivalent to baseline. In addition...

  16. Time course of the antiproteinuric and antihypertensive effects of direct renin inhibition in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of renin with an active site inhibitor, aliskiren, lowers blood pressure (BP) in diabetic patients. Here, we studied the time course of the antihypertensive and antiproteinuric effect of renin inhibition in 15 patients with type 2 diabetes and elevated urinary albumin/creatinine ratios...... (UACRs) to check whether aliskiren can decrease proteinuria. After a 4-week washout of previous medications, patients received aliskiren and furosemide daily for 28 days followed by a 4-week withdrawal period. Twenty-four-hour BPs were measured at baseline throughout treatment and withdrawal periods....... The UACR was significantly reduced after 2-4 days of treatment with another significant reduction after 28 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly lower after 7 days with no further reduction after 28 days. The BP returned toward baseline 3 days after withdrawal, whereas the UACR was still...

  17. Time course of radiometric detection of positive blood cultures in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadow, W.L.; Schwartz, I.K.

    1986-05-01

    We have determined the time course of radiometric detection of microbial growth in 2348 positive blood culture specimens obtained at Wyler Children's Hospital during a 5-year interval. Overall 72 and 88% of isolates were detected within 48 and 72 hours after sampling, respectively. For pathogenic organisms aerobic detection was generally more rapid and more inclusive than anaerobic detection. At 48 hours of incubation the detection of six potential pathogens (Salmonella sp., Haemophilus influenzae, Group D streptococci, Neisseria meningitidis, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Candida sp.) was significantly delayed compared with detection of other pathogenic organisms recovered from blood. At 72 hours of incubation the detection rates remained less than 95% for H. influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella sp., coagulase-negative staphylococci, Group D streptococci and Candida sp. These data should assist clinical decisions regarding duration of antibiotic therapy for the presumptive diagnosis of bacteremia in children.

  18. Ultrastructural studies of time-course and cellular specificity of interleukin-1 mediated islet cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup-Poulsen, T; Egeberg, J; Nerup, J

    1987-01-01

    of incubation and examined by electron microscopy in a blinded fashion. Already after 30 min, accumulation of opaque intracytoplasmic bodies without apparent surrounding membranes, and autophagic vacuoles were seen in about 20% of the beta cells examined in rat islets exposed to interleukin-1. After 16 h......Previous electron-microscopic studies of isolated islets of Langerhans exposed to the monokine interleukin-1 for 7 days have indicated that interleukin-1 is cytotoxic to all islet cells. To study the time-course and possible cellular specificity of interleukin-1 cytotoxicity to islets exposed...... of incubation with interleukin-1, more than 80% of rat beta cells showed signs of degeneration. Beta cell specific changes similar to those observed in rat islets exposed to IL-1 for 30 min were seen in human islets exposed to IL-1 for 24 h. The described changes were not observed in alpha cells in interleukin...

  19. Just-in-Time Teaching in undergraduate physics courses: Implementation, learning, and perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Jessica Hewitt

    Regardless of discipline, a decades-long battle has ensued within nearly every classroom in higher education: instructors getting students to come to class prepared to learn. In response to this clash between teacher expectations and frequent student neglect, a group of four physics education researchers developed a reformed instructional strategy called Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT). This dissertation investigates the following three areas: 1) the fidelity with which undergraduate physics instructors implement JiTT, 2) whether student performance predicts student perception of their instructor's fidelity of JiTT implementation, and 3) whether student perception of their instructor's fidelity of JiTT implementation correlates with student views of their physics course. A blend of quantitative data (e.g., students grades, inventory scores, and questionnaire responses) are integrated with qualitative data (e.g., individual faculty interviews, student focus group discussions, and classroom observations). This study revealed no statistically significant relationship between instructors who spent time on a predefined JiTT critical component and their designation as a JiTT user or non-user. While JiTT users implemented the pedagogy in accordance with the creators' intended ideal vision, many also had trouble reconciling personal concerns about their role as a JiTT adopter and the anticipated demand of the innovation. I recommend that this population of faculty members can serve as a JiTT model for other courses, disciplines, and/or institutions. Student performance was not a predictor of student perception instructor fidelity of JiTT implementation. Additionally, the majority of students in this study reported they read their textbook prior to class and that JiTT assignments helped them prepare for in-class learning. I found evidence that exposure to the JiTT strategy may correlate with a more favorable student view of their physics course. Finally, according to students

  20. Real-time DSP-based shape determination and plasma position control in the ISTTOK tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, B. E-mail: bernardo@cfn.ist.utl.pt; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Borba, D.; Varandas, C.A.F

    2004-06-01

    We have developed a digital signal processor-based system for real-time control of the ISTTOK plasma position based on a low-cost digital signal processor (DSP) board. A novel plasma shape reproduction method was developed using a Cauchy-condition expansion applied to the vacuum region around the plasma. This method showed to be best suited than classic methods such as Legendre-Fourier expansion (LFE) or current filaments (CF), particularly in small tokamaks with passive stabilizer conductors where the presence of strong eddy currents can cause significant errors in magnetic field sensors. We compare the results of the boundary reconstruction method with the measurements from a microwave interferometer diagnostic. We present an implementation in the DSP system that allows the real time control of the plasma position with a required 1 ms period.

  1. Time course based artifact identification for independent components of resting state fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eRummel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI coherent oscillations of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal can be detected. These arise when brain regions respond to external stimuli or are activated by tasks. The same networks have been characterized during wakeful rest when functional connectivity of the human brain is organized in generic resting state networks (RSN. Alterations of RSN emerge as neurobiological markers of pathological conditions such as altered mental state. In single-subject fMRI data the coherent components can be identified by blind source separation of the pre-processed BOLD data using spatial independent component analysis (ICA and related approaches. The resulting maps may represent physiological RSNs or may be due to various artifacts. In this methodological study, we propose a conceptually simple and fully automatic time course based filtering procedure to detect obvious artifacts in the ICA output for resting state fMRI. The filter is trained on six and tested on 29 healthy subjects, yielding mean filter accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of 0.80, 0.82 and 0.75 in out-of-sample tests. To estimate the impact of clearly artifactual single-subject components on group resting state studies we analyze unfiltered and filtered output with a second level ICA procedure. Although the automated filter does not reach performance values of visual analysis by human raters, we propose that resting state compatible analysis of ICA time courses could be very useful to complement the existing map or task/event oriented artifact classification algorithms.

  2. Validity and Reliability Study for Studio Work Course Time Management Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnci BULUT KILIÇ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a data collection tool to be used in determining the time management skill levels of visual arts teacher candidates in their studio work courses. After a review of the literature, a pool of items was created and arranged upon expert recommendation and a pilot study for intelligibility of the expressions was conducted. The researcher contacted a total of 288 visual arts teacher candidates who all agreed to volunteer to take part in this research. As a result of exploratory (EFA and confirmatory (CFA factor analyses, the scale determined to have four factors and 26 items. Variance ration explained by all four factors is 47.23%. Factor loadings were valued from 0.48 to 0.80. Goodness of fit values calculated by CFA were found to be χ2/sd rate 1.94 (χ2/sd=567.17/291. The other goodness of fit values calculated by CFA were RMSEA=0.05, NNFI=0.92, CFI=0.93, IFI=0.93, and RMR=0.06. All fitness indexes obtained were found to be sufficient for model fitness, and accordingly it was decided that this structure was validated. As a result of the difference between item average scores of the 27% subgroup and super group, distinctiveness of all items were found to be significant at p<0.001 level and Cronbach’s Alpha coefficients of the factors were calculated to range from 0.73 to 0.82. Cronbach’s Alpha of the total scale was calculated as 0.83. The results indicate that the questionnaire provides opportunity to make meaningful interpretations on the time management skills of visual arts teacher candidates for studio work courses.

  3. Causes and time-course of vertigo in an ear, nose, and throat clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaradisaikul, Suwicha; Navacharoen, Niramon; Hanprasertpong, Charuk; Kangsanarak, Jaran; Panyathong, Rapeepun

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to review etiologies and identify the time-course of vertigo presenting in an ear, nose, and throat clinic, and serve as a reference guide for other clinics. The study includes retrospective chart review in a tertiary care, university hospital. The patient data with reported ICD-10 codes as causes of vertigo between April 2005 and December 2007 were extracted from the database. At each visit, the main diagnosis as to etiology, characteristics of the vertigo, its time-course, and patient demographic data were recorded. Of 547 cases, 17 diagnoses were made in 73.9%. Diagnostic categories included peripheral vertigo 72.9%, central vertigo 0.8%, psychogenic cause 0.2%, and unknown 26.1%. Common causes of vertigo were benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) 52.5%, Meniere's disease 14.6%, and sudden idiopathic hearing loss 2.9%. Less common diagnoses were benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood 0.7%, labyrinthitis 0.7%, and vestibular schwannoma 0.3%. Rare conditions were delayed endolymphatic hydrops, Ramsey Hunt syndrome, otosyphilis, vestibular neuritis, temporal bone fracture, post-concussion syndrome, cerebellar infarction, epilepsy, cervical vertigo, Streptococcus suis meningitis, and psychogenic vertigo. Ninety-nine cases who reported remission of vertigo during the study period had median onset of the remission at 4 weeks. In the ear, nose, and throat clinic at Chiang Mai University, a tertiary university hospital, peripheral vestibular disorders were the main etiology of vertigo. The three most common causes were BPPV, Meniere's disease, and sudden idiopathic hearing loss. Half of the cases who returned for follow up had remitted symptoms within 4 weeks.

  4. Taenia saginata taeniosis: copro-antigen time-course in a voluntary self-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembo, A; Craig, P S

    2015-09-01

    Human taeniosis due to Taenia saginata is cosmopolitan where beef is consumed; however, there is little or no information on the symptomatology over the early time-course of human infection. Copro-antigen detection is very useful in community screening for human taeniosis, particularly for T. solium, but there are no data on copro-antigen detection in pre-patent infection. In order to provide insight into this, a voluntary self-infection with T. saginata was undertaken and monitored over a 6-month period using a copro-antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that we developed using anti-T. saginata antibody based reagents. Tapeworm patency, defined as first proglottid appearance, occurred on day 86 post-infection (pi) and was followed by almost daily release of proglottids (range 1-8) until termination using praziquantel on day 180 pi. The first 10 weeks post-infection (wpi) were essentially asymptomatic, followed by main symptoms of involuntary proglottid discharge throughout the infection period, and abdominal discomfort peaking around 15-19 wpi. Copro-antigens could not be reliably detected until 2 weeks before proglottid patency but then remained highly elevated over the next 15 weeks until treatment. Copro-antigen levels reverted to negative 4 days post-treatment. This time-course study suggests that although copro-antigen ELISA is an excellent diagnostic tool for established patent infections of T. saginata, it may not be reliable for faecal antigen detection in the early infection phase prior to proglottid release for T. saginata and other human taenioses.

  5. [The influence of modern plasma substitutes on the course of abdominal compartment syndrome in patients with abdominal sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursov, S V

    2013-01-01

    The changes of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) were followed up in 244 patients with abdominal sepsis after operation. The influence of liquid "resuscitation" with different types of plasma substitutes on the rates of IAP was studied and the dependence of changes IAP from filling of vascular bed was investigated. The impedance technique was used to determine the circulating blood volume and its percentage from proper index was estimated according to the sex, age and constitution. The percentage of interstitial liquid in organism was calculated by analogy. The severity of manifestations of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) increases with the assessment of severity of the general condition to APACHE-II scale. The most severe ACS course was while using the crystalloid solutions in the complex of infusion therapy. The inclusion of colloids in the infusion therapy facilitated more full volume filling of vascular bed with the liquid, reduced the capillary leakage, accelerated the process of reduction of ACS. The advantage was shown by using the derivatives of hydroxyethylstarch, which promoted the elimination of deficiency of intravascular liquid in the best way.

  6. Space-Time Localization of Plasma Turbulence Using Multiple Spacecraft Radio Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, John W.; Estabrook, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Space weather is described as the variability of solar wind plasma that can disturb satellites and systems and affect human space exploration. Accurate prediction requires information of the heliosphere inside the orbit of the Earth. However, for predictions using remote sensing, one needs not only plane-of-sky position but also range information the third spatial dimension to show the distance to the plasma disturbances and thus when they might propagate or co-rotate to create disturbances at the orbit of the Earth. Appropriately processed radio signals from spacecraft having communications lines-of-sight passing through the inner heliosphere can be used for this spacetime localization of plasma disturbances. The solar plasma has an electron density- and radio-wavelength-dependent index of refraction. An approximately monochromatic wave propagating through a thin layer of plasma turbulence causes a geometrical-optics phase shift proportional to the electron density at the point of passage, the radio wavelength, and the thickness of the layer. This phase shift is the same for a wave propagating either up or down through the layer at the point of passage. This attribute can be used for space-time localization of plasma irregularities. The transfer function of plasma irregularities to the observed time series depends on the Doppler tracking mode. When spacecraft observations are in the two-way mode (downlink radio signal phase-locked to an uplink radio transmission), plasma fluctuations have a two-pulse response in the Doppler. In the two-way mode, the Doppler time series y2(t) is the difference between the frequency of the downlink signal received and the frequency of a ground reference oscillator. A plasma blob localized at a distance x along the line of sight perturbs the phase on both the up and down link, giving rise to two events in the two-way tracking time series separated by a time lag depending the blob s distance from the Earth: T2-2x/c, where T2 is the

  7. Digital Holography for in Situ Real-Time Measurement of Plasma-Facing-Component Erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ThomasJr., C. E. [Third Dimension Technologies, LLC, Knoxville, TN; Granstedt, E. M. [Tri-Alpha Energy; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

    2014-01-01

    In situ, real time measurement of net plasma-facing-component (PFC) erosion/deposition in a real plasma device is challenging due to the need for good spatial and temporal resolution, sufficient sensitivity, and immunity to fringe-jump errors. Design of a high-sensitivity, potentially high-speed, dual-wavelength CO2 laser digital holography system (nominally immune to fringe jumps) for PFC erosion measurement is discussed.

  8. A real-time algorithm for the harmonic estimation and frequency tracking of dominant components in fusion plasma magnetic diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, D.; Coelho, R.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-08-01

    The real-time tracking of instantaneous quantities such as frequency, amplitude, and phase of components immerse in noisy signals has been a common problem in many scientific and engineering fields such as power systems and delivery, telecommunications, and acoustics for the past decades. In magnetically confined fusion research, extracting this sort of information from magnetic signals can be of valuable assistance in, for instance, feedback control of detrimental magnetohydrodynamic modes and disruption avoidance mechanisms by monitoring instability growth or anticipating mode-locking events. This work is focused on nonlinear Kalman filter based methods for tackling this problem. Similar methods have already proven their merits and have been successfully employed in this scientific domain in applications such as amplitude demodulation for the motional Stark effect diagnostic. In the course of this work, three approaches are described, compared, and discussed using magnetic signals from the Joint European Torus tokamak plasma discharges for benchmarking purposes.

  9. A Growth Curve Model with Fractional Polynomials for Analysing Incomplete Time-Course Data in Microarray Gene Expression Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihua Tan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the various gene expression response patterns is a challenging issue in expression microarray time-course experiments. Due to heterogeneity in the regulatory reaction among thousands of genes tested, it is impossible to manually characterize a parametric form for each of the time-course pattern in a gene by gene manner. We introduce a growth curve model with fractional polynomials to automatically capture the various time-dependent expression patterns and meanwhile efficiently handle missing values due to incomplete observations. For each gene, our procedure compares the performances among fractional polynomial models with power terms from a set of fixed values that offer a wide range of curve shapes and suggests a best fitting model. After a limited simulation study, the model has been applied to our human in vivo irritated epidermis data with missing observations to investigate time-dependent transcriptional responses to a chemical irritant. Our method was able to identify the various nonlinear time-course expression trajectories. The integration of growth curves with fractional polynomials provides a flexible way to model different time-course patterns together with model selection and significant gene identification strategies that can be applied in microarray-based time-course gene expression experiments with missing observations.

  10. Breathing for answering: the time course of response planning in conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreira, Francisco; Bögels, Sara; Levinson, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the timing of pre-answer inbreaths in order to shed light on the time course of response planning and execution in conversational turn-taking. Using acoustic and inductive plethysmography recordings of seven dyadic conversations in Dutch, we show that pre-answer inbreaths in conversation typically begin briefly after the end of questions. We also show that the presence of a pre-answer inbreath usually co-occurs with substantially delayed answers, with a modal latency of 576 vs. 100 ms for answers not preceded by an inbreath. Based on previously reported minimal latencies for internal intercostal activation and the production of speech sounds, we propose that vocal responses, either in the form of a pre-utterance inbreath or of speech proper when an inbreath is not produced, are typically launched in reaction to information present in the last portion of the interlocutor's turn. We also show that short responses are usually made on residual breath, while longer responses are more often preceded by an inbreath. This relation of inbreaths to answer length suggests that by the time an inbreath is launched, typically during the last few hundred milliseconds of the question, the length of the answer is often prepared to some extent. Together, our findings are consistent with a two-stage model of response planning in conversational turn-taking: early planning of content often carried out in overlap with the incoming turn, and late launching of articulation based on the identification of turn-final cues.

  11. The time-course and spatial distribution of brain activity associated with sentence processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jonathan; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2012-04-01

    Sentence comprehension involves a host of highly interrelated processes, including syntactic parsing, semantic composition, and pragmatic inferencing. In neuroimaging, a primary paradigm for examining the brain bases of sentence processing has been to compare brain activity elicited by sentences versus unstructured lists of words. These studies commonly find an effect of increased activity for sentences in the anterior temporal lobes (aTL). Together with neuropsychological data, these findings have motivated the hypothesis that the aTL is engaged in sentence level combinatorics. Combinatoric processing during language comprehension, however, occurs within tens and hundreds of milliseconds, i.e., at a time-scale much faster than the temporal resolution of hemodynamic measures. Here, we examined the time-course of sentence-level processing using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to better understand the temporal profile of activation in this common paradigm and to test a key prediction of the combinatoric hypothesis: because sentences are interpreted incrementally, word-by-word, activity associated with basic linguistic combinatorics should be time-locked to word-presentation. Our results reveal increased anterior temporal activity for sentences compared to word lists beginning approximately 250 ms after word onset. We also observed increased activation in a network of other brain areas, extending across posterior temporal, inferior frontal, and ventral medial areas. These findings confirm a key prediction of the combinatoric hypothesis for the aTL and further elucidate the spatio-temporal characteristics of sentence-level computations in the brain.

  12. Time Course of Corticospinal Excitability and Intracortical Inhibition Just before Muscle Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomotaka; Sugawara, Kenichi; Ogahara, Kakuya; Higashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we investigated how short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was involved with transient motor cortex (M1) excitability changes observed just before the transition from muscle contraction to muscle relaxation. Ten healthy participants performed a simultaneous relaxation task of the ipsilateral finger and foot, relaxing from 10% of their maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force after the go signal. In the simple reaction time (RT) paradigm, single or paired TMS pulses were randomly delivered after the go signal, and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. We analyzed the time course prior to the estimated relaxation reaction time (RRT), defined here as the onset of voluntary relaxation. SICI decreased in the 80-100 ms before RRT, and MEPs were significantly greater in amplitude in the 60-80 ms period before RRT than in the other intervals in single-pulse trials. TMS pulses did not effectively increase RRT. These results show that cortical excitability in the early stage, before muscle relaxation, plays an important role in muscle relaxation control. SICI circuits may vary between decreased and increased activation to continuously maintain muscle relaxation during or after a relaxation response. With regard to M1 excitability dynamics, we suggest that SICI also dynamically changes throughout the muscle relaxation process.

  13. Time on my side? Life course trajectories of poverty and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Peggy; Sacker, Amanda; Wiggins, Richard D

    2005-10-01

    This study examines the relationship between poverty and health in time. Following the argument that time is significant for shaping the experience of being poor or not poor and growing evidence of heterogeneity in long-term patterns of poverty, we investigate whether different kinds of poverty have distinct consequences for long-term health. Using data from the 1968-1996 annual waves of the United States Panel Study of Income Dynamics Data, we estimate a general growth mixture model to assess the relationship between the longitudinal courses of poverty and health. The model allows us to first estimate latent poverty classes in the data and then determine their effects on latent self-rated health. Four types of long-term poverty patterns characterized as stable nonpoor, exiting poverty, entering poverty and stable poor were evident in the data. These different kinds of poverty affected self-rated health trajectories in distinct ways, but worked in concert with age, education and race to create gaps in initial health status that were constant over time.

  14. Time Course of Corticospinal Excitability and Intracortical Inhibition Just before Muscle Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomotaka; Sugawara, Kenichi; Ogahara, Kakuya; Higashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we investigated how short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was involved with transient motor cortex (M1) excitability changes observed just before the transition from muscle contraction to muscle relaxation. Ten healthy participants performed a simultaneous relaxation task of the ipsilateral finger and foot, relaxing from 10% of their maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force after the go signal. In the simple reaction time (RT) paradigm, single or paired TMS pulses were randomly delivered after the go signal, and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. We analyzed the time course prior to the estimated relaxation reaction time (RRT), defined here as the onset of voluntary relaxation. SICI decreased in the 80–100 ms before RRT, and MEPs were significantly greater in amplitude in the 60–80 ms period before RRT than in the other intervals in single-pulse trials. TMS pulses did not effectively increase RRT. These results show that cortical excitability in the early stage, before muscle relaxation, plays an important role in muscle relaxation control. SICI circuits may vary between decreased and increased activation to continuously maintain muscle relaxation during or after a relaxation response. With regard to M1 excitability dynamics, we suggest that SICI also dynamically changes throughout the muscle relaxation process. PMID:26858619

  15. The Onset and Time Course of Semantic Priming During Rapid Recognition of Visual Words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoedemaker, Renske S; Gordon, Peter C

    2017-02-23

    In 2 experiments, we assessed the effects of response latency and task-induced goals on the onset and time course of semantic priming during rapid processing of visual words as revealed by ocular response tasks. In Experiment 1 (ocular lexical decision task), participants performed a lexical decision task using eye movement responses on a sequence of 4 words. In Experiment 2, the same words were encoded for an episodic recognition memory task that did not require a metalinguistic judgment. For both tasks, survival analyses showed that the earliest observable effect (divergence point [DP]) of semantic priming on target-word reading times occurred at approximately 260 ms, and ex-Gaussian distribution fits revealed that the magnitude of the priming effect increased as a function of response time. Together, these distributional effects of semantic priming suggest that the influence of the prime increases when target processing is more effortful. This effect does not require that the task include a metalinguistic judgment; manipulation of the task goals across experiments affected the overall response speed but not the location of the DP or the overall distributional pattern of the priming effect. These results are more readily explained as the result of a retrospective, rather than a prospective, priming mechanism and are consistent with compound-cue models of semantic priming. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Solution of time-dependent Boltzmann equation for electrons in non-thermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trunec, D; Bonaventura, Z; Necas, D [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2006-06-21

    The time development of the electron distribution function and electron macroscopic parameters was studied by solving the time-dependent Boltzmann equation for low temperature plasma. A new technique for solving the time-dependent Boltzmann equation was developed. This technique is based on a multi-term approximation of the electron distribution function expansion in Legendre polynomials. The results for electron relaxation in Reid's ramp model and argon plasma are presented. The effect of negative mobility was studied and is discussed for argon plasma. Finally, the time-dependent Boltzmann equation was solved for pulsed microwave discharge in nitrogen. The accuracy of all results was confirmed by the Monte Carlo simulation.

  17. Relationship Between Ebola Virus Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction-Based Threshold Cycle Value and Virus Isolation From Human Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Jessica R; McElroy, Anita K; Harmon, Jessica R; Ströher, Ute; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2015-10-01

    We performed a longitudinal analysis of plasma samples obtained from 4 patients with Ebola virus (EBOV) disease (EVD) to determine the relationship between the real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR)-based threshold cycle (Ct) value and the presence of infectious EBOV. EBOV was not isolated from plasma samples with a Ct value of >35.5 or >12 days after onset of symptoms. EBOV was not isolated from plasma samples in which anti-EBOV nucleoprotein immunoglobulin G was detected. These data demonstrate the utility of interpreting qRT-PCR results in the context of the course of EBOV infection and associated serological responses for patient-management decisions. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Statistical inference of transcriptional module-based gene networks from time course gene expression profiles by using state space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Osamu; Yoshida, Ryo; Imoto, Seiya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Print, Cristin; Miyano, Satoru

    2008-04-01

    Statistical inference of gene networks by using time-course microarray gene expression profiles is an essential step towards understanding the temporal structure of gene regulatory mechanisms. Unfortunately, most of the current studies have been limited to analysing a small number of genes because the length of time-course gene expression profiles is fairly short. One promising approach to overcome such a limitation is to infer gene networks by exploring the potential transcriptional modules which are sets of genes sharing a common function or involved in the same pathway. In this article, we present a novel approach based on the state space model to identify the transcriptional modules and module-based gene networks simultaneously. The state space model has the potential to infer large-scale gene networks, e.g. of order 10(3), from time-course gene expression profiles. Particularly, we succeeded in the identification of a cell cycle system by using the gene expression profiles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which the length of the time-course and number of genes were 24 and 4382, respectively. However, when analysing shorter time-course data, e.g. of length 10 or less, the parameter estimations of the state space model often fail due to overfitting. To extend the applicability of the state space model, we provide an approach to use the technical replicates of gene expression profiles, which are often measured in duplicate or triplicate. The use of technical replicates is important for achieving highly-efficient inferences of gene networks with short time-course data. The potential of the proposed method has been demonstrated through the time-course analysis of the gene expression profiles of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) undergoing growth factor deprivation-induced apoptosis. Supplementary Information and the software (TRANS-MNET) are available at http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/~yoshidar/software/ssm/.

  19. Time resolved measurements of the CF{sub 2} rotational temperature in pulsed fluorocarbon rf plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, O; Stepanov, S; Pfafferott, M; Meichsner, J [Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Domstrasse 10a, D-17498, Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-11-01

    Knowledge of the absolute densities of small radicals like CF, CF{sub 2} and CF{sub 3} in fluorocarbon plasmas is essential for a fundamental understanding of plasma chemical processes and plasma surface interaction. Infrared absorption spectroscopy by means of tunable diode lasers (IR-TDLAS) was established and widely used for density measurements in the last decade. The often unknown parameter in the calculation of absolute radical densities from a measured absorption of a single line is the rotational temperature. In particular, a strong dependence of the line strength on rotational temperature has a significant influence on density calculation. In this paper we report on measurements of the CF{sub 2} rotational temperature in capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasmas (CCP) with rf (13.56 MHz) powers up to 200 W. Rotational temperatures in continuous and pulsed modes of the discharge were found to be between 300 and 450 K. Furthermore, first measurements of the time dependence of the rotational temperature in pulsed rf plasma are presented. The rotational temperature rises in the plasma phase within 0.1 s and goes down again to the temperature of the background gas in the plasma pause within 0.5 s. It is also shown that accurate density measurements of the radicals by means of single line absorption need correct information about the rotational temperature and careful selection of a suitable absorption line.

  20. Identifying significant temporal variation in time course microarray data without replicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Weston

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important component of time course microarray studies is the identification of genes that demonstrate significant time-dependent variation in their expression levels. Until recently, available methods for performing such significance tests required replicates of individual time points. This paper describes a replicate-free method that was developed as part of a study of the estrous cycle in the rat mammary gland in which no replicate data was collected. Results A temporal test statistic is proposed that is based on the degree to which data are smoothed when fit by a spline function. An algorithm is presented that uses this test statistic together with a false discovery rate method to identify genes whose expression profiles exhibit significant temporal variation. The algorithm is tested on simulated data, and is compared with another recently published replicate-free method. The simulated data consists both of genes with known temporal dependencies, and genes from a null distribution. The proposed algorithm identifies a larger percentage of the time-dependent genes for a given false discovery rate. Use of the algorithm in a study of the estrous cycle in the rat mammary gland resulted in the identification of genes exhibiting distinct circadian variation. These results were confirmed in follow-up laboratory experiments. Conclusion The proposed algorithm provides a new approach for identifying expression profiles with significant temporal variation without relying on replicates. When compared with a recently published algorithm on simulated data, the proposed algorithm appears to identify a larger percentage of time-dependent genes for a given false discovery rate. The development of the algorithm was instrumental in revealing the presence of circadian variation in the virgin rat mammary gland during the estrous cycle.

  1. Time course of strength adaptations following high-intensity resistance training in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, A; Dvir, Z; Dragone, D; Mureddu, G; Bua, G; Deriu, Franca

    2017-04-01

    No evidence exists regarding the time course and clinical relevance of muscle strength improvements following resistance training in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal course and the clinical meaningfulness of the changes in strength induced by high-intensity resistance training and whether these changes impact on muscle endurance to fatigue and functional outcomes. PwMS with predominantly unilateral hyposthenia of the ankle dorsiflexors underwent a 6-week isokinetic training of the more affected ankle dorsiflexion muscles. Maximal strength was measured at baseline, during the training on a weekly basis, at the end of the intervention (POST) and at the 12-week follow-up. Muscle endurance to fatigue, mobility and walking outcomes were assessed at baseline, POST and follow-up. Reproducibility and responsiveness analyses were performed. Significant gains in muscle strength were already detected after 3 weeks of training with no further improvements in the following weeks. These improvements exceeded the cutoff values for relevant changes and were also positively correlated to improved muscle endurance to fatigue and mobility measures. None of the observed changes in muscle performance and functional outcomes was retained at the follow-up. Preliminary evidence showed that 3 weeks of high-intensity resistance training induces consistent and meaningful improvements in muscle performance of the ankle dorsiflexors in PwMS. These findings may have practical dose-response and cost-effectiveness implications in the management of MS-induced muscle weakness, potentially enhancing the understanding of the response to training exhibited by PwMS. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02010398; December 2013.

  2. Investigations on the time evolution of the plasma density in argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyan, BAI; Chen, CHEN; Hong, LI; Wandong, LIU

    2017-03-01

    The time evolution of the argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure and low electron beam intensity was presented. By applying the amplitude modulation with the frequency of 20 Hz on the stable beam current, the plasma evolution was studied. A Faraday cup was used for the measurement of the electron beam current and a single electrostatic probe was used for the measurement of the ion current. Experimental results indicated that the ion current was in phase with the electron beam current in the pressure range from 200 Pa to 3000 Pa and in the beam current range lower than 20 mA, the residual density increased approximately linearly with the maximum density in the log-log plot and the fitting coefficient was irrelative to the pressure. And then three kinds of kinetic models were developed and the simulated results given by the kinetic model, without the consideration of the excited atoms, mostly approached to the experimental results. This indicated that the effect of the excited atoms on the plasma density can be ignored at intermediate pressure and low electron beam current intensity, which can greatly simplify the kinetic model. In the end, the decrease of the plasma density when the beam current was suddenly off was studied based on the simplified model and it was found that the decease characteristic at intermediate pressure was approximate to the one at high pressure at low electron beam intensity, which was in good accordance with the experimental results. Supported by National Natural Science Foundations of China (No. 11375187) and the Foundation of State key Laboratory of China (No. SKLIPR1510).

  3. Time-resolved characterization of laser-induced plasma from fresh potatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wenqi; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Boueri, Myriam; Ma, Qianli; Zhang, Dacheng; Zheng, Lijuan; Zeng, Heping; Yu, Jin

    2009-09-01

    Optical emission of laser-induced plasma on the surface of fresh vegetables provides sensitive analysis of trace elements for in situ or online detection of these materials. This emergent technique promises applications with expected outcomes in food security or nutrition quality, as well as environment pollution detection. Characterization of the plasma induced on such soft and humid materials represents the first step towards quantitative measurement using this technique. In this paper, we present the experimental setup and protocol that optimize the plasma generation on fresh vegetables, potatoes for instance. The temporal evolution of the plasma properties are investigated using time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In particular, the electron density and the temperatures of the plasma are reported as functions of its decay time. The temperatures are evaluated from the well known Boltzmann and Saha-Boltzmann plot methods. These temperatures are further compared to that of the typical molecular species, CN, for laser-induced plasma from plant materials. This comparison validates the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in the specific case of fresh vegetables ablated in the typical LIBS conditions. A study of the temporal evolution of the signal to noise ratio also provides practical indications for an optimized detection of trace elements. We demonstrate finally that, under certain conditions, the calibration-free LIBS procedure can be applied to determine the concentrations of trace elements in fresh vegetables.

  4. A time course of orchestrated endophilin action in sensing, bending, and stabilizing curved membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Kumud R.; Dong, Yongming; Yu, Hang; Su, Allen; Ho, Thuong; Liu, Yan; Schulten, Klaus; Bai, Jihong

    2016-01-01

    Numerous proteins act in concert to sculpt membrane compartments for cell signaling and metabolism. These proteins may act as curvature sensors, membrane benders, and scaffolding molecules. Here we show that endophilin, a critical protein for rapid endocytosis, quickly transforms from a curvature sensor into an active bender upon membrane association. We find that local membrane deformation does not occur until endophilin inserts its amphipathic helices into lipid bilayers, supporting an active bending mechanism through wedging. Our time-course studies show that endophilin continues to drive membrane changes on a seconds-to-minutes time scale, indicating that the duration of endocytosis events constrains the mode of endophilin action. Finally, we find a requirement of coordinated activities between wedging and scaffolding for endophilin to produce stable membrane tubules in vitro and to promote synaptic activity in vivo. Together these data demonstrate that endophilin is a multifaceted molecule that precisely integrates activities of sensing, bending, and stabilizing curvature to sculpt membranes with speed. PMID:27170174

  5. Time course of human motoneuron recovery after sustained low-level voluntary activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroux, Martin E; Butler, Annie A; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L; Butler, Jane E

    2016-02-01

    Motoneurons often fire repetitively and for long periods. In sustained voluntary contractions the excitability of motoneurons declines. We provide the first detailed description of the time course of human motoneuron recovery after sustained activity at a constant discharge rate. We recorded the discharge of single motor units (MUs, n = 30) with intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in triceps brachii during weak isometric contractions. Subjects (n = 15) discharged single MUs at a constant frequency (∼10 Hz) with visual feedback for prolonged durations (3-7 min) until rectified surface electromyogram (sEMG) of triceps brachii increased by ∼100%. After a rest of 1-2, 15, 30, 60, 120, or 240 s, subjects briefly resumed the contraction with the target MU at the same discharge rate. Each MU was tested with three to four rest periods. The magnitude of sEMG was increased when contractions were resumed, and the target motoneuron discharged at the test frequency following rest intervals of 2-60 s (P = 0.001-0.038). The increased sEMG indicates that greater excitatory drive was needed to discharge the motoneuron at the test rate. The increase in EMG recovered exponentially with a time constant of 28 s but did not return to baseline even after a rest period of ∼240 s. Thus the decline in motoneuron excitability from a weak contraction takes several minutes to recover fully.

  6. Investigating the Retention and Time-Course of Phonotactic Constraint Learning From Production Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warker, Jill A.

    2013-01-01

    Adults can rapidly learn artificial phonotactic constraints such as /f/ only occurs at the beginning of syllables by producing syllables that contain those constraints. This implicit learning is then reflected in their speech errors. However, second-order constraints in which the placement of a phoneme depends on another characteristic of the syllable (e.g., if the vowel is /æ/, /f/ occurs at the beginning of syllables and /s/ occurs at the end of syllables but if the vowel is /I/, the reverse is true) require a longer learning period. Two experiments question the transience of second-order learning and whether consolidation plays a role in learning phonological dependencies. Using speech errors as a measure of learning, Experiment 1 investigated the durability of learning, and Experiment 2 investigated the time-course of learning. Experiment 1 found that learning is still present in speech errors a week later. Experiment 2 looked at whether more time in the form of a consolidation period or more experience in the form of more trials was necessary for learning to be revealed in speech errors. Both consolidation and more trials led to learning; however, consolidation provided a more substantial benefit. PMID:22686839

  7. Time-course mass spectrometry imaging for depicting drug incorporation into hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Tooru; Shima, Noriaki; Sasaki, Keiko; Matsuta, Shuntaro; Takei, Shiori; Katagi, Munehiro; Miki, Akihiro; Zaitsu, Kei; Nakanishi, Toyofumi; Sato, Takako; Suzuki, Koichi; Tsuchihashi, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate the incorporation of drugs into hair, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) imaging was performed on the longitudinal sections of single scalp hair shafts sampled from volunteers after a single oral administration of methoxyphenamine (MOP), a noncontrolled analogue of methamphetamine. Hair specimens were collected by plucking out with the roots intact, and these specimens were prepped by an optimized procedure based on freeze-sectioning to detect the drug inside the hair shaft and hair root. Time-course changes in the imaging results, with confirmatory quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis for each 1-mm segment of single hair strands, revealed a substantial concentration of the drug first onto the hair bulbs after ingestion, while only a small portion appeared to be incorporated into the hair matrix, forming a 2-3 mm distinctive drug band with tailing. Comparable amount of the drug also appeared to be incorporated into the keratinized hair shaft in the upper dermis zone, forming another distinct drug band of about 2 mm, which both moved toward the distal side, following the strand's growth rate. These findings provide forensically crucial information: there are two major drug incorporation sites, at least for MOP, which cause overlap of the recordings and deteriorates its chronological resolution down to about 11 days or perhaps longer.

  8. The time-course of feature interference in agreement comprehension: Multiple mechanisms and asymmetrical attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Darren; Nicol, Janet; Brehm, Laurel

    2014-10-01

    Attraction interference in language comprehension and production may be as a result of common or different processes. In the present paper, we investigate attraction interference during language comprehension, focusing on the contexts in which interference arises and the time-course of these effects. Using evidence from event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and sentence judgment times, we show that agreement attraction in comprehension is best explained as morphosyntactic interference during memory retrieval. This stands in contrast to attraction as a message-level process involving the representation of the subject NP's number features, which is a strong contributor to attraction in production. We thus argue that the cognitive antecedents of agreement attraction in comprehension are non-identical with those of attraction in production, and moreover, that attraction in comprehension is primarily a consequence of similarity-based interference in cue-based memory retrieval processes. We suggest that mechanisms responsible for attraction during language comprehension are a subset of those involved in language production.

  9. A growth curve model with fractional polynomials for analysing incomplete time-course data in microarray gene expression studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Thomassen, Mads; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B

    2011-01-01

    among fractional polynomial models with power terms from a set of fixed values that offer a wide range of curve shapes and suggests a best fitting model. After a limited simulation study, the model has been applied to our human in vivo irritated epidermis data with missing observations to investigate......-course pattern in a gene by gene manner. We introduce a growth curve model with fractional polynomials to automatically capture the various time-dependent expression patterns and meanwhile efficiently handle missing values due to incomplete observations. For each gene, our procedure compares the performances...... time-dependent transcriptional responses to a chemical irritant. Our method was able to identify the various nonlinear time-course expression trajectories. The integration of growth curves with fractional polynomials provides a flexible way to model different time-course patterns together with model...

  10. HARDENING OF CRANE RAILS BY PLASMA DISCRETE-TIME SURFACE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Samotugin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Crane wheels and rails are subjected to intensive wear in the process of operation. Therefore, improvement of these components’ performance can be considered a task of high importance. A promising direction in this regard is surface treatment by highly concentrated energy flows such as laser beams or plasma jets. This thesis suggests that the use of gradient plasma surface treatment can improve the performance of crane rails. A research was conducted, according to which hardened zones were deposited on crane rails under different treatment modes. Microhardness was measured both at the surface and in depth using custom-made microsections. The article includes the results of study of plasma surface hardening effects on wear resistance of crane rails. Change of plasma surface treatment parameters (current, plasma torch movement speed, argon gas flow rate allows for desired steel hardness and structure, while the choice of optimal location for hardened zones makes it possible to significantly improve wear resistance and crack resistance. As a result of plasma surface hardening, the fine-grained martensite structure is obtained with mainly lamellar morphology and higher hardness rate compared toinduction hardening or overlaying. Wear test of carbon steels revealed that plasma surfacing reduces abrasive wear rate compared to the irinitial state by 2 to 3 times. Enough sharp boundary between hardened and non-hardened portions has a positive effect on the performance of parts under dynamic loads, contributing to the inhibition of cracks during the transition from solid to a soft metal. For carbon and low alloy rail steels, the properties achieved by plasma surface hardening can effectively replace induction hardening or overlaying.The mode range for plasma surface treatment that allow sobtaining a surface layer with certain operating properties has been determined.

  11. Functional and time-course changes in single word production from childhood to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganaro, Marina; Tzieropoulos, Hélène; Frauenfelder, Ulrich H; Zesiger, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    Picture naming tasks are widely used both in children and adults to investigate language production for research and for assessment purposes. The main theoretical models of single word production based on the investigation of picture naming in adults provide a detailed account of the principal mental operations involved in the transformation of an abstract concept into articulated speech and their temporal dynamics. These models and in particular their time-course do not apply directly to children who display much longer production latencies than adults. Here we investigate the functional processes and the temporal dynamics of word encoding in school-age children and adults. ERPs were analysed from picture onset to the onset of articulation in 32 children and 32 adults performing the same overt picture naming task. Waveform analyses were not informative since differences appeared throughout the entire period, due to an early shift of waveform morphology and to larger amplitudes in children. However, when the sequences of periods of topographic stability were considered, different patterns of electric fields at scalp only appeared in approximately the first third of the analysed period, corresponding to the P1-N1 complex. From about 200 ms in adults and from 300 ms in children to articulation onset similar patterns of global topography were observed across groups but with a different time distribution. These results indicate qualitative changes in an early time-window, likely corresponding to pre-linguistic processes, and only quantitative changes in later time-windows, suggesting similar mental operations underlying lexical processes between age-school children and adults, with temporal dynamic changes during development.

  12. Inference of RNA polymerase II transcription dynamics from chromatin immunoprecipitation time course data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciira wa Maina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II (pol-II is a key step in gene expression. The dynamics of pol-II moving along the transcribed region influence the rate and timing of gene expression. In this work, we present a probabilistic model of transcription dynamics which is fitted to pol-II occupancy time course data measured using ChIP-Seq. The model can be used to estimate transcription speed and to infer the temporal pol-II activity profile at the gene promoter. Model parameters are estimated using either maximum likelihood estimation or via Bayesian inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The Bayesian approach provides confidence intervals for parameter estimates and allows the use of priors that capture domain knowledge, e.g. the expected range of transcription speeds, based on previous experiments. The model describes the movement of pol-II down the gene body and can be used to identify the time of induction for transcriptionally engaged genes. By clustering the inferred promoter activity time profiles, we are able to determine which genes respond quickly to stimuli and group genes that share activity profiles and may therefore be co-regulated. We apply our methodology to biological data obtained using ChIP-seq to measure pol-II occupancy genome-wide when MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are treated with estradiol (E2. The transcription speeds we obtain agree with those obtained previously for smaller numbers of genes with the advantage that our approach can be applied genome-wide. We validate the biological significance of the pol-II promoter activity clusters by investigating cluster-specific transcription factor binding patterns and determining canonical pathway enrichment. We find that rapidly induced genes are enriched for both estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and FOXA1 binding in their proximal promoter regions.

  13. Time course of dorsal and ventral hippocampal involvement in the expression of trace fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, David; Czerniawski, Jennifer; Ree, Fredrick; Otto, Tim

    2013-11-01

    While a number of early studies demonstrated that hippocampal damage attenuates the expression of recent, but not remotely trained tasks, an emerging body of evidence has shown that damage to, or inactivation of, the hippocampus often impairs recall across a wide range of training-testing intervals. Collectively, these data suggest that the time course of hippocampal involvement in the storage or recall of previously-acquired memories may differ according to hippocampal subregion and the particular learning task under consideration. The present study examined the contributions of dorsal (DH) and ventral (VH) hippocampus to the expression of previously-acquired trace fear conditioning, a form of Pavlovian conditioning in which the offset of an initially neutral cue or cues and the onset of an aversive stimulus is separated by a temporal (trace) interval. Specifically, either saline or the GABA-A agonist muscimol was infused into DH or VH prior to testing either 1, 7, 28, or 42 days after trace fear conditioning. The results revealed a marked dissociation: pre-testing inactivation of DH failed to impair performance at any time-point, while pre-testing inactivation of VH impaired performance at all time-points. Importantly, pre-testing inactivation of VH had no effect on the performance of previously-acquired delay conditioning, suggesting that the deficits observed in trace conditioning cannot be attributed to a deficit in performance of the freezing response. Collectively, these data suggest that VH, but not DH, remains a neuroanatomical locus critical to the recall or expression of trace fear conditioning over an extended period of time.

  14. Inference of RNA polymerase II transcription dynamics from chromatin immunoprecipitation time course data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciira wa Maina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II (pol-II is a key step in gene expression. The dynamics of pol-II moving along the transcribed region influence the rate and timing of gene expression. In this work, we present a probabilistic model of transcription dynamics which is fitted to pol-II occupancy time course data measured using ChIP-Seq. The model can be used to estimate transcription speed and to infer the temporal pol-II activity profile at the gene promoter. Model parameters are estimated using either maximum likelihood estimation or via Bayesian inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The Bayesian approach provides confidence intervals for parameter estimates and allows the use of priors that capture domain knowledge, e.g. the expected range of transcription speeds, based on previous experiments. The model describes the movement of pol-II down the gene body and can be used to identify the time of induction for transcriptionally engaged genes. By clustering the inferred promoter activity time profiles, we are able to determine which genes respond quickly to stimuli and group genes that share activity profiles and may therefore be co-regulated. We apply our methodology to biological data obtained using ChIP-seq to measure pol-II occupancy genome-wide when MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are treated with estradiol (E2. The transcription speeds we obtain agree with those obtained previously for smaller numbers of genes with the advantage that our approach can be applied genome-wide. We validate the biological significance of the pol-II promoter activity clusters by investigating cluster-specific transcription factor binding patterns and determining canonical pathway enrichment. We find that rapidly induced genes are enriched for both estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and FOXA1 binding in their proximal promoter regions.

  15. Time-related surface modification of denture base acrylic resin treated by atmospheric pressure cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Pan, Hong; Li, Yinglong; Wang, Guomin; Zhang, Jue; Pan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The changes of denture base acrylic resin surface properties under cold plasma and the relationships with time were investigated. Cold plasma treated the specimens for 30 s, 60 s, 90 s, and 120 s, respectively. Water contact angles were measured immediately after the treatment, 48 h, 15 days and 30 days later. Surface roughness was measured with 3-D laser scanning microscope. Candida albicans adherence was evaluated by CFU counting. Chemical composition was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Water contact angle reduced after treated for 30 s. No changes were observed with time prolonged, except the durability. There were no differences in roughness among all groups. However, treatment groups showed significantly lower C. albicans adherence. XPS demonstrated a decrease in C/O, and this reduction was affected by treatment time. Cold plasma was an effective means of increasing hydrophilicity of acrylic resin and reducing C. albicans adherence without affecting physical properties.

  16. Time course of cortical hemorrhages after closed traumatic brain injury: statistical analysis of posttraumatic histomorphological alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, Manfred; Walter, Till; Meissner, Christoph; Friedrich, Hans-Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    We examined 305 autopsied brains for histomorphological alterations to determine the time course of reactions in cortical hemorrhages following traumatic closed brain injury. Eighteen morphological criteria were considered: red blood cells (RBCs), polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), macrophages (Ms), RBC-containing Ms, hemosiderin, hematoidin, lipid-containing Ms, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, collagenous fibres, gemistocytic astrocytes, fibrillary gliosis, hemosiderin-containing astrocytes, neuronal damage, neuronophagy, axonal swelling (beta-amyloid precursor protein: beta-APP), axonal bulbs (van Gieson stain), and mineralisation of neurons. The interval between the time of brain injury and death ranged from 1 min to 58 years. Following routine staining and immunohistochemical staining of microglia (CD68), astrocytes (GFAP) and injured axons (beta-APP), paraffin sections were examined by light microscopy for the presence of the selected histomorphological features. For each cytomorphological phenomenon, the time at which it could be demonstrated for the first time and for the last time (observation period) was determined. The relative frequency of each criterion was established for each observation period. The limits of confidence for the respective relative frequencies were estimated with a reliability of 95% according to Clopper and Pearson. An apparent correlation was found between the frequency of a given histomorphological phenomenon and the length of the posttraumatic interval. To check for accuracy of prediction, half of the cases (group 1; n = 153) were used to develop a multistage evaluation model; half (group 2; n = 152) were used to evaluate the validity of the data of group 1. Applying this model, 117 of the 152 control group cases (76.97%) could be correctly classified and further 26 cases (17.11%) being assigned to an interval close to the correct interval. Thus, this model allows classification of the correct posttraumatic interval or an

  17. A time course analysis of the extracellular proteome of Aspergillus nidulans growing on sorghum stover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saykhedkar Sayali

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fungi are important players in the turnover of plant biomass because they produce a broad range of degradative enzymes. Aspergillus nidulans, a well-studied saprophyte and close homologue to industrially important species such as A. niger and A. oryzae, was selected for this study. Results A. nidulans was grown on sorghum stover under solid-state culture conditions for 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days. Based on analysis of chitin content, A. nidulans grew to be 4-5% of the total biomass in the culture after 2 days and then maintained a steady state of 4% of the total biomass for the next 12 days. A hyphal mat developed on the surface of the sorghum by day one and as seen by scanning electron microscopy the hyphae enmeshed the sorghum particles by day 5. After 14 days hyphae had penetrated the entire sorghum slurry. Analysis (1-D PAGE LC-MS/MS of the secretome of A. nidulans, and analysis of the breakdown products from the sorghum stover showed a wide range of enzymes secreted. A total of 294 extracellular proteins were identified with hemicellulases, cellulases, polygalacturonases, chitinases, esterases and lipases predominating the secretome. Time course analysis revealed a total of 196, 166, 172 and 182 proteins on day 1, 3, 7 and 14 respectively. The fungus used 20% of the xylan and cellulose by day 7 and 30% by day 14. Cellobiose dehydrogenase, feruloyl esterases, and CAZy family 61 endoglucanases, all of which are thought to reduce the recalcitrance of biomass to hydrolysis, were found in high abundance. Conclusions Our results show that A. nidulans secretes a wide array of enzymes to degrade the major polysaccharides and lipids (but probably not lignin by 1 day of growth on sorghum. The data suggests simultaneous breakdown of hemicellulose, cellulose and pectin. Despite secretion of most of the enzymes on day 1, changes in the relative abundances of enzymes over the time course indicates that the set of enzymes

  18. Time course degeneration and expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in mer-knockout mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao-ying; WANG Huai-zhou; WANG Ning-li

    2010-01-01

    Background Muller cells in the mammalian retina normally express low levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP); however, its expression is upregulated in response to the loss of retinal neurons. The change in expression of GFAP is one of the earliest indicators of retinal damage and is correlated with the time course of disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the time course of degeneration and the expression of GFAP in the retina of mer knockout mice. Methods A total of 30 mer knockout mice, aged from 15-20 days to 1 year and 32 age-matched wild type mice as controls were tested. Immunohistochemistry was used to show the expression of GFAP in the central and peripheral retina of mer knockout and control mice at postnatal age of 15 days (P15d), 20 days (P20d), 4 weeks (P4w), 6 weeks (P6w), 8 weeks (P8w), 3 months (P3m), 6 months (P6m) and 1 years (P1y).Results The expression of GFAP in the central and peripheral retina of wild type mice was limited to the retinal ganglion cell and nerve fiber layers. In the central retina of mer knockout mice, GFAP expression was upregulated at P4w and GFAP immunolabelling penetrates across the entire thickness of the retina at P8w; whereas in the peripheral retina, the GFAP expression was upregulated at P20d and GFAP immunolabelling penetrates the entire retina after P4w. Conclusions Increased expression of GFAP in Muller cells of mer knockout mice occur at P20d in the peripheral retina and P4w in the central retina. GFAP expression in Muller cells appears to be a secondary response to the loss of retinal neurons. Increased expression of GFAP may occur prior to any detectable morphological changes in the retina. This study suggests that the loss of retinal neurons may begin in the early stages of retinitis pigmentosa, prior to the discovery of any morphological changes in the retina.

  19. Providing space for time - The impact of temporality on life course research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mills, M

    2000-01-01

    The article alerts those in the field of quantitative life course research to the ontological impact of different forms of temporality. The first section reviews the influence of cosmic cycles, human development, historical, cultural, social and institutional forms of temporality on life course beha

  20. Work, Family and Life-Course Fit: Does Control over Work Time Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Qinlei

    2008-01-01

    This study moves from "work-family" to a multi-dimensional "life-course fit" construct (employees' cognitive assessments of resources, resource deficits, and resource demands), using a combined work-family, demands-control and ecology of the life course framing. It examined (1) impacts of job and home ecological systems on fit dimensions, and (2)…

  1. Breathing for answering: the time course of response planning in conversation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eTorreira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the timing of pre-answer inbreaths in order to shed light on the time course of response planning and execution in conversational turn-taking. Using acoustic and inductive plethysmography recordings of seven dyadic conversations in Dutch, we show that pre-answer inbreaths in conversation typically begin briefly after the end of questions. We also show that the presence of a pre-answer inbreath usually co-occurs with substantially delayed answers, with a modal latency of 576 ms vs. 100 ms for answers not preceded by an inbreath. Based on previously reported minimal latencies for internal intercostal activation and the production of speech sounds, we propose that vocal responses, either in the form of a pre-utterance inbreath or of speech proper when an inbreath is not produced, are typically launched in reaction to information present in the last portion of the interlocutor’s turn. We also show that short responses are usually made on residual breath, while longer responses are more often preceded by an inbreath. This relation of inbreaths to answer length suggests that by the time an inbreath is launched, typically during the last few hundred milliseconds of the question, the length of the answer is often prepared to some extent. Together, our findings are consistent with a two-stage model of response planning in conversational turn-taking: early planning of content often carried out in overlap with the incoming turn, and late launching of articulation based on the identification of turn-final cues.

  2. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin time course during cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bignami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: NGAL is one of the most promising AKI biomarkers in cardiac surgery. However, the best timing to dose it and the reference values are still matter of discussion. Aim of the Study: We performed a uNGAL perioperative time course, to better understand its perioperative kinetics and its role in AKI diagnosis. Setting of the Study: San Raffaele University Hospital, cardiac surgery department. Material and Methods: We enrolled in this prospective observational study 19 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Based on preoperative characteristics, they were divided in low-risk and high-risk patients. uNGAL measurements were collected at pre-defined times before, during, and up to 24 hours after surgery. Statistical Analysis: Data were analysed by use of SAS 1999-2001 program or IBM SPSS Statistics. Results: In low-risk patients, uNGAL had the highest value immediately after general anesthesia induction (basal dosage: uNGAL: 12.20ng×ml -1 , IQR 14.00. It later decreased significantly (3.40 ng×ml -1 , IQR 4.80; P = 0.006 during CPB, and finally return to its original value 24 hours after surgery. In high-risk patients, uNGAL increased immediately after surgery; it had the highest value on ICU arrival (38,20 ng×ml -1 ; IQR 133,10 and remained high for several hours. A difference in uNGAL levels between the two groups was already observed at the end of surgery, but it became statistically significant on ICU arrival (P = 0.002. Conclusion: This study helps to better understand the different kinetics of this new biomarker in low-risk and high-risk cardiac patients.

  3. Real-time wavelet detection of crashes in limit cycles of non-stationary fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkel, M. van, E-mail: m.v.berkel@tue.nl [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Witvoet, G.; Baar, M.R. de [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Nuij, P.W.J.M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Morsche, H.G. ter [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Steinbuch, M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose a new wavelet-based method for accurate and robust detection of limit cycle crashes in fusion plasmas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method is optimized for real-time applications such that it has small delay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method is implemented in a real-time algorithm and is tested on experimental data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost all crashes are detected flawlessly including off-waveforms with high SNR. - Abstract: The high performance mode (H-mode) is one of the baseline plasma scenarios for the experimental fusion reactor ITER. This scenario features a periodic crash-like reorganization of the plasma pressure and the magnetic flux in the plasma core and plasma periphery. The core instability is often referred to as the sawtooth instability while the instability at the edge of the plasma is referred to as ELM. In this paper we present an algorithm for optimized (low latency, robust and high fidelity) real-time sensing of the crashes. The algorithm is based on time-scale wavelet theory and edge-detection. It is argued that detection of crashes has considerably less delay than the other methods. The realized accuracy of the detection algorithm is well below the uncertainty of the crash period for most crashes. Multiresolution analysis enables distinction between different sizes of sawtooth crashes due to the different sizes of wavelets (scales), resulting in an algorithm, which is robust and accurate. Although strictly speaking, the crash detection method is demonstrated for sawteeth measured with ECE only, it can be applied to any periodic crash, measured with any temporally resolved data. Note that the possibility of differentiating between crash like events of different nature depends on their individual time-scales and used measurement setup.

  4. Modeling corticosteroid effects in a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis I: mechanistic disease progression model for the time course of collagen-induced arthritis in Lewis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Justin C; Dubois, Debra C; Molano, Diana S; Pyszczynski, Nancy A; Keller, Craig E; Almon, Richard R; Jusko, William J

    2008-08-01

    A mechanism-based model was developed to describe the time course of arthritis progression in the rat. Arthritis was induced in male Lewis rats with type II porcine collagen into the base of the tail. Disease progression was monitored by paw swelling, bone mineral density (BMD), body weights, plasma corticosterone (CST) concentrations, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA expression in paw tissue. Bone mineral density was determined by PIXImus II dual energy X-ray densitometry. Plasma CST was assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Cytokine and GR mRNA were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Disease progression models were constructed from transduction and indirect response models and applied using S-ADAPT software. A delay in the onset of increased paw TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNA concentrations was successfully characterized by simple transduction. This rise was closely followed by an up-regulation of GR mRNA and CST concentrations. Paw swelling and body weight responses peaked approximately 21 days after induction, whereas bone mineral density changes were greatest at 23 days after induction. After peak response, the time course in IL-1beta, IL-6 mRNA, and paw edema slowly declined toward a disease steady state. Model parameters indicate TNF-alpha and IL-1beta mRNA most significantly induce paw edema, whereas IL-6 mRNA exerted the most influence on BMD. The model for bone mineral density captures rates of turnover of cancellous and cortical bone and the fraction of each in the different regions analyzed. This small systems model integrates and quantitates multiple factors contributing to arthritis in rats.

  5. Fluorescence interference contrast based approach to study real time interaction of melittin with plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Gui, Dong; Zandi, Roya; Gill, Sarjeet; Mohideen, Umar

    2014-03-01

    Melittin is an anti-bacterial and hemolytic toxic peptide found in bee venom. Cell lysis behavior of peptides has been widely investigated, but the exact interaction mechanism of lytic peptides with lipid membranes and its constituents has not been understood completely. In this paper we study the melittin interaction with lipid plasma membranes in real time using non-invasive and non-contact fluorescence interference contrast microscopy (FLIC). Particularly the interaction of melittin with plasma membranes was studied in a controlled molecular environment, where these plasma membrane were composed of saturated lipid, 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) and unsaturated lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine(DOPC) with and without cholesterol. We found out that melittin starts to form nanometer size pores in the plasma membranes shortly after interacting with membranes. But the addition of cholesterol in plasma membrane slows down the pore formation process. Our results show that inclusion of cholesterol to the plasma membranes make them more resilient towards pore formation and lysis of membrane.

  6. The time course of psychological stress as revealed by event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Qi, Mingming; Guan, Lili; Hou, Yan; Yang, Yu

    2012-11-14

    Psychological stress is common in everyday life and is believed to affect emotion, cognition and health. Previous brain imaging studies have been able to identify the brain regions involved in the stress response. However, our understanding of the temporal neurological response to psychological stress is limited. The present work aims to investigate the time course of psychological stress induced by a mental arithmetic task, utilizing event-related potentials (ERPs). The elicitation of stress was verified by self-reports of stress and increases in salivary cortisol levels. The subjective and physiological data showed that the stress-elicitation paradigm successfully induced a mild-to-moderate level of psychological stress. The electrophysiological data showed that the amplitude of occipital N1 was more negative in the control task than in the stress task, and the latency of frontal P2 was shorter in the stress task than in the control task. Our results provide electrophysiological evidence that psychological stress occurs primarily at the early stage of cognitive processing.

  7. Time Course of Atrophic Remodeling: Effects of Exercise on Cardiac Morpology and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. M.; Martin, D.; Caine, T.; Matz, T.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Early and consistent evaluation of cardiac morphology and function throughout an atrophic stimulus is critically important for the design and optimization of interventions. Exercise training is one intervention that has been shown to confer favorable improvements in LV mass and function during unloading. However, the format and intensity of exercise required to induce optimal cardiac improvements has not been investigated. PURPOSE: This randomized, controlled trial was designed to 1) comprehensively characterize the time course of unloading-induced morpho-functional remodeling, and 2) examine the effects of high intensity exercise training on cardiac structural and functional parameters during unloading. METHODS: Twenty six subjects completed 70 days of head down tilt bed rest (HDBR): 17 were randomized to exercise training (ExBR) and 9 remained sedentary. Exercise consisted of integrated high intensity, continuous, and resistance exercise. We assessed cardiac morphology (left ventricular mass; LVM) and function (speckle-tracking assessment of longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain and twist) before (BR-2), during (BR7,21,31,70), and following (BR+0, +3) HDBR. Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) was evaluated before (BR- 3), during (BR4,25,46,68) and following (BR+0) HDBR. RESULTS: Sedentary HDBR resulted in a progressive decline in LVM, longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain, and an increase in twist. ExBR mitigated decreases in LVM and function. Change in twist was significantly related to change in VO2max (R=0.68, premodeling.

  8. Time course analyses of orthographic and phonological priming effects in developing readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeguers, M H T; Huizenga, H M; van der Molen, M W; Snellings, P

    2017-06-23

    It has been assumed that fluent reading requires efficient integration of orthographic and phonological codes. However, it is thus far unclear how this integration process develops when children learn to become fluent readers. Therefore, we used masked priming to investigate time courses of orthographic and phonological code activation in children at incremental levels of reading development (2nd, 4th and 6th grade). The first study used targets with small phonological differences between phonological and orthographic primes, which are typical in transparent orthographies. The second study manipulated the strength of the phonological difference between prime and target to clarify whether phonological difference influences phonological priming effects. Results in both studies showed that orthographic priming effects became facilitative at increasingly short durations during reading development, but phonological priming was absent. These results are taken to suggest that development of reading fluency is accompanied by increased automatization of orthographic representations. The absence of phonological priming suggests that developing readers cannot yet activate phonological codes automatically.

  9. Time course of implicit processing and explicit processing of emotional faces and emotional words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frühholz, Sascha; Jellinghaus, Anne; Herrmann, Manfred

    2011-05-01

    Facial expressions are important emotional stimuli during social interactions. Symbolic emotional cues, such as affective words, also convey information regarding emotions that is relevant for social communication. Various studies have demonstrated fast decoding of emotions from words, as was shown for faces, whereas others report a rather delayed decoding of information about emotions from words. Here, we introduced an implicit (color naming) and explicit task (emotion judgment) with facial expressions and words, both containing information about emotions, to directly compare the time course of emotion processing using event-related potentials (ERP). The data show that only negative faces affected task performance, resulting in increased error rates compared to neutral faces. Presentation of emotional faces resulted in a modulation of the N170, the EPN and the LPP components and these modulations were found during both the explicit and implicit tasks. Emotional words only affected the EPN during the explicit task, but a task-independent effect on the LPP was revealed. Finally, emotional faces modulated source activity in the extrastriate cortex underlying the generation of the N170, EPN and LPP components. Emotional words led to a modulation of source activity corresponding to the EPN and LPP, but they also affected the N170 source on the right hemisphere. These data show that facial expressions affect earlier stages of emotion processing compared to emotional words, but the emotional value of words may have been detected at early stages of emotional processing in the visual cortex, as was indicated by the extrastriate source activity.

  10. Time course of information processing in visual and haptic object classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna eMartinovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Vision identifies objects rapidly and efficiently. In contrast, object recognition by touch is much slower. Furthermore, haptics usually serially accumulates information from different parts of objects, whereas vision typically processes object information in parallel. Is haptic object identification slower simply due to sequential information acquisition and the resulting memory load or due to more fundamental processing differences between the senses? To compare the time course of visual and haptic object recognition, we slowed visual processing using a novel, restricted viewing technique. In an electroencephalographic (EEG experiment, participants discriminated familiar, nameable from unfamiliar, unnameable objects both visually and haptically. Analyses focused on the evoked and induced fronto-central theta-band (5-7 Hz; a marker of working memory and the occipital upper alpha-band (10-12 Hz; a marker of perceptual processing locked to the onset of classification. Long-latency modulations of both theta-band and alpha-band activities differentiated between familiar and unfamiliar objects in haptics. Decreases in right occipital alpha-band activity for haptic identification of unfamiliar relative to familiar objects indicate a likely processing role of multisensory extrastriate areas. In contrast, differential visual processing of familiar and unfamiliar objects was characterized only by a relatively early difference in left occipital upper alpha-band activity. We conclude that haptic object recognition relies on common representations with vision but also that there are fundamental differences between the senses that do not merely arise from differences in their speed of processing.

  11. Prediction of pharmacological and xenobiotic responses to drugs based on time course gene expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Huang

    Full Text Available More and more people are concerned by the risk of unexpected side effects observed in the later steps of the development of new drugs, either in late clinical development or after marketing approval. In order to reduce the risk of the side effects, it is important to look out for the possible xenobiotic responses at an early stage. We attempt such an effort through a prediction by assuming that similarities in microarray profiles indicate shared mechanisms of action and/or toxicological responses among the chemicals being compared. A large time course microarray database derived from livers of compound-treated rats with thirty-four distinct pharmacological and toxicological responses were studied. The mRMR (Minimum-Redundancy-Maximum-Relevance method and IFS (Incremental Feature Selection were used to select a compact feature set (141 features for the reduction of feature dimension and improvement of prediction performance. With these 141 features, the Leave-one-out cross-validation prediction accuracy of first order response using NNA (Nearest Neighbor Algorithm was 63.9%. Our method can be used for pharmacological and xenobiotic responses prediction of new compounds and accelerate drug development.

  12. Efficacy and time course of palliative radiotherapy for pain relief in 70 patients with bone metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhang; Chen Gong; Huihua Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the ef icacy and time course of radiotherapy for pain relief in patients with bone metastases. Methods A total of 70 patients with painful bone metastases were investigated between January 2013 and August 2015. The patients were divided into 3 groups and each group was treated with radiotherapy using 30 Gy in 10 fractions, 20 Gy in 5 fractions, or a single dose of 8 Gy. The pain over the irradiated site was assessed using a numerical rating scale (NRS) ranging from 0 to 10. Pain relief was assessed every 5 days based on a pain questionnaire. Results Complete pain relief was achieved in 14.3% (10/70) patients; partial pain relief in 74.3% (52/70); and no response in 11.4% (8/70). The overal response rate was 88.6%. No significant dif erence was observed between single fraction radiotherapy and multifraction radiotherapy. There was no relationship between the pain relief and treated sites. The pain score gradual y decreased and most patients reached a moderate pain score (NRS Conclusion Local radiotherapy is a very rapid and ef ective pal iative treatment for painful bone metas-tases; however, the optimal dose and fractionation regimen remain debatable. Individualized therapy for painful bone metastases should be considered according to the patient’s condition and life expectancy.

  13. The footprints of a wandering mind: Further examination of the time course of an attentional lapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Jonathan

    2011-06-01

    Recently, understanding the sequence of events that precedes an attentional lapse has become an important question in cognitive neuroscience. To examine the processes which lead to such errors, participants performed a simple go/no-go task used for measuring attentional failure. To study the role of internal distraction, the participants' tendency to daydreaming was assessed via a questionnaire. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to decompose the response time (RT) course into the underlying components. Analysis identified three components that made up 54% of the data collected. One factor indicated the overall magnitude of the RT in a given block. This factor showed a significant negative weighting prior to an error. A second factor indicating that RT shifted from slow to fast was also identified. The parity of this factor was predictive of error for individuals high on daydreaming, indicating that errors in individuals with a rich, imaginative mental life showed a shift from slow to fast responding prior to an attentional lapse. This analysis provides further evidence that attentional lapses can result from events that took place many seconds before the mistake and that the elements of the default mode may be involved in these lapses.

  14. The time course of implicit processing of erotic pictures: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunliang; Wang, Lili; Wang, Naiyi; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2012-12-13

    The current study investigated the time course of the implicit processing of erotic stimuli using event-related potentials (ERPs). ERPs elicited by erotic pictures were compared with those by three other types of pictures: non-erotic positive, negative, and neutral pictures. We observed that erotic pictures evoked enhanced neural responses compared with other pictures at both early (P2/N2) and late (P3/positive slow wave) temporal stages. These results suggested that erotic pictures selectively captured individuals' attention at early stages and evoked deeper processing at late stages. More importantly, the amplitudes of P2, N2, and P3 only discriminated between erotic and non-erotic (i.e., positive, neutral, and negative) pictures. That is, no difference was revealed among non-erotic pictures, although these pictures differed in both valence and arousal. Thus, our results suggest that the erotic picture processing is beyond the valence and arousal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The different time courses of reading different levels of Chinese characters: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qilin; Tang, Yi-Yuan; Zhou, Li; Yu, Qingbao

    2011-07-12

    The dual route processing was generally accepted in the reading of alphabetic languages, which suggests alphabetic words can be read by either addressed pathway or assembled pathway. However, it was still unclear whether there was a particular 'dual route mechanism' during reading Chinese characters. In our previous fMRI study, the result showed that there might be a particular 'dual route mechanism', and its addressed pathway was similar between Chinese and English, whereas for the need of spatial analysis, the assembled pathway of Chinese was different from that of English which involved grapheme-to-phoneme correspondences. The present study, using event-related potential, which provide more temporal information, aimed to further support our previous view, and peered inside the different time courses of reading different types of Chinese characters. It was found that reading high frequency Chinese characters increased the N170 component which was believed to enhance attention to the addressed pathway in the left occipital-temporal area. Pseudo Chinese characters could be read by a particular assembled pathway, which caused the largest amplitude of P320 component in the right occipital-temporal area, which considered as a key brain area for radical analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The time course of morphological processing during spoken word recognition in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei; Qu, Qingqing; Ni, Aiping; Zhou, Junyi; Li, Xingshan

    2017-03-30

    We investigated the time course of morphological processing during spoken word recognition using the printed-word paradigm. Chinese participants were asked to listen to a spoken disyllabic compound word while simultaneously viewing a printed-word display. Each visual display consisted of three printed words: a semantic associate of the first constituent of the compound word (morphemic competitor), a semantic associate of the whole compound word (whole-word competitor), and an unrelated word (distractor). Participants were directed to detect whether the spoken target word was on the visual display. Results indicated that both the morphemic and whole-word competitors attracted more fixations than the distractor. More importantly, the morphemic competitor began to diverge from the distractor immediately at the acoustic offset of the first constituent, which was earlier than the whole-word competitor. These results suggest that lexical access to the auditory word is incremental and morphological processing (i.e., semantic access to the first constituent) that occurs at an early processing stage before access to the representation of the whole word in Chinese.

  17. The time course of serotonin 2C receptor expression after spinal transection of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Li-Qun; Wienecke, Jacob; Chen, Meng

    2013-01-01

    -IR analysis was confined to the ventral horn motoneuron somata (including a proportion of proximal dendrites) a significant increase was not detected until 45 day post-operation. 5-HT2CR upregulation in the spinal gray matter is confirmed with Western blot in the rats 60 days post-operation. The time course......In the spinal cord 5-HT systems modulate the spinal network via various 5-HT receptors. 5-HT2A and 2C receptors are likely the most important 5-HT receptors for enhancing the motoneuron excitability by facilitating the persistent inward current, and thus play an important role for the pathogenesis...... after transection (with an average ~1.3-fold higher than in sham-operated group) but did not reach a significant level until at 21 days (~1.4-fold). The increase sustained thereafter and a plateau level was reached at 45 days (~1.7-fold higher), a value similar as that at 60 days. When 5-HT2CR...

  18. The time course of short-term hypertrophy in the absence of eccentric muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Matt S; Mota, Jacob A; DeFranco, Ryan N; Grue, Katherine A; Jacobo, A Unique; Chung, Eunhee; Moon, Jordan R; DeFreitas, Jason M; Beck, Travis W

    2017-05-01

    It has been proposed that the increase in skeletal muscle mass observed during the initial weeks of initiating a resistance training program is concomitant with eccentric muscle damage and edema. We examined the time course of muscle hypertrophy during 4 weeks of concentric-only resistance training. Thirteen untrained men performed unilateral concentric-only dumbbell curls and shoulder presses twice per week for 4 weeks. Sets of 8-12 repetitions were performed to failure, and training loads were increased during each session. Subjects consumed 500 ml of whole milk during training. Assessments of soreness, lean mass, echo intensity, muscle thickness, relaxed and flexed arm circumference, and isokinetic strength were performed every 72 or 96 h. Soreness, echo intensity, relaxed circumference, and peak torque data did not significantly change. Significant increases in lean mass, muscle thickness, and flexed circumference were observed within seven training sessions. Lean mass was elevated at tests #7 (+109.3 g, p = .002) and #8 (+116.1 g, p = .035), with eight different subjects showing changes above the minimal difference of 139.1 g. Muscle thickness was elevated at tests #6 (+0.23 cm, p = .004), #7 (+0.31 cm, p hypertrophy may occur in the absence of eccentric muscle damage within seven training sessions.

  19. Real time control of long duration plasma discharges in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Laurent, F.; Bucalossi, J.; Buravand, Y.; Chatelier, E.; Guillerminet, B.; Leroux, F.; Martin, G.; Moulin, D.; Spuig, P.; Van Houtte, D

    2003-07-01

    The in-vessel components and water cooling loops were fully renewed in order to permit Tore-Supra to explore the route of long duration plasma discharges. This renovation has implied important upgrades of both the data acquisition system (DAS) and the plasma control system. This paper is dedicated to these 2 upgrades. The new DAS design allows: -) a continuous data acquisition, -) high data flow rate management (the flow rate can reach 18 MB/s per front-end unit), -) continuous data access and processing, and -) real-time data processing. The upgrade of the plasma control system implies to share information at a real time level. This system is supported by the SCRAMNet network that has proved its flexibility (continuous addition of nodes), and its robustness (no network failure during 7 years of operation). The possibility to share VME units as well as PC units enable us to strongly increase the available real-time CPU power. The development of advanced real-time plasma control algorithms becomes thus accessible. The real-time equilibrium reconstruction is a first example of such a generation of algorithms. (A.C.)

  20. Real-Time Plasma Process Condition Sensing and Abnormal Process Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Yang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The plasma process is often used in the fabrication of semiconductor wafers. However, due to the lack of real-time etching control, this may result in some unacceptable process performances and thus leads to significant waste and lower wafer yield. In order to maximize the product wafer yield, a timely and accurately process fault or abnormal detection in a plasma reactor is needed. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES is one of the most frequently used metrologies in in-situ process monitoring. Even though OES has the advantage of non-invasiveness, it is required to provide a huge amount of information. As a result, the data analysis of OES becomes a big challenge. To accomplish real-time detection, this work employed the sigma matching method technique, which is the time series of OES full spectrum intensity. First, the response model of a healthy plasma spectrum was developed. Then, we defined a matching rate as an indictor for comparing the difference between the tested wafers response and the health sigma model. The experimental results showed that this proposal method can detect process faults in real-time, even in plasma etching tools.

  1. Reliability of the interval death rate analysis for estimating the time course of the motoneurone afterhyperpolarization in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonell, Christopher William; Ivanova, Tanya Dimitrova; Garland, S Jayne

    2007-05-15

    The reliability of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) time course, as estimated by the interval death rate (IDR) analysis was evaluated both within and between investigators. The IDR analysis uses the firing history of a single motor unit train at low tonic firing rates to calculate an estimate of the AHP time course [Matthews PB. Relationship of firing intervals of human motor units to the trajectory of post-spike after-hyperpolarization and synaptic noise. J Physiol 1996;492:597-628]. Single motor unit trains were collected from the tibialis anterior (TA) to determine intra-rater reliability (within investigator). Data from the first dorsal interosseus (FDI), collected in a previous investigation [Gossen ER, Ivanova TD, Garland SJ. The time course of the motoneurone afterhyperpolarization is related to motor unit twitch speed in human skeletal muscle. J Physiol 2003;552:657-64], were used to examine the inter-rater reliability (between investigators). The lead author was blinded to the original time constants and file identities for the re-analysis. The intra-rater reliability of the AHP time constant in the TA data was high (r(2)=0.88; pFDI data was also strong (r(2)=0.92; pFDI. It is concluded that the interval death rate analysis is a reliable tool for estimating the AHP time course with experienced investigators.

  2. Analysis of time phase of characteristic rad iation in plasma induced by laser ablating aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    With time- and space-resolved technique, we have recorde d time-resolved spectra of irradiation of the plasma induced by Nd: YAG laser a blating metal Aluminum in Ar, in which, laser pulse-energy was set up to 145 mJ /pulse and the buffer pressure 100 kpa. The continuum radiation and special emis sion of Aluminum plasma were studied based on the records. According to time dis tribution of Al Ⅰ396.15 nm emission, we analyzed the time differences between c haracteristic and continuum radiation evolving. We tried to explain the time pha ses of characteristic radiation evolving with traditional theoretical model of a tomic transition. As the result, we found that it was difficult to explain our e xperimental results with the model. In order to explain our experimental results , we need new model or to improve the traditional theoretical model of atomic tr ansition.

  3. Time-Course Analysis of Gene Expression During the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hypoxic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrine Bendjilali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many cells experience hypoxia, or low oxygen, and respond by dramatically altering gene expression. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, genes that respond are required for many oxygen-dependent cellular processes, such as respiration, biosynthesis, and redox regulation. To more fully characterize the global response to hypoxia, we exposed yeast to hypoxic conditions, extracted RNA at different times, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq analysis. Time-course statistical analysis revealed hundreds of genes that changed expression by up to 550-fold. The genes responded with varying kinetics suggesting that multiple regulatory pathways are involved. We identified most known oxygen-regulated genes and also uncovered new regulated genes. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR analysis confirmed that the lysine methyltransferase EFM6 and the recombinase DMC1, both conserved in humans, are indeed oxygen-responsive. Looking more broadly, oxygen-regulated genes participate in expected processes like respiration and lipid metabolism, but also in unexpected processes like amino acid and vitamin metabolism. Using principle component analysis, we discovered that the hypoxic response largely occurs during the first 2 hr and then a new steady-state expression state is achieved. Moreover, we show that the oxygen-dependent genes are not part of the previously described environmental stress response (ESR consisting of genes that respond to diverse types of stress. While hypoxia appears to cause a transient stress, the hypoxic response is mostly characterized by a transition to a new state of gene expression. In summary, our results reveal that hypoxia causes widespread and complex changes in gene expression to prepare the cell to function with little or no oxygen.

  4. Time course effects of lithium administration on spatial memory acquisition and cholinergic marker expression in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M H Karimfar

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effects of chronic lithium exposure on spatial memory in rats remain controversial. In this study a time course of the effects of lithium, administered systemically, on spatial memory acquisition in Morris water maze was investigated. Material and Methods: Lithium (600 mg/L was administered to four groups of rats in their drinking water; the first group of animals received lithium for one week, the second group for two weeks, the third group for three weeks, and the fourth group for four weeks.  As controls, four groups of animals received only normal drinking water for the same period of time.  Toward the end of their lithium or water treatment, all animals were trained for four days; each day included one block and each block contained four trials.  Test trials were conducted 48 hrs after completion of the lithium treatment. Escape latency, traveled distance and swimming speed were evaluated during testing trials. Brain tissues from animals were processed according to the standard protocols for immunohistochemical analysis.  Results: Lithium treatment decreased escape latency and traveled distance, but not swimming speed, compared with controls, suggesting significant spatial memory acquisition enhancement by lithium. Quantitative analysis showed that lithium, particularly after four weeks of exposure, significantly increased the number and density of immunostained ChAT-containing (choline acetyltransferase neurons in the medial septal area in comparison with control groups.  There was also a significant correlation between the number of immunostained ChAT neurons and behavioral measures. Conclusion: These results suggest that chronic oral administration of lithium causes spatial memory acquisition improvement in rats and an increase in ChAT immunostaining levels in medial septal nuclei.

  5. Time-course of exercise and its association with 12-month bone changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vainionpää Aki

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise has been shown to have positive effects on bone density and strength. However, knowledge of the time-course of exercise and bone changes is scarce due to lack of methods to quantify and qualify daily physical activity in long-term. The aim was to evaluate the association between exercise intensity at 3, 6 and 12 month intervals and 12-month changes in upper femur areal bone mineral density (aBMD and mid-femur geometry in healthy premenopausal women. Methods Physical activity was continuously assessed with a waist-worn accelerometer in 35 healthy women (35-40 years participating in progressive high-impact training. To describe exercise intensity, individual average daily numbers of impacts were calculated at five acceleration levels (range 0.3-9.2 g during time intervals of 0-3, 0-6, and 0-12 months. Proximal femur aBMD was measured with dual x-ray absorptiometry and mid-femur geometry was evaluated with quantitative computed tomography at the baseline and after 12 months. Physical activity data were correlated with yearly changes in bone density and geometry, and adjusted for confounding factors and impacts at later months of the trial using multivariate analysis. Results Femoral neck aBMD changes were significantly correlated with 6 and 12 months' impact activity at high intensity levels (> 3.9 g, r being up to 0.42. Trochanteric aBMD changes were associated even with first three months of exercise exceeding 1.1 g (r = 0.39-0.59, p r = 0.38-0.52, p Conclusion The number of high acceleration impacts during 6 months of training was positively associated with 12-month bone changes at the femoral neck, trochanter and mid-femur. These results can be utilized when designing feasible training programs to prevent bone loss in premenopausal women. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov NCT00697957

  6. Time course of isotonic shortening and the underlying contraction mechanism in airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syyong, Harley T; Raqeeb, Abdul; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2011-09-01

    Although the structure of the contractile unit in smooth muscle is poorly understood, some of the mechanical properties of the muscle suggest that a sliding-filament mechanism, similar to that in striated muscle, is also operative in smooth muscle. To test the applicability of this mechanism to smooth muscle function, we have constructed a mathematical model based on a hypothetical structure of the smooth muscle contractile unit: a side-polar myosin filament sandwiched by actin filaments, each attached to the equivalent of a Z disk. Model prediction of isotonic shortening as a function of time was compared with data from experiments using ovine tracheal smooth muscle. After equilibration and establishment of in situ length, the muscle was stimulated with ACh (100 μM) until force reached a plateau. The muscle was then allowed to shorten isotonically against various loads. From the experimental records, length-force and force-velocity relationships were obtained. Integration of the hyperbolic force-velocity relationship and the linear length-force relationship yielded an exponential function that approximated the time course of isotonic shortening generated by the modeled sliding-filament mechanism. However, to obtain an accurate fit, it was necessary to incorporate a viscoelastic element in series with the sliding-filament mechanism. The results suggest that a large portion of the shortening is due to filament sliding associated with muscle activation and that a small portion is due to continued deformation associated with an element that shows viscoelastic or power-law creep after a step change in force.

  7. Molecular time-course and the metabolic basis of entry into dauer in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Pan-Young Jeong

    Full Text Available When Caenorhabditis elegans senses dauer pheromone (daumone, signaling inadequate growth conditions, it enters the dauer state, which is capable of long-term survival. However, the molecular pathway of dauer entry in C. elegans has remained elusive. To systematically monitor changes in gene expression in dauer paths, we used a DNA microarray containing 22,625 gene probes corresponding to 22,150 unique genes from C. elegans. We employed two different paths: direct exposure to daumone (Path 1 and normal growth media plus liquid culture (Path 2. Our data reveal that entry into dauer is accomplished through the multi-step process, which appears to be compartmentalized in time and according to metabolic flux. That is, a time-course of dauer entry in Path 1 shows that dauer larvae formation begins at post-embryonic stage S4 (48 h and is complete at S6 (72 h. Our results also suggest the presence of a unique adaptive metabolic control mechanism that requires both stage-specific expression of specific genes and tight regulation of different modes of fuel metabolite utilization to sustain the energy balance in the context of prolonged survival under adverse growth conditions. It is apparent that worms entering dauer stage may rely heavily on carbohydrate-based energy reserves, whereas dauer larvae utilize fat or glyoxylate cycle-based energy sources. We created a comprehensive web-based dauer metabolic database for C. elegans (www.DauerDB.org that makes it possible to search any gene and compare its relative expression at a specific stage, or evaluate overall patterns of gene expression in both paths. This database can be accessed by the research community and could be widely applicable to other related nematodes as a molecular atlas.

  8. Factorial and time course designs for cDNA microarray experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glonek, G F V; Solomon, P J

    2004-01-01

    Microarrays are powerful tools for surveying the expression levels of many thousands of genes simultaneously. They belong to the new genomics technologies which have important applications in the biological, agricultural and pharmaceutical sciences. There are myriad sources of uncertainty in microarray experiments, and rigorous experimental design is essential for fully realizing the potential of these valuable resources. Two questions frequently asked by biologists on the brink of conducting cDNA or two-colour, spotted microarray experiments are 'Which mRNA samples should be competitively hybridized together on the same slide?' and 'How many times should each slide be replicated?' Early experience has shown that whilst the field of classical experimental design has much to offer this emerging multi-disciplinary area, new approaches which accommodate features specific to the microarray context are needed. In this paper, we propose optimal designs for factorial and time course experiments, which are special designs arising quite frequently in microarray experimentation. Our criterion for optimality is statistical efficiency based on a new notion of admissible designs; our approach enables efficient designs to be selected subject to the information available on the effects of most interest to biologists, the number of arrays available for the experiment, and other resource or practical constraints, including limitations on the amount of mRNA probe. We show that our designs are superior to both the popular reference designs, which are highly inefficient, and to designs incorporating all possible direct pairwise comparisons. Moreover, our proposed designs represent a substantial practical improvement over classical experimental designs which work in terms of standard interactions and main effects. The latter do not provide a basis for meaningful inference on the effects of most interest to biologists, nor make the most efficient use of valuable and limited resources.

  9. The time course of reading processes in children with and without dyslexia: An ERP study

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    Sandra eHasko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main diagnostic criterion for developmental dyslexia (DD in transparent orthographies is a remarkable reading speed deficit, which is often accompanied by spelling difficulties. These deficits have been traced back to both deficits in orthographic and phonological processing. For a better understanding of the reading speed deficit in DD it is necessary to clarify which processing steps are degraded in children with DD during reading. In order to address this question the present study used EEG to investigate three reading related ERPs: the N170, N400 and LPC. Twenty-nine children without DD and 52 children with DD performed a phonological lexical decision (PLD – task, which tapped both orthographic and phonological processing. Children were presented with words, pseudohomophones, pseudowords and false fonts and had to decide whether the presented stimulus sounded like an existing German word or not. Compared to control children, children with DD showed deficits in all the investigated ERPs. Firstly, a diminished mean area under the curve for the word material - false font contrasts in the time window of the N170 was observed, indicating a reduced degree of print sensitivity; secondly, N400 amplitudes, as suggested to reflect the access to the orthographic lexicon and grapheme-phoneme conversion, were attenuated; and lastly, phonological access as indexed by the LPC was degraded in children with DD. Processing differences dependent on the linguistic material in children without DD were observed only in the LPC, suggesting that similar reading processes were adopted independent of orthographic familiarity. The results of this study suggest that effective treatment should include both orthographic and phonological training. Furthermore, more longitudinal studies utilizing the same task and stimuli are needed to clarify how these processing steps and their time course change during reading development.

  10. Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Model with Time-Evolution of Energy and State Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Sankaran, Kamesh

    2012-01-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically-equivalent quantities that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous one-dimensional performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the energy and state properties of the plasma, the latter allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. The time evolution of the various energy modes in the system and the associated plasma properties, calculated for argon propellant, are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model compares favorably with performance measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters, with disagreements attributable to simplifying assumptions employed in the generation of the model solution.

  11. Time-course microarrays reveal early activation of the immune transcriptome and adipokine dysregulation leads to fibrosis in visceral adipose depots during diet-induced obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Eun-Young

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral white adipose tissue (WAT hypertrophy, adipokine production, inflammation and fibrosis are strongly associated with obesity, but the time-course of these changes in-vivo are not fully understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the time-course of changes in adipocyte morphology, adipokines and the global transcriptional landscape in visceral WAT during the development of diet-induced obesity. Results C57BL/6 J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD or normal diet (ND and sacrificed at 8 time-points over 24 weeks. Excessive fat accumulation was evident in visceral WAT depots (Epidydimal, Perirenal, Retroperitoneum, Mesentery after 2–4 weeks. Fibrillar collagen accumulation was evident in epidydimal adipocytes at 24 weeks. Plasma adipokines, leptin, resistin and adipsin, increased early and time-dependently, while adiponectin decreased late after 20 weeks. Only plasma leptin and adiponectin levels were associated with their respective mRNA levels in visceral WAT. Time-course microarrays revealed early and sustained activation of the immune transcriptome in epididymal and mesenteric depots. Up-regulated inflammatory genes included pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines (Tnf, Il1rn, Saa3, Emr1, Adam8, Itgam, Ccl2, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 9 and their upstream signalling pathway genes (multiple Toll-like receptors, Irf5 and Cd14. Early changes also occurred in fibrosis, extracellular matrix, collagen and cathepsin related-genes, but histological fibrosis was only visible in the later stages. Conclusions In diet-induced obesity, early activation of TLR-mediated inflammatory signalling cascades by CD antigen genes, leads to increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, resulting in chronic low-grade inflammation. Early changes in collagen genes may trigger the accumulation of ECM components, promoting fibrosis in the later stages of diet-induced obesity. New therapeutic approaches

  12. Time-course microarrays reveal early activation of the immune transcriptome and adipokine dysregulation leads to fibrosis in visceral adipose depots during diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eun-Young; Shin, Su-Kyung; Cho, Yun-Young; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Eunjung; Park, Taesun; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Yun, Jong Won; McGregor, Robin A; Park, Yong Bok; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2012-09-04

    Visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) hypertrophy, adipokine production, inflammation and fibrosis are strongly associated with obesity, but the time-course of these changes in-vivo are not fully understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the time-course of changes in adipocyte morphology, adipokines and the global transcriptional landscape in visceral WAT during the development of diet-induced obesity. C57BL/6 J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or normal diet (ND) and sacrificed at 8 time-points over 24 weeks. Excessive fat accumulation was evident in visceral WAT depots (Epidydimal, Perirenal, Retroperitoneum, Mesentery) after 2-4 weeks. Fibrillar collagen accumulation was evident in epidydimal adipocytes at 24 weeks. Plasma adipokines, leptin, resistin and adipsin, increased early and time-dependently, while adiponectin decreased late after 20 weeks. Only plasma leptin and adiponectin levels were associated with their respective mRNA levels in visceral WAT. Time-course microarrays revealed early and sustained activation of the immune transcriptome in epididymal and mesenteric depots. Up-regulated inflammatory genes included pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines (Tnf, Il1rn, Saa3, Emr1, Adam8, Itgam, Ccl2, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 9) and their upstream signalling pathway genes (multiple Toll-like receptors, Irf5 and Cd14). Early changes also occurred in fibrosis, extracellular matrix, collagen and cathepsin related-genes, but histological fibrosis was only visible in the later stages. In diet-induced obesity, early activation of TLR-mediated inflammatory signalling cascades by CD antigen genes, leads to increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, resulting in chronic low-grade inflammation. Early changes in collagen genes may trigger the accumulation of ECM components, promoting fibrosis in the later stages of diet-induced obesity. New therapeutic approaches targeting visceral adipose tissue genes altered early by HFD

  13. Effects of particulate matter on the pulmonary and vascular system: time course in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salonen Raimo O

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed within the scope of two multi-center European Commission-funded projects (HEPMEAP and PAMCHAR concerning source-composition-toxicity relationship for particulate matter (PM sampled in Europe. The present study aimed to optimize the design for PM in vivo toxicity screening studies in terms of dose and time between a single exposure and the determination of the biological responses in a rat model mimicking human disease resulting in susceptibility to ambient PM. Dust in thoracic PM size-range (aerodynamic diameter Results The neutrophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid increased tremendously after exposure to the highest RTD doses or EHC-93. Furthermore, PM exposure slightly affected blood coagulation since there was a small but significant increase in the plasma fibrinogen levels (factor 1.2. Pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress as well as changes in blood coagulation factors and circulating blood cell populations were observed within the range of 3 to 10 mg PM/kg of body weight without significant pulmonary injury. Conclusion The optimal dose for determining the toxicity ranking of ambient derived PM samples in spontaneously hypertensive rats is suggested to be between 3 and 10 mg PM/kg of body weight under the conditions used in the present study. At a lower dose only some inflammatory effects were detected, which will probably be too few to be able to discriminate between PM samples while a completely different response pattern was observed with the highest dose. In addition to the dose, a 24-hr interval from exposure to sacrifice seemed appropriate to assess the relative toxic potency of PM since the majority of the health effects were observed one day after PM exposure compared to the other times examined. The aforementioned considerations provide a good basis for conducting PM toxicity screening studies in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

  14. Time-course changes in the expression of Na+, K+-ATPase in gills and pyloric caeca of brown trout (Salmo trutta) during acclimation to seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Michel; Madsen, Steffen; Blenstrup, Henrik;

    2000-01-01

    Changes in protein and mRNA expression of Na+,K+-ATPase in gills and pyloric caeca of brown trout were investigated on a detailed time course after transfer from freshwater to 25 ppt seawater (SW). A transient deflection in plasma osmolality and muscle water content lasting from 4 h until day 3...... posttransfer. The similarity of the response in these two organs suggests that they both play significant physiological roles in restoring hydromineral balance after abrupt increase in salinity. Further, SW transfer induced a slight, though significant, increase in primary gill filament Na+, K......+-ATPase immunoreactive (NKIR) cell abundance. This was paralleled by a marked (50%) decrease in secondary lamellar NKIR cell abundance after less than 1 d in SW. Thus, SW acclimation in brown trout is characterised by a lasting decrease in overall NKIR cell abundance in the gill. We propose that SW transfer stimulates...

  15. A high performance real-time plasma control and event detection DSP based VME system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, A.P. E-mail: pinto@ci.uc.pt; Correia, Carlos; Varandas, Carlos

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the digital signal processors module of a high performance system, specially designed for real-time plasma control and event detection on the next generation fusion experiments with long duration discharges. The system is composed of a commercial CPU board and several on-site developed intelligent modules inserted in the same VME crate.

  16. Time-related contact angle measurements with human plasma on biomaterial surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhorst, G; Van der Mei, HC; Van Oeveren, W; Spijker, HT; Busscher, HJ

    1999-01-01

    Axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile (ADSA-P) was used to assess in time contact angle changes of human plasma drops placed on four different biomaterials. Results were related with conventional blood compatibility measurements: albumin adsorption, fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion.

  17. Development of real-time plasma analysis and control algorithms for the TCV tokamak using Simulink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felici, F.; Le, H. B.; J. I. Paley,; Duval, B. P.; Coda, S.; Moret, J. M.; Bortolon, A.; L. Federspiel,; Goodman, T. P.; Hommen, G.; A. Karpushov,; Piras, F.; A. Pitzschke,; J. Romero,; G. Sevillano,; Sauter, O.; Vijvers, W.; TCV team,

    2014-01-01

    One of the key features of the new digital plasma control system installed on the TCV tokamak is the possibility to rapidly design, test and deploy real-time algorithms. With this flexibility the new control system has been used for a large number of new experiments which exploit TCV's powerful

  18. The relation between doses or post-plasma time points and apoptosis of leukemia cells induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD plasma was applied to induce apoptosis of LT-12 leukemia cells. Plasma effects on cell death was evaluated by MTT assay and FCM apoptosis assay with Annexin V/PI double staining, suggesting that plasma killing cells rate and inducing cell apoptosis rate both positively were related to the plasma doses or the post-plasma time points. The cell death rates increased from 15.2% to 33.1% and the apoptosis rate raise from 23.8% to 28% when the dose raise from 60s to 120 s at 8 h post-plasma, while they increased from 15.4% to 34.9% and from 48% to 55.3% respectively at the same doses at 12 h post-plasma. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members were measured for exploring the related apoptotic mechanisms phenomenon. We found ROS immediately increased to 1.24 times of the original amount, then increasing to 5.39-fold at 20 h after treatment. The gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members are very active at 8-12 h post-plasma. Our results demonstrate that DBD plasma can effectively induce tumor cell death through primarily related apoptotic mechanisms.

  19. \\mathbf{E}\\times \\mathbf{B} staircases and barrier permeability in magnetised plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, G.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Clairet, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Sabot, R.; Hennequin, P.; Verdoolaege, G.

    2017-01-01

    In-depth experimental characterisation of spontaneous shear flow patterning into a so-called \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} staircase—named after its planetary analogue—is shown in magnetised plasma turbulence, using ultrafast-sweeping reflectometry in the Tore Supra tokamak. Staircase signatures are found in a large variety of L-mode plasma conditions. Sensitivity to the dominant source of free energy is highlighted for the first time. A connection between staircase shear layer permeability and deviation from gyro-Bohm confinement scaling is strongly suggested, opening new routes to understanding confinement in drift-wave turbulence.

  20. Integrated pathway modules using time-course metabolic profiles and EST data from Milnesium tardigradum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisser, Daniela; Grohme, Markus A; Kopka, Joachim; Frohme, Marcus; Schill, Ralph O; Hengherr, Steffen; Dandekar, Thomas; Klau, Gunnar W; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias

    2012-06-19

    Tardigrades are multicellular organisms, resistant to extreme environmental changes such as heat, drought, radiation and freezing. They outlast these conditions in an inactive form (tun) to escape damage to cellular structures and cell death. Tardigrades are apparently able to prevent or repair such damage and are therefore a crucial model organism for stress tolerance. Cultures of the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum were dehydrated by removing the surrounding water to induce tun formation. During this process and the subsequent rehydration, metabolites were measured in a time series by GC-MS. Additionally expressed sequence tags are available, especially libraries generated from the active and inactive state. The aim of this integrated analysis is to trace changes in tardigrade metabolism and identify pathways responsible for their extreme resistance against physical stress. In this study we propose a novel integrative approach for the analysis of metabolic networks to identify modules of joint shifts on the transcriptomic and metabolic levels. We derive a tardigrade-specific metabolic network represented as an undirected graph with 3,658 nodes (metabolites) and 4,378 edges (reactions). Time course metabolite profiles are used to score the network nodes showing a significant change over time. The edges are scored according to information on enzymes from the EST data. Using this combined information, we identify a key subnetwork (functional module) of concerted changes in metabolic pathways, specific for de- and rehydration. The module is enriched in reactions showing significant changes in metabolite levels and enzyme abundance during the transition. It resembles the cessation of a measurable metabolism (e.g. glycolysis and amino acid anabolism) during the tun formation, the production of storage metabolites and bioprotectants, such as DNA stabilizers, and the generation of amino acids and cellular components from monosaccharides as carbon and energy source

  1. Integrated pathway modules using time-course metabolic profiles and EST data from Milnesium tardigradum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beisser Daniela

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tardigrades are multicellular organisms, resistant to extreme environmental changes such as heat, drought, radiation and freezing. They outlast these conditions in an inactive form (tun to escape damage to cellular structures and cell death. Tardigrades are apparently able to prevent or repair such damage and are therefore a crucial model organism for stress tolerance. Cultures of the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum were dehydrated by removing the surrounding water to induce tun formation. During this process and the subsequent rehydration, metabolites were measured in a time series by GC-MS. Additionally expressed sequence tags are available, especially libraries generated from the active and inactive state. The aim of this integrated analysis is to trace changes in tardigrade metabolism and identify pathways responsible for their extreme resistance against physical stress. Results In this study we propose a novel integrative approach for the analysis of metabolic networks to identify modules of joint shifts on the transcriptomic and metabolic levels. We derive a tardigrade-specific metabolic network represented as an undirected graph with 3,658 nodes (metabolites and 4,378 edges (reactions. Time course metabolite profiles are used to score the network nodes showing a significant change over time. The edges are scored according to information on enzymes from the EST data. Using this combined information, we identify a key subnetwork (functional module of concerted changes in metabolic pathways, specific for de- and rehydration. The module is enriched in reactions showing significant changes in metabolite levels and enzyme abundance during the transition. It resembles the cessation of a measurable metabolism (e.g. glycolysis and amino acid anabolism during the tun formation, the production of storage metabolites and bioprotectants, such as DNA stabilizers, and the generation of amino acids and cellular components from

  2. Clinical Spectrum Time Course in Anti Jo-1 Positive Antisynthetase Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagna, Lorenzo; Nuño, Laura; Scirè, Carlo Alberto; Govoni, Marcello; Longo, Francisco Javier Lopez; Franceschini, Franco; Neri, Rossella; Castañeda, Santos; Giraldo, Walter Alberto Sifuentes; Caporali, Roberto; Iannone, Florenzo; Fusaro, Enrico; Paolazzi, Giuseppe; Pellerito, Raffaele; Schwarting, Andreas; Saketkoo, Lesley Ann; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Quartuccio, Luca; Bartoloni, Elena; Specker, Christof; Murcia, Trinitario Pina; La Corte, Renato; Furini, Federica; Foschi, Valentina; Corral, Javier Bachiller; Airò, Paolo; Cavazzana, Ilaria; Martínez-Barrio, Julia; Hinojosa, Michelle; Giannini, Margherita; Barsotti, Simone; Menke, Julia; Triantafyllias, Kostantinos; Vitetta, Rosetta; Russo, Alessandra; Bajocchi, Gianluigi; Bravi, Elena; Barausse, Giovanni; Bortolotti, Roberto; Selmi, Carlo; Parisi, Simone; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; González-Gay, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anti Jo-1 antibodies are the main markers of the antisynthetase syndrome (ASSD), an autoimmune disease clinically characterized by the occurrence of arthritis, myositis, and interstitial lung disease (ILD). These manifestations usually co-occur (for practical purpose complete forms) in the same patient, but cases with only 1 or 2 of these findings (for practical purpose incomplete forms) have been described. In incomplete forms, the ex novo occurrence of further manifestations is possible, although with frequencies and timing not still defined. The aim of this international, multicenter, retrospective study was to characterize the clinical time course of anti Jo-1 positive ASSD in a large cohort of patients. Included patients should be anti Jo-1 positive and with at least 1 feature between arthritis, myositis, and ILD. We evaluated the differences between complete and incomplete forms, timing of clinical picture appearance and analyzed factors predicting the appearance of further manifestations in incomplete ASSD. Finally, we collected 225 patients (58 males and 167 females) with a median follow-up of 80 months. At the onset, complete ASSD were 44 and incomplete 181. Patients with incomplete ASSD had frequently only 1 of the classic triad findings (110 cases), in particular, isolated arthritis in 54 cases, isolated myositis in 28 cases, and isolated ILD in 28 cases. At the end of follow-up, complete ASSD were 113, incomplete 112. Only 5 patients had an isolated arthritis, only 5 an isolated myositis, and 15 an isolated ILD. During the follow-up, 108 patients with incomplete forms developed further manifestations. Single main feature onset was the main risk factor for the ex novo appearance of further manifestation. ILD was the prevalent ex novo manifestation (74 cases). In conclusion, ASSD is a condition that should be carefully considered in all patients presenting with arthritis, myositis, and ILD, even when isolated. The ex novo appearance of further

  3. Time course of the effects of orthokeratology on peripheral refraction and corneal topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pauline; Swarbrick, Helen

    2013-05-01

    To describe the time course of changes in both peripheral refraction and corneal topography in myopic adults wearing myopic orthokeratology (OK) lenses. Nineteen adult myopes were fitted with OK lenses in both eyes for overnight wear. Central and peripheral refraction and corneal topography were measured along the horizontal meridian at baseline and after 1, 4, 7 and 14 nights of lens wear. At baseline, refraction was myopic at all positions along the horizontal meridian. Two weeks of OK lens wear caused a significant change in refraction where the general trend was a hyperopic shift in spherical equivalent (M) except at 35° in the nasal visual field where there was instead a myopic shift in M. The most significant change in M occurred between baseline and after 1 night of OK lens wear and the effect became less dramatic across subsequent days of OK treatment. Similarly, OK caused significant change in corneal refractive power at all positions along the horizontal corneal chord. There was a reduction in corneal power or flattening of the cornea at all positions except at 2.4 mm and 2.8 mm on the nasal cornea where there was an increase in corneal refractive power or steepening of the cornea. This change was most apparent after 1 night of OK lens wear and, similar to changes in peripheral refraction, changes in corneal refractive power on subsequent days of OK treatment became less marked. Orthokeratology caused significant changes in both peripheral refraction and corneal topography. The greatest change in refraction and corneal refractive power across the horizontal corneal meridian occurred during the first night of OK lens wear. Subsequent changes in both peripheral refraction and corneal topography were less dramatic, in the same manner as reported changes in apical radius and central refraction after OK. This study confirms that with OK treatment, the peripheral retina experiences myopic defocus, which is conjectured to underlie the observed slowing of myopia

  4. Weekly Time Course of Neuro-Muscular Adaptation to Intensive Strength Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Brown

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Detailed description of the time course of muscular adaptation is rarely found in literature. Thus, models of muscular adaptation are difficult to validate since no detailed data of adaptation are available. In this article, as an initial step toward a detailed description and analysis of muscular adaptation, we provide a case report of 8 weeks of intense strength training with two active, male participants. Muscular adaptations were analyzed on a morphological level with MRI scans of the right quadriceps muscle and the calculation of muscle volume, on a voluntary strength level by isometric voluntary contractions with doublet stimulation (interpolated twitch technique and on a non-voluntary level by resting twitch torques. Further, training volume and isokinetic power were closely monitored during the training phase. Data were analyzed weekly for 1 week prior to training, pre-training, 8 weeks of training and 2 weeks of detraining (no strength training. Results show a very individual adaptation to the intense strength training protocol. While training volume and isokinetic power increased linearly during the training phase, resting twitch parameters decreased for both participants after the first week of training and stayed below baseline until de-training. Voluntary activation level showed an increase in the first 4 weeks of training, while maximum voluntary contraction showed only little increase compared to baseline. Muscle volume increased for both subjects. Especially training status seemed to influence the acute reaction to intense strength training. Fatigue had a major influence on performance and could only be overcome by one participant. The results give a first detailed insight into muscular adaptation to intense strength training on various levels, providing a basis of data for a validation of muscle fatigue and adaptation models.

  5. ISPC effect is not observed when the word comes too late: A time course analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nart Bedin Atalay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The item-specific proportion congruency (ISPC effect is demonstrated by a smaller Stroop effect observed for mostly incongruent items compared to mostly congruent items. Currently, there is a continuing debate on whether conflict driven item-specific control processes or stimulus-response contingency learning account for the ISPC effect. In the present study, we conducted two experiments to investigate the time course of the ISPC effect with a stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA manipulation. Both negative and positive SOAs were used in order to manipulate the contingency learning between the word and the color dimensions. We also combined this SOA manipulation with a set size manipulation (Bugg & Hutchison, 2013 to moderate the contribution of contingency learning and item-specific processes to the observed ISPC effect. We expected that the change in the magnitude of the ISPC effect as a result of SOA would follow different patterns for the 2-item and 4-item set conditions. Results showed that the SOA manipulation influenced the ISPC effect. Specifically, when the word followed the color with a 200 ms delay, the observed ISPC effect was smaller, if at all present, than the ISPC effects in other negative and positive SOA conditions, regardless of set size. In conclusion, our results showed that the ISPC effect was not observed if the word arrived too late. We also conducted additional awareness and RT distribution analyses (delta plots to further investigate the ISPC effect. These analyses showed that a higher percentage of participants were aware of the ISPC manipulation in the 2-item set condition compared to the 4-item set condition. Delta plots revealed that the ISPC effect was smaller for fastest responses and increased as the responses got slower.

  6. The time course and characteristics of procedural learning in schizophrenia patients and healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael eAdini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with schizophrenia have deficits in some types of procedural learning. Several mechanisms contribute to this learning in healthy individuals, including statistical and sequence-learning. To find preserved and impaired learning mechanisms in schizophrenia, we studied the time course and characteristics of implicitly-introduced sequence-learning (SRT task in 15 schizophrenia patients (7 mild and 8 severe and 9 healthy controls, in short sessions over multiple days (5-22. The data show speed gains of similar magnitude for all groups, but the groups differed in overall speed and in the characteristics of the learning. By analyzing the data according to its spatial-position and temporal-order components, we provide evidence for two types of learning that could differentiate the groups: while the learning of the slower, severe group was dominated by statistical learning, the control group moved from a fast learning phase of statistical-related performance to subsequence learning (chunking. Our findings oppose the naïve assumption that a similar gain of speed reflects a similar learning process; they indicate that the slower performance reflects the activation of a different motor plan than does the faster performance; and demonstrate that statistical learning and subsequence learning are two successive stages in implicit sequence learning, with chunks inferred from prior statistical computations. Our results indicate that statistical learning is intact in patients with schizophrenia, but is slower to develop in the severe patients. We suggest that this slow learning rate and the associated slow performance contribute to their deficit in developing sequence-specific learning by setting a temporal constraint on developing higher order associations.

  7. Time course of changes in heart rate and blood pressure variability in rats with myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Aires

    Full Text Available Our aim was to determine the time course of changes in autonomic balance in the acute (1 and 3 days, sub-acute (7 days and chronic (28 days phases of myocardial infarction (MI in rats. Autonomic balance was assessed by temporal and spectral analyses of blood pressure variability (BPV and heart rate variability (HRV. Pulsatile blood pressure (BP recordings (30 min were obtained in awake and unrestrained male Wistar rats (N = 77; 8-10 weeks old with MI (coronary ligature or sham operation (SO. Data are reported as means±SE. The high frequency (HF component (n.u. of HRV was significantly lower in MI-1- (P0.05. This reduction was mainly due to attenuation of the low frequency (LF band of BPV in absolute and normalized units (SO-1=39.3±7%; SO-3=55±4.5%; SO-7=46.8±4.5%; SO-28=45.7±5%; MI-1=13±3.5%; MI-3=35±4.7%; MI-7=25±2.8%; MI-28=21.4±2.8%. The results suggest that the reduction in HRV was associated with decrease of the HF component of HRV suggesting recovery of the vagal control of heartbeats along the post-infarction healing period. The depression of BPV was more dependent on the attenuation of the LF component, which is linked to the baroreflex modulation of the autonomic balance.

  8. Time course study of delayed wound healing in a biofilm-challenged diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ge; Usui, Marcia L; Underwood, Robert A; Singh, Pradeep K; James, Garth A; Stewart, Philip S; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm has been shown to play a role in delaying wound healing of chronic wounds, a major medical problem that results in significant health care burden. A reproducible animal model could be very valuable for studying the mechanism and management of chronic wounds. Our previous work showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) biofilm challenge on wounds in diabetic (db/db) mice significantly delayed wound healing. In this wound time course study, we further characterize the bacterial burden, delayed wound healing, and certain aspects of the host inflammatory response in the PAO1 biofilm-challenged db/db mouse model. PAO1 biofilms were transferred onto 2-day-old wounds created on the dorsal surface of db/db mice. Control wounds without biofilm challenge healed by 4 weeks, consistent with previous studies; none of the biofilm-challenged wounds healed by 4 weeks. Of the biofilm-challenged wounds, 64% healed by 6 weeks, and all of the biofilm-challenged wounds healed by 8 weeks. During the wound-healing process, P. aeruginosa was gradually cleared from the wounds while the presence of Staphylococcus aureus (part of the normal mouse skin flora) increased. Scabs from all unhealed wounds contained 10(7) P. aeruginosa, which was 100-fold higher than the counts isolated from wound beds (i.e., 99% of the P. aeruginosa was in the scab). Histology and genetic analysis showed proliferative epidermis, deficient vascularization, and increased inflammatory cytokines. Hypoxia inducible factor expression increased threefold in 4-week wounds. In summary, our study shows that biofilm-challenged wounds typically heal in approximately 6 weeks, at least 2 weeks longer than nonbiofilm-challenged normal wounds. These data suggest that this delayed wound healing model enables the in vivo study of bacterial biofilm responses to host defenses and the effects of biofilms on host wound healing pathways. It may also be used to test antibiofilm strategies for treating chronic wounds.

  9. Time course of changes in heart rate and blood pressure variability in rats with myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, R.; Pimentel, E.B.; Forechi, L.; Dantas, E.M.; Mill, J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the time course of changes in autonomic balance in the acute (1 and 3 days), sub-acute (7 days) and chronic (28 days) phases of myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Autonomic balance was assessed by temporal and spectral analyses of blood pressure variability (BPV) and heart rate variability (HRV). Pulsatile blood pressure (BP) recordings (30 min) were obtained in awake and unrestrained male Wistar rats (N = 77; 8-10 weeks old) with MI (coronary ligature) or sham operation (SO). Data are reported as means±SE. The high frequency (HF) component (n.u.) of HRV was significantly lower in MI-1- (P0.05). This reduction was mainly due to attenuation of the low frequency (LF) band of BPV in absolute and normalized units (SO-1=39.3±7%; SO-3=55±4.5%; SO-7=46.8±4.5%; SO-28=45.7±5%; MI-1=13±3.5%; MI-3=35±4.7%; MI-7=25±2.8%; MI-28=21.4±2.8%). The results suggest that the reduction in HRV was associated with decrease of the HF component of HRV suggesting recovery of the vagal control of heartbeats along the post-infarction healing period. The depression of BPV was more dependent on the attenuation of the LF component, which is linked to the baroreflex modulation of the autonomic balance. PMID:28076450

  10. Time-course of behavioural changes induced by ethanol in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Steven; Gerlai, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish has been proposed for the study of the effects of ethanol on the vertebrate brain. Behavioural tests have been successfully employed in the phenotypical characterization of these effects. However, the short scale (minute to minute) time course of ethanol induced changes of zebrafish behaviour has not been analyzed. The current study alleviates this need using a 2 × 3 chronic × acute ethanol exposure experimental design. We first expose zebrafish to ethanol chronically using a dose escalation procedure in which fish are kept in a final concentration of 0.5% vol/vol ethanol for 10 days while control fish receive identical dosing procedures but no ethanol. Subsequently, we expose zebrafish for one hour to an acute dose of ethanol (0.00, 0.50, or 1.00 % vol.vol) and monitor their behaviour throughout this. period. We quantify the mean and within-individual temporal variance of distance travelled, distance from bottom and angular velocity using video-tracking, and establish temporal trajectories of ethanol induced behavioural changes in zebrafish. For example, we find fish of the highest acute dose group previously not exposed to chronic ethanol to exhibit an inverted U shaped temporal trajectory in distance travelled (biphasic alcohol effect). We find this response to be blunted after chronic ethanol exposure (development of tolerance). We also describe an acute ethanol withdrawal induced increase in angular velocity. We conclude that temporal analysis of zebrafish behaviour is a sensitive method for the study of chronic and acute ethanol exposure induced functional changes in the vertebrate brain. PMID:23756142

  11. Memory time-course: mRNA 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Meneses, Alfredo

    2009-08-24

    In an attempt to clarify conflicting results about serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors in memory formation, their mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR in key brain areas for explicit and implicit memory. The time-course (0-120 h) of autoshaped responses was progressive and mRNA 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(7) receptors expression monotonically augmented or declined in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and raphe nuclei, respectively. At 24-48 h acutely 8-OH-DPAT (0.062 mg/kg) administration enhanced memory and attenuated mRNA 5-HT(1A)memory; however both combinations suppressed or up-regulated mRNA expression 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(7) receptors. In contrast, AS19 (5.0 mg/kg) facilitated memory consolidation, decreased or increased hippocampal 5-HT(7) and 5-HT(1A) receptors expression. Together these data revealed that, when both 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors were stimulated by 8-OHDPAT under memory consolidation, subtle changes emerged, not evident at behavioral level though detectable at genes expression. Notably, high levels of efficient memory were maintained even when serotonergic tone, via either 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(7) receptor, was down- or up-regulated. Nevertheless, WAY100635 plus SB-269970 impaired memory consolidation and suppressed their expression. Considering that serotonergic changes are prominent in AD patients with an earlier onset of disease the present approach might be useful in the identification of functional changes associated to memory formation, memory deficits and reversing or even preventing these deficits.

  12. The time course of neurolinguistic and neuropsychological symptoms in three cases of logopenic primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, Louise; Seidel, Barbara; Grande, Marion; Schulte, Stephanie; Pieperhoff, Peter; Südmeyer, Martin; Minnerop, Martina; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Huber, Walter; Grodzinsky, Yosef; Amunts, Katrin; Heim, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a rare clinical dementia syndrome affecting predominantly language abilities. Word-finding difficulties and comprehension deficits despite relatively preserved cognitive functions are characteristic symptoms during the first two years, and distinguish PPA from other dementia types like Alzheimer's disease. However, the dynamics of changes in language and non-linguistic abilities are not well understood. Most studies on progression used cross-sectional designs, which provide only limited insight into the course of the disease. Here we report the results of a longitudinal study in three cases of logopenic PPA over a period of 18 months, with exemplary longitudinal data from one patient even over 46 months. A comprehensive battery of neurolinguistic and neuropsychological tests was applied four times at intervals of six months. Over this period, deterioration of verbal abilities such as picture naming, story retelling, and semantic word recall was found, and the individual decline was quantified and compared between the three patients. Furthermore, decrease in non-verbal skills such as divided attention and increasing apraxia was observed in all three patients. In addition, inter-subject variability in the progression with different focuses was observed, with one patient developing a non-fluent PPA variant. The longitudinal, multivariate investigation of logopenic PPA thus provides novel insights into the progressive deterioration of verbal as well as non-verbal abilities. These deficits may further interact and thus form a multi-causal basis for the patients' problems in every-day life which need to be considered when planning individually targeted intervention in PPA.

  13. A time course analysis of satiety-induced instrumental outcome devaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Shauna L; Marchand, Alain R; Ferreira, Guillaume; Coutureau, Etienne

    2016-12-01

    Sensory-specific satiety is commonly used in studies of decision making to selectively devalue a food reward. Devaluation is reflected in an immediate reduction in the subsequent intake of the food and in the performance of actions that gain access to that food. Despite its frequent use, the lasting effects of satiety-induced devaluation on instrumental actions are unknown. Here, we examined the time course and contextual dependency of sensory-specific satiety-induced devaluation on instrumental responding and consumption. Rats were trained to perform two instrumental actions for two distinct food rewards. Then, one of the instrumental outcomes was provided ad libitum for 1 hour in separate feeding cages and the effect of this devaluation was assessed 0, 2, or 5 hours after satiation. At a delay of 0 or 2 hours, both intake and instrumental responding were sensitive to the satiety treatment. That is, rats consumed less of the devalued outcome and responded less for the devalued outcome than for the valued outcome. By contrast, after 5 hours, rats showed sensitivity to devaluation in consumption but not in instrumental responding. Strikingly, sensitivity to devaluation was restored for the instrumental response after a 5 hour delay when devaluation was performed in the instrumental context. These results indicate that, in rats, specific satiety-induced devaluation endures and is context-independent for up to 2 hours post-satiation. At longer delays, the impact of sensory-specific satiety on instrumental responding is context-dependent, suggesting that contextual cues may be required for the value of specific outcomes to control instrumental responding.

  14. Real-time Numerical Solution for the Plasma Response Matrix for Disruption Avoidance in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Alexander; Kolemen, Egemen; Glasser, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    Real-time analysis of plasma stability is essential to any active feedback control system that performs ideal MHD disruption avoidance. Due to singularities and poor numerical conditioning endemic to ideal MHD models of tokamak plasmas, current state-of-the-art codes require serial operation, and are as yet inoperable on the sub- O (1s) timescale required by ITER's MHD evolution time. In this work, low-toroidal-n ideal MHD modes are found in near real-time as solutions to a well-posed boundary value problem. Using a modified parallel shooting technique and linear methods to subdue numerical instability, such modes are integrated with parallelization across spatial and ``temporal'' parts, via a Riccati approach. The resulting state transition matrix is shown to yield the desired plasma response matrix, which describes how magnetic perturbations may be employed to maintain plasma stability. Such an algorithm may be helpful in designing a control system to achieve ITER's high-performance operational objectives. Sponsored by US DOE under DE-SC0015878 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  15. Time-resolved spectra of dense plasma focus using spectrometer, streak camera, and CCD combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldin, F. J. [Livermore Operations, National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [North Las Vegas Facility, National Security Technologies, LLC, North Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States); Wilkins, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A time-resolving spectrographic instrument has been assembled with the primary components of a spectrometer, image-converting streak camera, and CCD recording camera, for the primary purpose of diagnosing highly dynamic plasmas. A collection lens defines the sampled region and couples light from the plasma into a step index, multimode fiber which leads to the spectrometer. The output spectrum is focused onto the photocathode of the streak camera, the output of which is proximity-coupled to the CCD. The spectrometer configuration is essentially Czerny-Turner, but off-the-shelf Nikon refraction lenses, rather than mirrors, are used for practicality and flexibility. Only recently assembled, the instrument requires significant refinement, but has now taken data on both bridge wire and dense plasma focus experiments.

  16. Time-Resolved Spectra of Dense Plasma Focus Using Spectrometer, Streak Camera, CCD Combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. J. Goldin, B. T. Meehan, E. C. Hagen, P. R. Wilkins

    2010-10-01

    A time-resolving spectrographic instrument has been assembled with the primary components of a spectrometer, image-converting streak camera, and CCD recording camera, for the primary purpose of diagnosing highly dynamic plasmas. A collection lens defines the sampled region and couples light from the plasma into a step index, multimode fiber which leads to the spectrometer. The output spectrum is focused onto the photocathode of the streak camera, the output of which is proximity-coupled to the CCD. The spectrometer configuration is essentially Czerny–Turner, but off-the-shelf Nikon refraction lenses, rather than mirrors, are used for practicality and flexibility. Only recently assembled, the instrument requires significant refinement, but has now taken data on both bridge wire and dense plasma focus experiments.

  17. Real-time dielectric-film thickness measurement system for plasma processing chamber wall monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Yong; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-12-01

    An in-situ real-time processing chamber wall monitoring system was developed. In order to measure the thickness of the dielectric film, two frequencies of small sinusoidal voltage (∼1 V) signals were applied to an electrically floated planar type probe, which is positioned at chamber wall surface, and the amplitudes of the currents and the phase differences between the voltage and current were measured. By using an equivalent sheath circuit model including a sheath capacitance, the dielectric thickness can be obtained. Experiments were performed in various plasma condition, and reliable dielectric film thickness was obtained regardless of the plasma properties. In addition, availability in commercial chamber for plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was verified. This study is expected to contribute to the control of etching and deposition processes and optimization of periodic maintenance in semiconductor manufacturing process.

  18. Time Course of the Rabbit's Conditioned Nictitating Membrane Movements during Acquisition, Extinction, and Reacquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, E. James; Ludvig, Elliot A.; Sutton, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    The present experiment tested whether or not the time course of a conditioned eyeblink response, particularly its duration, would expand and contract, as the magnitude of the conditioned response (CR) changed massively during acquisition, extinction, and reacquisition. The CR duration remained largely constant throughout the experiment, while CR…

  19. Behavioral changes during exposure to 1,1,1-trichloroethane: time-course and relationship to blood solvent levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, C J; Campbell, L; Samuel, A M; Alderman, K J; Idzikowski, C; Wilson, H K; Gompertz, D

    1987-01-01

    We report the results of an exposure chamber study in which volunteers were exposed to 0, 950 mg.m-3 (175 ppm) and 1,990 mg.m-3 (350 ppm) of 1,1,1-trichloroethane for 3.5 hours. The time-course of the behavioral changes and the relationship to blood concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloroethane were investigated. A pattern of performance deficits consistent with earlier work was found for some of the tests of psychomotor performance. The time-course of these appeared to be rapid, occurring in some cases within 20 minutes of exposure. For those tasks shown to be sensitive to 1,1,1-trichloroethane exposure, the development of performance changes followed the time-course of blood solvent levels. Two behavioral tests not previously used in this type of work were also employed. One was concerned with the distractability of attention and concentration (the Stroop test), and the other was concerned with analysing grammatical statements (the syntactic reasoning test). Different effects were found. In the Stroop test, enhanced performance was observed following exposure; however, the syntactic reasoning test was found to be resistant to solvent effects. Measures of short-term subjective well-being were not affected by exposure. It is suggested that the observations of time-course effects in performance and their relationship to change in blood solvent levels have implications for psychological test selection and for study designs for examining field exposure.

  20. TIME COURSE OF CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN ADULT RATS TREATED ACUTELY WITH CARBARYL CARBOFURAN, FORMETANATE, METHOMYL, METHIOCARB, OXAMYL ON PROPOXUR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To compare the toxicity of seven N-methyl carbamates, time course profiles for brain and red blood cell (RBC) cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition were established for each. Adult, male, Long Evans rats (n=4-5 dose group) were dosed orally with either carbaryl (30 mg/kg in corn oil); ...

  1. The time course of denervation-induced changes is similar in soleus muscles of adult and old rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degens, H.; Kosar, S.N.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Haan, A. de

    2008-01-01

    Muscle denervation is accompanied by atrophy and a decline in oxidative capacity. We investigated whether the time course of adaptations following denervation of the soleus muscle differs in adult (5 months old) and older adult (25 months old) rats. We denervated the soleus muscle of the left leg, w

  2. Young Chinese Children's Anger and Distress: Emotion Category and Intensity Identified by the Time Course of Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Qiu, Peihua; Park, Ka Young; Xu, Qinmei; Potegal, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A hierarchical cluster analysis of the time course of the videotaped reactions of 75 Chinese 2-4-year olds to mothers' toy-removal identified Distress, Low Anger, and High Anger behavior clusters. Anger often begins at low intensity; some children then escalate. The face-validity of Low and High Anger-cluster classifications was supported in…

  3. Evaluation of design strategies for time course experiments in genetic networks: the XlnR regulon in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omony, J.; Mach-Aigner, A.R.; Graaff, de L.H.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in the reconstruction of genetic network is to find experimental designs that maximize the information content in the data. In this work the information value of time course experiments (TCEs) is used to rank experimental designs. The study concerns the dynamic response of gene

  4. Variations in Help-Seeking, Battered Women's Relationship Course, Emotional Well-Being, and Experiences of Abuse over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Margret E.; Goodman, Lisa A.; Dutton, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Despite assumptions that leaving the batterer offers the best chance for improvement in battered women's lives, few studies provide conclusive data on this issue. Although many women eventually reunite with partners, also unexamined is the influence of relationship course over time. Five waves of data from 206 low-income, largely Black,…

  5. A LEGO Mindstorms NXT Approach for Teaching at Data Acquisition, Control Systems Engineering and Real-Time Systems Undergraduate Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Martin, A.; Fernandez-Madrigal, J. A.; Galindo, C.; Gonzalez-Jimenez, J.; Stockmans-Daou, C.; Blanco-Claraco, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    LEGO Mindstorms NXT robots are being increasingly used in undergraduate courses, mostly in robotics-related subjects. But other engineering topics, like the ones found in data acquisition, control and real-time subjects, also have difficult concepts that can be well understood only with good lab exercises. Such exercises require physical…

  6. Distribution and time course of corticosterone excretion in faeces and urine of female mice with varying systemic concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Hau, Jann; Jacobsen, Kirsten R;

    2010-01-01

    distribution and time course of corticosterone excretion, after intravenous injection of varying corticosterone concentrations, was investigated in female mice. Female BALB/c mice excreted 60% of all corticosterone in the urine with an approximate delay of 5h from tail vein administration. The remaining 40...

  7. Defining the Microglia Response during the Time Course of Chronic Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenti, James E; Murphy, Lita; Grabert, Kathleen; McColl, Barry W; Cancellotti, Enrico; Freeman, Tom C; Manson, Jean C

    2015-12-30

    Inflammation has been proposed as a major component of neurodegenerative diseases, although the precise role it plays has yet to be defined. We examined the role of key contributors to this inflammatory process, microglia, the major resident immune cell population of the brain, in a prion disease model of chronic neurodegeneration. Initially, we performed an extensive reanalysis of a large study of prion disease, where the transcriptome of mouse brains had been monitored throughout the time course of disease. Our analysis has provided a detailed classification of the disease-associated genes based on cell type of origin and gene function. This revealed that the genes upregulated during disease, regardless of the strain of mouse or prion protein, are expressed predominantly by activated microglia. In order to study the microglia contribution more specifically, we established a mouse model of prion disease in which the 79A murine prion strain was introduced by an intraperitoneal route into BALB/cJ(Fms-EGFP/-) mice, which express enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of the c-fms operon. Samples were taken at time points during disease progression, and histological analysis of the brain and transcriptional analysis of isolated microglia was carried out. The analysis of isolated microglia revealed a disease-specific, highly proinflammatory signature in addition to an upregulation of genes associated with metabolism and respiratory stress. This study strongly supports the growing recognition of the importance of microglia within the prion disease process and identifies the nature of the response through gene expression analysis of isolated microglia. Inflammation has been proposed as a major component of neurodegenerative diseases. We have examined the role of key contributors to this inflammatory process, microglia, the major resident immune cell population of the brain, in a murine prion disease model of chronic neurodegeneration. Our study demonstrates

  8. Recovery from exercise at varying work loads - Time course of responses of heart rate and systolic intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, P. S.; Spodick, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    The time course of the recovery period was characterized by noninvasive measurements after 4 minute bicycle exercise at 3 separate work loads in volunteers with normal peak responses. Most responses started immediately to return toward resting control values. Left ventricular ejection time and stroke volume change are discussed. Changes in pre-ejection period were determined by changes in isovolume contraction time, and factors affecting the degree and rate of return are considered. The rates of change in the ejection time index and in the ratio pre-ejection period/left ventricular ejection time were virtually independent of load throughout most of recovery.

  9. Recovery from exercise at varying work loads - Time course of responses of heart rate and systolic intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, P. S.; Spodick, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    The time course of the recovery period was characterized by noninvasive measurements after 4 minute bicycle exercise at 3 separate work loads in volunteers with normal peak responses. Most responses started immediately to return toward resting control values. Left ventricular ejection time and stroke volume change are discussed. Changes in pre-ejection period were determined by changes in isovolume contraction time, and factors affecting the degree and rate of return are considered. The rates of change in the ejection time index and in the ratio pre-ejection period/left ventricular ejection time were virtually independent of load throughout most of recovery.

  10. The Influence of Parental Education on Timing and Type of Union Formation : Changes Over the Life Course and Over Time in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooyaart, Jarl E.; Liefbroer, Aart C.

    Family background shapes young adults' decisions in their transition to adulthood, and the outcomes of these decisions lay the foundation for their subsequent life course. This study examines the influence of parental education on their children's union formation. We examine the timing of entry into

  11. The Influence of Parental Education on Timing and Type of Union Formation: Changes Over the Life Course and Over Time in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooyaart, J.E.; Liefbroer, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Family background shapes young adults’ decisions in their transition to adulthood, and the outcomes of these decisions lay the foundation for their subsequent life course. This study examines the influence of parental education on their children’s union formation. We examine the timing of entry into

  12. Learning Style versus Time Spent Studying and Career Choice: Which Is Associated with Success in a Combined Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Gary J.; Mazurek, Ewa; Marone, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    The VARK learning style is a pedagogical focus in health care education. This study examines relationships of course performance vs. VARK learning preference, study time, and career plan among students enrolled in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course at a large urban university. Students (n?=?492) from the fall semester course completed…

  13. Near Real Time Tools for ISS Plasma Science and Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily M.; Parker, Linda Neergaard; Shim, Ja Soon; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Pulkkinen, Antti, A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program utilizes a plasma environment forecast for estimating electrical charging hazards for crews during extravehicular activity (EVA). The process uses ionospheric electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) measurements from the ISS Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) instrument suite with the assumption that the plasma conditions will remain constant for one to fourteen days with a low probability for a space weather event which would significantly change the environment before an EVA. FPMU data is typically not available during EVA's, therefore, the most recent FPMU data available for characterizing the state of the ionosphere during EVA is typically a day or two before the start of an EVA or after the EVA has been completed. Three near real time space weather tools under development for ISS applications are described here including: (a) Ne from ground based ionosonde measurements of foF2 (b) Ne from near real time satellite radio occultation measurements of electron density profiles (c) Ne, Te from a physics based ionosphere model These applications are used to characterize the ISS space plasma environment during EVA periods when FPMU data is not available, monitor for large changes in ionosphere density that could render the ionosphere forecast and plasma hazard assessment invalid, and validate the "persistence of conditions" forecast assumption. In addition, the tools are useful for providing space environment input to science payloads on ISS and anomaly investigations during periods the FPMU is not operating.

  14. Plasma discharge and time-dependence of its effect to bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justan, I; Cernohorska, L; Dvorak, Z; Slavicek, P

    2014-07-01

    Several types of plasma discharge have been proven to have a capacity for sterilization. Our goal is to introduce new nonthermal plasma pencil. We used it to sterilize different microbial populations with differing ages. We used a plasma discharge of the following characteristics: radio frequency barrier discharger at atmospheric pressure with a working frequency of 13.56 MHz, and the working gas used was argon. We performed 110 tests with the following microbial populations: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus species, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. All populations were inoculated on the previous day and also on the day of our experiment. We made our evaluations the following day and also after 5 days, with all our microbial populations. Eradication of microbial populations is dependent on the plasma discharge exposure time in all cases. With regard to freshly inoculated microbes, we were able to sterilize agar with intensive exposure lasting for 10 s of colonies Pseudomonas, Proteus, and Klebsiella. The most resistant microbe seems to be S. aureus, which survives 5 s of coherent exposure in half of the cases. Using the lightest plasma discharge exposure, we achieved a maximum of 10(4)-10(5) CFU/mL (colony-forming unit - CFU). Regarding older microbial populations inoculated the day before the experiment, we can only decrease population growth to 10(5) CFU/mL approximately, but never completely sterilize. The plasma discharge with our characteristics could be used for the sterilization of the aforementioned superficially growing microbes, but does not sufficiently affect deeper layers and thus seems to be a limitation for eradication of the already erupted colonies.

  15. Quantitative Models of the Dose-Response and Time Course of Inhalational Anthrax in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Wiley A.; Bulmahn, Kenneth; Walton, Thomas E.; Woods, Christopher W.; Coghill, Catherine; Gallegos, Frank; Samore, Matthew H.; Adler, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    Anthrax poses a community health risk due to accidental or intentional aerosol release. Reliable quantitative dose-response analyses are required to estimate the magnitude and timeline of potential consequences and the effect of public health intervention strategies under specific scenarios. Analyses of available data from exposures and infections of humans and non-human primates are often contradictory. We review existing quantitative inhalational anthrax dose-response models in light of criteria we propose for a model to be useful and defensible. To satisfy these criteria, we extend an existing mechanistic competing-risks model to create a novel Exposure–Infection–Symptomatic illness–Death (EISD) model and use experimental non-human primate data and human epidemiological data to optimize parameter values. The best fit to these data leads to estimates of a dose leading to infection in 50% of susceptible humans (ID50) of 11,000 spores (95% confidence interval 7,200–17,000), ID10 of 1,700 (1,100–2,600), and ID1 of 160 (100–250). These estimates suggest that use of a threshold to human infection of 600 spores (as suggested in the literature) underestimates the infectivity of low doses, while an existing estimate of a 1% infection rate for a single spore overestimates low dose infectivity. We estimate the median time from exposure to onset of symptoms (incubation period) among untreated cases to be 9.9 days (7.7–13.1) for exposure to ID50, 11.8 days (9.5–15.0) for ID10, and 12.1 days (9.9–15.3) for ID1. Our model is the first to provide incubation period estimates that are independently consistent with data from the largest known human outbreak. This model refines previous estimates of the distribution of early onset cases after a release and provides support for the recommended 60-day course of prophylactic antibiotic treatment for individuals exposed to low doses. PMID:24058320

  16. Changing Attitudes over Time: Assessing the Effectiveness of a Workplace Diversity Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Tahira M.

    2003-01-01

    Diversity is increasing within the United States, and higher education will likely play a key role in preparing people to function in this new environment. This study assessed the effectiveness of a semester-long psychology workplace diversity course at changing student levels of ethnocentrism and attitudes regarding gender roles; the disabled;…

  17. A Course-Based Research Experience: How Benefits Change with Increased Investment in Instructional Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christopher D.; Alvarez, Consuelo J.; Bednarski, April E.; Dunbar, David; Goodman, Anya L.; Reinke, Catherine; Rosenwald, Anne G.; Wolyniak, Michael J.; Bailey, Cheryl; Barnard, Daron; Bazinet, Christopher; Beach, Dale L.; Bedard, James E. J.; Bhalla, Satish; Braverman, John; Burg, Martin; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Chung, Hui-Min; Clase, Kari; DeJong, Randall J.; DiAngelo, Justin R.; Du, Chunguang; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Eisler, Heather; Emerson, Julia A.; Frary, Amy; Frohlich, Donald; Gosser, Yuying; Govind, Shubha; Haberman, Adam; Hark, Amy T.; Hauser, Charles; Hoogewerf, Arlene; Hoopes, Laura L. M.; Howell, Carina E.; Johnson, Diana; Jones, Christopher J.; Kadlec, Lisa; Kaehler, Marian; Key, S. Catherine Silver; Kleinschmit, Adam; Kokan, Nighat P.; Kopp, Olga; Kuleck, Gary; Leatherman, Judith; Lopilato, Jane; MacKinnon, Christy; Martinez-Cruzado, Juan Carlos; McNeil, Gerard; Mel, Stephanie; Mistry, Hemlata; Nagengast, Alexis; Overvoorde, Paul; Paetkau, Don W.; Parrish, Susan; Peterson, Celeste N.; Preuss, Mary; Reed, Laura K.; Revie, Dennis; Robic, Srebrenka; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer; Rubin, Michael R.; Saville, Kenneth; Schroeder, Stephanie; Sharif, Karim; Shaw, Mary; Skuse, Gary; Smith, Christopher D.; Smith, Mary A.; Smith, Sheryl T.; Spana, Eric; Spratt, Mary; Sreenivasan, Aparna; Stamm, Joyce; Szauter, Paul; Thompson, Jeffrey S.; Wawersik, Matthew; Youngblom, James; Zhou, Leming; Mardis, Elaine R.; Buhler, Jeremy; Leung, Wilson; Lopatto, David; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2014-01-01

    There is widespread agreement that science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programs should provide undergraduates with research experience. Practical issues and limited resources, however, make this a challenge. We have developed a bioinformatics project that provides a course-based research experience for students at a diverse group of…

  18. How Cognitive Requirement of Prompt and Time in Course Are Correlated with Intersubjectivity within Threaded Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Barbara M.

    2011-01-01

    Threaded discussions represent conversational turn-taking in asynchronous, online learning environments. Given the crucial role that discussions play in the construction of knowledge within an online course, the quality of the interaction that occurs within threaded discussions is important to achieving the learning objectives of the designed…

  19. The Images of Our Time: Using Iconic Photographs in Developing a Modern American History Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, David H.

    2012-01-01

    History courses based on chronological narratives in textbooks often assume a linear format through which students accumulate substantial amounts of surface-level information, with the various pieces of that information being disconnected from each other and from larger historical contexts. In addition, such narratives are often dry and lifeless,…

  20. Onset of intractability and its course over time : The Dutch study of epilepsy in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Ada; Brouwer, Oebele; Stroink, Hans; van Donselaar, Cees; Peters, Boudewijn; Peeters, Els; Arts, Willem F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Intractability in epilepsy is difficult to define, and little is known about its onset, course, and duration. We investigated these aspects (as well as the occurrence of intractability) during long-term follow-up in patients with epilepsy, focusing on possible explanations for the variation

  1. Changing Attitudes over Time: Assessing the Effectiveness of a Workplace Diversity Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Tahira M.

    2003-01-01

    Diversity is increasing within the United States, and higher education will likely play a key role in preparing people to function in this new environment. This study assessed the effectiveness of a semester-long psychology workplace diversity course at changing student levels of ethnocentrism and attitudes regarding gender roles; the disabled;…

  2. An Investigation of Collaboration Processes in an Online Course: How Do Small Groups Develop over Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahng, Namsook

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated communication patterns and behavior in problem-solving groups in a graduate online course. An inductive qualitative analysis method was employed to analyze 732 messages that were retrieved from small group forums. The current study identified a temporal pattern of group development was in comparison with existing…

  3. Determination of reference intervals of glycated albumin and hemoglobin A1c in healthy pregnant Japanese women and analysis of their time courses and influencing factors during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Yuji; Shimizu, Ikki; Omori, Yasue; Nakabayashi, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Glycemic control is an important issue in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and in diabetic pregnant women. We determined the reference intervals of glycated albumin (GA) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as glycemic control markers in healthy Japanese pregnant women and analyzed their time courses and factors that influence these variables during pregnancy. 676 women were screened for the present study. After the exclusion of non-pregnant and puerperal women, 574 women were studied to determine the reference intervals. HbA1c, GA, casual plasma glucose, urinary glucose, urinary protein, and body mass index (BMI) (non-pregnancy) were measured. HbA1c levels significantly decreased in the second trimester of pregnancy and increased in the third trimester, while GA levels significantly decreased towards the third trimester. Casual plasma glucose levels decreased in the first trimester and subsequently remained constant. The reference intervals of GA and HbA1c in the healthy pregnant women were 11.5-15.7% and 4.5-5.7%, respectively. GA levels were lower (ppregnant women with proteinuria. In the obese group, GA levels were lower (ppregnant women were determined. Strict glycemic control is essential to reduce perinatal complications. GA appears to be a useful marker for pregnant women, since it can be measured easily and changes rapidly and markedly.

  4. A turbidimetric assay for the measurement of clotting times of procoagulant venoms in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Margaret A; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of the procoagulant effect of snake venoms is important for understanding their effects. The aim of this study was to develop a simple automated method to measure clotting times to assess procoagulant venoms. A turbidimetric assay was developed which monitors changes in optical density when plasma and venom are mixed. Plasma was added simultaneously to venom solutions in a 96 well microtitre plate. After mixing, the optical density at 340 nm was monitored in a microplate reader every 30 s over 30 min. The clotting time was defined as the lag time until the absorbance sharply increased. The turbidimetric method was compared to manual measurement of the clotting time defined as the time when a strand of fibrin can be drawn out of the mixture. The two methods were done simultaneously, with the same venom and plasma, and compared by plotting the manual versus turbidimetric clotting times. Within-day and between-day runs were done and the coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated. Plots comparing manual clotting times to the lag time in the turbidimetric assay showed good correlation between the two methods for brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis) venom, including 24 determinations in triplicate over six days for seven different venom concentrations. Good correlation was also found for four other venoms: tiger snake (Notechis scutatus), Carpet viper (Echis carinatus), Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) and Malaysian pit piper (Calloselasma rhodostoma). Between-day CV was in the range 10-20% for both methods, while within-day CV <10%. The turbidimetric assay appears to be a simple and convenient automated method for the measurement of clotting times to assess the effects of procoagulant venoms. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Scale size and life time of energy conversion regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, and in a companion paper by Hamrin et al. (2009 [Occurrence and location of concentrated load and generator regions observed by Cluster in the plasma sheet], we investigate localized energy conversion regions (ECRs in Earth's plasma sheet. From more than 80 Cluster plasma sheet crossings (660 h data at the altitude of about 15–20 RE in the summer and fall of 2001, we have identified 116 Concentrated Load Regions (CLRs and 35 Concentrated Generator Regions (CGRs. By examining variations in the power density, E·J, where E is the electric field and J is the current density obtained by Cluster, we have estimated typical values of the scale size and life time of the CLRs and the CGRs. We find that a majority of the observed ECRs are rather stationary in space, but varying in time. Assuming that the ECRs are cylindrically shaped and equal in size, we conclude that the typical scale size of the ECRs is 2 RE≲ΔSECR≲5 RE. The ECRs hence occupy a significant portion of the mid altitude plasma sheet. Moreover, the CLRs appear to be somewhat larger than the CGRs. The life time of the ECRs are of the order of 1–10 min, consistent with the large scale magnetotail MHD simulations of Birn and Hesse (2005. The life time of the CGRs is somewhat shorter than for the CLRs. On time scales of 1–10 min, we believe that ECRs rise and vanish in significant regions of the plasma sheet, possibly oscillating between load and generator character. It is probable that at least some of the observed ECRs oscillate energy back and forth in the plasma sheet instead of channeling it to the ionosphere.

  6. CHARACTERISTICS OF A FAST RISE TIME POWER SUPPLY FOR A PULSED PLASMA REACTOR FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DESTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages highe...

  7. Time fractional effect on ion acoustic shock waves in ion-pair plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahed, H. G., E-mail: hgomaa-eg@hotmail.com [Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Physics Department (Saudi Arabia); El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, A. A. [Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The nonlinear properties of ion acoustic shock waves are studied. The Burgers equation is derived and converted into the time fractional Burgers equation by Agrawal’s method. Using the Adomian decomposition method, shock wave solutions of the time fractional Burgers equation are constructed. The effect of the time fractional parameter on the shock wave properties in ion-pair plasma is investigated. The results obtained may be important in investigating the broadband electrostatic shock noise in D- and F-regions of Earth’s ionosphere.

  8. A discrete adaptive near-time optimum control for the plasma vertical position in a Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Scibile, L

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear controller for the plasma vertical position in a Tokamak, based on a discrete-time adaptive near time optimum control algorithm (DANTOC) is designed to stabilize the system and to maximize the state-space region over which stability can be guaranteed. The controller is also robust to the edge localized modes (ELMs) and the 600 Hz noise from the thyristor power supplies that are the primary source of disturbances and measurement noise. The controller is tested in simulation for the JET Tokamak and the results confirm its efficacy in controlling the vertical position for different plasma configurations. The controller is also tested experimentally on a real Tokamak, COMPASS-D, and the results demonstrate the improvement with respect to a simple linear PD controller in the presence of disturbances and measurement noise. The emphasis of the is on the development of the design methodology. (38 refs).

  9. Estimating time of last oral ingestion of cannabis from plasma THC and THCCOOH concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, Marilyn A; Elsohly, Mahmoud; Nebro, Wesenyalsh; Barnes, Allan; Gustafson, Richard A; Smith, Michael L

    2006-08-01

    Estimating the time of last cannabis use is important in assessing possible impairment of drivers involved in accidents, in verifying accuracy of court testimony and in the future, helpful in therapeutic monitoring of cannabis agonists. In 1992, Huestis et al developed model 1, based on plasma Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations, and model 2, on plasma 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannbinol/THC ratios, that predicted 95% confidence intervals for time of last cannabis use. These models seemed to be valuable when applied to the small amount of data from published studies of oral ingestion, a route of administration more popular with the advent of cannabis therapies. A study was designed to further validate the models after oral ingestion of THC, and to determine whether they could predict last usage after multiple oral doses. Eighteen subjects in IRB-approved studies participated after providing informed consent. Each of 12 subjects in one group received a single 10 mg oral dose of dronabinol (synthetic THC). In another protocol, 6 subjects received 4 different oral daily doses, divided into thirds and administered with meals for 5 consecutive days. There was a 10-day washout period between each dosing regimen. Daily doses were 0.39, 0.47, and 14.8 mg THC in hemp oil and 7.5 mg dronabinol. Blood specimens were collected throughout the study and analyzed for plasma THC and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannbinol by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with limits of quantification (LOQs) of 0.5 and 1.0 ng/mL, respectively. Actual times between ingestion of THC and blood collection spanned 0.5 to 16 hours. All plasma specimens with analyte concentrations >LOQ (n=90) were evaluated. Models 1 and 2 correctly predicted time of last THC ingestion for 74.4% and 90.0% of plasma specimens, respectively. 96.7% of predicted times were correct with one overestimate and 2 underestimates using the time interval defined by the lowest and highest 95

  10. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine\\ud exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the ...

  11. Renal function and plasma dabigatran level measured at trough by diluted thrombin time assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta E. Martinuzzo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Dabigatran etexilate (direct thrombin inhibitor is effective in preventing embolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. It does not require laboratory control, but given the high renal elimination, its measurement in plasma is important in renal failure. The objectives of the study were to verify the analytical quality of the diluted thrombin time assay for measurement of dabigatran plasma concentration (cc, correlate cc with classic coagulation assays, prothrombin time (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT, and evaluate them according to the creatinine clearance (CLCr. Forty plasma samples of patients (34 consecutive and 6 suspected of drug accumulation receiving dabigatran at 150 (n = 19 or 110 (n = 21 mg/12 hours were collected. Blood samples were drawn at 10-14 hours of the last intake. Dabigatran concentration was determined by diluted thrombin time (HemosIl DTI, Instrumentation Laboratory (IL. PT and APTT (IL were performed on two fotooptical coagulometers, ACL TOP 300 and 500 (IL. DTI presented intra-assay coefficient of variation < 5.4% and inter-assay < 6%, linearity range 0-493 ng/ml. Patients' cc: median 83 (4-945 ng/ml. Individuals with CLCr in the lowest tertile (22.6-46.1 ml/min showed significantly higher median cc: 308 (49-945, compared to the average 72 (12-190 and highest tertile, 60 (4-118 ng/ml. Correlation between cc and APTT or PT were moderate, r2 = 0.59 and -0.66, p < 0.0001, respectively. DTI test allowed us to quantify plasma dabigatran levels, both in patients with normal or altered renal function, representing a useful tool in clinical situations such as renal failure, pre surgery or emergencies

  12. Time courses for phytochrome-induced enzyme levels in phenylpropanoid metabolism (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, naringenin-chalcone synthase) compared with time courses for phytochrome-mediated end-product accumulation (anthocyanin, quercetin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brödenfeldt, R; Mohr, H

    1988-12-01

    Time course for changes in the levels of enzymes characteristic of general phenylpropanoid metabolism (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, PAL; EC 4.3.1.5) and of the flavonoid-glycoside branch pathway (naringenin-chalcone synthase, CHS; EC 2.3.1.74) were measured in the cotyledons of mustard (Sinapis alba L.) seedlings and compared with the rates of accumulation of related end products (anthocyanin and quercetin). Induction of enzyme levels and of end-product accumulation was carried out with red and far-red (FR) light, operating via phytochrome. The data are compatible with the concept that the phytochrome-mediated appearance of enzymes such as PAL and CHS is indeed a prerequisite for the appearance of anthocyanins and flavonols. However, there is no close correlation between enzyme levels and the rates of synthesis of end products which could justify the identification of specific rate-limiting enzymes. Rather, the data indicate that there is a second phytochrome-dependent step, beyond enzyme induction, where the actual rate of flavonoid accumulation is determined. Anthocyanin and quercetin accumulation respond differently to light. However, the relative action of continuous FR, red light pulses and 'stored phytochrome signal' is the same in both cases. This indicates that the mode of operation of phytochrome is the same in both cases. The two syntheses differ only in the degree of responsiveness towards phytochrome. The time course for changes in CHS levels in continuous FR, i.e. under conditions of phytochrome photosteady state, is similar to the time course for PAL levels whereas the time courses in darkness, following transfer from FR to darkness, are totally different. In the case of CHS, a transient rise is observed whereas, with PAL, an instantaneous drop in enzyme level occurs after transfer from FR to darkness. It is concluded that the 'stored phytochrome signal' operates in darkness in the case of CHS but not in the case of PAL.

  13. Time effect and aliquot concentration in Streptococcus mutans elimination by plasma needle

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alcantara, E.; López-Callejas, R.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.; Lagunas-Bernabé, S.; Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Barocio, S. R.; Muñoz-Castro, A. E.; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G.; de la Piedad-Beneitez, A.

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric plasma needle systems are being intensively studied with a view to potential applications in medicine. The aim of this in vitro study is the improved elimination of Streptococcus Mutants (S. mutans) bacteria. A 5 ml volume of Luria-Bertani culture medium has been inoculated with a test bacterial population and incubated during 24 hours, followed by ten dilutions producing aliquots at 20, 50 and 100 micro l per dilution. Each aliquot is deposited on a paper filter and then exposed to a 2 W RF room pressure helium plasma needle discharge at a 1.5 l.p.m. rate for 1, 3, 5 or 7 minutes. Each sample paper is placed in a test tube, again containing Luria-Bertani fluid, in order to develop a new bacterium colony after a 24h incubation period. The plasma needle lethality has been evaluated from absorbance studies by means of a 6305 Jeway spectrophotometer at a 600 nm wavelength, indicating a clear correlation with exposure time. These studies validate the high disinfection efficacy of the plasma needle.

  14. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode. PMID:26496630

  15. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouyan Talebizadeh

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasma (NTP has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode.

  16. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode.

  17. Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of pulsed plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adámek, P; Olejníček, J; Čada, M; Kment, Š; Hubička, Z

    2013-07-15

    A method for time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been developed. In this Letter, we describe in detail a developed electronic module that controls the time resolution of the LAS system. The transistor-transistor logic signal triggering the plasma pulse is used for generation of two signals: the first one triggers fine tuning of the laser wavelength and the second one controls time-defined signal sampling from the absorption detector. The described method and electronic system enable investigation of the temporal evolution of the density and temperature of selected particles in technological plasma systems. The high-power impulse magnetron sputtering system with a period of 10 ms and a duty cycle of 1% has been used to verify this method. The temporal evolution of argon metastable density was measured in the active part of the pulse and in the afterglow. The resulting density of Ar* displays a double-peak structure with a first peak in the plasma "ON" phase and a second peak in the afterglow approximately 1 ms after the end of the pulse.

  18. Ionospheric plasma flow over large high-voltage space platforms. I - Ion-plasma-time scale interactions of a plate at zero angle of attack. II - The formation and structure of plasma wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Hastings, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the theory and particle simulation results for the ionospheric plasma flow over a large high-voltage space platform at a zero angle of attack and at a large angle of attack. Emphasis is placed on the structures in the large, high-voltage regime and the transient plasma response on the ion-plasma time scale. Special consideration is given to the transient formation of the space-charge wake and its steady-state structure.

  19. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  20. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudhir, Dass, E-mail: dass.sudhir@iter-india.org; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29 GIDC, Sec-25, Gandhinagar, 382016 Gujarat (India)

    2016-02-15

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  1. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  2. Real Time Mid-course Maneuver and Guidance of a Generic Reentry Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Chander

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of any mission is to accomplish the final objective with desired accuracy and the same is valid for a generic launch vehicle. In many missions it is necessary to execute mid-course maneuvers with an intentional diversion trajectory to create a counter measure or to avoid certain specific known geographical locations. The current work elaborates a novel and practically implementable mid-course maneuver and an ascent phase guidance of a reentry vehicle executing an in-flight determined mid-course maneuver (trajectory reshaping without compromising the accuracy of the final achieved target position. The robustness of the algorithm is validated with 6DoF simulation results by considering the dispersion of the burnout state vector conditions which arises due to variations in thrust profile, aerodynamics characteristics of the vehicle, atmosphere, etc.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(4, pp.346-354, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.4207

  3. Riding the lexical speedway: a critical review on the time course of lexical selection in speech production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristof eStrijkers

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Speech requires time. How much time often depends on the amount of labor the brain has to perform in order to retrieve the linguistic information related to the ideas we want to express. Although most psycholinguistic research in the field of language production has focused on the net result of time required to utter words in various experimental conditions, over the last years more and more researchers pursued the objective to flesh out the time course of particular stages implicated in language production. Here we critically review these studies, with particular interest for the time course of lexical selection. First, we evaluate the data underlying the estimates of an influential temporal meta-analysis on language production (Indefrey & Levelt, 2004. We conclude that those data alone are not sufficient to provide a reliable time frame of lexical selection. Next, we discuss recent neurophysiological evidence which we argue to offer more explicit insights into the time course of lexical selection. Based on this evidence we suggest that, despite the absence of a clear time frame of how long lexical selection takes, there is sufficient direct evidence to conclude that the brain initiates lexical access within 200 ms after stimulus presentation, hereby confirming Indefrey and Levelt’s estimate. In a final section, we briefly review the proposed mechanisms which could lead to this rapid onset of lexical access, namely automatic spreading activation versus specific concept selection, and discuss novel data which support the notion of spreading activation, but indicate that the speed with which this principle takes effect is driven by a top-down signal in function of the intention to engage in a speech act.

  4. Time course and extent of alpha 1-adrenoceptor density changes in rat heart after beta-adrenoceptor blockade.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinkraus, V.; Nose, M.; Scholz, H; Thormählen, K.

    1989-01-01

    1. It has been suggested that impaired beta-adrenoceptor stimulation is a condition under which the functional role of cardiac alpha 1-adrenoceptors is enhanced. We therefore investigated the extent and time course of changes in alpha 1-adrenoceptor characteristics after chronic treatment with the beta-adrenoceptor blocker propranolol in rat heart. For comparison beta-adrenoceptors were also studied. The mechanism of the changes in adrenoceptor density was investigated with cycloheximide, an ...

  5. A study of the conditions and accuracy of the thrombin time assay of plasma fibrinogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, J; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen

    1982-01-01

    The conditions, accuracy, precision and possible error of the thrombin time assay of plasma fibrinogen are determined. Comparison with an estimation of clottable protein by absorbance at 280 nm gave a correlation coefficient of 0.96 and the regression line y = 1.00 x + 0.56 (n = 34). Comparison...... with a radial immunodiffusion method yielded the correlation coefficient 0.97 and the regression line y = 1.18 x = 2.47 (n = 26). The presence of heparin in clinically applied concentrations produced a slight shortening of the clotting times. The resulting error in the estimated concentrations of fibrinogen...

  6. Nonlinear ion dynamics in Hall thruster plasma source by ion transit-time instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Youbong; Choe, Wonho; Mazouffre, Stéphane; Park, Jae Sun; Kim, Holak; Seon, Jongho; Garrigues, L.

    2017-03-01

    High-energy tail formation in an ion energy distribution function (IEDF) is explained in a Hall thruster plasma with the stationary crossed electric and magnetic fields whose discharge current is oscillated at the ion transit-time scale with a frequency of 360 kHz. Among ions in different charge states, singly charged Xe ions (Xe+) have an IEDF that is significantly broadened and shifted toward the high-energy side, which contributes to tail formation in the entire IEDF. Analytical and numerical investigations confirm that the IEDF tail is due to nonlinear ion dynamics in the ion transit-time oscillation.

  7. Salivary but not plasma cortisone tracks the plasma cortisol response to exercise: effect of time of day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Corral, P; Schurman, R C; Kinza, S S; Fitzgerald, M J; Kordick, C A; Rusch, J L; Nadolski, J B

    2016-03-01

    The cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, and CBG responses to exercise in the AM and PM have not been described. This study examined the response of these glucocorticoids and CBG to intense exercise in 12 endurance-trained men in plasma (Pl) and saliva (Sa). Each subject completed treadmill exercise in the morning and evening. Paired blood and Sa samples were obtained at rest before and after exercise. Significant time effect existed for Pl-cortisol and Sa-cortisol from baseline in the AM and PM (p cortisone and CBG significantly increased in the PM (p cortisone, Sa-cortisone was significantly higher in the AM compared to the PM, increasing in the AM and PM (All p cortisone (r = 0.81, p cortisone (~90 %) and corticosterone (~200 %) in the AM and PM, whereas exercise increases CBG in the PM, but not in the AM; (2) vigorous exercise increases Sa-cortisone; (3) Sa-cortisone and cortisol are equally strongly correlated to Pl-cortisol, suggesting a significant role for Sa-cortisone as a novel marker of free cortisol during exercise.

  8. Mapping of courses on vector biology and vector-borne diseases systems: time for a worldwide effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Jérôme; Lazzari, Claudio; Insausti, Teresita; Launois, Pascal; Fouque, Florence

    2016-11-01

    Major emergency efforts are being mounted for each vector-borne disease epidemiological crisis anew, while knowledge about the biology of arthropods vectors is dwindling slowly but continuously, as is the number of field entomologists. The discrepancy between the rates of production of knowledge and its use and need for solving crises is widening, in particular due to the highly differing time spans of the two concurrent processes. A worldwide web based search using multiple key words and search engines of onsite and online courses in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and German concerned with the biology of vectors identified over 140 courses. They are geographically and thematically scattered, the vast majority of them are on-site, with very few courses using the latest massive open online course (MOOC) powerfulness. Over two third of them is given in English and Western Africa is particularity poorly represented. The taxonomic groups covered are highly unbalanced towards mosquitoes. A worldwide unique portal to guide students of all grades and levels of expertise, in particular those in remote locations, is badly needed. This is the objective a new activity supported by the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR).

  9. Mapping of courses on vector biology and vector-borne diseases systems: time for a worldwide effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Casas

    Full Text Available Major emergency efforts are being mounted for each vector-borne disease epidemiological crisis anew, while knowledge about the biology of arthropods vectors is dwindling slowly but continuously, as is the number of field entomologists. The discrepancy between the rates of production of knowledge and its use and need for solving crises is widening, in particular due to the highly differing time spans of the two concurrent processes. A worldwide web based search using multiple key words and search engines of onsite and online courses in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and German concerned with the biology of vectors identified over 140 courses. They are geographically and thematically scattered, the vast majority of them are on-site, with very few courses using the latest massive open online course (MOOC powerfulness. Over two third of them is given in English and Western Africa is particularity poorly represented. The taxonomic groups covered are highly unbalanced towards mosquitoes. A worldwide unique portal to guide students of all grades and levels of expertise, in particular those in remote locations, is badly needed. This is the objective a new activity supported by the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR.

  10. Towards Real-Time Detection and Tracking of Blob-Filaments in Fusion Plasma Big Data

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Lingfei; Sim, Alex; Churchill, Michael; Choi, Jong Y; Stathopoulos, Andreas; Chang, Cs; Klasky, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fusion could provide an inexhaustible, clean, and safe solution to the global energy needs. The success of magnetically-confined fusion reactors demands steady-state plasma confinement which is challenged by the blob-filaments driven by the edge turbulence. Real-time analysis can be used to monitor the progress of fusion experiments and prevent catastrophic events. However, terabytes of data are generated over short time periods in fusion experiments. Timely access to and analyzing this amount of data demands properly responding to extreme scale computing and big data challenges. In this paper, we apply outlier detection techniques to effectively tackle the fusion blob detection problem on extremely large parallel machines. We present a real-time region outlier detection algorithm to efficiently find blobs in fusion experiments and simulations. In addition, we propose an efficient scheme to track the movement of region outliers over time. We have implemented our algorithms with hybrid MPI/OpenMP and ...

  11. Space-Time Localization of Inner Heliospheric Plasma Turbulence Using Multiple Spacecraft Radio Links

    CERN Document Server

    Richie-Halford, Adam C; Tortora, Paolo; Armstrong, John W; Asmar, Sami W; Woo, Richard; Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw; 10.1029/2009SW000499

    2010-01-01

    Radio remote sensing of the heliosphere using spacecraft radio signals has been used to study the near-sun plasma in and out of the ecliptic, close to the sun, and on spatial and temporal scales not accessible with other techniques. Studies of space-time variations in the inner solar wind are particularly timely because of the desire to understand and predict space weather, which can disturb satellites and systems at 1AU and affect human space exploration. Here we demonstrate proof-of-concept of a new radio science application for spacecraft radio science links. The differing transfer functions of plasma irregularities to spacecraft radio up- and downlinks can be exploited to localize plasma scattering along the line of sight. We demonstrate the utility of this idea using Cassini radio data taken in 2001-2002. Under favorable circumstances we demonstrate how this technique, unlike other remote sensing methods, can determine center-of-scattering position to within a few thousandths of an AU and thickness of sc...

  12. Effects of plasma treatment time on modification of acrylic denture material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To study the relationship between plasma treatment time and efficacy. Methods:Test specimens were prepared from an acrylic resin denture material in the size of 2 mm × 10 mm × 10 mm. Plasma treatment was carried out on the surface of Polymethyl methacrylate(PMMA) at different time. XPS studies, IR spectra studies and measurement of wetting angle were performed. Results: XPS showed the peak corresponding to C-O getting higher as the treatment proceeded, however at 120 seconds, the peak did not increase any longer and partly crossed with the peak at the duration of 60 seconds. IR spectra showed the wave corresponding to C-H was reduced as O2-plasma treatment proceeded, and then changed little. Wetting angle initially decreased dramatically, however, as the reaction proceeded, wetting angle increased slightly. Conclusion:Equilibrium was reached for introducing oxygen-containing groups and changing of C-H. As the treatment proceeded, wetting angle increased slightly.

  13. Propagation of a laser beam in a time-varying waveguide. [plasma heating for controlled fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. M.; Kevorkian, J.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of an axisymmetric laser beam in a plasma column having a radially parabolic electron density distribution is reported. For the case of an axially uniform waveguide it is found that the basic characteristics of alternating focusing and defocusing beams are maintained. However, the intensity distribution is changed at the foci and outer-beam regions. The features of paraxial beam propagation are discussed with reference to axially varying waveguides. Laser plasma coupling is considered noting the case where laser heating produces a density distribution radially parabolic near the axis and the energy absorbed over the focal length of the plasma is small. It is found that: (1) beam-propagation stability is governed by the relative magnitude of the density fluctuations existing in the axial variation of the waveguides due to laser heating, and (2) for beam propagation in a time-varying waveguide, the global instability of the propagation is a function of the initial fluctuation growth rate as compared to the initial time rate of change in the radial curvature of the waveguide.

  14. Equatorial nighttime vertical f-region plasma drifts during disturbed-time in the african sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyekola, O. S.; Ojo, A.; Akinrimisi, J.

    The terrestrial ionosphere deals with the basic structure and variability of plasma within the upper atmosphere of the Earth Furthermore the ionosphere comprises less than one percent of the mass of the upper atmosphere yet it has a significant influence on advanced communication and navigation systems both have important economic consequences As society beings to rely on more complex technologies those systems become more susceptible to environmental effects However there is still considerable difficulty in the understanding of the equatorial ionospheric phenomena under different solar and geomagnetic conditions despite all extensive studies in the middle and high latitudes and in equatorial and low latitude American and Indian sectors By contrast there is a remarkably sparse database at equatorial African continent of the globe Consequently we infer F-region vertical plasma drifts at the magnetic equatorial station Ibadan 7 4 o N 3 9 o E 6 o S dip from the time variation of the hourly recorded ionosonde virtual height of F layer h F data obtained during 1957-58 International Geophysical Year IGY period corresponding to a year of high solar flux under geomagnetic disturbed night hours 1800-0600 LT The results show a strong geomagnetic control of ionospheric plasma drifts velocities variability in month-to-month and at three different seasonal conditions The largest random fluctuations are observed in June solstice months The evening and morning reversal times are highly variable The average magnitude of the downward

  15. The neural time course of art perception: an ERP study on the processing of style versus content in art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, M Dorothee; Defranceschi, Birgit; Fuchs, Helene K; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Hutzler, Florian

    2011-06-01

    A central prerequisite to understand the phenomenon of art in psychological terms is to investigate the nature of the underlying perceptual and cognitive processes. Building on a study by Augustin, Leder, Hutzler, and Carbon (2008) the current ERP study examined the neural time course of two central aspects of representational art, one of which is closely related to object- and scene perception, the other of which is art-specific: content and style. We adapted a paradigm that has repeatedly been employed in psycholinguistics and that allows one to examine the neural time course of two processes in terms of when sufficient information is available to allow successful classification. Twenty-two participants viewed pictures that systematically varied in style and content and conducted a combined go/nogo dual choice task. The dependent variables of interest were the Lateralised Readiness Potential (LRP) and the N200 effect. Analyses of both measures support the notion that in the processing of art style follows content, with style-related information being available at around 224 ms or between 40 and 94 ms later than content-related information. The paradigm used here offers a promising approach to further explore the time course of art perception, thus helping to unravel the perceptual and cognitive processes that underlie the phenomenon of art and the fascination it exerts.

  16. Surprisal analysis characterizes the free energy time course of cancer cells undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadran, Sohila; Arumugam, Rameshkumar; Herschman, Harvey; Phelps, Michael E; Levine, R D

    2014-09-09

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) initiates the invasive and metastatic behavior of many epithelial cancers. Mechanisms underlying EMT are not fully known. Surprisal analysis of mRNA time course data from lung and pancreatic cancer cells stimulated to undergo TGF-β1-induced EMT identifies two phenotypes. Examination of the time course for these phenotypes reveals that EMT reprogramming is a multistep process characterized by initiation, maturation, and stabilization stages that correlate with changes in cell metabolism. Surprisal analysis characterizes the free energy time course of the expression levels throughout the transition in terms of two state variables. The landscape of the free energy changes during the EMT for the lung cancer cells shows a stable intermediate state. Existing data suggest this is the previously proposed maturation stage. Using a single-cell ATP assay, we demonstrate that the TGF-β1-induced EMT for lung cancer cells, particularly during the maturation stage, coincides with a metabolic shift resulting in increased cytosolic ATP levels. Surprisal analysis also characterizes the absolute expression levels of the mRNAs and thereby examines the homeostasis of the transcription system during EMT.

  17. Time course of pH change in plant epidermis using microscopic pH imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Risako; Shimizu, Megumi; Kazama, Haruko; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2010-11-01

    We established a microscopic pH imaging system to track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis in vivo. In the previous research, we have found out that anthocyanin containing cells have higher pH. However, it was not clear whether the anthocyanin increased the pH or anthocyanin was synthesized result from the higher pH. Therefore, we further investigated the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change. To track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis, we established a system using luminescent imaging technique. We used HPTS (8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-Trisulfonate) as pH indicator and applied excitation ratio imaging method. Luminescent image was converted to a pH distribution by obtained in vitro calibration using known pH solution. Cellular level observation was enabled by merging microscopic color picture of the same region to the pH change image. The established system was applied to epidermal cells of red-tip leaf lettuce, Lactuca Sativa L. and the time course was tracked in the growth process. We would discuss about the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change in plant epidermis.

  18. Time- and space-resolved spectroscopic characterization of laser-induced swine muscle tissue plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, J.J. [Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Diaz, L., E-mail: luis.diaz@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Ramirez, S. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Caceres, J.O. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense, Cuidad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    The spatial-temporal evolution of muscle tissue sample plasma induced by a high-power transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} pulsed laser at vacuum conditions (0.1–0.01 Pa) has been investigated using high-resolution optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and imaging methods. The induced plasma shows mainly electronically excited neutral Na, K, C, Mg, H, Ca, N and O atoms, ionized C{sup +}, C{sup 2+}, C{sup 3+}, Mg{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, N{sup +}, N{sup 2+}, Ca{sup +}, O{sup +} and O{sup 2+} species and molecular band systems of CN(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}), C{sub 2}(d{sup 3}Π{sub g}–a{sup 3}Π{sub u}), CH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup −}–X{sup 2}Π; A{sup 2}Δ–X{sup 2}Π), NH(A{sup 3}Π–X{sup 3}Σ{sup −}), OH(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2} Σ{sup +}), and CaOH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}; A{sup 2}Π–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}). Time-resolved two-dimensional emission spectroscopy is used to study the expanded distribution of different species ejected during ablation. Spatial and temporal variations of different atoms and ionic excited species are reported. Plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature were measured from the spatio-temporal analysis of different species. Average velocities of some plasma species were estimated. - Highlights: • LIBS of swine muscle tissue sample generated by CO{sub 2} laser pulses has been done for the first time. • Average velocities of some plasma species have been calculated from spatial and temporally resolved 2D OES images. • Electron density (~ 9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) has been studied with spatial and temporal resolution. • Temporal evolution of the plasma temperature has been calculated by means of Boltzmann plots.

  19. Real-time detection of an extreme scattering event: constraints on Galactic plasma lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Bannister, Keith W; Tuntsov, Artem V; Walker, Mark A; Johnston, Simon; Reynolds, Cormac; Bignall, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    Extreme scattering events (ESEs) are distinctive fluctuations in the brightness of astronomical radio sources caused by occulting plasma lenses in the interstellar medium. The inferred plasma pressures of the lenses are $\\sim 10^3$ times the ambient pressure, challenging our understanding of gas conditions in the Milky Way. Using a new survey technique, we have discovered an ESE while it was in progress. We report radio and optical follow-up observations. Modelling of the radio data demonstrates that the lensing structure is a density enhancement and that the lens is diverging, ruling out one of two competing physical models. Our technique will uncover many more ESEs, addressing a long-standing mystery of the small-scale gas structure of the Galaxy.

  20. Determination of structure tilting in magnetized plasmas - Time delay estimation in two dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Guszejnov, Dávid; Zoletnik, Sándor; Andreas-Krämer-Flecken,

    2013-01-01

    Time delay estimation (TDE) is a well-known technique to investigate poloidal flows in fusion plasmas. The present work is an extension of the earlier works of A. Bencze and S. Zoletnik 2005 and B. T\\'al et al. 2011. From the prospective of the comparison of theory and experiment it seem to be important to estimate the statistical properties of the TDE based on solid mathematical groundings. This paper provides analytic derivation of the variance of the TDE using a two-dimensional model for coherent turbulent structures in the plasma edge and also gives an explicit method for determination of the tilt angle of structures. As a demonstration this method is then applied to the results of a quasi-2D Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) measurement performed at the TEXTOR tokamak.

  1. Chimeric External Control to Quantify Cell Free DNA in Plasma Samples by Real Time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini, Maryam; Behzad-Behbahani, Abbas; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali; Ramezani, Amin; Rafiei Dehbidi, Gholam Reza; Okhovat, Mohammad Ali; Farhadi, Ali; Alavi, Parniyan

    2016-01-01

    Background: DNA isolation procedure can significantly influence the quantification of DNA by real time PCR specially when cell free DNA (cfDNA) is the subject. To assess the extraction efficiency, linearity of the extraction yield, presence of co-purified inhibitors and to avoid problems with fragment size relevant to cfDNA, development of appropriate External DNA Control (EDC) is challenging. Using non-human chimeric nucleotide sequences, an EDC was developed for standardization of qPCR for monitoring stability of cfDNA concentration in blood samples over time. Methods: A0 DNA fragment of 167 bp chimeric sequence of parvovirus B19 and pBHA designated as EDC fragment was designed. To determine the impact of different factors during DNA extraction processing on quantification of cfDNA, blood samples were collected from normal subjects and divided into aliquots with and without specific treatment. In time intervals, the plasma samples were isolated. The amplicon of 167 bp EDC fragment in final concentration of 1.1 pg/500 μl was added to each plasma sample and total DNA was extracted by an in house method. Relative and absolute quantification real time PCR was performed to quantify both EDC fragment and cfDNA in extracted samples. Results: Comparison of real time PCR threshold cycle (Ct) for cfDNA fragment in tubes with and without specific treatment indicated a decrease in untreated tubes. In contrast, the threshold cycle was constant for EDC fragment in treated and untreated tubes, indicating the difference in Ct values of the cfDNA is because of specific treatments that were made on them. Conclusions: Spiking of DNA fragment size relevant to cfDNA into the plasma sample can be useful to minimize the bias due to sample preparation and extraction processing. Therefore, it is highly recommended that standard external DNA control be employed for the extraction and quantification of cfDNA for accurate data analysis. PMID:27141267

  2. Time-resolved fast-neutron pinhole camera for studying thermonuclear plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, R.W.; Weingart, R.C.

    1976-02-02

    A fast-neutron pinhole camera with high detection efficiency and nanosecond time-resolution has been developed and applied to the investigation of the spatial and temporal distributions of DD- and DT-neutrons produced by thermonuclear plasmas. The pinhole consists of a specially designed 1.15 m long copper collimator with an effective aperture of 1 mm diameter. Several different types of spatial resolution detectors have been used at the image plane: (1) a multi-element, scintillation-photomultiplier system used for time-resolved measurements consisting of sixty-one individual detectors, (2) a scintillation-fiber-chamber coupled to a gated image-intensifier tube used for direct photographing of the neutron image, and (3) a propane bubble chamber used for time-integrated recording with a capability to distinguish DD- from DT-neutrons. Pulsed neutron sources with typical dimensions of 1 cm emitting of the order of 10/sup 12/ neutrons over a time period of 10-100 nsec have been investigated. A spatial resolution of 1 mm and a time resolution of approximately 10 nsec was achieved in the investigations of dense plasma compression phenomena.

  3. Simulating Time-Dependent Energy Transfer Between Crossed Laser Beams in an Expanding Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hittinger, J F; Dorr, M R; Berger, R L; Williams, E A

    2004-10-11

    A coupled mode system is derived to investigate a three-wave parametric instability leading to energy transfer between co-propagating laser beams crossing in a plasma flow. The model includes beams of finite width refracting in a prescribed transverse plasma flow with spatial and temporal gradients in velocity and density. The resulting paraxial light equations are discretized spatially with a Crank-Nicholson-type scheme, and these algebraic constraints are nonlinearly coupled with ordinary differential equations in time that describe the ion acoustic response. The entire nonlinear differential-algebraic system is solved using an adaptive, backward-differencing method coupled with Newton's method. A numerical study is conducted in two dimensions that compares the intensity gain of the fully time-dependent coupled mode system with the gain computed under the further assumption of a strongly-damped ion acoustic response. The results demonstrate a time-dependent gain suppression when the beam diameter is commensurate with the velocity gradient scale length. The gain suppression is shown to depend on time-dependent beam refraction and is interpreted as a time-dependent frequency shift.

  4. A paperless course on structural engineering programming: investing in educational technology in the times of the Greek financial recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sextos, Anastasios G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the structure of an undergraduate course entitled 'programming techniques and the use of specialised software in structural engineering' which is offered to the fifth (final) year students of the Civil Engineering Department of Aristotle University Thessaloniki in Greece. The aim of this course is to demonstrate the use of new information technologies in the field of structural engineering and to teach modern programming and finite element simulation techniques that the students can in turn apply in both research and everyday design of structures. The course also focuses on the physical interpretation of structural engineering problems, in a way that the students become familiar with the concept of computational tools without losing perspective from the engineering problem studied. For this purpose, a wide variety of structural engineering problems are studied in class, involving structural statics, dynamics, earthquake engineering, design of reinforced concrete and steel structures as well as data and information management. The main novelty of the course is that it is taught and examined solely in the computer laboratory ensuring that each student can accomplish the prescribed 'hands-on' training on a dedicated computer, strictly on a 1:1 student over hardware ratio. Significant effort has also been put so that modern educational techniques and tools are utilised to offer the course in an essentially paperless mode. This involves electronic educational material, video tutorials, student information in real time and exams given and assessed electronically through an ad hoc developed, personalised, electronic system. The positive feedback received from the students reveals that the concept of a paperless course is not only applicable in real academic conditions but is also a promising approach that significantly increases student productivity and engagement. The question, however, is whether such an investment in educational technology is indeed

  5. Derivation and Testing of Computer Algorithms for Automatic Real-Time Determination of Space Vehicle Potentials in Various Plasma Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-31

    COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS PLASMA ENVIRONMENTS May 31, 1988 Stanley L. Spiegel...crrnaion DiviSiofl 838 12 2 DERIVATION AND TESTING OF COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS...S.L., "Derivation and testing of computer algorithms for automatic real time determination of space vehicle poteuatials in various plasma

  6. Ensemble Space-Time Correlation of Plasma Turbulence in the Solar Wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W H; Weygand, J M; Dasso, S

    2016-06-17

    Single point measurement turbulence cannot distinguish variations in space and time. We employ an ensemble of one- and two-point measurements in the solar wind to estimate the space-time correlation function in the comoving plasma frame. The method is illustrated using near Earth spacecraft observations, employing ACE, Geotail, IMP-8, and Wind data sets. New results include an evaluation of both correlation time and correlation length from a single method, and a new assessment of the accuracy of the familiar frozen-in flow approximation. This novel view of the space-time structure of turbulence may prove essential in exploratory space missions such as Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter for which the frozen-in flow hypothesis may not be a useful approximation.

  7. Dose- and time-dependent benefits of iPad technology in an undergraduate human anatomy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Marcella A

    2016-07-08

    This study examined the impact of iPad integration on performance in an undergraduate gross anatomy course. Two out of six course sections were assigned to one of the following conditions: control (no iPad, n = 61); limited access (laboratory iPads, n = 58); and unlimited access (personal iPads, n = 47). Student knowledge was assessed over time during the semester with two practical examinations in laboratory and four multiple choice/essay examinations in lecture. The same PowerPoint presentations and examinations were utilized for all conditions. Mixed ANOVA analysis identified an interaction effect between time and condition for both laboratory (F2,153  = 16.12; P higher by 3.0% in control and unlimited access conditions, respectively. Unlimited access students scored higher than control and limited access (82.8 ± 2.2 vs 71.5 ± 2.6 and 74.3 ± 1.7%; P higher than control students (78.7 ± 2.1 vs 70.6 ± 2.0%; P tablet devices and relevant applications can be useful tools in human anatomy courses. Anat Sci Educ 9: 367-377. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  8. Intravenous ethanol infusions can mimic the time course of breath alcohol concentrations following oral alcohol administration in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchandani, Vijay A; Plawecki, Martin; Li, Ting-Kai; O'Connor, Sean

    2009-05-01

    Our previous studies have used intravenous (IV) clamping methods to demonstrate that family history positive (FHP) subjects exhibit a greater initial response to alcohol than family history negative (FHN) subjects. These results differ from other studies of family history of alcoholism (FHA) influences, most of which have used an oral alcohol challenge, suggesting that the route of administration may influence both the response to alcohol and FHA-related differences in response. To examine this possibility, one approach would be to directly compare responses following oral and IV alcohol administration in the same subjects. There is, however, a 3- to 4-fold variance, between- and within-subjects, in the breath alcohol concentrations (BrACs) following oral alcohol administration. Thus, our objective was to characterize the between-subject variability in the time course of BrACs following oral alcohol administration in healthy volunteers and to develop an IV infusion method to mimic the BrAC-time course attained following oral alcohol in the same subject. This was a 2-session study in young adult, healthy, nondependent drinkers. In the first session, subjects ingested an oral dose of alcohol, based on total body water, to achieve a target peak BrAC of 80 mg%. In the second session, subjects received an IV infusion of ethanol designed to achieve the same BrAC time course as that achieved in the first session. The individualized infusion-rate profile was precomputed using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for alcohol with model parameters adjusted to the individual's physiology. The peak BrACs (C(max)), times of peak BrAC (T(max)), and the areas under the BrAC vs. time curve (AUC) were compared between sessions to assess how closely the BrAC exposure during the IV infusion session mimicked the exposure following oral alcohol. The time course of BrACs following oral alcohol administration showed a high degree of between-subject variability. Mean C

  9. Real-time imaging, spectroscopy, and structural investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation of molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojadinović, Stevan, E-mail: sstevan@ff.bg.ac.rs; Tadić, Nenad; Šišović, Nikola M.; Vasilić, Rastko [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-06-21

    In this paper, the results of the investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation (CPEO) of molybdenum at 160 V in a mixed solution of borax, water, and ethylene glycol are presented. Real-time imaging and optical emission spectroscopy were used for the characterization of the CPEO. During the process, vapor envelope is formed around the cathode and strong electric field within the envelope caused the generation of plasma discharges. The spectral line shape analysis of hydrogen Balmer line H{sub β} (486.13 nm) shows that plasma discharges are characterized by the electron number density of about 1.4 × 10{sup 21 }m{sup −3}. The electron temperature of 15 000 K was estimated by measuring molybdenum atomic lines intensity. Surface morphology, chemical, and phase composition of coatings formed by CPEO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The elemental components of CPEO coatings are Mo and O and the predominant crystalline form is MoO{sub 3}.

  10. Short-course TLR9 Agonist Treatment Impacts Innate Immunity and Plasma Viremia in Individuals with HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vibholm, Line; Schleimann, Mariane H; Højen, Jesper F

    2017-01-01

    characterized plasmacytoid dendritic cell, NK -and T cell activation using flow cytometry on baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment. HIV-1 transcription was quantified by measuring plasma HIV-1 RNA during MGN1703 administration. Results: In accordance with the cell-type specific expression of TLR9, MGN1703...

  11. Training haptic stiffness discrimination: time course of learning with or without visual information and knowledge of results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, Kinneret; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Korman, Maria

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we explored the time course of haptic stiffness discrimination learning and how it was affected by two experimental factors, the addition of visual information and/or knowledge of results (KR) during training. Stiffness perception may integrate both haptic and visual modalities. However, in many tasks, the visual field is typically occluded, forcing stiffness perception to be dependent exclusively on haptic information. No studies to date addressed the time course of haptic stiffness perceptual learning. Using a virtual environment (VE) haptic interface and a two-alternative forced-choice discrimination task, the haptic stiffness discrimination ability of 48 participants was tested across 2 days. Each day included two haptic test blocks separated by a training block Additional visual information and/or KR were manipulated between participants during training blocks. Practice repetitions alone induced significant improvement in haptic stiffness discrimination. Between days, accuracy was slightly improved, but decision time performance was deteriorated. The addition of visual information and/or KR had only temporary effects on decision time, without affecting the time course of haptic discrimination learning. Learning in haptic stiffness discrimination appears to evolve through at least two distinctive phases: A single training session resulted in both immediate and latent learning. This learning was not affected by the training manipulations inspected. Training skills in VE in spaced sessions can be beneficial for tasks in which haptic perception is critical, such as surgery procedures, when the visual field is occluded. However, training protocols for such tasks should account for low impact of multisensory information and KR.

  12. 10-Month-Old Infants Are Sensitive to the Time Course of Perceived Actions: Eye-Tracking and EEG Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bache, Cathleen; Springer, Anne; Noack, Hannes; Stadler, Waltraud; Kopp, Franziska; Lindenberger, Ulman; Werkle-Bergner, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Research has shown that infants are able to track a moving target efficiently – even if it is transiently occluded from sight. This basic ability allows prediction of when and where events happen in everyday life. Yet, it is unclear whether, and how, infants internally represent the time course of ongoing movements to derive predictions. In this study, 10-month-old crawlers observed the video of a same-aged crawling baby that was transiently occluded and reappeared in either a temporally continuous or non-continuous manner (i.e., delayed by 500 ms vs. forwarded by 500 ms relative to the real-time movement). Eye movement and rhythmic neural brain activity (EEG) were measured simultaneously. Eye movement analyses showed that infants were sensitive to slight temporal shifts in movement continuation after occlusion. Furthermore, brain activity associated with sensorimotor processing differed between observation of continuous and non-continuous movements. Early sensitivity to an action’s timing may hence be explained within the internal real-time simulation account of action observation. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that 10-month-old infants are well prepared for internal representation of the time course of observed movements that are within the infants’ current motor repertoire. PMID:28769831

  13. Restoration of Normal Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio With Fresh Frozen Plasma in Hypocoagulable Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Only, Arthur J; DeChristopher, Phillip J; Iqal, Omer; Fareed, Jawed

    2016-01-01

    Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is an effective reversal agent for hypocoagulable patients. Its proven efficacy continues to prompt its usage as both a prophylactic and a therapeutic therapy. Although published guidelines encouraging the appropriate administration of FFP exist, overutilization continues. The purpose of these ex vivo studies was to determine the effects of succeeding volumes of FFP supplementation on hypocoagulable plasma prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR). By analyzing the decline in PT/INR with varying volumes of FFP, a minimal required volume of FFP could be identified representing the optimal volume to administer while still providing therapeutic effect. A total of 497 plasma samples were screened for elevated PT/INR values and 50 samples were selected for inclusion in this experiment. The initial PTs/INRs ranged from 12.5 to 43.4 seconds/1.42 to 4.91. Subsequent declines in PT/INR values were analyzed following addition of 50, 100, and 150 µL of FFP to a fixed volume of 250 µL of plasma (26.4 ± 5.318 seconds/2.99 ± 0.603, 13.3 ± 1.077 seconds/1.51 ± 0.122, 11.2 ± 0.712 seconds/1.27 ± 0.081, and 10.3 ± 0.533 seconds/1.16 ± 0.06, respectively). A nonlinear relationship between decline in INR values and percentage of FFP supplementation was demonstrated. The greatest effect on INR was obtained after supplementation with 50 µL (49%). Doubling and tripling the volume of FFP lead to significantly lower declines in INR (16% and 8%, respectively). Analysis of variance indicated a statistical significance with subsequent volume supplementation of FFP, but marginal clinical benefits exist between the PTs/INRs obtainable with increased FFP volume administration.

  14. An Investigation of Collaboration Processes in an Online Course: How do Small Groups Develop over Time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namsook Jahng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated communication patterns and behavior in problem-solving groups in a graduate online course. An inductive qualitative analysis method was employed to analyze 732 messages that were retrieved from small group forums. The current study identified a temporal pattern of group development was in comparison with existing theoretical models: the traditional group development model (Tuckman, 1965; Tuckman & Jensen, 1977 and the punctuated equilibrium model (Gersick, 1988; 1991. All the groups had two working phases and three decision-making points. The temporal pattern of group behavior was close to the phase transition concept of Gersick’s model. Some groups tended to undergo Tuckman’s stages, but their development stages were not necessarily sequential or hierarchical. Thus, it is concluded that Gersick’s model could be more useful for researchers and instructors to better understand and assist online students in problem solving collaborative activities.

  15. Time and space correlated investigations of confinement effects due to static axial magnetic fields acting on laser produced carbon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Mario; Wyndham, Edmund; Veloso, Felipe; Bhuyan, Heman; Reyes, Sebastian; Ruiz, Hugo Marcelo; Caballero-Bendixsen, Luis Sebastian

    2016-10-01

    We present further detailed studies of the dynamics and plasma properties of a laser produced Carbon plasma expanding in a static axial magnetic field. The laser plasmas are produced in vacuum, 1 .10-6 Torr, using a graphite target, with a Nd:YAG laser, 3.5 ns, 340 mJ at 1.06 μm, focused at 2 .109 W/cm2, and propagate in static magnetic fields of maximum value 0.2 T. 15 ns time and spaced resolved OES is used to investigate plasma composition. 50 ns time resolved plasma imaging is used to visualize the plasma dynamics. A mm size B-dot probe is used, in combination with a Faraday cup, to characterize the interaction between the expanding plasma and the magnetic field. As a result of time and space correlated measurements, unique features of the laser plasma dynamics in the presence of the magnetic field are identified, which highlight the confinement effects of the static magnetic field Funded by project FONDECYT 1141119.

  16. Synthesis of low carbon boron carbide powder using a minimal time processing route: Thermal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinna Mishra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron carbide powder was synthesized by thermal plasma reduction of boric acid in presence of graphite with a very minimal processing time. Subsequently, the as-synthesized products were leached to minimize the impurities content. Based on the results of X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, the effect of leaching on phase purity and crystallinity was studied. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to identify the chemical composition which highlighted the absence of the BO bonding in the deconvoluted B 1s core-level spectrum. Finally, the temperature dependent thermal conductivity behavior of the leached materials was analyzed and presented.

  17. Applying Boundary Conditions Using a Time-Dependent Lagrangian for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Jonathan; Shadwick, B. A.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling the evolution of a short, intense laser pulse propagating through an underdense plasma is of particular interest in the physics of laser-plasma interactions. Numerical models are typically created by first discretizing the equations of motion and then imposing boundary conditions. Using the variational principle of Chen and Sudan, we spatially discretize the Lagrangian density to obtain discrete equations of motion and a discrete energy conservation law which is exactly satisfied regardless of the spatial grid resolution. Modifying the derived equations of motion (e.g., enforcing boundary conditions) generally ruins energy conservation. However, time-dependent terms can be added to the Lagrangian which force the equations of motion to have the desired boundary conditions. Although some foresight is needed to choose these time-dependent terms, this approach provides a mechanism for energy to exit the closed system while allowing the conservation law to account for the loss. An appropriate time discretization scheme is selected based on stability analysis and resolution requirements. We present results using this variational approach in a co-moving coordinate system and compare such results to those using traditional second-order methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY- 1104683.

  18. Storm time plasma transport in a unified and inter-coupled global magnetosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Toth, G.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from the two-way self-consistent coupling between the kinetic Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) model and the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). HEIDI solves the time dependent, gyration and bounced averaged kinetic equation for the phase space density of different ring current species and computes full pitch angle distributions for all local times and radial distances. During geomagnetic times the dipole approximation becomes unsuitable even in the inner magnetosphere. Therefore the HEIDI model was generalized to accommodate an arbitrary magnetic field and through the coupling with SWMF it obtains a magnetic field description throughout the HEIDI domain along with a plasma distribution at the model outer boundary from the Block Adaptive Tree Solar Wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model within SWMF. Electric field self-consistency is assured by the passing of convection potentials from the Ridley Ionosphere Model (RIM) within SWMF. In this study we test the various levels of coupling between the 3 physics based models, highlighting the role that the magnetic field, plasma sheet conditions and the cross polar cap potential play in the formation and evolution of the ring current. We show that the dynamically changing geospace environment itself plays a key role in determining the geoeffectiveness of the driver. The results of the self-consistent coupling between HEIDI, BATS-R-US and RIM during disturbed conditions emphasize the importance of a kinetic self-consistent approach to the description of geospace.

  19. Time course of systemic oxidative stress and inflammatory response induced by an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchini, T.; Magnani, N.D. [Cátedra de Química General e Inorgánica, Instituto de Bioquímica y Medicina Molecular (IBIMOL UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 954, C1113AAB Buenos Aires (Argentina); Paz, M.L. [Cátedra de Inmunología, Instituto de Estudios de la Inmunidad Humoral (IDEHU UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 954, C1113AAB Buenos Aires (Argentina); Vanasco, V. [Cátedra de Química General e Inorgánica, Instituto de Bioquímica y Medicina Molecular (IBIMOL UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 954, C1113AAB Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tasat, D. [CESyMA, Facultad de Ciencia Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de General San Martín, Martín de Irigoyen 3100, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); González Maglio, D.H. [Cátedra de Inmunología, Instituto de Estudios de la Inmunidad Humoral (IDEHU UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 954, C1113AAB Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2014-01-15

    It is suggested that systemic oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases associated with the exposure to particulate matter (PM). The aim of this work was to evaluate the time changes of systemic markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash (ROFA). Female Swiss mice were intranasally instilled with a ROFA suspension (1.0 mg/kg body weight) or saline solution, and plasma levels of oxidative damage markers [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) and protein carbonyls], antioxidant status [reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, ascorbic acid levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity], cytokines levels, and intravascular leukocyte activation were evaluated after 1, 3 or 5 h of exposure. Oxidative damage to lipids and decreased GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in ROFA-exposed mice as early as 1 h. Afterwards, increased protein oxidation, decreased ascorbic acid content and SOD activity were found in this group at 3 h. The onset of an adaptive response was observed at 5 h after the ROFA exposure, as indicated by decreased TBARS plasma content and increased SOD activity. The observed increase in oxidative damage to plasma macromolecules, together with systemic antioxidants depletion, may be a consequence of a systemic inflammatory response triggered by the ROFA exposure, since increased TNF-α and IL-6 plasma levels and polymorphonuclear leukocytes activation was found at every evaluated time point. These findings contribute to the understanding of the increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, in association with environmental PM inhalation. - Highlights: • An acute exposure to ROFA triggers the occurrence of systemic oxidative stress. • Changes in plasmatic oxidative stress markers appear as early as 1 h after exposure. • ROFA induces proinflammatory cytokines release and intravascular leukocyte activation. • PMN

  20. Time course of systemic oxidative stress and inflammatory response induced by an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchini, T; Magnani, N D; Paz, M L; Vanasco, V; Tasat, D; González Maglio, D H; Alvarez, S; Evelson, P A

    2014-01-15

    It is suggested that systemic oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases associated with the exposure to particulate matter (PM). The aim of this work was to evaluate the time changes of systemic markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash (ROFA). Female Swiss mice were intranasally instilled with a ROFA suspension (1.0mg/kg body weight) or saline solution, and plasma levels of oxidative damage markers [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) and protein carbonyls], antioxidant status [reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, ascorbic acid levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity], cytokines levels, and intravascular leukocyte activation were evaluated after 1, 3 or 5h of exposure. Oxidative damage to lipids and decreased GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in ROFA-exposed mice as early as 1h. Afterwards, increased protein oxidation, decreased ascorbic acid content and SOD activity were found in this group at 3h. The onset of an adaptive response was observed at 5h after the ROFA exposure, as indicated by decreased TBARS plasma content and increased SOD activity. The observed increase in oxidative damage to plasma macromolecules, together with systemic antioxidants depletion, may be a consequence of a systemic inflammatory response triggered by the ROFA exposure, since increased TNF-α and IL-6 plasma levels and polymorphonuclear leukocytes activation was found at every evaluated time point. These findings contribute to the understanding of the increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, in association with environmental PM inhalation.

  1. Short-time plasma surface modification of HDPE powder in a Plasma Downer Reactor - process, wettability improvement and ageing effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpagaus, C. [ETH Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zentrum, Sonneggstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Rossi, A. [ETH Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Hoenggerberg, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Chimica Inorganica ed Analitica, UdR INSTM I-09100 Cagliari (Italy); Rudolf von Rohr, Ph. [ETH Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zentrum, Sonneggstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: vonrohr@ipe.mavt.ethz.ch

    2005-12-15

    The effectiveness of improving the wettability of HDPE powders within less than 0.1 s by plasma surface modification in a Plasma Downer Reactor is investigated. A correlation is revealed between the XPS results (O/C-ratio) and the wettability (contact angle, polar surface tension by capillary rise method). The O{sub 2}-content in the plasma feed gas has been adjusted for best wettability properties. XPS results indicate the formation of C=O and COOH functional groups on the powder surface. The O/C-ratio increased from 0.0 (no oxygen on the non-treated powder) up to 0.15 for the plasma treated HDPE powder surface. With pure O{sub 2}-plasma treatment, a water contact angle reduction from >90{sup o} (no water penetration into the untreated PE powder) down to 65{sup o} was achieved. The total surface free energy increased from 31.2 to 45 mN/m. Ageing of treated powders occurs and proceeds mostly within the first 7 days of storage. Contact angle measurements and O1s/O2s intensity ratio data support that ageing is mainly a diffusion-controlled process. Nevertheless, XPS results show the presence of oxygen functional groups even after 40 days, which explains why the powder is still dispersible in water without any addition of surfactants.

  2. Time courses and time-resolved spectra of firefly bioluminescence initiated by two methods of ATP injection and photolysis of caged ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Yuki; Kageyama, Takeshi; Wada, Naohisa; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Ohno, Shin-Ya

    2013-01-01

    The time-dependent characteristics of firefly bioluminescence initiated by manual injection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into buffer solution containing luciferin (Ln), luciferase (Luc) and Mg(2+) were measured with a resolution of 10 ms, and compared with those obtained by photolysis of caged ATP. The time course depends on pH; both rise and decay rates decrease when pH is lowered from 7.8 to 6.8. In contrast, the parameter λ in the kinetic formula related to diffusion of ATP is almost independent of pH. The pH dependence of the time course of bioluminescence can be explained by the same pH tendency as the rate of ATP binding at the active site of Luc. The time-resolved spectra can be decomposed into two Gaussian components with maxima at 2.2 and 2.0 eV. At pH 7.8, the band at 2.2 eV is more intense than that at 2.0 eV for all three concentration conditions. At lower pH, the band at 2.2 eV becomes weaker than that at 2.0 eV. The intensity ratio of the 2.0 and 2.2 eV bands is constant for duration time of 600 s for both injection and photolysis experiments, and the above conclusions are unaffected by the concentration ratio [Ln]/[Luc].

  3. Time Ordering Effects on Hydrogen Zeeman-Stark Line Profiles in Low-Density Magnetized Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rosato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark broadening of hydrogen lines is investigated in low-density magnetized plasmas, at typical conditions of magnetic fusion experiments. The role of time ordering is assessed numerically, by using a simulation code accounting for the evolution of the microscopic electric field generated by the charged particles moving at the vicinity of the atom. The Zeeman effect due to the magnetic field is also retained. Lyman lines with a low principal quantum number n are first investigated, for an application to opacity calculations; next Balmer lines with successively low and high principal quantum numbers are considered for diagnostic purposes. It is shown that neglecting time ordering results in a dramatic underestimation of the Stark effect on the low-n lines. Another conclusion is that time ordering becomes negligible only when ion dynamics effects vanish, as shown in the case of high-n lines.

  4. Real-time wavelet detection of crashes in limit cycles of non-stationary fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, M.; Witvoet, G.; M.R. de Baar,; Nuij, Pwjm; Morschec, H. G. ter; Steinbuch, M.

    2011-01-01

    The high performance mode (H-mode) is one of the baseline plasma scenarios for the experimental fusion reactor ITER. This scenario features a periodic crash-like reorganization of the plasma pressure and the magnetic flux in the plasma core and plasma periphery. The core instability is often referre

  5. Development of the time course for processing conflict: an event-related potentials study with 4 year olds and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posner Michael I

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tasks involving conflict are widely used to study executive attention. In the flanker task, a target stimulus is surrounded by distracting information that can be congruent or incongruent with the correct response. Developmental differences in the time course of brain activations involved in conflict processing were examined for 22 four year old children and 18 adults. Subjects performed a child-friendly flanker task while their brain activity was registered using a high-density electroencephalography system. Results General differences were found in the amplitude and time course of event-related potentials (ERPs between children and adults that are consistent with their differences in reaction time. In addition, the congruency of flankers affected both the amplitude and latency of some of the ERP components. These effects were delayed and sustained for longer periods of time in the children compared to the adults. Conclusions These differences constitute neural correlates of children's greater difficulty in monitoring and resolving conflict in this and similar tasks.

  6. Spectral Analysis on Time-Course Expression Data: Detecting Periodic Genes Using a Real-Valued Iterative Adaptive Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwadwo S. Agyepong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-course expression profiles and methods for spectrum analysis have been applied for detecting transcriptional periodicities, which are valuable patterns to unravel genes associated with cell cycle and circadian rhythm regulation. However, most of the proposed methods suffer from restrictions and large false positives to a certain extent. Additionally, in some experiments, arbitrarily irregular sampling times as well as the presence of high noise and small sample sizes make accurate detection a challenging task. A novel scheme for detecting periodicities in time-course expression data is proposed, in which a real-valued iterative adaptive approach (RIAA, originally proposed for signal processing, is applied for periodogram estimation. The inferred spectrum is then analyzed using Fisher’s hypothesis test. With a proper -value threshold, periodic genes can be detected. A periodic signal, two nonperiodic signals, and four sampling strategies were considered in the simulations, including both bursts and drops. In addition, two yeast real datasets were applied for validation. The simulations and real data analysis reveal that RIAA can perform competitively with the existing algorithms. The advantage of RIAA is manifested when the expression data are highly irregularly sampled, and when the number of cycles covered by the sampling time points is very reduced.

  7. Effect of storage conditions on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen concentration on canine plasma samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Stefania; Giannetto, Claudia; Giudice, Elisabetta

    2010-01-01

    The present study was to assess the effect of storage conditions on prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and fibrinogen concentration in blood samples of healthy dogs. Thirty-five dogs of various breeds were included in the study. Citrated blood samples were obtained and plasma was divided into four aliquots to assess selected clotting parameters by means of a coagulometer. The first aliquot was analysed within 1 h after collection, while the remaining 3 were stored at 8℃ for 4, 8 and 24 h, respectively. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance documented a significant decreasing effect on PT at 24 h compared to 8 h and on fibrinogen concentration after 8 and 24 h compared to sampling time and at 4 and 24 h compared to 8 h post sampling. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that only fibrinogen appears prone to significant decrease. In fact, aPTT is not substantially affected by refrigeration for at least 24 h post sampling and PT showed a statistical difference that does not necessary indicate biological significance as the results obtained were within reference intervals for the dog. PMID:20458152

  8. Unraveling the plasma-material interface with real time diagnosis of dynamic boron conditioning in extreme tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Gutiérrez, F. Javier; Bedoya, Felipe; Krstić, Predrag S.; Allain, Jean P.; Irle, Stephan; Skinner, Charles H.; Kaita, Robert; Koel, Bruce

    2017-08-01

    We present a study of the role of boron and oxygen in the chemistry of deuterium retention in boronized ATJ graphite irradiated by the extreme environment of a tokamak deuterium plasma. The experimental results were obtained by the first XPS measurements inside the plasma chamber of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade, between the plasma exposures. The subtle interplay of boron, carbon, oxygen and deuterium chemistry is explained by reactive molecular dynamics simulations, verified by quantum-classical molecular dynamics and successfully compared to the measured data. The calculations deciphered the roles of oxygen and boron for the deuterium retention and predict deuterium uptake into a boronized carbon surface close in value to that previously predicted for a lithiated and oxidized carbon surface.

  9. The effectiveness of the Geritalk communication skills course: a real-time assessment of skill acquisition and deliberate practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfman, Laura P; Lindenberger, Elizabeth; Fernandez, Helen; Goldberg, Gabrielle R; Lim, Betty B; Litrivis, Evgenia; O'Neill, Lynn; Smith, Cardinale B; Kelley, Amy S

    2014-10-01

    Communication skills are critical in Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine because these patients confront complex clinical scenarios. We evaluated the effectiveness of the Geritalk communication skills course by comparing pre- and post-course real-time assessment of the participants leading family meetings. We also evaluated the participants' sustained skills practice. We compare the participants' skill acquisition before and after Geritalk using a direct observation Family Meeting Communication Assessment Tool and assess their deliberate practice at follow-up. First-year Geriatrics or Palliative Medicine fellows at Mount Sinai Medical Center and the James J. Peters Bronx VA Medical Center participated in Geritalk. Pre- and post-course family meeting assessments were compared. An average net gain of 6.8 skills represented a greater than 20% improvement in use of applicable skills. At two month follow-up, most participants reported deliberate practice of fundamental and advanced skills. This intensive training and family meeting assessment offers evidence-based communication skills training. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. An Analysis of the Impact of Valve Closure Time on the Course of Water Hammer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodura, Apoloniusz

    2016-06-01

    The knowledge of transient flow in pressure pipelines is very important for the designing and describing of pressure networks. The water hammer is the most common example of transient flow in pressure pipelines. During this phenomenon, the transformation of kinetic energy into pressure energy causes significant changes in pressure, which can lead to serious problems in the management of pressure networks. The phenomenon is very complex, and a large number of different factors influence its course. In the case of a water hammer caused by valve closing, the characteristic of gate closure is one of the most important factors. However, this factor is rarely investigated. In this paper, the results of physical experiments with water hammer in steel and PE pipelines are described and analyzed. For each water hammer, characteristics of pressure change and valve closing were recorded. The measurements were compared with the results of calculations perfomed by common methods used by engineers - Michaud's equation and Wood and Jones's method. The comparison revealed very significant differences between the results of calculations and the results of experiments. In addition, it was shown that, the characteristic of butterfly valve closure has a significant influence on water hammer, which should be taken into account in analyzing this phenomenon. Comparison of the results of experiments with the results of calculations? may lead to new, improved calculation methods and to new methods to describe transient flow.

  11. Associative memory impairment in acute stress disorder: characteristics and time course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guez, Jonathan; Cohen, Jonathan; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Shiber, Asher; Yankovsky, Yan; Saar, Rotem; Shalev, Hadar

    2013-10-30

    Stress and episodic memory impairment have previously been associated. Acute stress disorder (ASD) is a maladaptive stress response, which develops in some individuals following traumatic life events. Recently, the authors demonstrated a specific deficit in associative memory for emotionally neutral stimuli in ASD and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study further tested the relationship between this memory impairment and the course of ASD. We assessed new learning and memory for item and associative information in patients diagnosed with ASD (n=14) and matched trauma naïve controls (n=14). Memory performance and posttraumatic symptoms were examined for approximately 1 and 10 week periods following the traumatic experience. In the two experiments, participants studied a list of stimuli pairs (verbal or visual) and were then tested for their memory of the items (item recognition test), or for the association between items in each pair (associative recognition test). In both experiments, ASD patients showed a marked associative memory deficit compared to the control group. After 10 weeks, ASD symptoms were resolved in most patients. Interestingly, their performance on associative recognition for verbal stimuli improved, while the associative deficit for visual stimuli remained unchanged. Potential mechanisms underlying such an associative memory deficit in post-trauma patients are discussed.

  12. Development of real-time plasma analysis and control algorithms for the TCV tokamak using SIMULINK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felici, F., E-mail: f.felici@tue.nl [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Le, H.B.; Paley, J.I.; Duval, B.P.; Coda, S.; Moret, J.-M.; Bortolon, A.; Federspiel, L.; Goodman, T.P. [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hommen, G. [FOM-Institute DIFFER, Association EURATOM-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Control Systems Technology Group, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Karpushov, A.; Piras, F.; Pitzschke, A. [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Romero, J. [National Laboratory of Fusion, EURATOM-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Sevillano, G. [Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, Bilbao University of the Basque Country, Bilbao (Spain); Sauter, O.; Vijvers, W. [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • A new digital control system for the TCV tokamak has been commissioned. • The system is entirely programmable by SIMULINK, allowing rapid algorithm development. • Different control system nodes can run different algorithms at varying sampling times. • The previous control system functions have been emulated and improved. • New capabilities include MHD control, profile control, equilibrium reconstruction. - Abstract: One of the key features of the new digital plasma control system installed on the TCV tokamak is the possibility to rapidly design, test and deploy real-time algorithms. With this flexibility the new control system has been used for a large number of new experiments which exploit TCV's powerful actuators consisting of 16 individually controllable poloidal field coils and 7 real-time steerable electron cyclotron (EC) launchers. The system has been used for various applications, ranging from event-based real-time MHD control to real-time current diffusion simulations. These advances have propelled real-time control to one of the cornerstones of the TCV experimental program. Use of the SIMULINK graphical programming language to directly program the control system has greatly facilitated algorithm development and allowed a multitude of different algorithms to be deployed in a short time. This paper will give an overview of the developed algorithms and their application in physics experiments.

  13. Fast, deep record length, time-resolved visible spectroscopy of plasmas using fiber grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Cruz, Edward; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Horton, Robert; Klauser, Ruth; Hwang, D. Q.

    2016-10-01

    HyperV Technologies is developing a fiber-coupled, deep-record-length, low-light camera head for performing high time resolution spectroscopy on visible emission from plasma events. New solid-state Silicon Photo-Multiplier (SiPM) chips are capable of single photon event detection and high speed data acquisition. By coupling the output of a spectrometer to an imaging fiber bundle connected to a bank of amplified SiPMs, time-resolved spectroscopic imagers of 100 to 1,000 pixels can be constructed. Target pixel performance is 10 Megaframes/sec with record lengths of up to 256,000 frames yielding 25.6 milliseconds of record at10 Megasamples/sec resolution. Pixel resolutions of 8 to 12 bits are pos- sible. Pixel pitch can be refined by using grids of 100 μm to 1000 μm diameter fibers. A prototype 32-pixel spectroscopic imager employing this technique was constructed and successfully tested at the University of California at Davis Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) as a full demonstration of the concept. Experimental results will be dis-cussed, along with future plans for the Phase 2 project, and potential applications to plasma experiments . Work supported by USDOE SBIR Grant DE-SC0013801.

  14. Gene expression time course in the human skin during elicitation of allergic contact dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene; Skov, Lone; Menné, Torkil

    2007-01-01

    and activator of transcription and small/mothers against decepentaplegic (SMAD) transcription factors in the late time-point gene expression patterns. Concerning specific genes, the homeostatic chemokine CCL19 was unexpectedly found to be highly expressed in cells scattered in the deep dermis of the late time...

  15. First-time home-ownership in the family life course: a West German - Dutch comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, C.H.; Wagner, M.

    1998-01-01

    The transition to first-time home-ownership is made at increasingly younger ages inboth West Germany and the Netherlands. This trend is stronger in the Netherlands than inGermany, however. There are also marked differences between the two countries in the extentto which first-time home-ownership is

  16. Time course of expression of intermediate filament protein vimentin, nestin and desmin in rat renal glomerular injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Jun; CHANG Tian-hui; CHANG He; Eishin Yaoita; Yutaka Yoshida; Masaaki Nameta; Tadashi Yamamoto; JIN Xin

    2007-01-01

    @@ Podocytes in renal glomerulus express unusual intermediate filament proteins (IFs) for visceral epithelial cells. IFs cytoskeleton is mainly composed of vimentin, nestin and desmin. Tissue injury is often accompanied by changes in gene expression of IFs.1 Enhanced desmin staining in podocytes are observed in a variety of rat experimental models of podocyte injury including puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)nephrosis.2-4 It has not been elucidated whether expression of vimentin and nestin is up-regulated in podocyte injury. To further gain insight into expression of IFs in podocytes, we investigated the time course of vimentin, nestin and desmin in PAN nephrosis.

  17. Time Course of the Soleus M Response and H Reflex after Lidocaine Tibial Nerve Block in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kévin Buffenoir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. In spastic subjects, lidocaine is often used to induce a block predictive of the result provided by subsequent surgery. Lidocaine has been demonstrated to inhibit the Hoffmann (H reflex to a greater extent than the direct motor (M response induced by electrical stimulation, but the timecourse of these responses has not been investigated. Methods. An animal (rat model of the effects of lidocaine on M and H responses was therefore developed to assess this time course. M and H responses were recorded in 18 adult rats before and after application of lidocaine to the sciatic nerve. Results. Two to five minutes after lidocaine injection, M responses were markedly reduced (mean reduction of 44% and H reflexes were completely abolished. Changes were observed more rapidly for the H reflex. The effects of lidocaine then persisted for 100 minutes. The effect of lidocaine was therefore more prolonged on the H reflex than on the M response. Conclusion. This study confirms that lidocaine blocks not only alpha motoneurons but also Ia afferent fibres responsible for the H reflex. The authors describe, for the first time, the detailed time course of the effect of lidocaine on direct or reflex activation of motoneurons in the rat.

  18. The effect of heating and cooling on time course of voluntary and electrically induced muscle force variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazaitis, Marius; Skurvydas, Albertas; Vadopalas, Kazys; Daniusevičiūtė, Laura; Senikienė, Zibuoklė

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heating and cooling on time course of voluntary and electrically induced muscle force variation. Ten volunteers performed 50 maximal voluntary and electrically induced contractions of the knee extensors at an angle of 120 degrees under the control conditions and after passive lower body heating and cooling in the control, heating, and cooling experiments. Peak torque, torque variation, and half-relaxation time were assessed during the exercise. Passive lower body heating increased muscle and core temperatures, while cooling lowered muscle temperature, but did not affect core temperature. We observed significantly lower muscle fatigue during voluntary contraction compared with electrically induced contractions. Body heating (opposite to cooling) increased involuntarily induced muscle force, but caused greater electrically induced muscle fatigue. In the middle of the exercise, the coefficient of correlation for electrically induced muscle torque decreased significantly as compared with the beginning of the exercise, while during maximal voluntary contractions, this relation for torque remained significant until the end of the exercise. It was shown that time course of voluntary contraction was more stable than in electrically induced contractions.

  19. Using a web-based course-management system: an evaluation of management tasks and time implications for the instructor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gervedink Nijhuis, G.J.; Collis, Betty

    2003-01-01

    Almost all the instructors at the Faculty of Educational Science and Technology of the University of Twente have been using a web-based course-management system for their courses since 1998. To set up a course, an instructor completes a course environment form with general information such as a

  20. Using a web-based course-management system: an evaluation of management tasks and time implications for the instructor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gervedink Nijhuis, Gerard; Collis, Betty

    2003-01-01

    Almost all the instructors at the Faculty of Educational Science and Technology of the University of Twente have been using a web-based course-management system for their courses since 1998. To set up a course, an instructor completes a course environment form with general information such as a cour

  1. Convergence of statistical moments of particle density time series in scrape-off layer plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kube, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Particle density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas, as measured by gas-puff imaging or Langmuir probes, are modeled as the realization of a stochastic process in which a superposition of pulses with a fixed shape, an exponential distribution of waiting times and amplitudes represents the radial motion of blob-like structures. With an analytic formulation of the process at hand, we derive expressions for the mean-squared error on estimators of sample mean and sample variance as a function of sample length, sampling frequency, and the parameters of the stochastic process. % Employing that the probability distribution function of a particularly relevant shot noise process is given by the gamma distribution, we derive estimators for sample skewness and kurtosis, and expressions for the mean-squared error on these estimators. Numerically generated synthetic time series are used to verify the proposed estimators, the sample length dependency of their mean-squared errors, and thei...

  2. Real time observables for the quark-gluon plasma from the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Christian

    2014-07-01

    In this thesis we studied real time quantities and processes of the quark-gluon plasma. We employed the fundamental theory of QCD allowing for predictions from first principles. Treating QCD on the lattice enabled us to access non-perturbative regimes and for the very first time we computed a hydrodynamic transport coefficient without having to resort to maximum entropy methods or functional input. Furthermore we established a semi-classical formulation of QCD that we applied to investigate the effects of dynamic fermions as well as of using the correct colour group of QCD, SU(3), on the isotropization process of the quark-gluon plasma. In this work we have calculated the second order hydrodynamic transport coefficient κ for the Yang-Mills plasma using lattice perturbation theory and Monte Carlo simulations. From calculations both in strong and weak coupling limits, we expect a temperature dependence of κ∝T{sup 2}. In the investigated temperature range 2T{sub c}time. For this reason we established a semiclassical lattice approach to QCD facilitating a first principle description of real time processes far from equilibrium. In the investigation of the isotropization process in heavy-ion collisions, we borrowed initial conditions from the colour-glass-condensate effective theory. Studying the pure bosonic dynamics with colour group SU(3) in a static box, we

  3. A real-time lattice simulation of the thermalization of a gluon plasma: first results

    CERN Document Server

    Attems, Maximilian; Schäfer, Christian; Wagenbach, Björn; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-01-01

    To achieve an understanding of the thermalization of a quark-gluon plasma, starting from QCD without using model assumptions, is a formidable task. We study the early stage dynamics of a relativistic heavy ion collision in the framework of real time simulations of classical Yang-Mills theory in a static box with the color glass condensate as initial condition. Our study generalizes a previous one by Fukushima and Gelis from SU(2) to the realistic case of SU(3). We calculate the chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic energy densities as well as the ratio of longitudinal and transverse pressure as a function of time as probes for thermalization. Our preliminary results on coarse lattices show the occurrence of Weibel instabilities prior to thermalization.

  4. Time-course of the DSM-5 cannabis withdrawal symptoms in poly-substance abusers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Morten; Thylstrup, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    the DSM-5 Withdrawal Symptom Check List with withdrawal symptoms from all classes of substances, with no indication that the described symptoms should be attributed to withdrawal. Self-reported time since last use of cannabis was used as a predictor of cannabis withdrawal severity. Results...... With the exception of loss of appetite, time since last use of cannabis was associated with all types of withdrawal symptoms listed in the DSM-5. Only four of 19 symptoms intended to measure withdrawal from other substances were related to time since last use of cannabis, including vivid, unpleasant dreams...

  5. Time course changes in selected biochemical indices of broilers in response to pretransport handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voslarova, E; Chloupek, P; Vosmerova, P; Chloupek, J; Bedanova, I; Vecerek, V

    2011-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the stress response of broilers to catching and pretransport handling followed by different periods of crating. The short-term changes in selected biochemical indices were monitored at 1-min intervals within 10 min of crating after the catching and handling of broilers (experiment 1). These indices were further monitored at 15-min intervals for 2 h of crating after the catching and handling of broilers (experiment 2). Increased (P handled, and placed in crates. They continued to increase until 7 min after crating and then slowly decreased, but even at 120 min after handling, corticosterone concentrations were higher (P handling except for catching and blood sampling, but 15 min later, the lactate concentrations had decreased to the precrating level. Lactate dehydrogenase concentrations increased (P = 0.042) 30 min after crating and continued to increase for the rest of the monitored period. A decreased level of cholesterol (P = 0.017) and increased concentration of uric acid (P = 0.041) were found 1 min after crating. The decrease in cholesterol was visible up to 9 min after crating; it then returned to its original value except for the period from 75 to 90 min after crating, when a decrease (P < 0.05) was again detected. Higher (P < 0.01) concentrations of uric acid were found continuously from 4 to 75 min after crating. Glucose concentrations were increased (P = 0.017) 2 min after crating, but the stress-induced increase was not consistent over the course of the next few minutes after crating. Glucose concentrations were not different from those of control broilers from 10 to 120 min after crating, although they showed a decreasing pattern. A decrease (P = 0.031) in triglyceride concentrations was detected 75 min after crating.

  6. [Atrial fibrillation registered for the first time: characteristics of clinical course, treatment, prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiarintsev, V V; Alekseeva, L A; Stazhadze, L L; Bulanova, N A; Bazarova, M B; Mikhaĭlovskaia, I V

    2013-01-01

    To study the clinical presentation of the first episode of atrial fibrillation (AF), treatment tactics and its compliance with current recommendations, features of the further clinical course and prognosis in patients with AF we performed a retrospective study on data of Polyclinic No 1 of the General Management Department of the President of RF . We analyzed data from 58 patients (36 men, 22 women) from January 2009 to September 2011 inclusive. The first episode of AF was recorded in the age from 48 to 90 years (in 39.7% of patients - aged 80 to 90 years old), mostly had paroxysmal character (84.5%), in 82.1% of cases was accompanied by marked clinical symptoms: sense of disruption of the heart (50%), feeling short of breath (28.6%), weakness (17.9%). In 87% of cases clinical symptomatology required calls for medical emergencies. In 42.9% of cases uncontrolled hypertension was possible predisposing factor for developing AF. Paroxysmal AF moved to constant in 38.8% of patients during the period from 1 year to 18 years. Due to the high risk of thromboembolic complications (2 to 5 on a scale of CHADS2), after the detection AF warfarin was shown to 96.6% of patients, because of the high risk of bleeding in practice was appointed only 37.9%. Complications of therapy in the form of bleeding were 9.1%. Tactics of rhythm control by antiarrhythmic drugs I and III classes has remained in 36.7% of patients with paroxysmal AF. -adrenoblockers were constantly taken by 63.3% of the patients using antiarrhythmic drugs I and III classes for relief of arrhythmia during her recurrence (the strategy of "pill in pocket").

  7. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser-induced copper plasma by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Unnikrishnan; Kamlesh Alti; V B Kartha; C Santhosh; G P Gupta; B M Suri

    2010-06-01

    Plasma produced by a 355 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 6 ns focussed onto a copper solid sample in air at atmospheric pressure is studied spectroscopically. The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions. The temperature is obtained using the Boltzmann plot method and the electron density is determined using the Saha– Boltzmann equation method. Both parameters are studied as a function of delay time with respect to the onset of the laser pulse. The results are discussed. The time window where the plasma is optically thin and is also in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), necessary for the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of samples, is deduced from the temporal evolution of the intensity ratio of two Cu I lines. It is found to be 700–1000 ns.

  8. Effects of Long-Term Storage Time and Original Sampling Month on Biobank Plasma Protein Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enroth, Stefan; Hallmans, Göran; Grankvist, Kjell; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2016-10-01

    The quality of clinical biobank samples is crucial to their value for life sciences research. A number of factors related to the collection and storage of samples may affect the biomolecular composition. We have studied the effect of long-time freezer storage, chronological age at sampling, season and month of the year and on the abundance levels of 108 proteins in 380 plasma samples collected from 106 Swedish women. Storage time affected 18 proteins and explained 4.8-34.9% of the observed variance. Chronological age at sample collection after adjustment for storage-time affected 70 proteins and explained 1.1-33.5% of the variance. Seasonal variation had an effect on 15 proteins and month (number of sun hours) affected 36 proteins and explained up to 4.5% of the variance after adjustment for storage-time and age. The results show that freezer storage time and collection date (month and season) exerted similar effect sizes as age on the protein abundance levels. This implies that information on the sample handling history, in particular storage time, should be regarded as equally prominent covariates as age or gender and need to be included in epidemiological studies involving protein levels.

  9. Time course of late rectal- and urinary bladder side effects after MRI-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, P.; Georg, D.; Poetter, R.; Doerr, W. [Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Medical University Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology; Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Comprehensive Cancer Centre; Boni, A.; Ghabuous, A. [Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Goldner, G.; Schmid, M.P. [Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Medical University Vienna/ AKH Wien (Austria). Comprehensive Cancer Centre

    2013-07-15

    Background and purpose: To analyze the time course of late rectal- and urinary bladder complications after brachytherapy for cervical cancer and to compare the incidence- and prevalence rates thereof. Patients and methods: A total of 225 patients were treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy. Late side effects were assessed prospectively using the Late Effects in Normal Tissue - Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic (LENT/SOMA) scale. The parameters analyzed were time to onset, duration, actuarial incidence- (occurrence of new side effects during a defined time period) and prevalence rates (side effects existing at a defined time point). Results: Median follow-up was 44 months. Side effects (grade 1-4) in rectum and bladder were present in 31 and 49 patients, 14 and 27 months (mean time to onset) after treatment, respectively. All rectal and 76 % of bladder side effects occurred within 3 years after radiotherapy. Mean duration of rectal events was 19 months; 81 % resolved within 3 years of their initial diagnosis. Mean duration of bladder side effects was 20 months; 61 % resolved within 3 years. The 3- and 5-year actuarial complication rates were 16 and 19 % in rectum and 18 and 28 % in bladder, respectively. The corresponding prevalence rates were 9 and 2 % (rectum) and 18 and 21 % (bladder), respectively. Conclusion: Late side effects after cervical cancer radiotherapy are partially reversible, but their time course is organ-dependent. The combined presentation of incidence- and prevalence rates provides the most comprehensive information. (orig.)

  10. Real-time 3-D hybrid simulation of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasma environment of Saturn's largest satellite Titan is known to be highly variable. Since Titan's orbit is located within the outer magnetosphere of Saturn, the moon can leave the region dominated by the magnetic field of its parent body in times of high solar wind dynamic pressure and interact with the thermalized magnetosheath plasma or even with the unshocked solar wind. By applying a three-dimensional hybrid simulation code (kinetic description of ions, fluid electrons, we study in real-time the transition that Titan's plasma environment undergoes when the moon leaves Saturn's magnetosphere and enters the supermagnetosonic solar wind. In the simulation, the transition between both plasma regimes is mimicked by a reversal of the magnetic field direction as well as a change in the composition and temperature of the impinging plasma flow. When the satellite enters the solar wind, the magnetic draping pattern in its vicinity is reconfigured due to reconnection, with the characteristic time scale of this process being determined by the convection of the field lines in the undisturbed plasma flow at the flanks of the interaction region. The build-up of a bow shock ahead of Titan takes place on a typical time scale of a few minutes as well. We also analyze the erosion of the newly formed shock front upstream of Titan that commences when the moon re-enters the submagnetosonic plasma regime of Saturn's magnetosphere. Although the model presented here is far from governing the full complexity of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion, the simulation provides important insights into general plasma-physical processes associated with such a disruptive change of the upstream flow conditions.

  11. Time-of-Flight Measurement of a 355-nm Nd:YAG Laser-Produced Aluminum Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Baclayon

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available An aluminum target in air was irradiated by a 355-nm Nd:YAG laser with a pulse width of 10 ns and arepetition rate of 10 Hz. The emission spectra of the laser-produced aluminum plasma were investigatedwith varying distances from the target surface. The results show the presence of a strong continuum veryclose to the target surface, but as the plasma evolve in space, the continuum gradually disappears and theemitted spectra are dominated by stronger line emissions. The observed plasma species are the neutraland singly ionized aluminum and their speeds were investigated using an optical time-of-flight measurementtechnique. Results show that the speeds of the plasma species decreases gradually with distance from thetarget surface. Comparison of the computed speeds of the plasma species shows that the singly ionizedspecies have relatively greater kinetic energy than the neutral species.

  12. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  13. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  14. Kinetic theory of time correlation functions for a dense one-component plasma in a magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoolderman, A.J.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    The time-dependent correlations of a one-component plasma in a uniform magnetic field are studied with the help of kinetic theory. The time correlation functions of the particle density, the momentum density, and the kinetic energy density are evaluated for large time intervals. In the collision-dom

  15. [Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the course of time - an issue only for the internist?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, S; John, E; Lippmann, N; Mössner, J; Lübbert, C

    2014-08-01

    Toxigenic strains of Clostridium (C.) difficile are the most prevalent pathogens of antibiotic associated intestinal disease and nosocomial diarrhoea. During the last 10 years, incidences of C. difficile infection (CDI) have increased worldwide. With clinical and microbiological original data for 2002-2012 from the University Hospitals Leipzig and Halle (Saale), Germany, the authors illustrate the current situation regarding CDI in the states of Saxony and Saxony-Anhalt and exemplify the latest developments in terms of incidence, prevalence of resistance, diagnosis and treatment strategies regarding CDI with an emphasis on surgical options. Following the general trend, at the University Hospitals of Leipzig and Halle (Saale) there was also an increase in incidence of CDI, especially of severe clinical courses. In primary and secondary care facilities, prevention of CDI is based on hygiene management and restricted usage of antibiotics, preferably as "Antibiotic Stewardship" programmes. In 2012, the new macrocyclic antibiotic Fidaxomicin was approved in the European Union for the treatment of CDI. The therapeutic armamentarium, previously based on metronidazole or vancomycin, has now been enriched by a substance that presumably will reduce the rate of recurrence of CDI. Moreover, early data from case series and controlled trials suggest that the re-establishment of eubiosis in the colon of patients with recurrent CDI by stool transplantation from healthy donors is an alternative to antibiotics. Standard surgical intervention for refractory CDI is subtotal colectomy with terminal ileostomy. In patients with adequate life expectancy and without organ dysfunction, a colon-saving surgical technique should be considered. Taking antibiotics for most remains the main risk factor for suffering from symptomatic CDI. With the introduction of Fidaxomicin there is hope for an improvement in the conservative treatment of CDI. Stool transplants from healthy donors are now

  16. Acute and Time-Course Effects of Traditional and Dynamic Warm-Up Routines in Young Elite Junior Tennis Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Francisco; Moreno-Pérez, Víctor; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J; Moya, Manuel; Sanz-Rivas, David; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of studies that have examined the acute effects of different warm up modalities (WU) on physical performance, none of them have documented the time course of potential performance recovery in tennis players. The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to analyze and compare the acute effects of two different WU modalities (traditional WU [TWU] and dynamic WU [DWU]) on physical performance (i.e., CMJ, sprint, serve speed and accuracy) in elite junior players, as well as (b) to monitor the time course of any WU-induced changes after 30 and 60 min of simulated match-play. Twelve junior elite players completed both WUs modalities (TWU and DWU) in a counterbalanced order on separate days. In each experimental session, counter movement jump (CMJ), 20-m sprint, tennis serve speed and accuracy tests were performed before (immediately after TWU or DWU) during (30 min) and after 60 min of a simulated match play. Measures were compared via four factorial (WU intervention and time) repeated measures ANOVAs. There were main effects of WU (TWU and DWU) throughout the time for all the variables analysed. The results indicate that DWU routine led to significantly faster 20 m sprint times and higher CMJs as well as faster and more accurate tennis serves at both post warm-up and 30 min match-play testing moments in comparison with the scores reported by the TWU routine (p 75-99%). No significant intergroup differences were found at 60-min match-play testing moment in any variable (except for the 20 m sprint). Therefore, the findings of this study recommend for optimal performance in these elite tennis players, DWU routines should be performed prior to formal training and competition rather than TWU routines.

  17. Acute and Time-Course Effects of Traditional and Dynamic Warm-Up Routines in Young Elite Junior Tennis Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, Víctor; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J.; Moya, Manuel; Sanz-Rivas, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of studies that have examined the acute effects of different warm up modalities (WU) on physical performance, none of them have documented the time course of potential performance recovery in tennis players. The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to analyze and compare the acute effects of two different WU modalities (traditional WU [TWU] and dynamic WU [DWU]) on physical performance (i.e., CMJ, sprint, serve speed and accuracy) in elite junior players, as well as (b) to monitor the time course of any WU-induced changes after 30 and 60 min of simulated match-play. Twelve junior elite players completed both WUs modalities (TWU and DWU) in a counterbalanced order on separate days. In each experimental session, counter movement jump (CMJ), 20-m sprint, tennis serve speed and accuracy tests were performed before (immediately after TWU or DWU) during (30 min) and after 60 min of a simulated match play. Measures were compared via four factorial (WU intervention and time) repeated measures ANOVAs. There were main effects of WU (TWU and DWU) throughout the time for all the variables analysed. The results indicate that DWU routine led to significantly faster 20 m sprint times and higher CMJs as well as faster and more accurate tennis serves at both post warm-up and 30 min match-play testing moments in comparison with the scores reported by the TWU routine (p 75–99%). No significant intergroup differences were found at 60-min match-play testing moment in any variable (except for the 20 m sprint). Therefore, the findings of this study recommend for optimal performance in these elite tennis players, DWU routines should be performed prior to formal training and competition rather than TWU routines. PMID:27071014

  18. The early time course of compensatory face processing in congenital prosopagnosia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Stollhoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prosopagnosia is a selective deficit in facial identification which can be either acquired, (e.g., after brain damage, or present from birth (congenital. The face recognition deficit in prosopagnosia is characterized by worse accuracy, longer reaction times, more dispersed gaze behavior and a strong reliance on featural processing. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce a conceptual model of an apperceptive/associative type of congenital prosopagnosia where a deficit in holistic processing is compensated by a serial inspection of isolated, informative features. Based on the model proposed we investigated performance differences in different face and shoe identification tasks between a group of 16 participants with congenital prosopagnosia and a group of 36 age-matched controls. Given enough training and unlimited stimulus presentation prosopagnosics achieved normal face identification accuracy evincing longer reaction times. The latter increase was paralleled by an equally-sized increase in stimulus presentation times needed achieve an accuracy of 80%. When the inspection time of stimuli was limited (50 ms to 750 ms, prosopagnosics only showed worse accuracy but no difference in reaction time. Tested for the ability to generalize from frontal to rotated views, prosopagnosics performed worse than controls across all rotation angles but the magnitude of the deficit didn't change with increasing rotation. All group differences in accuracy, reaction or presentation times were selective to face stimuli and didn't extend to shoes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study provides a characterization of congenital prosopagnosia in terms of early processing differences. More specifically, compensatory processing in congenital prosopagnosia requires an inspection of faces that is sufficiently long to allow for sequential focusing on informative features. This characterization of dysfunctional processing in prosopagnosia further emphasizes fast

  19. Quantifying the time course of visual object processing using ERPs: it’s time to up the game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume A Rousselet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of studies have investigated the early ERPs to faces and objects using scalp and intracranial recordings. The vast majority of these studies have used uncontrolled stimuli, inappropriate designs, peak measurements, poor figures, and poor inferential and descriptive group statistics. These problems, together with a tendency to discuss any effect p<0.05 rather than to report effect sizes, have led to a research field very much qualitative in nature, despite its quantitative inspirations, and in which predictions do not go beyond condition A > condition B. Here we describe the main limitations of face and object ERP research and suggest alternative strategies to move forward. The problems plague intracranial and surface ERP studies, but also studies using more advanced techniques – e.g. source space analyses and measurements of network dynamics, as well as many behavioural, fMRI, TMS and LFP studies. In essence, it is time to stop amassing binary results and start using single-trial analyses to build models of visual perception.

  20. Time-course determination of plasmid content in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapuça, Elisabete; Azzoni, Adriano R; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Monteiro, Gabriel A; Mergulhão, Filipe J M

    2007-10-01

    A Real-Time PCR method was developed to monitor the plasmid copy number (PCN) in Escherichia coli and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. E. coli was transformed with plasmids containing a ColE1 or p15A origin of replication and CHO cells were transfected with a ColE1 derived plasmid used in DNA vaccination and carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene. The procedure requires neither specific cell lysis nor DNA purification and can be performed in cells, respectively. Analysis of PCN in E. coli batch cultures revealed that the maximum copy number per cell is attained in mid-exponential phase and that this number decreases on average 80% towards the end of cultivation for both types of plasmids. The plasmid content of CHO cells determined 24 h post-transfection was around 3 x 104 copies per cell although only 37% of the cells expressed GFP one day after transfection. The half-life of pDNA was 20 h and around 100 copies/cell were still detected 6 days after transfection.

  1. Time-Fractional KdV Equation for the plasma in auroral zone using Variational Methods

    CERN Document Server

    El-Wakil, El-Said A; Elshewy, Emad K; Mahmoud, Aber A

    2010-01-01

    The reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for small but finite amplitude electrostatic waves. The Lagrangian of the time fractional KdV equation is used in similar form to the Lagrangian of the regular KdV equation. The variation of the functional of this Lagrangian leads to the Euler-Lagrange equation that leads to the time fractional KdV equation. The Riemann-Liouvulle definition of the fractional derivative is used to describe the time fractional operator in the fractional KdV equation. The variational-iteration method given by He is used to solve the derived time fractional KdV equation. The calculations of the solution with initial condition A0*sech(cx)^2 are carried out. Numerical studies have been made using plasma parameters close to those values corresponding to the dayside auroral zone. The effects of the time fractional parameter on the electrostatic solitary structures are presented.

  2. Time-course profiling of molecular stress responses to silver nanoparticles in the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Simonsen, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity, particularly its temporal aspect, is currently limited in the literature. This study seeks to identify and profile changes in molecular response patterns over time during soil exposure of the earthworm Eisenia fetida to AgNPs (82±27 nm......) with reference to dissolved silver salt (AgNO3). Principal component analysis of selected gene and enzyme response profiles revealed dissimilar patterns between AgNO3 and AgNP treatments and also over time. Despite the observed difference in molecular profiles, the body burdens of total Ag were within the same...

  3. Time-course analysis of the Shewanella amazonensis SB2B proteome in response to sodium chloride shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parnell, John J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Rompato, Giovanni; Nicora, Carrie D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Williamson, Ashley; Pfrender, Michael E.

    2011-06-29

    Organisms in the genus Shewanella have become models for response to environmental stress. One of the most important environmental stresses is change in osmolarity. In this study, we experimentally determine the response mechanisms of Shewanella amazonensis SB2B during osmotic stress. Osmotic stress in SB2B was induced through exposure to NaCl, and the time-course proteomics response was measured using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Protein trends were qualitatively compared to gene expression trends and to phenotypic characterization. Osmotic stress affects motility, and has also been associated with a change in the membrane fatty acid composition (due to induction of branched chain amino acid degradation pathways); however, we show this is not the case for SB2B. Although proteins and genes involved with branched chain amino acid degradation are induced, fatty acid degradation pathways are not induced and no change in the fatty acid profile occurs in SB2B as a result of osmotic shock. The most extensive response of SB2B over the time course of acclimation to high salt involves an orchestrated sequence of events comprising increased expression of signal transduction associated with motility and restricted cell division and DNA replication. After SB2B has switched to increased branched chain amino acid degradation, motility, and cellular replication proteins return to pre-perturbed levels.

  4. A meta-analysis of profile and time-course of symptom change in acute schizophrenia treated with atypical antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Megan; Thornton, Allen E; Honer, William G

    2006-06-01

    The profile and time-course of symptom response in acute schizophrenia is unclear. For the present study, we hypothesized that the time-course would be nonlinear. A meta-analysis was performed using randomized, controlled clinical trials of five atypical antipsychotics reported in nine electronic databases. Studies were of subjects experiencing an acute exacerbation of illness, with multiple BPRS or PANSS data-points as outcome measures. A mixed factorial repeated-measures ANOVA was used. Twenty-one published clinical trials were identified. Reduction in total symptoms from baseline to 4 wk was associated with a linear decline in symptomatology (F=23.4, d.f.=1, 7, p=0.002) without attenuation of effect. In contrast, from baseline to 6 wk the linear symptom reduction (F=76.5, d.f.=1, 12, pdata altered the results at 4 wk, but not 6 wk; completion rates had no effect on results. In conclusion, this meta-analysis confirms our hypothesis for 6-wk data. The profile of symptom change is one of linear symptom reduction until 4 wk, with a flattening of treatment effects by 6 wk. A curvilinear profile of schizophrenia symptom reduction has possible implications with respect to trial design and clinical decision-making.

  5. Time course changes of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice after heat stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Ling Chen; Yu-Zhong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the time course changes of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice after acute heat stress.Methods:Models of mice after acute heat stress were duplicated. Shuttle box test was used to observe the learning and memory function of mice at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, respectively after heat stress. NADPH-d histochemical staining test was used to observe the time course changes of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h respectively after heat stress.Results:Compared with control group, mistakes in heat stress (HS) group was significantly increased while escape latency was significantly shortened at 6 h, 12 h respectively (P<0.05). Compared with control group, NADPH-d positive neuron counts in HS group were significantly increased at 6 h (P<0.05). NADPH-d positive neuron counts in HS group were significantly decreased at 12 h.Conclusions:Acute heat stress could result in obvious damages on learning and memory function of mice, which is possibly related with the increased NADPH-d positive neuron expression.

  6. Changes in time course of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice after heat stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Ling Chen; Yuzhong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the time course changes of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice after acute heat stress. Methods:Model of mice after acute heat stress were duplicated. Shuttle box test was used to observe the learning and memory function of mice at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h respectively after heat stress. NADPH-d histochemical staining test was used to observe the time course changes of NADPH-d positive neuron counts in the cortex of mice at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h respectively after heat stress. Results:(1) Shuttle box test indicated that:Compared with control group, mistakes (M) in HS (heat stress) group was significantly increased while escape latency (EL) was significantly shortened at 6 h, 12 h respectively. (2) NADPH-d histochemical staining test indicated that:Compared with control group, NADPH-d positive neuron counts in HS group were significantly increased at 6 h, and difference had statistical significance. NADPH-d positive neuron counts in HS group were significantly decreased at 12 h. Conclusion:Acute heat stress could result in obvious damages on learning and memory function of mice, which was possibly related with the increased NADPH-d positive neuron expression.

  7. Time-course of prednisone effects on hormonal and inflammatory responses at rest and during resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collomp, K; Zorgati, H; Cottin, F; Do, M-C; Labsy, Z; Gagey, O; Lasne, F; Prieur, F; Collomp, R

    2015-06-01

    Glucocorticoids are among the most commonly used drugs. They are widely administered for acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, as well as for several other pain syndromes, although their therapeutic use is sometimes diverted for doping purposes. Their time-course effects on hormonal and inflammatory responses nevertheless remain poorly understood, both at rest and during exercise. We therefore studied the alterations induced by 1 week of prednisone treatment (60 mg daily) in recreationally trained male athletes after 2 days (i. e., acute) and 7 days (i. e., short-term). Hormonal (i. e., DHEA, DHEA-S, aldosterone, and testosterone) and pro- and anti-inflammatory markers (i. e., IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1β) were investigated at rest and after resistance exercise. A significant decrease in DHEA and DHEA-S (pprednisone intake. A significant increment in IL-10 and a significant decrement in IL-6 (pprednisone both at rest and during exercise, without significant change in IL-1β. Continued prednisone treatment led to another significant decrease in both DHEA and DHEA-S (pprednisone were maximal and stable from the beginning of treatment, both in rest and exercise conditions. However, hormonal concentrations continued to decline during short-term intake. Further studies are needed to determine the effects of hormonal time-course alterations with longer glucocorticoid treatment and the clinical consequences.

  8. Effect of Androctonus bicolor scorpion venom on serum electrolytes in rats: A 24-h time-course study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, A; Khan, H A; Manthiri, R A

    2016-03-01

    Black fat-tailed scorpion (Androctonus bicolor) belongs to the family Buthidae and is one of the most venomous scorpions in the world. The effects of A. bicolor venom on serum electrolytes were not known and therefore investigated in this study. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups with five animals in each group. One of the groups served as control and received vehicle only. The animals in the remaining groups received a single subcutaneous injection of crude A. bicolor venom (200 μg/kg bodyweight) and were killed at different time intervals including 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h after venom injection. The results showed that scorpion venom caused significant increase in serum sodium levels within 30 min after injection which slightly subsided after 1 h and then persisted over 24 h. Serum potassium levels continued to significantly increase until 4 h and then slightly subsided. There were significant decreases in serum magnesium (Mg(+)) levels following scorpion venom injection, at all the time points during the course of study. Serum calcium levels were significantly increased during the entire course of study, whereas serum chloride was significantly decreased. In conclusion, A. bicolor envenomation in rats caused severe and persistent hypomagnesemia with accompanied hypernatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypercalcemia. It is important to measure serum Mg(+) levels in victims of scorpion envenomation, and patients with severe Mg(+) deficiency should be treated accordingly.

  9. Real-time control of the plasma density profile on ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mlynek, Alexander

    2010-07-20

    The tokamak concept currently is the most promising approach to future power generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion. The spatial distribution of the particle density in the toroidally confined fusion plasma is of particular importance. This thesis work therefore focuses on the question as to what extent the shape of the density profile can be actively controlled by a feedback loop in the fusion experiment ASDEX Upgrade. There are basically two essential requirements for such feedback control of the density profile, which has been experimentally demonstrated within the scope of this thesis work: On the one hand, for this purpose the density profile must be continuously calculated under real-time constraints during a plasma discharge. The calculation of the density profile is based on the measurements of a sub-millimeter interferometer, which provides the line-integrated electron density along 5 chords through the plasma. Interferometric density measurements can suffer from counting errors by integer multiples of 2{pi} when detecting the phase difference between a probing and a reference beam. As such measurement errors have severe impact on the reconstructed density profile, one major part of this work consists in the development of new readout electronics for the interferometer, which allows for detection of such measurement errors in real-time with high reliability. A further part of this work is the design of a computer algorithm which reconstructs the spatial distribution of the plasma density from the line-integrated measurements. This algorithm has to be implemented on a computer which communicates the measured data to other computers in real-time, especially to the tokamak control system. On the other hand, a second fundamental requirement for the successful implementation of a feedback controller is the identification of at least one actuator which enables a modification of the density profile. Here, electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) has

  10. Model polymer etching and surface modification by a time modulated RF plasma jet: role of atomic oxygen and water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, P.; Knoll, A. J.; Wang, H.; Kondeti, V. S. S. K.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2017-01-01

    The surface interaction of a well-characterized time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet with polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(vinyl alcohol) as model polymers is investigated. The RF plasma jet shows fast polymer etching but mild chemical modification with a characteristic carbonate ester and NO formation on the etched surface. By varying the plasma treatment conditions including feed gas composition, environment gaseous composition, and treatment distance, we find that short lived species, especially atomic O for Ar/1% O2 and 1% air plasma and OH for Ar/1% H2O plasma, play an essential role for polymer etching. For O2 containing plasma, we find that atomic O initiates polymer etching and the etching depth mirrors the measured decay of O atoms in the gas phase as the nozzle-surface distance increases. The etching reaction probability of an O atom ranging from 10-4 to 10-3 is consistent with low pressure plasma research. We also find that adding O2 and H2O simultaneously into Ar feed gas quenches polymer etching compared to adding them separately which suggests the reduction of O and OH density in Ar/O2/H2O plasma.

  11. The Swine Plasma Metabolome Chronicles "Many Days" Biological Timing and Functions Linked to Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy G Bromage

    Full Text Available The paradigm of chronobiology is based almost wholly upon the daily biological clock, or circadian rhythm, which has been the focus of intense molecular, cellular, pharmacological, and behavioral, research. However, the circadian rhythm does not explain biological timings related to fundamental aspects of life history such as rates of tissue/organ/body size development and control of the timing of life stages such as gestation length, age at maturity, and lifespan. This suggests that another biological timing mechanism is at work. Here we focus on a "many days" (multidien chronobiological period first observed as enigmatic recurring growth lines in developing mammalian tooth enamel that is strongly associate with all adult tissue, organ, and body masses as well as life history attributes such as gestation length, age at maturity, weaning, and lifespan, particularly among the well studied primates. Yet, knowledge of the biological factors regulating the patterning of mammalian life, such as the development of body size and life history structure, does not exist. To identify underlying molecular mechanisms we performed metabolome and genome analyses from blood plasma in domestic pigs. We show that blood plasma metabolites and small non-coding RNA (sncRNA drawn from 33 domestic pigs over a two-week period strongly oscillate on a 5-day multidien rhythm, as does the pig enamel rhythm. Metabolomics and genomics pathway analyses actually reveal two 5-day rhythms, one related to growth in which biological functions include cell proliferation, apoptosis, and transcription regulation/protein synthesis, and another 5-day rhythm related to degradative pathways that follows three days later. Our results provide experimental confirmation of a 5-day multidien rhythm in the domestic pig linking the periodic growth of enamel with oscillations of the metabolome and genome. This association reveals a new class of chronobiological rhythm and a snapshot of the

  12. The Swine Plasma Metabolome Chronicles "Many Days" Biological Timing and Functions Linked to Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, Timothy G.; Idaghdour, Youssef; Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Crenshaw, Thomas D.; Ovsiy, Olexandra; Rotter, Björn; Hoffmeier, Klaus; Schrenk, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm of chronobiology is based almost wholly upon the daily biological clock, or circadian rhythm, which has been the focus of intense molecular, cellular, pharmacological, and behavioral, research. However, the circadian rhythm does not explain biological timings related to fundamental aspects of life history such as rates of tissue/organ/body size development and control of the timing of life stages such as gestation length, age at maturity, and lifespan. This suggests that another biological timing mechanism is at work. Here we focus on a "many days" (multidien) chronobiological period first observed as enigmatic recurring growth lines in developing mammalian tooth enamel that is strongly associate with all adult tissue, organ, and body masses as well as life history attributes such as gestation length, age at maturity, weaning, and lifespan, particularly among the well studied primates. Yet, knowledge of the biological factors regulating the patterning of mammalian life, such as the development of body size and life history structure, does not exist. To identify underlying molecular mechanisms we performed metabolome and genome analyses from blood plasma in domestic pigs. We show that blood plasma metabolites and small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) drawn from 33 domestic pigs over a two-week period strongly oscillate on a 5-day multidien rhythm, as does the pig enamel rhythm. Metabolomics and genomics pathway analyses actually reveal two 5-day rhythms, one related to growth in which biological functions include cell proliferation, apoptosis, and transcription regulation/protein synthesis, and another 5-day rhythm related to degradative pathways that follows three days later. Our results provide experimental confirmation of a 5-day multidien rhythm in the domestic pig linking the periodic growth of enamel with oscillations of the metabolome and genome. This association reveals a new class of chronobiological rhythm and a snapshot of the biological bases that

  13. The Swine Plasma Metabolome Chronicles "Many Days" Biological Timing and Functions Linked to Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, Timothy G; Idaghdour, Youssef; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Crenshaw, Thomas D; Ovsiy, Olexandra; Rotter, Björn; Hoffmeier, Klaus; Schrenk, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm of chronobiology is based almost wholly upon the daily biological clock, or circadian rhythm, which has been the focus of intense molecular, cellular, pharmacological, and behavioral, research. However, the circadian rhythm does not explain biological timings related to fundamental aspects of life history such as rates of tissue/organ/body size development and control of the timing of life stages such as gestation length, age at maturity, and lifespan. This suggests that another biological timing mechanism is at work. Here we focus on a "many days" (multidien) chronobiological period first observed as enigmatic recurring growth lines in developing mammalian tooth enamel that is strongly associate with all adult tissue, organ, and body masses as well as life history attributes such as gestation length, age at maturity, weaning, and lifespan, particularly among the well studied primates. Yet, knowledge of the biological factors regulating the patterning of mammalian life, such as the development of body size and life history structure, does not exist. To identify underlying molecular mechanisms we performed metabolome and genome analyses from blood plasma in domestic pigs. We show that blood plasma metabolites and small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) drawn from 33 domestic pigs over a two-week period strongly oscillate on a 5-day multidien rhythm, as does the pig enamel rhythm. Metabolomics and genomics pathway analyses actually reveal two 5-day rhythms, one related to growth in which biological functions include cell proliferation, apoptosis, and transcription regulation/protein synthesis, and another 5-day rhythm related to degradative pathways that follows three days later. Our results provide experimental confirmation of a 5-day multidien rhythm in the domestic pig linking the periodic growth of enamel with oscillations of the metabolome and genome. This association reveals a new class of chronobiological rhythm and a snapshot of the biological bases that

  14. Time-Dependent Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Plasmas: Exact Solutions Including Momentum-Dependent Escape

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, P A; Le, T

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic acceleration of charged particles due to interactions with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma waves is the dominant process leading to the formation of the high-energy electron and ion distributions in a variety of astrophysical systems. Collisions with the waves influence both the energization and the spatial transport of the particles, and therefore it is important to treat these two aspects of the problem in a self-consistent manner. We solve the representative Fokker-Planck equation to obtain a new, closed-form solution for the time-dependent Green's function describing the acceleration and escape of relativistic ions interacting with Alfven or fast-mode waves characterized by momentum diffusion coefficient $D(p)\\propto p^q$ and mean particle escape timescale $t_esc(p) \\propto p^{q-2}$, where $p$ is the particle momentum and $q$ is the power-law index of the MHD wave spectrum. In particular, we obtain solutions for the momentum distribution of the ions in the plasma and also for the momentum dist...

  15. Student Performance in Online Quizzes as a Function of Time in Undergraduate Financial Management Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnusenberg, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    An interesting research question in light of recent technological developments is an investigation of the relationship between the time remaining to complete online quizzes and quiz scores. The data consist of over 4,000 individual quiz scores for six sections of Financial Management at The University of North Florida taught between the Summer of…

  16. Interlateral asymmetry in the time course of the effect of a peripheral prime stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Barros, B A; Righi, L L; Grechi, G; Ribeiro-do-Valle, L E

    2008-04-01

    Evidence exists that both right and left hemisphere attentional mechanisms are mobilized when attention is directed to the right visual hemifield and only right hemisphere attentional mechanisms are mobilized when attention is directed to the left visual hemifield. This arrangement might lead to a rightward bias of automatic attention. The hypothesis was investigated by testing male volunteers, wherein a "location discrimination" reaction time task (Experiments 1 and 3) and a "location and shape discrimination" reaction time task (Experiments 2 and 4) were used. Unilateral (Experiments 1 and 2) and unilateral or bilateral (Experiments 3 and 4) peripheral visual prime stimuli were used to control attention. Reaction time to a small visual target stimulus in the same location or in the horizontally opposite location was evaluated. Stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) were 34, 50, 67, 83 and 100 ms. An important prime stimulus attentional effect was observed as early as 50 ms in the four experiments. In Experiments 2, 3 and 4, this effect was larger when the prime stimulus occurred in the right hemifield than when it occurred in the left hemifield for SOA 100 ms. In Experiment 4, when the prime stimulus occurred simultaneously in both hemifields, reaction time was faster for the right hemifield and for SOA 100 ms. These results indicate that automatic attention tends to favor the right side of space, particularly when identification of the target stimulus shape is required.

  17. High Performance Computing (HPC) for Real-Time Course of Action (COA) Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    architectures including Beowulf clusters . Installing FSS is discussed in the Installation Guide FSS supports a force on force simulation which...workstations, clusters , or combinations of architectures. FSS is a discrete event simulation meaning there is no ‘time step’ to the simulation

  18. Using Prime-Time Animation to Engage Students in Courses on Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curch, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Prime-time animation is a television genre that frequently reflects on issues that are significant in contemporary society, including aging issues. Using such programs to present aging-related content can be a constructive pedagogical device, offering a means of actively engaging students. This article provides a brief overview of the use of…

  19. The cognitive and neural time course of empathy and sympathy: an electrical neuroimaging study on self-other interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirioux, B; Mercier, M R; Blanke, O; Berthoz, A

    2014-05-16

    Although extensively investigated in socio-cognitive neuroscience, empathy is difficult to study. The first difficulty originates in its multifaceted nature. According to the multidimensional model, empathy combines emotional, automatic (simulation), cognitive (mentalizing) and regulatory (executive functions) processes. Substantial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data demonstrated that co-activations in the mirror neuron system (MNS) and mentalizing network (MENT) sustain this co-recruitment of so-called first- and second-person-like processes. Because of the poor temporal resolution of fMRI techniques, we currently lack evidence about the precise timing of the MNS-MENT combination. An important challenge is, thus, to disentangle how MNS and MENT dynamically work together along time in empathy. Moreover, the role of the executive functions in the MNS-MENT combination time course is still unknown. Second, empathy - feeling into - is closely related to sympathy - feeling with - and both phenomena are often conflated in experimental studies on intersubjectivity. In this electrical neuroimaging (EEG) pilot-study, we tested whether the egocentered vs. heterocentered visuo-spatial mechanisms respectively associated with sympathy and empathy differentially modulate the dynamic combination of the MNS-MENT activations in their respective neural time course. For that, we employed our newly developed behavioral paradigm assessing the visuo-spatial - but not emotional - features of empathy and sympathy. Using a data-driven approach, we report that empathy and sympathy are underlied by sequential activations in the MNS from the insula to the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) between 63ms and 424ms. However, at 333-424ms, empathy triggered greater co-activations in the right IFG and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) (executive functions). Linking together our present and prior (Thirioux et al., 2010) findings from the same dataset, we suggest that this greater

  20. Transient and sustained BOLD signal time courses affect the detection of emotion-related brain activation in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paret, Christian; Kluetsch, Rosemarie; Ruf, Matthias; Demirakca, Traute; Kalisch, Raffael; Schmahl, Christian; Ende, Gabriele

    2014-12-01

    A tremendous amount of effort has been dedicated to unravel the functional neuroanatomy of the processing and regulation of emotion, resulting in a well-described picture of limbic, para-limbic and prefrontal regions involved. Studies applying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) often use the block-wise presentation of stimuli with affective content, and conventionally model brain activation as a function of stimulus or task duration. However, there is increasing evidence that regional brain responses may not always translate to task duration and rather show stimulus onset-related transient time courses. We assume that brain regions showing transient responses cannot be detected in block designs using a conventional fMRI analysis approach. At the same time, the probability of detecting these regions with conventional analyses may be increased when shorter stimulus timing or a more intense stimulation during a block is used. In a within-subject fMRI study, we presented aversive pictures to 20 healthy subjects and investigated the effect of experimental design (i.e. event-related and block design) on the detection of brain activation in limbic and para-limbic regions of interest of emotion processing. In addition to conventional modeling of sustained activation during blocks of stimulus presentation, we included a second response function into the general linear model (GLM), suited to detect transient time courses at block onset. In the conventional analysis, several regions like the amygdala, thalamus and periaqueductal gray were activated irrespective of design. However, we found a positive BOLD response in the anterior insula (AI) in event-related but not in block-design analyses. GLM analyses suggest that this difference may result from a transient response pattern which cannot be captured by the conventional fMRI analysis approach. Our results indicate that regions with a transient response profile like the AI can be missed in block designs if analyses

  1. Time Course Field Analysis of COMT-Downregulated Switchgrass: Lignification, Recalcitrance, and Rust Susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Holly L.; Mazarei, Mitra; Fu, Chunxiang; Cheng, Qunkang; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Sykes, Robert W.; Windham, Mark T.; Davis, Mark F.; Dixon, Richard A.; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Stewart, C. Neal

    2016-05-18

    Modifying plant cell walls by manipulating lignin biosynthesis can improve biofuel yields from lignocellulosic crops. For example, transgenic switchgrass lines with downregulated expression of caffeic acid O-methyltransferase, a lignin biosynthetic enzyme, produce up to 38% more ethanol than controls. The aim of the present study was to understand cell wall lignification over the second and third growing seasons of COMT-downregulated field-grown switchgrass. COMT gene expression, lignification, and cell wall recalcitrance were assayed for two independent transgenic lines at monthly intervals. Switchgrass rust (Puccinia emaculata) incidence was also tracked across the seasons. Trends in lignification over time differed between the 2 years. In 2012, sampling was initiated in mid-growing season on reproductive-stage plants and there was little variation in the lignin content of all lines (COMT-downregulated and control) over time. COMT-downregulated lines maintained 11-16% less lignin, 33-40% lower S/G (syringyl-to-guaiacyl) ratios, and 15-42% higher sugar release relative to controls for all time points. In 2013, sampling was initiated earlier in the season on elongation-stage plants and the lignin content of all lines steadily increased over time, while sugar release expectedly decreased. S/G ratios increased in non-transgenic control plants as biomass accumulated over the season, while remaining relatively stable across the season in the COMT-downregulated lines. Differences in cell wall chemistry between transgenic and non-transgenic lines were not apparent until plants transitioned to reproductive growth in mid-season, after which the cell walls of COMT-downregulated plants exhibited phenotypes consistent with what was observed in 2012. There were no differences in rust damage between transgenics and controls at any time point. These results provide relevant fundamental insights into the process of lignification in a maturing field-grown biofuel feedstock with

  2. Time course of endotoxin-induced airways' inflammation in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyen, Virginie; Kassengera, Zaina; Dinh, Duc Huy Phong; Michel, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    Few data are available on the kinetic of the airways' inflammation induced by inhaled endotoxin in a given subject. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in healthy subjects the time-related endotoxin-induced airways' inflammation. The cells counts from the induced-sputum were evaluated before, 6 and 24 h, and 7 days after an exposure to 20 mcg inhaled endotoxin, in eight pre-selected volunteers. To avoid interference of the induced-sputum procedure on the response to endotoxin, each time-point was evaluated in randomized order at 2-weeks interval after three separate inhalations of endotoxin. A significant rise of the relative number of lymphocytes (pinflammation after 6 h, peaked at 24 h and recovered after 7 days. When repeated endotoxin inhalations are used as a model of inflammation, a wash-out period of at least 7 days should be applied between each exposure in each subject.

  3. Changes of MR imaging by course of time after surgery for lumbar disc herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, Yasutomo (Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Yoshioka, Toshitaka; Yokota, Tohru; Noike, Masatoshi; Endo, Akihiko; Yamauchi, Hiroo; Kazui, Hideo

    1993-02-01

    Fourteen patients with lumber disc herniation underwent magnetic resonance (MR) scanning before and one, 3, 6 and 12 months after LOVE method. The degree of compression of the dural canal on pre- and post-operative sagittal images and the sectional area of the dural canal on axial images were measured to evaluate postoperative repair and decompression of the dural canal. Inhomogeneous signal intensities suggestive of edema, angioma and scar were observed on MR scans taken one month after surgery. Disappearance of these signal intensities and decompression of the dural canal were observed with time, corresponding to the degree of clinical improvement. Antero-posterior diameter of the dural canal and the sectional area reflecting repair of the dural canal were increased. Sequential MR scanning with time may be helpful in evaluating the postoperative condition of intervertebral disc and the root of a spinal nerve. (N.K.).

  4. Time course of an X-ray picture following operation for the ventricular septal defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khenynya, R.L.; Latsis, A.T.; Rubene, M.Ya.

    1983-01-01

    An x-ray picture was studied over time in 80 pediatric patients by hemodynamic groups in accordance with the classification adopted in the A.I. Bakulev Institute of Cardiovascular Surgery, USSR AMS. Of them in 15 patients in addition to the ventricular septal defect, stenosis of the pulmonary artery was revealed, in 11 concomitant insufficiency of the tricuspid valve. The best results after radical correction of the defect were achieved in patients with insignificant or moderate disorder of the pulmonary hemodynamics; positive results in patients with a high pulmonary hypertension were observed over time later. X-ray studies on the regression of disorders of the pulmonary hemodynamics emphasize the necessity of early diagnosis of the ventricular septal defect followed by surgical correction.

  5. Orientation enhancement in early visual processing can explain time course of brightness contrast and White's illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Subhajit; Sarkar, Sandip

    2013-06-01

    Dynamics of orientation tuning in V1 indicates that computational model of V1 should not only comprise of bank of static spatially oriented filters but also include the contribution for dynamical response facilitation or suppression along orientation. Time evolution of orientation response in V1 can emerge due to time- dependent excitation and lateral inhibition in the orientation domain. Lateral inhibition in the orientation domain suggests that Ernst Mach's proposition can be applied for the enhancement of initial orientation distribution that is generated due to interaction of visual stimulus with spatially oriented filters and subcortical temporal filter. Oriented spatial filtering that appears much early (explain experimentally observed temporal dynamics of brightness contrast illusion. But, enhancement of orientation response at early phase of visual processing is the key mechanism that can guide visual system to predict the brightness by "Max-rule" or "Winner Takes All" (WTA) estimation and thus producing White's illusions at any exposure.

  6. Numerical analysis of a coupled problem: Time evolution of a tokamak plasma in contact with a conducting wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, R.; Formisano, A.; Fresa, R.; Martone, R.; Rubinacci, G.; Villone, F. [Univ. degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Elettrica

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the authors analyze the time evolution of a tokamak plasma after the failure of the vertical control system. In this case, the plasma eventually touches the conducting wall and gives rise to currents which flow partly in the wall, partly in the plasma. They show how, under simplifying assumptions, the problem can be analyzed by means of pure electromagnetic formulations. After a brief review of the state of the art in the analysis of this phenomenon, they propose and discuss three alternative Eulerian approaches: an evolutionary equilibrium formulation, a convection-diffusion model and a 3D error-based approach.

  7. Time course of the meiotic arrest in sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes treated with roscovitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocomo, Letícia Ferrari; Marques Filho, Wolff Camargo; Ackermann, Camila Louise; Paschoal, Daniela Martins; Guastali, Midyan Daroz; Dias Maziero, Rosiára Rosária; Sudano, Mateus José; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda da Cruz; Bicudo, Sony Dimas

    2016-04-01

    Temporary meiosis arrest with cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors has been proposed in order to improve the quality of in vitro matured oocytes. In sheep, however, this phenomenon has been rarely investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of different incubation times with roscovitine on nuclear maturation and cumulus cell expansion of sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). For this, COCs were cultured for 0, 6, 12 or 20 h in basic maturation medium (Control) containing 75 μM roscovitine (Rosco). After, they were in vitro matured (IVM) for 18 h in the presence of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). At the end of each treatment, cumulus cell expansion and nuclear maturation were assessed under a stereomicroscope and by Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. In the Control and Rosco groups, the absence of cumulus cell expansion prevailed at 0, 6, 12 and 20 h. After IVM for 18 h, total cumulus cell expansion in the Rosco treatments was dependent on the exposure time to roscovitine. A significantly high percentage of oocytes treated with roscovitine for 6 h (87%), 12 h or 20 h (65%) were arrested at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. In contrast, 23% GVBD, 54% metaphase I (MI) and 61% MII oocytes were observed in the Control groups at 6, 12 and 20 h, respectively. In all treatments, a significant percentage of oocytes reached MII after IVM for 18 h. Therefore, roscovitine reversibly arrested the meiosis of sheep oocytes during different culture times with the maximal efficiency of meiotic inhibition reached at 6 h. In addition, reversibility of its inhibitory action on cumulus cells was exposure-time dependent.

  8. Time courses of MRI BOLD signals in prolonged visual stimulation. Comparison between colors and orders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikura, Kenichi; Fujita, Hideaki; Kershaw, J.B.; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Seki, Chie [Akita Laboratory, Japan Science and Technology Corp. (Japan); Kashikura, Akemi; Ardekani, B.A.; Kanno, Iwao

    1998-06-01

    We investigated: the BOLD signal response during 270 second photic stimulation using an EPI pulse sequence; the BOLD signal response for two different color checkerboards; and the BOLD signal response during six consecutive stimulation series. Ten healthy human subjects (age 25{+-}5.5 years) were studied with a 1.5 T MRI system (Siemens Vision, Erlangen, Germany). Black and white (BW) and red and white (RW) checkerboards alternating at 8 Hz were applied in turns for a total series of six. Stimulation timing was: 30 sec. off, 15 sec. on, 15 sec. off, 270 sec. on, 15 sec. off, 15 sec. on, 15 sec. off. Acquired data were analyzed according to color and/or order: color (without considering the order); color and order (1st BW vs. 1st RW, 2nd BW vs. 2nd RW, 3rd BW vs. 3rd RW); and order (without considering the color). A t-test (p<0.001) was used for obtaining the activated areas, and simple regression and two-way repeated-measures ANOVA were used for testing the statistical significance of the BOLD response. Results were: the BOLD signal responses during sustained photic stimulation maintained a constant level for the full duration and all series, suggesting stable levels of oxygen extraction and metabolism during cortical activation; the BOLD signal responses in two colors showed no significant difference in time response, suggesting that the neuronal populations perceiving black and red give a similar time response; and the effect of habituation or fatigue as observed by a signal decrease was not obtained, although the S.D. for each subject greatly increased with time and might be an indicator for evaluation fatigue or attention. (author)

  9. Time course of the angiogenic response during normotrophic and hypertrophic scar formation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veer, Willem M; Niessen, Frank B; Ferreira, José A; Zwiers, Peter J; de Jong, Etty H; Middelkoop, Esther; Molema, Grietje

    2011-01-01

    Previous research suggests that in hypertrophic scars (HSs), an excess of microvessels is present compared with normotrophic scars (NSs). The aim of our study was to quantify vascular densities in HSs and normotrophic scars and to provide an insight into the kinetics of changes in the expression of angiogenic factors in time during wound healing and HS formation. Human presternal wound healing after cardiothoracic surgery through a sternotomy incision was investigated in a standardized manner. Skin biopsies were collected at consecutive time points, i.e., during surgery and 2, 4, 6, 12, and 52 weeks postoperatively. The expression levels of angiopoietin-1, angiopoietin-2, Tie-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator were measured by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Quantification of angiogenesis and cellular localization of the proteins of interest were based on immunohistochemical analysis. Microvessel densities were higher in the HSs compared with the normotrophic scars 12 weeks (p=0.017) and 52 weeks (p=0.030) postoperatively. Angiopoietin-1 expression was lower in the hypertrophic group (pdecrease in the angiopoietin-1/angiopoietin-2 ratio in the hypertrophic group 4 weeks (p=0.053), 12 weeks (pscars.

  10. An advanced time-dependent collisional-radiative model of helium plasma discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claustre, J.; Boukandou-Mombo, C.; Margot, J.; Matte, J.-P.; Vidal, F.

    2017-10-01

    A new spatially averaged time-dependent collisional-radiative model for helium plasmas, coupled to the electron Boltzmann equation (EBE), has been developed. Its main novelties are: (1) full time dependence for both the multi-species kinetics and the EBE. It is shown that this is necessary to correctly simulate discharges where the parameters vary on nanoseconds-microsecond timescales. (2) All electron processes are accounted for accurately. In particular, for the various ionization and recombination processes, free electrons are added or removed at the appropriate energy, with the appropriate interpolation on the energy grid. (3) The energy dependence of the electron loss by ambipolar diffusion is taken into account approximately. (4) All of the processes which are known to be important in helium discharges for pressure P≤slant 760 Torr are included, and 42 energy levels up to n = 6, where n is the main quantum number, are taken into account. Atomic and molecular ions, as well as excimers, are also included. (5) The gas temperature is calculated self-consistently. The model is validated through comparisons with known numerical steady-state results of Santos et al (2014 J. Phys. D. 47 265201) which they compared to their experimental results, and good agreement is obtained for their measured quantities. It is then applied to post-discharge decay cases with very short power decay times. The time evolution of the population densities and reaction rates are analyzed in detail with emphasis on the observed large increase of the metastable density.

  11. Time-course of vascular adaptations during 8 weeks of exercise training in subjects with type 2 diabetes and middle-aged controls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Green, D.J.; Nyakayiru, J.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Exercise training in healthy volunteers rapidly improves vascular function, preceding structural remodelling. No study examined the time-course of such adaptations in subjects with a priori endothelial dysfunction. METHODS: We examined brachial artery endothelial and smooth muscle function

  12. Factors associated with the success of first-time African American freshmen taking introductory science lecture courses at a private HBCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kendra Leigh

    This study had four purposes: (1) to investigate the relationship between performance in introductory biology or introductory chemistry lecture courses and their accompanying laboratory courses, (2) to investigate the relationship between performance in introductory biology or introductory chemistry lecture courses and a student's gender, (3) to investigate the relationship between performance in introductory biology or introductory chemistry lecture courses and a student's major, and (4) to investigate the relationship between performance in introductory biology or introductory chemistry lecture courses and a student's ACT scores. The sample consisted of 195 first--time freshmen who enrolled in and completed an introductory biology or an introductory chemistry lecture and laboratory courses during the fall semesters of 2007-2012. Of the 195 students, 61 were enrolled in introductory chemistry and 134 were enrolled in introductory biology courses. Logistic regression, via the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), was utilized to analyze several variables as they related to success in the lecture courses. Data were extracted from the university's student information system (BANNER), and analyses were conducted on biology and chemistry separately. The dependent variable for this study was a dichotomous variable for success and nonsuccess in introductory biology or introductory chemistry lecture course. The independent variables analyzed were student's gender, major, final grade in an accompanying biology or chemistry laboratory course, and ACT test scores (composite, mathematics, and science). Results indicate that concurrent enrollment in a biology laboratory course increased the likelihood of success by 15.64 times in the lecture course. Gender was found to not be a significant predictor of success for either introductory biology or introductory chemistry lecture courses. STEM majors were 9.6 times more likely to be successful than non-STEM majors in

  13. Transport of time-varying plasma currents by whistler wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Rousculp, C.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between pulsed currents and electromagnetic waves is examined in a regime characterized by electron MHD. Pulsed currents are generated by (1) collection/emission of charged particles by/from biased electrodes and (2) induction of currents by time-varying and moving magnetic fields. Pulsed currents are observed to propagate at the speed of whistler wave packets. Their field structure forms ropelike configurations which are electromagnetically force-free. Moving sources induce 'eddy' currents which excite waves and form Cerenkov-like whistler 'wings'. The radiation patterns of moving magnetic antennas and electrodynamic tethers are investigated. Nonlinear effects of large-amplitude, antenna-launched whistler pulses are observed. These involve a new modulational instability in which a channel of high conductivity which permits the wave/currents to penetrate deeply into a collisional plasma is formed.

  14. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  15. CUE USAGE IN VOLLEYBALL: A TIME COURSE COMPARISON OF ELITE, INTERMEDIATE AND NOVICE FEMALE PLAYERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaeyens, R; Zeuwts, L; Philippaerts, R; Lenoir, M

    2014-01-01

    This study compared visual search strategies in adult female volleyball players of three levels. Video clips of the attack of the opponent team were presented on a large screen and participants reacted to the final pass before the spike. Reaction time, response accuracy and eye movement patterns were measured. Elite players had the highest response accuracy (97.50 ± 3.5%) compared to the intermediate (91.50 ± 4.7%) and novice players (83.50 ± 17.6%; pvolleyball and suggests that expert players extract more information from parafoveal regions. PMID:25609887

  16. Time course of altered sensitivity to inhibitory and excitatory agonist responses in the longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus and analgesia in the guinea pig after chronic morphine treatment

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Tolerance that develops after chronic morphine exposure has been proposed to be an adaptive response that develops and decays over a defined time course. The present study examined the development of tolerance to the acute hypothermic and analgesic effects of morphine and correlated the time course for the desensitization in vivo with the reduced responsiveness to DAMGO and 2-CADO and increased responsiveness to nicotine of the longitudinal muscle/myenteric plexus (LM/MP) preparation in vitr...

  17. The time course of temporal attention effects on nonconscious prime processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Torsten; Palazova, Marina; Hutt, Axel

    2013-11-01

    We presented a masked prime at various prime-target intervals (PTIs) before a target that required a speeded motor response and investigated the impact of temporal attention on the nonconscious prime processing. The allocation of temporal attention to the target was manipulated by presenting an accessory tone and comparing that condition with a no-tone condition. The results showed that, independently of the visibility of the prime, temporal attention led to an enhanced effect of prime-target congruency on the reaction times, and that the amount of the enhancement increased with increasing PTIs. This effect pattern is consistent with the assumption of increasing influences of temporal attention and of the increasing PTI on nonconscious prime processing; it argues against the hypothesis that temporal attention narrows the time period in which the prime may affect target processing. An accumulator model is proposed assuming that target-related temporal attention increases the accumulation rate for masked primes and, thus, enhances the impact of the prime on the speed of choice decisions.

  18. Time course of the hemodynamic responses to aortic depressor nerve stimulation in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, M.T.; Mota, A.L. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Barale, A.R. [Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Castania, J.A.; Fazan, R. Jr.; Salgado, H.C. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-16

    The time to reach the maximum response of arterial pressure, heart rate and vascular resistance (hindquarter and mesenteric) was measured in conscious male spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive control rats (NCR; Wistar; 18-22 weeks) subjected to electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN). The parameters of stimulation were 1 mA intensity and 2 ms pulse length applied for 5 s, using frequencies of 10, 30, and 90 Hz. The time to reach the hemodynamic responses at different frequencies of ADN stimulation was similar for SHR (N = 15) and NCR (N = 14); hypotension = NCR (4194 ± 336 to 3695 ± 463 ms) vs SHR (3475 ± 354 to 4494 ± 300 ms); bradycardia = NCR (1618 ± 152 to 1358 ± 185 ms) vs SHR (1911 ± 323 to 1852 ± 431 ms), and the fall in hindquarter vascular resistance = NCR (6054 ± 486 to 6550 ± 847 ms) vs SHR (4849 ± 918 to 4926 ± 646 ms); mesenteric = NCR (5574 ± 790 to 5752 ± 539 ms) vs SHR (5638 ± 648 to 6777 ± 624 ms). In addition, ADN stimulation produced baroreflex responses characterized by a faster cardiac effect followed by a vascular effect, which together contributed to the decrease in arterial pressure. Therefore, the results indicate that there is no alteration in the conduction of the electrical impulse after the site of baroreceptor mechanical transduction in the baroreflex pathway (central and/or efferent) in conscious SHR compared to NCR.

  19. Mapping time-course mitochondrial adaptations in the kidney in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Melinda T; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Penfold, Sally A; Higgins, Gavin C; Thallas-Bonke, Vicki; Tan, Sih Min; Van Bergen, Nicole J; Sourris, Karly C; Harcourt, Brooke E; Thorburn, David R; Trounce, Ian A; Cooper, Mark E; Forbes, Josephine M

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) drives ATP production by mitochondria, which are dynamic organelles, constantly fusing and dividing to maintain kidney homoeostasis. In diabetic kidney disease (DKD), mitochondria appear dysfunctional, but the temporal development of diabetes-induced adaptations in mitochondrial structure and bioenergetics have not been previously documented. In the present study, we map the changes in mitochondrial dynamics and function in rat kidney mitochondria at 4, 8, 16 and 32 weeks of diabetes. Our data reveal that changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics precede the development of albuminuria and renal histological changes. Specifically, in early diabetes (4 weeks), a decrease in ATP content and mitochondrial fragmentation within proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTECs) of diabetic kidneys were clearly apparent, but no changes in urinary albumin excretion or glomerular morphology were evident at this time. By 8 weeks of diabetes, there was increased capacity for mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) by pore opening, which persisted over time and correlated with mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation and glomerular damage. Late in diabetes, by week 16, tubular damage was evident with increased urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) excretion, where an increase in the Complex I-linked oxygen consumption rate (OCR), in the context of a decrease in kidney ATP, indicated mitochondrial uncoupling. Taken together, these data show that changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics may precede the development of the renal lesion in diabetes, and this supports the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is a primary cause of DKD.

  20. Catheter failure rates and time course with epidural versus combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groden, J; Gonzalez-Fiol, A; Aaronson, J; Sachs, A; Smiley, R

    2016-05-01

    The combined spinal-epidural technique for labor analgesia has several advantages over the traditional epidural technique, including faster onset, greater maternal satisfaction, and decreased need for physician boluses. Proponents of the epidural technique criticize the combined spinal-epidural technique, arguing that the epidural catheter remains untested and thus may not be reliable if needed for surgical intervention. We compared failure rates and time of failure between techniques in our tertiary-care academic practice. Data regarding failed catheters were collected from October 2012 to September 2014 as part of our Quality Assurance program. Failed catheters were defined as any catheter replaced after it was considered to be properly placed and then determined to be intravascular, one sided or resulting in poor maternal analgesia or anesthesia. A total of 5487 analgesics were performed (3980 combined spinal-epidural; 1507 epidural). Eighty-five combined spinal-epidural catheters (2.1%) and 59 epidural catheters (3.9%) were replaced during labor (Plabor and that the time to detection of a failed catheter was significantly longer in the combined spinal-epidural group. Our findings validate the combined spinal-epidural technique as reliable for labor analgesia and tend to refute the theory of the untested catheter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Time-course regulation of survival pathways by epicatechin on HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén; Angeles Martín, María; Goya, Luis; Bravo, Laura; Ramos, Sonia

    2009-02-01

    Polyphenols, such as epicatechin, have been reported to exhibit a wide range of biological activities. The objective of the present study was to investigate the time-dependent regulation by epicatechin of survival/proliferation pathways in HepG2 cells. Treatment of HepG2 cells with 10 micromol/L epicatechin did not result in any cell damage up to 18 h, as evaluated by the lactate dehydrogenase assay. Moreover, the enhanced cell death evoked by an oxidative stress induced with tert-butyl hydroperoxide was prevented in the cells pretreated 4 or 18 h with epicatechin. Epicatechin-induced survival was a rapid event that was accompanied by early and sustained activation of major survival signaling proteins, such as AKT/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and extracellular-regulated kinase (activated from 5 min to 18 h), as well as protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha (30 min to 18 h), in concert with unaltered c-jun N-amino terminal kinase levels and early inactivation of key death-related signals like PKC-delta (5 min to 18 h). Additionally, reactive oxygen species generation was transiently reduced when cells were treated with 10 micromol/L epicatechin (15-240 min). These data suggest that epicatechin induces cellular survival through a tight regulation of survival/proliferation pathways that requires the integration of different signals and persists over time, the ultimate effect on HepG2 cells being regulated by the balance among these signals.

  2. Time course of transient cortical scintigraphic defects associated with acute pyelonephritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditchfield, Michael R.; Summerville, Dianne; Cook, David J.; Campo, John F. de [Department of Radiology, Royal Children' s Hospital, Melbourne 3052 (Australia); Grimwood, Keith; Nolan, Terrance M. [Department of General Paediatrics, Royal Children' s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Powell, Harley R. [Department of Nephrology, Royal Children' s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Sloane, Robert [Department of General Paediatrics, Royal Children' s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia)

    2002-12-01

    Acute pyelonephritis is distinguished from renal scarring using repeat cortical scintigraphy. The defects of acute pyelonephritis resolve, while those of scars persist. To determine the duration of reversible cortical defects following acute pyelonephritis and the time interval required to differentiate infection from scars. Materials and methods. An observational prospective study of 193 children (386 kidneys) aged less than 5 years following their first proven urinary tract infection (UTI). Renal cortical scintigraphic defects were detected in 112 (29%) kidneys within 15 days of diagnosis. Of these, 95 underwent repeat renal cortical scans 2 years after the UTI, including 50 with additional scans performed within 2-6 months of infection. Of the 50 kidneys undergoing a second renal cortical scan within 2-6 months of the first UTI, 22 (44%) had persistent defects. A third scan was performed on 17 (77%) kidneys after 2 years, by which time defects had resolved in another 8 (47%) kidneys. The predictive value of defects detected within 2-6 months of UTI representing scars is 53% (95% CI 28, 77). Overall, nine (18%) kidneys with initial renal cortical abnormalities had permanent defects. In the 45 kidneys undergoing a second cortical scan more than 6 months after the UTI, 11 (24%) had persistent defects. None of the 95 kidneys undergoing serial scans developed new or larger defects. Renal scars may not be reliably diagnosed by cortical scintigraphy performed within 6 months of UTI because the inflammatory lesions may not have fully resolved. (orig.)

  3. Time-course of trigeminal versus olfactory stimulation: evidence from chemosensory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, Elena L R; Boesveldt, Sanne; Haehner, Antje; Iannilli, Emilia; Sinding, Charlotte; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Habituation of responses to chemosensory signals has been explored in many ways. Strong habituation and adaptation processes can be observed at the various levels of processing. For example, with repeated exposure, amplitudes of chemosensory event-related potentials (ERP) decrease over time. However, long-term habituation has not been investigated so far and investigations of differences in habituation between trigeminal and olfactory ERPs are very rare. The present study investigated habituation over a period of approximately 80 min for two olfactory and one trigeminal stimulus, respectively. Habituation was examined analyzing the N1 and P2 amplitudes and latencies of chemosensory ERPs and intensity ratings. It was shown that amplitudes of both components - and intensity ratings - decreased from the first to the last block. Concerning ERP latencies no effects of habituation were seen. Amplitudes of trigeminal ERPs diminished faster than amplitudes of olfactory ERPs, indicating that the habituation of trigeminal ERPs is stronger than habituation of olfactory ERPs. Amplitudes of trigeminal ERPs were generally higher than amplitudes of olfactory ERPs, as it has been shown in various studies before. The results reflect relatively selective central changes in response to chemosensory stimuli over time.

  4. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoops, Harm C. M.; de Peuter, K.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2015-07-01

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiNx) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiNx by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiNx by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called "redeposition effect". This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiNx ALD using SiH2(NHtBu)2 as precursor and N2 plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiNx film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  5. Time Course of Isoflurane-Induced Vasodilation: A Doppler Ultrasound Study of the Left Coronary Artery in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzarini, Francesca; Di Lascio, Nicole; Stea, Francesco; Kusmic, Claudia; Faita, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Isoflurane is widely used as vasodilator in studies of coronary flow reserve (CFR) in small animals, but the protocols have not been standardized. This study assessed the time course of the increase in isoflurane-induced flow in the mouse coronary artery by pulsed-wave Doppler measurements at 1% isoflurane concentration maintained for 6 min and then increased to 2.5% for 30 min. Velocity-time integral and velocity peak values were best fitted by the sigmoid model, which allowed derivation of the mean time (Tt90 = 14 min) of high-isoflurane needed to reach 90% of the hyperemic plateau value. In subsequent experiments, CFR was measured at 4 min (mean time of literature data) and 14 min of hyperemic response. The 4-min CFR was significantly lower than the 14 -min CFR, and the Bland-Altman plot revealed significant bias of the 4-min CFR against the 14-min CFR. This result suggests that measurements of flow velocity at times shorter than 14 min may be inappropriate for expressing the effective value of CFR.

  6. Life-Course Relationship between Socioeconomic Circumstances and Timing of First Birth in a Birth Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roode, Thea; Sharples, Katrina; Dickson, Nigel; Paul, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study examines the influence of socioeconomic circumstances in childhood (childhood SES) and adulthood (adult SES) on timing of first birth by age 37. Methods A longitudinal study of a 1972–1973 New Zealand birth cohort collected information on socioeconomic characteristics from age 3–32 and reproductive histories at 21, 26, 32 and 38; information on first birth was available from 978 of the original 1037. Relative Risks (RR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated using Poisson regression to examine first live birth prior to age 21, from 21–25, from 26–31, and from 32–37, by socioeconomic characteristics at different ages. Results Overall, 68.5% of men had fathered a child and 75.9% of women had given birth, by age 37; with overall differences in parenthood to age 31 for men, and 37 for women evident by childhood SES. While parenthood by age 20 was strongly associated with lower childhood SES for both sexes, first entry into motherhood from 32–37 was more likely with higher adult SES at age 32 (RR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.1–3.0 for medium and RR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.1–3.3 for high compared with low). Education also differientated age at parenthood, with those with higher education more likely to defer fatherhood past age 31, and motherhood past age 25 followed by a period of increased likelihood of motherhood for women with higher levels of education from age 32–37 (RR = 1.4, 95% CI 0.87–2.2 and RR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.6 for medium and high respectively compared with low). Conclusions SES varies across the lifecourse, and SES at the time has the strongest association with first births at that time. Low childhood SES drives adolescent parenthood, with resulting cumulative differences in parenthood past age 30. Those with more education and higher adult SES are deferring parenthood but attempt to catch up in the mid to late thirties. PMID:28085935

  7. Role of serotonin transporter inhibition in the regulation of tryptophan hydroxylase in brainstem raphe nuclei: time course and regional specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGillivray, L; Lagrou, L M; Reynolds, K B; Rosebush, P I; Mazurek, M F

    2010-12-01

    Drugs that selectively inhibit the serotonin transporter (SERT) are widely prescribed for treatment of depression and a range of anxiety disorders. We studied the time course of changes in tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in four raphe nuclei after initiation of two different SERT inhibitors, citalopram and fluoxetine. In the first experiment, groups of Sprague-Dawley rats received daily meals of rice pudding either alone (n=9) or mixed with citalopram 5 mg/kg/day (n=27). Rats were sacrificed after 24 h, 7 days or 28 days of treatment. Sections of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), median raphe nucleus (MRN), raphe magnus nucleus (RMN) and caudal linear nucleus (CLN) were processed for TPH immunohistochemistry. Citalopram induced a significant reduction in DRN TPH-positive cell counts at 24 h (41%), 7 days (38%) and 28 days (52%). Similar reductions in TPH-positive cell counts were also observed at each timepoint in the MRN and in the RMN. In the MRN, citalopram resulted in significant reductions at 24 h (26%), 7 days (16%) and 28 days (23%). In the RMN, citalopram induced significant reductions of TPH-positive cell counts at 24 h (45%), 7 days (34%) and 28 days (43%). By contrast, no significant differences between control and treatment groups were observed in the CLN at any of the time points that we studied. To investigate whether these changes would occur with other SERT inhibitors, we conducted a second experiment, this time with a 28-day course of fluoxetine. As was observed with citalopram, fluoxetine induced significant reductions of TPH cell counts in the DRN (39%), MRN (38%) and RMN (41%), with no significant differences in the CLN. These results indicate that SERT inhibition can alter the regulation of TPH, the rate limiting enzyme for serotonin biosynthesis. This persistent and regionally specific downregulation of serotonin biosynthesis may account for some of the clinical withdrawal symptoms associated with drugs that inhibit SERT.

  8. Interoceptive processes in anorexia nervosa in the time course of cognitive-behavioral therapy: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Fischer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Previous studies report reduced interoceptive abilities in anorexia nervosa (AN using various methods. Recent research suggests that different levels of interoceptive processes aiming at different subdomains of interoceptive abilities must be further distinguished as these levels can be differentially affected. Two important levels refer to interoceptive accuracy (IA derived from objective performance tasks such as the heartbeat detection task, and interoceptive sensibility (IS as assessed by self-report. There is a lack of studies investigating both IA and IS in AN, and examining them in the time course of therapy. Aim of the pilot study was to evaluate the different interoceptive processes – especially IA and IS – in the time course of therapy.Methods: Fifteen patients with AN (restricting type from the Psychosomatic Clinic in Windach were investigated three times (T1, T2, T3 during a standardized cognitive-behavioral therapy and compared to fifteen matched healthy controls assessed at Ulm University in a comparable design. All participants performed the heartbeat detection task examining IA and completed standard psychological assessments including an assessment of IS. Results: Patients with AN showed a significantly decreased weight, higher levels of depression and both reduced IA and IS compared to healthy controls at T1. Following therapy, patients recovered in terms of weight and depression symptomatology. A descriptive trend for recovering from IA and IS was observed. Discussion: Our findings suggest that interoceptive deficits are present in recovered patients. Therefore, further investigations are needed with more patients, differentiating between relapsed and recovered patients, and more specific training methods to improve interoceptive processes.

  9. Interoceptive Processes in Anorexia Nervosa in the Time Course of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Dana; Berberich, Götz; Zaudig, Michael; Krauseneck, Till; Weiss, Sarah; Pollatos, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies report reduced interoceptive abilities in anorexia nervosa (AN) using various methods. Recent research suggests that different levels of interoceptive processes aiming at different subdomains of interoceptive abilities must be further distinguished as these levels can be differentially affected. Two important levels refer to interoceptive accuracy (IA) derived from objective performance tasks such as the heartbeat detection task and interoceptive sensibility (IS) as assessed by self-report. There is a lack of studies investigating both IA and IS in AN and examining them in the time course of therapy. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the different interoceptive processes - especially IA and IS - in the time course of therapy. Fifteen patients with AN (restricting type) from the Psychosomatic Clinic in Windach were investigated three times (T1, T2, T3) during a standardized cognitive-behavioral therapy and compared with 15 matched healthy controls assessed at Ulm University in a comparable design. All participants performed the heartbeat detection task examining IA and completed standard psychological assessments including an assessment of IS. Patients with AN showed a significantly decreased weight, higher levels of depression, and both reduced IA and IS compared to healthy controls at T1. Following therapy, patients recovered in terms of weight and depression symptomatology. A descriptive trend for recovering from IA and IS was observed. Our findings suggest that interoceptive deficits are present in recovered patients. Therefore, further investigations are needed with more patients, differentiating between relapsed and recovered patients, and more specific training methods to improve interoceptive processes.

  10. Dynamics in Transcriptomics: Advancements in RNA-seq Time Course and Downstream Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Daniel; Ciaudo, Constance

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of gene expression has contributed to a plethora of biological and medical research studies. Microarrays have been intensively used for the profiling of gene expression during diverse developmental processes, treatments and diseases. New massively parallel sequencing methods, often named as RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) are extensively improving our understanding of gene regulation and signaling networks. Computational methods developed originally for microarrays analysis can now be optimized and applied to genome-wide studies in order to have access to a better comprehension of the whole transcriptome. This review addresses current challenges on RNA-seq analysis and specifically focuses on new bioinformatics tools developed for time series experiments. Furthermore, possible improvements in analysis, data integration as well as future applications of differential expression analysis are discussed. PMID:26430493

  11. Time course for the recovery of physical performance, blood hemoglobin, and ferritin content after blood donation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Andreas K; Grand, Johannes; Stangerup, Ida;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is widely accepted that blood donation negatively affects endurance performance, but data on physical recovery after a standard blood donation are scarce. This study aimed to elucidate the temporary impact of blood donation on endurance performance, measured as peak oxygen uptake (VO......2peak ) and time trial (TT) performance. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: VO2peak , TT performance, blood, iron, and anthropometric variables were determined before (baseline) and 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after blood donation in 19 healthy men. RESULTS: VO2peak was reduced by 6.5% from 49.7 ± 2 m......L/kg/min at baseline to 46.3 ± 2 mL/kg/min on Day 3 (p blood donation. Blood hemoglobin (Hb) concentration declined 7.9% from 9.3 ± 0.11 mmol...

  12. Dynamics in Transcriptomics: Advancements in RNA-seq Time Course and Downstream Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Spies

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of gene expression has contributed to a plethora of biological and medical research studies. Microarrays have been intensively used for the profiling of gene expression during diverse developmental processes, treatments and diseases. New massively parallel sequencing methods, often named as RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq are extensively improving our understanding of gene regulation and signaling networks. Computational methods developed originally for microarrays analysis can now be optimized and applied to genome-wide studies in order to have access to a better comprehension of the whole transcriptome. This review addresses current challenges on RNA-seq analysis and specifically focuses on new bioinformatics tools developed for time series experiments. Furthermore, possible improvements in analysis, data integration as well as future applications of differential expression analysis are discussed.

  13. ERP time course and brain areas of spontaneous and intentional goal inferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Cruyssen, Laurens; Van Duynslaeger, Marijke; Cortoos, Aisha; Van Overwalle, Frank

    2009-01-01

    This study measured event-related potentials during spontaneous and intentional goal inferences. Participants read sentences describing the behavior of a target person from which a strong goal or intention could be inferred. The last word of each sentence determined the consistency with the goal induced during preceding sentences. In comparison with behaviors that were consistent with the implied goal, a stronger P200 waveform was obtained when the behaviors were irrelevant with that goal or did not contain goal-directed behavior at all, and this P200 showed considerable parallels between spontaneous and intentional inferences. This indicates that goals were inferred rapidly and automatically while reading the behaviors, irrespective of the participants' spontaneous or intentional instructions. In line with this, source localization (LORETA) of the event-related potentials shows predominantly activation in the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) during and immediately after goal detection (225-300 ms). Before and after this time interval, however, activation is stronger at the TPJ during spontaneous processing, and stronger at the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during intentional processing. Memory measures taken after the presentation of the stimulus materials support the occurrence of goal inferences and show significant correlations with the neural components, indicating that these components are valid neural indices of spontaneous and intentional goal inferences. The results are highly similar to previous ERP research on trait inferences that revealed a similar division of brain activation for spontaneous (TPJ) and intentional (mPFC) processes, but appearing later at about 600 ms, pointing to similar brain areas recruited for social inferences, but at different timings for different inference types.

  14. Differential effects of experimental central sensitization on the time-course and magnitude of offset analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martucci, Katherine T; Yelle, Marc D; Coghill, Robert C

    2012-02-01

    Pain perception is temporally altered during states of chronic pain and acute central sensitization; however, the mechanisms contributing to temporal processing of nociceptive information remain poorly understood. Offset analgesia is a phenomenon that reflects the presence of temporal contrast mechanisms for nociceptive information and can provide an end point to study temporal aspects of pain processing. In order to investigate whether offset analgesia is disrupted during sensitized states, 23 healthy volunteers provided real-time continuous visual analogue scale responses to noxious heat stimuli that evoke offset analgesia. Responses to these stimuli were evaluated during capsaicin-heat sensitization (45°C stimulus, capsaicin cream 0.1%) and heat-only sensitization (40°C stimulus, placebo cream). Capsaicin-heat sensitization produced significantly larger regions of secondary mechanical allodynia compared to heat-only sensitization. Although areas of mechanical allodynia were positively related to individual differences in heat pain sensitivity, this relationship was altered at later time points after capsaicin-heat sensitization. Heat hyperalgesia was observed in the secondary region following both capsaicin-heat and heat-only sensitization. Increased latencies to maximal offset analgesia and prolonged aftersensations were observed only in the primary regions directly treated by capsaicin-heat or heat alone. However, contrary to the hypothesis that offset analgesia would be reduced following capsaicin-heat sensitization, the magnitude of offset analgesia remained remarkably intact after both capsaicin-heat and heat-only sensitization in zones of both primary and secondary mechanical allodynia. These data indicate that offset analgesia is a robust phenomenon and engages mechanisms that interact minimally with those supporting acute central sensitization.

  15. Time course of auditory streaming: Do CI users differ from normal-hearing listeners?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eBöckmann-Barthel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In a complex acoustical environment with multiple sound sources the auditory system uses streaming as a tool to organize the incoming sounds in one or more streams depending on the stimulus parameters. Streaming is commonly studied by alternating sequences of signals. These are often tones with different frequencies. The present study investigates stream segregation in cochlear implant (CI users, where hearing is restored by electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. CI users listened to 30-s long sequences of alternating A and B harmonic complexes at four different fundamental frequency separations, ranging from 2 to 14 semitones. They had to indicate as promptly as possible after sequence onset, if they perceived one stream or two streams and, in addition, any changes of the percept throughout the rest of the sequence. The conventional view is that the initial percept is always that of a single stream which may after some time change to a percept of two streams. This general build-up hypothesis has recently been challenged on the basis of a new analysis of data of normal-hearing listeners which showed a build-up response only for an intermediate frequency separation. Using the same experimental paradigm and analysis, the present study found that the results of CI users agree with those of the normal-hearing listeners: (i the probability of the first decision to be a one-stream percept decreased and that of a two-stream percept increased as Δf increased, and (ii a build-up was only found for 6 semitones. Only the time elapsed before the listeners made their first decision of the percept was prolonged as compared to normal-hearing listeners. The similarity in the data of the CI user and the normal-hearing listeners indicates that the quality of stream formation is similar in these groups of listeners.

  16. Two-Year Community: Time for Action: Vision and Change Implementation in an Online Biology Course at a Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The author discusses an Introduction to Biology course they created. The course was designed by following the recommendations from the Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: A Call to Action report, which stresses the need for engaging students through hands-on and student-centered activities. In the course, students perform…

  17. Using a Web-Based Course-Management System: An Evaluation of Management Tasks and Time Implications for the Instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhuis, Gerard Gervedink; Collis, Betty

    2003-01-01

    Used data from a Web-based course management system in use at the Faculty of Educational Science and Technology, University of Twente, The Netherlands since 1998 to analyze tasks instructors must manage while using such a system. Results from 51 courses contribute to more efficient use of the Web-based course management system. (SLD)

  18. [Time course of changes in aqueous flare following intravitreous gas injection in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K

    1991-06-01

    The quantitative changes of the aqueous flare following intravitreous gas injection were determined by laser flare-cell metry in rabbits. A volume of 0.4 ml of air, 100% sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), or 100% perfluoropropane (C3F8), was injected separately into the vitreous of pigmented rabbits. The normal range of the aqueous flare was 7.8 +/- 3.0 (photon counts/msec). Each model showed an increase of aqueous flare on the first day (air: 18.9 +/- 9.1, SF6: 19.5 +/- 11.5, C3F8: 40.8 +/- 22.8). Subsequently, the aqueous flare of air-injected eyes gradually decreased, while that of SF6-injected eyes increased on the 4th day, and then gradually decreased. Also that of C3F8-injected eyes increased on the 4th day, and the 7th day, then decreased on the 14th day, but it was still higher than normal. Cataracts developed in two of the five eyes injected with SF6 and all of the four eyes injected with C3F8. These findings revealed that following intravitreous gas injection, disruption of the blood-ocular barrier depended on the expansibility of the gas and the length of time it remained in the vitreous cavity.

  19. Reconstructing the hidden states in time course data of stochastic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    Parameter estimation is central for analyzing models in Systems Biology. The relevance of stochastic modeling in the field is increasing. Therefore, the need for tailored parameter estimation techniques is increasing as well. Challenges for parameter estimation are partial observability, measurement noise, and the computational complexity arising from the dimension of the parameter space. This article extends the multiple shooting for stochastic systems' method, developed for inference in intrinsic stochastic systems. The treatment of extrinsic noise and the estimation of the unobserved states is improved, by taking into account the correlation between unobserved and observed species. This article demonstrates the power of the method on different scenarios of a Lotka-Volterra model, including cases in which the prey population dies out or explodes, and a Calcium oscillation system. Besides showing how the new extension improves the accuracy of the parameter estimates, this article analyzes the accuracy of the state estimates. In contrast to previous approaches, the new approach is well able to estimate states and parameters for all the scenarios. As it does not need stochastic simulations, it is of the same order of speed as conventional least squares parameter estimation methods with respect to computational time.

  20. Time course study of blood pressure in term and preterm infants immediately after birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Pichler

    Full Text Available To describe temporal changes in systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure (SBP, DBP, and MBP, respectively in term and preterm infants immediately after birth.Prospective observational two-center study. In term infants SBP, DBP, and MBP were assessed non-invasively every minute for the first 15 minutes, and in preterm infants every minute for the first 15 minutes, as well as at 20, 25, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after birth. Regression analyses were performed by gender and respiratory support in all neonates; and by mode of delivery, cord clamping time, and development of ultrasound-detected brain injury in preterm neonates.Term infants (n = 54 had a mean (SD birth weight of 3298 (442 g and gestational age of 38 (1 weeks, and preterm infants (n = 94 weighed 1340 (672 g and were 30 (3 weeks gestation. Term infants' SBP, DBP and MBP within the first 15 minutes after birth were independent of gender or respiratory support. Linear mixed regression analysis showed that preterm infants, who were female, born vaginally, had delayed cord clamping and did not require positive pressure ventilation nor develop periventricular injury or ventriculomegaly, had significantly higher SBP, DBP, and MBP at some measurement points within the first hour after birth.We present novel reference ranges of BP immediately after birth in a cohort of term and preterm neonates. They may aid in optimization of cardiovascular support during early transition at all gestations.

  1. Factors affecting magnitude and time course of neuromuscular block produced by suxamethonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlinthout, L E; van Egmond, J; de Boo, T; Lerou, J G; Wevers, R A; Booij, L H

    1992-07-01

    This study was designed to identify factors that significantly alter the magnitude and duration of suxamethonium-induced neuromuscular block in patients with an apparently normal genotype for pseudocholinesterase. One hundred and fifty-six adults (ages 18-65 yr) were allocated to 13 subgroups. Patients in each subgroup received suxamethonium 50-2000 micrograms kg-1. The mechanographic response of the adductor pollicis brevis muscle to ulnar nerve stimulation was recorded. The ED50 was found to be 167 micrograms kg-1, ED90 was 316 micrograms kg-1 and ED95 was 392 micrograms kg-1. The duration of action (delta t) was in agreement with earlier published results. The magnitude of block was dose-related and decreased with increasing onset time (ton) and pseudocholinesterase activity (PChA). Neither age nor gender affected the degree of suxamethonium-induced block. Delta t was dose-related, decreased with increasing PChA, and was shorter for women. Age and ton had no effect on delta t.

  2. More than accuracy: Nonverbal dialects modulate the time course of vocal emotion recognition across cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoming; Paulmann, Silke; Robin, Jessica; Pell, Marc D

    2015-06-01

    Using a gating paradigm, this study investigated the nature of the in-group advantage in vocal emotion recognition by comparing 2 distinct cultures. Pseudoutterances conveying 4 basic emotions, expressed in English and Hindi, were presented to English and Hindi listeners. In addition to hearing full utterances, each stimulus was gated from its onset to construct 5 processing intervals to pinpoint when the in-group advantage emerges, and whether this differs when listening to a foreign language (English participants judging Hindi) or a second language (Hindi participants judging English). An index of the mean emotion identification point for each group and unbiased measures of accuracy at each time point was calculated. Results showed that in each language condition, native listeners were faster and more accurate than non-native listeners to recognize emotions. The in-group advantage emerged in both conditions after processing 400 ms to 500 ms of acoustic information. In the bilingual Hindi group, greater oral proficiency in English predicted faster and more accurate recognition of English emotional expressions. Consistent with dialect theory, our findings provide new evidence that nonverbal dialects impede both the accuracy and the efficiency of vocal emotion processing in cross-cultural settings, even when individuals are highly proficient in the out-group target language.

  3. Time course and recovery of arterial blood gases during exacerbations in adults with Cystic Fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waterhouse, D F

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia and hypercapnia are closely linked to morbidity and mortality in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). The aims of this study were to describe the changes in blood gases during and following an acute pulmonary exacerbation in adults with CF. METHODS: We performed a prospective observational study of patients with CF admitted for management of an acute exacerbation. Blood gas and spirometric analysis was performed on admission, throughout the treatment period, and 31 days after discharge (day 45). RESULTS: At presentation, eight of nineteen patients had evidence of either hypoxia (PaO(2)<8 kPa) and\\/or hypercapnia (PaCO(2)>6.6 kPa). Blood gas parameters stabilized following two weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy, with little difference evident in between treatment completion and subsequent review following discharge. Hypercapnia reversed in three patients, with persistent hypercapnia evident in two patients. CONCLUSION: In our study group, hypoxemia and hypercapnia were frequently observed at presentation of the acute exacerbation. Blood gases stabilized following two weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy, with arterial PCO(2) one month following hospital discharge generally similar to that at time of discharge.

  4. TIME COURSE OF MYOCARDIAL INTERSTITIAL EDEMA RESOLUTION AND ASSOCIATED LEFT VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M.; Stewart, Randolph H.; Quick, Christopher M.; Uray, Karen L.; Cox, Charles S.; Laine, Glen A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although the causal relationship between acute myocardial edema and cardiac dysfunction has been established, resolution of myocardial edema and subsequent recovery of cardiac function have not. The time to resolve myocardial edema and the degree that cardiac function is depressed after edema resolves are not known. We therefore characterized temporal changes in cardiac function as acute myocardial edema formed and resolved. Methods Acute myocardial edema was induced in the canine model by elevating coronary sinus pressure for three hours. Myocardial water content and cardiac function were determined before and during coronary sinus pressure elevation, and after coronary sinus pressure restoration. Results Although no change in systolic properties was detected, accumulation of water in myocardial interstitium was associated with increased diastolic stiffness. When coronary sinus pressure was relieved, myocardial edema resolved within 180 min. Diastolic stiffness, however, remained significantly elevated compared to baseline values, and cardiac function remained compromised. Conclusions The present work suggests that the cardiac dysfunction caused by the formation of myocardial edema may persist after myocardial edema resolves. With the advent of new imaging techniques to quantify myocardial edema, this insight provides a new avenue for research to detect and treat a significant cause of cardiac dysfunction. PMID:22708850

  5. Time-course changes of hematology and clinical chemistry values in pregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Tatsuya; Honda, Katsuya; Kokubun, Chisato; Nishimura, Tomonari; Hasegawa, Mina; Nishida, Atsuyuki; Inui, Toshihide; Kitamura, Kazuyuki

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report how pregnancy alters hematology and clinical chemistry values in rats. Female and male Sprague-Dawley rats were mated; the day of copulation was designated as Day 0. Hematology and clinical chemistry measurements were conducted on Days 7, 14, 17 and 21 in pregnant rats. Measurements were also conducted in non-pregnant rats. Red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Ht), total protein and albumin decreased on Days 7, 14, 17 and 21; sodium, chloride and glucose decreased on Days 14, 17 and 21; iron decreased on Days 17 and 21; hemoglobin content of reticulocytes (CHr), calcium, inorganic phosphorus and the albumin/globulin ratio decreased on Day 21; and total cholesterol, phospholipid and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased on Day 14 in pregnant rats compared with non-pregnant rats. Reticulocyte increased on Days 7, 14 and 17; mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, neutrophil count and rate increased on Days 14, 17 and 21; platelets, fibrinogen, triglyceride and free fatty acid increased on Days 17 and 21; and activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged on Days 17 and 21 in pregnant rats compared with non-pregnant rats. The decreased RBC, Hb, Ht, CHr and iron in pregnant rats indicated that they suffered from iron deficiency anemia. These data can be used as background information for effective evaluation in reproductive toxicology studies.

  6. Projectors, associators, visual imagery, and the time course of visual processing in grapheme-color synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsel, Ben D; Kutas, Marta; Coulson, Seana

    2017-10-01

    In grapheme-color synesthesia, seeing particular letters or numbers evokes the experience of specific colors. We investigate the brain's real-time processing of words in this population by recording event-related brain potentials (ERPs) from 15 grapheme-color synesthetes and 15 controls as they judged the validity of word pairs ('yellow banana' vs. 'blue banana') presented under high and low visual contrast. Low contrast words elicited delayed P1/N170 visual ERP components in both groups, relative to high contrast. When color concepts were conveyed to synesthetes by individually tailored achromatic grapheme strings ('55555 banana'), visual contrast effects were like those in color words: P1/N170 components were delayed but unchanged in amplitude. When controls saw equivalent colored grapheme strings, visual contrast modulated P1/N170 amplitude but not latency. Color induction in synesthetes thus differs from color perception in controls. Independent from experimental effects, all orthographic stimuli elicited larger N170 and P2 in synesthetes than controls. While P2 (150-250ms) enhancement was similar in all synesthetes, N170 (130-210ms) amplitude varied with individual differences in synesthesia and visual imagery. Results suggest immediate cross-activation in visual areas processing color and shape is most pronounced in so-called projector synesthetes whose concurrent colors are experienced as originating in external space.

  7. The electrophysiological time course of the interaction of stimulus conflict and the multisensory spread of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, U; Itthipanyanan, S; Grent-'t-Jong, T; Woldorff, M G

    2010-05-01

    Previously, we have shown that spatial attention to a visual stimulus can spread across both space and modality to a synchronously presented but task-irrelevant sound arising from a different location, reflected by a late-onsetting, sustained, negative-polarity event-related potential (ERP) wave over frontal-central scalp sites, probably originating in part from the auditory cortices. Here we explore the influence of cross-modal conflict on the amplitude and temporal dynamics of this multisensory spreading-of-attention activity. Subjects attended selectively to one of two concurrently presented lateral visually-presented letter streams to perform a sequential comparison task, while ignoring task-irrelevant, centrally presented spoken letters that could occur synchronously with either the attended or unattended lateral visual letters and could be either congruent or incongruent with them. Extracted auditory ERPs revealed that, collapsed across congruency conditions, attentional spreading across modalities started at approximately 220 ms, replicating our earlier findings. The interaction between attentional spreading and conflict occurred beginning at approximately 300 ms, with attentional-spreading activity being larger for incongruent trials. Thus, the increased processing of an incongruent, task-irrelevant sound in a multisensory stimulation appeared to occur some time after attention has spread from the attended visual part to the ignored auditory part, presumably reflecting the conflict detection and associated attentional capture requiring accrual of some multisensory interaction processes at a higher-level semantic processing stage.

  8. [Time course of excretion of tebuconazole and its metabolites in vineyard workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni, S; Polledri, E; Mercadante, R; Rubino, F; Colosio, C; Moretto, A

    2012-01-01

    Tebuconazole (TEB) is a fungicide widely used in vineyards. This work aimed at the identification of urinary metabolites of TEB for the biological monitoring of exposure, and to study their kinetics of excretion. Major urinary metabolites of TEB in rats are t-butyl-hydroxy-and-carboxy-tebuconazole (TEB-OH and TEB-COOH). TEB and these metabolites were determined in urine samples of 5 wine growers who collected each void before (24 hours), during and after (48 hours) TEB application. These chemicals were found in 95%, 100% and 100% of the samples with levels of < 1.5-13.4 microg/L for TEB, 5.2-749 microg/L for TEB-OH e 2.8-234 microg/l for TEB-COOH. TEB-OH is the major metabolite of TEB, its concentration increases at the end of exposure and peaks after 16-24 hours. TEB-COOH has similar pattern. TEB-OH and TEB -COOH are promising candidates for biological monitoring of TEB exposure; preliminary results suggest the day after the application as the best sampling time.

  9. Age-dependent time courses of recovery for motor functions following acute toluene intoxication in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel-Herter, Susan R; Slaght, Shelby L; McKay, Bruce E

    2014-05-01

    Toluene is a psychoactive chemical found in many household products including adhesives and thinners. Inhalation of these vapors can cause euphoria and impairments in motor control and neurological functioning. Misuse and abuse of toluene is most common in children, which may in part be due to an age-dependent neurobehavioral sensitivity to toluene. Here we assessed the effects of acute binge-like toluene inhalations (15 or 30 min; ∼5,000 ppm) on tasks that examine locomotion, exploration, balance, gait, and neurological functioning for adolescent (1 month), young adult (2-3 months), adult (5-6 months), and older adult (10-12 months) rats. Both motor and neurological functions were impaired following acute toluene inhalation at all ages. However, only the duration to recover from deficits in motor functions differed among age groups, with adolescent and young adult rats requiring notably longer recovery times than older rats. Our results are suggestive of an age-dependent vulnerability to the intoxicating effects of toluene. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Time course transcriptome changes in Shewanella algae in response to salt stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuping Fu

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae, which produces tetrodotoxin and exists in various seafoods, can cause human diseases, such as spondylodiscitis and bloody diarrhea. In the present study, we focused on the temporal, dynamic process in salt-stressed S. algae by monitoring the gene transcript levels at different time points after high salt exposure. Transcript changes in amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, energy metabolism, membrane transport, regulatory functions, and cellular signaling were found to be important for the high salt response in S. algae. The most common strategies used by bacteria to survive and grow in high salt environments, such as Na+ efflux, K+ uptake, glutamate transport and biosynthesis, and the accumulation of compatible solutes, were also observed in S. algae. In particular, genes involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis and DNA repair were highly and steadily up-regulated, accompanied by rapid and instantaneous enhancement of the transcription of large- and small-ribosome subunits, which suggested that the structural changes in the cell wall and some stressful responses occurred in S. algae. Furthermore, the transcription of genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and the glycolytic pathway was decreased, whereas the transcription of genes involved in anaerobic respiration was increased. These results, demonstrating the multi-pathway reactions of S. algae in response to salt stress, increase our understanding of the microbial stress response mechanisms.

  11. The effects of platelet-rich plasma on recovery time and aesthetic outcome in facial rejuvenation : preliminary retrospective observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Joep C N; van der Lei, Berend; Vermeulen, Karin M; Stevens, Hieronymus P J D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study focused on the possible effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on recovery time and aesthetic outcome after facial rejuvenation. We conducted a retrospective analysis with regard to recovery time and the aesthetic improvement after treatment among four groups of patients: those

  12. The effects of platelet-rich plasma on recovery time and aesthetic outcome in facial rejuvenation : preliminary retrospective observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Joep C N; van der Lei, Berend; Vermeulen, Karin M; Stevens, Hieronymus P J D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study focused on the possible effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on recovery time and aesthetic outcome after facial rejuvenation. We conducted a retrospective analysis with regard to recovery time and the aesthetic improvement after treatment among four groups of patients: those

  13. PDGF supplementation alters oxidative events in wound healing process: a time course study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltalioglu, Kaan; Coskun-Cevher, Sule; Tugcu-Demiroz, Fatmanur; Celebi, Nevin

    2013-07-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), an important stimulant, plays a role in almost all stages of wound healing process. In various studies, it has been shown that PDGF has healing effects in this process. In the present study, we especially focused on investigating the effects of exogenous PDGF administration on oxidative events during cutaneous wound healing process. Experiments were performed on 42 female Wistar-albino rats. Animals were divided into four groups: control, untreated, chitosan-treated and chitosan + PDGF-treated. Two uniform full-thickness excisional skin wounds were made under anesthesia in all animals except control group. In the chitosan + PDGF-treated groups, the wounds were treated topically with a single daily dose PDGF-BB (7 ng/ml) after wounding. In the chitosan-treated groups, the wounds were treated topically with equal amount of blank chitosan gel. After that, on the 3rd and 7th days of wound healing, the animals were killed. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), nitric oxide (NOx), ascorbic acid (AA), glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured spectrophotometrically in the wound tissues. PDGF significantly increased TBARS levels in early phase of wound healing. In contrast, it significantly decreased TBARS levels in later phase of healing. In the chitosan + PDGF-treated group, NOx levels decreased on days 3 and 7 when compared with the chitosan-treated groups. Non-enzymatic antioxidant levels were increased by PDGF administration and this may have contributed to increase in wound tissue antioxidant capacity. In the light of these findings, PDGF supplementation may have altering effects on oxidative events depending on the time in wound healing process.

  14. Time course of early audiovisual interactions during speech and nonspeech central auditory processing: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertrich, Ingo; Mathiak, Klaus; Lutzenberger, Werner; Ackermann, Hermann

    2009-02-01

    Cross-modal fusion phenomena suggest specific interactions of auditory and visual sensory information both within the speech and nonspeech domains. Using whole-head magnetoencephalography, this study recorded M50 and M100 fields evoked by ambiguous acoustic stimuli that were visually disambiguated to perceived /ta/ or /pa/ syllables. As in natural speech, visual motion onset preceded the acoustic signal by 150 msec. Control conditions included visual and acoustic nonspeech signals as well as visual-only and acoustic-only stimuli. (a) Both speech and nonspeech motion yielded a consistent attenuation of the auditory M50 field, suggesting a visually induced "preparatory baseline shift" at the level of the auditory cortex. (b) Within the temporal domain of the auditory M100 field, visual speech and nonspeech motion gave rise to different response patterns (nonspeech: M100 attenuation; visual /pa/: left-hemisphere M100 enhancement; /ta/: no effect). (c) These interactions could be further decomposed using a six-dipole model. One of these three pairs of dipoles (V270) was fitted to motion-induced activity at a latency of 270 msec after motion onset, that is, the time domain of the auditory M100 field, and could be attributed to the posterior insula. This dipole source responded to nonspeech motion and visual /pa/, but was found suppressed in the case of visual /ta/. Such a nonlinear interaction might reflect the operation of a binary distinction between the marked phonological feature "labial" versus its underspecified competitor "coronal." Thus, visual processing seems to be shaped by linguistic data structures even prior to its fusion with auditory information channel.

  15. ERP correlates of Motivating Voices: Quality of Motivation and Time-Course Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zougkou, Konstantina; Weinstein, Netta; Paulmann, Silke

    2017-05-19

    Here, we conducted the first study to explore how motivations expressed through speech are processed in real-time. Participants listened to sentences spoken in two types of well-studied motivational tones (autonomy-supportive and controlling), or a neutral tone of voice. To examine this, listeners were presented with sentences that either signaled motivations through prosody (tone of voice) and words simultaneously (e.g., "You absolutely have to do it my way" spoken in a controlling tone of voice), or lacked motivationally biasing words (e.g., "Why don't we meet again tomorrow" spoken in a motivational tone of voice). Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in response to motivations conveyed through words and prosody showed that listeners rapidly distinguished between motivations and neutral forms of communication as shown in enhanced P2 amplitudes in response to motivational when compared to neutral speech. This early detection mechanism is argued to help determine the importance of incoming information. Once assessed, motivational language is continuously monitored and thoroughly evaluated. When compared to neutral speech, listening to controlling (but not autonomy-supportive) speech led to enhanced late potential ERP mean amplitudes, suggesting that listeners are particularly attuned to controlling messages. The importance of controlling motivation for listeners is mirrored in effects observed for motivations expressed through prosody only. Here, an early rapid appraisal, as reflected in enhanced P2 amplitudes, is only found for sentences spoken in controlling (but not autonomy-supportive) prosody. Once identified as sounding pressuring, the message seems to be preferentially processed, as shown by enhanced late potential amplitudes in response to controlling prosody. Taken together, results suggest that motivational and neutral language are differentially processed; further, the data suggest that listening to cues signaling pressure and control cannot be ignored

  16. The time course of altered brain activity during 7-day simulated microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eLiao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity causes multiple changes in physical and mental levels in humans, which can induce performance deficiency among astronauts. Studying the variations in brain activity that occur during microgravity would help astronauts to deal with these changes. In the current study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI was used to observe the variations in brain activity during a 7-day head down tilt (HDT bed rest, which is a common and reliable model for simulated microgravity. The amplitudes of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF of twenty subjects were recorded pre-head down tilt (pre-HDT, during a bed rest period (HDT0, and then each day in the HDT period (HDT1–HDT7. One-way analysis of variance of the ALFF values over these 8 days was used to test the variation across time period (P<0.05, corrected. Compared to HDT0, subjects presented lower ALFF values in the posterior cingulate cortex and higher ALFF values in the anterior cingulate cortex during the HDT period, which may partially account for the lack of cognitive flexibility and alterations in autonomic nervous system seen among astronauts in microgravity. Additionally, the observed improvement in function in CPL during the HDT period may play a compensatory role to the functional decline in the paracentral lobule to sustain normal levels of fine motor control for astronauts in a microgravity environment. Above all, those floating brain activities during 7 days of simulated microgravity may indicate that the brain self-adapts to help astronauts adjust to the multiple negative stressors encountered in a microgravity environment.

  17. Identifying genes relevant to specific biological conditions in time course microarray experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nitesh Kumar; Repsilber, Dirk; Liebscher, Volkmar; Taher, Leila; Fuellen, Georg

    2013-01-01